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W E D N E S D A Y SEPTEMBER 10, 2003

THE BROWN DAILY HERALD Volume CXXXVIII, No. 68

An independent newspaper serving the Brown community since 1891

www.browndailyherald.com

WBRU wins altrock radio wars in Providence BY JONATHAN HERMAN

WBRU has won its three-year alt-rock radio ratings war with Boston-based competitor 103.5 FNX, topping the new entrant in the latest round of Arbitron ratings. After an initial drop when FNX entered the Providence market in 2000, WBRU has recovered its key demographic of males aged 18 to 34. “Anytime a new radio station that is targeting the same demographic enters the market, you’re going to lose some listeners,” said WBRU General Manager Cate Brandon ’04. “People have checked them out and decided BRU is better. And we have gotten these listeners back.” From the spring of 2000 to 2002, WBRU’s ratings decreased from a 9.7 share to 6.6. FNX’s share increased from 4.0 to 6.2 during the same period. Since then the fortunes of the two stations have reversed. WBRU is currently ranked fourth in the ProvidenceWarwick-Pawtucket market among listeners aged 18 to 34 with a rating of 8.1. FNX is eighth with a rating of 3.1. A share, or quarter share hour, is a rating that accounts for number of listeners and the amount of time they listen. After the top four stations in a market, advertising revenue plummets, Brandon said. WBRU’s Sunday programming has remained its most popular. On Sundays, when WBRU switches formats to the “360 Degree Black Experience in Sound,” the station is rated number one in the market. A quarter of all Providence radio listeners on Sundays are tuned to WBRU. WBRU is an independent commercial radio station operated by Brown students. The station functions as an educational workshop for Brown students interested in all aspects of the operation of a radio station. “To be honest, we always thought it was amusing that here we are college students going to class and running a radio station and here are these professionals who tried to compete with us, ” said Station Manager Kate London ’04. “Although we need the ratings to compete, we are not all about ratings.” FNX isn’t the first station to take on WBRU and lose. The Edge, an alternative radio station, began broadcasting in Providence in 1997, in direct competition with WBRU. The station set its sights on overcoming see WBRU, page 5

Sara Perkins / Herald

GREENERY ON THE GREEN: Students perused plants for sale outside Faunce this week.

Sophomore slump more than just a cliché, according to U. officials BY ZOE RIPPLE

“Sophomore slump” isn’t just an empty cliché. The slump is an observable phenomenon, University officials say. Although uncomfortable with the term “slump,” John Sauve, assistant director of psychological services, said sophomore year “is felt as a more difficult time” than freshman year. Sophomores are “more often struggling with motivation, and trying to figure out concentrations,” he said. Sophomores often link their concentration with a sense of identity, Sauve said, and “if a concentration will define who they are, we help them with that.” Often it’s helpful for students to think about “who you are besides your concentration,” he said.

ACADEMIC WATCH

Red wine could prolong life, Brown professor says BY CHARU GUPTA

It’s a long-standing paradox: How can the French eat a diet rich in saturated fat, smoke and drink heavily, yet still live as long as anyone else? A Brown researcher may have found the answer. Marc Tatar, associate professor of biology, recently completed a study suggesting a chemical in red wine helps prolong life. Tatar’s study tested the impact of the chemical resveratrol — found in red wine — on the lifespan of fruit flies. His results, which will be published pending follow-up experiments, indicate resveratrol may slow the aging of the heart, and help to prevent diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and osteoporosis. Resveratrol also may delay the signs of physical aging, he said. Negative side effects of consuming resveratrol

have yet to be found. Tatar suggested this may be because resveratrol is a very unstable compound that oxidizes very quickly and thus loses its activity. For example, a bottle of wine left uncorked for several days would not have the same effect on the body as a freshly consumed glass, he said. For this reason, “scientists will need more stable derivatives of the compound for drug phase testing,” Tatar said. Studies testing the impact of resveratrol on the life span of fungus yeast have already begun — but testing on humans is still a long way off, he said. And in the meantime, Tatar cautioned he wouldn’t necessarily recommend red wine to control the symptoms of aging. The best solution, he said, is still exercise and a healthy diet. “Drink red wine if you enjoy it,” he said.

