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42 New Oyster in town Vol. 101 No. 93 • Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

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EAST WEEKEND EDITION

photo Dan Toulgoet

Endangered spaces

Budget shortfalls and low enrolment have forced the Vancouver School Board to consider closing five East Side elementary schools. Parents and students at the five schools make their case to keep the schools alive. — story by Naoibh O’Connor YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS, WEATHER AND ENTERTAINMENT! WWW.VANCOURIER.COM


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in this issue

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photo Dan Toulgoet

Stalled transport

BY MIKE HOWELL A year after asking, the VPD is still waiting for the province to provide a vehicle to get the homeless to shelters, says Const. Jodyne Keller, VPD homeless coordinator.

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NAOIBH O’CONNOR The Vancouver School Board’s COPE trustees say the district needs a strategy to encourage parents to enroll their kids in the public system. BY

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ON THE COVER Students from schools on the closure list on Carleton elementary’s steps. The Vancouver Courier is a division of Postmedia Network Inc. Postmedia Network Inc. and its affiliates (collectively, “Postmedia Network”) collect and use your personal information primarily for the purpose of providing you with the products and services you have requested from us. Postmedia Network may also contact you from time to time about your account or to conduct market research and surveys in an effort to continually improve our product and service offerings. To enable us to more efficiently provide the products and services you have requested from us, Postmedia Network may share your personal information within Postmedia Network and with selected third parties who are acting on our behalf as our agents, suppliers or service providers. A copy of our privacy policy is available at www.van.net or by contacting 604-589-9182. For all distribution/delivery problems, please call 604-439-2660. To contact the Courier’s main office, call 604-738-1411

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Only 51,901 students enrolled in a public school system designed for 60,343

Five East Side schools squirm on chopping block Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

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rustees decide the fate of Champlain Heights annex, Sir Richard McBride annex, Sir Guy Carleton, Queen Alexandra and Sir William Macdonald elementary schools Dec. 14. Closure threats ignited five grassroots campaigns to save the East Side schools. Despite tight timelines and limited resources, activists rallied communities, launched petitions, attended meetings, dreamed up ways to attract students, and secured provincial and federal political support. It’s uncertain if that’s enough to keep doors open as trustees grapple with budget shortfalls and a declining student population. Public school enrolment peaked in 1997 with 57,575 kindergarten to Grade 12 students, but slumped to 51,901 this year in a system designed for 60,343. The VSB hacked $17 million from its 2010/11 budget and predicts another $9.6 million shortfall in 2011/2012, followed by a $5.6 million shortfall in 2012/13. If all five schools close, it saves a relatively insignificant $1.4 million, but the alternative is slashing already gutted programs and services. Critics see closures as an attack on public education and say the cost to displaced students is immeasurable. While closure is anathema to some, others suggest students can adjust. “Children are amazingly resilient and at the end of the day are more adaptable than we are,” superintendent Steve Cardwell said at several feedback meetings. After the recent sessions, board chair Patti Bacchus, a Vision Vancouver trustee, tweeted:

Carleton elementary (left) and Champlain Heights annex (right) sit on the district’s endangered school list. “So far no real solutions to underlying problems but some interesting ideas. Can we make them work and still solve the bigger challenges?” Clear winners are unlikely, regardless of the decision, but the stories that follow capture the efforts of five schools as they fight for survival.

Broken promises

Five years ago, then Liberal education minister Tom Christensen stood in Sir Guy Carleton elementary for a pre-election press conference announcing a $254-million seismic upgrading program for 80 B.C. schools over three years—16 in Vancouver, including Carleton. Welcome news—except it never happened at Carleton. The 114-yearold school not only remains at high risk in an earthquake, but with an enrolment of 376 in kindergarten to Grade 7, it would be the most-popu-

lated school in B.C. to close and its students split among as many as six schools. Supporters feel betrayed. “There’s a long history of broken promises around Carleton and we’re sick of being short-changed,” complained a long-time Collingwood resident at a meeting that attracted more than 500. “Stand your ground with the provincial government even if it means they’ll fire you.” Speakers intermittently pleaded, then demanded, the board spare Carleton. NDP MLA Adrian Dix lent his support to the battle, and supporters have published a 34-page case against closure, but victory is uncertain. Three Collingwood schools were considered for closure, but only Carleton made the shortlist. Supporters are convinced the student population will climb, securing a letter from the president of Wall Financial Corporation indicating

more than 800 residential housing units are proposed for a new Collingwood development. They also point out Carleton survived depressions, recessions and world wars. Parent Advisory Committee chair Ann Wong, who believes the process has lacked transparency, maintains closure is shortsighted and the threat has placed undue stress on children and families. “I don’t even think closing a school is an option. Honestly it’s just wrong,” she said. “Let’s work together to look for options that will work for the community.” More than 7,000 signed a petition to save Carleton, whose sprawling property features several buildings, including a small, historically significant yellow schoolhouse damaged by arson a few years ago. The property, assessed at more than $22 million, has split zoning—

photos Dan Toulgoet

commercial and single-family residential—with redevelopment potential. The district estimates $468,120 in annual savings if Carleton is closed. Critics argue the loss would be too severe. “Carleton and Collingwood Neighbourhood House are the two pillars of Collingwood. Should one pillar fall or be allowed to deteriorate, the result will be devastation,” warned teacher Scott Macdonald.

Little red schoolhouse

Champlain Heights annex’s storybook appearance is undeniably appealing. Located at the northern tip of Everett Crowley Park, its treed surroundings, well-kept red schoolhouse, small student population and proximity to a community centre provide a welcoming introduction to formal education, particularly for special needs and ESL students.

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Enrolment plummets in school full of aboriginal and Chinese students

Eighty-eight kindergarten to Grade 3 students attend the annex, which has space for 103. Opened only 24 years ago, the building contrasts with the district’s mostly aging stock—upgrading isn’t needed any time soon. Closing the annex, whose site is assessed at $9 million, would save $175,134 annually. Champlain Heights underenrolled main school, and other nearby schools, can easily fit displaced students. Development planned for East Fraserlands may drive up student numbers, but that’s not expected for years. While new schools are envisioned for the area, there’s no guarantee when or if they’ll be built. Parent advisory council chair Joanne Kautz-Allard isn’t surprised the annex made the shortlist. Closure rumours circulated ever since her son started school. When rumours turned to reality, parents launched a “Good things come in small packages” campaign. Speakers at an October meeting wore Save our School arm bands, carried protest signs, and affectionately referred to the annex as “the little red schoolhouse on the hill.” At the second meeting, they donned red clothing. Smartboards in every class, Grade 3 students’ ability to take leadership roles, the condition

of the building, and the fact it’s close to capacity, are among arguments to keep it open. Many parents walk kids to class, some pushing strollers—an uphill trek made more difficult if they’re expected to climb further to the main school whose after-school program was recently eliminated. Parents warn they’ll send kids to Burnaby’s Suncrest school, which is closer, further eroding Vancouver’s depleted enrolment and associated per-student provincial funding. If only 34 fled, it would siphon more than $200,000 from the district. Kautz-Allard wants trustees to reconsider. “Build communities, be creative, generate income, but not at the expense of children,” she said. “I ask you as a school board whose ultimate focus is to educate children—find a better answer to this problem. Get out your erasers, erase your answer and try again.” Liberal MLA Kash Heed and Liberal MP Ujjal Dosanjh back the annex’s campaign, but some parents, such as Carolyn Grafton, are cynical. “I don’t think these stories will make any difference to you. We’re at the mercy of gutter politics and finger-pointing between the Vancouver School Board and Ministry of Education,” she told trustees, calling projected savings “a drop

Sir William Macdonald elementary is 105 years old. photo Dan Toulgoet in the bucket.” “You can close our school, but where will that get you? I just can’t see the business case. Move out of the school board office and lease out the palatial office on Broadway and stop the pretense of consulting with the public.”

Battle grounds

Ron LaRochelle rolls up to Sir William Macdonald elementary one afternoon to pick up his granddaughter Charlotte. The Grade 2 student is one of many generations of the family to attend the

historic inner city school on East Hastings. LaRochelle’s deep roots are obvious as the wheelchair-bound 61-year-old casually lists relatives, past and present, who’ve attended the 105-year-old school. Students trickle through solid oak doors carved by First Nations artist Henry Robertson. Framed by painted native figures, and topped by a three-dimensional eagle, the doors’ design depicts salmon swimming as if to spawn, an aboriginal storage box guarded by wolves—protect-

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ing education—and a black bear and cubs. Its enrolment of 239 in 2000 has dwindled to 70 students, mostly from aboriginal and Chinese communities, many with special needs. The school runs at one third of its capacity, making it difficult to offer programs and organize classes efficiently. LaRochelle speaks fondly of Macdonald. “The First Nations kids are well taken care of by First Nations staff,” he said. “It would be a big loss to the First Nation and Chinese community, and everybody here, if it closes. It makes you wonder where they’ll go. There’ll be a lot of lost history.” That sentiment was echoed repeatedly, and often emotionally, at an October consultation meeting kicked off by Native drumming and songs. On hand were students, former students, parents, staff, business people and politicians, including Vancouver-Hastings MLA Shane Simpson, and Burnaby city councillor Nick Volkow—a Macdonald graduate from decades ago. “To close this school, in particular, would be criminal,” the 58year-old said. “You stand with the people of this school and these people will stand with you.” Continued on page 6


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Continued from page 5 Few were angrier than parent Pam Sitar. “I’m pissed off. I’m really, really angry. Poor people, disadvantaged people, get screwed and I’m sick of it.” Sitar worries the land—assessed at $15.4 million—is headed for development at the expense of needy families. [It’s unclear what would happen to closed schools, although the VSB can’t sell property or lease it for more than 10 years without provincial approval.] Former teacher Connie Barkase came out of retirement to fight for the school, fearing few others would. “I wake up every morning saying what am I going to do today because I’ve got to do something,” she told the Courier. Cherise Craney, who struggled to find an appropriate school for her disabled 11-year-old daughter Bronwyn until she found Macdonald, heads up the hastily formed parent group. Her daughter doesn’t adapt well to change or to highly populated schools. “If you put her in a school of 600 children, she will be invisible,” she told trustees. Closure critics see Macdonald as the victim of benign neglect, but Macdonald’s resolve can’t be underestimated. In 1997, parents camped outside the school board office for 43 days demanding increased staffing and resources. Craney believes a decision to close it would have implications far more costly than projected annual savings of $275,593. “If we look at [students] as numbers, we’re going to be looking at them as numbers when they grow up. These are vulnerable kids. They will be statistics again.”

Accidental activists

Lilli Wong can’t help feel resentful. The mother of a five-year-old and five-month-old is on maternity leave, but can’t enjoy it. In September, Wong discovered

The one-storey Sir Richard McBride annex has the fewest students of all schools considered for closure. photo Dan Toulgoet Sir Richard McBride annex, her daughter’s small, one-storey school at 4750 St. Catherines St., could close. The 40-year-old has spent most of her time since then rallying parents, attending meetings, designing a Save McBride Annex website and crafting reasons to save the 47-year-old kindergarten to Grade 3 school next to Grays Park. Wong voiced frustration at a meeting on the annex’s future. “It’s unfair how this burden to save the school has gone down to parents,” she said. The accidental activist imagined sending both children to McBride annex. With that in jeopardy, she’s joined the small group fighting to save it. “It’s a fantastic school. It’s right on the park. It’s very intimate—that’s one of the benefits and also one of its downfalls—the intimate class sizes,” Wong told the Courier. Its enrolment fell to 63 this year

from 151 in 2000. The VSB estimates $171,462 in annual savings by closing the school whose property is assessed at $5.8 million. The annex has the fewest students of all schools eyed for closure, translating into a quieter voice, evident at the first consultation meeting that attracted about 40 people— only seven spoke. It was the lowest turnout of the first five meetings, although the second meeting was better attended. What activists lack in numbers, they’ve tried to compensate for in a reasoned case to keep its doors open, with proposals and concerns detailed on their website. Enrolment tumbled after the Fraser Villa housing complex was demolished, but some predict a population boom with hundreds of new units under construction and neighbourhood densification. Continued on page 7

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Closure opponents argue school’s loss would damage needy families

Continued from page 6 Among ideas is to create an “edible school yard” magnet program featuring an organic garden for urban students modeled on a successful program in Berkeley, Calif. Others suggest introducing a daycare or pre-school, attracting seniors or children’s programs, or starting Tagalog immersion. The VSB warned parents at all five schools new students must come from out of district or private schools—shuffling the students around won’t address declining enrolment. Parent Dr. Jennifer Kong is pushing for a three-year moratorium on the annex’s closure while assumptions about the VSB’s enrolment projections and other data is examined, along with potential fallout, including extra costs, from sending more students to the main school. It will allow time to see if new developments increase enrolment and whether the provincial government implements junior kindergarten. It also gives the board time to consider McBride proposals and adopt its own strategies to bump up enrolment district wide. If the annex closes, and students are dispersed among several schools, activists fear troublemakers will hang around the vacated building and adjacent Grays Park,

where Churchill student Deward Ponte was murdered in 2008. Travel distances would increase and parents with babies might have trouble accessing multi-storey schools, according to annex supporters. Wong doesn’t want to contemplate it. “There needs to be more done to look at the options. Having a school close is the death of a neighbourhood,” she said.

Artful proposal

Located on a busy corner at Clark and Broadway, Queen Alexandra elementary opened as a oneroom schoolhouse more than a century ago and is now a multistorey landmark in an inner city neighbourhood. Twenty three per cent of students are aboriginal. Those remaining are typically new immigrants or have been in Canada less than five years. It’s a designated inner city school and several organizations provide enrichment activities, including after-school piano lessons through UBC’s Heart of the City Piano Program Student Society and the Sarah McLachlan Music Outreach. Kidsafe and StrongStart programs, along with the subsidized breakfast and lunch service, tip off Queen Alex’s needy status. In 2000, enrolment hit 334, but

Queen Alexandra elementary opened as a one-room schoolhouse photo Dan Toulgoet more than a century ago. it slipped to 176 this year. The school, which is assessed at $18.7 million, has space for 288. Split zoning—multiple-family zoning on East Broadway and single family residential on East 10th—coupled with its central location mean it has considerable redevelopment potential, according to the district. The closure report notes surrounding traffic and noise are bad for learning and shutting its doors would produce annual savings of $358,576. Nearby schools can ac-

commodate displaced students. Closure opponents argue the school’s loss would be a hardship on some of the city’s neediest families. Renita Fernandez, cochair at Queen Alex, fears friendships and tight relationships with teachers will be severed, while students may lose valuable enrichment opportunities. Hopes are pinned on transforming the school into a district fine arts program similar to Nootka elementary’s, which has a wait list.

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The pitch, by staff and parents, is endorsed by arts organizations, NDP MLA Jenny Kwan and NDP MP Libby Davies. A focus on multi-cultural themes would highlight students’ diverse backgrounds. Supporters want a fouryear commitment to prove it can work. “This hardly seems an idea that would need a sales pitch,” one teacher said. Queen Alex would be the first inner city school to offer such a program. Proponents cite studies that project-based, arts-integrated learning is highly correlated with success, particularly for at-risk students. Fernandez is convinced it would draw new students to the district. “Each year we meet new families who move into our neighbourhood but choose to send their children to local private schools. A Fine Arts program would be a magnet for some of those families to Queen Alexandra. Our population would grow as a result,” she said. Others insist the school has changed the lives of poor, immigrant and disenfranchised students. But it was Libby Davies who captured the larger fear: “Once a school is gone, it’s very hard to bring it back.” noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh


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Oly Village mess birthed under Judy Rogers

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WEB POLL NATION Go to www.vancourier.com to vote Are school closures a solution to the Vancouver School Board’s financial constraints? Last week’s poll question: Are the separated bike lanes still a success now that fall weather has arrived?

Yes: 77 per cent No: 23 per cent This is not a scientific poll.

Consider the dramatic events Wednesday with the B.C. Supreme Court placing the Olympic Village property into receivership as the beginning of the end. The court order that essentially gives the city of Vancouver control over the development allows two long-standing demands of the city to be met: First there is now a plan in place for the city to recoup most, if not all of the money coming to it from the developers for its outstanding loan balance of about $740 million; with that in place a marketing plan can now be approved for the sale of the 480 condos plus commercial properties, possibly at reduced rates. In the likely event the city can’t get all of its money out of the sales of the property, the developer has provided other assets that the receiver can liquidate or turn over to the city to make up some or all of the balance. This court-arranged process is the result of a deal that was mutually agreed upon between lawyers representing the city and those representing Peter and Shahram Malek, owners of Millennium Development Corporation. But it was a tough couple of weeks’ worth of negotiations that concluded within hours of the city unilaterally heading to court to force the receivership. It was triggered by the realization that, for the second time in a row, the Maleks were about to default on a loan repayment, this one for $75 million due in January. Following the first red flags going up over a loan default in September, the city began to aggressively search out and attach legal encumbrances on the titles of other

allengarr Malek-owned properties. At the same time, the city began discussing the possibility of the legal remedy we saw put in place this week. If you want to start pointing fingers over this mess, you will have to go back four city administrations to the dying days of Philip Owen’s final term in office. Based on documents retrieved by anti-Olympics activist Philip Le Good, two days before the Nov. 16, 2002 municipal election, the city signed a contract with the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation agreeing to build the Village by November 2009 in exchange for a contribution of $30 million. Nothing concrete happened on the development during Larry Campbell’s term although there was a commitment the project would be LEED Gold and housing would be equally divided among social, low-cost and market. It was when Sam Sullivan was mayor that

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the housing mix changed, the contract was let to Millennium and the construction began. By the time Gregor Robertson and his crew took over, Millennium’s financer, the Fortress hedge fund, was balking at handing over construction advances because of cost over-runs. That led the city to have the Vancouver Charter amended so it could essentially replace Fortress as the banker for the project. Through all of this, land-use and real estate specialist Bob Ransford was on the board of the Urban Development Institute, an organization representing the city’s major developers. He was also, incidentally, Peter Ladner’s campaign manager in his run again Robertson for mayor. It’s his view that the city under the management of Judy Rogers never had the expertise to oversee the development. Those put in charge were way over their heads and Sullivan never asked for outside help. Within weeks of Robertson’s election, he was reaching out, first to billionaire businessman Jimmy Pattison, who advised him on which lawyers to hire and then to the UDI, which offered a panel of expert developers to help guide the process the city has followed. Ransford is critical of this administration for publicly criticizing the Maleks; that did nothing to help sales. But he generally believes Robertson inherited a mess and his council and staff are doing the best possible job. And, by the way, this will take several years before the end is finally reached. agarr@vancourier.com

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opinion COUPLE PLUCKS LAB-CROSS FROM SPCA

Man’s best friend embodies best of humanity and virtue If there’s one thing we like here at the Courier, it’s stories involving dogs or bicycles. Preferably both at the same time. A rabid Labradoodle or Cockapoo attacking a Critical Mass cyclist—that’s the Holy Grail news item for this newsroom. So I guess it’s time for me to chime in, with a story about how I turned into a dog person. Two years ago, my partner and I dropped into the East Side SPCA for a look-see. In a kennel enclosure, a lanky Labcross regarded us with a calm expression through the wire mesh. Its floppy ears crossed over at the top of its head, making it look as if it was wearing a small black beret. We returned a week later and “Meika” was still there. I had doubts, but my partner pushed, and after bit of paperwork and an interview with SPCA staff, the yard dog from Kamloops was ours. Meika was afraid of water, and had never seen a flight of stairs before. She was also a nervous chewer, reducing my slippers to leather origami and destroying the lining of my favourite hat. She topped this with $300 worth of damage in the back of our van. Oh well. Owning a dog is having a three-yearold that will never grow up. With fangs. I marvelled how my wife had managed to talk me into this. This was my first used cur. She turned out to be a fast model that handled corners well, with amphibious capability and a GPS system stuck on one setting: squirrel. With a bit of training, Meika became a terrific dog, and I became a responsible dog owner. Slowly I turned into one of THEM. Like the minor character in the zombie films that you can’t imagine eating human brains, I became one of those crazy dog people who blather on about their fourlegged machine for converting kibble to crap. A middle-aged guy without kids, I found myself talking about my smart, athletic canine to anyone who might remotely care—which turned out to be my partner and other crazy dog people, some of them randomly encountered during Meika’s morning walk. “The ears? No, we don’t know what’s up with ‘em. We think she’s part Border Collie and Rottweiler. Maybe some predator drone in there, too.” In other words, the sort of exchange that is of no interest

letter of the week

geoffolson to the dogless. (And if you are among them, dear reader, I encourage you to move over to Allen Garr. It’s not going to get any better here.) I began to detect the “tells” of other dog-owners, even without their pets. During a screening of Disney’s Up, my wife and I heard a few people in the theatre laughing particularly hard when the animated canines turned their heads simultaneously at the word “squirrel.” Other dog people. You may have seen the YouTube video, where a cop stops a speeding driver and asks for ID with the driver’s picture. The cop looks at it, and mutters “super cool, super cool” before returning it, saying, “Here, I don’t deserve to have this.” The caption: “what if the world saw you like your dog does.” Dog owners know their furry buddies are more steadfast than most human beings. There’s no artifice, no subterfuge. A dog cannot fudge, finagle or fib. The human-canine bond is about unspoken truth, of a kind dating backing thousands of years. At the close of Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus returns home after many years of adventures, and discovers that only his dog Argos still recognizes him. Writing of this long awaited reunion, anthropologist Loren Eiseley wrote, “The magic that gleams an instant between Argos and Odysseus is both the recognition of diversity and the need for affection across the illusions of form. It is nature’s cry to homeless, far-wandering, insatiable man: ‘Do not forget your brethren, nor the green wood from which you sprang. To do so is to invite disaster.’” It seems Meika never had much exposure to the green wood prior to her liberation from the kennel. But now she can’t get enough of it during her outings; she’s a fast-moving smudge of charcoal among the trees. Unrestrained animal joy makes the West Coast rain that much easier to take. www.geoffolson.com

First United Church’s storage facility employs seven Downtown Eastside residents and remains open seven days a week. file photo Dan Toulgoet To the editor: Re: “Grant keeps storage facility for homeless open,” Nov. 12. Congratulations to First United for winning the Pepsi grant—no thanks to Vancouver’s city council. Mayor Gregor Robertson campaigned on helping the homeless yet refused to find the $98,000 that was initially needed for this

worthwhile storage project, let alone the remaining $18,000 needed now. But he has no problem spending $250,000 to beautify his own offices or spend over $3 million on a bike lane “trial.” What a hypocrite and opportunist. I hope the homeless will vote come November 2011. Lin Sheffield, Vancouver

Steeves Manor rife with supports and services To the editor: Re: “Living in fear,” Nov. 5. The recent article on Steeves Manor was not a fair characterization of daily life at Steeves Manor and the sense of community that exists there. Steeves Manor has been housing seniors and people with disabilities successfully since 1976. There are a wide range of supports available for the tenants, including two building managers who live on-site and are on-call in the evenings along with an after-hours emergency maintenance contact, in addition to regular janitorial, maintenance and groundskeeping staff who may attend the site during the day. Tenants have access to nursing and mental health supports and a tenant support worker is on-site three days a week. Kits Neighbourhood House operates an in-house resource office five days a week to help residents connect to

community services and supports. Residents have access to social and recreational programs such as weekly lunch programs and cooking lessons, osteofit classes, grocery shopping trips and an annual summer barbecue. Last year the Province announced a $17.75 million renovation to Steeves Manor that will see the development become a CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) certified property. B.C. Housing takes tenant concerns seriously and every effort is made to ensure that tenants are appropriate for the development and that placement matches the level of support needed. When tenants have concerns, they should not hesitate to contact property management staff, so they can address the situation as quickly as possible. Rich Coleman, B.C. Housing Minister

Wild, rude, wayward cyclists burden taxpayers

To the editor: Re: “12th and Cambie,” Nov. 12. I certainly understand and support local, national and international green initiatives, however, I feel that the City of Vancouver is putting an undue burden on its taxpaying citizens by investing in these infrastructure changes. Unlike vehicle owners, bicyclists are not required to get a license or pass any sort of competency test before they take their ve-

hicles on the road whether in a designated lane or a regular street. Too many times, I have been verbally accosted by a wayward cyclist, or experienced an errant rider ignoring basic road etiquette and almost causing an accident with my, or another, vehicle. All of these factors contribute to my lack of support for bicycle-specific initiatives in Vancouver. Ken Roed, Vancouver

Human race always regressing into mindless war

To the editor: Re: “War not confined to the bloody battlefield,” Nov. 12. This was great, timely, very thoughtful. We are indeed a culture of war, poor fools that we are.

Our language is peppered with words and phrases seeded and born in war. And there’s plastic surgery, clothing, household equipment, medicine and on and on. But I’d be willing to bet that we’d have discovered

all the things that civilization needed sooner or later. And without the colossal misappropriation of people and resources vitally needed elsewhere. Janet Hudgins, Vancouver

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editor@vancourier.com Letters to the editor (1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2, fax 738-2154 or e-mail editor@vancourier.com) may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be typed, signed and include the writer’s full name (no initials), home address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified.


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

news

Empty school space leased to private schools -

COPE trustees tout school marketing Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

A Fusing of Dream & Creation

FUSION

JOURNEY

Step into Your World

COPE trustees want long-term strategies encouraging registration at neighbourhood schools and talks on how to keep public spaces for public use, according to notices of motions tabled at Monday night’s board meeting. The motions come just weeks before decisions about school closures are reached. Critics at consultation meetings have complained the Vancouver School Board hasn’t done enough to market public schools. Trustee Jane Bouey said residents should understand the strengths and uniqueness of community schools and the district hasn’t taken enough of a leadership role to see that happens. Strategy details require consultation, according to Bouey, but she envisions initiatives such as orientation or information nights ahead of kindergarten registration. “What tends to happen is once people are registered, then they get orientation, but we don’t do much to encourage people to come and visit the school,” she said. Bouey acknowledged the VSB has been slow to understand the importance of promoting itself and the implications of developments such as school choice legislation and Fraser Institute rankings. “When that switched to publishing elementary school rankings, it’s undeniable that had an impact. Individual schools have tried various things but I don’t think the district as a whole has taken a lot of leadership in that,” Bouey said. “Some of it, to be completely frank, is concern around do you spend money on promoting schools at the same

time as you’re laying off teachers? Sometimes it’s difficult to justify that, although if it makes a difference in terms of enrolment, maybe you can make the argument that it’s worthwhile.” Trustee Al Blakey, who agrees the VSB hasn’t actively promoted schools, suspects it wouldn’t take much money for schools to do projects such as information mailouts prior to kindergarten registration and it might be worth the investment. “I look around and see independent schools doing a lot of marketing,” Blakey said. Trustee Allan Wong tabled the second notice of motion that calls for meetings between city council, the park board, community associations, neighbourhood houses and childcare service providers, about the public use of public space. If schools are closed or have extra space, he said it’s preferable to lease the space to public agencies for services such as childcare rather than to private schools. The Delta school district prohibits leasing vacant schools to private schools, according to COPE trustees. The VSB did, however, lease Shannon Park annex to the Vancouver Hebrew Academy in recent years. Bouey maintains leasing to private schools undermines confidence in public education. “The Hebrew Academy has, by all accounts, been very good tenants but it is a question. You have to weigh the concerns around the school being left empty— I don’t think anybody wants that.” The motions will be discussed at a committee meeting Dec.7 . noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

“Equality is more than appearance” – Canadian Human Rights Commission


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news

Class Notes

with

Naoibh O’Connor

Seeking closure

Volumes could be written on each school being considered for closure by the Vancouver School Board. Most have long histories in the district and advocates for each produced untold pages of arguments aimed at saving their elementary schools. Hours of meetings featured students, parents, staff and community members— some in tears, others clearly angry—addressing trustees with heartfelt speeches.

Today’s cover story, Endangered spaces, provides brief overviews of their efforts, but anyone who attended any of the feedback sessions knows the complexity of the issue and the lengths to which closure opponents have gone to justify saving Carleton elementary, Champlain Heights annex, Sir William Macdonald elementary, Sir Richard McBride annex and Queen Alexandra elementary. It remains unclear what would happen if any of the school buildings are closed. Critics worry they’ll be left empty, inviting vandalism, or leased to private school competitors. I asked board chair Patti Bacchus if the province could suddenly decide to sell the land. She’s not

Patti Bacchus

Carol Gibson

sure, but she pointed me to a Ministry of Education Governance and Legislation Branch web page on “Disposal of Land or Improvements Order.” “The process must include closure followed by information to the ministry on the nature of the disposal. The way the order reads is that it is the board that needs to apply to the minister to approve disposal, not

the ministry suddenly deciding to sell any land that is unused,” Bacchus wrote in an email. While some fear school properties’ redevelopment potential, Bacchus added, “There are no plans to sell and I believe the majority of trustees are committed to keeping school lands for public use.” Since all of the schools being considered for closure

are on the East Side, comments at many meetings questioned why that side of the city is being targeted. I addressed that point in a previous Class Notes after the initial list of 11 schools was released, which may be worth repeating. “The comment that the preliminary list includes a disproportionate number of schools located east of Main Street [East Side schools] assumes that the number of schools east of Main Street is equal to the number of schools west of Main Street,” NPA trustee Carol Gibson told me, pointing out that’s only the case for secondary schools—nine are located on each side of Main. There are 91 elementary schools in Vancouver-—56 of the schools, or 62 per

100 %

cent, are found east of Main Street. “While it is not exactly proportionate, having fewer West Side schools on the preliminary list reflects a reality—there are many more elementary schools in Vancouver located east of Main Street,” Gibson said. Public consultation meetings concluded Nov. 9, but feedback is being accepted by the VSB until Nov. 24. A summary report will be posted on the district’s website Dec. 3, and formally presented to a committee meeting Dec. 7—the location and time is to be announced. Trustees make their decision at a special board meeting Dec. 14 at 7 p.m., again at a location to be announced. noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

B.C. Owned and Operate

d

Seminars & Events

Thurs, Nov 25 • 4:00-6:00pm

Natural Health Questions and Answers with Dr. Aliya Kabani, ND from Ray Clinic. Choices Market at the Crest, 8683 10th Ave, Burnaby. FREE. To register call 604-522-0936

Thurs, Nov 25 • 7:00-8:30pm

Low Thyroid Function: Alternative Treatment Options with Dr. Arjuna Veeravagu, ND. Canadian Memorial Centre for Peace, 1825 16th Ave., Vancouver. Cost $10. To register call 604-736-0009

VGH Thrift Shop 120 East Broadway Open 7 Days a Week

Donations of clean used, good quality clothing, household goods and furniture, jewellery and books can be dropped off at the shop during business hours. To arrange pick up of donations or to volunteer at the shop call

604.875.4604

Turn to the pages of our holiday guides for ideas from jewellery to fashion, spas to travel, from gift baskets to dining and beautiful stuff for the home.

You’ll find the perfect gift, right here! Guide publishes in full colour every Wed. and Fri. from Nov. 26 to Dec. 24.

To advertise in this feature, call 604-738-1412.


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

The Vancouver Welsh Men’s Choir presents

Friday, Dec 3 ~ 7:30 White Rock Baptist Church 1657 140th Street, Surrey $25 regular $22 senior/student

Sunday, Dec 5 ~ 2:30 with Winter Harp Massey Theatre

735 8th Ave, New Westminster

$22 / $25 / $30 reserved seating

Saturday, Dec 11 ~ 8:00 Thursday, Dec 16 ~ 8:00 Shaughnessy Heights United St. Andrew’s Wesley United Church 1022 Nelson St (at Burrard) 1550 W.33rd Ave, Vancouver $25 regular $22 senior/student

Vancouver

$25 regular $22 senior/student

BUY TICKETS on line at www.vwmc.ca or telephone the Choir at 604-878-1190

Tickets for Dec 5th also available at masseytheatre.com

North Shore Celtic Ensemble in concert Saturday, December 4 at 7:30pm Samedi 4 décembre à 19h30 The Cultch, 1895 Venables St., Vancouver Tickets available at theatre box office Les billets sont disponibles à la billetterie du théâtre http://tickets.thecultch.com 604-251-1363 $15 for adults; $10 for seniors, students and children, plus applicable service charges Adultes, 15$ ; Aînés, étudiants et enfants, 10$ frais de service en sus www.nscelticensemble.com Join us on Facebook | Joignez nous sur Facebook

C R E A T I V E

The NSCE gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver through the Arts Office.

news

Cost of proposed Point Grey Road lane unknown

Former councillor peddles new bike lane plan Mike Howell

Staff writer

Former city councillor Peter Ladner is renewing his push to have the city create a separated bike lane along a stretch of Point Grey Road that he says will make the route safer for cyclists and joggers. Ladner said ideally a separated bike lane would connect with the existing separated lane on the Burrard Bridge and run west along Cornwall and Point Grey Road to Highbury Street, near the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and Jericho Park. “That would be the ultimate goal,” said Ladner, a commuter cyclist who first pitched the idea during his first term on council in 2004. But, he said, the nine-block stretch of Point Grey Road from Macdonald to Highbury would be the first section where he would create a separated lane. It’s a route heavily used by cyclists and joggers. “It’s already being used and it’s very dangerous, especially in the narrow section between Blenheim and Alma [streets],” said Ladner, who lives near the yacht club. “Cars can’t get by cyclists, so there’s always an issue. The runners are unsafe as well because they’re spilling off into the street.” Ladner’s proposal comes after city council approved a separated bike lane trial in October for Hornby Street. Previously, council approved separated bike lane trials on the Burrard Bridge, Dunsmuir viaduct and Dunsmuir Street. The Burrard link is now permanent, with city staff to report in the new year on the success or failure of the Dunsmuir and Hornby routes. When the Hornby link is open—possibly before the end of the year—the separated bike lane network will allow a cyclist

Point Grey Road does not have a bike lane. to ride from Chinatown to Kitsilano. Total cost of the network is estimated at $5 million but Ladner wouldn’t speculate on the cost of a link along Cornwall or Point Grey Road. The city’s annual budget for transportation-related projects such as roads is $125 million. The implementation of separated bike lanes has been controversial, particularly with associations such as the Vancouver Board of Trade, the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. All three associations are worried about the economic impact of the lanes, which are separated by a variety of barriers including concrete medians and planter boxes, will have on businesses. The lanes have replaced metered parking spots. However, polls released by the city, commentary from the cycling community and some business owners

photo Dan Toulgoet

show support for the lanes. City statistics show marked increases in cycling since the implementation of the separated lanes. Vision Vancouver Coun. Geoff Meggs has been one of the most vocal supporters on council of the network but he said the ruling Vision council has no plans to approve the implementation of another separated lane before the November 2011 civic election. “What I’ve been saying to all those people proposing new bicycle infrastructure is that I really want to see it incorporated into the overall planning process,” said Meggs, noting people have also proposed a bike route along Kingsway. “They’re all probably good ideas but they need to be ranked and then put into some kind of systematic review, and that’s what we’re trying to do.” For a longer version of this story, visit vancourier.com. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings


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news

VPD says province ignored written proposal about transport to shelters

Homeless transport service remains in limbo Mike Howell Staff writer

The Vancouver Police Department’s request in January to have the provincial government provide a transport service for homeless people seeking shelter has gone unanswered. Const. Jodyne Keller said she wrote a business proposal 11 months ago for the service and it was sent to the office of Housing Minister Rich Coleman, whose new duties include being the province’s top cop as solicitor general. “I would love to hear a response on whether or not they appreciate the request,” Keller told the Courier Tuesday. “But I don’t know. It’s been almost a year and I haven’t heard.” Keller, the VPD’s homeless coordinator, said the department is often the social service agency of last resort in the early morning on the streets. Police do not typically transport homeless people who want to go to a shelter or hospital.

Const. Jodyne Keller, homeless coordinator for the VPD, handed out a blanket to Andy Gesjarlais Tuesday. photo Dan Toulgoet Most times, the people—some with carts and dogs—are left to fend for themselves and police will do their best to check up on them during a shift, said Keller, who handed out blankets to homeless people at Pigeon Park

in the Downtown Eastside Tuesday as part of a campaign run by the Salvation Army and VPD. “If there is a vehicle available, we would love the opportunity to have that out on the street,” said Keller, who believes the provin-

cial government should pay for the vehicle because of legislation it introduced last winter related to homeless people. In November 2009, the provincial government passed the Assistance to Shelter Act, which allows police to use “reasonable force, if necessary” to remove a homeless person from the street during extreme weather and transport that person to a shelter. Two weeks after the legislation was introduced, Police Chief Jim Chu announced that his officers would use only “minimal non-forceful touching” to urge a homeless person to seek shelter during extreme weather alerts. Chu likened the “touching” to the supporting hand a person would use in helping an elderly person cross the street. If a homeless person resisted, police would back off, the chief said at the time. Keller said officers never used the legislation last winter and the VPD has no plans to change its approach as the temperatures begin to drop. Police can still resort

to the Mental Health Act, which allows officers to apprehend a person if they believe the person is a danger to themselves or the public. The Courier interviewed Coleman in October 2009 about the idea for a transport service and he said it was “a good idea.” But, the minister said, he had yet to see a proposal from the VPD, which prompted Keller’s request. “We have all kinds of services, particularly in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver,” Coleman said at the time. “And we spend millions of dollars down there. I would think that there’s some operation that we could look at to do something like that.” The Courier requested an interview with Coleman this week and wanted to learn the status of the VPD’s proposal. Neither Coleman nor the ministry were able to provide an update before the Courier’s deadline. In March, the city’s homeless count found 1,762 people without a home. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings

NEW MICHAELS STORE OFFERS URBAN DÉCOR & CRAFTS GALORE With the winter season fast approaching, people are looking for new ways to decorate their homes, and have a bit of fun, too. Fortunately for theVancouver community, Michaels had their grand opening on October 16th at 665 West Broadway, allowing for a new and different home decorating experience. Doug Castro, manager of several Michaels locations in BC, explains how the company adapted for its’ new, and only, urban store. Vancouverites have a much different living space than the suburbs, where most Michael stores are located, and the store has adjusted to this. Explains Castro, “We have product to suit condominiums that have space constraints. So we have a lot of custom floral arrangements that are tall and narrow, to suit this different lifestyle.” It is because of this type of care the store has taken to suit their Vancouver clientele that the bigbox store has been so well received by the community. Castro also attributes the love the Vancouver community has shown for the store to, “the friendly retail experience.” The staff is incredibly helpful and each staff member specializes in a certain section of the store. This allows each staff member to be an expert in home décor or crafts, giving them the utmost knowledge to help their customers every need. If you’re looking for home and holiday-themed décor, the new Michaels on Broadway will have exactly what you’re looking for. The best in prices, product and staff will give you the most convenient shopping experience.

Michaels, by department:

665 W. Broadway 604-638-2523 www.michaels.com

• Art Supplies • Beads • Craft Painting • Framing • Home Décor • Scrapbooking • Wedding • Bakeware • Floral

• Christmas & Gifting • General Crafts • Kids / Teachers • Yarn & Needle Crafts • Seasons & Celebrations

First in Fabric Selection, Quality & Value

VANCOUVER

1678 S.E. Marine Dr. at Argyle (604)321-1848 Hours: Mon.-Wed. 10am-6pm / Thurs.-Fri. 10am-9pm / Sat. 10am-6pm Sun. 11am-5pm / Holidays 12pm-5pm

Plus 7 more locations in the Lower Mainland to serve you! Join us on the Internet! webs: www.fabriclandwest.com

Fabricland Sewing Club Members Value Hotline 1-866-R-FABRIC 1-866-732-2742


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

news

12th & Cambie

with Mike Howell

Follow the leader

Look for our flyer in today’s paper! Only in selected areas. See in store store for for complete complete details. details.

The Dance Centre presents

Discover Dance!

photo credit: Peter Eastwood

LINK Dance

Choreographer Gail Lotenberg introduces excerpts from her new work Experiments: Where Logic and Emotion Collide, which explores the rich relationship between dance and science.

Thursday, November 25 at 12 noon Scotiabank Dance Centre 677 Davie Street (at Granville), Vancouver

Tickets $10/$8 students, seniors from Tickets Tonight 604.684.2787

www.ticketstonight.ca

Information: 604.606.6400 • www.thedancecentre.ca

Now that Gordon Campbell is on his way out and some members of the NDP are calling for a leadership convention, will any local politicians want to take a shot at becoming an MLA? Or in Mayor Gregor Robertson’s case, a shot at leading the NDP? I haven’t diligently pursued this question with all the city’s politicos but Vision Vancouver’s executive director Ian Baillie assured me former NDP MLA Robertson will seek a second term as mayor. “He’s been very clear to the party that he is seeking re-election,” Baillie said. “He couldn’t be more clear, to tell you the truth. I know on at least 10 to a dozen occasions he’s been very clear in his desire to seek re-election.” Vision councillors Geoff Meggs and Raymond Louie have told me they plan to seek re-election. Haven’t had a chance to catch up with the rest of the Vision caucus to determine who will run again or whether any are considering trying provincial politics. But the question related

Vision Vancouver executive director Ian Baillie (right) says Mayor Gregor Robertson will seek reelection. photo Dan Toulgoet to provincial politics is one Baillie said will undoubtedly be discussed by Vision’s executive when it finalizes its rules for the November 2011 civic election. Will the party make candidates sign a contract that commits them to Vision and keeps them from jumping ship to the NDP? “That’s something that’s come up more and more and we’ll have to take a look at that, for sure,” Baillie said. “We have not settled on any rules as of yet, but I think those will be coming shortly.” Stay tuned.

Party’s over?

Breaking news—Coun. Suzanne Anton is no longer

a member of the Non Partisan Association! At least that’s what I take from a guest column Anton wrote about rapid transit for the Indo-Canadian Voice newspaper, published Nov. 6, 2010. Her byline reads, “By Independent Councillor Suzanne Anton.” An accompanying photograph, which looks like one left over from her 2008 campaign brochures, also describes her as an independent. So I called her to find out what was going on. Are you still a member of the NPA? “Am I still a member of the NPA? Yes,” she replied. Then what’s the deal with you describing yourself as

an independent instead of a proud member of the city’s oldest party? “Oops. I’ll have to get the person who helped me with that one to correct that. I didn’t submit it directly myself. Thank you for pointing that out to me. I will make sure to get that corrected.” So there’s nothing behind that? Fed up with the NPA? Going the Carole Taylor route? Independent sounds better than NPA? “No, no, no, it’s a mistake.” Anton and her NPA cohorts will get together this Saturday (Nov. 20) for the party’s first nomination meeting, where the only battle will be for a park board seat. The party will decide on the rest of its slate in the new year, including naming a mayoral candidate. The civic election is November 2011.

Hair removal

A Movember update… Mayor Gregor Robertson’s self-confessed “lame” attempt to grow a moustache this month in support of prostate cancer got even lamer at Tuesday’s council meeting. That’s when Robertson resorted to a stickon Groucho Marx-like lip warmer. The mayor had trouble keeping it on. So he took it off. Unfortunately, the chocolate milk on his upper lip is still there. Two weeks to go. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings


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news

Ernst and Young now managing Southeast False Creek development

RealestategurupreachesOlympic Vil agepatience Cheryl Rossi Staff writer

Bob Rennie hopes to relaunch the sales and marketing campaign for the 480 unsold condos at the Olympic Village in early February, after the slow time for sales has passed. He said he’ll meet this weekend with representatives of Ernst and Young, the accounting firm now responsible for ensuring the city recoups the $740 million owed to it for the Southeast False Creek development. The city announced late in the afternoon Nov. 17 that the Olympic Village on Southeast False Creek is in receivership. At the ninth hour, the city and the developer of the village, Millennium, had agreed that the city would file for receivership at the Supreme Court of B.C. Both city manager Penny Ballem and Rennie said receivership evades costly and ugly legal battles. Millennium Southeast False Creek Properties is transferring ownership of the condos and commercial spaces at the village to the city. Vision Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson said Ernst and Young will only be able to recoup the $740 million through condo sales if the real estate market stays strong in the months and years ahead. “Patience is what’s critical,” he said. Rennie, director of Rennie Marketing Systems, says he’s had a marketing and sales plan on his desk for months that would align condo prices at the Olympic Village with prices at comparable developments. But Millennium needed to provide the city, its lender, with more security to release the condos at lower prices, and that’s where negotiations broke down. Any gap that remains while the condos are sold over the next few years is to be met by liquidating Millennium’s assets.

Millennium owns multiple residential and commercial developments. But the mayor said taxpayers could end up covering some of the shortfall. The city has been adding legal attachments to Millennium’s property titles since September, after Millennium Water was $8 million short in paying the $200 million that was due to the city at the end of August. Millennium owed another $75 million by Jan. 3. The city bought out Fortress Investment Group’s high-interest loan to Millennium in February 2009 to make sure the development was completed in time for the Olympics. Ballem said the value of Millennium’s assets will take time to understand. Ernst and Young will have to sort out other encumbrances on its holdings. The city has negotiated a deal with Peter and Shahram Malek, the brothers behind Millennium Water, to help their company avoid bankruptcy. The Maleks have signed a non-disclosure agreement with the city. The mayor blamed the previous NPAdominated council for getting the city into this mess. Ballem called the receivership advantageous because it allows Ernst and Young to make quick decisions on the transfer of assets and for the city to feel more secure that there’s a plan in place to get its money back. The lone NPA councillor, Suzanne Anton, disagreed. “It’s a sad day for the taxpayers of Vancouver,” she said, adding the entire risk has now been transferred to the city. Rennie wouldn’t comment directly on Anton’s views. “I’m hoping that nobody uses the Olympic Village as a political podium,” he said. “We should all go through those audits when the last person moves in.” crossi@vancourier.com

OPEN TO EVERYONE! OFFERING EVENTS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

MASS FOR THE EARTH March 21, 5 pm

THE REV. DR. PAULA SAMPSON

Free A VST community created and sponsored worship service in celebration for the Earth and our relationship to the ecological and natural communities in which we live, held on the Spring Equinox. Location: VST’s Chapel of the Epiphany

OPEN HOUSE

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

news

Malte Kluetz was inspired by childhood memories of Christmas markets in Germany and the photo Dan Toulgoet recent Olympics to start a Christkindlmarkt in Vancouver.

Germans present Christmas market Cheryl Rossi

Staff writer

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Malte Kluetz wants to change the way Vancouverites celebrate Christmas. The president of a company that plans special events for international visitors to Vancouver, Seattle and Banff, is mounting a traditional German Christmas market in Vancouver. Kluetz first dreamt of creating a European-style Christmas market when he moved to North America 20 years ago from Hamelin, the home of the legendary Pied Piper in northern Germany. “All this great excitement and buzz during the Olympics, that was when I realized, OK, Vancouver is ready to become the fun city again,” he said. The Vancouver Christmas Market will run at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre Plaza on the corner of West Georgia and Hamilton streets from Nov. 24 to Dec. 24. More than 30 wooden huts will radiate from a centre stage where the Dal Richards Big Band, the Langley Ukulele Ensemble and VOC Sweet Soul Gospel Choir, among others, will perform. Adults will be able to sip mulled wine and Bavarian wheat beer while kids decorate chocolate lollipops, candles and gingerbread versions of the market’s mascots, Holly and Jolly. Vendors from Germany and Canada will sell Christmas ornaments, wooden toys and German embroidery and lace.