Concentration choice is tied up in other academic questions and uncertainties, Sauve said, because many sophomores are wondering, “where do these classes fit in with the rest of my life?” Some students also come to Sauve because they feel they should be more motivated academically. Carol Cohen, associate dean of the college and dean of sophomore studies, said the slump sometimes lasts for the whole sophomore year. One characteristic of the phenomenon is asking, “Why am I here?” Cohen said. Sophomore year is “a collision between the end of a noncommittal freshman year … where there is no pressure to make choices” and a time when students’ choices about classes can “lead to a concentration, a career and identifying who you are as a person with what your education will be,” Cohen said. Until sophomore year of college, there is often little agency associated with education, Cohen said. Sophomores often feel scared and overwhelmed as they take responsibility for their educations, Cohen said. Sophomore year is a time when “the rush of college is replaced with the seriousness of what college is all about,” she said. Office hours have been well-attended in the past week, Cohen said. Many students have come to her saying, “I have no idea why I am here,” Cohen said. Pressures from parents and family can deepen the slump. In order to help students discover a direction for themselves at Brown, Cohen asks them about their academic likes and dislikes. Sometimes students discuss taking time off with Cohen. “Advisors help you figure out what’s inside you,” Cohen said. Some students, however, have trouble connecting with their advisors. Julia Rappaport ’06 said she had not made connecsee SLUMP, page 4

I N S I D E W E D N E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 0 , 2 0 0 3 Yale workers get support of over 100 faculty after two weeks of union strikes campus watch,page 3

Taking the place of landlines, cell phones arrive at tech-savvy Morrisville State campus watch,page 3

Unlike their media rep., Israelis lead normal lives, says Joshua Schulman-Marcus ’04 column, page 7

TO D AY ’ S F O R E C A S T W. baller gets international experience as member of Canadian Junior National team sports, page 8

Badass Andy Roddick is America’s next best tennis player, says Chris Hatfield ’06 sports column, page 8

sunny high 73 low 55


THE BROWN DAILY HERALD

THIS MORNING WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2003 · PAGE 2 Coup de Grace Grace Farris

W E AT H E R WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

High 73 Low 55 sunny

FRIDAY

High 76 Low 56 mostly sunny

SATURDAY

High 74 Low 56 partly cloudy

High 75 Low 59 showers

GRAPHICS BY TED WU

Three Words Eddie Ahn

MENU THE RATTY LUNCH — Vegetarian Fagoli Soup, Split Pea Soup with Ham, Garlic Pepper Chicken, Squash Pie, Cauliflower, Green Beans and Peppers, Fudge Bars, Pineapple Upside Down Cake, Lemon Chiffon Pie

V-DUB LUNCH — Vegetarian Cheese Soup, Ham & Bean Soup, Tex-Mex Lasagna, Vegan Roasted Vegetable Burritos, Mexican Corn, Fudge Bars

DINNER — Vegetarian Fagoli Soup, Split Pea Soup with Ham, Chicken Cacciatore, Fish Duglere, Grilled Vegetable Calzone, Red Rice, Savory Spinach, Zucchini, Carrot and Garlic Medley, Pumpernickel Bread, Fudge Bars, Pineapple Upside Down Cake, Lemon Chiffon Pie

DINNER — Vegetarian Cheese Soup, Ham & Bean Soup, Pork Loin with Green Apple Dressing, Stuffed Shells with Meat or Meatless Sauce, Risotto Primavera, Whole Green Beans, Stewed Tomatoes, Pumpernickel Bread, Lemon Chiffon Pie

Greg and Todd’s Awesome Comic Greg Shilling and Todd Goldstein

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Hollywood Walk figure 5 Skewered Asian dish 10 It’s nearly bisected by the Missouri R. 14 Caribbean country 15 Unmetered writing 16 Bath application? 17 Loads 18 Heloise’s forte 19 Fishing, perhaps 20 Approximation 23 RR car cargo 24 Oft-twisted cookie 25 Provides backing for 28 Small songbird 29 Not on the up and up 31 Got a hole in one on 33 __-cone 34 “__ dreaming?” 35 “Almost!” 40 Verb for Popeye 41 But end? 42 Eugene’s st. 43 Indigenous U.S. language 46 Heart 48 Some Santa Anita margins 49 Arm bone 50 Real good time, man 53 Pretty near a target figure 57 Pup __ 59 Prefix for 5Down 60 “Sock __ me!” 61 Get in on a deal 62 Sporty Mazda 63 Jordanian queen 64 “Young Frankenstein” assistant 65 Give away, in a way 66 Bouncy gait DOWN 1 Gobble (up), as junk food