Among the crafts to go on sale at the market are the incense-holding “smokies.” photo Dan Toulgoet Hungry shoppers can dine on apple strudel, German sausages and Christmas cake, Swiss raclette cheese and suckling pig. Kluetz hopes the Vancouver Christmas Market will become an annual tradition. “I still remember when my parents took me to the market and that was very exciting to see all the lights and have a chance to get some unique food that we typically didn’t eat at home,” Kluetz said. “Then later on, it was a typical place to meet with friends and business colleagues after work or during lunch. Weekends was typically a family thing.” The plaza can hold 3,300 people. Christmas markets, or Christkindlmarkt, have been a German tradition for 700 years. Local tradespeople sold their wares at the markets, giving each gathering

an individual flavour. Traditional German handicrafts include hand-carved nutcrackers, wooden smokers, cuckoo clocks and ornaments made of blown glass and straw. The European-style Christmas markets have spread to North America in places like Chicago where a Christkindlmarket started in 1995 and each year attracts more than a million people. The Vancouver Christmas Market runs 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week. Admission is $5 for those aged 13 and up, $2 for youth aged seven to 12 and free for younger kids. Children’s activities cost $20 for four activities or $6 each. Visitors who present a valid transit FareCard or an unexpired ticket receive a $1 discount on admission. For more information, see vancouverchristmasmarket.com. crossi@vancourier.com


E17

F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

news

Family counsellor notes consent ‘confusion’

Study spotlights sex between young teenagers and adults A 2008 federal law that raised the age of sexual consent from 14 to 16 was intended to protect teens from exploitation and abuse, but sexologists, researchers and educators believe a better understanding of what it means to consent may be more effective protection. Vancouver sex therapist and family counsellor Dr. Pega Ren says the issue of sexual consent “is an area of great confusion.” “Consent needs to be explicit,” she said. “No response is not yes. Nor is it no. No response is no response.” For Ren, who writes a monthly column for Xtra magazine, education is essential because she says social behaviour cannot be legislated. The changes to the Criminal Code raised the age of consent by two years and includes a “close-in-age” exemption that allows sexual activity between adolescents aged 14 and 15 with peers five years older or less. For 12- and 13-year-olds, the range is lowered to peers within two years of age. Under the law, children under 12 cannot consent to sex. Alcohol also impairs a person’s ability to give consent. The law seeks to avoid criminalizing sexual activity and experimentation between teens but nonetheless increase the means of prosecuting older adults out to exploit or abuse adolescents. Although the age of consent is raised to include 14- and 15-year-old teens, Elizabeth Saewyc, a professor of nursing and adolescent medicine at the University of B.C., said children 13 and younger are more vulnerable to the risk of sexual abuse. “The law was already presumably protecting them,” she said. Saewyc is a co-author of a study released this week in the Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality that determined only two to three per cent of 14- and 15-year-olds had sex for the first time with an adult in contrast to 39 per cent of sexually active

“CONSENT NEEDS TO BE EXPLICIT. NO RESPONSE IS NOT YES. ” Dr. Pega Ren

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12-year-olds whose first sexual partner was 20 or older. The data determined less than three per cent of all 12-year-olds, roughly 700 adolescents, in the province were having sex. The data is drawn from the 2008 B.C. Adolescent Health Survey, a population controlled survey of 29,000 youth in Grades 7 to 12 around the province. Unique in Canada, the survey is organized every five years by the McCreary Centre Society where Saewyc is the director of research. The study did find that older teens were more likely to report instances of forced sexual activity by another youth close in age. That abuse is reported is a positive indication, but Saewyc said the research suggests not all teens understand what constitutes a healthy and consensual relationship. “At least some of them are not necessarily understanding what does true consent mean in a sexual relationship—that pressure is not OK and that no does mean no.” Expanding on the meaning of consent, Kristen Gilbert, a sexual health educator with Options for Sexual Health, emphasizes that consent is active. “Consent doesn’t mean not saying ‘no,’ consent doesn’t mean not saying anything, it doesn’t mean not crying, not yelling,” she told a radio station in September at the time of a police investigation of the repeated rape of a 16-year-old Pitt Meadows high schooler. In the workshops Gilbert gives to teens around the Lower Mainland, she says consent is an unfamiliar topic, meaning rape is often misunderstood. “When I bring up consent, it’s almost always for the first time.” mstewart@vancourier.com

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EW18

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

news

$62-million condo development combines Island culture with urban sophistication

Nanaimo developers court Vancouverites with quiet promises Jeremy Shepherd Contributing writer

High above the city originally built by coal, an artist is putting the final touches on the graffiti art and sculptures adorning a Nanaimo penthouse. The penthouse is in The Pacifica, a $62-million condo development on Nanaimo’s shore that developers hope will entice Vancouverites to hop on a float plane and settle down in the small Vancouver Island city. “They thought the market was maximized,” said Pamela Groberman, public relations manager for the 18-storey development, discussing the potential of the Vancouver market. “I think the reason every [tenant] likes it is because they’re on the water.” Groberman has an office in Yaletown, but spends a great deal of her time in Nanaimo, often taking the 20-minute float plane ride to business meetings in the city, which sits 100 kilometres north of Victoria. “It’s expensive [to live] in Vancouver,” she said. “It’s half the price in Nanaimo.”

“THE ONLY THINGS DOWNTOWN WERE PAWN SHOPS AND STRIPS CLUBS.” Chelsea Barr

The Pacifica is part of a movement that seems to combine Island culture with urban sophistication. And while numbers are hard to pin down, an unknown number of Vancouverites are fleeing the big city for a quieter life. Eric McLean, the proprietor of a specialty foods store in Nanaimo, said he left the mainland 18 years ago, in part because of the traffic and the stress. “I laugh when I listen to the radio and hear about the backup at the Pitt River bridge,” he said. McLean said part of the purpose of his store, which offers appenzeller cheese for Swiss customers and curried lamb for those with a taste for South African cuisine, is to eliminate the need to leave Nanaimo to shop. “I picked products that I knew

Vince Dumoulin, an artist who has lived in the Downtown Eastside, is creating graffiti art at The Pacifica. photo Kris Krug were very difficult to get,” he said of his establishment, which sits in a changing downtown. “The only things downtown were pawn shops and strips clubs,” said Chelsea Barr, media relations guide for Nanaimo, pointing out the boutiques and coffee shops that have sprung up in the last few years.

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She said part of the change is because of Vancouver Island University, which brings 5,000 international students to the area. She said she and her husband bought a 2,600-square-foot home for $280,000, a price she couldn’t imagine finding in Vancouver. DeBorah Grant, an employee at the Best Western Dorchester

Hotel, a small hotel in operation since 1889, said there’s been a large influx of people settling down in Nanaimo. “A lot of the growth is old people,” she said. “Do you know how long it takes old people to get around corners?” Besides adding a few minutes to her commute, Grant said the changes in the community are putting more people in the cozy, 70-room hotel. “We brought all the electrical power over and down,” she said, discussing the difficulty in rewiring the old building from the roof down. Back in the penthouse, Vince Dumoulin, an artist who has lived in the Downtown Eastside, explained his work. “This is not religious, it’s spiritual,” he said of the light beaming from one hand to another in a large painting hanging in the bedroom. He said it’s about creating a sense of peace amid “chaotic urbanity.” For Nanaimo boosters, that’s how they see their city compared to the mainland. jshepherdcourier@gmail.com

What would you put in your shopping cart? Many people who are homeless take trash from dumpsters and put in their shopping carts. For them they can make a few bucks. Do we really want to be a city that feeds the poor through our garbage? Thirty to 50% of people who are homeless are seriously mentally ill. With treatment almost 80% can recover. At Coastʼs downtown Mental Health Resource Centre, we help people to learn practical life skills to get off and stay off the streets. Feeding people is not enough. No one should live on the street because they have a mental illness and are untreated. Feed the hungry, yes, but give them hope and skills to live in society. Make a difference - give to Coast. Donations can be made online at our secure site – www.coastfoundation.com or send a cheque to:

Coast Mental Health Foundation 293 East 11th Avenue Vancouver, BC V5T 2C4 604-675-2316

www.coastfoundation.com


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW19

city frame

NO LONGER AT

and his fiancee Kim Ozenick to head out to Spanish Banks for a run. The couple tries to get out two to four times a week for a 40-minute run.

When your child chooses science, they’re choosing more than a rewarding career. They’re choosing to contribute, achieve and have their thinking recognized. And to start them off right, we’re even offering one potential scientist a $25,000 scholarship. To learn more, visit yearofsciencebc.ca

photo Dan Toulgoet

Help us prevent kids from making bad choices.

A surprise break from Wednesday’s stormy weather inspired Matt Drenner

give.uwlm.ca Please give.


EW20

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

community briefs Going ape

What’s the difference between an ape and an orangutan? Or an orangutan and a gorilla? Maybe there is no difference, maybe there is. Dr. Birute Mary Galdikas will surely be able to answer those questions when she speaks at Vancouver Community College’s Broadway campus, 1155 East Broadway, on Thursday, Nov. 25 at 8 p.m. Galdikas is said to be the world’s leading authority on the orangutan and has dedicated her career to understanding the nature of this compelling species,

which hovers on the edge of extinction. Charlton Heston is not expected to be in attendance.

Seasonal reading

The West End Writers read about the season’s holidays at the Red Umbrella Cafe, 1707 Davie St. Nov. 25 at 7 p.m.

Culture capital

Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore has named Vancouver the Cultural Capital of Canada for 2011. Vancouver is one of three cities honoured with this designation, including Charlottetown, P.E.I.

and Levis, Que. Vancouver earned the honour for a city with a population of more than 125,000. During his Nov.12 announcement, Moore also provided $1.75 million for the City of Vancouver’s 125th anniversary of incorporation celebrations, which will begin in January and continue throughout 2011. “It is a great honour to be recognized for our vibrant, diverse and active arts and cultural community,” Mayor Gregor Robertson said in a news release. “This past year, we hosted the biggest arts and culture event

in Canadian history with the Cultural Olympiad, and with our 125th anniversary in 2011, we’re looking forward to even more events.”

Mood music

The Brock House/Kerrisdale Music Makers with guest choir Kids Sing Chorus present Scotch Mints and Xmas Hints with selections from Brigadoon, Nov. 21. They’ll sing a sprightly assortment of Scottish ballads, seasonal pieces and a few traditional songs meant to chase away the late-November blues. Scotch Mints and Xmas Hints starts at 3

p.m. at 1805 Larch St. and West Second Avenue. Admission is by donation.

A season of giving

Dust off your dancing shoes or just chill out to Or Shalom Synagogue’s own InEffeable Blues Band and the Burke Street Blues Band. They’ll play rock ’n’ roll, blues and Motown at a fundraiser for the Red Cross that’ll be emceed by Charles Kaplan, Nov. 27. The one-time fundraising event for tsunami victims in Thailand has evolved into an annual fundraiser. This year, organizer Jenny Wright has chosen to direct money

raised to the Red Cross’s Haiti and Pakistan funds. Organizers are seeking donated items for its silent auction and the Red Cross can give those who donate a tax receipt. The Benefit Concert and Dance for Haiti and Pakistan runs from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at Hycroft Mansion, 1489 McRae Ave., near Granville and West 16th Avenue. Advance tickets are $16 and available at Dollar and Classic Store, 2881 West Broadway. Tickets are $22 at the door. For more information, see dinosaurmusic.net and look under “concerts,” phone 604-266-3644 or email jennywright3@hotmail. com.

Hitchhiker’s Expo

TOPICS

Douglas Adams was an English writer and dramatist who envisioned the futurist worlds that brought us Dr. Who and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. The Vancouver Public Library is paying homage to Adams’ literary work with a free, allages exhibition about what the future holds for us. Check out the latest gear, eco-gadgets and revolutionary tech products at the Hitchhiker’s Innovation Expo, Nov. 20 from 12 to 3:30 p.m. at the interior promenade of the central library (350 West Georgia St.).

Dr. Google

TIME

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010 3:30pm-5:00pm KERRISDALE COMMUNITY CENTRE • 5851 W. Boulevard, Van. Wednesday, Novemer 24th, 2010 1:30pm-3:00pm VANCOUVER LAWN TENNIS & BADMINTON CLUB • 1630 W.15th Ave, Van.

YOUR PRESENTER

Is the Internet the best source for medical consultation? Is Dr. Google always the best source for health information? Health experts say there are several reputable online sources, but many other websites can make misleading, incomplete, and even contradictory health claims. So how can you tell? And what community services are needed to help Vancouverites tell the difference between useful and potentially harmful online medial information. Could different levels of online literacy result in lower health outcomes for some Canadians? Join health researchers Nov. 24 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Bellaggio Café (773 Hornby St.) for a discussion. Presented by the Canadian Institute of Health Research. Free admission. For more information and to RSVP, contact ipph-ispp@uottawa.ca.

Got an event?

Seats are FREE but LIMITED. Call Trish Javier 604-682-5431, ext 243 (24 hours) to reserve seating

Got a community event that’s happening in Vancouver you’d like to share with our readers? Send it to events@vancourier.com. Events will be included on a space-permitting basis. School and charitable entertainment events are also welcome.


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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travel

There’s no place quite like Querpon Island

Lighthouse experience tops terrific travel year Michael McCarthy Contributing writer

QUERPON ISLAND, N.L.—As the end of the year approaches, it is customary to look back and reflect upon the experiences that have shaped our lives, and for a travel writer that means mentally listing all the journeys and strange adventures that have transpired over the past 12 months. For a lucky soul such as myself, who has had the good fortune to traipse all over the planet, that means selecting the best of a long list of wonderful trips. That’s impossible, so I resort to the old trick of thinking of the first image that comes to mind, and that strange image is of a foghorn booming throughout the night then waking in the morning to the whoosh of humpback whales breaching below my bedroom window. Of all the strange and exotic destinations I’ve experienced this year, nothing comes close to the days I spent stumbling around in the hallucinogenic atmosphere of Querpon Island (pronounced as in “harpoon”), a rocky islet found off the northernmost tip of the remote Newfoundland shore. Here, the intrepid traveller finds himself sleeping in a converted lighthouse lost in a sea of deep fog while booming waves washing all the way from Greenland bash upon the steep cliffs and the entire ancient wooden structure rocks in the wind like a child’s

It’s a long boat ride through open ocean or a five-mile slog through bog to reach photo Michael McCarthy the lighthouse on Querpon Island. cradle. There’s no place like it in the world. The staff at the Querpon Island Lighthouse B&B spiced up the dinner tale every night with ribald Newfie humour. The jazz scene in the French Quarter of New Orleans ranks high on any list, as

does the mystic glory of Gwaii Haanas National Park in northern British Columbia. The crocodile-infested swamps of Louisiana were almost as fascinating as the rocky outport villages of Labrador, and what can compare to the rolling green vineyards of

Washington County of Oregon? Sadly the memories of the monastery in Nepal were tarnished by a bacterial infection, and the riotous food cart scene of Portland only served to remind me how far Vancouver has to go to catch up to our sister city in the culinary department. As any ride on the Star Ferry at sunset shows, Hong Kong remains one of the most interesting and scenic cities anywhere, and my explorations of the farms and dairies of the Fraser Valley revealed that home really is where the heart is. But Querpon, like a harpoon, stabs you in the heart. First there is the long boat ride through the open ocean wondering if the seas are too rough to land at the cove, the alternative being a five-mile slog through bog and tundra carrying one’s luggage. Then awakening to a crystal blue sky with puffy white clouds racing across a robin’s egg sky while dozens of humpbacks cavort offshore. Or kayaking in the open ocean in search of icebergs, or wandering around the island picking wildflowers while watching storm petrels hover in the thermals, and then the raucous laughter of saucy Newfie humour spicing up the dinner tale as darkness falls like a cloak? It’s not just the exoticism of the destination or the strangeness of a different culture that ends up so fascinating. Continued next page


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

travel

Madonna Roberts, Mariah Young and Doris Roberts at the Querpon Island Lighthouse spiced up the dinner table every night with raucous Newfoundland humour. photo Michael McCarthy

Newfoundland’s ‘sense of place’ strong

Continued from page 21 No, it’s more of a “sense of place” that grabs one by the throat, and no place seems truer to itself than Newfoundland, and no place on that rocky island sums up the Rock like a working lighthouse, with its heartbreaking cry of mournful warning. “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do,” wrote Mark Twain. “So throw off the bowlines, sail away

from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” Travel, then, to places like Querpon whenever you get the chance. Savour the wind upon your cheek and the smell of brine in the air. Life is short and when you get to your destination the journey will be over. There is never “next year.” There is only now. For more Michael McCarthy travel stories, log on to www.i-traveler.info.


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

For youth living on the streets, there is no home for the

community briefs Entrepreneur talk

Join Anthony Ariganello, president and CEO of CGA-Canada and Eamonn Siggins, chief executive of CPA Ireland, for a presentation on issues facing entrepreneurs today. It’s aimed at helping entrepreneurs succeed in the volatile economy. The event starts at 11:45 a.m. at the Sheraton Wall Centre, Nov 25. See boardoftrade.com for more information.

Black is back

West Point Grey United Church at 4595 West Eighth Ave. hosts an author luncheon, reading, and book signing with award-winning author and radio and TV personality Arthur Black, at 11 a.m., Nov. 25. Black reads from his new book, A Chip Off the Old Black. Registration is required. For more information call 604-224-4388.

Chinese Art lecture

The Centre for Chinese Research, Institute of Asian Research, at UBC presents a talk by renowned British Museum curator of Chinese Art Carol Michaelson from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Nov. 23. Michaelson’s visit was made possible by a donation from the Rosalie Stronck Family Foundation, the Department of Anthropology and the Centre for Chinese Research, IAR, at UBC. The event is in room 120 in the C.K. Choi Building, Institute of Asian Research, 1855 West Mall, UBC.

Magee 50th Reunion

Magee High School Class of 1961 celebrates its 50th reunion May 14th, 2011. Is 1961 the year you graduated or do you know someone who did? For more information email carlsongrid@shaw.ca or call Nicky at 604-536-1173.

World AIDS Day concert

holidays...

The Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation presents the third annual Voices of Hope concert in celebration of World AIDS Day. The Vancouver Men’s Chorus, Will Blunderfield, Linda Lee Thomas, Kunaka Marimba and The North Shore Celtic Ensemble perform at the event at 7 p.m., Nov. 30, at Christ Church Cathedral, 690 Burrard St. See cathedral.vancouver.bc.ca for more information. Admission is by donation. Call 604-331-3452 or email events@drpeter.org.

Vancouver’s problem with homelessness is at an all time high, with many of those with no home of their own being under the age of 24. At the Courier, we decided to provide an opportunity to our readers to give a little cheer and kindness to the youth on our streets this holiday season.

Here’s how you can help: When out shopping for those stocking stuffers this holiday season, see what’s on special and grab an extra something on top of your usual purchase. Please note that we ask all items we collecting to be NEW (please, no used goods at this time)!

Aberthau lighting

The annual holiday lighting of Aberthau, the West Point Grey Community Centre, takes place Nov. 24 from 6 to 8 p.m. The free event, one of West Point Grey community’s most anticipated seasonal traditions, will include a children’s entertainer, holiday songs, hot chocolate and cookies for the kids and children’s crafts. Members of city council, and the park board will be in attendance. West Point Grey Community Centre is located at Aberthau Mansion, an old English Tudor style heritage building just off of Locarno Beach at 4397 West Second Ave.

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Suggested gifts include:

Socks, underwear, mittens, gloves, scarfs, toques, boots, jackets, blankets or sleeping bags, toothpaste, toothbrushes, dental floss, deodorant, soap etc... Transit tickets, grocery vouchers or restaurant/fast-food/coffee shop gift certificates Directions to Youth Services centre, operated by Family Services of Greater Vancouver is our partner in this endeavour, and will distribute the goods to youth who are homeless or living in atrisk situations. Anything you can give will help make the holidays a little easier for the youth on our streets.

Fashion for orphans

St. Vartan Armenian Apostolic Church holds its annual fashion fundraising auction for orphanages in Armenia Nov. 27 at 7 p.m. Fashion accessories will be available through a silent auction. Admission is free with complimentary snacks, coffee and tea. More than 165 items are available including hats, jewelry, scarves, shawls, belts, purses and shoes. Proceeds go to the orphanages in Armenia via Children’s Fund for Armenia. St. Vartan is at 1260 West 67th Ave. between Oak & Granville in Marpole. Call 604-261-7411 for information.

Thank you for your support!

Happy Holidays!

Simply drop your items off in the big box situated in the Courier lobby at 1574 West 6th Ave., near Fir St. by Friday, December 17th. Hours are Mon-Fri, 8:30 am to 4:30pm.

games comics quizzes puzzles get caught in our web…

v a n c o u r i e r. c o m

COOK UP DINNER WITH A SIDE OF ENERGY SAVINGS When you cook delicious meals, you can still get the most out of all your flavours, while trying to use the least amount of energy. In fact, whether it’s at our home, at our business, or even when commuting in between those two, we’re keen conservationists. That’s why we joined Team Power Smart and we invite you to do the same. It’s easy to do our part. Plus most of all, it’s amazing how all the small changes we make… really add up. From our kitchen to yours, we hope you enjoy this recipe from our new cookbook—and discover how tasty conserving energy can be!

REMEMBER TO ADD A DASH OF ENERGY SAVINGS! Try reducing the number of times and length of time you open the fridge door. And keep your fridge or freezer away from heat sources such as a radiators, heating vents, washers, dryers or furnaces so they don’t need to work as hard.

COCONUT CURRY FOR ANY DAY AND ANY DISH Serves 6 / Prep and Cooking time: 30 minutes to soak saffron + 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS ½ tsp saffron (optional) ¼ cup very hot water (optional) ¹⁄ ³ cup cooking oil

5 cups coconut milk

2 Tbsp finely chopped garlic (6 medium cloves)

2 cups stock (chicken or vegetable)

1 tsp turmeric

½ cup chopped cilantro (optional)

1 Tbsp cumin seeds or black mustard seeds

1 ½ tsp salt

½ tsp asafoetida (optional)

2 tsp paprika (optional)

1 tsp ground cayenne pepper

COOKING METHOD

Vikram Vij and Meeru Dhalwala Team Power Smart Members and Owners of Vij’s Restaurant, Vancouver, BC

and Vikram) or over salted steamed kale (Meeru). Place saffron threads in a small bowl. Add water and soak for 30 minutes. Set aside. In a medium pot, heat oil on medium-high for 45 seconds. Add cumin (or mustard) seeds. Allow cumin seeds to sizzle for 30 seconds (or wait 1 to 2 minutes for mustard seeds to start popping). Sprinkle in

asafoetida, stir, then immediately add garlic and sauté for 2 minutes. Add turmeric, salt, cayenne and paprika and sauté for 1 minute. Stir in coconut milk and stock. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Cover, decrease the heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove the lid and stir in saffron and its water. Stir in cilantro and serve immediately.

From the book Vij’s at Home—Relax, Honey: The Warmth and Ease of Indian Cooking © 2010, by Meeru Dhalwala and Vikram Vij. Published by Douglas and McIntyre an imprint of D&M Publishers Inc. Photographs by John Sherlock. Reprinted with permission of the publisher.

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You can make this very simple and quick curry and pour it over rice, meats, seafood or plain vegetables. Although the concept of this curry isn’t very Indian—we don’t really pour curry over other foods—it does add either a mild taste to an already spicy dish or a mild Indian flavour to a non-Indian dish. We like it over simple boiled potatoes with skins (Nanaki, Shanik


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

health

Focusing the mind initially challenging

Meditation need not always begin in a temple or garden davidicuswong

I learned to meditate in the most unlikely of places. In the bathroom I shared with my older brother, I would find the most interesting reading material. It was there that I became fascinated with the human mind thanks to his Psych 101 textbook. For several months, he left a book on meditation. So that’s where I began

my journey to master my mind and my emotions— not in a temple, a Zen garden or an ashram, but in the cold green-tiled bathroom of our basement. I learned that I could find refuge from the anxieties of my teens and learn to tame the torrent of difficult emotions without drugs or alcohol. I learned that though I had no con-

trol over most of the circumstances of my life, I could choose how I would react to them. I learned that real peace cannot be found lying in the sun on a faraway beach and real happiness is not a future time when everything is perfect. Meditation is challenging to define as it encompasses differing practices

among many cultures throughout history. It is used by many to manage stress and anxiety. It is used by others as a spiritual discipline to find meaning in their lives. It can be a mental or spiritual practice in which the practitioner intentionally focuses attention on either an object, an image or an idea. In such concentration meditation, the attention may be centred on the portrait of a saint or guru, an image in one’s mind’s eye or on an idea, such as peace, happiness or light.

THE OPPOSITE OF MINDFULNESS IS MINDLESSNESS, IN WHICH OUR MONKEY MINDS JUMP FROM ONE THOUGHT TO ANOTHER, FROM THE PAST TO THE FUTURE, AND FROM EMOTION TO EMOTION.

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Alternatively, as in the case of mindfulness meditation, the focus of concentration is the authentic observations, thoughts and feelings that enter one’s awareness in the present moment. With diligent practice, mindfulness can give depth, breadth and meaning to the moments of each day, and with experience, one can live more deliberately. So what is the value of meditation, and how is this different from our

usual mental states? After all, aren’t we already in control of our thoughts and our actions? If you think you are, meditate a moment on that question. The opposite of mindfulness is mindlessness, in which our monkey minds jump from one thought to another, from the past to the future, and from emotion to emotion. Your usual mental state may be reactive—reacting to the urgency of the moment, unresolved sadness or anger about the past, or anxiety about the future. When you first attempt to focus your attention on a single object, you discover how cluttered your consciousness is—with stray thoughts darting in and out of your awareness. With time and practice, you will master your attention and awareness. You will reflect on your own thoughts, yet realize you are more than just your thoughts. You will become aware of your emotional states, master them and not be washed away with them, knowing that you are more than your emotions. You will experience the sensations, pleasure and pain of being alive yet not be overwhelmed by them for you are more than your body. Through meditation you may find the peace and stillness you seek, and through meditation you may discover the meaning and joy in your life. Dr. Davidicus Wong is a physician at PrimeCare Medical. His column appears regularly in this paper and his internet radio show, Positive Potential Medicine can be heard on pwrnradio.com. Next week: Beginning Meditation.

Seniors and the medical system

The talk, A Bitter Pill: How the Medical System is Failing the Elderly, takes place Nov. 26, from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Dr. John Sloan, senior academic physician in the Department of Family Practice at UBC, feels that medical treatment of the elderly as it’s now delivered is often harmful. He discusses how treatment must change, the dangers of hospitals and over-medication, the impact on healthcare funding and quality of life. Johanna Trimble, a patient advocate for the elderly will discuss adverse drug reactions, researching drugs and engaging with health care professionals from her own family’s experience. The talk takes place at 1055 W. Broadway, 2nd floor. Tickets for adults are $20, seniors $10. Pre-register, seating is limited. Call 604-253-3412 for more information or email johanna@daletrimble.com.


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

Rain douses purist roadie principles

Fenders are uncool, but necessary On a beautiful summer day it’s tempting to ride my bike naked; on a rainy and gloomy day it is tempting to simply not ride it at all. Like anything in life, if it rhymes with suspenders it’s a sure bet that whatever it is, is on the not-cool spectrum somewhere between Velcro shoes and picking your nose. Unfortunately for me, and many other cyclists with a bit of an ego, fenders happens to rhyme with suspenders. Fenders are corny. Just the word fender itself rolls through the jowls with such a lame undertone that it’s no wonder my pride was damaged when it came time to attach them to my bicycle. I wish I could say that I’d rather have muck up my backside from my rear tire and goop all over my face from my front tire than have the sexy lines of my bike destroyed by a set of fenders, but I can’t. Given where we live, the reality is if I want to keep putting kilometres on my bicycle during the rainy season I’m going to have to swallow my pride and loosen up on my

jeffreyhansen-carlson purist roadie principles. Soggy toes, freezing fingers, and gritty road grime combine to pull the rug out from underneath my motivation to ride in the rain. But, the romance I have with my bikes, and the sport itself, is passionate enough to counteract the season-induced weakening of my cycling mojo. I clip on the goofy fenders. I slip on the embarrassing booties. I cover my flashy jersey with a boring rain jacket. I swap cycling shorts for a fulllength bib. I’m begrudgingly ready to ride in the rain. Of course, the moment I begin pedalling things change a little bit. I settle into a zone where all that matters is the

power I’m delivering to the pavement, my legs’ cadence, and my forward speed. It’s in that moment I forget how ridiculous I look. The fenders are great at keeping water from spraying all over. The booties are definitely keeping my feet dry and warm. The rain jacket is living up to its name. And my fulllength cycling bib is doing its job, too. All of the pieces of the puzzle have come together to make this bike ride in the rain enjoyable. The cup of coffee I sip while winding down from a few hours of cycling in the rain seems to always be as satisfying as the post-ride beer I’d indulge in on a scorching summer day. The coffee warms me up. Beer cools me down. I must keep myself thinking positively about the rain because there are at least a few more months of it to come before cycling season is back in full swing. The rain waters the fields that grow the barley that produce the beer that I can’t wait to drink after my summertime rides. jeffreyhansencarlson@gmail.com

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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ing family in Ohio, Jenie and her son Skyler visited the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, which has a mission to “educate visitors, fans and scholars from around the world about the history and continuing significance of rock and roll music.”

Beat the BEST ODDS EVER! Become a corporate member of The Vancouver Board of Trade during November or December 2010 and be entered into the prize draw of the year for NEW MEMBERS ONLY. Plus call today and save on amazing MEMBERS’ FESTIVE DEALS. Contact us at 604-640-5460 or info@boardoftrade.com EXCLUSIVE NEW MEMBERS DRAW Join The Vancouver Board of Trade NovemberDecember 2010 and be entered to win:

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Include the Vancouver Courier in your next vacation or exotic adventure and send a photo (200 dpi or larger) of yourself and/or travel companion displaying an edition of the Courier, along with a brief description of your trip, your name and contact information to fhughes@vancourier.com

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Master of Ceremonies: Red Robinson On Sunday, December 5th 2010 at the Arts Club’s Granville Island Stage, over twenty-five international artists will come together to perform in a variety show benefiting the Zajac Ranch for Children. Along with an evening-long silent auction, this event will raise funds for The Zajac Ranch for Children, a one-of-a-kind camp for children with chronic and serious illnesses and disabilities who would otherwise not have an opportunity to attend camp.

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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travel

Otherwordly landscape of buttes and mesas outshines Sin City

American Southwest delivers on visual wonders

Cheryl Rossi Staff writer

A woman barely clad in beads and shells whirled her body to frenzied tribal beats. Two topless young women slithered over one another in a giant glass bowl. An Audrey Hepburn look-alike balanced horizontal to the stage, one hand on her partner’s forehead, and a little man wrapped in white ribbons flew through the air with great ease. Such were fleeting highlights of Cirque du Soleil’s Zumanity at the New York-New York Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The provocative cabaret-style show is less death defying than Cirque’s Kooza, and more suited to recharging sexual engines. Perhaps the most refreshing aspect of the show was the plethora of natural breasts on topless talents, a stark contrast to those juggling for attention in casinos and along the strip in a city that needlessly has a Hooters. But it wasn’t nudity, gambling or lights that brought my husband and me to Vegas. The fountain-rich glitz in the middle of a desert was a mere gateway to the natural wonders that lie to its east in Utah and Arizona. The 1991 film Thelma & Louise inspired me to visit the otherworldly

Dead Horse Point in Utah surpassed expectations in the eyephoto Cheryl Rossi popping department of beautiful vistas. landscape of buttes and mesas the pair cruised through, and the reality didn’t disappoint. Near Page, Ariz., we took in Horseshoe Bend, where you stand on an abrupt ridge and see a river curve around a rock outcrop. Red rocks worn to resemble giant wafers, green water far below and blue sky had us

dashing around snapping photos under the blazing July sun. Next stop was the spectacular Antelope Canyon where shafts of light filter into the slot canyon, higher than it is wide, to pick up marbled patterns of coral, terracotta and plum. If only our guide hadn’t used her laser pointer to outline shapes

such as hearts and George Washington’s head that apparently could be discerned among the flash floodworn sandstone (you can only access the upper canyon with a guide), we could have peacefully marvelled at the dramatic hues and contours. Friends advised us to skip the Grand Canyon, but I’m glad we ignored them. We arrived at the less touristy North Rim at sunset and were gobsmacked by its awesome scale, resolving to visit again. Red earth, sandstone mesas (flat topped mounts) and buttes, archetypal landscapes of the Wild West, drew us to Monument Valley, which, like Antelope Canyon, is on Navajo land. We braved twisting, potholed dirt roads to shoot colossal red rock formations that glowed in the evening’s dying light. Moab, Utah, is a great base for visiting Canyonlands and Arches national parks and Dead Horse Point State Park, where Thelma and Louise soared off the cliff. The 1,365 square kilometre Canyonlands park has three distinct sections. We only visited Island in the Sky, where a jagged 1,500 foot-deep crater of green tinged white salt is ringed by a sea of red sandstone at Upheaval Dome.

We worried Dead Horse Point would be disappointing after the larger Canyonlands, but it was even more scenic, with stepped cliffs stretching to the horizon and a double rainbow after a brief but intense rainstorm. Fitting in a drive around Arches in the same day was too much. Early the next morning, the weird and wonderful red rock formations that include an egg-shaped boulder that appears precariously balanced atop a tall tower and, of course, the naturally hewn windows, were worth rising for. Looping back toward Vegas, we traversed Capital Reef National Park, with its steep red cliffs and petroglyphs. The touristy Bryce Canyon was worth a quick visit for the countless coral-hued pinnacles or hoodoos, but we ditched a planned second night to spend one in the more tastefully touristic Springdale, Utah, near Zion National Park, where we missed snapping 17 mountain goats perched on a small, sheer cliff. We plan to return to the American Southwest, where nature’s bounty is a million times more spellbinding than fake gondolas, a dark-glassed pyramid and slot machines. Go. crossi@vancourier.com

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EW30

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

electronics

32”

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2HDMI inputs

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after savings

Aveis 19”LCD TV DVD LD19AP3 / 755086

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22999

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after savings

34999

Vtech digital phone CS5121 /838251

Quantities may vary in store.

after savings

Aveis 32”LCD TV

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select models

PERSONAL AUDIO ACCESSORIES

save

50%

up to

off original retails

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STEREOS & CLOCK RADIOS

save

25

up to

%

off original retails

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AUDIO VIDEO ACCESSORIES

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50

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after savings

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off original retails

NO TAX

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on selected heaters and o humidifiers

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toys

Farberware Affiniti 10 pc cookware set

PC® Stainless steel roaster

7499

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619906

737404

after savings

after savings

select Play-Doh items

save

SATURDAY

40%

up to

NOV 20

✦No returns accepted or rain checks issued for taxable items during this promotion. We reserve the right to limit purchases to reasonable family requirements. Offer only valid at participating stores. Cannot be combined with any other promotional offers. Does not apply to prior purchases. EXCLUDES ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, PRESCRIPTIONS, DRY CLEANING, GAS BAR, LOTTERY, POSTAL SERVICES OR PRODUCTS FROM THIRD PARTY BUSINESSES WITHIN OUR STORES.

50%

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WE PAY THE HST

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select Maisto diecast

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%

President’s Choice Financial MasterCard

Prices are in effect only Saturday, November 20, 2010 or while stock lasts.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some items may have ‘plus deposit and/or environmental charge’ where applicable.

is provided by

President’s Choice Bank

*PRICE MATCH. We determine a major competitor based on our assessment of a number of relevant factors that may vary by region. “Items you buy most” refers to our top selling products. We check competitor pricing on the majority of items you buy most on a weekly basis; and in all cases, no less than quarterly. We may not match a competitor’s short term promotional pricing activities(ie. one day sales or ‘door crashers’) or other promotional pricing activities such as ‘2 for 1’ or ‘buy 1 get 1 free’. We do not Price Match all items at all times; where we have Price Matched an item, it will be identified in-store. This is not a price match guarantee where we match any competitor price you find. PRICE CUT. Longer term price reductions on items identified in-store. “Items that matter most to you” refers to our top selling products. WEEKLY SPECIAL. Typically in effect from Friday to Thursday of each week on items identified in-store and/or in flyer.


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW31

NOV/2010

Flu Season

Eye on Health

Give it a shot in the arm

Get rid of the irritation

your guide to healthy living in vancouver

Weight for Winter Does a decrease in sunlight cause an increase in obesity?

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For more information, contact Suzanna, VGH, at (604) 875–4203, FowlersStudy@gmail.com

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EW32

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Foods for healthy skin BY CR ISTINA SU TT ER , R EGIST ER ED DIETITI AN

It is common sense that a healthy, balanced diet is good for overall skin health, but there is a lack of scientific evidence to show that certain foods specifically prevent wrinkles, acne or other skin problems.

It is more likely that in our busy lives surrounded by fast food, caffeine and sugary treats, we lack the basic vitamins and minerals that help to protect our skin cells. Here are the top foods for healthy skin:

Berries, broccoli and beans:

To keep your skin healthy, you should load up on these antioxidant rich fruits and vegetables. Antioxidants can protect your skin from the inside out, by neutralizing damaging free radicals, which harm your skin cells and are believed to contribute to wrinkling and sagging. Though they are naturally good for you, taking antioxidant supplements can be harmful. A balanced diet is all you need to fulfill your body’s quota for antioxidants.

Salmon, sardines and flax seeds:

Rich in omega-3, the essential fatty acid, which is believed to help skin retain moisture and reduce the appearance of wrinkles. Cristina Sutter is a registered dietitian at Satori Integrated Health Centre in Steveston. She has 10 years experience providing nutrition and exercise counseling and seminars. She has a Bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from Simon Fraser University and worked as a personal trainer before earning her Masters degree in Nutrition at the University of Toronto.

Carrots, kale and spinach:

These vitamin A rich foods helps repairs damaged skin cells and resists the bacterial growth that leads to acne.

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Citrus fruits, tomatoes and peppers:

Packed with vitamin C, these foods can help prevent some DNA damage from the sun, which leads to early signs of aging.

Almonds, avocados and soybean oil:

These “good fats” are rich in Vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant believed to help keep skin firm.

Brazil nuts, tuna and garlic:

Rich in the trace mineral Selenium, these foods also have antioxidant properties.

One skin condition to be aware of: Eczema in babies and children may be linked to certain food sensitivities. Some cases of eczema may improve by avoiding foods to which there is a known sensitivity. Common foods that can cause problems include milk products, nuts, and shellfish, but a doctor or naturopath can pinpoint your child’s specific food sensitivities. Once the problem foods have been identified, it is important to see a registered dietitian to ensure your child is still getting all their nutrients from a balanced diet.

Ask the Dentists!

by Drs Clease and Willoughby

MOVEMBER 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer Q: I’ve been reading a lot recently, in advertisements and in the news, about oral health being related to overall health. This month is prostate cancer awareness month. Has there been any connection reported between gum disease and cancers? Answer: Gum disease has been linked to a number of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, arthritis, lung infections, prostatitis, kidney disease and others. There have been many studies connecting gum disease with increased incidence of various cancers. According to a recent British study published in Lancet Oncology, participants with a history of periodontal disease (gum disease) had a 14% increased risk of cancer compared with subject who did not have the disease. Dr. Michaud and colleagues found significant associations between a history of periodontal disease and several cancers, including: • A 36% increase in risk of lung cancer • A 49% increase in the risk of kidney cancer • A 54% increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer • And a 30% increase in the risk of hematologic cancers, including nonHodgkin’s lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma

– Leo Buscaglia

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In an earlier study, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute found that periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of cancer of the pancreas. The study appeared in the January 17,

2007 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The results showed that, after adjusting for age, smoking, diabetes, body mass index and a number of other factors, men with periodontal disease had a 63% higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to those reporting no periodontal disease. The most convincing finding was that “never-smokers had a two-fold increase in risk of pancreatic cancer”. This being Movember, we want to focus in on the research about prostate health and gingivitis, conducted by dentists at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine. The study, published in the Journal of Periodontology, compared levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) —an indicator of prostate disease— with the clinical attachment level (CAL) of the teeth and gums and teeth— indicating possible gum disease. Granted, prostatitis only affects a portion of the male population, and the research doesn’t try to claim that gum disease causes prostate disease, but this study is another example of how your dental health will affect your overall health. It can worsen other health conditions, lower your immunity, and of course, cause bad breath and a smattering of other dental problems. Should you have further questions please call Drs’ Clease and Willoughby at the Vancouver Dental Spa, #1801-805 West Broadway, Vancouver Phone: 604-879-7366 www.vancouverdentalspa.com


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW33

Don’t let the darkness get you down BY C AIT L I N D OW L I N G , CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Could falling back be making us fat?

A British professor seems to think so. Mayer Hillman, the senior fellow emeritus at the University of Westminster in London, has written an essay in the British Medical Journal claiming that losing an hour of daylight each fall could be contributing to obesity and illness levels in the U.K. and abroad. Hillman discusses the lack of exercise in the U.K. as the main factor in the country’s rising obesity levels, and notes that an extra hour of darkness in the evenings makes people even less likely to go outside and be active. “It’s an interesting hypothesis, but I don’t think we have any evidence from rigorous research to back that up,” says Dr. James Lu, the acting Medical Officer for the North Shore. Lu notes that a lack of daylight can bring about a slump in the psyche, often leading to a mood disorder, which affects a substantial amount of Canadians every year, Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.). “Seasonal Affective Disorder ... is influenced by the ability of the person who is affected by it to have enough exposure to sunlight or UV light, or light in general.” Lu suggests that our location in the

northern hemisphere is the main issue for local sufferers. Because the difference in the length of daylight between winter and summer days is so pronounced due to our latitudinal whereabouts, that the effects of S.A.D. are increased. Among the symptoms of S.A.D. is a craving for carbohydrates, or “comfort foods,” which can lead to weight gain. Lu feels that a direct link between the clocks going back in fall and obesity is rather tenuous, but considers that this possibility should be of interest to researchers and warrants further examination. One recommended treatment for S.A.D. is light therapy, using fluorescent lamps to replicate the additional hours of daylight in the summer months. Alternatively, one effective remedy for both is already programmed into us. “Going back to how we’re built and what we’re meant to be as a human living being – we’re meant to be moving,” says Lu. When we are depressed, we go against our natural tendencies to be active. By getting the motivation to up our levels of fitness, we can stave off the blues and any unwanted pounds. The key is to be prepared for the oncom-

ing time and weather fluctuation, says Lu. “Seasons change and we do need to adjust in terms of physical activity.” Lu recommends braving the winter chill and getting active outside. “You could still go for a walk or run in the winter in Vancouver, you may need to adjust to the rain or dress appropriately.” At this time of year, raking leaves is a great way to stay in shape, he says. Later on during the winter, shoveling snow is marvelous for the cardiovascular system. Lu recommends making small changes to your daily routine that can be kept up throughout the year, such as taking the stairs instead of the elevators at work. So despite the extra hour of darkness brought about by turning back the clocks, we can still make the most of our rainy, dark winter months. Get up to the mountains, strap on your skis, snowboards or snowshoes, or get to a fun dance class at your local gym. Get motivated and feel better all year round.

Winter Exercise ideas: OUTSIDE

Add lights to your running gear to exercise more safely outdoors. Lights that can be fastened to your belt, bag or buttonholes are available at MEC from $3.75. See why the grey winters here are an inspiration to so many. Admire the scenery and enjoy the snow. Grouse Mountain is easily accessible by car and transit and offers many different activities, including skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and ice skating.

INSIDE

Look into the inexpensive and fun fitness programs at your local community centres. Why not try a class, or enjoy a dip at your local swimming pool. Visit one of the wide varieties of yoga classes for beginners to advanced yogis and feel your spirits rise.

Give a Gift and Receive a Gift! Buy a $50 Gift Certificate and Receive a $10 Gift Certificate Yourself! This holiday season give and receive the gift of health and wellness. Vancouver Park Board gift certificates are accepted at all Park Board pools, rinks, fitness centres, golf courses, and attractions. Buy a $50 gift certificate from November 23rd to December 25th and receive a $10 gift certificate for your own use!

Home for the Holidays? Check out our special holiday public swim and skate hours and drop-in for some festive, fun activity. Or, drop-in to our fitness centres for the same, low price. View our schedules online at vancouverparks.ca!

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EW34

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Committed to....... · Building relationships with families · Promoting good oral health and well being · Providing quality preventative and restorative services · Creating a caring environment and a positive experience Dr. Anita Gartner Certified Specialist in Pediatric Dentistry

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Walk in for

BC Cancer Agency

Community Cancer Forum A free public forum for all members of the community Sponsored by the Provincial Health Services Authority

Presenting sponsor:

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When a loved one has cancer, family and friends become partners on a journey through care and treatment. Cancer patients, supporters and caregivers are invited to learn how to better navigate this journey at the BC Cancer Agency’s Community Cancer Forum. Learn about brain-fog, nutrition, moving forward after treatment, empowering the mind, body and spirit, and complementary therapies, and visit displays from the BC Cancer Agency and its community partners.

Don’t tear up:

Prescription drops can help with allergies

There needn’t be dry eyes in the house come allergy season.

eye and provide cool relief for itchy eyes. Be careful, though, as some eye drops can damage certain contact lenses. Check with your optometrist on what will work best. For those seeking oldfashioned means, a cold and wet facecloth can also reduce itching and swelling.

British Columbians who suffer allergies are able to get fast, effective, prescriptive treatment from their optometrists who have new prescription powers. Last year, the B.C. government expanded the scope of practice to allow The B.C. Association of optometrists to prescribe Optometrists offers the foleye drops — which Lower Mainland practitioner Dr. lowing tips for fall/winter Gurpreet Leekha said allergy sufferers: can work well with other • Identify and avoid those allergens. The best treatments. Dr. Gurpreet Leekha of Tri-City Optometry. way to reduce allergy “The usual culprits for PHOTO: Paul vanPeenen fall/winter allergies are suffering is to identify what ragweed pollen and leaf mould,” the B.C. triggers your reaction and limit your exposure. Association of Optometrists members said. In addition to ragweed pollen and leaf mold, “Drops provide relief for a host of allergy other common triggers include dust, mold, symptoms from irritated, watery and red eyes animal dander and, in spring, tree and grass to puffy eyelids, itching, mucous discharge pollen. • If you wear contact lenses, switch to daily and contact lens discomfort.” Prescription eye drops can be used to pre- disposables or wear your glasses. Pollen and treat allergies, for acute phases of itching dust can stick to the surface of your contact or for extended use during allergy season lenses and keep you in close contact with the so contact lenses can continue to be worn allergens. Disposable contacts ensure you start with a clean, fresh pair every day. Switching to comfortably. Leekha says patients should keep in mind glasses can reduce your exposure, deflecting that allergy relief can come in many forms, wind that could be carrying irritants. • Wash your hands frequently. Irritants and seeing an optometrist just before or during allergy season is one way to remain don’t just float in the air, they settle on any number of outdoor surfaces you touch. If symptom-free. The first thing allergy sufferers should do you’re susceptible to allergies, chances are is ensure they have the correct diagnosis. you may rub your eyes and aggravate the Diseases like pink eye or other conditions inflammation. So, wash up and try not to rub your eyes. that affect vision should be ruled out. Some people also “pre-treat” their allergies • Clear the air. Invest in air filters for your by taking oral medications or using anti- air conditioner, humidifier or dehumidifier. allergy eye drops a week or two before Don’t forget to regularly change or clean them. symptoms habitually begin, as a way of Have your home’s air ducts professionally reducing the intensity or duration of reactions. cleaned. Antihistamines and decongestants can also • Close the windows and stay inside. Those who experience severe reactions may choose provide relief often without a prescription. Saline drops, artificial tears and wetting to stay indoors when pollen and mould counts solutions can help remove irritants from the are high.

Accepting New Patients Dr. Feroozan Ghohari and Dr. Mandy MacIvor are accepting new patients to their family practice

Saturday, November 27, 2010 9:30 am to 3:30 pm

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW35

Eucalyptus: natural-source cough and cold remedy fEvery year, Canadians spend more

than $300 million on over-the-counter cold remedies. Many adults will have at least one or two colds a year, and most children will have five to eight, according to News Canada research.

While there is no cure for the common cold or the flu, certain natural-source ingredients, such as eucalyptus, can relieve the symptoms and reduce the discomfort related to these ailments. f

y

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The eucalyptus plant, native to Australia and Tasmania, has long been used for its medicinal properties. The essential oils extracted from leaves which are both persistent and tough, are often used in western medicines to treat respiratory tract infections and disorders; one of the uses is to treat nasal congestion and sinus pain.

Ease Chest Congestion and Cough with Eucalyptus Steam

Suffering from chest congestion and cough? Here is an easy way to help alleviate that irritating and uncomfortable chest congestion and cough brought on by a cold or flu virus. (Note, this is not recommended for asthma sufferers.)

You’ll Need:

• boiling pot • water • Eucalyptus Essential Oil • towel (optional)

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Method:

1. Chest congestion and cough can be eased with the use of eucalyptus infused steam. To achieve this you can simply boil a large pan of water on the stove until it comes to a rolling boil. Then turn off the burner or turn it way down to prevent splattering. 2. Immediately add several drops (approx. 12-15) of authentic eucalyptus essential oil to the boiling water (this can be done during boiling as well) - this will work with the steam to help clear chest congestion and cough. - Be careful it can be potent so just a few drops are needed.

3. Remove pot from stove; place on counter with trivet underneath. Drape a light towel over your head as you are slightly bent over the steaming water to get a more direct dose. This is recommended for those whose chest congestion and cough are deeper. 4. Stand over the steaming pot - being careful to not get too close - and breathe in the steam vapours. This will help to loosen phlegm; you may experience a momentary increase in coughing as your body tries to get rid of it, but by doing this for several minutes and repeating only as needed, you can reduce your chest congestion and cough.

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EW36

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Dr. Daisy Tang, DENTIST

4210 Dunbar St., Vancouver

733-1616

Flu prevention a wise step

• • • • • • •

preventive dentistry, laser gum treatment restorative (biocompatible non mercury fillings) cosmetic (laser bleaching, veneers, etc.) crown and bridge orthodontic Open Saturdays new patients always welcome

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Flu is a highly contagious viral infection of the nose, throat and lungs. It is one of the most severe illnesses of the winter season. Typical flu symptoms include abrupt high fever, chills, a dry cough, headache, runny nose, sore throat, and muscle and joint pain. Flu can be severe, lasting one to two weeks with residual effects up to one month. Flu is spread easily from person to person through the air e.g. coughs or sneezes. Yearly immunization is the single, most effective means of preventing flu.

Flu stats:

• Flu vaccine is 70 to 90 per cent effective in preventing flu. Vaccine is given in the fall/winter (October through March) - for protection during the “flu season”.

CALL TODAY! Hastings Denture Clinic (604)255-9433 Free Consultation

2609 E. Hastings St. Vancouver (at Penticton St.)

“Quality work you can count on”

The Health and Home CARE Society of B.C. (www.carebc.ca) is a founding branch of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON) BC, and is heads above the rest when it comes to flu season awareness. Follow their sage advice:

Ken Wong, Denturist

• Most people have little or no reaction to the vaccine. • Flu, if contracted, is usually less severe if vaccination has been done. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends annual flu immunization. Because the flu virus

The Aspirin® 81mg ZoomerShow is Vancouver’s first consumer show and lifestyle expo for age 45-plus, and those who love and care for them. It will be held at the Vancouver Convention Centre, Hall A, on Saturday, Nov. 27 and Sunday, Nov. 28 from 9 am to 5 pm. The ZoomerShow is FREE for CARP members (plus a guest). Regular tickets are $5 in advance online at www.zoomershow.ca, or $12 at the door. Attendees will be treated to the best advice, inspiration and solutions on positive aging from over 180 exhibitors in categories including Zoomer Travel, Health & Wellness, Money & Finance, Fitness, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Anti-Aging, Nutrition and much more.