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ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE: B U L B

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By Kim Taylor (c)2003 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

09/10/03

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CAMPUS WATCH WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2003 · PAGE 3

Yale union workers strike during opening week of school year BY KERRY SONIA

Freshmen arriving at Yale University this year found an unorthodox welcoming committee awaiting them on campus — striking union workers. With “Welcome to Yale” signs around their necks, 2,500 clerical, service and maintenance workers began striking in the streets of New Haven on Aug. 27 for better wages, more substantial pension plans and greater job security. Although the strike has been peaceful, the blockage of several streets by protesters prompted the arrest of 83 people, including the Rev. Jesse Jackson, on Aug. 29. Jackson led a march that also included two prominent alumni from Yale, Connecticut Secretary of State Susan Bysiewicz and State Attorney General Richard Blumenthal. In the strike’s latest development, over 100 professors gathered Monday outside Yale President Richard Levin’s office to give him a signed letter asking the administration to agree to binding arbitration, which would put the conditions for a new contract in the hands of a neutral party. As of yet, Yale has agreed to no such action. According to union spokesman Bill Meyerson, having the strike during the opening of the fall semester allowed members of the community to see they have a major problem on campus and that, as long as that problem persists, it will not be “business as usual” at Yale. The campus is split on the issue. Several professors refused to cross picket lines, taking their classes off campus as a sign of support for the strik-

ing workers. The administration tried to increase student awareness of the situation as well. “They passed out pamphlets, but people only glanced at them,” said freshman Ian Bishop. Strikes have become an important part of contract negotiations at Yale. The last strike took place in March when 95 percent of service and technical workers and two-thirds of the clerical staff walked off their jobs for five days. Strikes have preceded eight of the past 10 contracts with university workers. Yale workers have been working without a new contract since January 2002. “Yale made a proposal a year and a half ago and hasn’t moved off it since,” Meyerson said. “They haven’t agreed to binding arbitration.” The retirement plan is one of the main sources of contention. Under the current contract, an average employee of 20 years would retire on $621 per month. This amount does not increase over time. “(The current plan) is not enough to live on,” Meyerson said. Although some workers have crossed the picket lines to go back to work, union leaders and members of the Yale administration differ on their numbers. Both sides have met several times to negotiate a settlement in meetings facilitated by New Haven Mayor John DeStefano Jr. Union representatives continue to ask Yale for an agreement to binding arbitration. A Yale University spokesman did not return repeated calls for comment.

Morrisville State gives students cell phones to replaces landlines BY MERYL ROTHSTEIN

Cell phones are nearly universal on college campuses, but nowhere is that truer than at Morrisville State College in upstate New York. As part of a comprehensive technology plan, the school recently eliminated landlines in residential halls and distributed cell phones to every student living on campus, said Morrisville Assistant Vice President for Technology Services Jean Boland. Seventeen thousand cell phones were distributed the weekend of Aug. 22, Boland said. The phones come with features designed to replicate those available on landlines, including free local and incoming calls, voicemail, caller ID and call waiting, she said. But the phones are also programmed with the Nextel “Direct Connect” walkie-talkie feature, a “push-to-talk” technology that, without dialing, connects users to one another in seconds. The cost of the phone is included in the usual room and board fee, and students can choose to purchase their own long-distance plan. The school, ranked twice as America’s Most Wired twoyear college by Yahoo! Internet Life magazine, replaced landline phones with cellular ones as the third phase of its “college technology strategy,” Boland said. Earlier phases provided students in 48 fields of study with laptops and set up the school for entirely wireless computer usage, she said. Because of the mobility provided by wireless Internet connection and the new cell phones, “our students can see CELL PHONES, page 4


PAGE 4 THE BROWN DAILY HERALD WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2003

Cell phones continued from page 3 learn in the space that’s best for them,” Boland said. It is estimated that, by 2006, two-thirds of the U.S. workforce will be mobile, Boland said. She said Morrisville’s program aims to give students a “marketable edge” in this increasingly mobile workforce. “We believe we’re the first college in the nation to do this,” she said. Feedback has been “overwhelmingly positive” so far, Boland said. Sophomore Greg Schwind said from his Morrisville cell phone that students love having cell phones, particularly to talk with friends and family. The faculty, who have yet to receive cell phones, gave Boland a round of applause at a recent meeting, she said. The next phase in the technology strategy is to expand the role of the cell phone, Boland said. In the “Totally Digital

Slump continued from page 1 tions with many professors or her advisor. This lack of guidance is the main difficulty with sophomore year, Rappaport said. Sometimes the slump can manifest itself as a depression or

Environment” phase, phones will be used to purchase items in the bookstore and vending machines or for access to the dining hall, she said. To accommodate the new cell phones, the Morrisville Auxiliary Corporation, responsible for the non-academic aspects of the college, hosted a number of training sessions to instruct students on using their phones, said Shannon Richards, marketing manager for the corporation. The school also established an authorized service center to handle any problems that may occur, said Jody Williams, computer service manager for the cell phone and laptop program. Lines at the center were long during the first week of school, she said, mostly with students unsure how to use their phones. Morrisville State College is a two and four-year residential college in the State University of New York system. Herald senior staff writer Meryl Rothstein ’06 can be reached at mrothstein@browndailyherald.c om.

severe anxiety, in which case students might be referred to Psychological Services, Cohen said. Additional resources for sophomores include other deans, Randall Counselors and other University staff. Herald staff writer Zoe Ripple ’05 can be reached at zripple@browndailyherald.com.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2003 THE BROWN DAILY HERALD PAGE 5

Hatfield

WBRU

continued from page 8

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of attitude. Pete Sampras is arguably the best male tennis player ever. Chances are you could have cared less when he was playing. Why? He’s a good guy. He rarely argued calls. He was humble. On the other hand, Agassi was probably more popular at the same time because of his former bad boy image. The battles between Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe got so much attention partly because they were such great players and partly because there was a decent chance one of them would attack an official. Let’s put it this way: Could you picture Pete Sampras making cameos in “Mr. Deeds” and “Anger Management” like McEnroe did? Didn’t think so. Anyways, Roddick knows he’s good. He is known for screaming at bad calls. His emotions show when he plays. Viewers want their winners to fold into a ball and cry like Roddick did on Sunday rather than give a slight head-nod like Sampras would do. Roddick won’t shy away from the spotlight, and that’s what will make him America’s darling.

FNX Radio Network

Chris Hatfield ’06 wishes he was really hot and kinda badass.

Clarett continued from page 8 so used, so misunderstood, so uncomfortable. Jim Brown, the Hall of Fame running back, has been advising Clarett, and Brown says the kid should think seriously about going to Grambling to play for Doug Williams. “Kudos to Jim Brown,” Williams told me in a phone conversation Tuesday, “for showing that kind of respect to Grambling. I can’t invite him to do anything because it might be tampering at this point, but if we ever get down that road, I’d be for it. If he did come here, he wouldn’t play in front of 100,000. But sometimes players, and coaches and recruiters and agents forget that you need to come home.” Some of you won’t know what Williams is talking about, and others will. There are kids, particularly young black men, who don’t need to be on campuses that have 60,000 students, with perhaps 5 percent of them black. It isn’t, to them, ever going to feel like home. It’s not particularly nurturing, no matter how many assistant coaches and tutors there are. Though rural Louisiana itself would likely be a culture shock for Clarett, an urban Ohioan, at first, life at Grambling would not be. “He wouldn’t be the first kid to transfer here from a big school, who needs to eat some collard greens and be around some people who look like his mama,” Williams said. “I could sit him down. ... Before integration, he’d have had no other choice.” What Williams also sees is that Clarett needs not to be cut loose at this point of his life, even though that may be what’s best for Ohio State. And Williams also understands what Jim Brown understands, which is why you don’t hear either of them saying the kid

did not return repeated calls for comment. WBRU’s popularity, but ratings quickly faltered. The Edge is no longer a presence in Providence. WHJY was WBRU’s first taste of direct competition. WHJY’s format incorporates both classic and current rock. WHJY was first among listeners between 18 and 34 with a rating of 11.0 in spring 2003. PRO-FM is second with 18to 34-year-old listeners with an AQH share of 8.8. PRO-FM is Providence’s top-50 format station owned by Citadel Broadcasting Company. Hot106 is a hip-hop and R&B station that rose in popularity in the 1990s. It was third in the spring AQH share with 8.7. FNX Radio Network did not return repeated calls for comment.