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Has loose Dentures? Cannot enjoy a meal? Has a sore mouth? Has stopped smiling? All of the above

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Roxanne - Patient

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Friedrich H.G. Brumm, D.D., B.A. Susan Leung Denturist Nader Eslami Friedrich Brumm 22yrs expLab Manager Denturist Denturist

WE CAN HELP YOU!

“Being of service to denture wearers over the last 22 years, I have learned to bring care and compassion to my work inAll orderour to make Dentures a difference in the quality of their lives. To me every denture is a "You'll love your Dentures that feature latest tech“Thank youBPS British Columbia for the your confidence inpersonal, choosing creative challenge - a piece of art where formand and funcnology availabe today – Drive a product of highest quality, The Victoria Denture Clinic as superior a recipient of the tion harmonise with the personality and the special requirements Services are Consumer‘s Choiceappearance." Award for Business Excellence in 2008 & 2009.” fit and a most natural of each individual.” TAX FREE! NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS Friedrich H.G. Brumm, B.A., Denturist NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

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CERTIFIED BPS DENTURE CENTRE

FOR YOUR FREE CONSULTATION PLEASE CALL 604-325-1914

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110510

What Patients Say...

Location: 204-3077 Granville St, (between 14th and 15th Ave.) Date: Tuesday, Nov. 30; Time: 8 am to 6 pm Prices: Regular seasonal flu vaccine - $20 per person; Intanza micro-needle flu vaccine (new, less invasive) - $25 per person. Payable by cash, Visa or Mastercard. Register: Contact the nurse manager via email at williamsw@ carebc.ca, or phone 604-733-9177, ext. 111, if you’d like to book an appointment in advance.

Are you a denture wearer who:

*30 Minute Initial Consultation Licensed Naturopathic Physician in B.C. since 1997

2010 Drop-in Clinic

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changes from year to year, it is important to get vaccinated with a new flu shot every year.

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Live online November 13 - November 20

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

EW39

news

Only 10 of 4,000 Squamish people fluent in native tongue

Squamish language takes to the airwaves Caitlin Dowling

Contributing writer By 2025, the last fluent speaker of the Squamish language will likely have passed away. One young woman wants to make sure the language doesn’t die as well. Orene Askew hosts a weekly show on Vancouver’s Co-op Radio. The show, Sne’waylh, literally means “teachings” and the first 15 minutes of every program is a lesson in Squamish language. “I’m really proud of who I am and where I come from, and I’d love to share that with the world,” she says. While her parents don’t speak Squamish, Askew learned it starting in preschool from prominent Squamish teachers. Though she isn’t fluent, she has a familiar grasp, which she imparts to her listeners through a “speak and repeat” lesson. Askew, 27, has been hosting the show since June 2009, after the Vancouver Foundation donated more

Orene Askew hosts a show on Co-op Radio. photo Cindy Goodman than $300,000 to B.C. First Nations causes. The show, which airs Tuesdays from 1 to 2 p.m., features guests from the Squamish and other First Nations bands, and is the first of its kind to bring Squamish community news and events to a larger audience. “During the last [Squamish] band council elections, I had a couple of

candidates on the show, which never gets done,” she says. “In media you see a little blurb about it... but I actually had candidates on [air].” Askew was born and raised on the Mission Reserve in North Vancouver. With an African-American father and a Squamish mother, she has always been acutely aware of her differences. Feeling stifled and unwanted at her schools, Askew didn’t really see a career ahead of her until her mid-20s, when she became the only First Nations student at BCIT’s radio broadcasting program. “I feel like a lot of the (Squamish) youth . . . we have a lot of potential, definitely, I just think a lot of the youth are just scared to show what they can do.” A 2010 report by the First Peoples’ Heritage, Language and Culture Council states that of the nearly 4,000 remaining Squamish Nation people, only 10 are fluent speakers. And they are elders over the age of 65. “It’s so hard to get something back when we’ve lost it,” Askew

says about the importance of her Squamish language lessons. “Once you had something, and then it gets taken away, and then you can’t get it back . . . that is almost impossible.” The Squamish Nation’s culture and language has traditionally been passed down the generations through oral tradition. Askew says that the elders continue to tell the younger generation as much as they can about their history through storytelling. According to the First People’s Council, 100 per cent of B.C.’s First Nations people spoke their language in 1890. In 2010, this number has plunged to only 5.1 per cent. The language and culture of the Squamish was ravaged by the introduction of the residential schools system in the 19th and 20th centuries when children were forcibly removed from their homes to be “assimilated” into Canadian schools. Askew points to Margaret Douglas, an 88-year-old Squamish woman, who was sent to such a school as a 12-year-old child.

Worship inVancouver

NOVEMBER 2010

St. Helen Helen''s

Anglican Church

4405 W. 8th Avenue (Corner of Trimble) 604-224-0212

Sunday Morning Services The Rev. Scott Gould

8:00 am Holy Communion 10:00 am Morning Worship & Sunday School & Nursery

Vespers 7:00 pm Wednesdays - All Are Welcome! -

“She spoke Squamish language, that’s all she spoke. And they basically ripped her out of her home, and it was taken from her.” Askew says the government’s attempts to redress the balance have been too little, too late. The systematic displacement from her family and culture has left Douglas “lost and lonely” her entire adult life. Askew hopes the B.C. government will take more proactive measures to remedy the damage done to Douglas and others like her, such as investing in programs to help aboriginal people rebuild their culture and language. The Report on the Status of B.C. First Nations Languages suggests that even languages on the brink of extinction can be saved with immediate action, such as recording and teaching. This fact is not lost on Askew. “I think as technology is changing... more and more people are getting involved with language programs for the computer.” cdowling@nsnews.com

Christmas Services See our Dec. 3rd and 17th Special Feature Issues. To be included contact

Kaelan at 604-998-1204

Second Church of Christ, Scientist 1900 West 12th Ave. ~ Tel/Fax 604-733-8040

WE'D LOVE TO WELCOME YOU! 10:30 am Sunday 7:30 pm Wednesday Service & Sunday School Testimonial Meeting

Please note temporary locations during renovations until further notice

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SENTINEL RADIO

11:15 am English Service at St. James 9:30 am Cantonese Service at St. James 9:30 am Mandarin Service at Kitsilano Community Centre

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM #103 - 1668 West Broadway • Info 604-733-4310 Mon. - Fri. 10am - 3pm • Sat. 11am - 2pm

St. James Community Square - 3214 West 10th Ave. Kitsilano Community Centre - 2690 Larch Street Church office - #407 - 2150 W. Broadway 604.732.1835 I www.lordsgrace.ca I info@lordsgrace.ca

AM 650 Radio - Sundays at 8:30 AM

FOURTH CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST

KERRISDALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Sundays 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays 7:30 p.m.

Tel. 604 261-1434 • Email: kpc@telus.net Minister Rev. Steve Filyk

2095 W. 43rd Ave., Kerrisdale

2733 West 41st Avenue, Vancouver, BC www.kerrisdalechurch.ca/

Sunday Family Worship: 10:00 am Contemporary Service: 12:30 pm

Childcare provided at all services Tel./Fax: 604-261-7515 Public Reading Room – Same Address Open 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.Tues.,Thurs., Sat. Tel: 604-266-2111

November 21, 2010 The New Atheism: Why bother?

“A thinking church with a warm heart!” Equipped Nursery Church School for ages 2+

to be known

Google: Woman at the Well David Greystone www.knoxunitedvancouver.org


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

2011

stars of vancouver OFFICIAL BALLOT

vote local in the 11th Annual “Best of ” Readers Poll…&

win

east side neighbourhood edition

circle your neighbourhood

Commercial Drive Hastings Street Main Street Collingwood Victoria Drive South Hill Killarney Live theatre company___________________________________ Local cinema__________________________________________ Pub __________________________________________________ Bakery _________________________________________________ Burger house __________________________________________ Cheap eats ___________________________________________ Coffee bar ____________________________________________ Ethnic food _____________________________________________ Fish & Chips ___________________________________________ Haute cuisine __________________________________________ Sushi bar _____________________________________________ College/University __________________________________ Financial institution __________________________________ Health / Fitness Club ________________________________ Private school ______________________________________ Seniors residence ____________________________________ Spa ________________________________________________ U-Brew (Wine or Beer) ________________________________ Video store __________________________________________ Yoga / Pilates ________________________________________

Appliance store _____________________________________ Art Gallery ________________________________________ Bike Shop _________________________________________ Bookstore __________________________________________ Consignment/Vintage _________________________________ Florist ______________________________________________ Furniture store ________________________________________ Gardening centre ______________________________________ Grocery store _______________________________________ Health food store____________________________________ Jewellery store_________________________________________ Kids’ clothing ________________________________________ Kitchenware __________________________________________ Pet store ____________________________________________ Produce store _______________________________________ Shoe store__________________________________________ Shopping mall _______________________________________ Sporting goods______________________________________ Womens’ clothing ____________________________________

Name______________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Postal Code ___________________________ Phone _______________________________________________________

TO BE ENTERED INTO OUR GRAND PRIZE DRAW,

please drop off or mail your ballot to: Readers’ Choice, The Vancouver Courier, 1574 West 6th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2. Ballots must be pages from the newspaper (no photocopies or faxes). Deadline for entries and Grand Prize Draw: December 6, 2010. Winner will be notified by phone. Reader Poll results will be published Friday, January 28, 2011.

It’s time again to make yourself heard! Here’s your chance to share your tried and true favourite places in your neighbourhood. We’ve gathered together a total of 40 categories for you to give us your opinions on everything from appliance dealers to video stores. You play, we’ll pay! Please specify what neighbourhood you live in and fill in the entry form. Send in your entry form and you will automatically be entered in our fabulous draw for a chance to win a Courier Gift Basket.


2

1

3 4 1. Ayden Gallery celebrates the season of upperlip-warmers with Le Movember Show, showcasing moustache friendly works by an array of hip young artists, including Peter Ricq, in support of Prostate Cancer Canada. The exhibit runs until Dec. 12 with opening reception Nov. 19, 7 to 11 p.m. featuring live painting, drinks and DJs at 88 West Pender, Second Floor, International Village (Tinseltown). More info at aydengallery.com. 2. He has a ton of media buzz behind him and lots of colourful eye shadow. Toronto’s John O, a.k.a. Diamond Rings, brings his Pitchfork-anointed brand of ’80s-synth pop and glammed-out fashion to the Biltmore Nov. 20 in support of his debut album Special Affections. Wear your best acid-wash jean jacket. Tickets at Zulu, Red Cat or online at ticketweb.ca.

3. Langara College’s Studio 58 brings Mary Zimmerman’s The Secret in the Wings to the stage. Described as “a spellbinding look at fairy tales not necessarily for children,” the Mike Stack-directed play with musical direction and original compositions by Kevin McNulty runs until Dec. 5. For tickets go to ticketstonight.ca or call 604-684-2787. 4. Oy vey. The 26th annual Jewish Book Festival gets underway Nov. 20 to 25 at the Jewish Community Centre of Greater Vancouver (950 West 41st Ave.) Highlights include Gary Shteyngart, author of the recent and very funny Super Sad True Love Story, Myla Goldberg (The False Friend) and dog psychologist Stanley Coren whose new autobiography is called, wait for it, Born to Bark. For more info and tickets, go to jewishbookfestival.ca or call 604-257-5111.

kudos & kvetches Be my friend

In case there was any confusion about how desperate the provincial government has become in recent months, now the Liberals have made it clearer than Gordon Campbell’s watered-down urine after an evening of Hawaiian mai-tais and blowing 0.161. On Wednesday, it was announced, or begrudgingly admitted, that the 15 per cent tax cut the premier so awkwardly and surprisingly offered up during a painful televised address to his disappearing supporters last month is a goner. Gone like the wind. Gone like Bill Bennett’s chances of ever getting a Christmas card from the Campbell family. Gone like Kevin Falcon’s hairline. Gone like Kash Heed’s warm, milksoftened hands caressing our trembling cheek before he slowly walks away and leaves us, calling us Angel of the Morning. We don’t even know what that means. When we first endured Campbell’s robotic plea to the province, it reminded us of elementary and high school when unpopular kids would try to buy friends by giving away the best parts of their lunches, letting others

ride their new BMX bike or offering free deeptissue massages to the school’s stressed out rugby team. Maybe that’s just us. But as soon as it became obvious that promising a 15 per cent tax cut doesn’t automatically buy you new friends, the provincial government snatched it away and took their bike home. Naturally, the Liberals’ official line is that they don’t want to saddle Campbell’s successor with the budgetary constraints such a tax cut would bring. Although they’ve yet to sufficiently explain why budgetary constraints weren’t an issue when Campbell was dangling the provincial wallet in front of voters’ noses mere weeks ago. If there is a bright side to all of this, at least Campbell didn’t promise voters a brand new pony. Speaking from personal experience, there is nothing more heartbreaking and damaging to a person’s fragile psyche than being promised a pony only to have that promise reneged and supplanted with a pathetic little hamster name Blackie, who your dumb little sister will accidentally kill by feeding it ketchup. This is getting too real.

Moustache backlash

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arts & entertainment

Picks of the week

F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

A longtime listener, first time caller to K&K lamented to us about the downside of Movember. She may have been crying, but our inability to read people’s emotions prevented us from being sure. In case you don’t know, Movember is the month-long facial hair fest held every November where men around the world grow moustaches to raise money and awareness for men’s health, in particular prostate cancer research. It also gives men a chance to grow the once-maligned 1970s porn accessory without shame, ridicule or automatically getting mistaken for a child molester. So it’s all good, right? Not so fast. “Whoever invented Movember isn’t a fan of the ladies,” maintains our colleague, who happens to be one of those ladies. “I’ve never looked at so many men in one month and said… No.” Ouch. Apparently, even if it’s for a good cause, philanthropy does not reverse or counteract the damaging effects to one’s attractiveness and potential do-ability caused by growing a moustache. So there you have it—science and one discerning woman at our office have spoken. Sorry about that, Mayor Robertson.


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

St. Chad's Church Christmas Fair

dining

Saturday Nov. 20th, 2010 • 1-3pm 3874 Trafalgar St. @ 23rd Ave.

• Bake Sale • Jam & Jellies • Crafts • Attic Treasures Kids: • Fun Filled Games • Cupcake Decorating

R e f r e s h m e n t s : Te a & D e s s e r t $ 5 . 0 0 Kids $2.00

PARK THEATRE

FIFTH AVENUE

DIGITAL 3D NOW AT THE PARK THEATRE

The Social Network 1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:35 The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet’s Nest

3440 Cambie at 18th 604-709-3456

Vancouver’s only independent theatre with 3D

Fair Game 4:00, 7:00, 9:20 + Sat & Sun 1:30

RIDGE THEATRE 3131 Arbutus 604-604-738-6311

Harry Potter and the Deadly Hallows Thurs, Nov 18 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 + Sat & Sun 12:45

2110 Burrard St. 604-734-7469

In Swedish with subtitles

1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40 Hereafter 1:15, 6:55 (No 6:55 show November 25)

127 Hours

In Dolby Digital

1:30, 2:00, 3:30, 4:00, 5:30, 6:00, 7:35, 8:00, 9:45, 10:00 Conviction 4:15, 9:30

NOVEMBER 12TH - 18TH

w w w. f e s t i va l c i n e m a s. c a We value our opinionated readers Reach us by email: editor@vancourier.com

1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2 • fax 604-738-2154

With its inexpensive bivalves and edgy cocktails, Jeremy Towning’s Oyster, in the old VSE building, delivers.

photos Tim Pawsey

Tiny Oyster offers one of the best shucks in town The Hired Belly with Tim Pawsey

The Hired Belly has long believed Vancouver deserves a quintessential dish or ingredient to call its own—and that anything oyster connected might be a worthy contender. For that reason alone, we were delighted to hear of the arrival of simply monikered Oyster (475 Howe St., ph. 604-899-0323), a Lilliputian celebration of the not-so-lowly bivalve, tucked away in the art-deco bowels of the original Vancouver Stock Exchange. “Tiny” doesn’t even say it—there’s barely enough room to swing a serious shucker in here. Never mind. On board is a devoted crew who, aside from being able to shoe-horn their way around, obviously share a common passion for everything oysterish, and more—including some edgy drinks, such as an Alaskan smoked salmon vodka and oyster shot. The brains behind this miniature mollusc emporium is Jeremy Towning, a cheerful oyster enthusiast who happily lays claim to what may be Vancouver’s smallest restaurant. Not that that should deter you from dropping in to this blackand-white-trimmed haunt with cozy

tables and glowing red bar backdrop. One more reason to come: some of the smartest bar stools in town that raise or lower automatically—to compensate for any excess intake, you understand. Replenished by regular deliveries from spot prawn fame purveyor Steve Johansen’s Organic Ocean, a glass aquarium perched barside is a temporary home to an intriguing assortment of oysters, swimming scallops and more. A prime lure is the daily “buck a shuck” (weekdays 3 to 6 p.m.), perhaps paired with a $7 glass of dry Muscadet Sevre et Maine or a bottle of Tantalus Riesling. Even if you’re not a fan of the extraordinary array of seductively saline raw oysters that B.C.’s pristine coastal waters yield, fear not. There’s plenty of wellcooked marine cuisine here to tempt.

Fine Dining Deal of the Week

More great B.C. bivalve tastes can be found at Yew in the Four Seasons. Through November you can sample an extraordinary Qualicum Bay scallop and citrus menu that includes seared jumbo scallop with heirloom pumpkin risotto and pork belly. Three courses for $35. It’s detail-driven cuisine in a spectacular setting. Reservations: 604-689-9333.

Brock House Society 3875 Point Grey Road

Winter Fair ANNUAL

Saturday November 27th 10 am to 2:30 pm

FREE ADMISSION Jewelry, Books, Silent Auction, Raffle, Crafts, Home Baking, Entertainment FREE PARKING AT JERICHO BEACH LOT.

Top tastes from our first foray included a fennel and tarragon-toned potted shrimp ($5), piping hot oyster pot pie with dressed spinach side salad ($10) and Everything Steamer bowl, packed with mussels, scallops, crab claws, prawns and more in an assertive white wine, parsley and garlic broth ($17). Both smaller bar bites ($5) and regular portions are moderately sized, which make sense considering the protein richness of most of these dishes (read: filling). Another bonus: Almost everything on this menu is certified Ocean Wise, which these days should be a pre-requisite for where you choose to spend you dining dollar. Oysters are cleanly shucked to order and fairly priced at $1.50. No $3 gouging here. They arrive still full of juice, served with a trio of cocktail sauces, red wine vinaigrette and birds eye chili mignonette. Save a spot for some decent sweet endings as well, such as chocolate raspberry mousse and espresso. Even though it’s still in its early days, we’re bullish on this bivalve upstart that given a few tweaks and a few more oyster-friendly wines, Oyster may prove to be the best shell corporation ever to come out of the old VSE. Open weekdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and for private functions on weekends. info@hiredbelly.com

BEST BUY CORRECTION NOTICE To our valued customers: We apologize for any inconvenience caused by an error in our flyer dated: November 12 – November 18.Product: Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood - Best Buy Exclusive “Officer” Character Download Code (PS3/ Xbox 360) On pull-out page 8 of the November 12 flyer, please note that there are only limited quantities available for this exclusive character download code. There will be a minimum quantity of 8 codes for each console per store. Please see a Product Specialist for details. SKU:10147132/10147419

BEST BUY CORRECTION NOTICE To our valued customers: We apologize for any inconvenience caused by an error in our flyer dated: November 12 - November 18. Product: Samsung N145 Netbook. On page 3 of the November 12 flyer, please note that the correct regular price of this netbook should be $299.99 no savings, NOT $229.99 save $70, as previously advertised. Customers can get the netbook for the promotional price of $229.99 save $70 only when it is purchased WITHOUT the Rogers Rocket Stick activation. Please see a Product Specialist for details. SKU: 10147661


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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movies

Young wizard saga nears its final showdown

Harry gets scary in penultimate Potter film Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part One Now playing at Dunbar, Oakridge, Ridge, Rio, Scotiabank

Reviewed by Julie Crawford

The penultimate film in the wildly successful Harry Potter franchise is so far removed in tone from the first one, that had you not seen all six films in succession you might think it was a different story altogether. You might, except for Harry himself. Sure, actor Daniel Radcliffe has beefed up a little over the years, but there’s no mistaking those trademark Groucho glasses, and eyebrows to match. The audience has grown up alongside the actors (who averaged age 11 when they filmed the first installment), thus the need for a more mature, more potent conclusion to J.K. Rowling’s canny magic. David Yates, who directed the last two films, is the man in charge of Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows: Part One, and of Part Two, which is set for a July 15 release next year. In Part One,

There’s no shortage of Harry Potters in the secondto-last installment of the popular movie franchise. Yates ensures that things are intense from the start, with Scrimgeour (Bill Nighy) vowing to save the Ministry of Magic and assuring terrified muggles that they have nothing to fear. Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) is on the loose, remember, and has infiltrated the ministry, waging a Third-Reich-style propaganda campaign against “mudbloods.” At times, the world outside Hogwart’s resembles a post-apocalyptic war zone. Harry’s ungrateful family flees for the countryside, leaving him in an empty house, filled only with bad memories of life beneath the stairs. Hermione’s (Emma

Watson) break with her parents is heart-wrenching. Ron (Rupert Grint) also leaves the happy Weasley home, and the trio exile themselves, camping in the most remote (and cinematically impressive) locales while they hunt down the Horcruxes. The what? If you forgot to brush up on your Potter before you headed to the theatre, you might need reminding that Horcruxes are the key to Voldemort’s power, and they must all be destroyed, as per a certain someone’s deathbed instruction in the last film. Things are spooky, indeed. Harry has scary flashbacks, dreams and visions of he-

who-shall-not-be-named. There’s a bit of torture, and a death. And filmmakers conjure up plenty of things that will make you jump in your seat, creating a horror-movie atmosphere rather than the magi-drama we’re expecting. Of course, Yates can’t keep up the frenetic pacing for the film’s entire 146 minutes, and frankly, the lags in action are a welcome respite. Effects and stunts are fabulous, as one would expect. Creatures (Dobby is back!) are convincingly drawn, and on-ground fight-and-flight sequences are easy to follow. But the audience will particularly enjoy the transformation of Potter protectors into multiple Harrys, a tactic meant to throw the Death Eaters off the real Harry’s scent. We get a glimpse of a half Ron, half Harry at one point and even get to see Harry in a bra, as one of the female characters changes forms. Grint and Watson do most of the work here (Radcliffe will get his chance in the concluding film) and make us care for their plight even as they are shouting expositional lines to help viewers make sense of it all. jcrawfordfilm@gmail.com

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Stuart McLean & the Vinyl Cafe

LIVE ON STAGE! Imagination Movers • Canadian Debut! • BIG WAREHOUSE TOUR!

March 3, 2011

NOVEMBER 27 AND 28, 2010

The Centre for Performing Arts - Vancouver Tickets @ 604-280-4444 or www.ticketmaster.ca


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

theatre

Screwed-up women difficult to like in catfight-filled Mrs. Klein

Bouchard play paints bleak period in Canadian history The Madonna Painter

But The Madonna Painter, under the direction of Craig Holzschuh, is relentlessly bleak in spite of the innocent sport of the village girls (Claire Hesselgrave, Christine Quintana and Barbara Kozicki) at the beginning of the play. Claudia Cantoral’s attractive scenic design features three illuminated panels on which projections appear. There’s no light, however, for the Saint-Coeur de Marie villagers who died—triptych or no triptych— along with 50,000 other Canadians.

At Telus Studio Theatre until Nov. 20 Tickets: 604.822.2678 theatre.ubc.ca Reviewed by Jo Ledingham

The hope of the newly arrived priest in Saint-Coeur de Marie, Quebec in 1918 seems more 14th-century European than 20th-century Canadian. In Michel Marc Bouchard’s play, the young priest (Eric Freilich) believes if a triptych to honour the Virgin were to be painted and hung in the church, the village would be spared the Spanish influenza that soldiers were bringing back from Europe. He hires Alessandro (Jameson Parker), an Italian painter, gets funding from the local doctor (Ben Whipple), and the village girls begin auditioning. Alessandro chooses one; she’s called Mary of the Secrets (Meaghan Chenosky) because she’s known to ease the terminally ill and take their confessions as they die. Alessandro uses Mary as his model, seduces her, impregnates her and then refuses to use her face in the paintings because she’s no longer a virgin. The doctor, a sadist and probably latent homosexual, drugs the priest and, scalpel in hand, removes the young man’s face. The first of the villagers dies of flu. As described by Dr. Patricia Badir in the ex-

Mrs. Klein

At Jericho Arts Centre until Dec. 5 Tickets: 604.224.8007 www.unitedplayers.com

Meaghan Chenosky appears in Michel Marc Bouchard’s bleak The Madonna Painter. cellent program/study guide, Bouchard sees “the repressive hypocrisy of the religious establishment as responsible for generations of inexcusable suffering and art has always been one of the principle vehicles for its deceptions.” Think of all the magnificent art, architecture and music in the service of religion.

You are invited to

VIP Opening Reception Friday, Nov. 26, 5-7 pm

RSVP to 604.251.7633 or cchristensen@ thekettle.ca 1725 Venables Street at Commercial Drive

Eastside Culture Crawl Art & Artists that Fight Stigma Against Mental Illness

Friday, November 26, 5 - 10pm Saturday, November 27,11 - 6pm Sunday, November 28,11 - 6pm 350+ pieces of multi-media art by Kettle Members

Art Raffle for exciting artwork – funds supporting art supplies for artists living with mental illness The Kettle Friendship Society 604.251.7633

"First Person Singular" by Winter Hammell PHOTOGRAPHED BY GREG MASUDA PACIFICA PHOTOGRAPHY

www.thekettle.ca

Supporting people living with mental illness to lead healthier lives SPONSORS

PRESENTING SPONSORS

ARTIST SUPPLIES PARTIALLY SPONSORED BY Commercial Drive Community Branch & Community Business Banking

Mrs. Klein, written by Nicholas Wright, is a catfight to the bitter end. There’s no bloodshed but there may as well be. Melanie Klein (1882-1960) was an Austrian Jew, a psychoanalyst with no university degrees, who diverged from some of the theories of Freud and whose advocates today—and they are legion—are called Kleinians. In this United Players production, directed by Charles Siegel, Klein is brilliantly portrayed by Joan Bryans who plumbs the nasty, compassionate, jealous, bullying, mothering depths of Klein. Despite being subjected to years of psychoanalysis as a young child by her own mother, Klein’s daughter Melitta grew up to be Dr. Melitta Schmideberg, a psychoanalyst who

openly opposed her mother’s theories. Alison James Raine portrays this hateful daughter who, after the death of her brother Hans, interprets his climbing accident as suicide and is prepared to use it to destroy her mother. Raine is taut and tension-filled but shows a girlish side to Paula Heimann, yet another psychoanalyst who has been bidden by Klein to housesit while Klein attends Hans’ funeral in Budapest. Trina McClure (as Paula) is restrained, mostly passive until the going gets rough. So, all three women are psychoanalysts, all three are seeing psychoanalysts and two are in the midst of switching psychoanalysts. There’s no one in this play you like. And that’s a problem, dramatically. Ironically, that’s at the heart of Klein’s theory: we all have good and bad in us and until we acknowledge that contradiction in ourselves and in others, happiness is impossible. During the evening they spend together in Klein’s flat, all three get their noses rubbed in their own badness. And so do we. Under Siegel’s direction, Stacey Sherlock’s set is realistic and Catherine E. Carr’s costumes take us back to the 1930s. This United Players production is strong, the performances excellent, but these three women are so screwed up, I came away shaking my head. Talk about the blind leading the blind. —JL joled@telus.net


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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Established and emerging artists honoured at annual arts bash

Mayor’s Art Awards recipients make personal connection State of the Arts

with Cheryl Rossi Evelyn Lau doesn’t have an email address. So when the Governor General Award-nominated writer mentored Kaitlin Fontana through the University of B.C.’s Booming Ground creative writing program, Lau sent Fontana feedback in oldfashioned letters. But two years later, when Lau read Fontana’s short memoir “The Flight Album” in the Canadian magazine The Walrus, about interning for a magazine in New York, Lau had to log on to her friend’s email and instantly tell Fontana how impressed she was. “She wrote this absolutely stunning piece... that I would have probably sacrificed a baby toe to have written myself,” Lau said. Now Lau is being honoured at the annual Mayor’s Arts Awards, Nov. 24, and she’s chosen 27year-old Fontana as a promising writer to be honoured as well. City council established the Mayor’s Arts Awards in 2006 to recognize established and emerging artists in a variety of disciplines, including culinary, performing and visual arts. The awards also honour community members who make significant contributions to arts in our city. This year, Yosef Wosk will receive an award for his philanthropy, Betty Lou Phillips for her volun-

teerism and Rio Tinto Alcan for its business support. Stephen Osborne was one of the three writers convened by the Alliance for Arts and Culture to choose this year’s literary winner. Osborne, publisher of Geist magazine and founder of what is now Arsenal Pulp Press, said the panel chose Lau for the high quality of her work and her support of young writers. Lau’s autobiographical bestseller, Runaway: Diary of a Street Kid, which was published when she was 18, set her course on the literary map. She’s since published personal essays in Inside Out: Reflections on a Life So Far, a novel (Other Women), two books of short stories and five volumes of poetry, including this year’s Living Under Plastic. Lau called the mayor’s award “meaningful” because she was chosen to receive it by writers she admires: Osborne, poet, novelist and editor Daphne Marlatt and playwright, editor, publisher and founder of Subterrain magazine, Brian Kaufman. For the Mayor’s Art Awards, Lau said she selected Fontana as the promising writer honouree because of her honest and personal approach to writing. “Her forte is really in the personal essay,” Lau said. “And the personal essays that I have read by her are all just really honest and vulnerable and beautifully done, and that’s always what I’ve always tried to aspire to when I’ve written personal essays.” Fontana says she’s long been a fan of Lau so being recognized by

her is an “additional honour.” “[She’s] a very courageous person and a courageous writer and I think it does take courage to be a writer in this world,” Fontana said. The resident of Cedar Cottage is grateful the city grants awards that shrink the gap between established and budding artists. Fontana primarily writes nonfiction. She won a National Magazine Award for her personal essay about her father’s death called “Sleeping with the Dead” and a creative non-fiction contest mounted by Event, a prestigious Canadian literary journal. Her book Fresh at Twenty: The Oral History of Mint Records will be released next fall. To pay her bills, Fontana works as a music journalist, writing for SPIN, Rolling Stone and Exclaim! magazine. She has also performed across North America as an improviser and sketch comedian. Fontana, who’s quick on her feet but patient with words, is looking forward to meeting Lau, who she described as a “mysterious figure,” at the award presentation at Club Five Sixty. It will be the first time the two have encountered one another in the flesh. “I think she just prefers to be not in everyone’s face,” Fontana said. “She wouldn’t be mentoring people through this program if she didn’t want to be reaching out to the community, but I think she just wants it to be on her own terms.” To see a complete list of award winners or to make a reservation to attend the free event, see Vancouver.ca. crossi@vancourier.com

Kaitlin Fontana will be honoured for her work as an emerging writer at the Mayor’s Arts Awards Nov. 24. photo Dan Toulgoet

“ DANNY BOYLE AND JAMES FRANCO TAKE US ON A MEMORABLE THRILL RIDE.” “ UNFORGETTABLE

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FESTIVAL CINEMAS

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 MMU

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1085 1170

Obituaries

Announcements

Lost & Found

LOST GOLD Ring. (round crown) Sat. Nov 6, Kerrisdale Area. Family Ring. Reward. 604-738-4731 LOST KEYS and fob on red wrist band, KITSILANO Sun Nov 7/10. REWARD. 604-928-4316

BAKER - George Ernest Henry After a full life well lived, George died October 8, 2010 at the age of 94. He leaves his wife of 65 years, Rita, and his five children, Ken (Pam McCorquodale), Doug (Gail Hunt), Louise, Jenine (Mahe), and Gerry. He also leaves 11 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. George liked baseball, scotch, camping and the outdoors, European history, old time fiddle music, winemaking, and dancing probably in that order. And he loved his family. Despite losing his father and his step-father by the age of 12, he somehow knew how to be an excellent dad. Raised on the homestead in Saskatchewan and deprived of any formal education after grade eight, he supported and encouraged his children to receive a combined 85 years of education. George was a selfreliant man and gave much more than he took. He built his own house by hand and lived in it for 60 years. He was a profoundly honest man, incapable of telling a lie. In common with his generation, George understood duty and commitment: he finished every task he ever started and, as a member and officer of his union, pressed all his working life for workers’ rights. He worked for social justice before it had a name. George understood that it is the responsibility of each of us to make the world a better place. His standard advice was always 'make yourself useful' Whenever his children thanked him for his help, his reply was 'just do the same for your kid’s' Our special thanks go to George’s caregivers: Virnith, Gecelyn, Nelly, and Marlene whose tender and affectionate care and attention were a comfort to him and to his family.

REWARD FOR LOST PAPILLION last seen Gov rd Nth Bby Nov 11 778-882-7439

1107

Singles Clubs

ENJOY A GREAT SOCIAL LIFE *** TGIF SINGLES *** Things to do, places to go, friends to meet. Dinners, dances, walks, trips, tennis, golf, etc... with fun people. Info. evenings Thursdays Call 604-988-5231 www.tgifcanada.com

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CALL 604.263.5005 ywcajobseeker.org Funded in whole or part through the CanadaBritish Columbia Labour Market Development Agreement

BAG CATCHER / OPERATOR A Richmond bag mfr has several perm, F/T openings for bag catchers and operators. The ideal candidate will be a grade 12 graduate, speak and write English, be physically fit, have an aptitude for mechanics, be willing to be trained as a bag machine adjuster, be willing to do shift work (7 day operation) and have their own car. Starting wage depending on experience. Excellent benefit package. Reply in confidence to: Human Resources, Bulldog Bag Ltd, 13631 Vulcan Way, Richmond, V6V 1K4, or fax to 604-273-9927, or email to hr@bulldogbag.com

1220

Career Services/ Job Search

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FREE Job Search Support for People with Disabilities and/or Chronic Health Conditions

Career Services/ Job Search

Locations in Alberta & BC. Hands on real world training. Full sized equipment. Job placement assistance. Funding Available. 1-866-399-3853 www.iheschool.com

1410

Education

FOODSAFE 1 DAY COURSES – ONLY $62 BEST VALUE GUARANTEED Classes Every Sat, Sun & Monday Taught by Certified Public Health Inspectors ADVANCE Hospitality Education BC’s #1 Foodsafe Choice

1415

Cheryl Carruthers Piano Studio Lessons, all levels. 21 yrs exp. 604-732-3602 www.ccpianist.ca IN HOME OR STUDIO LESSONS Piano, Theory & other instruments. Allegro Music School 604-327-7765 PIANO LESSONS- ALL LEVELS Bernard Duerksen, M.Mus. 30 yrs exp. West side. 604-605-0962.

1420

FOODSAFE 1 DAY COURSES Guaranteed best value! Six Metro Vancouver Locations: Vancouver • Burnaby • Surrey • Richmond • Coquitlam • Maple Ridge All our Instructors are also working local Health Inspectors! Classes held each week & weekend! Course materials available in 6 languages. Same-day Certification. Visit our website at www.foodsafe-courses.com or call 604-272-7213 ADVANCE Hospitality Education – B.C.’s #1 Choice for Foodsafe & WorldHost Training.

Personal Trainer Certification

Earn up to $70/hr as a Personal Trainer. Government Financial Aid may be available. 604-930-8377 Hilltop Academy

Pender & Granville

Tutoring Services

HELPFUL MATH TUTOR Phone: 778-866-8877 Web: http://m101m.org QUALIFIED TUTORS in your home $32/hr. All subjects. All levels. www.pdplustutors.com or call Angela at 604-421-6101

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Education? Find it in the calssifieds!

434-1177 Boundary & Kingsway

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P. VILLAGRA req’s F/T Bookkeeper. Courses in acc. or bkg combined with sev. yrs of exp. in Nafta Provisions req . Spanish Lang. a must due to targeted clientele. $17.50/hr. E-res: taxexperts@pvtax.com

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL

1403

COMPUTER LESSONS FOR 50+ $30/hr Winter Special $210 /8hrs. Call Sol at 604-266-2414 Website: www.easypc.ca

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs and tributes on

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE CLERK

required by ContainerWest, located on Mitchell Island, Richmond. This person will be responsible for the management of vendor records, ensuring timely processing of transactions, payments and resolution of issues. The ideal candidate will be a team player with at least 3 years of Microsoft Dynamics GP experience, follows instructions, works independently, and is dependable. Please email resumes to: larissab@containerwest.com

EDUCATION

604-272-7213

604-630-3300

Accounting

681-2774

www.advance-education.com

Celebrate with a Birthday Greeting in the classified section!

1205

The EDGE Program IAM CARES Society 604 -731- 8504 info@iamcares.ca

1240

General Employment

EDUCATIONAL COORDINATOR required for Community Needs Assessment Research. Email resume to admin@chcabc.com or fax 604-540-8550

CARE FACILITY requires

CASUAL DIETARY, HOUSEKEEPING and LAUNDRY AIDES

with relevant experience and education.

CASUAL ACTIVITY AIDES Experience working with people with dementia. TR Diploma preferred; passion for working with seniors essential.

BLENHEIM LODGE 3263 Blenheim St. Vancouver, BC, V6L 2X7 Fax: (604)732-7316 Email: reception@blenheimlodge.org

FISH PROCESSING LABOURERS

Sung Fish Co. Ltd. at 1795 Pandora St, Vancouver. F/T job. Clean & cut fish, unpack & pack fish on ice. Training incl’d. $10-$13/hr. 2 wks pd vacation. Fax resume: 604-255-4781 Email: sung@sungfish.com

1240

General Employment

CERT EXP F/T PET GROOMER for mobile business, valid drivers license, customer service oriented a must. Send resume to: michelle.berg@aussiepetmobile.ca

COSTA LANDSCAPING seeking Landscapers. Must have several yrs of exp. and compl. of high school. $18.20/hr. 40 hr wk. E-resume: aguiar@shaw.ca GROCERY CLERK needed. $9.25/hr-$12.38/hr, 40hrs/wk, related job experience an asset, Send resume by mail to CLM Management Ltd. 5191 Joyce Street, Vancouver, B.C., V5R 4G8, babylin@telus.net or fax 604-463-3758.

1240

GARLANDS FLORIST req’s F/T Artistic Floral Arranger. $14/hr, 40hrs/wk, design & create floral arrangements at shop/customers venues. Advise customers. Receive payments. Min. 2 yr exp & compl of HS. Knowledge of proper handling of flower. Japanese language skill an asset. CV with photos of floral arrangements to: hr.garlandsflorist@gmail.com Fax 604-739-6622 Location: 2950 W. Broadway, Van Personal Trainer Certification Earn up to $70/hr as a Personal Trainer. Government Financial Aid may be avail. 604-930-8377 See our ad in todays paper under Education.

1250 LABORATORY ASSISTANT

Acme Analytical Laboratories (Vancouver), a premier BC mining laboratory, is looking to fill various Laboratory Assistant positions in Vancouver. Must be able to handle up to 40 lbs as some heavy manual labor may be required. Experience in a lab environment an asset but training will be provided. Starting wage of approximately $12 (combination of base hourly rate and daily production bonus). Detailed descriptions of the various positions are available on Acme’s website:

www.acmelab.com

Interested parties should submit resume and cover letter by email as instructed on the website.

General Employment

Hotel Restaurant

TOKOYO JOHN Enterprises ltd in Van is hiring F/T Jap Cook; 3+ yrs exp with knowledge. Salary $18.75/hour. Main duty: prepare/ cook Jap. food & ensure quality of food. Contact sokris@hotmail.com

1270

Office Personnel

OFFICE ASSISTANT

required part time, for Real Estate Consultant in the 25th/Arbutus area. Efficient computer skills (Word, Excel) and familiarity with office procedures essential. Please send resume to: anne-francis@hotmail.com

1285

Retail Sales

UP YOUR LEATHER Factory Direct Warehouse

Hiring Full & Part-time Store Manager & Sales Personnel

Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. If you’ve been looking for a home-based opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work. Qualified applicants receive training, support and monthly remuneration. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door. Make it yours. Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.ca

TRUTH IN ''EMPLOYMENT'' ADVERTISING Postmedia Community Publishing makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711, Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

Beautiful New Leather Store concept is now hiring! Retail experience an asset. Must be bondable. Apply in person with resume: Monday to Friday between 10am to 5 pm Up Your Leather 3511 East Hastings Vancouver. (Hasting / Skeena) (parking at rear)

1300

Teachers/ Instructors

INSTRUCTOR required for part time evening English course. Bachelor’s Degree in Education or English a must. Email resume to admin@chcabc.com or fax 604-540-8550

INSTRUCTOR required for part time evening Mathematics course. Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Science a must. Email resume to admin@chcabc.com or fax 604-540-8550

Take Your Pick from the

HOTTEST JOBS To advertise in Employment Classifieds call

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F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

2060 2010

Appliances

Furniture

MEN’S CLOTHING FOR SALE

Act Fast! Won’t Last!

Look stunning in real designer clothing such as Ed Hardy & Christian Audigier’s t-shirts, hoodies & jeans. Barely worn & in like new condition. Downsizing wardrobe. Serious buyers only, for more info pls contact: 604-880-0288

$$200 Fridge Fridge 200 $ Stove $ 100 Stove 100 Washer $$150 Washer $150 Dryer 100 Dryer $$100 Stacker 300 Warranty & Delivery 750 Coin W/D set $Available

2070

604.306.5134 MIELE STEAM OVEN as new, ht17.75 x wd23.38 inches. Health eating. $2000. 604-261-1817

Fuel

Alder • Birch • Maple Dry, Clean Hardwoods

#1 in Sales • 27 yrs in business Full & half cords 7days/week

Burial Plots

604-805-6694

FOREST LAWN Memorial Park Burnaby, single plot, asking $9,800 obo. Call 604-987-2948

Adjustable Sealy Queen Bed with frame Frame rests on 4 wheels with breaks and comes with a head board mount. The head and foot part can be adjusted separately from each other and each part has a massage feature, easily controlled via included remote control. The bed comes with Primu dreamer memory foam mattress in a Tempurpedic breathable/waterproof mattress cover. The bed has never been in contact with smoke, pets and has no damage (spillage, burns etc.). Similar models sell for $5000, paid $3800 6 months ago. Willing to part for $2900obo. Call 778-384-1210

TOP KNOT FIREWOOD est 1981 Dry Alder, Birch & Maple. Pick up or delivered. Rod 604-985-7193

2075

To advertise call

Industrial, Construction, Forklifts, Farm & Turf Equip., Fleet Trucks & Trailers, Lumber, Boats . . . see web for more! Cars & Trucks, 9am Start!!!

Located in Langley just minutes from Vancouver WE WELCOME INDUSTRIAL SMALLS.

6780 Glover Rd., Langley, BC • Phone: 604-534-0901 www.canamauctions.com

MOVING SALE: Dinette suite - 36' glass top and 4 solid iron, rattan back and padded chairs - paid $1000 asking $300 obo. 2 patio loungers - sturdy iron bases and brown pads - $50 for both. Broil King Crown 40 BBQ - w/ side burner - has broken wheel sacrifice at $50. Sofa - Barrymore - green upholstery - $750.00 firm, Loveseat - Ethan Allen- only 3 yrs old - same colour as sofa - $1200 Wing chair and ottoman - beige $35. Can send photos. Jim or Esther (604) 952-0661

2095

COMPLETE BATHROOM Sets $298. Include:main, side cabinets,mirror,faucet,popup,wall drain,light Many different styles available. 604-313-0670

MOVING soon MUST sell! Thomasville Mystique Dining Ste, 6ft table x 45in & 2 inserts, Hutch w/glass & lights 6ft x 19in, 8 chairs, $2500. Sony Trinitron TV 36in & cabinet $100. Sony TV 12x12in, $50. 4 Drawer black filing cabinet $30. All OBO. 778-552-5557

3507

Furniture

Lumber/Building Supplies

#1A STEEL BUILDING SALE! Save up to 60% on your new garage, shop, warehouse or storage building. 6 different colors available! 40 year warranty! FREE shipping for the first 20 callers! 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Sports Equipment

FOUR BIKE bike rack with 2 inch car hitch insert.604 731-0606

Auctions

NEXT AUCTION: Dec. 11, 9am CAN-AM AUCTIONS

2075

2120

Furniture

ITALIAN SOFA BED, cream & brown, confortable and warm. Asking $200. Call 604-251-7461

604-630-3300 2020

2075

$$ Great Deals !! $$

LIKE NEW!

2035

For Sale Miscellaneous

LADIES FULL-SIZE golf bag and pull cart. 604 731-0606 NORTHERN LIGHTS single weight stack weight machine; includes protective floor mat. (Purchaser to dismantle and move.) $400.00604 731-0606

2135

Wanted to Buy

Old Books Wanted also: Photos Postcards, Letters, Paintings. (no text books/encyclopedia) I pay cash. 604-737-0530

3015

Childcare Available

★ BOOK NOW!★ An overseas live-in Nanny for 2010 placement. 604-682-4688

3020

★CATS & KITTENS★ FOR ADOPTION !

3508

Children’s Activities

Dogs BLK LAB pups family raised ready Dec 11. Will hold for X-Mas, vet checked $600. 604-991-4158

6 BEAUTIFUL CHOCOLATE LAB PUPS pure bred, english style, CKC reg’d, $750. Ready for their new homes. Call Glenn 604-230-5136 BOXER - CKC Registered flashy fawn male boxers. Champion Dam, Top Lines. Mom is pictured at boxerdog.ca/jewel $1200.00 604 596 2090 or 604 614 0952 or 604 792 9003

UBC RESEARCH

Vision Laboratory at Children’s Hospital needs volunteers (4-12yrs) with good vision and hearing for a study on visual perception. Study involves computer games. Honorarium paid. Call Jenn at 875-2345 x 7853

3507

Cats

CAT SOFT carrying case, climbing tree, heated hooded bed, litter box, toys, misc 604-824-8487

classified.van.net

Dogs

BICHON FRIESE PUPS, 2 males p/bred unreg. 9 wks, 1st shots, homebreed $500 604-376-8327

604-724-7652

Childcare Wanted

F/T FILIPINO live-in nanny for 2 children. First Aid & tutoring req’d. Please Call: 604-708-1019

3025

3508

Cats

EW47

ADORABLE POMERANIAN puppies, very sweet, 1st shots, 2 left $450.. 604-636-4238 AUSTRALIAN Red Heeler pups. 1st shots, vet ✔, ready to go, View parents. Sry 604-572-7249

CHIHUAHUA X pug male Ready to go, shots & vet checked $550. 604-702-1960 or 604-316-2136

Foster homes urgently req’d for rescued, abandoned & neglected dogs. Many breeds. www. abetterlifedogrescue.com GOLD LABRADOR Retriever’ Pups, 2 male, 1 female, ready now. $850. Sry, 604-593-1532

BERNESE MOUNTAIN Dog Pups, vet ✔ 1st shots, dewormed. $950. Chwk. 1-604-794-3561

GOLDEN RETRIEVER Pups ready to go, first shots, email pics available. $650. 250-674-0091

BOXERS, CKC reg. show champion lines, 9 flashy brindle males, 2 reverse, chip, wormed & shots, ready Nov 12. 604-987-0020

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Sprott-Shaw Community College has been training students in B.C. for over 107 years. We want you to be a success story too!

° Small class sizes for individual attention

Monthly get youattention working faster °° Small classintakes sizes fortoindividual Career focused to keepfaster you in °° Monthly intakes toprograms get you working demand ° Career focused programs to keep you in demand ° Financial options tailored to ° Financial options tailored to individudal needs individudal needs °° Qualified dedicated instructors Qualifiedand and dedicated instructors FREElifetime lifetimeupgrading upgrading °° FREE andand refresher courses refresher courses ° Job placement assistance/skills warranty ° Job placement assistance/skills warranty °° Monthly fairs to keep you you current Monthlycareer career fairs to keep current - PRACTICAL NURSING -- HEALTH PRACTICAL NURSING CARE ASSISTANT - MEDICAL HEALTHOFFICE CAREASSISTANT ASSISTANT - COMMUNITY MEDICAL SUPPORT OFFICEWORKER ASSISTANT - SOCIAL COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKER SERVICES/ASSISTED LIVING - BUSINESS SOCIALMANAGEMENT/BBA SERVICES/ASSISTED DEGREE LIVING - PHARMACY BUSINESSASSISTANT MANAGEMENT/BBA DEGREE - LEGAL TOURISM & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT SECRETARY AND MORE... - SPA THERAPY AND MORE...

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In a matter of months, you can earn your diploma from CDI College in one of more than 50 programs in Business, Health Care, and Technology. Multiple start dates mean you can start training for your career as soon as you’re ready and, with 17 campuses across Canada, CDI College is closer than you think. Ready for your career? Make the call.

unting & Payroll Administrator • Accounting Certificate • Addictions & Community Services Worker • Business Administration •

Computer Bu

plications Specialist • Computer Programmer • Dental Receptionist Coordinator • Event Coordinator & Management • Exp ing in Orthodontics • Health Care Assistant • Help Desk Analyst • Intra Oral Dental Assistant • Introduction to Business mputing • Law Enforcement Foundations • Legal Administrative Assistant • Medical Office Assistant • Microsoft Office Specialist •Network Call our East Vancouver Campus tabase Administrator •Network & Internet Security Specialist • Network Administrator • Paraleg Call our East Vancouver Campus nician • Practical Nursing • Programmer Analysts/ISD • Programmer Analysts/Web • Rehabilitation Assistant • Trav (604)

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(604)

251-4473 251-4473

www.sprottshaw.com Find a Career in Education

Make the call 1 800-320-3058 city.cdicollege.ca

Canada’s Leading Career Training Provider.

Become a

Psychiatric Nurse in 23 months There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN); with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $29/hour. The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is recognized by the CRPNBC. Government funding may be available.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG

www.stenbergcollege.com


EW48

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

GARAGE SALES

3508

3508

Dogs

Dogs

3540

Pet Services

MOBILE PROF Small Dog Groom up to 18 lbs Lower Mainland 19 yrs exp. loriben@shaw.ca 1-604-556-2496

LAB PUPS CKC Reg’d Yellows & Blacks Good Temp. Shots & Tattooed. $750. 604-377-0820

PUPS - purebred Australian Cattle Dogs (Blue Heelers). $460. Chilliwack. Call 604-512-7560.

3545

Pets - Other

SMALL FLUFFY PODDLE X, Male & Female. Ready to Go. $500/each. Bby 604-521-2797

LAB PUPS, yellow, m/f, shots, dewormed, vet checked, $500. family raised Call 604-701-1587

3540

Pet Services

Sat. Nov 20th 10am - 3pm

Park Royal Towers 955 Marine Dr. Tudor Bldg. (follow signs) Visitor’s prkg.

(at Vivian St)

Silver, Dresden, Orrefors, furniture, Doulton.

Sat NOV 20 th 9am - 11:30am Richmond WHOLESALERS WAREHOUSE Moving & Clearance Sale Open to public Mon to Sat 11am - 5 pm 2300 Simpson Rd. Richmond, 604-270-1050 $1items, gift items, electronics,

H BIG FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sun. Nov 21 10:00 am - 4:00 pm, 5468 Inverness Street Dishes, furniture,clothing, electronics, books and more. Rain or Shine • No Early Birds

food items & MUCH MORE !!

GARAGE SALE

I

Empty your Garage Fill Your Wallet

GIANT FLEA MARKET Sat. & Sun. Nov, 20th & 21st... 9 am to 3 pm Buy tables $25/day or $40 for both days. Brittania Elementary. 1110 Cotton Drive. Gym D. Bonnie.. 604-713-4497

MAKE IT A SUCCESS! Call 604-630-3300

TAPESTRY THRIFT SHOP

1369 Kingsway (just west of Knight St) NG • Furniture • Houseware HI • Books • Knick Knacks SOMEFTOR NE! YO • Jewellery • Accessories ER AT V ! E E • Clothing for Women, Men GR ICES PR and Children OPEN EVERYDAY 10am - 5pm incl. SUNDAY Proceeds to the Tapestry Foundation in support of residential & elder care at Mount St. Joseph, Holy Family, St. Vincent’s Langara, Brock Farhni, Youville Residence & Marion Hospice.

MALTESE X 2 - 4 lbs full grown non shedding, quiet 2 males. 1st shot, dewormed $600. 604-392-7372

PET HOTEL @YVR FREE daycare or Overnight stay for first time clients! Call now 604-238-PETS www.jetpetresort.com

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

You are warmly invited to our annual

Children’s

Christmas Fair &Marketplace

at the

Vancouver Waldorf School Sat Nov 20

10am-3pm Info: www.vws.ca (604) 985-7435 reception@vws.ca

2725 St Christophers Road, North Vancouver

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR 10 AM to 4 PM Sat/Sun, Nov. 20th & 21st FREE ADMISSION

60 tables of quality, hand-made crafts Raffle & Refreshments

West End Community Centre 870 Denman Street, Vancouver Underground pay parking off Haro Street

604-257-8333 www.westendcc.ca

SWEDISH BODY MASSAGE & WAXING

$45/hr. $109 Head to toe pkg. $78/2hrs Body + Facial or Waxing pkg. Brazilian Waxing from $35

3482 Main St. Van 604-376-1686

4005 REWARD FOR LOST PAPILLION last seen Gov rd Nth Bby Nov 11 778-882-7439

4051

Registered Massage Services

Try the Best 604-872-1702

Catering/ Bartending

1620

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

Just Right Catering

Fairs/Bazaars

Mark your calendar!

For all your entertaining needs private & corporate since 1983.

Tel : 604 (688) 4482

info@vancouvercatering.com

1655

1655

A NON Surgical beauty treatment avail. Acupuncture for facial rejuvenation or lift. Dr. Wendy, 20 yrs exp. with cosmetics. #150 - 5780 Cambie St. 604-600-5658

Metaphysical

LOVE! MONEY! LIFE! #1 Psychics! 1-877-478-4410 CreditCards/Deposit $3.19/min 18+ 1-900-783-3800 www.mysticalconnections.ca

Fairs/Bazaars

COTTAGE CHRISTMAS.. Sat. Nov. 20. 10am-4pm Kanata Co-op @ 7155 Blake St.

HUGE CRAFT Fair ! Killarney Comm. Centre 6260 Killarney St. Sat. Nov 20 - 10 -3 pm Over 65 tables! Admission is FREE infor. call 604.718.8201

Oakridge United Church

BRITANNIA COMMUNITY EDUCATION PRESENTS

27th Annual

BRITANNIA CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS MARKET SQUARE SATURDAY, NOV. 27 9AM - 2PM

305 West 41st Avenue

FRIDAY,Nov. NOVEMBER (3PM – 8PM) Fri., 19th19TH • 3pm – 8pm SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH (10AM – 5PM) Sat., Nov. 20th • 10am – 5pm SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST (10AM – 5PM) Sun., Nov. 21st • 10am – 5pm

(2 blocks east of Cambie

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR Sat. Dec. 4th. 10am - 4pm

Kensington Community Centre 5175 Dumfries St. Vancouver (Near 33rd & Knight St) 604-718-6201 Door Prizes & Food! Free Admission and Free Parking!

Craft Fair

Sat. Dec 4th • 11am - 5pm 5288 Joyce Street, Vancouver

(2 blks south of Joyce Skytrain station)

britanniacraftfair@live.ca

24 20th th

Sat., Nov. 27 • 10am - 5pm Over 140 Vendors

Admission: $3 Under 12 Free

Deck The Hall Craft Fair Sat. Dec 4 • Sun. Dec 5 11:00am - 5:00pm 45 Outstanding Craft Vendors

Snack Bar • Child-Minding • Entertainment • Prizes

DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTRE 4747 Dunbar St. (at West 31st)

604-222-6060

Heritage Hall

3102 Main St. at 15th Ave.

Annual Annual

DELBROOK CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR

SATURDAY SUNDAY SATURDAY &&SUNDAY 10AM-4PM 10AM–4PM NOV 18 & &21 19,• DEC. DEC 4 2& & 53 NOV. 20 •• 101 EW CRAFTERS 101 N CRAFTERS EAND ACH D AY! ARTISANS •• CCONCESSION ONCESSION •• CFREE HILDCARE CHILD CARE PRIZES •• DDOOR OOR PRIZES

$2 Admission, Kids free!

FURNITURE SALE

Selling off overstock from previous projects. Very cool & Eclectic!! 20% off new design projects! ★Vintage★ Modern★ Antique ★Retro Visit www.madvancouver.com For more info Or Call 778-994-7357

Mark Your Calendar!

Holiday Craft Fair

Sat. Nov. 20 • 9:30am - 4:00pm West Point Grey Community Centre 4397 West 2nd Ave. Vancouver

604.257.8140

Admission and parking free!

BAZAAR & UKRAINIAN FOOD FAIR Silent Auction,Raffles • Christmas Crafts Ukrainian Buffet at 5pm and 7pm SATURDAY, NOV 27TH from 11AM – 8PM

St.Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Centre 3150 Ash St. at 16th Ave. Vancouver Free Admission and Parking. Info: Parish 604-879-5830

Fairs/Bazaars

Friends of the SPCA

CHRISTMAS SALE Nov. 26 & 27

from 10 am - 2pm

at: SPCA

1205 East 7th Ave., Vancouver (in Board Room)

GERMAN CANADIAN BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF B.C. Christmas Bazaar and

Delbrook DelbrookCommunity RecCentre Recreation Centre 600 North Van 600West WestQueens, Queens. N.Van. 604-987-PLAY 987-PLAY

FAB FAIR Jewelry & Fashion Accessory Sale

Sat. Nov 20 • Sun. Nov 21 11:00am - 5:00pm 45 Local Designers Heritage Hall

3102 Main St. at 15th Ave. $2 Admission, Kids free!

5005

(corner of Victoria Dr. & SE Marine Dr.)

Holly & TBeedady Bazaarr Bazaar Sat., Nov. 27, 2010 11:00am - 2:00pm

St. Helen’s Anglican Church 4405 W. 8th Ave. @ Trimble

★★★★

Local North Shore Chef

Ann Kirsebom

Will be launching Gourmet products with Grand Marnier & Callebaut Chocolate!! At Circle Craft Nov. 17-21st! Don’t miss out on these Limited Edition Gourmet Gifts for the season.

St. Philip’s Church Christmas Fayre Saturday, Nov. 27 • 12:00-3:00pm Silent Auction, Handcrafted Gifts, Home Baking, Attic Treasures, Christmas Gifts, Books, Tea Room. Fun for the whole family!

3737 West 27th Ave. • 604-224-3238

Accounting/ Bookkeeping

Corporate Tax Returns $225 +up $20 and up for personal tax. Monthly bookkeeping $20 hr +. Specialize: construction; sm bus. accounting. Trevor 604-788-0396

To advertise call

604-630-3300

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

MARTIN LUTHER CHURCH

"We Welcome You" Christmas Craft Fair

November 20 • 10am - 2pm Crafts, Baking, Fresh Evergreen Wreaths, Traditional German Lunch 505 East 46th Avenue, Vancouver (one block West of Fraser St)

CHRISTMAS BAZAAR, LUNCH, TEA & BAKE SALE Saturday, Nov. 27 10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Oakridge Lutheran Church 585 West 41st Ave. Supported by Faith Life Insurance

Amazing Auction

Saturday, Nov. 20th, 2010 12 noon to 4:00 pm at The German Canadian Care Home 2010 Harrison Drive, Vancouver

Free Admission

ADMISSION $1.00 CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE

THAILAND, COME & kitesurfe Warm ocean! Big winds everyday! Miles of empty beach! The time of your life! 604-720-8746

604-630-3300

Baking & Preserves, Crafts & Cards, Attic Treasures, Jewellery, Books, Tea Room, Raffle, Auction

DESIGNER

Travel Destinations

To advertise call

Collingwood Neighbourhood House

free admission featuring arts & crafts by local artisans

Tel: (604) 713-8273 Tel: (604) 713-8273 (604) 713-8273 Email: Email: britanniacraftfair@live.ca britanniacraftfair@live.ca Email:

1655

4530

Acupuncture

Christmas Calendar

Britannia Secondary School – Gyms A&B Britannia A&B BritanniaSecondary SecondarySchool School – – Gyms Gyms A&B 1001 Cotton Drive, Vancouver, B.C. V5L 3T4 1001 CottonDrive, Drive,Vancouver Vancouver, B.C. V5L 3T4 1001 Cotton

Christmas Calendar

Registered Massage Services

4060

K- FAIRHAVEN THRIFT SALE 2720 E. 48th Ave

92 -West Van Estate Sale!

4051

Christmas Craft Fair

Browse through 150 tables of unique handmade gifts

Saturday, Nov. 27th 10am - 4pm

Admission: cash or food donation

Steveston Community Centre 4111 Moncton St. Richmond

Info: 604-718-8080

1675

Holiday Helper

BOOK YOUR SANTA PHOTO SESSION NOW! Santa is visiting Intuition Photography on Granville Island Nov 27 & 28 - Dec 4 & 5. Avoid the mall line-ups! Call Janine at 604-563-5084 or visit our website: www.intuitionphoto.com

CHRISTMAS LIGHT INSTALLATION Santa doesn't deliver to houses without lights – you want Santa to stop in, don’t you?

Handy ‘D’ • 604-722-5684


F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

Financial Services

5035

Cut Your Debt by up to 70% DEBT Forgiveness Program Avoid Bankruptcy, Stops Creditor Calls. Much lower Payments at 0% Interest. We work for You, not Your Creditors.

Call 1-866-690-3328 www.4pillars.ca

DEBT CONSOLIDATION PROGRAM We help Canadians repay debts, reduce or eliminate interest, regardless of you credit. Steady income? You may qualify for instant help. Considering bankruptcy? Call us first 1-877-220-3328 Free consultation. Government approved program, BBB member

NEED CASH AND OWN A VEHICLE?

You keep your keys and drive away with cash. Call Got Keys? Got Cash! (604) 760-9629

http://www.gotkeysgotcash.com

5040

Business Opps/ Franchises

Seeking

PIZZAPRENEURS Since 2003 Rocky Mountain Flatbread Restaurants have been winning awards for “Best Pizza,” “Best Green Business” & “Best Family Experience!” We are now offering franchise opportunities to passionate Hospitality Entrepreneurs. An unbelievable opportunity to build your own buisness & take control of your financial futures. Experience our winning organic family restaurant concept at 1876 West 1st Ave., Vancouver. Email: dominic@rockymountainflatbread.ca for an appointment. #1 JANITORIAL FRANCHISE Customers, (Office Cleaning), Training and support. Financing. www.coverall.com 604-434-7744 info@coverallbc.com

5060

Legal Services

#1 IN PARDONS Remove your criminal record. Express Pardons offers the FASTEST pardons, LOWEST prices, and it’s GUARANTEED. BBB Accredited. FREE Consultation Toll-free: 1-866-416-6772 www.ExpressPardons.com

5070

Money to Loan

Get Cash Today!

Use your vehicle as collateral Borrow up to $10,000!

Real Car Cash Loans

604-777-5046

7005

Body Work

DELIGHTFUL MASSAGE Certified non sexual Call 778-323-9177 RELAXING MASSAGE very clean/private. 9am-11pm, 7days, D/town & Kits. Anie 604-684-8773

**RELIEVE ROAD RAGE**

604-739-3998

JUNE’S MASSAGE

Treat, train couple sex problems, pain. DON’T WORK NO CHARGE within 10 min.

www.sexclinic.tw

$40UP IN/OUT Cell: 604-603-3638

7005

Body Work

RELAXING SWEET FULL BODY MASSAGE 604-321-8296

7010

HOME SERVICES 8055

Cleaning

8073

Drainage

Crown Roofing & Drainage Residental Div. Roofing installations & repairs. 604-327-3086

Personals

GENTLEMEN! Attractive discreet, European lady is available for company 604-451-0175

DRAINAGE, SEWER & WATER ASPHALT & CONCRETE REM. Call Tobias 604 782-4322 Mia Casa − Drain Tile/Sewer Line Water Line Repairs / Replacement & Cleaning. Vince 604-941-6060, Al 604-783-3142

5505

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: The estate of Ernest John Burchell also known as Ernest J. Burchell, Ernest Burchell and E.J. Burchell, deceased, formerly of 5181 Wales Street, Vancouver BC V5T 3M5 Creditors and others having claims against the Estate are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the VANCOUVER CITY SAVINGS CREDIT UNION, Attention: Hamlata Dayal at 183 Terminal Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 5R8 on or before December 22, 2010, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor then has notice. Vancouver City Savings Credit Union, Executor, Peterson Stark Scott, Solicitors NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: THE ESTATE OF MARIA ROCIO EUGENIA MORALES, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS ROCIO MORALES AND MARIA ROCIO MORALES, DECEASED NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of Maria Rocio Eugenia Morales, late of Vancouver, who died on December 22, 2009 are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Administrator c/o 700 - 401 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6B 5A1, on or before January 1, 2011 after which date the Administrator will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which he has notice. David Barrera Administrator By: Richards Buell Sutton LLP Attention: Angela M. Spanjers NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Notice if hereby given that creditors and others having claims against the following estate: GORDON DOUGLAS CAIRNS, formerly of 470 West 22nd Avenue Vancouver BC V5Y 2G5, Deceased, who died on April 13th, 2010, and to anyone knowing the whereabouts of Patrick Gordon Cairns also known as Patrick Gordon Brown, and Stephen Michael Cairns also known as Stephen Michael Brown, are hereby required to send full particulars thereof to the undersigned Executors, c/o Kenneth B. Krag, 228 - 8055 Anderson Road, Richmond, B. C. V6Y 1S2, on or before the 31st day of March, 2011, after which date the Executor will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims that have been received. Richard James Beardsley and Carol Ayako Beardsley, Executors.

8075

Drywall

8087

Excavating

# 1 BACKHOE, EXCAVATOR & BOBCAT

one mini, drainage, landscaping, stump / rock / cement / oil tank removal. Water / sewer line, 24 hours Call 341-4446 or 254-6865

Butterfly Cleaning Inc. ‘‘Moving out, Home & Office’’ Bonded, Prof & Affordable. 604-781-4374 CLEANING SERVICE. Reas rates, specializing in homes. Guar work. Refs avail. 604-715-4706 EXP CLEANING ladies avail 7 days/wk. Bonded. Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond 604-928-0025 H.C. Office / House Cleaning Quality & Experience. Bonded & Insured. 604-725-0856 PRIVATE CLEANER Mon - Sat, • Houses • Apartments • Offices • 20 yrs experience. 604-669-9255 QUALITY CLEANING. Exc refs. Res/com. Move in/out. Carpets + pressure wash’g. 778-895-3522

8060

Concrete

CONCRETE SPECIALIST Sidewalk, Driveway, Patio Exposed Aggregate, remove & replacing

Reasonable rates. 35 yrs. exp. For free estimates call Mario

253-0049

CONCRETE & ASPHALT

• Removal & Replace • Free Disposal • Free Estimates • Quality Guaranteed • Fully Insured • Commercial / Residential

LMD Ltd. 604-540-6567

A. FOUNDATIONS, Retaining walls, Stairs, Driveways, Sidewalks. Any concrete project. We also do block, & stone work. Free ests. Call Basile 604-690-3316 ASPHALT & CONCRETE REMOVAL /JACK HAMMERING Call Tobias 604 782-4322 Concrete Specialist. Driveways, sidewalks, exposed aggregate & patios. Santino 604.254.5551 CONCRETE SPECIALIST, patio sidewalk, driveway, exposed aggregate reas rate 604-764-2726 L & L CONCRETE. All types: Stamped, Repairs, Pressure Wash, Seal Larry 778-882-0098

8073

Drainage

DRAIN TILES, sewer lines, water lines & sumps. Mini excavation 604-230-1472 or 604-327-0885

Drywall Specialists • Framing Renovations • Restoration Honest, Reliable & Affordable

604-618-1520 or 778-321-3980

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

J.A. CONSTRUCTION

Specializing in drywall & textured ceiling repairs, drywall finishing, stucco repairs, painting. Fully insured.

604-916-7729 JEFF

CITY LINK DRYWALL LTD WCB, liability insured. 20 yrs exp. Call Indy. Free Est. 604-780-5302 *Drywall * Taping * Texture * Stucco*Painting * Steel stud framing Quality Home 604-725-8925

FIJI ISLANDS

DRYWALL Boarding, Taping & Painting cell: 604-318-3584 VICTORIA DRYWALL LTD. 25 yrs exp. Reno’s & New Constr. Call Bruno ★ 604-313-2763

Wayne The Drywaller

Quality Drywall Finishing. Textured Ceilings & Repair. Renov Specialist. No job too small. 837-1785

8080

Electrical

#1167 LIC Bonded. BBB, lrg & sm jobs, expert trouble shooter, WCB, low rates, 24/7. 617-1774. A. LIC. ELECTRICIAN #19807 Semi-retired wants small jobs only. 604-689-1747, pgr 604-686-2319 A Lic’d. Electrician #30582. Rewiring & Reno, Appliance/Plumbing. Rotor Rooter & Hydro Pressure Jetting Service, 604-255-9026 - 778-998-9026 Free Estimates / 24 Hr Service ABACUS ELECTRIC.ca Lic Elect Contr 97222. 40 yrs exp. 1 stop! Reas. rates! BBB. 778-988-9493.

ELECTRIC AVE Installations. Electrian lic# 99207, Res/comm, www.electric-ave.ca 604-215-0562 LIC. ELECTRICIAN #37309 Commercial & residential renos & small jobs. 778-322-0934. QUALIFIED RESIDENTIAL & Commercial Electrical Contractor. Cert. 92294.. Nick 778-237-2132 YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 service call. Insured. Lic # 89402. Fast same day service guaranteed. We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

Tim Stephens' Astral Reflections Aries March 21 - April 19: A month of mellow understanding, gentle love, intellectual pursuits, legal, travel, cultural and religious involvements begins Monday morning. As your planet (Mars) is in this same area until early December, the first two weeks of this period will be intense, memorable and “high stakes.” You could fall in love, engage in a major lawsuit, travel afar – something unusual, a once-in-a-decade thing. Be honest, true-hearted; if you are not, the rest of December, into January, could bring retribution from higher-ups. Someone is ready for love with you. You’re romantic, Friday/Saturday! Taurus April 20-May 20: The weeks ahead accent depths, mysteries, investments and debts, lust, lifestyle changes, health diagnosis and cures. Your subconscious desires swell to the surface. A big decision or commitment might be demanded of you. For the next two weeks, these matters are more intense, more “impatient” than usual – and might also have more “strings attached” than is healthy. Be cautious, don’t be rushed into a situation or promise. Chase money Sunday to Tuesday – luck’s mixed, so be alert. Errands, paperwork, casual friends frustrate Wednesday, succeed Thursday. Home, family Friday onward. Gemini May 21-June 20: Drudgery ends, fresh horizons blow in, now to late December. A “quiet” relationship might take off like a rocket, or a new one begin. Links, confrontations, opportunities, challenges, competition, enmity, attraction – all grow intense. But in all the intensity, even in enmity, there is a definite streak of friendship, buoyancy and hope. A mingling effect can occur – e.g., love/hate, or you might become “best enemies.” Relocation and business/fame opportunities arise. Maturity, flexibility, diplomacy and an eagerness to join are your success tools. You’re energetic, charming this week!

Cancer June 21-July 22: Work and health issues loom large for the next four weeks. These are most intense to Dec. 7, as work swells and the stakes rise in your reputation and career zones. A working partnership might be volatile, but if you can keep tempers level, a splendid success is possible. Rest, withdraw to plan and contemplate Sunday to Tuesday eve. Midweek, your energy and charisma step up a notch – start projects, tasks. Chase money, or spend, Friday/ Saturday. This month ahead will favour machinery. This week, buy it Friday, but watch for electrical/tech faults. Romance? Next week. Leo July 23-Aug. 22: The weeks ahead offer romance, pleasure, beauty, creative surges and speculative urges. This is your time to accent your own desires, to take a chance on your talents – to expand and express yourself! A semi-romantic relationship could take off with fireworks the first two weeks, or a new, intense romance could spark. However, neither of these is likely to emerge into a stable marriage. You might wed, swiftly and impulsively, but create huge tensions as a result. Be patient. 2011 is your time. Your hopes, popularity soar early week. Rest, midweek. You shine, Friday/Saturday! Virgo Aug. 23-Sept. 22: Home, children, diet, nutrition, Mother Nature, gardening, parks, rest, hibernation, security, real estate – these form your “best world” for the month ahead. You might invest in property, or renovate or improve your present abode, especially over the immediate two weeks ahead. That’s good, BUT be aware of two “unforeseens” – 1) an unpredictable reaction by your mate, and/or 2) electrical issues. Make sure both are “settled” before you begin. You’ve had a bit of a wild ride in relationships over the last seven years. Decide now with whom you’ll go to the future.

Fencing & Decking EST 1991

Call Ron 604.377.1345 MINI-EXCAVATOR: Lot grading and levelling, concrete removal and demolition. 604-306-8599

8090

Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panel for Sale & Installation 8291 No.5 Rd Richmond Call 604-275-3158

To advertise call

604-630-3300

Flooring/ Refinishing

8105

Hardwood Floor Refinishing Repairs & Staining Installation Free Estimates

Century Hardwood Floors 604-376-7224 www.centuryhardwood.com

HENRY’S

HARDWOOD FLOOR SERVICES Sanding & Refinishing Installation Quality Workmanship Free Estimates Fully Licensed & Insured

Fencing/Gates

S&S LANDSCAPING & FENCING

ALL FLOOR COVERINGS Repair & Replace. Material sales Dwight, 604-732-3057 I’ll show you the inexpensive route www.fccarpets.shawwebspace.ca

604-771-8885

ALL ABOUT FLOORS Hardwood, Laminate. Free Estimates. Call Mo 778-789-4333

Artistry of Hardwood Floors

Refinish, sanding, install, dustless Prof & Quality work 604-219-6944 INSTALLATION REFINISHING, Sanding. Free est, great prices. Satisfaction guar. 604-518-7508

8120

Real Estate Services

3 Bdrm-RENT TO OWN Poor Credit Ok 604-857-3597 ★A RENT TO OWN! ★ If you have a small down payment, I have a nice home for you! Less then perfect credit OK. Call Kim 604-628-6598

6007

BUSINESSES FOR SALE

ESTABLISHED TOW TRUCK BUSINESS FOR SALE due to health problem. Great cash base business especially in bad & snowy weather. $10,000 $12,000 income per mth. For info 604-729-1003 or after 4:30pm & weekends 778-839-9762

6008

Condos/ Townhouses

6008-14

Maple Ridge/ Pitt Mead.

RENT TO OWN, If you have a small down payment, I have a home for you. Less then perfect credit ok. Call Kelly 604-418-3162

6020

Commercial/Residential 2837 Kingsway, Vancouver

Tel: 604-603-9655

One call does it all...

ANYTHING IN WOOD Hardwood flrs, install, refinishing. Non-toxic finishes. 604-782-8275

604-630-3300

Golden Hardwood & Laminate Prof install, refinishing, sanding, and repairs. 778-858-7263

Ads continued on next page

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-01

Real Estate

6020-01

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-01

Real Estate

● DIFFICULTY SELLING?●

Expired Listing No Equity High Pymts?

uSELLaHOME.com

$99 can sell your home 574-5243 Chilliwack Promontory 1880sf 2br 2.5ba home, stunning view $379K 392-6065 id5266 Delta Price Reduced studio condo, 19+ complex, pool, park, $99,900 597-8361 id4714 Maple Ridge spotless 947sf 1br condo above snrs cent 55+ $219,900 466-1882 id5262 New Westminster Open House Sun 2-4, 301, 505-9th St, immaculate 620sf 1br top fl condo $147,900 778-231-1926 id5251 Sry Sullivan Mews ground lvl 1200sf 2br 2ba tnhse, 55+complex $220K 834-6935 id5136 Sry E Newton 1 acre lot with 2600sf 6br 2.5ba bungalow $479,900 778-549-2056 id5198 Sry Fleetwood 2865sf 5br 3ba home w/suite, 9901sf lot $569,900 715-4048 id5255 Sry Newton Investor Alert, 2 homes on 3/4 acre lot, subdivide? $700K 596-6572 id5260 S. Surrey 1700sf 2 or 3br 2.5ba exec gated townhome, 19+ $434,900 809-5974 id5265 Sry Panorama 2675sf 4br home on subdividable 7724sf lot $469K 778-999-3387 id5272 Vanc Price Reduced updated 1900sf 4br 2ba w/suite $699,900 778-549-6858 id5258

Houses - Sale

We Will Take Over Your Payment Until We Sell Your Property. No Fees. Call Kristen today (604) 786 - 4663

www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

❏WE BUY HOMES❏

Any Price, Any Condition Any Location. No Fees! No Risk ! (604) 812-3718 OR (604) 786-4663

www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

6020-26

North Vancouver

YOU MUST see this Apt. in a prime position in Lower Lonsdale. 2 Br, 2 Baths In Suite wd, Gas fp, 6 Appls. Price $425,000 for 974sf. Phone: 604-988-6192

6030

Lots & Acreage

BUILDING LOT, New West. 33’ x 130’. $75,000 in services paid! No HST! 4,240 total sq. feet. Priced to sell! $318,888. 604-726-0677

Real Estate

★ ALERT: WE BUY HOUSES ★ Foreclosure Help! Debt Relief! No Equity! Don’t Delay! Call us First! 604-657-9422

Glass Mirrors

Store Fronts • Windows & Doors Broken Glass • Foggy Glass Patio Doors • Mirrors • Etc.

REAL ESTATE 6005

Flooring/ Refinishing

8105

604-270-2358, Cell: 604-788-6458

EXCAVATOR • BACKHOE DUMP TRUCK All Phases of Residential Site Work

Fencing/Gates

West Coast Cedar Installations

WWW.CATSFORHIRE.COM

Estimates are Fast & Free 40 Years Servicing the Industry A.S.B.A ENTERPRISE Comm/ Res, Free Est, $20/hr incls supplies, Insured, 604-723-0162

8090

EW49

www.bcforeclosures.com 5 BR home from $18,000 down $1,800/mo. 604-538-8888, Alain @ Sutton WC Realty W. Rock

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Libra Sept. 23-Oct. 22: The weeks ahead feature travel, paperwork, errands, details, casual acquaintances and siblings, and communications. Usually this would be a fine time to buy phones, computers, etc. – but lemons lurk until Dec. 7 (and to some degree until March 2011) so delay such purchases if you can. As in the last few weeks, you might meet a “viable” potential mate while travelling or talking. But here, too, glitches exist – long-term tension and/or an unpredictable relationship. Patience, Libra – real love’s coming! Enjoyment, happiness abound this week! Be ambitious Thursday (morning best). Scorpio Oct. 23-Nov. 21: The month ahead emphasizes money, possessions, sensual involvements and memory or rote learning. (This is always your best 30 days of the year to memorize anything – vocabulary, foreign languages, math techniques, etc.) Sensual = anything from good drapes, beautiful paintings, to someone’s closeness. Buy/sell, seek new clients, ask for a pay raise. BUT in all this, go slow before Dec. 8, as pitfalls exist. E.g., you might get too sensual and alienate a romantic prospect, or push too fast for a pay raise and spark tension. Love, legal, intellectual, travel success Thursday! Sagittarius Nov. 22-Dec. 21: Your energy, charisma and effectiveness rise now through December! Your sexual magnetism, determination and “wilfulness” have already grown over the last few weeks – now these increase also. Start new projects, ask favours, see and be seen, attend “in person,” get your way, negotiate – you’re in charge! But, especially until Dec. 7, don’t recklessly overpower other’s needs, desires and sensibilities, or you could create “invisible rebellions” that erupt later, just when you need allies. This week’s happy. Financial, sexual luck soars Thursday! Love, wisdom Friday/Saturday. Capricorn Dec. 22-Jan. 19: Take a break. During the four

Find your perfect home at

househunting.ca

Nov. 21 - Nov. 27 weeks ahead, rest, contemplate and plan. Your energy will ebb. Attend to government-related tasks, institutional and charitable involvements. Fulfil obligations, but don’t volunteer for new ones. Avoid the spotlight. Avoid places where belligerent people gather – bars, dark alleys. Chores call Sunday to Tuesday – get them done. Relationships face you Tuesday eve through Thursday – be diplomatic, even evasive before Thursday. True friends, real loves, show Thursday. Mysteries, big finances, lifestyle decisions come Friday/Saturday – good results! Aquarius Jan. 20-Feb. 18: Friends, popularity, wish fulfilment, optimism, flirtation and happiness visit for the next few weeks! You might face an unexpected dilemma in which your money and your wishes don’t agree, and you might have to choose one. Pick the dream – maybe you can accomplish it for less.You might discover that the person you “possess” doesn’t mix well with your friends. Choose friends – but don’t listen to friends’ advice about money. Romance, flirtation, pleasure, a risk-taking mood buoy you Sunday to Tuesday. Tackle chores midweek. Exciting meetings Friday/Saturday – forgo eccentricity. Pisces Feb. 19-March 20: Your career, neighbourhood prestige, relations with parents and bosses, are emphasized for the month ahead. I’ve already warned you that bosses are temperamental. That continues to Dec. 7, so be diplomatic, good-humoured. Expect unexpected reactions, results! Hustle to perform tasks, to meet deadlines. Bosses love eager screw-ups more than competent grouches. (In some fields, engineering, math, medicine, Pisces are truly favoured now.) Sink into “domestic rejuvenation” early week. Creative, romantic success Thursday. Tackle chores Friday/Saturday – practise safety Saturday. timstephens@shaw.ca • Reading: 416-686-5014


EW50

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

HOME SERVICES 8125

Gutters

8125

Gutters

@

Carpentry • Painting • Ceramic Tiles Fences • Kitchens • Bathrooms Basement Suites • Roof • Plumbing Leak Repair • Decks

Vancouver Division Since 1985 • Gutter Installation Cleaning & Repairs • Roofing & Roof Repairs • Moss Control, Removal & Prevention 25 year Warranteed Leaf & Needle Guard

CALL NOW for 20% OFF WCB – Fully Insured 100% Money Back Guarantee

604-340-7189

Alliance

Windows & Gutter Cleaning • Professional Power Washing • Gutter Cleaning • Window Cleaning done by hand • Contract Pricing • Will Beat Any Reputable Estimate Work Done by Professionals

Call Steve

604-723-2526

Handyperson

WEST SIDE HANDYMAN

YOUR HOME GUTTER SERVICES FALL SPECIALS

8130

Full Seamless Gutter Installation/Repairs Soffits All jobs Guaranteed. Fully insured/WCB covered Will beat any competitors price

Residential & Commercial 604

Cell:

Professional Powerwash Gutters cleaned & repaired Since 1984, 604-339-0949 PRP GUTTER CLEANING & GUTTER REPAIRS. Free estimates 604-764-0399 Waters Home Maintenance Gutter Cleaning, repairs, windows Free estimate 604-738-6606

8130

Handyperson

604

671-0288

Complete Home Maint./Repairs Certified Trained Pros. For that small job. Rates you can afford. RJR Small Projects Division

604-439-9417 GUTTER , yard cleaning, and rubbish removal. Best price in town. 778-580-6560

224-1005

Part of RJR group

604-202-6118 DAHIPP CONTRACTING Handyman Services Baths, Kitchens, etc 604.817.0718

8140

Heating

Lorenzo & Son Plumbing & Heating (604) 312-6311 Local Licensed Plumbers & Gas Fitters

8150

Kitchens/Baths

TRUSTED HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Apartments & Condos

1 BR + den 750 sf, Mountain view, u/g prkg, insuite w/d, d/w, nr shops & transit, ns, np, seniors 55+, W. King Edward, $1340/mo Quiet Complex. 604-737-1125

6508

Apt/Condos

MOVE-IN BONUS

GEORGIAN TOWERS 1450 WEST GEORGIA ST.

1 & 2 bedrooms starting from $1230 Heart of Downtown, easy transit access. Large gym, laundry on every floor, dishwashers in all suites, in/outdoor parking.

Bathtub Reglazing

604-878-5232 SINCE 1997

BEST PRICE! Bath, kitchen, plumbing, flooring, painting, etc. Call Mic, 604-725-3127

6508

Apt/Condos

204- 5725 Agronomy Rd. UBC 2 br corner, 2 bath, 900sf, granite, balc. lease, ns, np, $2400, now, Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt BEAUTIFUL APTS. 1 & 2 BR avail. Rates from $800. Call 604-327-9419.

Metrotown Area - Bby

Updated Studio & 1 BR Apts. Rental Incentives Offered. Rent includes heat and hot water.

CALL (604) 438-4544 leasing@burnabycentre.com

2 BR + den, updated, mtn & water view ‘see the ships go by’, enclosed balcony, end unit, deck, ns np $1550 Immed 604-980-5689

8155

Landscaping

HEDGE REMOVAL, stump grinding, excavator, concrete removal, etc Steve 604-724-3670

8160

Lawn & Garden

HEDGE SHRUB TREE & STUMP REMOVAL FREE ESTIMATE INSURED

224-3669

★ SD ENTERPRISES ★

Autumn Clean-up:

604.597.1171 mrtubman.ca

Gardening • Landscaping • Pruning • Lawncare • Cedar Fencing • 20% seniors discount • Free estimates! Call Terry, 604-726-1931

KITCHEN & BATHS, renos, tiles, plumbing, painting. Insured, refs, Quality work Adam 604-512-6010

ASK ABOUT OUR $159 GARDEN CLEANUP SPECIAL 43 yrs exp. 604-726-0166

5 year warranty – BBB rated A

6522

Furnished Accommodation

2 BR, corner ste, city view, W.Georgia @ Bute, Coal Harbour new reno, built-in sound syst., w/d $1750 avail now 604-603-4111

6540

Houses - Rent

185 W 45 Ave. Oakridge. 5Br 4.5 bath, yard maintained by owner, 3000sf, lease, ns, np, now $3200. Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt 5 BR, 3 up & 2 down, 3 levels character home, 2 bath, sun rm, storage, Clark & 1st, np, lease, avail now, $2600, 604-720-9268 DEC 1 Newly renovated 4bdrm 11/2 bath uppr flr,5 appl, garage, deck, $2250/mth+60%util. n/s. pets considered. 604-880-0161

LANGARA GARDENS

2 BR, 2 Baths, nr Granville Mrkt area, new, huge private deck w/downtown view, top line appls, np, ns, refs. $2195,604-328-0606

• Refinish old bathtubs • 4 hour dry time From $325 standard size

BURNABY CENTRE

rentals@capreit.net www.caprent.com

1602-3438 Vanness St. 1 Br, balc. 580sf, mtn & city view, Joyce Stn. lease, np, ns, $1200, Dec 1, Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt

#3 - 8652 Joffre Ave, Burnaby

6602

8160

Lawn & Garden

WILDWOOD LANDSCAPING Hedge Trimmimg & Tree Pruning & Hedge Removal Fall Clean Up Chaffer Control & Lawn Restoration. Comm/Strata/Res Aerating & Power Raking. Free Estimates. 604-893-5745 EXP. GARDENER. Fall clean ups, leaf removal, weeding, pruning, new soil Ron 604-202-2176

Ny Ton Gardening Tree cutting & topping, yard cleanup, trimming, hedging, 604-782-5288 T. TRAN -604-723-2468, Tree Pruning, hedging, weeding, leaf cleanup, gutters, etc. Reliable. TREES • HEDGES • SHRUBS Pruning.Shaping.Removal. Fruit Topiary. Wolfgang 604-738-4016 YARD CLEAN-UP, lawns cut & lawn aeration, hedge trim, rubbish removal, gutters. 604-773-0075

8175

Masonry

MASONRY REPAIRS •Stone Walls •Bricks •Chimneys & more. George • 604-365-7672 NORTHLAND MASONRY. Rock, slate, brick, granite, pavers. 20 yrs exp on the N. Shore. No job to small.. Will 604-805-1582

8180

Home Services

BE COOL! COLD FEET? Talk to Someone You Trust.

CENTRAL AIR INSTALLED FURNACES CONDITIONING Sears also installs ROOFING, WINDOWS, WINDOW COVERINGS & CARPETING

Suites/Partial Houses

601 West 57th Ave, Van

Spacious 1, 2 & 3 BR Rental Apartments and Townhouses in the Oakridge area at West 57th Ave and Cambie St. Included are heat & hot water, plus a spacious storage locker. Many suites have big patios and balconies with gorgeous views. Quiet and tasteful gardens, swimming pools, hot tub, gym, laundry facilities, gated parking and 16 shops & services. Near Oakridge Centre, Canada Line stations, Langara College, Churchill High School, Langara Golf Course and much more. Sorry no pets. For more information: 604-327-1178 info-vnc@langaragardens.com www.langaragardens.com Managed by Dodwell Strata Management Ltd.

★RENT TO OWN! ★ If you have a small down payment, I have a nice home for you! Less then perfect credit OK. Call Kim 604-628-6598 STOP RENTING-RENT TO OWN ● No Qualification - Low Down ● CHILLIWACK - 9557 Williams, 3 bdrm, 1 bath, cozy HOUSE on 49x171’ lot, excellent investment property in heart of town..... $888/M SURREY- 6297 134 St. Solid 7 Bdrm HOUSE w/3 bdrm suite on 1/4 acre lot with views... $1,688/M WHITE ROCK - 15532 Madrona Dr 3 bdrm, HOUSE, quiet st, huge yard, dble garage, 2 yr old roof....$1,388/M Call (604)812-3718 or (604)786-4663

www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

6602

Suites/Partial Houses

2 BR Basement suite, new, ns, np, $1100 avail imm. Main & 64th604-374-3738

2 BDR BSMNT Suite, $990 Upper Deer Lake, seprate entrnce, share W/D, incl heat, cbl, elec intrnt, NS/NP, new reno,cls trnst, schl, mall, ref reqrd, 604 432-7526

24 HOURS 1-800-4-MY-HOME • (1-800-469-4663)

8185

AFFORDABLE MOVING

3 BR, 2 Ba, top flr, exc cond never rented. s/room, Renfrew & 1st $1750+util Dec. 604-603-5082

1, 3, 5, 7 or 10 Ton $ From

1 to 3 Men

45 We accept Visa, Mastercard & Interac Licenced & Insured Local & Long Distance

FREE ESTIMATES Seniors Discount

604-537-4140 www.affordablemoversbc.com

DUNBAR, 2 Bdrms, garden level suite, 5 appl, close to UBC, shops, on bus routes, $1100 incl util, avail immed 604-671-1664 or 604-224-7085 TOP FLOOR, 1 bdrm apt in Character House in Kits. Pets are welcome. Heat & h/w incl. Avail. Dec 1st. $800 Call 604-734-4786

VAN 30TH/MAIN, 3 BR gr lev ste, sep W/D, f/bath, prkg. NS/NP. Avail Dec 15. $1300 incls utls. 604-879-1454 or 778-389-9925 VANCOUVER, 60TH/KNIGHT. Clean, bright 2 BR bsmt. 1,200 sf. $750 incl util. Ns/np. Ref’s a must, suits quiet people. 604-649-3525

6605

Townhouses Rent

FURNISHED ONE BDRM townhouse on SEASIDE walk, False Creek, Granville Isld. $1500/mon Dec 1st. Min rental period 2 mon. max 6 months. 604-736-7291

8195

Painting/ Wallpaper

AMIGO'S MOVING. Delivery. Storage. No Job too Small or Big. Clean up, Garage, Basement. Call 604-782-9511

ACCURATE PAINTING - Int & ext. Competitive prices. 15+ yrs exp. Henry cell 604-754-9661

FLYING SCOTSMAN

MILANO Painting 604-551-6510 Int/Ext. Good Prices. Free Est. Written Guar. Prof & Insured.

604-377-2503

PASSION FOR PAINTING Int & Ext, power wash. Free Est. WCB. David 604-942-0115

MOVING Formerly known as Popeyes Moving www.popeyesmovingbc.com

TWO BROTHERS MOVING Local & Long Distance 604-720-0931 • bc.moving@gmail.com • TwoGuysWithATruck.ca Moving, Storage, Free EST 604-628-7136. Visa, OK

8193

Oil Tank Removal

FLECK CONTRACTING LTD.

• Oil Tank Removal • Work complies with city bylaws BC Mainland • Always fair & reasonable rates • Excellent references

For Free Estimates Call

Off: 604-266-2120 Cell: 604-290-8592

Serving West Side since 1987

STORMWORKS

● Oil Tank Removal ● Recommended ● Insured ● Reasonable Rates

604-724-3670

8195

Painting/ Wallpaper

ARBUTUS PAINTING

Andrew’s Painting & Wallpaper 25yrs exp. WCB/Ins. Refs Free est off seas. rates 604-785-5651

AJK MOVING LTD.

Moving. Storage. Deliveries Local & Long Distance MOVERS.... Residential. Commercial. Industrial. Truck for Clean-ups

• Fully Insured • References • Green Products

Call Today!

604-338-2339 FREE ESTIMATES

BESTWAY PAINTING & DECORATING

Interior / Exterior • Small / Big Jobs Comm./Res. • Fully Insured AURA Stone Countertops Crown molding installation. Faux finish, staining & custom painting. $150 Off (certain restrictions apply)

John 778-881-6737

D&M PAINTING

Interior/Exterior Specialist

• Includes all Taxes • Licenced & Insured • Professional Piano Movers

604-708-8850

3 & 5 Ton truck, fully insured, lowest price! NO tax, Social Asst. accepted. 778-580-6560 AAA ADVANCE MOVING Experts in all kinds of Moving, Storage & Packing. Different from the Rest. 604-861-8885 ABBA MOVERS bsmt clean 1-4 ton Lic, ins’d from $35/hr, 2 men $45 day honest 26 yrs est 506-7576.

URBAN PAINTING ...High quality, material discounts, warranty. & great refs. 604-836-9675 AAA Professional int/ext painter & wall paperer. Guar work. Free est. John 604-318-2059 (Kits)

8200

Decks/Patios/ Railings

Central Decking Co.

• 24 hr. service, water damage • Built-rebuild decks, deck repair • Specialize in seamless polyurethane membrane deck coatings • Sundecks – Balconies – Patios • Waterproofing

604-618-0631

centraldecking@gmail.com

Dream Decks Trex Pro Platinum certified installer

For All Your Decking Needs Vinyl, Wood, Composite Decks marc@dreamdecks.ca

604.924.3746

www.dreamdecks.ca DECKS & FENCES, gates, front steps etc. John 778-998-5591 tarasoffconstruction.com

West Coast Cedar Installations Fencing & Decking EST 1991

604-270-2358, Cell: 604-788-6458

8205

Paving/Seal Coating

ALLEN Asphalt, concrete, brick, drains, foundations, walls, membranes 604-618-2304/ 820-2187

8220

Plumbing

ATLAS

Plumbing & Rooter Plugged Drains, Main Sewer Lines Water Service, Video Pipe Inspection Drain Tiles, Fixtures, Faucets Licensed, Insured & Bonded Hot Water Tanks, Seniors Discounts Call Today

731-8875

604-724-3832

• • • •

garage, basement, backyard.

Experienced Movers ~ 2 Men $50 ~

THOMAS MASTER MATCH PAINTING. Int & Ext. Good Prices, 18 yrs exp. 604-724-8648

Many Years Experience Fully Insured Top Quality, Quick Work Free Estimate

(604) 875-9072 873-5292

B&Y MOVING

T&H PAINTING Int/Ext res/comm painting, power wash, gutters, Free Est., Guar. 778-316-7709

VANCOUVER LTD.

arbutuspainting.com

Moving & Storage

2 BR, large, Dunbar & 40th, very bright garden level, all appls, heat & light, $1150, self-contained, 6 sky-lights, ns, np, 604-266-1953

BRAND NEW, 1 bdrm, $800. Hardwood flrs, new appls, own alarm & entrance. 59th/Ontario, nr Langara & transit, ns, np, avail now, 604-261-4633.. 880-9613

Moving & Storage

8185

GB GARDENING - lawn cut, trim, prune, clean up, power wash, free est. 778-988-5544 604-322-9412

604-685-7112 ext 5101

RENTALS 604-669-4185

1 BR, Kerrisdale, newly reno’d, 750sf, 5 appls incld wd, large patio, ug prkg, heat incld, ns, avail Dec 1, $1200, 604-732-3989

604-879-9191 Superior Cove Tops & Cabinets

604-618-9741

RENTALS 6505

• In business 50 years

Colin Malcolm, Insured

• Sales & Installation of 5’’ Continuous Gutter • Minor Repairs • Cleaning

DYNAMIC GUTTERS & Exteriors. Full seamless gutters. Installation repairs & soffits. All jobs guaranteed. Fully insured, bonded, WCB. Will beat any competitors price. 604-439-9417

Counter Tops, Custom Cabinets & Refacing NO HST til end of Dec

Northwest Arboriculture

EDGEMONT GUTTERS

Established 1963

Kitchens/Baths

Expert Pruning ISA By Certified Arborist Ornamental & Fruit Trees, Shrubs & Hedges

References Available

604-420-4800

8150

Licensed, Insured & Bonded Lic. Plumbers & Gas Fitters Over 20 years Experience Custom Renovations to Small Repairs

604-312-6311

Marty’s

Painting & Decorating Ltd. NO JOB TOO SMALL Quality work est. 1973

Colour Consulting Included Free Estimate 604-733-2865

PRIMO PAINTING

Certified Plumber & Gas Fitter * Reno’s & Repairs 24 hrs/day * Furnaces * Boilers * Hot Water Heating * Reasonable Rates * Hot Water Tanks

604-731-2443

Interior & Exterior

Christmas Special

15% OFF

Free Est. - 15 Years Exp. Insured /WCB

604-723-8434

10% Off with this Ad! Aman’s Plumbing Service, Lic. Gas Fitter, Reas. Rates. 778-895-2005


HOME SERVICES 8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

Since 1989

9129 Shaughnessy St.

.com

732-8453

All Renovations and Restoration Work 20 years in business

Hannah - 5 ⁄Hannah yrs. old Jaxon 11½ Almost Jaxon - 3 ⁄ yrs. old 14 Years Old! Years Old! 3

1

8220

4

4

Plumbing

★ 3 Licensed Plumbers ★ 66 years of exp. 604-830-6617 www.oceansidemechanical.com BS & SONS gas heating & plumbing. Certified. Renos, h/w tanks, boilers, drains. 24 hrs. 671-6815

CERT

PLUMBER- Lic/Ins

Exp- Reno’s - Repairs - Hot water Tanks. Shaun 604.727.9326

❑ Warranty ❑ References ❑ Fully Insured

8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

PLUMBERS

Lorenzo & Son Plumbing & Heating (604) 312-6311 Local Licensed Plumbers & Gas Fitters

8225

Power Washing

POWER WASH, Gutters, Fall clean up, junk removal, Free Est. Great rates! call 778-320-3441

8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

Call ThE Experts South Vancouver Mini-Public Storage

Repairs & Renos, general contracting. Insured, WCB, Licensed

604-318-4390 aaronrconstruction.com

SUNDECKS FENCES • STAIRS

30 years exp.