should legally challenge the NFL or flee to Canada. “The kid really, really needs another two years of college football,” Williams said. “It’s so different from basketball, even from baseball where you have instructional leagues and layers of minor league ball that is still professional. Physically, from what I’ve seen, his upper body is not there yet. He’s got good legs, but he’s had shoulder injuries, which I think are related to a lack of upper body strength. For his sake and for everybody’s sake, he needs a couple of more years of college football and of growing up. I tell kids with all these big aspirations the same thing every day.” It’s silly to question Williams and Brown on this point. One is a Super Bowl MVP and the other the greatest football player ever. If Clarett hadn’t blown off an arranged conversation with another Super Bowl MVP, Marcus Allen, he’d have heard the same advice from Allen. Clarett isn’t going to be LeBron James. He’s never going to make as much money, never going to be as big a star, never going to have as long a career in professional sports. So he needs to get over it. He’s already led a team to a national championship. The scouts will find him, just like they found Walter Payton and Jerry Rice and, well, Doug Williams. Whether it’s Grambling or Howard or Florida A&M or South Carolina State or Jackson State, Clarett needs to find a place where he can go to school and play football and get an uncompromising tough love that he nonetheless would be more receptive to. He needs to start clean with the NCAA, and for two years put himself in an environment that in many respects is well-suited to letting him try this college and college football thing one more time — with much healthier results.

@ BROWN business

Representatives from The Brown Entrepreneurship Program, WBRU, and The Brown Daily Herald will be on hand to tell you about opportunities for you to get involved in business management, marketing, promotions, and more.

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EDITORIAL/LETTERS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2003 · PAGE 6 S T A F F

E D I T O R I A L

Tech troubles When it comes to technology, Brown has many rivals. Most notably, Morrisville State. Students at the upstate New York college returned to school this semester to find a wireless campus, cell phones and the promise of a virtually wireless campus. We got some e-mail kiosks and the news that progress toward going wireless could be rolled back. Technology at Brown seems to be treading water. Computing and Information Services stepped up efforts to prevent file sharing over the summer and staged a massive mobilization of resources to solve crippling network outages during the first week of the semester. Yet plans for progressive goals like online registration remain vague. For Brown to undertake all of the same projects as a college like Morrisville State would be a foolish waste of resources. But just because Brown is in the middle of a tough economic period doesn’t mean the University should allow itself to sink to the bottom among its peers. A wireless campus is inevitable. Students already list lack of mobile network access alongside meager workout facilities and the non-existent student center as Brown’s glaring shortcomings. Going wireless may have wreaked havoc on the network, but the solution isn’t to quit. Soon that will no longer be an option. High school students will continue to dream of coming to Brown whether its technology rivals Morrisville State or remains in the 21st century equivalent of the Stone Age. President Simmons’ Initiatives for Academic Enrichment could catapult the University from the middle of the pack of the nation’s top schools into international preeminence. But technological shortcomings, combined with other campus life failures, will continue to sully Brown’s reputation.

THE BROWN DAILY HERALD EDITORIAL Elena Lesley, Editor-in-Chief Brian Baskin, Executive Editor Zachary Frechette, Executive Editor Kerry Miller, Executive Editor Kavita Mishra, Senior Editor Rachel Aviv, Arts & Culture Editor Jen Sopchockchai, Asst. Arts & Culture Editor Carla Blumenkranz, Campus Watch Editor Juliette Wallack, Metro Editor Philissa Cramer, RISD News Editor Jonathan Skolnick, Opinions Editor Jonathan Meachin, Sports Editor Maggie Haskins, Sports Editor PRODUCTION Zachary Frechette, Chief Technology Officer Marc Debush, Copy Desk Chief Yafang Deng, Copy Desk Chief Grace Farris, Graphics Editor Andrew Sheets, Graphics Editor Sara Perkins, Photo Editor

BUSINESS Jamie Wolosky, General Manager Joe Laganas, Executive Manager Joshua Miller, Executive Manager Lawrence Hester, Senior Accounts Manager Bill Louis, Senior Accounts Manager Midori Asaka, National Accounts Manager David Zehngut, National Accounts Manager Anastasia Ali, Local Accounts Manager Elias Roman, Local Accounts Manager Peter Schermerhorn, Local Accounts Manager Jack Carrere, Noncomm Accounts Manager Laurie-Ann Paliotti, Sr. Advertising Rep. Elyse Major, Advertising Rep. Kate Sparaco, Office Manager P O S T- M A G A Z I N E Alex Carnevale, Editor-in-Chief Dan Poulson, Executive Editor Morgan Clendaniel, Senior Editor Theo Schell-Lambert, Senior Editor Doug Fretty, Film Editor Jason Ng, Music Editor Colin Hartnett, Design Editor