731-7709

drytech.ca RENOVATIONS 22-BUILD (222-8453) Showroom: 1230 West 75th Ave.

FERREIRA HOME IMPROVEMENTS Additions ★ Renovations Concrete Forming ★ Decks Garages ★ Bathrooms Ceramic Tile ★ Drywall Hardwood Flooring

GET OUT YOUR LIST!

Renovations

from concept to occupancy

Winner of Gold & Silver Georgie Awards

– Renovator Member of the Year

Winner of the National SAM Award

– Best Renovated Kitchen in Canada

We do all the fussy little jobs no one else wants to do. Complete home repairs. Workmanship and your Satisfaction Guaranteed. Est 1983. Ralph 682-8256

LUCKY METAL WORKS Fence & Gates Stainless Steel Door Window & Door Replacement Patio Covers & Sunrooms Andy: 604-719-8689 #158-11782 River Rd., RMD

When your house is great except… ❏ The kitchen’s too

small ❏ You need another bedroom ❏ The carport could be a two-car garage ❏ One bathroom just isn’t enough anymore

We Fix The “EXCEPTS…” Since 1978

604-987-5438

www.rjrrenovator.com

WELCRAFT RENOVATION

Quality Custom Cabinets & Countertops Kitchen, Bathroom, Basement Flooring, Decks, Painting Electrical, Plumbing

DAN (604) 339-2759

MOZAIK MOZAIK HANDYMAN HANDYMAN SERVICES SERVICES LTD.

• Painting • Electrical • Plumbing • Tiling • Carpentry Carpeting

Tel: 739-8786, Cell: 716-8687

8250

Special deal with this ad

8255

Roofing

RESIDENTIAL DIVISION LTD.

Tried & True Since 1902

• BBB • RCABC • GAF/ELK Master Elite Contractor • Residential Roofing • Liability Coverage and WCB • Designated Project Managers • Homes & Strata • Third Party Inspection Installations & Repairs Call 604-327-3086 for a free estimate •• 24 Hr Emergency Service Quote code 2010 for a 5% discount www.crownresidentialroofing.com

8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

8250

Roofing

BATH/KITCHEN Renos, decks, fencing, home repairs. Home Improvment Centre. 604-240-9081 KITCHEN & BATHS Home renovations, 30+ years experience. Call 604-731-7709 RENOVATIONS SKILLED CARPENTER + • Helper • Tools • Truck • Call 604-506-4519 RENOVATIONS & ADDITIONS Kitchens, Bathrooms, Suites. Ins. Refs, Charles 778-999-8072

8250

Roofing

#1 Roofing Company in BC

★ BATHROOM SPECIALIST★ Tiles, tub, vanity, plumbing, paint framing. From start to finish. Over 20 yrs exp. Peter 604-715-0030

21 YEARS IN SERVICE • BEST RATES

WE DO Basements Bathrooms Kitchens Drywall Painting Exteriors Decks & More!

(604) 773-4441

www.wilsongc.com Ask for Simon!

All types of Roofing Over 35 Years in Business Call now & we pay ½ the HST

604-588-0833

SALES@ PATTARGROUP.COM

WWW.PATTARGROUP.COM

drytech.ca drytech.ca ROOFING/ RE-ROOFING Leak Repairs & Chimney Repairs

SAVE $ 604-228-ROOF (7663)

Showroom: 1230 West 75th Ave.

•Re-Roofing •Repair •Maintenance SAVE $$$ WINTERIZE your roof NOW! Call Brad • 604-773-0492

8255

Rubbish Removal

604-RUBBISH 782-2474

BEARING WALLS removed, floors leveled, cathedral ceilings, garage leveled, door and window openings. 604-787-7484 D & M RENOVATIONS, Flooring, tiling, finishing. Fully Insured. Top quality, quick work 604-724-3832

All Types of Roofing, Re-Roofing & Repairs

Yes, we Remove & Recycle Anything

604-537-8523

SALTING & SNOW REMOVAL Backhoe, Dump Truck, Excavating

MASTERCRAFT ROOFING Ltd. Right the 1st time! Repairs, reroofing, garage, decks. Hart 322-5517 Topside Roofing 604-290-1650 Quality Workmanship. Prompt, Prof Service. Insured. Call Phillip

604-379-2641

Check us out at: www.pointgreyroofing.com

8309

Tiling

8335

Reasonable rates - Free Est. Pat 604-224-2112, anytime

8295

Snow Removal

SALTING & SNOW REMOVAL Backhoe, Dump Truck, and Excavating. Call (604) 290-5893

Stucco/Siding/ Exterior

Quality Home Improvement ★ Stucco ★ All Kinds. No Job Too Big or Small. 604-725-8925

Window Cleaning

Edgemont Building Maintenance • Power Washing • Window Cleaning • Gutter Cleaning

604-420-4800 Established 1963

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Sea Island Renovations

All home renovations, tiles, painting, drywall, flooring, etc. All work Gtd. Free Est. Ph: 604-771-9686

ALL CLEAR WINDOW & gutter cleaners. No streaks, no drips, right down to the corners. Quality work guaranteed. 604-519-0678

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T.G. TILES Marble, Slate, Granite Entry, kitchen, bath, patio, stairs. Prof Installation 604-760-7991

8315

Tree Services

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2000 BUELL LIGHTNING 1200 by Harley Davidson Pays $150 minimum for Full-Size Complete Vehicles. Free Removal! 2-Hr. Service in Most Areas

1991 PLYMOUTH Laser 2.0 L turbo, 113 k, 3 dr h/b, mint cond. $1,750. 604-983-3436 1994 FORD Tempo, auto, V6, 4 dr, good cond, lady driven, $2000 obo. 604-988-0347 2007 CHEV Aveo, only 14,000 kms, 4 dr 5 spd, fully warranted, 1 older driver $6300. 604-926-8400

49

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2008 CHEVY IMPALA LS 26K kms, Show rm cond, metallic coffee ext $16,500. 604.220.4144

9129

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RUBBISH REMOVAL

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778-237-ROOF (7663)

604-764-0399

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8300

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Rubbish Removal

* We Remove & Recycle Anything*

McNabb Roofing

PRP ROOFING

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Established 1946

HOME SERVICES

~ FREE ESTIMATES ~

A1 CONTRACTING. Bsmt, bath, kitchen cabinets, tiling, painting & decks. Dhillon, 604-782-1936

POINT GREY ROOFING

www.southvanminipublicstorage.com

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EW51

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F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

2000 CADILLAC Catera Sport, auto, full load, 155k, runs excellent, $4700 604-868-2149

Accelerate your car buying

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2000 NISSAN Pathfinder SE only 125k kms, mint cond, 4x4, exc deal $8,500 obo 604-833-4999

9160

Sports & Imports

1989 VOLVO, $1500, 4 door sedan, runs great, aircared Feb/ 11, must sell. Call 778-840-1961 2005 MAZDA 3 GS, auto, sedan, gray, great cond a/c, loaded $11,000. Call 604-990-5687 NEED CHEAP AUTOBODY ? www.cheapautobody.ca 604-341-7738


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

dashboard

Stunning R8 e-tron offers electrifying drive

Audi maps out green future with climate-friendly cars Graeme Fletcher Contributing writer

Munich—Of late, a number of manufacturers have revealed their respective plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and the footprint the automobile leaves in its wake. Audi is the latest company to map out its future. The new direction includes hybrids, plug-in hybrids and all-electric vehicles— it all falls under an initiative called e-tron (in Audi speak, e-tron is to electromobility what quattro is to all-wheel drive). At the Electromobility workshop, Audi had a number of rides available for test. The list included an A1 e-tron range- extended compact and the stunning all-electric R8 e-tron. The latter is one seriously electrifying drive and a world-class sports car in its own right. Based on the R8’s skeletal platform, the e-tron features a large lithium-ion battery (mounted behind the passengers for optimal balance), all the needed power electronics and four electric motors (two front, two rear). The latter ensures that the electric version retains Audi’s preferred allwheel-drive setup. However, the

The Audi R8 e-tron is a world-class sports car in its own right. proactive nature of the e-quattro system means the power can be directed to the wheel(s) best able to put torque to tarmac, and it

can torque vector by driving the outside rear motor faster than the others. Even with all of this electronic

trickery aboard, the R8 e-tron tips the scales at just 1,600 kilograms, which is about the same as the R8 V10 and its monster 5.2-litre V10

gasoline engine. The main battery has a total energy content of 53-kilowatt hours; however, the usable portion is limited to 42.4 kWh in the interest of service life (never fully recharging or depleting the battery extends its usable life enormously). Recharging the main battery takes eight hours when using a 220-volt outlet—a special fast-charge system cuts the charge time to just 2.5 hours. From a practical perspective, the R8 etron boasts a driving range of approximately 250 kilometres on a full charge and the ongoing assistance of regenerative braking. The net result is a riotous automobile that’s quite unlike anything I have driven. The four motors combine to deliver 308 horsepower, which is not too shabby. What makes the R8 e-tron such an electrifying ride, however, is the torque component. The electric motors generate a combined total of 442.5 pound-feet of torque from Rev One. The mind-blowing part is that after going through the gearboxes, the R8 e-tron launches off the line with a combined total of 3,319 lb-ft of torque! To put that into perspective, the R8 V10

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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dashboard

R8 e-tron set to go into production in late 2012 makes almost the same amount of torque after the gearbox and final drive, but not until 6,500 rpm. Obviously, having this much twisting power brings scorching performance. The R8 e-tron runs to 100 kilometres an hour in 4.8 seconds and it accomplishes the 60-to-120-km/h dash in the same time as most self-respecting sports cars take to get from 80 to 120 km/h. Trop the go pedal at 60 km/h and the speedometer’s needle flashes through 120 km/h in just 4.1 seconds as it races toward its electronically limited top speed of 200 km/h. The speed is

capped because of the tremendous draw higher speeds place on the battery. As impressive as the phenomenal torque plateau is, the noise this car makes is even more so. It’s basically silent. In my years covering the automotive beat, I have driven some seriously radical cars—the R8 e-tron takes the biscuit. The A1 e-tron is an all- electric vehicle for the first 50 km. Beyond that distance, it uses a gasolinepowered range extender. It is, in terms of its operation, similar to the Chevrolet Volt in that there is no direct connection between the

engine and wheels. The 254-cc engine drives a 15-kW generator, which supplies the electricity to charge the battery and/or power the electric motor. This strategy delivers a driving range of 250 km (from a 12-litre gas tank!) and a fuel consumption rate of just 1.9 L/100 km. The 12-kWh lithiumion battery, which operates at 270 volts, can be charged from a 220-volt outlet in less than three hours. The electric motor, which is mounted low and up front, delivers a continuous output of 61 hp and 111 lb-ft of torque. However, it can deliver a peak of 102

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er’s seat, it is virtually silent) and it’s impeccably smooth in spite of the fact it spins away at 5,000 rpm whenever it comes to life. Finally, the A1 e-tron’s instrumentation is to die for—the satinsilver dials and a pictogram show the driver exactly what’s going on at any given time. The A1 etron is currently undergoing fleet testing before series production, while the R8 e-tron is set to go into production in late 2012. If this is the future of the allelectric automobile, I’m an unabashed fan. Postmedia News

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hp and 177 lb-ft when the driver hammers the go pedal. This gives the four-seat A1 e-tron the wherewithal to run to 100 km/h in 10.2 seconds and on up to a top speed of 130 km/h. The drive proved just how integrated the extended-range system is in operation. The transition between all-electric and extendedrange modes is completely seamless. In fact, the only thing that gives the game away is a small “range” light that illuminates within the instrumentation. The Wankel (rotary) engine is also surprisingly quiet (from the driv-

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Rates sta rting

100 point certified Honda mechanical inspection ‘09 Honda Fit LX

from

VEHICLES INSPECTED BY

‘08 Honda Accord EX-L

Manual, 19,752 km, fuel saving local 5-speed with only 19,752 Auto, 45,237 km, very clean, local, 1-owner, luxury sedan, k’s, extended warranty extended warranty.

NOW $

14,995

Stk# HP4836A

‘08 Honda Civic LX

Auto, 67,188 km, very nicely equipped and fuel efficient, local, 1-owner sedan, just serviced, extended warranty

NOW $

15,995

Stk# HP4990

NOW $

19,800

Stk# HP4944

‘07 Honda Civic LX

D L O S 13,995

Auto, 83,748 km, clean economical sporty, local, 1-owner coupe, just serviced, extended warranty

NOW $

Stk# HP4923

‘08 Honda CR-V EX

‘08 Honda Element SC 2WD

Auto, 28,931 km beauty, local, 1-owner, 4x4, very nicely equipped, extended warranty

Auto, only 7,800 easy k’s, local, 1-owner, well equipped, extended warranty

NOW $

24,995

Stk# HP4955

Stk# HP4974

‘08 Honda CR-V EXL

Auto, 46,433 km, very nicely equipped, local 1-owner luxury AWD SUV, just serviced, extended warranty

NOW $

28,995!

Stk# 10919A

‘07 Honda Civic Hybrid

D L O S 14,800

Auto, 54,604 km, clean, sporty, local, 1-owner, 2dr coupe, very Auto, 54,748 km, local 1-owner, fuel saving sedan, just fuel efficient, extended warranty serviced, extended waranty

Manual, 43,906 km, local, 1-owner, sporty luxury coupe, just serviced, extended warranty

22,995

27,995

‘07 Honda Civic LX

‘08 HONDA ACCORD EX-L

NOW $

NOW $

2.9%

up to 36 m onths o.a.c

Stk# 110039A

NOW $

Stk# HP4971A

NOW $

14,900!

Stk# HP4951

‘07 Honda Element 2WD LX

‘06 HONDA CIVIC LX

‘06 Honda Accord SE

‘06 Honda Civic EX

‘06 Honda Element 2WD Y Package

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

Manual, 47,033 km, local, 1-owner, just serviced, extended warranty

17,995

OLD S 12,995

Manual, 93,103 km, local, 1-owner, sports coupe with body kit, leather, extended warranty and a low monthly payment

Manual, 72,460 km, very nicely equipped, local, 1-owner, sports Auto, 10,4956 km, nicely equipped, local sedan, just serviced, coupe, just serviced, extended warranty extended warranty as well as a low monthly payment

Stk# HP4970

13,995

Stk# HP4987

Stk# HP4946A

13,800

Stk# HP4977

Auto, 48,638 km, very nice, local, 1-owner, extended warranty

16,995

‘05 Honda Civic SE

‘05 Honda Civic DX

‘06 Pontiac Solstice

‘06 Honda CR-V SE

‘99 Honda CR-V EX

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

Manual, 123,119 km, local, 1-owner, fuel efficient 5-speed coupe, just serviced, new tires, warranty

8,995

Stk# HP4969

Manual, 40,435 km, one owner, fuel efficent, 5-speed coupe, just serviced, extended warranty

9,995

Stk# HP4824

Manual, 94,414 km, very nicely equipped, 1-owner, 4x4 SUV, extended warranty

Manual, 47,531 km, good looking, sporty convert

13,995

Stk# 10869B

17,800

Stk# HP4994

Auto, clean economical 4x4, just had a $1100 major service, warranty

8,800

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WINTER SPECIALS

• Vehicle History Report ‘09 Kia RIO5 EX

Bluetooth. AC, PL, PW, Heated Seat, Automatic 37,524Km

NOW

9,995!

$

‘09 Kia RIO5 EX

Bluetooth. AC, PL, PW, Heated Seat, Automatic 32,631Km

NOW Stk# HY10102

$

9,995!

‘08 Kia Sorento LX

‘05 Honda Civic

NOW

NOW

Local 4×4, V6, ABS, Cruise Control, CD Changer, Automatic, 68,277Km

19,700!

$

Stk# HY10117

‘06 Mitsubishi Galant ES

Local Sedan, Keyless Entry, PL, PW, AM/FM CD, Automatic, 77,912Km

NOW

9,995!

$

Stk# HY10105

‘07 Mazda 3

NOW

11,800!

Stk# HY10136

‘06 Hyundai Sonata GL

16" Wheels, Cruise Control, Side Curtain Airbags, Automatic, 78,916Km

9,995!

Stk# HY10119

‘05 Honda Civic SE

NOW

Stk# 11039A

7,995!

Local 4WD, V6, ABS, Cruise Control, Sunroof, Automatic 99,280Km

9,995!

NOW

$

Stk# HY10095

‘09 Nissan Rogue S

2WD, auto, local, one owner, low km’s, great value

$

18,995!

20,995!

$

‘08 Hyundai Accent L

25,800!

13,995!

Stk# HY10062

NOW Stk# HY10121

NOW

Stk# HY10135

$

‘06 Mercedes-Benz B200 TURBO NAVI

Local 1-owner Luxury 4WD, V6, Premium Sound System 96,256Km

$

Local 1-owner, 5 Speed, CD Changer, Factory Warranty 76,983Km

Premium Sound/Navigation System, Backup Sensor 56,500Km

‘06 Acura MDX TOURING

Local, Hatchback, CD Changer, 5 Speed, Rear Spoiler 40,028Km

7,995!

Stk# HY10109

1-owner, Only 41,000Km, Mint 4×4

NOW

Stk# HY10133

NOW

‘06 Honda CR-V EX

Stk# HY10077

Stk# HY10072B

NOW

NOW

$

22,995!

‘06 Honda Element 2WD

19,800!

Stk# HY10141

2WD, auto, Y pkg, local, one owner, nicely equipped

$

Stk# HY10098A

$

‘06 Honda Pilot EX

$

‘06 Honda Element

13,995!

15,600!

Local 4×4, V6, Alloy Wheels, ABS, Cruise Control, Automatic, 24,624Km

NOW

1-owner 8-passenger 4WD, Premium Sound System 121,427Km

NOW

4 Dr 5 speed, Local 1-owner, Fuel Saver 10,9517 Km

$

$

ARE YOU READY? inspected

‘06 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS 3.5 AWD ‘08 Hyundai Santa Fe 3.3 GL

4Dr Sedan, Bluetooth. AC, PL, PW, Automatic 14,134Km

NOW

NOW

Local 1-owner, Alloy Wheels, ABS, Cruise Control, 5 Speed, 85,790Km

$

Stk# HY10130

9,995!

$

‘09 Kia Rio EX

NOW

Rare Reverb Edition, 2dr, 5spd, local, one owner, nice car

$

Stk# 10953A

Member of the

Dealer # D8508

CALL 604-873-3676

Stk# HP4927

$

17,995!

Stk# HY10129

‘05 Toyota Highlander V6 4WD

Local 4WD, V6, ABS, TC, Premium Sound System 106,608Km

NOW

Stk# HY10122

$

18,400!

Stk# HY10124

wn to wn Do

445 Kingsway near 12th Ave in Vancouver

E 12th Ave

Ki ng sw ay

CALL 604-292-8188 www.destinationhyundai.com

D#31042

EW54


UP TO

Delivery and Destination are included in all prices.

VISIT HYUNDAICANADA.COM TO FIND THE HYUNDAI THAT FITS YOUR LIFE.

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2010 SANTA FE GL 2.4L MANUAL

NOW SAVE $

AWARD-WINNING COMPACT HIGHWAY 5.6L/100 KM – 50 MPG! Limited model shown

DOWN PAYMENT APR/ 84 MOS. MONTH

BEST-SELLING SUB-COMPACT IN CANADA∞ HIGHWAY 5.7L/100 KM – 50 MPG!

DOWN PAYMENT APR/ 84 MOS. MONTH

CLASS-LEADING FUEL ECONOMY ^ HIGHWAY 5.7L/100 KM – 50 MPGˆ Limited model shown

FINANCING 2011 ACCENT L 3DR

1,600

NOW SAVE $

WITH AT

MONTHS# STARTING FROM

GL Sport model shown

2010 ELANTRA L

STARTING FROM

Dealer participation of $500 included.

2011 SONATA

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live smart.

445 Kingsway near 12th Ave in Vancouver

PAPER TO INSERT DEALER TAG Phone HERE OWN IT FOR ONLY

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5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

www.destinationhyundai.com

D#31042

TM The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. "Prices for models shown: 2011 Accent 3 Dr GL Sport is $17,844, 2010 Elantra Limited is $22,944. Delivery and Destination charges of $1,495/$1,495 are included. Registration, insurance, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. ◊Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on new 2011 Sonata models with an annual finance rate of 0.9% for 60 months. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on new 2011 Accent L 3 Dr 5-speed/2010 Elantra L 5-speed with an annual finance rate of 0%/0% for 84/84 months. Monthly payments are $161/$173. No down payment is required. Dealer participation of $500 for 2010 Elantra L 5-speed is included. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,495/$1,495. Registration, insurance, PPSA, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2010 Elantra L 5-speed for $14,494 at 0% per annum equals $172.55 per month for 84 months for a total obligation of $14,494. Cash price is $14,494. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,495. Registration, insurance, PPSA, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Ω∏ $4,000 savings on the cash purchase of the 2010 Santa Fe GL 2.4L 6-speed manual model is composed of $1,000 price adjustment (available on purchase or lease) and $3,000 cash purchase price adjustment (for cash purchases only). Price adjustments are calculated against the lease/finance starting price. Cash purchase price for model shown: 2010 Santa Fe Limited is $35,559. Delivery and Destination charge of $1,760 is included. Registration, insurance, PPSA, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Certain conditions apply. ‡Purchase or lease any 2011 Accent and receive a price adjustment of $1,600. ◊†"Ω∏‡ Offers available for a limited time and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. !Fuel consumption for 2011 Accent 3Dr (HWY 5.7L/100KM; City 7.2L/100KM)/2010 Elantra L 5-speed (HWY 5.6L/100KM; City 7.8L/100KM) are based on EnerGuide fuel consumption ratings. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. ^Fuel economy comparison based on combined fuel consumption rating for the 2011 Sonata GL 6-speed manual (7.35/100km) and 2011 Energuide combined fuel consumption ratings for the full size vehicle class. Fuel consumption for the Sonata GL 6-speed manual (HWY 5.7L/100KM; City 8.7L/100KM) based on 2011 Energuide rating. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. %Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov). The 5-star rating applies to all the trim levels of the 2011 Sonata produced after July 2, 2010. ∞Based on the September 2010 AIAMC report. ∆See your dealer for eligible vehicles and full details of the Graduate Rebate Program. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions.

FOR

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Star of the m a r g Season Pro

100% B C Owned and Operated

November 1 to December nities 24, 2010, your donation of only $2 helps strengthen our commu during the aign holiday season . All of the money generated from the Choices’ Star of the Season Camp will be donat inters. ed to eight neighbou rhood houses. Stars kindly provided by Calabar pr

Yogi Organic Herbal Teas

Chapman’s Frozen Yogurt

assorted varieties

from 16 bags

2.99

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We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not all items may be available at all locations. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.


42 New Oyster in town Vol. 101 No. 93 • Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

44

Frohe Weihnachten!

16

Emerging writer honoured

Established 1908

WEST WEEKEND EDITION

photo Dan Toulgoet

Endangered spaces

Budget shortfalls and low enrolment have forced the Vancouver School Board to consider closing five East Side elementary schools. Parents and students at the five schools make their case to keep the schools alive. — story by Naoibh O’Connor YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS, WEATHER AND ENTERTAINMENT! WWW.VANCOURIER.COM


W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

news

Study spotlights sex between young teenagers and adults Staff writer

A 2008 federal law that raised the age of sexual consent from 14 to 16 was intended to protect teens from exploitation and abuse, but sexologists, researchers and educators believe a better understanding of what it means to consent may be more effective protection. Vancouver sex therapist and family counsellor Dr. Pega Ren says the issue of sexual consent “is an area of great confusion.” “Consent needs to be explicit,” she said. “No response is not yes. Nor is it no. No response is no response.” For Ren, who writes a monthly column for Xtra magazine, education is essential because she says social behaviour cannot be legislated. The changes to the Criminal Code raised the age of consent by two years and includes a “close-in-age” exemption that allows sexual activity between adolescents aged 14 and 15 with peers five years older or less. For 12- and 13-year-olds, the range is lowered to peers within two years of age. Under the law, children under 12 cannot consent to sex. Alcohol also impairs a person’s ability to give consent. The law seeks to avoid criminalizing sexual activity and experimentation between teens but nonetheless increase the means of prosecuting older adults out to exploit or abuse adolescents. Although the age of consent is raised to include 14- and 15-year-old teens, Elizabeth Saewyc, a professor of nursing and adolescent medicine at the University of B.C., said children 13 and younger are more vulnerable to the risk of sexual abuse. “The law was already presumably protecting them,” she said. Saewyc is a co-author of a study released this week in the Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality that determined only two to three per cent of 14- and 15-year-olds had sex for the first time with an adult in contrast to 39 per cent of sexually active

CIHR Café Scientifique Invites you to participate in:

Family counsellor notes consent ‘confusion’

Megan Stewart

W17

“CONSENT NEEDS TO BE EXPLICIT. NO RESPONSE IS NOT YES. ” Dr. Pega Ren

12-year-olds whose first sexual partner was 20 or older. The data determined less than three per cent of all 12-year-olds, roughly 700 adolescents, in the province were having sex. The data is drawn from the 2008 B.C. Adolescent Health Survey, a population controlled survey of 29,000 youth in Grades 7 to 12 around the province. Unique in Canada, the survey is organized every five years by the McCreary Centre Society where Saewyc is the director of research. The study did find that older teens were more likely to report instances of forced sexual activity by another youth close in age. That abuse is reported is a positive indication, but Saewyc said the research suggests not all teens understand what constitutes a healthy and consensual relationship. “At least some of them are not necessarily understanding what does true consent mean in a sexual relationship—that pressure is not OK and that no does mean no.” Expanding on the meaning of consent, Kristen Gilbert, a sexual health educator with Options for Sexual Health, emphasizes that consent is active. “Consent doesn’t mean not saying ‘no,’ consent doesn’t mean not saying anything, it doesn’t mean not crying, not yelling,” she told a radio station in September at the time of a police investigation of the repeated rape of a 16-year-old Pitt Meadows high schooler. In the workshops Gilbert gives to teens around the Lower Mainland, she says consent is an unfamiliar topic, meaning rape is often misunderstood. “When I bring up consent, it’s almost always for the first time.” mstewart@vancourier.com

The Gnome in Genome A public discussion of unexpected findings from genomic testing We all carry mutations in our genes that may give us an increased risk of cancer, heart disease, dementia, or a variety of other problems. Or they might predispose to happy old age! These are the gnomes of genomic testing. Genomic testing can be used to diagnose a variety of genetic conditions. But the technology has got ahead of us. Come and help discuss these difficult but fascinating societal issues with geneticists, researchers, clinicians and ethicists.

Mon., Nov. 29, 7:30 - 9PM OR Our Town Café, 245 E. Broadway, Vancouver

Tues., Nov. 30, 7:30 - 9PM Juliet’s Café 1905 Cornwall, Vancouver This session will be audio taped

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More information: www.bccgn.ca News & Events

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W22

T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Free Oral–B ElectricToothbrush for New Patients

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Madonna Roberts, Mariah Young and Doris Roberts at the Querpon Island Lighthouse spiced up the dinner table every night with raucous Newfoundland humour. photo Michael McCarthy

Newfoundland’s ‘sense of place’ strong

Continued from page 21 No, it’s more of a “sense of place” that grabs one by the throat, and no place seems truer to itself than Newfoundland, and no place on that rocky island sums up the Rock like a working lighthouse, with its heartbreaking cry of mournful warning. “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do,” wrote Mark Twain. “So throw off the bowlines, sail away

from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” Travel, then, to places like Querpon whenever you get the chance. Savour the wind upon your cheek and the smell of brine in the air. Life is short and when you get to your destination the journey will be over. There is never “next year.” There is only now. For more Michael McCarthy travel stories, log on to www.i-traveler.info.

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W28 T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0


W E D N E SD AY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 THE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

W29

travel

Otherwordly landscape of buttes and mesas outshines Sin City

American Southwest delivers on visual wonders Cheryl Rossi

Staff writer

A woman barely clad in beads and shells whirled her body to frenzied tribal beats. Two topless young women slithered over one another in a giant glass bowl. An Audrey Hepburn look-alike balanced horizontal to the stage, one hand on her partner’s forehead, and a little man wrapped in white ribbons flew through the air with great ease. Such were fleeting highlights of Cirque du Soleil’s Zumanity at the New York-New York Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The provocative cabaret-style show is less death defying than Cirque’s Kooza, and more suited to recharging sexual engines. Perhaps the most refreshing aspect of the show was the plethora of natural breasts on topless talents, a stark contrast to those juggling for attention in casinos and along the strip in a city that needlessly has a Hooters. But it wasn’t nudity, gambling or lights that brought my husband and me to Vegas. The fountain-rich glitz in the middle of a desert was a mere gateway to the natural wonders that lie to its east in Utah and Arizona. The 1991 film Thelma & Louise inspired me to visit the otherworldly

Dead Horse Point in Utah surpassed expectations in the eyephoto Cheryl Rossi popping department of beautiful vistas. landscape of buttes and mesas the pair cruised through, and the reality didn’t disappoint. Near Page, Ariz., we took in Horseshoe Bend, where you stand on an abrupt ridge and see a river curve around a rock outcrop. Red rocks worn to resemble giant wafers, green water far below and blue sky had us

dashing around snapping photos under the blazing July sun. Next stop was the spectacular Antelope Canyon where shafts of light filter into the slot canyon, higher than it is wide, to pick up marbled patterns of coral, terracotta and plum. If only our guide hadn’t used her laser pointer to outline shapes

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such as hearts and George Washington’s head that apparently could be discerned among the flash floodworn sandstone (you can only access the upper canyon with a guide), we could have peacefully marvelled at the dramatic hues and contours. Friends advised us to skip the Grand Canyon, but I’m glad we ignored them. We arrived at the less touristy North Rim at sunset and were gobsmacked by its awesome scale, resolving to visit again. Red earth, sandstone mesas (flat topped mounts) and buttes, archetypal landscapes of the Wild West, drew us to Monument Valley, which, like Antelope Canyon, is on Navajo land. We braved twisting, potholed dirt roads to shoot colossal red rock formations that glowed in the evening’s dying light. Moab, Utah, is a great base for visiting Canyonlands and Arches national parks and Dead Horse Point State Park, where Thelma and Louise soared off the cliff. The 1,365 square kilometre Canyonlands park has three distinct sections. We only visited Island in the Sky, where a jagged 1,500 foot-deep crater of green tinged white salt is ringed by a sea of red sandstone at Upheaval Dome.

We worried Dead Horse Point would be disappointing after the larger Canyonlands, but it was even more scenic, with stepped cliffs stretching to the horizon and a double rainbow after a brief but intense rainstorm. Fitting in a drive around Arches in the same day was too much. Early the next morning, the weird and wonderful red rock formations that include an egg-shaped boulder that appears precariously balanced atop a tall tower and, of course, the naturally hewn windows, were worth rising for. Looping back toward Vegas, we traversed Capital Reef National Park, with its steep red cliffs and petroglyphs. The touristy Bryce Canyon was worth a quick visit for the countless coral-hued pinnacles or hoodoos, but we ditched a planned second night to spend one in the more tastefully touristic Springdale, Utah, near Zion National Park, where we missed snapping 17 mountain goats perched on a small, sheer cliff. We plan to return to the American Southwest, where nature’s bounty is a million times more spellbinding than fake gondolas, a dark-glassed pyramid and slot machines. Go. crossi@vancourier.com


W40

T HE VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

2011

stars of vancouver OFFICIAL BALLOT

vote local in the 11th Annual “Best of ” Readers Poll…&

win

west side neighbourhood edition

circle your neighbourhood

Kerrisdale Dunbar Kitsilano Marpole South Granville Granville Island False Creek Cambie West Point Grey West 10th Live theatre company___________________________________ Local cinema__________________________________________ Pub __________________________________________________ Bakery _________________________________________________ Burger house __________________________________________ Cheap eats ___________________________________________ Coffee bar ____________________________________________ Ethnic food _____________________________________________ Fish & Chips ___________________________________________ Haute cuisine __________________________________________ Sushi bar _____________________________________________ College/University __________________________________ Financial institution __________________________________ Health / Fitness Club ________________________________ Private school ______________________________________ Seniors residence ____________________________________ Spa ________________________________________________ U-Brew (Wine or Beer) ________________________________ Video store __________________________________________ Yoga / Pilates ________________________________________

Appliance store _____________________________________ Art Gallery ________________________________________ Bike Shop _________________________________________ Bookstore __________________________________________ Consignment/Vintage _________________________________ Florist ______________________________________________ Furniture store ________________________________________ Gardening centre ______________________________________ Grocery store _______________________________________ Health food store____________________________________ Jewellery store_________________________________________ Kids’ clothing ________________________________________ Kitchenware __________________________________________ Pet store ____________________________________________ Produce store _______________________________________ Shoe store__________________________________________ Shopping mall _______________________________________ Sporting goods______________________________________ Womens’ clothing ____________________________________

Name______________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Postal Code ___________________________ Phone _______________________________________________________

TO BE ENTERED INTO OUR GRAND PRIZE DRAW,

please drop off or mail your ballot to: Readers’ Choice, The Vancouver Courier, 1574 West 6th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2. Ballots must be pages from the newspaper (no photocopies or faxes). Deadline for entries and Grand Prize Draw: December 6, 2010. Winner will be notified by phone. Reader Poll results will be published Friday, January 28, 2011.

It’s time again to make yourself heard! Here’s your chance to share your tried and true favourite places in your neighbourhood. We’ve gathered together a total of 40 categories for you to give us your opinions on everything from appliance dealers to video stores. You play, we’ll pay! Please specify what neighbourhood you live in and fill in the entry form. Send in your entry form and you will automatically be entered in our fabulous draw for a chance to win a Courier Gift Basket.


24 New Oyster in town Vol. 21 No. 47 • Friday, Nov. 19, 2010

25

Frohe Weihnachten!

10

Emerging writer honoured

Established 1908 photo Dan Toulgoet

DOWNTOWN EDITION

Endangered spaces

Budget shortfalls and low enrolment have forced the Vancouver School Board to consider closing five East Side elementary schools. Parents and students at the five schools make their case to keep the schools alive. — story by Naoibh O’Connor YOUR SOURCE FOR LOCAL NEWS, WEATHER AND ENTERTAINMENT! WWW.VANCOURIER.COM


D02

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0


in this issue

F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

13 I

photo Dan Toulgoet

Stalled transport

MIKE HOWELL A year after asking, the VPD is still waiting for the province to provide a vehicle to get the homeless to shelters, says Const. Jodyne Keller, VPD homeless coordinator. BY

N E W S

11 I 17 I

9I

Hair today...

BY MIKE HOWELL Vision Vancouver ponders election rules, Suzanne Anton confirms she’s still with the NPA, the mayor confirms he’s still growing a moustache.

COPE’ing with the market

BY NAOIBH O’CONNOR The Vancouver School Board’s COPE trustees say the district needs a strategy to encourage parents to enroll their kids in the public system.

Taken by a Village

Vancouver’s problem with homelessness is at an all time high, with many of those with no home of their own being under the age of 24. At the Courier, we decided to provide an opportunity to our readers to give a little cheer and kindness to the youth on our streets this holiday season.

When out shopping for those stocking stuffers this holiday season, see what’s on special and grab an extra something on top of your usual purchase. Please note that we ask all items we collecting to be NEW (please, no used goods at this time)!

Suggested gifts include:

Socks, underwear, mittens, gloves, scarfs, toques, boots, jackets, blankets or sleeping bags, toothpaste, toothbrushes, dental floss, deodorant, soap etc... Transit tickets, grocery vouchers or restaurant/fast-food/coffee shop gift certificates Directions to Youth Services centre, operated by Family Services of Greater

ALLEN GARR The Olympic Village fiasco has its roots in previous civic administrations who bit off more than they could chew.

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Vancouver is our partner in this endeavour, and will distribute the goods to youth who are homeless or living in atrisk situations. Anything you can give will help make the holidays a little easier for the youth on our streets.

GEOFF OLSON Against his better judgment, Geoff Olson became a dog person and now can’t stop talking about his squirrel-obssessed companion. BY

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Simply drop your items off in the big box situated in the Courier lobby at 1574 West 6th Ave., near Fir St. by Friday, December 17th. Hours are Mon-Fri, 8:30 am to 4:30pm.

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Shelling out

BY TIM PAWSEY It may be small, but a new oyster bar, appropriately called Oyster and located in the old VSE building, is a little piece of bivalve heaven.

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A R T S

From one writer to another

BY CHERYL ROSSI Mayor’s Arts Award recipient Evelyn Lau has chosen Kaitlin Fontana for the Award’s promising writer honours.

Quote of the week

All this great excitement and buzz during the Olympics, that was when I realized, OK, Vancouver is ready to become the fun city again.” Malte Kluetz, Vancouver Christmas Market organizer

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ON THE COVER Students from schools on the closure list on Carleton elementary’s steps. The Vancouver Courier is a division of Postmedia Network Inc. Postmedia Network Inc. and its affiliates (collectively, “Postmedia Network”) collect and use your personal information primarily for the purpose of providing you with the products and services you have requested from us. Postmedia Network may also contact you from time to time about your account or to conduct market research and surveys in an effort to continually improve our product and service offerings. To enable us to more efficiently provide the products and services you have requested from us, Postmedia Network may share your personal information within Postmedia Network and with selected third parties who are acting on our behalf as our agents, suppliers or service providers. A copy of our privacy policy is available at www.van.net or by contacting 604-589-9182. For all distribution/delivery problems, please call 604-439-2660. To contact the Courier’s main office, call 604-738-1411

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Only 51,901 students enrolled in a public school system designed for 60,343

Five East Side schools squirm on chopping block Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

T

rustees decide the fate of Champlain Heights annex, Sir Richard McBride annex, Sir Guy Carleton, Queen Alexandra and Sir William Macdonald elementary schools Dec. 14. Closure threats ignited five grassroots campaigns to save the East Side schools. Despite tight timelines and limited resources, activists rallied communities, launched petitions, attended meetings, dreamed up ways to attract students, and secured provincial and federal political support. It’s uncertain if that’s enough to keep doors open as trustees grapple with budget shortfalls and a declining student population. Public school enrolment peaked in 1997 with 57,575 kindergarten to Grade 12 students, but slumped to 51,901 this year in a system designed for 60,343. The VSB hacked $17 million from its 2010/11 budget and predicts another $9.6 million shortfall in 2011/2012, followed by a $5.6 million shortfall in 2012/13. If all five schools close, it saves a relatively insignificant $1.4 million, but the alternative is slashing already gutted programs and services. Critics see closures as an attack on public education and say the cost to displaced students is immeasurable. While closure is anathema to some, others suggest students can adjust. “Children are amazingly resilient and at the end of the day are more adaptable than we are,” superintendent Steve Cardwell said at several feedback meetings. After the recent sessions, board chair Patti Bacchus, a Vision Vancouver trustee, tweeted:

Carleton elementary (left) and Champlain Heights annex (right) sit on the district’s endangered school list. “So far no real solutions to underlying problems but some interesting ideas. Can we make them work and still solve the bigger challenges?” Clear winners are unlikely, regardless of the decision, but the stories that follow capture the efforts of five schools as they fight for survival.

Broken promises

Five years ago, then Liberal education minister Tom Christensen stood in Sir Guy Carleton elementary for a pre-election press conference announcing a $254-million seismic upgrading program for 80 B.C. schools over three years—16 in Vancouver, including Carleton. Welcome news—except it never happened at Carleton. The 114-yearold school not only remains at high risk in an earthquake, but with an enrolment of 376 in kindergarten to Grade 7, it would be the most-popu-

lated school in B.C. to close and its students split among as many as six schools. Supporters feel betrayed. “There’s a long history of broken promises around Carleton and we’re sick of being short-changed,” complained a long-time Collingwood resident at a meeting that attracted more than 500. “Stand your ground with the provincial government even if it means they’ll fire you.” Speakers intermittently pleaded, then demanded, the board spare Carleton. NDP MLA Adrian Dix lent his support to the battle, and supporters have published a 34-page case against closure, but victory is uncertain. Three Collingwood schools were considered for closure, but only Carleton made the shortlist. Supporters are convinced the student population will climb, securing a letter from the president of Wall Financial Corporation indicating

more than 800 residential housing units are proposed for a new Collingwood development. They also point out Carleton survived depressions, recessions and world wars. Parent Advisory Committee chair Ann Wong, who believes the process has lacked transparency, maintains closure is shortsighted and the threat has placed undue stress on children and families. “I don’t even think closing a school is an option. Honestly it’s just wrong,” she said. “Let’s work together to look for options that will work for the community.” More than 7,000 signed a petition to save Carleton, whose sprawling property features several buildings, including a small, historically significant yellow schoolhouse damaged by arson a few years ago. The property, assessed at more than $22 million, has split zoning—

photos Dan Toulgoet

commercial and single-family residential—with redevelopment potential. The district estimates $468,120 in annual savings if Carleton is closed. Critics argue the loss would be too severe. “Carleton and Collingwood Neighbourhood House are the two pillars of Collingwood. Should one pillar fall or be allowed to deteriorate, the result will be devastation,” warned teacher Scott Macdonald.

Little red schoolhouse

Champlain Heights annex’s storybook appearance is undeniably appealing. Located at the northern tip of Everett Crowley Park, its treed surroundings, well-kept red schoolhouse, small student population and proximity to a community centre provide a welcoming introduction to formal education, particularly for special needs and ESL students.

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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Enrolment plummets in school full of aboriginal and Chinese students

Eighty-eight kindergarten to Grade 3 students attend the annex, which has space for 103. Opened only 24 years ago, the building contrasts with the district’s mostly aging stock—upgrading isn’t needed any time soon. Closing the annex, whose site is assessed at $9 million, would save $175,134 annually. Champlain Heights underenrolled main school, and other nearby schools, can easily fit displaced students. Development planned for East Fraserlands may drive up student numbers, but that’s not expected for years. While new schools are envisioned for the area, there’s no guarantee when or if they’ll be built. Parent advisory council chair Joanne Kautz-Allard isn’t surprised the annex made the shortlist. Closure rumours circulated ever since her son started school. When rumours turned to reality, parents launched a “Good things come in small packages” campaign. Speakers at an October meeting wore Save our School arm bands, carried protest signs, and affectionately referred to the annex as “the little red schoolhouse on the hill.” At the second meeting, they donned red clothing. Smartboards in every class, Grade 3 students’ ability to take leadership roles, the condition

of the building, and the fact it’s close to capacity, are among arguments to keep it open. Many parents walk kids to class, some pushing strollers—an uphill trek made more difficult if they’re expected to climb further to the main school whose after-school program was recently eliminated. Parents warn they’ll send kids to Burnaby’s Suncrest school, which is closer, further eroding Vancouver’s depleted enrolment and associated per-student provincial funding. If only 34 fled, it would siphon more than $200,000 from the district. Kautz-Allard wants trustees to reconsider. “Build communities, be creative, generate income, but not at the expense of children,” she said. “I ask you as a school board whose ultimate focus is to educate children—find a better answer to this problem. Get out your erasers, erase your answer and try again.” Liberal MLA Kash Heed and Liberal MP Ujjal Dosanjh back the annex’s campaign, but some parents, such as Carolyn Grafton, are cynical. “I don’t think these stories will make any difference to you. We’re at the mercy of gutter politics and finger-pointing between the Vancouver School Board and Ministry of Education,” she told trustees, calling projected savings “a drop

Sir William Macdonald elementary is 105 years old. photo Dan Toulgoet in the bucket.” “You can close our school, but where will that get you? I just can’t see the business case. Move out of the school board office and lease out the palatial office on Broadway and stop the pretense of consulting with the public.”

Battle grounds

Ron LaRochelle rolls up to Sir William Macdonald elementary one afternoon to pick up his granddaughter Charlotte. The Grade 2 student is one of many generations of the family to attend the

historic inner city school on East Hastings. LaRochelle’s deep roots are obvious as the wheelchair-bound 61-year-old casually lists relatives, past and present, who’ve attended the 105-year-old school. Students trickle through solid oak doors carved by First Nations artist Henry Robertson. Framed by painted native figures, and topped by a three-dimensional eagle, the doors’ design depicts salmon swimming as if to spawn, an aboriginal storage box guarded by wolves—protect-

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ing education—and a black bear and cubs. Its enrolment of 239 in 2000 has dwindled to 70 students, mostly from aboriginal and Chinese communities, many with special needs. The school runs at one third of its capacity, making it difficult to offer programs and organize classes efficiently. LaRochelle speaks fondly of Macdonald. “The First Nations kids are well taken care of by First Nations staff,” he said. “It would be a big loss to the First Nation and Chinese community, and everybody here, if it closes. It makes you wonder where they’ll go. There’ll be a lot of lost history.” That sentiment was echoed repeatedly, and often emotionally, at an October consultation meeting kicked off by Native drumming and songs. On hand were students, former students, parents, staff, business people and politicians, including Vancouver-Hastings MLA Shane Simpson, and Burnaby city councillor Nick Volkow—a Macdonald graduate from decades ago. “To close this school, in particular, would be criminal,” the 58year-old said. “You stand with the people of this school and these people will stand with you.” Continued on page 6


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In 1997, parents camped outside school board Continued from page 5 Few were angrier than parent Pam Sitar. “I’m pissed off. I’m really, really angry. Poor people, disadvantaged people, get screwed and I’m sick of it.” Sitar worries the land—assessed at $15.4 million—is headed for development at the expense of needy families. [It’s unclear what would happen to closed schools, although the VSB can’t sell property or lease it for more than 10 years without provincial approval.] Former teacher Connie Barkase came out of retirement to fight for the school, fearing few others would. “I wake up every morning saying what am I going to do today because I’ve got to do something,” she told the Courier. Cherise Craney, who struggled to find an appropriate school for her disabled 11-year-old daughter Bronwyn until she found Macdonald, heads up the hastily formed parent group. Her daughter doesn’t adapt well to change or to highly populated schools. “If you put her in a school of 600 children, she will be invisible,” she told trustees. Closure critics see Macdonald as the victim of benign neglect, but Macdonald’s resolve can’t be underestimated. In 1997, parents camped outside the school board office for 43 days demanding increased staffing and resources. Craney believes a decision to close it would have implications far more costly than projected annual savings of $275,593. “If we look at [students] as numbers, we’re going to be looking at them as numbers when they grow up. These are vulnerable kids. They will be statistics again.”

Accidental activists

Lilli Wong can’t help feel resentful. The mother of a five-year-old and five-month-old is on maternity leave, but can’t enjoy it. In September, Wong discovered

The one-storey Sir Richard McBride annex has the fewest students of all schools considered for closure. photo Dan Toulgoet Sir Richard McBride annex, her daughter’s small, one-storey school at 4750 St. Catherines St., could close. The 40-year-old has spent most of her time since then rallying parents, attending meetings, designing a Save McBride Annex website and crafting reasons to save the 47-year-old kindergarten to Grade 3 school next to Grays Park. Wong voiced frustration at a meeting on the annex’s future. “It’s unfair how this burden to save the school has gone down to parents,” she said. The accidental activist imagined sending both children to McBride annex. With that in jeopardy, she’s joined the small group fighting to save it. “It’s a fantastic school. It’s right on the park. It’s very intimate—that’s one of the benefits and also one of its downfalls—the intimate class sizes,” Wong told the Courier. Its enrolment fell to 63 this year

from 151 in 2000. The VSB estimates $171,462 in annual savings by closing the school whose property is assessed at $5.8 million. The annex has the fewest students of all schools eyed for closure, translating into a quieter voice, evident at the first consultation meeting that attracted about 40 people— only seven spoke. It was the lowest turnout of the first five meetings, although the second meeting was better attended. What activists lack in numbers, they’ve tried to compensate for in a reasoned case to keep its doors open, with proposals and concerns detailed on their website. Enrolment tumbled after the Fraser Villa housing complex was demolished, but some predict a population boom with hundreds of new units under construction and neighbourhood densification. Continued on page 7


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Closure opponents argue school’s loss would damage needy families

Continued from page 6 Among ideas is to create an “edible school yard” magnet program featuring an organic garden for urban students modeled on a successful program in Berkeley, Calif. Others suggest introducing a daycare or pre-school, attracting seniors or children’s programs, or starting Tagalog immersion. The VSB warned parents at all five schools new students must come from out of district or private schools—shuffling the students around won’t address declining enrolment. Parent Dr. Jennifer Kong is pushing for a three-year moratorium on the annex’s closure while assumptions about the VSB’s enrolment projections and other data is examined, along with potential fallout, including extra costs, from sending more students to the main school. It will allow time to see if new developments increase enrolment and whether the provincial government implements junior kindergarten. It also gives the board time to consider McBride proposals and adopt its own strategies to bump up enrolment district wide. If the annex closes, and students are dispersed among several schools, activists fear troublemakers will hang around the vacated building and adjacent Grays Park,

where Churchill student Deward Ponte was murdered in 2008. Travel distances would increase and parents with babies might have trouble accessing multi-storey schools, according to annex supporters. Wong doesn’t want to contemplate it. “There needs to be more done to look at the options. Having a school close is the death of a neighbourhood,” she said.

Artful proposal

Located on a busy corner at Clark and Broadway, Queen Alexandra elementary opened as a oneroom schoolhouse more than a century ago and is now a multistorey landmark in an inner city neighbourhood. Twenty three per cent of students are aboriginal. Those remaining are typically new immigrants or have been in Canada less than five years. It’s a designated inner city school and several organizations provide enrichment activities, including after-school piano lessons through UBC’s Heart of the City Piano Program Student Society and the Sarah McLachlan Music Outreach. Kidsafe and StrongStart programs, along with the subsidized breakfast and lunch service, tip off Queen Alex’s needy status. In 2000, enrolment hit 334, but

Queen Alexandra elementary opened as a one-room schoolhouse photo Dan Toulgoet more than a century ago. it slipped to 176 this year. The school, which is assessed at $18.7 million, has space for 288. Split zoning—multiple-family zoning on East Broadway and single family residential on East 10th—coupled with its central location mean it has considerable redevelopment potential, according to the district. The closure report notes surrounding traffic and noise are bad for learning and shutting its doors would produce annual savings of $358,576. Nearby schools can ac-

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commodate displaced students. Closure opponents argue the school’s loss would be a hardship on some of the city’s neediest families. Renita Fernandez, cochair at Queen Alex, fears friendships and tight relationships with teachers will be severed, while students may lose valuable enrichment opportunities. Hopes are pinned on transforming the school into a district fine arts program similar to Nootka elementary’s, which has a wait list.

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The pitch, by staff and parents, is endorsed by arts organizations, NDP MLA Jenny Kwan and NDP MP Libby Davies. A focus on multi-cultural themes would highlight students’ diverse backgrounds. Supporters want a fouryear commitment to prove it can work. “This hardly seems an idea that would need a sales pitch,” one teacher said. Queen Alex would be the first inner city school to offer such a program. Proponents cite studies that project-based, arts-integrated learning is highly correlated with success, particularly for at-risk students. Fernandez is convinced it would draw new students to the district. “Each year we meet new families who move into our neighbourhood but choose to send their children to local private schools. A Fine Arts program would be a magnet for some of those families to Queen Alexandra. Our population would grow as a result,” she said. Others insist the school has changed the lives of poor, immigrant and disenfranchised students. But it was Libby Davies who captured the larger fear: “Once a school is gone, it’s very hard to bring it back.” noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

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WEB POLL NATION Go to www.vancourier.com to vote Are school closures a solution to the Vancouver School Board’s financial constraints? Last week’s poll question: Are the separated bike lanes still a success now that fall weather has arrived?

Yes: 77 per cent No: 23 per cent This is not a scientific poll.

Consider the dramatic events Wednesday with the B.C. Supreme Court placing the Olympic Village property into receivership as the beginning of the end. The court order that essentially gives the city of Vancouver control over the development allows two long-standing demands of the city to be met: First there is now a plan in place for the city to recoup most, if not all of the money coming to it from the developers for its outstanding loan balance of about $740 million; with that in place a marketing plan can now be approved for the sale of the 480 condos plus commercial properties, possibly at reduced rates. In the likely event the city can’t get all of its money out of the sales of the property, the developer has provided other assets that the receiver can liquidate or turn over to the city to make up some or all of the balance. This court-arranged process is the result of a deal that was mutually agreed upon between lawyers representing the city and those representing Peter and Shahram Malek, owners of Millennium Development Corporation. But it was a tough couple of weeks’ worth of negotiations that concluded within hours of the city unilaterally heading to court to force the receivership. It was triggered by the realization that, for the second time in a row, the Maleks were about to default on a loan repayment, this one for $75 million due in January. Following the first red flags going up over a loan default in September, the city began to aggressively search out and attach legal encumbrances on the titles of other

allengarr Malek-owned properties. At the same time, the city began discussing the possibility of the legal remedy we saw put in place this week. If you want to start pointing fingers over this mess, you will have to go back four city administrations to the dying days of Philip Owen’s final term in office. Based on documents retrieved by anti-Olympics activist Philip Le Good, two days before the Nov. 16, 2002 municipal election, the city signed a contract with the Vancouver 2010 Bid Corporation agreeing to build the Village by November 2009 in exchange for a contribution of $30 million. Nothing concrete happened on the development during Larry Campbell’s term although there was a commitment the project would be LEED Gold and housing would be equally divided among social, low-cost and market. It was when Sam Sullivan was mayor that

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the housing mix changed, the contract was let to Millennium and the construction began. By the time Gregor Robertson and his crew took over, Millennium’s financer, the Fortress hedge fund, was balking at handing over construction advances because of cost over-runs. That led the city to have the Vancouver Charter amended so it could essentially replace Fortress as the banker for the project. Through all of this, land-use and real estate specialist Bob Ransford was on the board of the Urban Development Institute, an organization representing the city’s major developers. He was also, incidentally, Peter Ladner’s campaign manager in his run again Robertson for mayor. It’s his view that the city under the management of Judy Rogers never had the expertise to oversee the development. Those put in charge were way over their heads and Sullivan never asked for outside help. Within weeks of Robertson’s election, he was reaching out, first to billionaire businessman Jimmy Pattison, who advised him on which lawyers to hire and then to the UDI, which offered a panel of expert developers to help guide the process the city has followed. Ransford is critical of this administration for publicly criticizing the Maleks; that did nothing to help sales. But he generally believes Robertson inherited a mess and his council and staff are doing the best possible job. And, by the way, this will take several years before the end is finally reached. agarr@vancourier.com

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

opinion COUPLE PLUCKS LAB-CROSS FROM SPCA

Man’s best friend embodies best of humanity and virtue If there’s one thing we like here at the Courier, it’s stories involving dogs or bicycles. Preferably both at the same time. A rabid Labradoodle or Cockapoo attacking a Critical Mass cyclist—that’s the Holy Grail news item for this newsroom. So I guess it’s time for me to chime in, with a story about how I turned into a dog person. Two years ago, my partner and I dropped into the East Side SPCA for a look-see. In a kennel enclosure, a lanky Labcross regarded us with a calm expression through the wire mesh. Its floppy ears crossed over at the top of its head, making it look as if it was wearing a small black beret. We returned a week later and “Meika” was still there. I had doubts, but my partner pushed, and after bit of paperwork and an interview with SPCA staff, the yard dog from Kamloops was ours. Meika was afraid of water, and had never seen a flight of stairs before. She was also a nervous chewer, reducing my slippers to leather origami and destroying the lining of my favourite hat. She topped this with $300 worth of damage in the back of our van. Oh well. Owning a dog is having a three-yearold that will never grow up. With fangs. I marvelled how my wife had managed to talk me into this. This was my first used cur. She turned out to be a fast model that handled corners well, with amphibious capability and a GPS system stuck on one setting: squirrel. With a bit of training, Meika became a terrific dog, and I became a responsible dog owner. Slowly I turned into one of THEM. Like the minor character in the zombie films that you can’t imagine eating human brains, I became one of those crazy dog people who blather on about their fourlegged machine for converting kibble to crap. A middle-aged guy without kids, I found myself talking about my smart, athletic canine to anyone who might remotely care—which turned out to be my partner and other crazy dog people, some of them randomly encountered during Meika’s morning walk. “The ears? No, we don’t know what’s up with ‘em. We think she’s part Border Collie and Rottweiler. Maybe some predator drone in there, too.” In other words, the sort of exchange that is of no interest

letter of the week

geoffolson to the dogless. (And if you are among them, dear reader, I encourage you to move over to Allen Garr. It’s not going to get any better here.) I began to detect the “tells” of other dog-owners, even without their pets. During a screening of Disney’s Up, my wife and I heard a few people in the theatre laughing particularly hard when the animated canines turned their heads simultaneously at the word “squirrel.” Other dog people. You may have seen the YouTube video, where a cop stops a speeding driver and asks for ID with the driver’s picture. The cop looks at it, and mutters “super cool, super cool” before returning it, saying, “Here, I don’t deserve to have this.” The caption: “what if the world saw you like your dog does.” Dog owners know their furry buddies are more steadfast than most human beings. There’s no artifice, no subterfuge. A dog cannot fudge, finagle or fib. The human-canine bond is about unspoken truth, of a kind dating backing thousands of years. At the close of Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus returns home after many years of adventures, and discovers that only his dog Argos still recognizes him. Writing of this long awaited reunion, anthropologist Loren Eiseley wrote, “The magic that gleams an instant between Argos and Odysseus is both the recognition of diversity and the need for affection across the illusions of form. It is nature’s cry to homeless, far-wandering, insatiable man: ‘Do not forget your brethren, nor the green wood from which you sprang. To do so is to invite disaster.’” It seems Meika never had much exposure to the green wood prior to her liberation from the kennel. But now she can’t get enough of it during her outings; she’s a fast-moving smudge of charcoal among the trees. Unrestrained animal joy makes the West Coast rain that much easier to take. www.geoffolson.com

First United Church’s storage facility employs seven Downtown Eastside residents and remains open seven days a week. file photo Dan Toulgoet To the editor: Re: “Grant keeps storage facility for homeless open,” Nov. 12. Congratulations to First United for winning the Pepsi grant—no thanks to Vancouver’s city council. Mayor Gregor Robertson campaigned on helping the homeless yet refused to find the $98,000 that was initially needed for this

worthwhile storage project, let alone the remaining $18,000 needed now. But he has no problem spending $250,000 to beautify his own offices or spend over $3 million on a bike lane “trial.” What a hypocrite and opportunist. I hope the homeless will vote come November 2011. Lin Sheffield, Vancouver

Steeves Manor rife with supports and services To the editor: Re: “Living in fear,” Nov. 5. The recent article on Steeves Manor was not a fair characterization of daily life at Steeves Manor and the sense of community that exists there. Steeves Manor has been housing seniors and people with disabilities successfully since 1976. There are a wide range of supports available for the tenants, including two building managers who live on-site and are on-call in the evenings along with an after-hours emergency maintenance contact, in addition to regular janitorial, maintenance and groundskeeping staff who may attend the site during the day. Tenants have access to nursing and mental health supports and a tenant support worker is on-site three days a week. Kits Neighbourhood House operates an in-house resource office five days a week to help residents connect to

community services and supports. Residents have access to social and recreational programs such as weekly lunch programs and cooking lessons, osteofit classes, grocery shopping trips and an annual summer barbecue. Last year the Province announced a $17.75 million renovation to Steeves Manor that will see the development become a CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) certified property. B.C. Housing takes tenant concerns seriously and every effort is made to ensure that tenants are appropriate for the development and that placement matches the level of support needed. When tenants have concerns, they should not hesitate to contact property management staff, so they can address the situation as quickly as possible. Rich Coleman, B.C. Housing Minister

Wild, rude, wayward cyclists burden taxpayers

To the editor: Re: “12th and Cambie,” Nov. 12. I certainly understand and support local, national and international green initiatives, however, I feel that the City of Vancouver is putting an undue burden on its taxpaying citizens by investing in these infrastructure changes. Unlike vehicle owners, bicyclists are not required to get a license or pass any sort of competency test before they take their ve-

hicles on the road whether in a designated lane or a regular street. Too many times, I have been verbally accosted by a wayward cyclist, or experienced an errant rider ignoring basic road etiquette and almost causing an accident with my, or another, vehicle. All of these factors contribute to my lack of support for bicycle-specific initiatives in Vancouver. Ken Roed, Vancouver

Human race always regressing into mindless war

To the editor: Re: “War not confined to the bloody battlefield,” Nov. 12. This was great, timely, very thoughtful. We are indeed a culture of war, poor fools that we are.

Our language is peppered with words and phrases seeded and born in war. And there’s plastic surgery, clothing, household equipment, medicine and on and on. But I’d be willing to bet that we’d have discovered

all the things that civilization needed sooner or later. And without the colossal misappropriation of people and resources vitally needed elsewhere. Janet Hudgins, Vancouver

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news

A Lot of Talking about Walking

F

rom November 17 to 19, 2010 the Walk21 International Conference on Walking and Liveable Communities XI and the 23rd International Cooperation on Theories and Concepts in Traffic Safety (ICTCT) conference will be taking place in the City of The Hague. The conference Cedric Hughes will “showcase best practices for promoting and supporting walking and sojourning, including the recent four year European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST) Action 358 project on Pedestrians’ Quality Needs.” The conference will also showcase the final report of the ‘Working Group on Pedestrian Safety, Urban Space and Health’ of the Joint Transport Research Centre, a structure of the International Transport Forum, a strategic think tank for the transport sector. Annually, the International Transport Forum “brings together Ministers from over 50 countries, along with leading decision-makers and actors from the private sector, civil society and research, to address transport issues of strategic importance.” Linked to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the Forum’s goal is to “help shape the transport policy agenda, and ensure that it contributes to economic growth, environmental protection, social inclusion and the preservation of human life and well-being.” Canada has been a member of the Forum since 1975. The Walk21 conference has five major themes: 1. Sustaining safe walking: Creating safe, accessible and sustainable conditions for walking and sojourning in public space. 2. Evaluating the impact of investment in walking: Defining success, benchmarking and measuring the value of money spent on walking projects. 3. Walking supporting prosperity: The relationship between where people choose to walk and the vitality of the economy.

4. Sharing space with cyclists: Managing a harmonious coexistence between cyclists and walkers, and 5. Safe, healthy, attractive and accessible environments are a community right: Creating a culture where people choose to walk and communiBarrister & Solicitor ties will thrive. Two of the workshop speakers are from the City of Vancouver. In Transforming Streets for Vibrant Businesses, Krisztina Kassay will speak on ‘Beyond street festivals: creating successful temporary pedestrian spaces in the midst of North American car culture – the Vancouver experiment’. In Walking and culture and the culture of Walking, Sandra James will speak on ‘Advocacy, citizenry and the Olympics—the transformation of walking in Vancouver’. There is lots of talking about the broad subject of pedestrians and roads and other road users. Given that we are all pedestrians, it hardly seems possible that it has come to this —that, as the Walk21 International Charter for Walking puts it we need a stated vision to “create a world where people decide to and are able to walk as a way to travel, to be healthy and to relax, a world where authorities, organizations and individuals have recognized the value of walking, make a commitment to healthy, efficient and sustainable communities; and worked together to overcome the physical, social and institutional barriers which often limit peoples’ option to walk.” Walk21 is online at www.walk21.com. Canada Walks, a Walk21 inspired initiative promoting walkable communities and active transportation in Canada can be found online at www.canadawalks. com.

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Malte Kluetz was inspired by childhood memories of Christmas markets in Germany and the photo Dan Toulgoet recent Olympics to start a Christkindlmarkt in Vancouver.

Germans present Christmas market Cheryl Rossi

Staff writer

Malte Kluetz wants to change the way Vancouverites celebrate Christmas. The president of a company that plans special events for international visitors to Vancouver, Seattle and Banff, is mounting a traditional German Christmas market in Vancouver. Kluetz first dreamt of creating a European-style Christmas market when he moved to North America 20 years ago from Hamelin, the home of the legendary Pied Piper in northern Germany. “All this great excitement and buzz during the Olympics, that was when I realized, OK, Vancouver is ready to become the fun city again,” he said. The Vancouver Christmas Market will run at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre Plaza on the corner of West Georgia and Hamilton streets from Nov. 24 to Dec. 24. More than 30 wooden huts will radiate from a centre stage where the Dal Richards Big Band, the Langley Ukulele Ensemble and VOC Sweet Soul Gospel Choir, among others, will perform. Adults will be able to sip mulled wine and Bavarian wheat beer while kids decorate chocolate lollipops, candles and gingerbread versions of the market’s mascots, Holly and Jolly. Vendors from Germany and Canada will sell Christmas ornaments, wooden toys and German embroidery and lace.

Among the crafts to go on sale at the market are the incense-holding “smokies.” photo Dan Toulgoet Hungry shoppers can dine on apple strudel, German sausages and Christmas cake, Swiss raclette cheese and suckling pig. Kluetz hopes the Vancouver Christmas Market will become an annual tradition. “I still remember when my parents took me to the market and that was very exciting to see all the lights and have a chance to get some unique food that we typically didn’t eat at home,” Kluetz said. “Then later on, it was a typical place to meet with friends and business colleagues after work or during lunch. Weekends was typically a family thing.” The plaza can hold 3,300 people. Christmas markets, or Christkindlmarkt, have been a German tradition for 700 years. Local tradespeople sold their wares at the markets, giving each gathering

an individual flavour. Traditional German handicrafts include hand-carved nutcrackers, wooden smokers, cuckoo clocks and ornaments made of blown glass and straw. The European-style Christmas markets have spread to North America in places like Chicago where a Christkindlmarket started in 1995 and each year attracts more than a million people. The Vancouver Christmas Market runs 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week. Admission is $5 for those aged 13 and up, $2 for youth aged seven to 12 and free for younger kids. Children’s activities cost $20 for four activities or $6 each. Visitors who present a valid transit FareCard or an expired ticket receive a $1 discount on admission. For more information, see vancouverchristmasmarket.com. crossi@vancourier.com


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news

12th & Cambie

with Mike Howell

Follow the leader

Now that Gordon Campbell is on his way out and some members of the NDP are calling for a leadership convention, will any local politicians want to take a shot at becoming an MLA? Or in Mayor Gregor Robertson’s case, a shot at leading the NDP? I haven’t diligently pursued this question with all the city’s politicos but Vision Vancouver’s executive director Ian Baillie assured me former NDP MLA Robertson will seek a second term as mayor. “He’s been very clear to the party that he is seeking re-election,” Baillie said. “He couldn’t be more clear, to tell you the truth. I know on at least 10 to a dozen occasions he’s been very clear in his desire to seek re-election.” Vision councillors Geoff Meggs and Raymond Louie have told me they plan to seek re-election. Haven’t had a chance to catch up with the rest of the Vision caucus to determine who will run again or whether any are considering trying provincial politics. But the question related to provincial politics is one Baillie said will undoubtedly be discussed by Vision’s executive when it finalizes its rules for the November 2011 civic election. Will the party make candidates sign a contract that commits them to Vision and keeps them from jumping ship to the NDP?

“That’s something that’s come up more and more and we’ll have to take a look at that, for sure,” Baillie said. “We have not settled on any rules as of yet, but I think those will be coming shortly.” Stay tuned.

Party’s over?

Breaking news—Coun. Suzanne Anton is no longer a member of the Non Partisan Association! At least that’s what I take from a guest column Anton wrote about rapid transit for the Indo-Canadian Voice newspaper, published Nov. 6, 2010. Her byline reads, “By Independent Councillor Suzanne Anton.” An accompanying photograph, which looks like one left over from her 2008 campaign brochures, also describes her as an independent. So I called her to find out what was going on. Are you still a member of the NPA? “Am I still a member of the NPA? Yes,” she replied. Then what’s the deal with you describing yourself as an independent instead of a proud member of the city’s oldest party? “Oops. I’ll have to get the person who helped me with that one to correct that. I didn’t submit it directly myself. Thank you for pointing that out to me. I will make sure to get that corrected.” So there’s nothing behind that? Fed up with the NPA? Going the Carole Taylor route? Independent sounds better than NPA? “No, no, no, it’s a mistake.” Anton and her NPA cohorts will get together this Saturday (Nov. 20) for the party’s first nomination meeting, where the only battle will be for a park board seat. The party will decide on the rest of its slate in the new year, in-

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cluding naming a mayoral candidate. The civic election is November 2011.

Hair removal

A Movember update… Mayor Gregor Robertson’s self-confessed “lame” attempt to grow a moustache this month in support of prostate cancer got even lamer at Tuesday’s council meeting. That’s when Robertson resorted to a stick-on Groucho Marx-like lip warmer. The mayor had trouble keeping it on. So he took it off. Unfortunately, the chocolate milk on his upper lip is still there. Two weeks to go. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings

Vision Vancouver executive director Ian Baillie (right) says former NDP MLA photo Dan Toulgoet Gregor Robertson will seek a second term as mayor.


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2011

stars of vancouver

downtown neighbourhood edition

OFFICIAL BALLOT vote local in the 11th Annual “Best of ” Readers Poll…&

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Downtown Yaletown Coal Harbour Gastown West End Chinatown Live theatre company___________________________________ Local cinema__________________________________________ Pub __________________________________________________ Bakery _________________________________________________ Burger house __________________________________________ Cheap eats ___________________________________________ Coffee bar ____________________________________________ Ethnic food _____________________________________________ Fish & Chips ___________________________________________ Haute cuisine __________________________________________ Sushi bar _____________________________________________ College/University __________________________________ Financial institution __________________________________ Health / Fitness Club ________________________________ Private school ______________________________________ Seniors residence ____________________________________ Spa ________________________________________________ U-Brew (Wine or Beer) ________________________________ Video store __________________________________________ Yoga / Pilates ________________________________________

Appliance store _____________________________________ Art Gallery ________________________________________ Bike Shop _________________________________________ Bookstore __________________________________________ Consignment/Vintage _________________________________ Florist ______________________________________________ Furniture store ________________________________________ Gardening centre ______________________________________ Grocery store _______________________________________ Health food store____________________________________ Jewellery store_________________________________________ Kids’ clothing ________________________________________ Kitchenware __________________________________________ Pet store ____________________________________________ Produce store _______________________________________ Shoe store__________________________________________ Shopping mall _______________________________________ Sporting goods______________________________________ Womens’ clothing ____________________________________

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please drop off or mail your ballot to: Readers’ Choice, The Vancouver Courier, 1574 West 6th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2. Ballots must be pages from the newspaper (no photocopies or faxes). Deadline for entries and Grand Prize Draw: December 6, 2010. Winner will be notified by phone. Reader Poll results will be published Friday, January 28, 2011.

It’s time again to make yourself heard! Here’s your chance to share your tried and true favourite places in your neighbourhood. We’ve gathered together a total of 40 categories for you to give us your opinions on everything from appliance dealers to video stores. You play, we’ll pay! Please specify what neighbourhood you live in and fill in the entry form. Send in your entry form and you will automatically be entered in our fabulous draw for a chance to win a Courier Gift Basket.


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news

VPD says province ignored written proposal about transport to shelters

Homeless transport service remains in limbo Mike Howell Staff writer

The Vancouver Police Department’s request in January to have the provincial government provide a transport service for homeless people seeking shelter has gone unanswered. Const. Jodyne Keller said she wrote a business proposal 11 months ago for the service and it was sent to the office of Housing Minister Rich Coleman, whose new duties include being the province’s top cop as solicitor general. “I would love to hear a response on whether or not they appreciate the request,” Keller told the Courier Tuesday. “But I don’t know. It’s been almost a year and I haven’t heard.” Keller, the VPD’s homeless coordinator, said the department is often the social service agency of last resort in the early morning on the streets. Police do not typically transport homeless people who want to go to a shelter or hospital.

Const. Jodyne Keller, homeless coordinator for the VPD, handed out a blanket to Andy Gesjarlais Tuesday. photo Dan Toulgoet Most times, the people—some with carts and dogs—are left to fend for themselves and police will do their best to check up on them during a shift, said Keller, who handed out blankets to homeless people at Pigeon Park

in the Downtown Eastside Tuesday as part of a campaign run by the Salvation Army and VPD. “If there is a vehicle available, we would love the opportunity to have that out on the street,” said Keller, who believes the provin-

cial government should pay for the vehicle because of legislation it introduced last winter related to homeless people. In November 2009, the provincial government passed the Assistance to Shelter Act, which allows police to use “reasonable force, if necessary” to remove a homeless person from the street during extreme weather and transport that person to a shelter. Two weeks after the legislation was introduced, Police Chief Jim Chu announced that his officers would use only “minimal non-forceful touching” to urge a homeless person to seek shelter during extreme weather alerts. Chu likened the “touching” to the supporting hand a person would use in helping an elderly person cross the street. If a homeless person resisted, police would back off, the chief said at the time. Keller said officers never used the legislation last winter and the VPD has no plans to change its approach as the temperatures begin to drop. Police can still resort

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to the Mental Health Act, which allows officers to apprehend a person if they believe the person is a danger to themselves or the public. The Courier interviewed Coleman in October 2009 about the idea for a transport service and he said it was “a good idea.” But, the minister said, he had yet to see a proposal from the VPD, which prompted Keller’s request. “We have all kinds of services, particularly in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver,” Coleman said at the time. “And we spend millions of dollars down there. I would think that there’s some operation that we could look at to do something like that.” The Courier requested an interview with Coleman this week and wanted to learn the status of the VPD’s proposal. Neither Coleman nor the ministry were able to provide an update before the Courier’s deadline. In March, the city’s homeless count found 1,762 people without a home. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings


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news

Family counsellor notes consent ‘confusion’

Study spotlights sex between young teenagers and adults Megan Stewart

Staff writer

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A 2008 federal law that raised the age of sexual consent from 14 to 16 was intended to protect teens from exploitation and abuse, but sexologists, researchers and educators believe a better understanding of what it means to consent may be more effective protection. Vancouver sex therapist and family counsellor Dr. Pega Ren says the issue of sexual consent “is an area of great confusion.” “Consent needs to be explicit,” she said. “No response is not yes. Nor is it no. No response is no response.” For Ren, who writes a monthly column for Xtra magazine, education is essential because she says social behaviour cannot be legislated. The changes to the Criminal Code raised the age of consent by two years and includes a “close-in-age” exemption that allows sexual activity between adolescents aged 14 and 15 with peers five years older or less. For 12- and 13-year-olds, the range is lowered to peers within two years of age. Under the law, children under 12 cannot consent to sex. Alcohol also impairs a person’s ability to give consent. The law seeks to avoid criminalizing sexual activity and experimentation between teens but nonetheless increase the means of prosecuting older adults out to exploit or abuse adolescents. Although the age of consent is raised to include 14- and 15-year-old teens, Elizabeth Saewyc, a professor of nursing and adolescent medicine at the University of B.C., said children 13 and younger are more vulnerable to the risk of sexual abuse. “The law was already presumably protecting them,” she said. Saewyc is a co-author of a study released this week in the Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality that determined only two to three per cent of 14- and 15-year-olds had sex for the first time with an adult in contrast to 39 per cent

“CONSENT NEEDS TO BE EXPLICIT. NO RESPONSE IS NOT YES.” Dr. Pega Ren

of sexually active 12-yearolds whose first sexual partner was 20 or older. The data determined less than three per cent of all 12-year-olds, roughly 700 adolescents, in the province were having sex. The data is drawn from the 2008 B.C. Adolescent Health Survey, a population controlled survey of 29,000 youth in Grades 7 to 12 around the province. Unique in Canada, the survey is organized every five years by the McCreary Centre Society where Saewyc is the director of research. The study did find that older teens were more likely to report instances of forced sexual activity by another youth close in age. That abuse is reported is a positive indication, but Saewyc said the research suggests not all teens understand what constitutes a healthy and consensual relationship. “At least some of them are not necessarily understanding what does true consent mean in a sexual relationship—that pressure is not OK and that no does mean no.” Expanding on the meaning of consent, Kristen Gilbert, a sexual health educator with Options for Sexual Health, emphasizes that consent is active. “Consent doesn’t mean not saying ‘no,’ consent doesn’t mean not saying anything, it doesn’t mean not crying, not yelling,” she told a radio station in September at the time of a police investigation of the repeated rape of a 16-yearold Pitt Meadows high schooler. In the workshops Gilbert gives to teens around the Lower Mainland, she says consent is an unfamiliar topic, meaning rape is often misunderstood. “When I bring up consent, it’s almost always for the first time.” mstewart@vancourier.com


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news

$62-million condo development combines Island culture with urban sophistication

Nanaimo developers court Vancouverites with quiet promises Jeremy Shepherd Contributing writer

High above the city originally built by coal, an artist is putting the final touches on the graffiti art and sculptures adorning a Nanaimo penthouse. The penthouse is in The Pacifica, a $62-million condo development on Nanaimo’s shore that developers hope will entice Vancouverites to hop on a float plane and settle down in the small Vancouver Island city. “They thought the market was maximized,” said Pamela Groberman, public relations manager for the 18-storey development, discussing the potential of the Vancouver market. “I think the reason every [tenant] likes it is because they’re on the water.” Groberman has an office in Yaletown, but spends a great deal of her time in Nanaimo, often taking the 20-minute float plane ride to business meetings in the city, which sits 100 kilometres north of Victoria. “It’s expensive [to live] in Vancouver,” she said. “It’s half the price in Nanaimo.”

“THE ONLY THINGS DOWNTOWN WERE PAWN SHOPS AND STRIPS CLUBS.” Chelsea Barr

The Pacifica is part of a movement that seems to combine Island culture with urban sophistication. And while numbers are hard to pin down, an unknown number of Vancouverites are fleeing the big city for a quieter life. Eric McLean, the proprietor of a specialty foods store in Nanaimo, said he left the mainland 18 years ago, in part because of the traffic and the stress. “I laugh when I listen to the radio and hear about the backup at the Pitt River bridge,” he said. McLean said part of the purpose of his store, which offers appenzeller cheese for Swiss customers and curried lamb for those with a taste for South African cuisine, is to eliminate the need to leave Nanaimo to shop. “I picked products that I knew

Vince Dumoulin, an artist who has lived in the Downtown Eastside, is creating graffiti art at The Pacifica. photo Kris Krug were very difficult to get,” he said of his establishment, which sits in a changing downtown. “The only things downtown were pawn shops and strips clubs,” said Chelsea Barr, media relations guide for Nanaimo, pointing out the boutiques and coffee shops that have sprung up in the last few years.

The Stars Step Out Variety Show and Auction ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE ZAJAC RANCH FOR CHILDREN

Master of Ceremonies: Red Robinson On Sunday, December 5th 2010 at the Arts Club’s Granville Island Stage, over twenty-five international artists will come together to perform in a variety show benefiting the Zajac Ranch for Children. Along with an evening-long silent auction, this event will raise funds for The Zajac Ranch for Children, a one-of-a-kind camp for children with chronic and serious illnesses and disabilities who would otherwise not have an opportunity to attend camp.

The doors open at 6:15pm; the show begins at 7:30pm. TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH:

www.zajacranch.com - or by calling 604-739-0444 www.vancouvertix.com - or by calling 604-629-8849

She said part of the change is because of Vancouver Island University, which brings 5,000 international students to the area. She said she and her husband bought a 2,600-square-foot home for $280,000, a price she couldn’t imagine finding in Vancouver. DeBorah Grant, an employee at the Best Western Dorchester

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Hotel, a small hotel in operation since 1889, said there’s been a large influx of people settling down in Nanaimo. “A lot of the growth is old people,” she said. “Do you know how long it takes old people to get around corners?” Besides adding a few minutes to her commute, Grant said the changes in the community are putting more people in the cozy, 70-room hotel. “We brought all the electrical power over and down,” she said, discussing the difficulty in rewiring the old building from the roof down. Back in the penthouse, Vince Dumoulin, an artist who has lived in the Downtown Eastside, explained his work. “This is not religious, it’s spiritual,” he said of the light beaming from one hand to another in a large painting hanging in the bedroom. He said it’s about creating a sense of peace amid “chaotic urbanity.” For Nanaimo boosters, that’s how they see their city compared to the mainland. jshepherdcourier@gmail.com

MEMBERS’ FESTIVE DEALS

Receive 20% off of any regularly scheduled base tours (only) including the Vancouver City Highlights tour, North Shore tour, Whistler tour, and Victoria tour. Includes pick-up and drop-off at any Vancouver or Richmond hotel, full commentary and any applicable admissions to attractions included with each specific tour. No “plus” options or add-ons are valid with this offer. (Whistler Train, Victoria Floatplane, Grouse Ziplining, etc. are excluded). Valid until March 31, 2012.

Receive 10% off The Peak of Christmas Celebration. Fresh snow, sleigh rides, reindeer and even Santa himself- all found within a fairy tale setting. Valid November 27-January 1, 2010.

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news

Cost of proposed Point Grey Road lane unknown

Former councillor peddles new bike lane plan Mike Howell Staff writer

NO LONGER AT

Help us prevent kids from making bad choices.

Former city councillor Peter Ladner is renewing his push to have the city create a separated bike lane along a stretch of Point Grey Road that he says will make the route safer for cyclists and joggers. Ladner said ideally a separated bike lane would connect with the existing separated lane on the Burrard Bridge and run west along Cornwall and Point Grey Road to Highbury Street, near the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and Jericho Park. “That would be the ultimate goal,” said Ladner, a commuter cyclist who first pitched the idea during his first term on council in 2004. But, he said, the nine-block stretch of Point Grey Road from Macdonald to Highbury would be the first section where he would create a separated lane. It’s a route heavily used by cyclists and joggers. “It’s already being used and it’s very dangerous, especially in the narrow section between Blenheim and Alma [streets],” said Ladner, who lives near the yacht club. “Cars can’t get by cyclists, so there’s always an issue. The runners are unsafe as well because they’re spilling off into the street.” Ladner’s proposal comes after city council approved a separated bike lane trial in October for Hornby Street. Previously, council approved separated bike lane trials on the Burrard Bridge, Dunsmuir viaduct and Dunsmuir Street. The Burrard link is now permanent, with city staff to report in the new year on the success or failure

Cyclists make do without a bike lane along Point Grey Road. of the Dunsmuir and Hornby routes. When the Hornby link is open—possibly before the end of the year—the separated bike lane network will allow a cyclist to ride from Chinatown to Kitsilano. Total cost of the network is estimated at $5 million but Ladner wouldn’t speculate on the cost of a link along Cornwall or Point Grey Road. The city’s annual budget for transportation-related projects such as roads is $125 million. The implementation of separated bike lanes has been controversial, particularly with associations such as the Vancouver Board of Trade, the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association and the

Canadian Federation of Independent Business. All three associations are worried about the economic impact of the lanes, which are separated by a variety of barriers including concrete medians and planter boxes, will have on businesses. The lanes have replaced metered parking spots. However, polls released by the city, commentary from the cycling community and some business owners show support for the lanes. City statistics show marked increases in cycling since the implementation of the separated lanes. Vision Vancouver Coun. Geoff Meggs has been one of the most vocal supporters on council of the net-

photo Dan Toulgoet

work but he said the ruling Vision council has no plans to approve the implementation of another separated lane before the November 2011 civic election. “What I’ve been saying to all those people proposing new bicycle infrastructure is that I really want to see it incorporated into the overall planning process,” said Meggs, noting people have also proposed a bike route along Kingsway. “They’re all probably good ideas but they need to be ranked and then put into some kind of systematic review, and that’s what we’re trying to do.” For a longer version of this story, visit vancourier.com. mhowell@vancourier.com Twitter: @Howellings

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news

Empty school space leased to private schools

6th ANNUAL

COPE trustees tout school marketing Naoibh O’Connor Staff writer

COPE trustees want long-term strategies encouraging registration at neighbourhood schools and talks on how to keep public spaces for public use, according to notices of motions tabled at Monday night’s board meeting. The motions come just weeks before decisions about school closures are reached. Critics at consultation meetings have complained the Vancouver School Board hasn’t done enough to market public schools. Trustee Jane Bouey said residents should understand the strengths and uniqueness of community schools and the district hasn’t taken enough of a leadership role to see that happens. Strategy details require consultation, according to Bouey, but she envisions initiatives such as orientation or information nights ahead of kindergarten registration. “What tends to happen is once people are registered, then they get orientation, but we don’t do much to encourage people to come and visit the school,” she said. Bouey acknowledged the VSB has been slow to understand the importance of promoting itself and the implications of developments such as school choice legislation and Fraser Institute rankings. “When that switched to publishing elementary school rankings, it’s undeniable that had an impact. Individual schools have tried various things but I don’t think the district as a whole has taken a lot of leadership in that,” Bouey said. “Some of it, to be completely frank, is concern around do you spend money on promoting schools at the same

time as you’re laying off teachers? Sometimes it’s difficult to justify that, although if it makes a difference in terms of enrolment, maybe you can make the argument that it’s worthwhile.” Trustee Al Blakey, who agrees the VSB hasn’t actively promoted schools, suspects it wouldn’t take much money for schools to do projects such as information mailouts prior to kindergarten registration and it might be worth the investment. “I look around and see independent schools doing a lot of marketing,” Blakey said. Trustee Allan Wong tabled the second notice of motion that calls for meetings between city council, the park board, community associations, neighbourhood houses and childcare service providers, about the public use of public space. If schools are closed or have extra space, he said it’s preferable to lease the space to public agencies for services such as childcare rather than to private schools. The Delta school district prohibits leasing vacant schools to private schools, according to COPE trustees. The VSB did, however, lease Shannon Park annex to the Vancouver Hebrew Academy in recent years. Bouey maintains leasing to private schools undermines confidence in public education. “The Hebrew Academy has, by all accounts, been very good tenants but it is a question. You have to weigh the concerns around the school being left empty— I don’t think anybody wants that.” The motions will be discussed at a committee meeting Dec.7 . noconnor@vancourier.com Twitter: @Naoibh

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Picture perfect president Ross Hill and vice president Marcella Munro generated over $100,000 at the Contemporary Art Gallery Gala.

Marking Joe Fortes 25th anniversary, owners Dottie and Bud Kanke fronted the Slurp & Swirl celebration benefitting B.C. Firefighter’s Burn Fund.

Fred Feeling amorous, Slurp & Swirl emcee CityTV’s Dawn Chubai planted one on Joe Fortes maitre d’ Frenchy. A reported $50,000 was raised for Firefighter’s Burn Fund.

UNLEESHED

Rockin’ for Research Gala chair Mary Jane Devine with her husband Mike Cyr raised $1 million for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

Rockin’ out: Started by local rock band Loverboy when guitarist Paul Dean’s son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, the 11th annual Rockin’ for Research Gala fronted by four-time chair Mary Jane Devine welcomed 600 wellheeled guests to the Hyatt Regency. Living up to its Night of a Million Wishes theme, gala-goers emptied their pockets to the tune of $1 million. Flower Power: The Lower Mainland chapter of the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation hosted its 10th 65 Roses Gala emceed by Gloria Macarenko and presented by Canaccord Financial. At the event chaired by Jackie Bevis and Leony Pinsky, 400 guests enjoyed an evening of dining, dancing and fundraising held at the Pan Pacific Hotel. The event raised a record breaking $380,000 to find a cure. Since its inception, the gala has raised over $1.5 million for cystic fibrosis research. An amorous affair: Marking Joe Fortes’ silver anniversary, owners Dottie and Bud Kanke celebrated the Seafood and Chophouse’s milestone with their eighth annual Slurp & Swirl soiree, a wine and oyster celebration benefitting the B.C. Firefighters Burn Fund. A fireman’s dinner for eight generated the night’s highest bid of $8,000 adding to the reported $50,000 raised. Hear Fred Monday morning on CBC Radio One’s The Early Edition AM690 and 88.1FM; email Fred at yvrflee@hotmail.com; follow Fred on Twitter: @FredAboutTown.

A fine feathered Shannon Heth and artist George Vergette attended the CAG gala dinner and art auction held at the Vancouver Club.

At the 65 Red Roses Gala, Luca Piccolo of Holy Cross Elementary helped collect a record-breaking $380,000 for CF researcher James Zlotnik and others.

Keynote Joyce Groote, flanked by founders David Mossman and Maya Kanigan, fronted Women in Leadership Foundation’s SuperWomen and Friends fete.

Mayor Gregor Robertson proclaimed November We Care Red Ribbon Month throughout the city, culminating in the Red Ribbon Gala Nov. 30 at MOV.


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community briefs Going ape

What’s the difference between an ape and an orangutan? Or an orangutan and a gorilla? Maybe there is no difference, maybe there is. Dr. Birute Mary Galdikas will surely be able to answer those questions when she speaks at Vancouver Community College’s Broadway campus, 1155 East Broadway, on Thursday, Nov. 25 at 8 p.m. Galdikas is said to be the world’s leading authority on the orangutan and has dedicated her career to understanding the nature of this compelling species, which hovers on the edge of extinction. Charlton Heston is not expected to be in attendance.

Street Blues Band. They’ll play rock ’n’ roll, blues and Motown at a fundraiser for the Red Cross that’ll be emceed by Charles Kaplan, Nov. 27. The one-time fundraising event for tsunami victims in Thailand has evolved into an

annual fundraiser. This year, organizer Jenny Wright has chosen to direct money raised to the Red Cross’s Haiti and Pakistan funds. Organizers are seeking donated items for its silent auction and the Red Cross can give those who do-

nate a tax receipt. The Benefit Concert and Dance for Haiti and Pakistan runs from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at Hycroft Mansion, 1489 McRae Ave., near Granville and West 16th Avenue. Advance tickets are $16 and available at Dollar

and Classic Store, 2881 West Broadway. Tickets are $22 at the door. For more information, see dinosaurmusic.net and look under “concerts,” phone 604-266-3644 or email jennywright3@hotmail.com.

Got an event?

Got a community event that’s happening in Vancouver you’d like to share with readers? Send it to events@ vancourier.com. Send entertainment events to mkissinger@vancourier.com. TELUS AUTHORIZED DEALERS Vancouver 551 Robson St. Bentall Tower Three Oakridge Centre Pacific Centre 2163 West 4th Ave. 2338 Cambie St. 925 West Georgia St. 689 Thurlow St. 1855 Burrard St. 3121 West Broadway 2748 Rupert St. 950 West Broadway 1707 Robson St. 1092 Kingsway 3490 Kingsway

Culture capital

Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore has named Vancouver the Cultural Capital of Canada for 2011. Vancouver is one of three cities honoured with this designation, including Charlottetown, P.E.I. and Levis, Que. Vancouver earned the honour for a city with a population of more than 125,000. During his Nov.12 announcement, Moore also provided $1.75 million for the City of Vancouver’s 125th anniversary of incorporation celebrations, which will begin in January and continue throughout 2011. “It is a great honour to be recognized for our vibrant, diverse and active arts and cultural community,” Mayor Gregor Robertson said in a news release. “This past year, we hosted the biggest arts and culture event in Canadian history with the Cultural Olympiad, and with our 125th anniversary in 2011, we’re looking forward to even more events.”

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The Brock House/Kerrisdale Music Makers with guest choir Kids Sing Chorus present Scotch Mints and Xmas Hints with selections from Brigadoon, Nov. 21. They’ll sing a sprightly assortment of Scottish ballads, seasonal pieces and a few traditional songs meant to chase away the late-November blues. Scotch Mints and Xmas Hints starts at 3 p.m. at 1805 Larch St. and West Second Avenue. Admission is by donation.

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Call 310-MYTV (6988) or visit telus.com/optik or your nearest TELUS authorized dealer. *Offers available until December 31, 2010, to new clients who have not signed up for Optik TV and Optik High Speed in the past 90 days. Free HD PVR rental offer available on a 3 year term; current rental rates will apply thereafter. A cancellation fee applies for early termination of the service agreement and will be $10 multiplied by the number of months remaining in the term. Free Xbox 360 offer available on a 2 or 3 year term. Manufacturer’s suggested retail price of the Xbox 360 is $299.99. A cancellation fee of $13 multiplied by the number of months remaining in the term applies to early cancellation of a service agreement. Minimum system requirements apply. Final eligibility for the services will be determined by a TELUS representative at the point of installation. TELUS, the TELUS logo, Optik, Optik TV, Optik High Speed and the future is friendly are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. Xbox 360 is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other countries. © 2010 TELUS.


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your guide to healthy living in vancouver

Don’t let the darkness get you down BY C AIT L I N D OW L I N G , CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Could falling back be making us fat?

A British professor seems to think so. Mayer Hillman, the senior fellow emeritus at the University of Westminster in London, has written an essay in the British Medical Journal claiming that losing an hour of daylight each fall could be contributing to obesity and illness levels in the U.K. and abroad. Hillman discusses the lack of exercise in the U.K. as the main factor in the country’s rising obesity levels, and notes that an extra hour of darkness in the evenings makes people even less likely to go outside and be active. “It’s an interesting hypothesis, but I don’t think we have any evidence from rigorous research to back that up,” says Dr. James Lu, the acting Medical Officer for the North Shore. Lu notes that a lack of daylight can bring about a slump in the psyche, often leading to

a mood disorder, which affects a substantial amount of Canadians every year, Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.). “Seasonal Affective Disorder ... is influenced by the ability of the person who is affected by it to have enough exposure to sunlight or UV light, or light in general.” Lu suggests that our location in the northern hemisphere is the main issue for local sufferers. Because the difference in the length of daylight between winter and summer days is so pronounced due to our latitudinal whereabouts, that the effects of S.A.D. are increased. Among the symptoms of S.A.D. is a craving for carbohydrates, or “comfort foods,” which can lead to weight gain. Lu feels that a direct link between the clocks going back in fall and obesity is rather tenuous, but considers that this possibility should be of

interest to researchers and warrants further examination. One recommended treatment for S.A.D. is light therapy, using fluorescent lamps to replicate the additional hours of daylight in the summer months. Alternatively, one effective remedy for both is already programmed into us. “Going back to how we’re built and what we’re meant to be as a human living being – we’re meant to be moving,” says Lu. When we are depressed, we go against our natural tendencies to be active. By getting the motivation to up our levels of fitness, we can stave off the blues and any unwanted pounds. The key is to be prepared for the oncoming time and weather fluctuation, says Lu. “Seasons change and we do need to adjust in terms of physical activity.” Lu recommends braving the winter chill

and getting active outside. “You could still go for a walk or run in the winter in Vancouver, you may need to adjust to the rain or dress appropriately.” At this time of year, raking leaves is a great way to stay in shape, he says. Later on during the winter, shoveling snow is marvelous for the cardiovascular system. Lu recommends making small changes to your daily routine that can be kept up throughout the year, such as taking the stairs instead of the elevators at work. So despite the extra hour of darkness brought about by turning back the clocks, we can still make the most of our rainy, dark winter months. Get up to the mountains, strap on your skis, snowboards or snowshoes, or get to a fun dance class at your local gym. Get motivated and feel better all year round.

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Home for the Holidays? Check out our special holiday public swim and skate hours and drop-in for some festive, fun activity. Or, drop-in to our fitness centres for the same, low price. View our schedules online at vancouverparks.ca!

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D21

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The Health and Home CARE Society of B.C. (www.carebc.ca) is a founding branch of the Victorian Order of Nurses (VON) BC, and is heads above the rest when it comes to flu season awareness. Follow their sage advice:

Flu is a highly contagious viral infection of the nose, throat and lungs. It is one of the most severe illnesses of the winter season. Typical flu symptoms include abrupt high fever, chills, a dry cough, headache, runny nose, sore throat, and muscle and joint pain. Flu can be severe, lasting one to two weeks with residual effects up to one month. Flu is spread easily from person to person through the air e.g. coughs or sneezes. Yearly immunization is the single, most effective means of preventing flu.

Flu stats:

• Flu vaccine is 70 to 90 per cent effective in preventing flu. Vaccine is given in the fall/winter (October through March) - for protection during the “flu season”.

• Most people have little or no reaction to the vaccine. • Flu, if contracted, is usually less severe if vaccination has been done.

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

STYLEreport

NOVEMBER 2010

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

PARTY GIRL by Helen Peterson photos by Manon Paradis

The dress is back. You say it never left? Well, now it’s knocking down doors with abandon. A plain black dress with a few rhinestones is fine, too. Oh, you wore that last year? And the year before? Get out of the staid and tried and true this year. Infuse some colour, some layers, beautiful pleats and fabrics and depth. Need inspiration? Local fashion designer Malene Grotrian is hosting an “Open Studio Day” on Tuesday, Nov. 23, from 11 am to 7 pm at #910-207 West Hastings St. (The Malene Grotrian Studio Boutique). Drop by anytime throughout the day; she’ll be featuring designer shoes, clutches, jewellery, clothing and a few more surprises! Go to www.malenegrotrian. com for details. RIGHT: FITTED DRESSES ACCENTUATE EVERY BEAUTIFUL CURVE. LET YOUR KIM KARDASHIAN SIDE OUT WITH THIS TEXTURED SKIMMER BY GROTRIAN. FAR RIGHT: GROTRIAN’S RICH TAFFETA NUMBER, ADORNED WITH A KICK OF BRIGHT RED FOOTWEAR, MAKES A GRAND ENTRANCE THIS SEASON. PHOTOS: RUNWAY SHOW AT FMA FASHION WEEK, VANCOUVER.

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3 4 1. Ayden Gallery celebrates the season of upperlip-warmers with Le Movember Show, showcasing moustache friendly works by an array of hip young artists, including Peter Ricq, in support of Prostate Cancer Canada. The exhibit runs until Dec. 12 with opening reception Nov. 19, 7 to 11 p.m. featuring live painting, drinks and DJs at 88 West Pender, Second Floor, International Village (Tinseltown). More info at aydengallery.com. 2. He has a ton of media buzz behind him and lots of colourful eye shadow. Toronto’s John O, a.k.a. Diamond Rings, brings his Pitchfork-anointed brand of ’80s-synth pop and glammed-out fashion to the Biltmore Nov. 20 in support of his debut album Special Affections. Wear your best acid-wash jean jacket. Tickets at Zulu, Red Cat or online at ticketweb.ca.

3. Langara College’s Studio 58 brings Mary Zimmerman’s The Secret in the Wings to the stage. Described as “a spellbinding look at fairy tales not necessarily for children,” the Mike Stack-directed play with musical direction and original compositions by Kevin McNulty runs until Dec. 5. For tickets go to ticketstonight.ca or call 604-684-2787. 4. Oy vey. The 26th annual Jewish Book Festival gets underway Nov. 20 to 25 at the Jewish Community Centre of Greater Vancouver (950 West 41st Ave.) Highlights include Gary Shteyngart, author of the recent and very funny Super Sad True Love Story, Myla Goldberg (The False Friend) and dog psychologist Stanley Coren whose new autobiography is called, wait for it, Born to Bark. For more info and tickets, go to jewishbookfestival.ca or call 604-257-5111.

kudos & kvetches Be my friend

In case there was any confusion about how desperate the provincial government has become in recent months, now the Liberals have made it clearer than Gordon Campbell’s watered-down urine after an evening of Hawaiian mai-tais and blowing 0.161. On Wednesday, it was announced, or begrudgingly admitted, that the 15 per cent tax cut the premier so awkwardly and surprisingly offered up during a painful televised address to his disappearing supporters last month is a goner. Gone like the wind. Gone like Bill Bennett’s chances of ever getting a Christmas card from the Campbell family. Gone like Kevin Falcon’s hairline. Gone like Kash Heed’s warm, milksoftened hands caressing our trembling cheek before he slowly walks away and leaves us, calling us Angel of the Morning. We don’t even know what that means. When we first endured Campbell’s robotic plea to the province, it reminded us of elementary and high school when unpopular kids would try to buy friends by giving away the best parts of their lunches, letting others

ride their new BMX bike or offering free deeptissue massages to the school’s stressed out rugby team. Maybe that’s just us. But as soon as it became obvious that promising a 15 per cent tax cut doesn’t automatically buy you new friends, the provincial government snatched it away and took their bike home. Naturally, the Liberals’ official line is that they don’t want to saddle Campbell’s successor with the budgetary constraints such a tax cut would bring. Although they’ve yet to sufficiently explain why budgetary constraints weren’t an issue when Campbell was dangling the provincial wallet in front of voters’ noses mere weeks ago. If there is a bright side to all of this, at least Campbell didn’t promise voters a brand new pony. Speaking from personal experience, there is nothing more heartbreaking and damaging to a person’s fragile psyche than being promised a pony only to have that promise reneged and supplanted with a pathetic little hamster name Blackie, who your dumb little sister will accidentally kill by feeding it ketchup. This is getting too real.

Moustache backlash

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arts & entertainment

Picks of the week

F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

A longtime listener, first time caller to K&K lamented to us about the downside of Movember. She may have been crying, but our inability to read people’s emotions prevented us from being sure. In case you don’t know, Movember is the month-long facial hair fest held every November where men around the world grow moustaches to raise money and awareness for men’s health, in particular prostate cancer research. It also gives men a chance to grow the once-maligned 1970s porn accessory without shame, ridicule or automatically getting mistaken for a child molester. So it’s all good, right? Not so fast. “Whoever invented Movember isn’t a fan of the ladies,” maintains our colleague, who happens to be one of those ladies. “I’ve never looked at so many men in one month and said… No.” Ouch. Apparently, even if it’s for a good cause, philanthropy does not reverse or counteract the damaging effects to one’s attractiveness and potential do-ability caused by growing a moustache. So there you have it—science and one discerning woman at our office have spoken. Sorry about that, Mayor Robertson.


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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

dining

Turn to the pages of our holiday guides for ideas from jewellery to fashion, spas to travel, from gift baskets to dining and beautiful stuff for the home.

You’ll find the perfect gift, right here! Guide publishes in full colour every Wed. and Fri. from Nov. 26 to Dec. 24.

To advertise in this feature, call 604-738-1412.

With its inexpensive bivalves and edgy cocktails, Jeremy Towning’s Oyster, in the old VSE building, delivers.

Marlin Travel-Downtown is proud to offer in partnership with Transat Holidays,

Tiny Oyster offers one of the best shucks in town

Yoga&Wellness Getaways

At the Aventura Palace Resort & Spa a World-Class Spa Resort in Riviera Maya, Mexico! All-inclusive package with 2 Yoga sessions per day. Hosted by: Saskia Schreiber, Lifestyle and Wellness Manager & Registered Yoga Instructor

Rejuvenate your mind, body and spirit! Join us and be surrounded by awe-inspiring scenery, join Saskia for 7 days of pure yoga bliss! Open to all levels. Departures:

23 Jan11 …… $2495.00cad 27 Feb11 …… $2460.00cad 01May11 …… $2310.00cad

Prices are based on double occupancy plus all applicable taxes. Call now for more information & book!!!! Space is limited.

Marlin Travel – Downtown 604-684 3291 939 Hornby Street,Vancouver, B.C.VV6Z 1V3 Saskia developed CreaYogaFlow, a holistic health management practice, founded on three pillars: Yoga, Meditation and Expressive Arts Therapy. For more information visit www.saskiaschreiber.com

The Dance Centre presents

Discover Dance!

photo credit: Peter Eastwood

LINK Dance

Choreographer Gail Lotenberg introduces excerpts from her new work Experiments: Where Logic and Emotion Collide, which explores the rich relationship between dance and science.

Thursday, November 25 at 12 noon

Scotiabank Dance Centre 677 Davie Street (at Granville), Vancouver

Tickets $10/$8 students, seniors from Tickets Tonight 604.684.2787

www.ticketstonight.ca

photos Tim Pawsey

Information: 604.606.6400 • www.thedancecentre.ca

The Hired Belly with Tim Pawsey

The Hired Belly has long believed Vancouver deserves a quintessential dish or ingredient to call its own—and that anything oyster connected might be a worthy contender. For that reason alone, we were delighted to hear of the arrival of simply monikered Oyster (475 Howe St., ph. 604-899-0323), a Lilliputian celebration of the not-so-lowly bivalve, tucked away in the art-deco bowels of the original Vancouver Stock Exchange. “Tiny” doesn’t even say it—there’s barely enough room to swing a serious shucker in here. Never mind. On board is a devoted crew who, aside from being able to shoe-horn their way around, obviously share a common passion for everything oysterish, and more—including some edgy drinks, such as an Alaskan smoked salmon vodka and oyster shot. The brains behind this miniature mollusc emporium is Jeremy Towning, a cheerful oyster enthusiast who happily lays claim to what may be Vancouver’s smallest restaurant. Not that that should deter you from dropping in to this blackand-white-trimmed haunt with cozy

tables and glowing red bar backdrop. One more reason to come: some of the smartest bar stools in town that raise or lower automatically—to compensate for any excess intake, you understand. Replenished by regular deliveries from spot prawn fame purveyor Steve Johansen’s Organic Ocean, a glass aquarium perched barside is a temporary home to an intriguing assortment of oysters, swimming scallops and more. A prime lure is the daily “buck a shuck” (weekdays 3 to 6 p.m.), perhaps paired with a $7 glass of dry Muscadet Sevre et Maine or a bottle of Tantalus Riesling. Even if you’re not a fan of the extraordinary array of seductively saline raw oysters that B.C.’s pristine coastal waters yield, fear not. There’s plenty of wellcooked marine cuisine here to tempt.

Fine Dining Deal of the Week

More great B.C. bivalve tastes can be found at Yew in the Four Seasons. Through November you can sample an extraordinary Qualicum Bay scallop and citrus menu that includes seared jumbo scallop with heirloom pumpkin risotto and pork belly. Three courses for $35. It’s detail-driven cuisine in a spectacular setting. Reservations: 604-689-9333.

Top tastes from our first foray included a fennel and tarragon-toned potted shrimp ($5), piping hot oyster pot pie with dressed spinach side salad ($10) and Everything Steamer bowl, packed with mussels, scallops, crab claws, prawns and more in an assertive white wine, parsley and garlic broth ($17). Both smaller bar bites ($5) and regular portions are moderately sized, which make sense considering the protein richness of most of these dishes (read: filling). Another bonus: Almost everything on this menu is certified Ocean Wise, which these days should be a pre-requisite for where you choose to spend you dining dollar. Oysters are cleanly shucked to order and fairly priced at $1.50. No $3 gouging here. They arrive still full of juice, served with a trio of cocktail sauces, red wine vinaigrette and birds eye chili mignonette. Save a spot for some decent sweet endings as well, such as chocolate raspberry mousse and espresso. Even though it’s still in its early days, we’re bullish on this bivalve upstart that given a few tweaks and a few more oyster-friendly wines, Oyster may prove to be the best shell corporation ever to come out of the old VSE. Open weekdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and for private functions on weekends. info@hiredbelly.com

St. Chad's Church Christmas Fair

Make your Holiday Wine

Saturday Nov. 20th, 2010 • 1-3pm 3874 Trafalgar St. @ 23rd Ave.

• Bake Sale • Jam & Jellies • Crafts • Attic Treasures Kids: • Fun Filled Games • Cupcake Decorating

R e f r e s h m e n t s : Te a & D e s s e r t $ 5 . 0 0 Kids $2.00

Easy to do

Great Price 1680 Davie Street | 604.683.7777


F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

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entertainment

Established and emerging artists honoured at annual arts bash

Mayor’s Art Awards recipients make personal connection State of the Arts

with Cheryl Rossi Evelyn Lau doesn’t have an email address. So when the Governor General Award-nominated writer mentored Kaitlin Fontana through the University of B.C.’s Booming Ground creative writing program, Lau sent Fontana feedback in oldfashioned letters. But two years later, when Lau read Fontana’s short memoir “The Flight Album” in the Canadian magazine The Walrus, about interning for a magazine in New York, Lau had to log on to her friend’s email and instantly tell Fontana how impressed she was. “She wrote this absolutely stunning piece... that I would have probably sacrificed a baby toe to have written myself,” Lau said. Now Lau is being honoured at the annual Mayor’s Arts Awards, Nov. 24, and she’s chosen 27year-old Fontana as a promising writer to be honoured as well. City council established the Mayor’s Arts Awards in 2006 to recognize established and emerging artists in a variety of disciplines, including culinary, performing and visual arts. The awards also honour community members who make significant contributions to arts in our city. This year, Yosef Wosk will receive an award for his philanthropy, Betty Lou Phillips for her volun-

teerism and Rio Tinto Alcan for its business support. Stephen Osborne was one of the three writers convened by the Alliance for Arts and Culture to choose this year’s literary winner. Osborne, publisher of Geist magazine and founder of what is now Arsenal Pulp Press, said the panel chose Lau for the high quality of her work and her support of young writers. Lau’s autobiographical bestseller, Runaway: Diary of a Street Kid, which was published when she was 18, set her course on the literary map. She’s since published personal essays in Inside Out: Reflections on a Life So Far, a novel (Other Women), two books of short stories and five volumes of poetry, including this year’s Living Under Plastic. Lau called the mayor’s award “meaningful” because she was chosen to receive it by writers she admires: Osborne, poet, novelist and editor Daphne Marlatt and playwright, editor, publisher and founder of Subterrain magazine, Brian Kaufman. For the Mayor’s Art Awards, Lau said she selected Fontana as the promising writer honouree because of her honest and personal approach to writing. “Her forte is really in the personal essay,” Lau said. “And the personal essays that I have read by her are all just really honest and vulnerable and beautifully done, and that’s always what I’ve always tried to aspire to when I’ve written personal essays.” Fontana says she’s long been a fan of Lau so being recognized by

her is an “additional honour.” “[She’s] a very courageous person and a courageous writer and I think it does take courage to be a writer in this world,” Fontana said. The resident of Cedar Cottage is grateful the city grants awards that shrink the gap between established and budding artists. Fontana primarily writes nonfiction. She won a National Magazine Award for her personal essay about her father’s death called “Sleeping with the Dead” and a creative non-fiction contest mounted by Event, a prestigious Canadian literary journal. Her book Fresh at Twenty: The Oral History of Mint Records will be released next fall. To pay her bills, Fontana works as a music journalist, writing for SPIN, Rolling Stone and Exclaim! magazine. She has also performed across North America as an improviser and sketch comedian. Fontana, who’s quick on her feet but patient with words, is looking forward to meeting Lau, who she described as a “mysterious figure,” at the award presentation at Club Five Sixty. It will be the first time the two have encountered one another in the flesh. “I think she just prefers to be not in everyone’s face,” Fontana said. “She wouldn’t be mentoring people through this program if she didn’t want to be reaching out to the community, but I think she just wants it to be on her own terms.” To see a complete list of award winners or to make a reservation to attend the free event, see Vancouver.ca. crossi@vancourier.com

Kaitlin Fontana will be honoured for her work as an emerging writer at the Mayor’s Arts Awards Nov. 24. photo Dan Toulgoet

Stuart McLean & the Vinyl Cafe

LIVE ON STAGE! Imagination Movers • Canadian Debut! • BIG WAREHOUSE TOUR!

March 3, 2011

North Shore Celtic Ensemble in concert Saturday, December 4 at 7:30pm Samedi 4 décembre à 19h30 The Cultch, 1895 Venables St., Vancouver Tickets available at theatre box office Les billets sont disponibles à la billetterie du théâtre http://tickets.thecultch.com 604-251-1363

NOVEMBER 27 AND 28, 2010

The Centre for Performing Arts - Vancouver Tickets @ 604-280-4444 or www.ticketmaster.ca

MOVIE LISTINGS

$15 for adults; $10 for seniors, students and children, plus applicable service charges Adultes, 15$ ; Aînés, étudiants et enfants, 10$ frais de service en sus www.nscelticensemble.com Join us on Facebook | Joignez nous sur Facebook

PARK THEATRE

FIFTH AVENUE

DIGITAL 3D NOW AT THE PARK THEATRE

The Social Network 1:45, 4:30, 7:05, 9:35 The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet’s Nest

3440 Cambie at 18th 604-709-3456

Vancouver’s only independent theatre with 3D

Fair Game 4:00, 7:00, 9:20 + Sat & Sun 1:30

RIDGE THEATRE

3131 Arbutus 604-604-738-6311

Harry Potter and the Deadly Hallows Thurs, Nov 18 3:45, 6:45, 9:45 + Sat & Sun 12:45

2110 Burrard St. 604-734-7469

In Swedish with subtitles

1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40 Hereafter 1:15, 6:55 (No 6:55 show November 25)

127 Hours

In Dolby Digital

1:30, 2:00, 3:30, 4:00, 5:30, 6:00, 7:35, 8:00, 9:45, 10:00 Conviction 4:15, 9:30

C R E A T I V E

online

vancourier.com

The NSCE gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the City of North Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver through the Arts Office.

NOVEMBER 12TH - 18TH

w w w. f e s t i va l c i n e m a s. c a


THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010 MMU

604-630-3300

N Y • 190

IT

IN YOUR

CO

8

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– 2008

Sales Centre Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:30am - 5:00pm

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Unemployed? Working less than 20 hours per week? All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and willingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort will be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss or damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections or changes will be made in the next available issue. The Vancouver Courier will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration.

For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

1010

CRIMINAL RECORD? Canadian pardon seals record. American waiver allows legal entry. Why risk employment, business, travel, licensing, deportation? All CANADIAN / AMERICAN Work & Travel Visa’s. 604-282-6668 or 1-800-347-2540 CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, Affordable. Our A+ BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT/ TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for your FREE INFORMATION BOOKLET. 1-8-NOW-PARDON (1 866 972 7366) - www.Pardon ServicesCanada.com QUIT SMOKING in less than 1 hr! Weight loss, drug & alcohol programs. 604-681-4501 imaginelaserworks.com

1085 1170

Obituaries

Announcements

Lost & Found

LOST GOLD Ring. (round crown) Sat. Nov 6, Kerrisdale Area. Family Ring. Reward. 604-738-4731 LOST KEYS and fob on red wrist band, KITSILANO Sun Nov 7/10. REWARD. 604-928-4316

BAKER - George Ernest Henry After a full life well lived, George died October 8, 2010 at the age of 94. He leaves his wife of 65 years, Rita, and his five children, Ken (Pam McCorquodale), Doug (Gail Hunt), Louise, Jenine (Mahe), and Gerry. He also leaves 11 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. George liked baseball, scotch, camping and the outdoors, European history, old time fiddle music, winemaking, and dancing probably in that order. And he loved his family. Despite losing his father and his step-father by the age of 12, he somehow knew how to be an excellent dad. Raised on the homestead in Saskatchewan and deprived of any formal education after grade eight, he supported and encouraged his children to receive a combined 85 years of education. George was a selfreliant man and gave much more than he took. He built his own house by hand and lived in it for 60 years. He was a profoundly honest man, incapable of telling a lie. In common with his generation, George understood duty and commitment: he finished every task he ever started and, as a member and officer of his union, pressed all his working life for workers’ rights. He worked for social justice before it had a name. George understood that it is the responsibility of each of us to make the world a better place. His standard advice was always 'make yourself useful' Whenever his children thanked him for his help, his reply was 'just do the same for your kid’s' Our special thanks go to George’s caregivers: Virnith, Gecelyn, Nelly, and Marlene whose tender and affectionate care and attention were a comfort to him and to his family.

REWARD FOR LOST PAPILLION last seen Gov rd Nth Bby Nov 11 778-882-7439

1107

Singles Clubs

ENJOY A GREAT SOCIAL LIFE *** TGIF SINGLES *** Things to do, places to go, friends to meet. Dinners, dances, walks, trips, tennis, golf, etc... with fun people. Info. evenings Thursdays Call 604-988-5231 www.tgifcanada.com

Need ideas? We can help.

5th Floor 5750 Oak Street (at 41st Avenue)

FREE job search and training assistance for men and women

CALL 604.263.5005 ywcajobseeker.org Funded in whole or part through the CanadaBritish Columbia Labour Market Development Agreement

BAG CATCHER / OPERATOR A Richmond bag mfr has several perm, F/T openings for bag catchers and operators. The ideal candidate will be a grade 12 graduate, speak and write English, be physically fit, have an aptitude for mechanics, be willing to be trained as a bag machine adjuster, be willing to do shift work (7 day operation) and have their own car. Starting wage depending on experience. Excellent benefit package. Reply in confidence to: Human Resources, Bulldog Bag Ltd, 13631 Vulcan Way, Richmond, V6V 1K4, or fax to 604-273-9927, or email to hr@bulldogbag.com

1220

Career Services/ Job Search

CAREER CONFUSION? FIND YOUR PASSION

Join our award-winning CAREER PLANNING PROGRAM Free to the Unemployed

www.transitionsprogram.ca

Programs start monthly

FREE Job Search Support for People with Disabilities and/or Chronic Health Conditions

Career Services/ Job Search

Locations in Alberta & BC. Hands on real world training. Full sized equipment. Job placement assistance. Funding Available. 1-866-399-3853 www.iheschool.com

1410

Education

FOODSAFE 1 DAY COURSES – ONLY $62 BEST VALUE GUARANTEED Classes Every Sat, Sun & Monday Taught by Certified Public Health Inspectors ADVANCE Hospitality Education BC’s #1 Foodsafe Choice

1415

Cheryl Carruthers Piano Studio Lessons, all levels. 21 yrs exp. 604-732-3602 www.ccpianist.ca IN HOME OR STUDIO LESSONS Piano, Theory & other instruments. Allegro Music School 604-327-7765 PIANO LESSONS- ALL LEVELS Bernard Duerksen, M.Mus. 30 yrs exp. West side. 604-605-0962.

1420

FOODSAFE 1 DAY COURSES Guaranteed best value! Six Metro Vancouver Locations: Vancouver • Burnaby • Surrey • Richmond • Coquitlam • Maple Ridge All our Instructors are also working local Health Inspectors! Classes held each week & weekend! Course materials available in 6 languages. Same-day Certification. Visit our website at www.foodsafe-courses.com or call 604-272-7213 ADVANCE Hospitality Education – B.C.’s #1 Choice for Foodsafe & WorldHost Training.

Personal Trainer Certification

Earn up to $70/hr as a Personal Trainer. Government Financial Aid may be available. 604-930-8377 Hilltop Academy

Pender & Granville

Tutoring Services

HELPFUL MATH TUTOR Phone: 778-866-8877 Web: http://m101m.org QUALIFIED TUTORS in your home $32/hr. All subjects. All levels. www.pdplustutors.com or call Angela at 604-421-6101

★COMPUTERS★

Education? Find it in the calssifieds!

434-1177 Boundary & Kingsway

Funded in whole or part through the Canada-British Columbia Labour Market Development Agreement

Unemployed? Feeling stuck?

Music/Theatre/ Dance

Dreaming of a career in

remembering.ca

P. VILLAGRA req’s F/T Bookkeeper. Courses in acc. or bkg combined with sev. yrs of exp. in Nafta Provisions req . Spanish Lang. a must due to targeted clientele. $17.50/hr. E-res: taxexperts@pvtax.com

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL

1403

COMPUTER LESSONS FOR 50+ $30/hr Winter Special $210 /8hrs. Call Sol at 604-266-2414 Website: www.easypc.ca

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs and tributes on

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE CLERK

required by ContainerWest, located on Mitchell Island, Richmond. This person will be responsible for the management of vendor records, ensuring timely processing of transactions, payments and resolution of issues. The ideal candidate will be a team player with at least 3 years of Microsoft Dynamics GP experience, follows instructions, works independently, and is dependable. Please email resumes to: larissab@containerwest.com

EDUCATION

604-272-7213

604-630-3300

Accounting

681-2774

www.advance-education.com

Celebrate with a Birthday Greeting in the classified section!

1205

The EDGE Program IAM CARES Society 604 -731- 8504 info@iamcares.ca

1240

General Employment

EDUCATIONAL COORDINATOR required for Community Needs Assessment Research. Email resume to admin@chcabc.com or fax 604-540-8550

CARE FACILITY requires

CASUAL DIETARY, HOUSEKEEPING and LAUNDRY AIDES

with relevant experience and education.

CASUAL ACTIVITY AIDES Experience working with people with dementia. TR Diploma preferred; passion for working with seniors essential.

BLENHEIM LODGE 3263 Blenheim St. Vancouver, BC, V6L 2X7 Fax: (604)732-7316 Email: reception@blenheimlodge.org

FISH PROCESSING LABOURERS

Sung Fish Co. Ltd. at 1795 Pandora St, Vancouver. F/T job. Clean & cut fish, unpack & pack fish on ice. Training incl’d. $10-$13/hr. 2 wks pd vacation. Fax resume: 604-255-4781 Email: sung@sungfish.com

1240

General Employment

CERT EXP F/T PET GROOMER for mobile business, valid drivers license, customer service oriented a must. Send resume to: michelle.berg@aussiepetmobile.ca

COSTA LANDSCAPING seeking Landscapers. Must have several yrs of exp. and compl. of high school. $18.20/hr. 40 hr wk. E-resume: aguiar@shaw.ca GROCERY CLERK needed. $9.25/hr-$12.38/hr, 40hrs/wk, related job experience an asset, Send resume by mail to CLM Management Ltd. 5191 Joyce Street, Vancouver, B.C., V5R 4G8, babylin@telus.net or fax 604-463-3758.

1240

GARLANDS FLORIST req’s F/T Artistic Floral Arranger. $14/hr, 40hrs/wk, design & create floral arrangements at shop/customers venues. Advise customers. Receive payments. Min. 2 yr exp & compl of HS. Knowledge of proper handling of flower. Japanese language skill an asset. CV with photos of floral arrangements to: hr.garlandsflorist@gmail.com Fax 604-739-6622 Location: 2950 W. Broadway, Van Personal Trainer Certification Earn up to $70/hr as a Personal Trainer. Government Financial Aid may be avail. 604-930-8377 See our ad in todays paper under Education.

1250 LABORATORY ASSISTANT

Acme Analytical Laboratories (Vancouver), a premier BC mining laboratory, is looking to fill various Laboratory Assistant positions in Vancouver. Must be able to handle up to 40 lbs as some heavy manual labor may be required. Experience in a lab environment an asset but training will be provided. Starting wage of approximately $12 (combination of base hourly rate and daily production bonus). Detailed descriptions of the various positions are available on Acme’s website:

www.acmelab.com

Interested parties should submit resume and cover letter by email as instructed on the website.

General Employment

Hotel Restaurant

TOKOYO JOHN Enterprises ltd in Van is hiring F/T Jap Cook; 3+ yrs exp with knowledge. Salary $18.75/hour. Main duty: prepare/ cook Jap. food & ensure quality of food. Contact sokris@hotmail.com

1270

Office Personnel

OFFICE ASSISTANT

required part time, for Real Estate Consultant in the 25th/Arbutus area. Efficient computer skills (Word, Excel) and familiarity with office procedures essential. Please send resume to: anne-francis@hotmail.com

1285

Retail Sales

UP YOUR LEATHER Factory Direct Warehouse

Hiring Full & Part-time Store Manager & Sales Personnel

Some great kids aged 12 to 18 who need a stable, caring home for a few months. If you’ve been looking for a home-based opportunity to do meaningful, fulfilling work. Qualified applicants receive training, support and monthly remuneration. Funding is available for modifications to better equip your home. A child at risk is waiting for an open door. Make it yours. Call 604-708-2628 www.plea.ca

TRUTH IN ''EMPLOYMENT'' ADVERTISING Postmedia Community Publishing makes every effort to ensure you are responding to a reputable and legitimate job opportunity. If you suspect that an ad to which you have responded is misleading, here are some hints to remember. Legitimate employers do not ask for money as part of the application process; do not send money; do not give any credit card information; or call a 900 number in order to respond to an employment ad. Job opportunity ads are salary based and do not require an investment. If you have responded to an ad which you believe to be misleading please call the Better Business Bureau at 604-682-2711, Monday to Friday, 9am - 3pm or email inquiries@bbbvan.org and they will investigate.

Beautiful New Leather Store concept is now hiring! Retail experience an asset. Must be bondable. Apply in person with resume: Monday to Friday between 10am to 5 pm Up Your Leather 3511 East Hastings Vancouver. (Hasting / Skeena) (parking at rear)

1300

Teachers/ Instructors

INSTRUCTOR required for part time evening English course. Bachelor’s Degree in Education or English a must. Email resume to admin@chcabc.com or fax 604-540-8550

INSTRUCTOR required for part time evening Mathematics course. Bachelor’s Degree in Education or Science a must. Email resume to admin@chcabc.com or fax 604-540-8550

Take Your Pick from the

HOTTEST JOBS To advertise in Employment Classifieds call

604-630-3300


F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

2060 2010

Appliances

Furniture

MEN’S CLOTHING FOR SALE

Act Fast! Won’t Last!

Look stunning in real designer clothing such as Ed Hardy & Christian Audigier’s t-shirts, hoodies & jeans. Barely worn & in like new condition. Downsizing wardrobe. Serious buyers only, for more info pls contact: 604-880-0288

$$200 Fridge Fridge 200 $ Stove $ 100 Stove 100 Washer $$150 Washer $150 Dryer 100 $ Dryer Stacker $100 300 Warranty & Delivery Coin W/D set $Available 100

2070

604.306.5134 MIELE STEAM OVEN as new, ht17.75 x wd23.38 inches. Health eating. $2000. 604-261-1817

Fuel

Alder • Birch • Maple Dry, Clean Hardwoods

#1 in Sales • 27 yrs in business Full & half cords 7days/week

Burial Plots

604-805-6694

FOREST LAWN Memorial Park Burnaby, single plot, asking $9,800 obo. Call 604-987-2948

Adjustable Sealy Queen Bed with frame Frame rests on 4 wheels with breaks and comes with a head board mount. The head and foot part can be adjusted separately from each other and each part has a massage feature, easily controlled via included remote control. The bed comes with Primu dreamer memory foam mattress in a Tempurpedic breathable/waterproof mattress cover. The bed has never been in contact with smoke, pets and has no damage (spillage, burns etc.). Similar models sell for $5000, paid $3800 6 months ago. Willing to part for $2900obo. Call 778-384-1210

TOP KNOT FIREWOOD est 1981 Dry Alder, Birch & Maple. Pick up or delivered. Rod 604-985-7193

2075

To advertise call

Industrial, Construction, Forklifts, Farm & Turf Equip., Fleet Trucks & Trailers, Lumber, Boats . . . see web for more! Cars & Trucks, 9am Start!!!

Located in Langley just minutes from Vancouver WE WELCOME INDUSTRIAL SMALLS.

6780 Glover Rd., Langley, BC • Phone: 604-534-0901 www.canamauctions.com

MOVING SALE: Dinette suite - 36' glass top and 4 solid iron, rattan back and padded chairs - paid $1000 asking $300 obo. 2 patio loungers - sturdy iron bases and brown pads - $50 for both. Broil King Crown 40 BBQ - w/ side burner - has broken wheel sacrifice at $50. Sofa - Barrymore - green upholstery - $750.00 firm, Loveseat - Ethan Allen- only 3 yrs old - same colour as sofa - $1200 Wing chair and ottoman - beige $35. Can send photos. Jim or Esther (604) 952-0661

2095

COMPLETE BATHROOM Sets $298. Include:main, side cabinets,mirror,faucet,popup,wall drain,light Many different styles available. 604-313-0670

MOVING soon MUST sell! Thomasville Mystique Dining Ste, 6ft table x 45in & 2 inserts, Hutch w/glass & lights 6ft x 19in, 8 chairs, $2500. Sony Trinitron TV 36in & cabinet $100. Sony TV 12x12in, $50. 4 Drawer black filing cabinet $30. All OBO. 778-552-5557

3507

Furniture

Lumber/Building Supplies

#1A STEEL BUILDING SALE! Save up to 60% on your new garage, shop, warehouse or storage building. 6 different colors available! 40 year warranty! FREE shipping for the first 20 callers! 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Sports Equipment

FOUR BIKE bike rack with 2 inch car hitch insert.604 731-0606

Auctions

NEXT AUCTION: Dec. 11, 9am CAN-AM AUCTIONS

2075

2120

Furniture

ITALIAN SOFA BED, cream & brown, confortable and warm. Asking $200. Call 604-251-7461

604-630-3300 2020

2075

$$ Great Deals !! $$

LIKE NEW!

2035

For Sale Miscellaneous

LADIES FULL-SIZE golf bag and pull cart. 604 731-0606 NORTHERN LIGHTS single weight stack weight machine; includes protective floor mat. (Purchaser to dismantle and move.) $400.00604 731-0606

2135

Wanted to Buy

Old Books Wanted also: Photos Postcards, Letters, Paintings. (no text books/encyclopedia) I pay cash. 604-737-0530

3015

Childcare Available

★ BOOK NOW!★ An overseas live-in Nanny for 2010 placement. 604-682-4688

3020

★CATS & KITTENS★ FOR ADOPTION !

3508

Children’s Activities

Dogs BLK LAB pups family raised ready Dec 11. Will hold for X-Mas, vet checked $600. 604-991-4158

6 BEAUTIFUL CHOCOLATE LAB PUPS pure bred, english style, CKC reg’d, $750. Ready for their new homes. Call Glenn 604-230-5136 BOXER - CKC Registered flashy fawn male boxers. Champion Dam, Top Lines. Mom is pictured at boxerdog.ca/jewel $1200.00 604 596 2090 or 604 614 0952 or 604 792 9003

UBC RESEARCH

Vision Laboratory at Children’s Hospital needs volunteers (4-12yrs) with good vision and hearing for a study on visual perception. Study involves computer games. Honorarium paid. Call Jenn at 875-2345 x 7853

3507

Cats

CAT SOFT carrying case, climbing tree, heated hooded bed, litter box, toys, misc 604-824-8487

classified.van.net

Dogs

BICHON FRIESE PUPS, 2 males p/bred unreg. 9 wks, 1st shots, homebreed $500 604-376-8327

604-724-7652

Childcare Wanted

F/T FILIPINO live-in nanny for 2 children. First Aid & tutoring req’d. Please Call: 604-708-1019

3025

3508

Cats

D27

ADORABLE POMERANIAN puppies, very sweet, 1st shots, 2 left $450.. 604-636-4238 AUSTRALIAN Red Heeler pups. 1st shots, vet ✔, ready to go, View parents. Sry 604-572-7249

CHIHUAHUA X pug male Ready to go, shots & vet checked $550. 604-702-1960 or 604-316-2136

Foster homes urgently req’d for rescued, abandoned & neglected dogs. Many breeds. www. abetterlifedogrescue.com GOLD LABRADOR Retriever’ Pups, 2 male, 1 female, ready now. $850. Sry, 604-593-1532

BERNESE MOUNTAIN Dog Pups, vet ✔ 1st shots, dewormed. $950. Chwk. 1-604-794-3561

GOLDEN RETRIEVER Pups ready to go, first shots, email pics available. $650. 250-674-0091

BOXERS, CKC reg. show champion lines, 9 flashy brindle males, 2 reverse, chip, wormed & shots, ready Nov 12. 604-987-0020

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D28

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

GARAGE SALES

3508

3508

Dogs

Dogs

3540

Pet Services

MOBILE PROF Small Dog Groom up to 18 lbs Lower Mainland 19 yrs exp. loriben@shaw.ca 1-604-556-2496

LAB PUPS CKC Reg’d Yellows & Blacks Good Temp. Shots & Tattooed. $750. 604-377-0820

PUPS - purebred Australian Cattle Dogs (Blue Heelers). $460. Chilliwack. Call 604-512-7560.

3545

Pets - Other

SMALL FLUFFY PODDLE X, Male & Female. Ready to Go. $500/each. Bby 604-521-2797

LAB PUPS, yellow, m/f, shots, dewormed, vet checked, $500. family raised Call 604-701-1587

Pet Services

Sat. Nov 20th 10am - 3pm

Park Royal Towers 955 Marine Dr. Tudor Bldg. (follow signs) Visitor’s prkg.

(at Vivian St)

Silver, Dresden, Orrefors, furniture, Doulton.

Sat NOV 20 th 9am - 11:30am Richmond WHOLESALERS WAREHOUSE Moving & Clearance Sale Open to public Mon to Sat 11am - 5 pm 2300 Simpson Rd. Richmond, 604-270-1050 $1items, gift items, electronics,

H BIG FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sun. Nov 21 10:00 am - 4:00 pm, 5468 Inverness Street Dishes, furniture,clothing, electronics, books and more. Rain or Shine • No Early Birds

food items & MUCH MORE !!

GARAGE SALE

Empty your Garage Fill Your Wallet

I

GIANT FLEA MARKET Sat. & Sun. Nov, 20th & 21st... 9 am to 3 pm Buy tables $25/day or $40 for both days. Brittania Elementary. 1110 Cotton Drive. Gym D. Bonnie.. 604-713-4497

MAKE IT A SUCCESS! Call 604-630-3300

MALTESE X 2 - 4 lbs full grown non shedding, quiet 2 males. 1st shot, dewormed $600. 604-392-7372

1369 Kingsway (just west of Knight St) • Furniture • Houseware ING TH E • Books • Knick Knacks SOM FOR NE! O RY • Jewellery • Accessories VE EAT ! E • Clothing for Women, Men GR ICES PR and Children OPEN EVERYDAY 10am - 5pm incl. SUNDAY Proceeds to the Tapestry Foundation in support of residential & elder care at Mount St. Joseph, Holy Family, St. Vincent’s Langara, Brock Farhni, Youville Residence & Marion Hospice.

Christmas Calendar Fairs/Bazaars

You are warmly invited to our annual

Children’s

Christmas Fair &Marketplace

at the

Vancouver Waldorf School Sat Nov 20

10am-3pm Info: www.vws.ca (604) 985-7435 reception@vws.ca

2725 St Christophers Road, North Vancouver

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR 10 AM to 4 PM Sat/Sun, Nov. 20th & 21st FREE ADMISSION

60 tables of quality, hand-made crafts Raffle & Refreshments

West End Community Centre 870 Denman Street, Vancouver Underground pay parking off Haro Street

604-257-8333 www.westendcc.ca

SWEDISH BODY MASSAGE & WAXING

$45/hr. $109 Head to toe pkg. $78/2hrs Body + Facial or Waxing pkg. Brazilian Waxing from $35

3482 Main St. Van 604-376-1686

4005 REWARD FOR LOST PAPILLION last seen Gov rd Nth Bby Nov 11 778-882-7439

PET HOTEL @YVR FREE daycare or Overnight stay for first time clients! Call now 604-238-PETS www.jetpetresort.com

4051

Registered Massage Services

Try the Best 604-872-1702

Catering/ Bartending

1620

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

Just Right Catering

Fairs/Bazaars

Mark your calendar!

For all your entertaining needs private & corporate since 1983.

Tel : 604 (688) 4482

1655

1655

A NON Surgical beauty treatment avail. Acupuncture for facial rejuvenation or lift. Dr. Wendy, 20 yrs exp. with cosmetics. #150 - 5780 Cambie St. 604-600-5658

Metaphysical

LOVE! MONEY! LIFE! #1 Psychics! 1-877-478-4410 CreditCards/Deposit $3.19/min 18+ 1-900-783-3800 www.mysticalconnections.ca

Fairs/Bazaars

COTTAGE CHRISTMAS.. Sat. Nov. 20. 10am-4pm Kanata Co-op @ 7155 Blake St.

HUGE CRAFT Fair ! Killarney Comm. Centre 6260 Killarney St. Sat. Nov 20 - 10 -3 pm Over 65 tables! Admission is FREE infor. call 604.718.8201

Oakridge United Church

BRITANNIA COMMUNITY EDUCATION PRESENTS

27th Annual

BRITANNIA CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS MARKET SQUARE SATURDAY, NOV. 27 9AM - 2PM

305 West 41st Avenue

FRIDAY,Nov. NOVEMBER (3PM – 8PM) Fri., 19th19TH • 3pm – 8pm SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH (10AM – 5PM) Sat., Nov. 20th • 10am – 5pm SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST (10AM – 5PM) Sun., Nov. 21st • 10am – 5pm

(2 blocks east of Cambie

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR Sat. Dec. 4th. 10am - 4pm

Kensington Community Centre 5175 Dumfries St. Vancouver (Near 33rd & Knight St) 604-718-6201 Door Prizes & Food! Free Admission and Free Parking!

Craft Fair

Sat. Dec 4th • 11am - 5pm 5288 Joyce Street, Vancouver

(2 blks south of Joyce Skytrain station)

Tel: (604) 713-8273 Tel: (604) 713-8273 (604) 713-8273 Email: Email: britanniacraftfair@live.ca britanniacraftfair@live.ca Email:

britanniacraftfair@live.ca

24 20th th

Sat., Nov. 27 • 10am - 5pm Over 140 Vendors

Admission: $3 Under 12 Free

Deck The Hall Craft Fair Sat. Dec 4 • Sun. Dec 5 11:00am - 5:00pm 45 Outstanding Craft Vendors

Snack Bar • Child-Minding • Entertainment • Prizes

DUNBAR COMMUNITY CENTRE 4747 Dunbar St. (at West 31st)

604-222-6060

Heritage Hall

3102 Main St. at 15th Ave.

Annual Annual

DELBROOK CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR

SATURDAY SUNDAY SATURDAY &&SUNDAY 10AM-4PM 10AM–4PM NOV 18 & &21 19,• DEC. DEC 4 2& & 53 NOV. 20 •• 101 EW CRAFTERS 101 N CRAFTERS EAND ACH D AY! ARTISANS •• CCONCESSION ONCESSION •• CFREE HILDCARE CHILD CARE PRIZES •• DDOOR OOR PRIZES

$2 Admission, Kids free!

FURNITURE SALE

Selling off overstock from previous projects. Very cool & Eclectic!! 20% off new design projects! ★Vintage★ Modern★ Antique ★Retro Visit www.madvancouver.com For more info Or Call 778-994-7357

Mark Your Calendar!

Holiday Craft Fair

Sat. Nov. 20 • 9:30am - 4:00pm West Point Grey Community Centre 4397 West 2nd Ave. Vancouver

604.257.8140

Admission and parking free!

BAZAAR & UKRAINIAN FOOD FAIR Silent Auction,Raffles • Christmas Crafts Ukrainian Buffet at 5pm and 7pm SATURDAY, NOV 27TH from 11AM – 8PM

St.Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Centre 3150 Ash St. at 16th Ave. Vancouver Free Admission and Parking. Info: Parish 604-879-5830

Fairs/Bazaars

Friends of the SPCA

CHRISTMAS SALE Nov. 26 & 27

from 10 am - 2pm

at: SPCA

1205 East 7th Ave., Vancouver (in Board Room)

GERMAN CANADIAN BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF B.C. Christmas Bazaar and

Delbrook DelbrookCommunity RecCentre Recreation Centre 600 North Van 600West WestQueens, Queens. N.Van. 604-987-PLAY 987-PLAY

FAB FAIR Jewelry & Fashion Accessory Sale

Sat. Nov 20 • Sun. Nov 21 11:00am - 5:00pm 45 Local Designers Heritage Hall

3102 Main St. at 15th Ave. $2 Admission, Kids free!

5005

(corner of Victoria Dr. & SE Marine Dr.)

Holly & TBeedady Bazaarr Bazaar Sat., Nov. 27, 2010 11:00am - 2:00pm

St. Helen’s Anglican Church 4405 W. 8th Ave. @ Trimble

★★★★

Local North Shore Chef

Ann Kirsebom

Will be launching Gourmet products with Grand Marnier & Callebaut Chocolate!! At Circle Craft Nov. 17-21st! Don’t miss out on these Limited Edition Gourmet Gifts for the season.

St. Philip’s Church Christmas Fayre Saturday, Nov. 27 • 12:00-3:00pm Silent Auction, Handcrafted Gifts, Home Baking, Attic Treasures, Christmas Gifts, Books, Tea Room. Fun for the whole family!

3737 West 27th Ave. • 604-224-3238

Accounting/ Bookkeeping

Corporate Tax Returns $225 +up $20 and up for personal tax. Monthly bookkeeping $20 hr +. Specialize: construction; sm bus. accounting. Trevor 604-788-0396

To advertise call

604-630-3300

1655

Fairs/Bazaars

MARTIN LUTHER CHURCH

"We Welcome You" Christmas Craft Fair

November 20 • 10am - 2pm Crafts, Baking, Fresh Evergreen Wreaths, Traditional German Lunch 505 East 46th Avenue, Vancouver (one block West of Fraser St)

CHRISTMAS BAZAAR, LUNCH, TEA & BAKE SALE Saturday, Nov. 27 10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Oakridge Lutheran Church 585 West 41st Ave. Supported by Faith Life Insurance

Amazing Auction

Saturday, Nov. 20th, 2010 12 noon to 4:00 pm at The German Canadian Care Home 2010 Harrison Drive, Vancouver

Free Admission

ADMISSION $1.00 CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE

THAILAND, COME & kitesurfe Warm ocean! Big winds everyday! Miles of empty beach! The time of your life! 604-720-8746

604-630-3300

Baking & Preserves, Crafts & Cards, Attic Treasures, Jewellery, Books, Tea Room, Raffle, Auction

DESIGNER

Travel Destinations

To advertise call

Collingwood Neighbourhood House

free admission featuring arts & crafts by local artisans

Britannia Secondary School – Gyms A&B Britannia A&B BritanniaSecondary SecondarySchool School – – Gyms Gyms A&B 1001 Cotton Drive, Vancouver, B.C. V5L 3T4 1001 CottonDrive, Drive,Vancouver Vancouver, B.C. V5L 3T4 1001 Cotton

1655

4530

Acupuncture

Christmas Calendar

info@vancouvercatering.com

TAPESTRY THRIFT SHOP

Registered Massage Services

4060

K- FAIRHAVEN THRIFT SALE 2720 E. 48th Ave

92 -West Van Estate Sale!

1655

3540

4051

Christmas Craft Fair

Browse through 150 tables of unique handmade gifts

Saturday, Nov. 27th 10am - 4pm

Admission: cash or food donation

Steveston Community Centre 4111 Moncton St. Richmond

Info: 604-718-8080

1675

Holiday Helper

BOOK YOUR SANTA PHOTO SESSION NOW! Santa is visiting Intuition Photography on Granville Island Nov 27 & 28 - Dec 4 & 5. Avoid the mall line-ups! Call Janine at 604-563-5084 or visit our website: www.intuitionphoto.com

CHRISTMAS LIGHT INSTALLATION Santa doesn't deliver to houses without lights – you want Santa to stop in, don’t you?

Handy ‘D’ • 604-722-5684


F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

Financial Services

5035

Cut Your Debt by up to 70% DEBT Forgiveness Program Avoid Bankruptcy, Stops Creditor Calls. Much lower Payments at 0% Interest. We work for You, not Your Creditors.

Call 1-866-690-3328 www.4pillars.ca

DEBT CONSOLIDATION PROGRAM We help Canadians repay debts, reduce or eliminate interest, regardless of you credit. Steady income? You may qualify for instant help. Considering bankruptcy? Call us first 1-877-220-3328 Free consultation. Government approved program, BBB member

NEED CASH AND OWN A VEHICLE?

You keep your keys and drive away with cash. Call Got Keys? Got Cash! (604) 760-9629

http://www.gotkeysgotcash.com

5040

Business Opps/ Franchises

Seeking

PIZZAPRENEURS Since 2003 Rocky Mountain Flatbread Restaurants have been winning awards for “Best Pizza,” “Best Green Business” & “Best Family Experience!” We are now offering franchise opportunities to passionate Hospitality Entrepreneurs. An unbelievable opportunity to build your own buisness & take control of your financial futures. Experience our winning organic family restaurant concept at 1876 West 1st Ave., Vancouver. Email: dominic@rockymountainflatbread.ca for an appointment. #1 JANITORIAL FRANCHISE Customers, (Office Cleaning), Training and support. Financing. www.coverall.com 604-434-7744 info@coverallbc.com

5060

Legal Services

#1 IN PARDONS Remove your criminal record. Express Pardons offers the FASTEST pardons, LOWEST prices, and it’s GUARANTEED. BBB Accredited. FREE Consultation Toll-free: 1-866-416-6772 www.ExpressPardons.com

5070

Money to Loan

Get Cash Today!

Use your vehicle as collateral Borrow up to $10,000!

Real Car Cash Loans

604-777-5046

7005

Body Work

DELIGHTFUL MASSAGE Certified non sexual Call 778-323-9177 RELAXING MASSAGE very clean/private. 9am-11pm, 7days, D/town & Kits. Anie 604-684-8773

**RELIEVE ROAD RAGE**

604-739-3998

JUNE’S MASSAGE

Treat, train couple sex problems, pain. DON’T WORK NO CHARGE within 10 min.

www.sexclinic.tw

$40UP IN/OUT Cell: 604-603-3638

7005

Body Work

RELAXING SWEET FULL BODY MASSAGE 604-321-8296

7010

HOME SERVICES 8055

Cleaning

8073

Drainage

Crown Roofing & Drainage Residental Div. Roofing installations & repairs. 604-327-3086

Personals

GENTLEMEN! Attractive discreet, European lady is available for company 604-451-0175

DRAINAGE, SEWER & WATER ASPHALT & CONCRETE REM. Call Tobias 604 782-4322 Mia Casa − Drain Tile/Sewer Line Water Line Repairs / Replacement & Cleaning. Vince 604-941-6060, Al 604-783-3142

5505

Legal/Public Notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Re: The estate of Ernest John Burchell also known as Ernest J. Burchell, Ernest Burchell and E.J. Burchell, deceased, formerly of 5181 Wales Street, Vancouver BC V5T 3M5 Creditors and others having claims against the Estate are hereby notified under section 38 of the Trustee Act that particulars of their claims should be sent to the VANCOUVER CITY SAVINGS CREDIT UNION, Attention: Hamlata Dayal at 183 Terminal Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 5R8 on or before December 22, 2010, after which date the Executor will distribute the estate among the parties entitled to it, having regard to the claims of which the Executor then has notice. Vancouver City Savings Credit Union, Executor, Peterson Stark Scott, Solicitors NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS RE: THE ESTATE OF MARIA ROCIO EUGENIA MORALES, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS ROCIO MORALES AND MARIA ROCIO MORALES, DECEASED NOTICE is hereby given that Creditors and others having claims against the Estate of Maria Rocio Eugenia Morales, late of Vancouver, who died on December 22, 2009 are hereby required to send them to the undersigned Administrator c/o 700 - 401 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6B 5A1, on or before January 1, 2011 after which date the Administrator will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims of which he has notice. David Barrera Administrator By: Richards Buell Sutton LLP Attention: Angela M. Spanjers NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS Notice if hereby given that creditors and others having claims against the following estate: GORDON DOUGLAS CAIRNS, formerly of 470 West 22nd Avenue Vancouver BC V5Y 2G5, Deceased, who died on April 13th, 2010, and to anyone knowing the whereabouts of Patrick Gordon Cairns also known as Patrick Gordon Brown, and Stephen Michael Cairns also known as Stephen Michael Brown, are hereby required to send full particulars thereof to the undersigned Executors, c/o Kenneth B. Krag, 228 - 8055 Anderson Road, Richmond, B. C. V6Y 1S2, on or before the 31st day of March, 2011, after which date the Executor will distribute the said Estate among the parties entitled thereto, having regard to the claims that have been received. Richard James Beardsley and Carol Ayako Beardsley, Executors.

8075

Drywall

8087

Excavating

# 1 BACKHOE, EXCAVATOR & BOBCAT

one mini, drainage, landscaping, stump / rock / cement / oil tank removal. Water / sewer line, 24 hours Call 341-4446 or 254-6865

Butterfly Cleaning Inc. ‘‘Moving out, Home & Office’’ Bonded, Prof & Affordable. 604-781-4374 CLEANING SERVICE. Reas rates, specializing in homes. Guar work. Refs avail. 604-715-4706 EXP CLEANING ladies avail 7 days/wk. Bonded. Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond 604-928-0025 H.C. Office / House Cleaning Quality & Experience. Bonded & Insured. 604-725-0856 PRIVATE CLEANER Mon - Sat, • Houses • Apartments • Offices • 20 yrs experience. 604-669-9255 QUALITY CLEANING. Exc refs. Res/com. Move in/out. Carpets + pressure wash’g. 778-895-3522

8060

Concrete

CONCRETE SPECIALIST Sidewalk, Driveway, Patio Exposed Aggregate, remove & replacing

Reasonable rates. 35 yrs. exp. For free estimates call Mario

253-0049

CONCRETE & ASPHALT

• Removal & Replace • Free Disposal • Free Estimates • Quality Guaranteed • Fully Insured • Commercial / Residential

LMD Ltd. 604-540-6567

A. FOUNDATIONS, Retaining walls, Stairs, Driveways, Sidewalks. Any concrete project. We also do block, & stone work. Free ests. Call Basile 604-690-3316 ASPHALT & CONCRETE REMOVAL /JACK HAMMERING Call Tobias 604 782-4322 Concrete Specialist. Driveways, sidewalks, exposed aggregate & patios. Santino 604.254.5551 CONCRETE SPECIALIST, patio sidewalk, driveway, exposed aggregate reas rate 604-764-2726 L & L CONCRETE. All types: Stamped, Repairs, Pressure Wash, Seal Larry 778-882-0098

8073

Drainage

DRAIN TILES, sewer lines, water lines & sumps. Mini excavation 604-230-1472 or 604-327-0885

Drywall Specialists • Framing Renovations • Restoration Honest, Reliable & Affordable

604-618-1520 or 778-321-3980

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

J.A. CONSTRUCTION

Specializing in drywall & textured ceiling repairs, drywall finishing, stucco repairs, painting. Fully insured.

604-916-7729 JEFF

CITY LINK DRYWALL LTD WCB, liability insured. 20 yrs exp. Call Indy. Free Est. 604-780-5302 *Drywall * Taping * Texture * Stucco*Painting * Steel stud framing Quality Home 604-725-8925

FIJI ISLANDS

DRYWALL Boarding, Taping & Painting cell: 604-318-3584 VICTORIA DRYWALL LTD. 25 yrs exp. Reno’s & New Constr. Call Bruno ★ 604-313-2763

Wayne The Drywaller

Quality Drywall Finishing. Textured Ceilings & Repair. Renov Specialist. No job too small. 837-1785

8080

Electrical

#1167 LIC Bonded. BBB, lrg & sm jobs, expert trouble shooter, WCB, low rates, 24/7. 617-1774. A. LIC. ELECTRICIAN #19807 Semi-retired wants small jobs only. 604-689-1747, pgr 604-686-2319 A Lic’d. Electrician #30582. Rewiring & Reno, Appliance/Plumbing. Rotor Rooter & Hydro Pressure Jetting Service, 604-255-9026 - 778-998-9026 Free Estimates / 24 Hr Service ABACUS ELECTRIC.ca Lic Elect Contr 97222. 40 yrs exp. 1 stop! Reas. rates! BBB. 778-988-9493.

ELECTRIC AVE Installations. Electrian lic# 99207, Res/comm, www.electric-ave.ca 604-215-0562 LIC. ELECTRICIAN #37309 Commercial & residential renos & small jobs. 778-322-0934. QUALIFIED RESIDENTIAL & Commercial Electrical Contractor. Cert. 92294.. Nick 778-237-2132 YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 service call. Insured. Lic # 89402. Fast same day service guaranteed. We love small jobs! 604-568-1899

Tim Stephens' Astral Reflections Aries March 21 - April 19: A month of mellow understanding, gentle love, intellectual pursuits, legal, travel, cultural and religious involvements begins Monday morning. As your planet (Mars) is in this same area until early December, the first two weeks of this period will be intense, memorable and “high stakes.” You could fall in love, engage in a major lawsuit, travel afar – something unusual, a once-in-a-decade thing. Be honest, true-hearted; if you are not, the rest of December, into January, could bring retribution from higher-ups. Someone is ready for love with you. You’re romantic, Friday/Saturday! Taurus April 20-May 20: The weeks ahead accent depths, mysteries, investments and debts, lust, lifestyle changes, health diagnosis and cures. Your subconscious desires swell to the surface. A big decision or commitment might be demanded of you. For the next two weeks, these matters are more intense, more “impatient” than usual – and might also have more “strings attached” than is healthy. Be cautious, don’t be rushed into a situation or promise. Chase money Sunday to Tuesday – luck’s mixed, so be alert. Errands, paperwork, casual friends frustrate Wednesday, succeed Thursday. Home, family Friday onward. Gemini May 21-June 20: Drudgery ends, fresh horizons blow in, now to late December. A “quiet” relationship might take off like a rocket, or a new one begin. Links, confrontations, opportunities, challenges, competition, enmity, attraction – all grow intense. But in all the intensity, even in enmity, there is a definite streak of friendship, buoyancy and hope. A mingling effect can occur – e.g., love/hate, or you might become “best enemies.” Relocation and business/fame opportunities arise. Maturity, flexibility, diplomacy and an eagerness to join are your success tools. You’re energetic, charming this week!

Cancer June 21-July 22: Work and health issues loom large for the next four weeks. These are most intense to Dec. 7, as work swells and the stakes rise in your reputation and career zones. A working partnership might be volatile, but if you can keep tempers level, a splendid success is possible. Rest, withdraw to plan and contemplate Sunday to Tuesday eve. Midweek, your energy and charisma step up a notch – start projects, tasks. Chase money, or spend, Friday/ Saturday. This month ahead will favour machinery. This week, buy it Friday, but watch for electrical/tech faults. Romance? Next week. Leo July 23-Aug. 22: The weeks ahead offer romance, pleasure, beauty, creative surges and speculative urges. This is your time to accent your own desires, to take a chance on your talents – to expand and express yourself! A semi-romantic relationship could take off with fireworks the first two weeks, or a new, intense romance could spark. However, neither of these is likely to emerge into a stable marriage. You might wed, swiftly and impulsively, but create huge tensions as a result. Be patient. 2011 is your time. Your hopes, popularity soar early week. Rest, midweek. You shine, Friday/Saturday! Virgo Aug. 23-Sept. 22: Home, children, diet, nutrition, Mother Nature, gardening, parks, rest, hibernation, security, real estate – these form your “best world” for the month ahead. You might invest in property, or renovate or improve your present abode, especially over the immediate two weeks ahead. That’s good, BUT be aware of two “unforeseens” – 1) an unpredictable reaction by your mate, and/or 2) electrical issues. Make sure both are “settled” before you begin. You’ve had a bit of a wild ride in relationships over the last seven years. Decide now with whom you’ll go to the future.

Fencing & Decking EST 1991

Call Ron 604.377.1345 MINI-EXCAVATOR: Lot grading and levelling, concrete removal and demolition. 604-306-8599

8090

Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panel for Sale & Installation 8291 No.5 Rd Richmond Call 604-275-3158

To advertise call

604-630-3300

Flooring/ Refinishing

8105

Hardwood Floor Refinishing Repairs & Staining Installation Free Estimates

Century Hardwood Floors 604-376-7224 www.centuryhardwood.com

HENRY’S

HARDWOOD FLOOR SERVICES Sanding & Refinishing Installation Quality Workmanship Free Estimates Fully Licensed & Insured

Fencing/Gates

S&S LANDSCAPING & FENCING

ALL FLOOR COVERINGS Repair & Replace. Material sales Dwight, 604-732-3057 I’ll show you the inexpensive route www.fccarpets.shawwebspace.ca

604-771-8885

ALL ABOUT FLOORS Hardwood, Laminate. Free Estimates. Call Mo 778-789-4333

Artistry of Hardwood Floors

Refinish, sanding, install, dustless Prof & Quality work 604-219-6944 INSTALLATION REFINISHING, Sanding. Free est, great prices. Satisfaction guar. 604-518-7508

8120

Real Estate Services

3 Bdrm-RENT TO OWN Poor Credit Ok 604-857-3597 ★A RENT TO OWN! ★ If you have a small down payment, I have a nice home for you! Less then perfect credit OK. Call Kim 604-628-6598

6007

BUSINESSES FOR SALE

ESTABLISHED TOW TRUCK BUSINESS FOR SALE due to health problem. Great cash base business especially in bad & snowy weather. $10,000 $12,000 income per mth. For info 604-729-1003 or after 4:30pm & weekends 778-839-9762

6008

Condos/ Townhouses

6008-14

Maple Ridge/ Pitt Mead.

RENT TO OWN, If you have a small down payment, I have a home for you. Less then perfect credit ok. Call Kelly 604-418-3162

6020

Commercial/Residential 2837 Kingsway, Vancouver

Tel: 604-603-9655

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ANYTHING IN WOOD Hardwood flrs, install, refinishing. Non-toxic finishes. 604-782-8275

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Ads continued on next page

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-01

Real Estate

6020-01

6020

Houses - Sale

6020-01

Real Estate

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Houses - Sale

We Will Take Over Your Payment Until We Sell Your Property. No Fees. Call Kristen today (604) 786 - 4663

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6020-26

North Vancouver

YOU MUST see this Apt. in a prime position in Lower Lonsdale. 2 Br, 2 Baths In Suite wd, Gas fp, 6 Appls. Price $425,000 for 974sf. Phone: 604-988-6192

6030

Lots & Acreage

BUILDING LOT, New West. 33’ x 130’. $75,000 in services paid! No HST! 4,240 total sq. feet. Priced to sell! $318,888. 604-726-0677

Real Estate

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Glass Mirrors

Store Fronts • Windows & Doors Broken Glass • Foggy Glass Patio Doors • Mirrors • Etc.

REAL ESTATE 6005

Flooring/ Refinishing

8105

604-270-2358, Cell: 604-788-6458

EXCAVATOR • BACKHOE DUMP TRUCK All Phases of Residential Site Work

Fencing/Gates

West Coast Cedar Installations

WWW.CATSFORHIRE.COM

Estimates are Fast & Free 40 Years Servicing the Industry A.S.B.A ENTERPRISE Comm/ Res, Free Est, $20/hr incls supplies, Insured, 604-723-0162

8090

D29

www.bcforeclosures.com 5 BR home from $18,000 down $1,800/mo. 604-538-8888, Alain @ Sutton WC Realty W. Rock

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Libra Sept. 23-Oct. 22: The weeks ahead feature travel, paperwork, errands, details, casual acquaintances and siblings, and communications. Usually this would be a fine time to buy phones, computers, etc. – but lemons lurk until Dec. 7 (and to some degree until March 2011) so delay such purchases if you can. As in the last few weeks, you might meet a “viable” potential mate while travelling or talking. But here, too, glitches exist – long-term tension and/or an unpredictable relationship. Patience, Libra – real love’s coming! Enjoyment, happiness abound this week! Be ambitious Thursday (morning best). Scorpio Oct. 23-Nov. 21: The month ahead emphasizes money, possessions, sensual involvements and memory or rote learning. (This is always your best 30 days of the year to memorize anything – vocabulary, foreign languages, math techniques, etc.) Sensual = anything from good drapes, beautiful paintings, to someone’s closeness. Buy/sell, seek new clients, ask for a pay raise. BUT in all this, go slow before Dec. 8, as pitfalls exist. E.g., you might get too sensual and alienate a romantic prospect, or push too fast for a pay raise and spark tension. Love, legal, intellectual, travel success Thursday! Sagittarius Nov. 22-Dec. 21: Your energy, charisma and effectiveness rise now through December! Your sexual magnetism, determination and “wilfulness” have already grown over the last few weeks – now these increase also. Start new projects, ask favours, see and be seen, attend “in person,” get your way, negotiate – you’re in charge! But, especially until Dec. 7, don’t recklessly overpower other’s needs, desires and sensibilities, or you could create “invisible rebellions” that erupt later, just when you need allies. This week’s happy. Financial, sexual luck soars Thursday! Love, wisdom Friday/Saturday. Capricorn Dec. 22-Jan. 19: Take a break. During the four

Find your perfect home at

househunting.ca

Nov. 21 - Nov. 27 weeks ahead, rest, contemplate and plan. Your energy will ebb. Attend to government-related tasks, institutional and charitable involvements. Fulfil obligations, but don’t volunteer for new ones. Avoid the spotlight. Avoid places where belligerent people gather – bars, dark alleys. Chores call Sunday to Tuesday – get them done. Relationships face you Tuesday eve through Thursday – be diplomatic, even evasive before Thursday. True friends, real loves, show Thursday. Mysteries, big finances, lifestyle decisions come Friday/Saturday – good results! Aquarius Jan. 20-Feb. 18: Friends, popularity, wish fulfilment, optimism, flirtation and happiness visit for the next few weeks! You might face an unexpected dilemma in which your money and your wishes don’t agree, and you might have to choose one. Pick the dream – maybe you can accomplish it for less.You might discover that the person you “possess” doesn’t mix well with your friends. Choose friends – but don’t listen to friends’ advice about money. Romance, flirtation, pleasure, a risk-taking mood buoy you Sunday to Tuesday. Tackle chores midweek. Exciting meetings Friday/Saturday – forgo eccentricity. Pisces Feb. 19-March 20: Your career, neighbourhood prestige, relations with parents and bosses, are emphasized for the month ahead. I’ve already warned you that bosses are temperamental. That continues to Dec. 7, so be diplomatic, good-humoured. Expect unexpected reactions, results! Hustle to perform tasks, to meet deadlines. Bosses love eager screw-ups more than competent grouches. (In some fields, engineering, math, medicine, Pisces are truly favoured now.) Sink into “domestic rejuvenation” early week. Creative, romantic success Thursday. Tackle chores Friday/Saturday – practise safety Saturday. timstephens@shaw.ca • Reading: 416-686-5014


D30

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2010

HOME SERVICES 8125

Gutters

8125

Gutters

@

Carpentry • Painting • Ceramic Tiles Fences • Kitchens • Bathrooms Basement Suites • Roof • Plumbing Leak Repair • Decks

Vancouver Division Since 1985 • Gutter Installation Cleaning & Repairs • Roofing & Roof Repairs • Moss Control, Removal & Prevention 25 year Warranteed Leaf & Needle Guard

CALL NOW for 20% OFF WCB – Fully Insured 100% Money Back Guarantee

604-340-7189

Alliance

Windows & Gutter Cleaning • Professional Power Washing • Gutter Cleaning • Window Cleaning done by hand • Contract Pricing • Will Beat Any Reputable Estimate Work Done by Professionals

Call Steve

604-723-2526

Handyperson

WEST SIDE HANDYMAN

YOUR HOME GUTTER SERVICES FALL SPECIALS

8130

Full Seamless Gutter Installation/Repairs Soffits All jobs Guaranteed. Fully insured/WCB covered Will beat any competitors price

Residential & Commercial 604

Cell:

Professional Powerwash Gutters cleaned & repaired Since 1984, 604-339-0949 PRP GUTTER CLEANING & GUTTER REPAIRS. Free estimates 604-764-0399 Waters Home Maintenance Gutter Cleaning, repairs, windows Free estimate 604-738-6606

8130

Handyperson

604

671-0288

Complete Home Maint./Repairs Certified Trained Pros. For that small job. Rates you can afford. RJR Small Projects Division

604-439-9417 GUTTER , yard cleaning, and rubbish removal. Best price in town. 778-580-6560

224-1005

Part of RJR group

604-202-6118 DAHIPP CONTRACTING Handyman Services Baths, Kitchens, etc 604.817.0718

8140

Heating

Lorenzo & Son Plumbing & Heating (604) 312-6311 Local Licensed Plumbers & Gas Fitters

8150

Kitchens/Baths

TRUSTED HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Apartments & Condos

1 BR + den 750 sf, Mountain view, u/g prkg, insuite w/d, d/w, nr shops & transit, ns, np, seniors 55+, W. King Edward, $1340/mo Quiet Complex. 604-737-1125

6508

Apt/Condos

MOVE-IN BONUS

GEORGIAN TOWERS 1450 WEST GEORGIA ST.

1 & 2 bedrooms starting from $1230 Heart of Downtown, easy transit access. Large gym, laundry on every floor, dishwashers in all suites, in/outdoor parking.

Bathtub Reglazing

604-878-5232 SINCE 1997

BEST PRICE! Bath, kitchen, plumbing, flooring, painting, etc. Call Mic, 604-725-3127

6508

Apt/Condos

204- 5725 Agronomy Rd. UBC 2 br corner, 2 bath, 900sf, granite, balc. lease, ns, np, $2400, now, Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt BEAUTIFUL APTS. 1 & 2 BR avail. Rates from $800. Call 604-327-9419.

Metrotown Area - Bby

Updated Studio & 1 BR Apts. Rental Incentives Offered. Rent includes heat and hot water.

CALL (604) 438-4544 leasing@burnabycentre.com

2 BR + den, updated, mtn & water view ‘see the ships go by’, enclosed balcony, end unit, deck, ns np $1550 Immed 604-980-5689

8155

Landscaping

HEDGE REMOVAL, stump grinding, excavator, concrete removal, etc Steve 604-724-3670

8160

Lawn & Garden

HEDGE SHRUB TREE & STUMP REMOVAL FREE ESTIMATE INSURED

224-3669

★ SD ENTERPRISES ★

Autumn Clean-up:

604.597.1171 mrtubman.ca

Gardening • Landscaping • Pruning • Lawncare • Cedar Fencing • 20% seniors discount • Free estimates! Call Terry, 604-726-1931

KITCHEN & BATHS, renos, tiles, plumbing, painting. Insured, refs, Quality work Adam 604-512-6010

ASK ABOUT OUR $159 GARDEN CLEANUP SPECIAL 43 yrs exp. 604-726-0166

5 year warranty – BBB rated A

6522

Furnished Accommodation

2 BR, corner ste, city view, W.Georgia @ Bute, Coal Harbour new reno, built-in sound syst., w/d $1750 avail now 604-603-4111

6540

Houses - Rent

185 W 45 Ave. Oakridge. 5Br 4.5 bath, yard maintained by owner, 3000sf, lease, ns, np, now $3200. Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt 5 BR, 3 up & 2 down, 3 levels character home, 2 bath, sun rm, storage, Clark & 1st, np, lease, avail now, $2600, 604-720-9268 DEC 1 Newly renovated 4bdrm 11/2 bath uppr flr,5 appl, garage, deck, $2250/mth+60%util. n/s. pets considered. 604-880-0161

LANGARA GARDENS

2 BR, 2 Baths, nr Granville Mrkt area, new, huge private deck w/downtown view, top line appls, np, ns, refs. $2195,604-328-0606

• Refinish old bathtubs • 4 hour dry time From $325 standard size

BURNABY CENTRE

rentals@capreit.net www.caprent.com

1602-3438 Vanness St. 1 Br, balc. 580sf, mtn & city view, Joyce Stn. lease, np, ns, $1200, Dec 1, Eric 604-723-7368 Prop Mngt

#3 - 8652 Joffre Ave, Burnaby

6602

8160

Lawn & Garden

WILDWOOD LANDSCAPING Hedge Trimmimg & Tree Pruning & Hedge Removal Fall Clean Up Chaffer Control & Lawn Restoration. Comm/Strata/Res Aerating & Power Raking. Free Estimates. 604-893-5745 EXP. GARDENER. Fall clean ups, leaf removal, weeding, pruning, new soil Ron 604-202-2176

Ny Ton Gardening Tree cutting & topping, yard cleanup, trimming, hedging, 604-782-5288 T. TRAN -604-723-2468, Tree Pruning, hedging, weeding, leaf cleanup, gutters, etc. Reliable. TREES • HEDGES • SHRUBS Pruning.Shaping.Removal. Fruit Topiary. Wolfgang 604-738-4016 YARD CLEAN-UP, lawns cut & lawn aeration, hedge trim, rubbish removal, gutters. 604-773-0075

8175

Masonry

MASONRY REPAIRS •Stone Walls •Bricks •Chimneys & more. George • 604-365-7672 NORTHLAND MASONRY. Rock, slate, brick, granite, pavers. 20 yrs exp on the N. Shore. No job to small.. Will 604-805-1582

8180

Home Services

BE COOL! COLD FEET? Talk to Someone You Trust.

CENTRAL AIR INSTALLED FURNACES CONDITIONING Sears also installs ROOFING, WINDOWS, WINDOW COVERINGS & CARPETING

Suites/Partial Houses

601 West 57th Ave, Van

Spacious 1, 2 & 3 BR Rental Apartments and Townhouses in the Oakridge area at West 57th Ave and Cambie St. Included are heat & hot water, plus a spacious storage locker. Many suites have big patios and balconies with gorgeous views. Quiet and tasteful gardens, swimming pools, hot tub, gym, laundry facilities, gated parking and 16 shops & services. Near Oakridge Centre, Canada Line stations, Langara College, Churchill High School, Langara Golf Course and much more. Sorry no pets. For more information: 604-327-1178 info-vnc@langaragardens.com www.langaragardens.com Managed by Dodwell Strata Management Ltd.

★RENT TO OWN! ★ If you have a small down payment, I have a nice home for you! Less then perfect credit OK. Call Kim 604-628-6598 STOP RENTING-RENT TO OWN ● No Qualification - Low Down ● CHILLIWACK - 9557 Williams, 3 bdrm, 1 bath, cozy HOUSE on 49x171’ lot, excellent investment property in heart of town..... $888/M SURREY- 6297 134 St. Solid 7 Bdrm HOUSE w/3 bdrm suite on 1/4 acre lot with views... $1,688/M WHITE ROCK - 15532 Madrona Dr 3 bdrm, HOUSE, quiet st, huge yard, dble garage, 2 yr old roof....$1,388/M Call (604)812-3718 or (604)786-4663

www.HomeBuyingCenter.ca

6602

Suites/Partial Houses

2 BR Basement suite, new, ns, np, $1100 avail imm. Main & 64th604-374-3738

2 BDR BSMNT Suite, $990 Upper Deer Lake, seprate entrnce, share W/D, incl heat, cbl, elec intrnt, NS/NP, new reno,cls trnst, schl, mall, ref reqrd, 604 432-7526

24 HOURS 1-800-4-MY-HOME • (1-800-469-4663)

8185

AFFORDABLE MOVING

3 BR, 2 Ba, top flr, exc cond never rented. s/room, Renfrew & 1st $1750+util Dec. 604-603-5082

1, 3, 5, 7 or 10 Ton $ From

1 to 3 Men

45 We accept Visa, Mastercard & Interac Licenced & Insured Local & Long Distance

FREE ESTIMATES Seniors Discount

604-537-4140 www.affordablemoversbc.com

DUNBAR, 2 Bdrms, garden level suite, 5 appl, close to UBC, shops, on bus routes, $1100 incl util, avail immed 604-671-1664 or 604-224-7085 TOP FLOOR, 1 bdrm apt in Character House in Kits. Pets are welcome. Heat & h/w incl. Avail. Dec 1st. $800 Call 604-734-4786

VAN 30TH/MAIN, 3 BR gr lev ste, sep W/D, f/bath, prkg. NS/NP. Avail Dec 15. $1300 incls utls. 604-879-1454 or 778-389-9925 VANCOUVER, 60TH/KNIGHT. Clean, bright 2 BR bsmt. 1,200 sf. $750 incl util. Ns/np. Ref’s a must, suits quiet people. 604-649-3525

6605

Townhouses Rent

FURNISHED ONE BDRM townhouse on SEASIDE walk, False Creek, Granville Isld. $1500/mon Dec 1st. Min rental period 2 mon. max 6 months. 604-736-7291

8195

Painting/ Wallpaper

AMIGO'S MOVING. Delivery. Storage. No Job too Small or Big. Clean up, Garage, Basement. Call 604-782-9511

ACCURATE PAINTING - Int & ext. Competitive prices. 15+ yrs exp. Henry cell 604-754-9661

FLYING SCOTSMAN

MILANO Painting 604-551-6510 Int/Ext. Good Prices. Free Est. Written Guar. Prof & Insured.

604-377-2503

PASSION FOR PAINTING Int & Ext, power wash. Free Est. WCB. David 604-942-0115

MOVING Formerly known as Popeyes Moving www.popeyesmovingbc.com

TWO BROTHERS MOVING Local & Long Distance 604-720-0931 • bc.moving@gmail.com • TwoGuysWithATruck.ca Moving, Storage, Free EST 604-628-7136. Visa, OK

8193

Oil Tank Removal

FLECK CONTRACTING LTD.

• Oil Tank Removal • Work complies with city bylaws BC Mainland • Always fair & reasonable rates • Excellent references

For Free Estimates Call

Off: 604-266-2120 Cell: 604-290-8592

Serving West Side since 1987

STORMWORKS

● Oil Tank Removal ● Recommended ● Insured ● Reasonable Rates

604-724-3670

8195

Painting/ Wallpaper

ARBUTUS PAINTING

Andrew’s Painting & Wallpaper 25yrs exp. WCB/Ins. Refs Free est off seas. rates 604-785-5651

AJK MOVING LTD.

Moving. Storage. Deliveries Local & Long Distance MOVERS.... Residential. Commercial. Industrial. Truck for Clean-ups

• Fully Insured • References • Green Products

Call Today!

604-338-2339 FREE ESTIMATES

BESTWAY PAINTING & DECORATING

Interior / Exterior • Small / Big Jobs Comm./Res. • Fully Insured AURA Stone Countertops Crown molding installation. Faux finish, staining & custom painting. $150 Off (certain restrictions apply)

John 778-881-6737

D&M PAINTING

Interior/Exterior Specialist

• Includes all Taxes • Licenced & Insured • Professional Piano Movers

604-708-8850

3 & 5 Ton truck, fully insured, lowest price! NO tax, Social Asst. accepted. 778-580-6560 AAA ADVANCE MOVING Experts in all kinds of Moving, Storage & Packing. Different from the Rest. 604-861-8885 ABBA MOVERS bsmt clean 1-4 ton Lic, ins’d from $35/hr, 2 men $45 day honest 26 yrs est 506-7576.

URBAN PAINTING ...High quality, material discounts, warranty. & great refs. 604-836-9675 AAA Professional int/ext painter & wall paperer. Guar work. Free est. John 604-318-2059 (Kits)

8200

Decks/Patios/ Railings

Central Decking Co.

• 24 hr. service, water damage • Built-rebuild decks, deck repair • Specialize in seamless polyurethane membrane deck coatings • Sundecks – Balconies – Patios • Waterproofing

604-618-0631

centraldecking@gmail.com

Dream Decks Trex Pro Platinum certified installer

For All Your Decking Needs Vinyl, Wood, Composite Decks marc@dreamdecks.ca

604.924.3746

www.dreamdecks.ca DECKS & FENCES, gates, front steps etc. John 778-998-5591 tarasoffconstruction.com

West Coast Cedar Installations Fencing & Decking EST 1991

604-270-2358, Cell: 604-788-6458

8205

Paving/Seal Coating

ALLEN Asphalt, concrete, brick, drains, foundations, walls, membranes 604-618-2304/ 820-2187

8220

Plumbing

ATLAS

Plumbing & Rooter Plugged Drains, Main Sewer Lines Water Service, Video Pipe Inspection Drain Tiles, Fixtures, Faucets Licensed, Insured & Bonded Hot Water Tanks, Seniors Discounts Call Today

731-8875

604-724-3832

• • • •

garage, basement, backyard.

Experienced Movers ~ 2 Men $50 ~

THOMAS MASTER MATCH PAINTING. Int & Ext. Good Prices, 18 yrs exp. 604-724-8648

Many Years Experience Fully Insured Top Quality, Quick Work Free Estimate

(604) 875-9072 873-5292

B&Y MOVING

T&H PAINTING Int/Ext res/comm painting, power wash, gutters, Free Est., Guar. 778-316-7709

VANCOUVER LTD.

arbutuspainting.com

Moving & Storage

2 BR, large, Dunbar & 40th, very bright garden level, all appls, heat & light, $1150, self-contained, 6 sky-lights, ns, np, 604-266-1953

BRAND NEW, 1 bdrm, $800. Hardwood flrs, new appls, own alarm & entrance. 59th/Ontario, nr Langara & transit, ns, np, avail now, 604-261-4633.. 880-9613

Moving & Storage

8185

GB GARDENING - lawn cut, trim, prune, clean up, power wash, free est. 778-988-5544 604-322-9412

604-685-7112 ext 5101

RENTALS 604-669-4185

1 BR, Kerrisdale, newly reno’d, 750sf, 5 appls incld wd, large patio, ug prkg, heat incld, ns, avail Dec 1, $1200, 604-732-3989

604-879-9191 Superior Cove Tops & Cabinets

604-618-9741

RENTALS 6505

• In business 50 years

Colin Malcolm, Insured

• Sales & Installation of 5’’ Continuous Gutter • Minor Repairs • Cleaning

DYNAMIC GUTTERS & Exteriors. Full seamless gutters. Installation repairs & soffits. All jobs guaranteed. Fully insured, bonded, WCB. Will beat any competitors price. 604-439-9417

Counter Tops, Custom Cabinets & Refacing NO HST til end of Dec

Northwest Arboriculture

EDGEMONT GUTTERS

Established 1963

Kitchens/Baths

Expert Pruning ISA By Certified Arborist Ornamental & Fruit Trees, Shrubs & Hedges

References Available

604-420-4800

8150

Licensed, Insured & Bonded Lic. Plumbers & Gas Fitters Over 20 years Experience Custom Renovations to Small Repairs

604-312-6311

Marty’s

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HOME SERVICES 8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

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All Renovations and Restoration Work 20 years in business

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Plumbing

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❑ Warranty ❑ References ❑ Fully Insured

8240

Renovations & Home Improvement

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Power Washing

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LUCKY METAL WORKS Fence & Gates Stainless Steel Door Window & Door Replacement Patio Covers & Sunrooms Andy: 604-719-8689 #158-11782 River Rd., RMD

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Roofing

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Roofing

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Rubbish Removal

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8335

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Stucco/Siding/ Exterior

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1991 PLYMOUTH Laser 2.0 L turbo, 113 k, 3 dr h/b, mint cond. $1,750. 604-983-3436 1994 FORD Tempo, auto, V6, 4 dr, good cond, lady driven, $2000 obo. 604-988-0347 2007 CHEV Aveo, only 14,000 kms, 4 dr 5 spd, fully warranted, 1 older driver $6300. 604-926-8400

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9129

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F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

2000 CADILLAC Catera Sport, auto, full load, 155k, runs excellent, $4700 604-868-2149

Accelerate your car buying

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2000 NISSAN Pathfinder SE only 125k kms, mint cond, 4x4, exc deal $8,500 obo 604-833-4999

9160

Sports & Imports

1989 VOLVO, $1500, 4 door sedan, runs great, aircared Feb/ 11, must sell. Call 778-840-1961 2005 MAZDA 3 GS, auto, sedan, gray, great cond a/c, loaded $11,000. Call 604-990-5687 NEED CHEAP AUTOBODY ? www.cheapautobody.ca 604-341-7738


D32

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

dashboard

Stunning R8 e-tron offers electrifying drive

Audi maps out green future with climate-friendly cars Graeme Fletcher Contributing writer

Munich—Of late, a number of manufacturers have revealed their respective plans to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and the footprint the automobile leaves in its wake. Audi is the latest company to map out its future. The new direction includes hybrids, plug-in hybrids and all-electric vehicles— it all falls under an initiative called e-tron (in Audi speak, e-tron is to electromobility what quattro is to all-wheel drive). At the Electromobility workshop, Audi had a number of rides available for test. The list included an A1 e-tron range- extended compact and the stunning all-electric R8 e-tron. The latter is one seriously electrifying drive and a world-class sports car in its own right. Based on the R8’s skeletal platform, the e-tron features a large lithium-ion battery (mounted behind the passengers for optimal balance), all the needed power electronics and four electric motors (two front, two rear). The latter ensures that the electric version retains Audi’s preferred allwheel-drive setup. However, the

The Audi R8 e-tron is a world-class sports car in its own right. proactive nature of the e-quattro system means the power can be directed to the wheel(s) best able to put torque to tarmac, and it

can torque vector by driving the outside rear motor faster than the others. Even with all of this electronic

trickery aboard, the R8 e-tron tips the scales at just 1,600 kilograms, which is about the same as the R8 V10 and its monster 5.2-litre V10

gasoline engine. The main battery has a total energy content of 53-kilowatt hours; however, the usable portion is limited to 42.4 kWh in the interest of service life (never fully recharging or depleting the battery extends its usable life enormously). Recharging the main battery takes eight hours when using a 220-volt outlet—a special fast-charge system cuts the charge time to just 2.5 hours. From a practical perspective, the R8 etron boasts a driving range of approximately 250 kilometres on a full charge and the ongoing assistance of regenerative braking. The net result is a riotous automobile that’s quite unlike anything I have driven. The four motors combine to deliver 308 horsepower, which is not too shabby. What makes the R8 e-tron such an electrifying ride, however, is the torque component. The electric motors generate a combined total of 442.5 pound-feet of torque from Rev One. The mind-blowing part is that after going through the gearboxes, the R8 e-tron launches off the line with a combined total of 3,319 lb-ft of torque! To put that into perspective, the R8 V10

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F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R

D33

dashboard

R8 e-tron set to go into production in late 2012 makes almost the same amount of torque after the gearbox and final drive, but not until 6,500 rpm. Obviously, having this much twisting power brings scorching performance. The R8 e-tron runs to 100 kilometres an hour in 4.8 seconds and it accomplishes the 60-to-120-km/h dash in the same time as most self-respecting sports cars take to get from 80 to 120 km/h. Trop the go pedal at 60 km/h and the speedometer’s needle flashes through 120 km/h in just 4.1 seconds as it races toward its electronically limited top speed of 200 km/h. The speed is

engine and wheels. The 254-cc engine drives a 15-kW generator, which supplies the electricity to charge the battery and/or power the electric motor. This strategy delivers a driving range of 250 km (from a 12-litre gas tank!) and a fuel consumption rate of just 1.9 L/100 km. The 12-kWh lithiumion battery, which operates at 270 volts, can be charged from a 220-volt outlet in less than three hours. The electric motor, which is mounted low and up front, delivers a continuous output of 61 hp and 111 lb-ft of torque. However, it can deliver a peak of 102

capped because of the tremendous draw higher speeds place on the battery. As impressive as the phenomenal torque plateau is, the noise this car makes is even more so. It’s basically silent. In my years covering the automotive beat, I have driven some seriously radical cars—the R8 e-tron takes the biscuit. The A1 e-tron is an all- electric vehicle for the first 50 km. Beyond that distance, it uses a gasolinepowered range extender. It is, in terms of its operation, similar to the Chevrolet Volt in that there is no direct connection between the

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er’s seat, it is virtually silent) and it’s impeccably smooth in spite of the fact it spins away at 5,000 rpm whenever it comes to life. Finally, the A1 e-tron’s instrumentation is to die for—the satinsilver dials and a pictogram show the driver exactly what’s going on at any given time. The A1 etron is currently undergoing fleet testing before series production, while the R8 e-tron is set to go into production in late 2012. If this is the future of the allelectric automobile, I’m an unabashed fan. Postmedia News

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hp and 177 lb-ft when the driver hammers the go pedal. This gives the four-seat A1 e-tron the wherewithal to run to 100 km/h in 10.2 seconds and on up to a top speed of 130 km/h. The drive proved just how integrated the extended-range system is in operation. The transition between all-electric and extendedrange modes is completely seamless. In fact, the only thing that gives the game away is a small “range” light that illuminates within the instrumentation. The Wankel (rotary) engine is also surprisingly quiet (from the driv-

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T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

Rates sta rting

100 point certified Honda mechanical inspection ‘09 Honda Fit LX

from

VEHICLES INSPECTED BY

‘08 Honda Accord EX-L

Manual, 19,752 km, fuel saving local 5-speed with only 19,752 Auto, 45,237 km, very clean, local, 1-owner, luxury sedan, k’s, extended warranty extended warranty.

NOW $

14,995

Stk# HP4836A

‘08 Honda Civic LX

Auto, 67,188 km, very nicely equipped and fuel efficient, local, 1-owner sedan, just serviced, extended warranty

NOW $

15,995

Stk# HP4990

NOW $

19,800

Stk# HP4944

‘07 Honda Civic LX

D L O S 13,995

Auto, 83,748 km, clean economical sporty, local, 1-owner coupe, just serviced, extended warranty

NOW $

Stk# HP4923

‘08 Honda CR-V EX

‘08 Honda Element SC 2WD

Auto, 28,931 km beauty, local, 1-owner, 4x4, very nicely equipped, extended warranty

Auto, only 7,800 easy k’s, local, 1-owner, well equipped, extended warranty

NOW $

24,995

Stk# HP4955

Stk# HP4974

‘08 Honda CR-V EXL

Auto, 46,433 km, very nicely equipped, local 1-owner luxury AWD SUV, just serviced, extended warranty

NOW $

28,995!

Stk# 10919A

‘07 Honda Civic Hybrid

D L O S 14,800

Auto, 54,604 km, clean, sporty, local, 1-owner, 2dr coupe, very Auto, 54,748 km, local 1-owner, fuel saving sedan, just fuel efficient, extended warranty serviced, extended waranty

Manual, 43,906 km, local, 1-owner, sporty luxury coupe, just serviced, extended warranty

22,995

27,995

‘07 Honda Civic LX

‘08 HONDA ACCORD EX-L

NOW $

NOW $

2.9%

up to 36 m onths o.a.c

Stk# 110039A

NOW $

Stk# HP4971A

NOW $

14,900!

Stk# HP4951

‘07 Honda Element 2WD LX

‘06 HONDA CIVIC LX

‘06 Honda Accord SE

‘06 Honda Civic EX

‘06 Honda Element 2WD Y Package

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

Manual, 47,033 km, local, 1-owner, just serviced, extended warranty

17,995

OLD S 12,995

Manual, 93,103 km, local, 1-owner, sports coupe with body kit, leather, extended warranty and a low monthly payment

Manual, 72,460 km, very nicely equipped, local, 1-owner, sports Auto, 10,4956 km, nicely equipped, local sedan, just serviced, coupe, just serviced, extended warranty extended warranty as well as a low monthly payment

Stk# HP4970

13,995

Stk# HP4987

Stk# HP4946A

13,800

Stk# HP4977

Auto, 48,638 km, very nice, local, 1-owner, extended warranty

16,995

‘05 Honda Civic SE

‘05 Honda Civic DX

‘06 Pontiac Solstice

‘06 Honda CR-V SE

‘99 Honda CR-V EX

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

NOW $

Manual, 123,119 km, local, 1-owner, fuel efficient 5-speed coupe, just serviced, new tires, warranty

8,995

Stk# HP4969

Manual, 40,435 km, one owner, fuel efficent, 5-speed coupe, just serviced, extended warranty

9,995

Stk# HP4824

Manual, 94,414 km, very nicely equipped, 1-owner, 4x4 SUV, extended warranty

Manual, 47,531 km, good looking, sporty convert

13,995

Stk# 10869B

17,800

Stk# HP4994

Auto, clean economical 4x4, just had a $1100 major service, warranty

8,800

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• Vehicle History Report ‘09 Kia RIO5 EX

Bluetooth. AC, PL, PW, Heated Seat, Automatic 37,524Km

NOW

9,995!

$

‘09 Kia RIO5 EX

Bluetooth. AC, PL, PW, Heated Seat, Automatic 32,631Km

NOW Stk# HY10102

$

9,995!

‘08 Kia Sorento LX

‘05 Honda Civic

NOW

NOW

Local 4×4, V6, ABS, Cruise Control, CD Changer, Automatic, 68,277Km

19,700!

$

Stk# HY10117

‘06 Mitsubishi Galant ES

Local Sedan, Keyless Entry, PL, PW, AM/FM CD, Automatic, 77,912Km

NOW

9,995!

$

Stk# HY10105

‘07 Mazda 3

NOW

11,800!

Stk# HY10136

‘06 Hyundai Sonata GL

16" Wheels, Cruise Control, Side Curtain Airbags, Automatic, 78,916Km

9,995!

Stk# HY10119

‘05 Honda Civic SE

NOW

Stk# 11039A

7,995!

Local 4WD, V6, ABS, Cruise Control, Sunroof, Automatic 99,280Km

9,995!

NOW

$

Stk# HY10095

‘09 Nissan Rogue S

2WD, auto, local, one owner, low km’s, great value

$

18,995!

20,995!

$

‘08 Hyundai Accent L

25,800!

13,995!

Stk# HY10062

NOW Stk# HY10121

NOW

Stk# HY10135

$

‘06 Mercedes-Benz B200 TURBO NAVI

Local 1-owner Luxury 4WD, V6, Premium Sound System 96,256Km

$

Local 1-owner, 5 Speed, CD Changer, Factory Warranty 76,983Km

Premium Sound/Navigation System, Backup Sensor 56,500Km

‘06 Acura MDX TOURING

Local, Hatchback, CD Changer, 5 Speed, Rear Spoiler 40,028Km

7,995!

Stk# HY10109

1-owner, Only 41,000Km, Mint 4×4

NOW

Stk# HY10133

NOW

‘06 Honda CR-V EX

Stk# HY10077

Stk# HY10072B

NOW

NOW

$

22,995!

‘06 Honda Element 2WD

19,800!

Stk# HY10141

2WD, auto, Y pkg, local, one owner, nicely equipped

$

Stk# HY10098A

$

‘06 Honda Pilot EX

$

‘06 Honda Element

13,995!

15,600!

Local 4×4, V6, Alloy Wheels, ABS, Cruise Control, Automatic, 24,624Km

NOW

1-owner 8-passenger 4WD, Premium Sound System 121,427Km

NOW

4 Dr 5 speed, Local 1-owner, Fuel Saver 10,9517 Km

$

$

ARE YOU READY? inspected

‘06 Hyundai Santa Fe GLS 3.5 AWD ‘08 Hyundai Santa Fe 3.3 GL

4Dr Sedan, Bluetooth. AC, PL, PW, Automatic 14,134Km

NOW

NOW

Local 1-owner, Alloy Wheels, ABS, Cruise Control, 5 Speed, 85,790Km

$

Stk# HY10130

9,995!

$

‘09 Kia Rio EX

NOW

Rare Reverb Edition, 2dr, 5spd, local, one owner, nice car

$

Stk# 10953A

Member of the

Dealer # D8508

CALL 604-873-3676

Stk# HP4927

$

17,995!

Stk# HY10129

‘05 Toyota Highlander V6 4WD

Local 4WD, V6, ABS, TC, Premium Sound System 106,608Km

NOW

Stk# HY10122

$

18,400!

Stk# HY10124

wn to wn Do

445 Kingsway near 12th Ave in Vancouver

E 12th Ave

Ki ng sw ay

CALL 604-292-8188 www.destinationhyundai.com

D#31042

D34


UP TO

Delivery and Destination are included in all prices.

VISIT HYUNDAICANADA.COM TO FIND THE HYUNDAI THAT FITS YOUR LIFE.

SMART LEASE OFFERS ALSO AVAILABLE

WITH AT

CASH PURCHASE PRICE

AWARDED THE HIGHEST GOVERNMENT CRASH SAFETY RATING% U.S. NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

MOS.# FINANCING FOR UP TO

CASH PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDING DELIVERY AND DESTINATION

DELIVERY & DESTINATION

+$1,760

25,748 WAS

$ OFF CASH PURCHASESΩ

4,000

2010 SANTA FE GL 2.4L MANUAL

NOW SAVE $

AWARD-WINNING COMPACT HIGHWAY 5.6L/100 KM – 50 MPG! Limited model shown

DOWN PAYMENT APR/ 84 MOS. MONTH

BEST-SELLING SUB-COMPACT IN CANADA∞ HIGHWAY 5.7L/100 KM – 50 MPG!

DOWN PAYMENT APR/ 84 MOS. MONTH

CLASS-LEADING FUEL ECONOMY ^ HIGHWAY 5.7L/100 KM – 50 MPGˆ Limited model shown

FINANCING 2011 ACCENT L 3DR

1,600

NOW SAVE $

WITH AT

MONTHS# STARTING FROM

GL Sport model shown

2010 ELANTRA L

STARTING FROM

Dealer participation of $500 included.

2011 SONATA

BEST-SELLING IMPORT SUV IN CANADA∞

Limited model shown

live smart.

445 Kingsway near 12th Ave in Vancouver

PAPER TO INSERT DEALER TAG Phone HERE OWN IT FOR ONLY

OWN IT FOR ONLY

5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

www.destinationhyundai.com

D#31042

TM The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. "Prices for models shown: 2011 Accent 3 Dr GL Sport is $17,844, 2010 Elantra Limited is $22,944. Delivery and Destination charges of $1,495/$1,495 are included. Registration, insurance, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. ◊Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on new 2011 Sonata models with an annual finance rate of 0.9% for 60 months. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on new 2011 Accent L 3 Dr 5-speed/2010 Elantra L 5-speed with an annual finance rate of 0%/0% for 84/84 months. Monthly payments are $161/$173. No down payment is required. Dealer participation of $500 for 2010 Elantra L 5-speed is included. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,495/$1,495. Registration, insurance, PPSA, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2010 Elantra L 5-speed for $14,494 at 0% per annum equals $172.55 per month for 84 months for a total obligation of $14,494. Cash price is $14,494. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,495. Registration, insurance, PPSA, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Ω∏ $4,000 savings on the cash purchase of the 2010 Santa Fe GL 2.4L 6-speed manual model is composed of $1,000 price adjustment (available on purchase or lease) and $3,000 cash purchase price adjustment (for cash purchases only). Price adjustments are calculated against the lease/finance starting price. Cash purchase price for model shown: 2010 Santa Fe Limited is $35,559. Delivery and Destination charge of $1,760 is included. Registration, insurance, PPSA, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Certain conditions apply. ‡Purchase or lease any 2011 Accent and receive a price adjustment of $1,600. ◊†"Ω∏‡ Offers available for a limited time and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. !Fuel consumption for 2011 Accent 3Dr (HWY 5.7L/100KM; City 7.2L/100KM)/2010 Elantra L 5-speed (HWY 5.6L/100KM; City 7.8L/100KM) are based on EnerGuide fuel consumption ratings. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. ^Fuel economy comparison based on combined fuel consumption rating for the 2011 Sonata GL 6-speed manual (7.35/100km) and 2011 Energuide combined fuel consumption ratings for the full size vehicle class. Fuel consumption for the Sonata GL 6-speed manual (HWY 5.7L/100KM; City 8.7L/100KM) based on 2011 Energuide rating. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. %Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov). The 5-star rating applies to all the trim levels of the 2011 Sonata produced after July 2, 2010. ∞Based on the September 2010 AIAMC report. ∆See your dealer for eligible vehicles and full details of the Graduate Rebate Program. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions.

FOR

D35 F R ID AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T H E VAN C O U V E R C O U R I E R


D36

T HE VA N C O U V E R C O U R I E R F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 0

1-877-8MOBIL8

Unlimited Mobilicity-toMobilicity Calling

+

Fixed Monthly Rate

Unlimited Text & Picture Messaging

+

25

Unlimited Local Calling

+

$

D Caller ID

Introducing truly Unlimited Talk, Text and Data • No Contracts, No Credit Checks • Complete Bill Certainty • Nationwide Coverage • 3.5G Network

Switch to Mobilicity

Taxes are extra. To have unlimited use of the features included in each plan, they must originate within the Mobilicity Unlimited Coverage area, see our coverage map for details. ‘Text and Picture Messaging’ refers to text and picture messages sent to Canada and the continental US only. Terms and conditions apply. Subject to change without notice. © Mobilicity. ‘Mobilicity’ and the Mobilicity logo are trademarks of Mobilicity.

Burnaby

Mobilicity Stores

4500 Kingsway, Unit 1639 (Crystal Mall)

Coquitlam

562 Clarke Rd, Unit E

New Westminster 135 - 555 6th St

Richmond

8180 No 2 Rd, Unit 128 5330 No 3 Rd, Unit 982 (Lansdowne Mall) 8181 Cambie Rd (Presidents Plaza) 4151 Hazelbridge Way, Unit 1030 (Aberdeen Mall) 8700 McKim Way, Unit 1083 (Admirality Centre)

Surrey

8673 - 120th St, Unit B 8128 - 128th St, Unit 306 10320 - 152nd St, Unit 55 10255 King George Blvd 10153 King George Hwy (Central City)

Vancouver

1651 Commercial Dr, Unit 105

2460 Commercial Dr, Unit 1 (Broadview Skytrain Station) 568 Dunsmuir St 2390 East Hastings St 6330 Fraser St, Unit 105 1463 Kingsway Ave 3081 Main St 530 West Broadway 555 West Hastings, Unit 15 (Harbour Centre) 88 West Pender St (Tinseltown)

Vancouver Courier November 19 2010  

Vancouver Courier November 19 2010

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