ANDREW SHEETS

LETTERS

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OPINIONS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2003 · PAGE 7

A view from the real Israel For Israelis, the ordinary issues and routines of everyday life endure despite the constant threat of terrorism WHEN I TELL PEOPLE I WAS IN ISRAEL wing and right-wing activists, religious for two months this summer working in and secular Jews, Israeli settlers, soldiers, the national ambulance system, Magen Israeli Arabs, teenagers, parents and David Adom, I imagine they envisage me Russian immigrants. In the ambulance, I picking up severed legs on the streets of also got a chance to see the homes, workplaces, nursing homes, farms Jerusalem. Because of the and stores where the Israel media coverage, the only beyond the tour bus windows way most people know of JOSHUA SCHULMAN-MARCUS begins. Israel is through the lens of In fact, after being there terror and the ongoing conGUEST COLUMNIST only a few weeks, the securiflict with the Palestinians. ty/peace situation (in However, through my proHebrew called just “the situagram, where I was trained to be an ambulance responder and then tion”) began to recede from my mind. volunteered in the Tel Aviv area, I came Other problems occupy a central place in to realize that Israel is so much more the average Israeli’s mindset. The hightech bubble burst and the violence has than that. Every day, I would go to my local MDA weakened the economy in recent years, station early in the morning and get ready and so many people are out of work. for the day. We would check over the There are persistent disputes between ambulances and then wait for calls to religious and secular Jews, as well as come through. On my ambulance there between Jews and Israeli Arabs. was a trained driver and several volun- Economic disparity, cost of living, enviteers like myself. Almost all the volunteers ronmental issues and traffic are all probwere Israeli high school students who do lems the rest of the world rarely sees, but, MDA in their spare time. Most calls were to Israelis, they are extremely significant. Of course, it is impossible to be in not traumatic incidents — in fact, the overwhelming majority of my friends and Israel and not be affected by the dispute I saw no shootings, bombings or anything with the Palestinians. I lived in an immialong those lines the entire summer. They grant absorption center in Kfar Sava, a were standard incidents like older people suburb of Tel Aviv located near the 1967 falling off beds, chest pains, car accidents, Green Line. In the last three years there work accidents and fainting incidents. I have been a few bombing attacks there, would help with bandaging, setting up and indeed the night I arrived a six-yearequipment, taking blood pressures and old girl was killed by a sniper from the pulses, filling out forms and moving neighboring Palestinian city of Qalqilya. From my building I could see Qalqilya stretchers. My volunteering presented me with an and the West Bank, and I also saw the extraordinary cross-section of Israeli soci- large “separation fence” being built. The ety. The drivers and volunteers came from area just across the Green Line is also a a broad array of groups. There were left- major Israeli settlement block, and so I happened to meet many settlers. Contrary to the stereotype, almost all were normal, friendly, rational people Joshua Schulman-Marcus ’04 hails from who just happen to live in the settleEast Meadow, NY.

And yet life goes on, largely without visible signs of fear. People in the United States have this vision of Israelis walking about trembling, checking over their shoulders all the time. I got no sense of this.

ments. The most visible way “the situation” manifests itself is with the omnipresence of security. There are security guards almost everywhere — I was checked several times a day at banks, supermarkets, hospitals, cafes, office buildings and transportation hubs. There are large fences around hospitals, schools and lots of other public institutions. I realized that here in America we take our freedom of motion for granted. At Penn Station in New York, for example, some 10,000 people are guarded by a handful of soldiers. This would be unthinkable in Israel. And yet life goes on, largely without visible signs of fear. People in the United States have a vision of Israelis walking about trembling, checking over their shoulders all the time. I got no sense of this. Even though there have been many horrific bombings, Israelis use the bus system all of the time. There is simply no other way to get around. People have not locked themselves in their houses, stopped going out to clubs or quit traveling around the tiny country (with the territories it’s about the size of New Jersey). For if Israelis were to quit living life normally, as many people did here after Sept.

11, 2001, it would be seen as a victory for terrorism. There are still so many things to be happy about in Israel these days. I saw young mothers watching their children play soccer in the gardens, flocks of white-shirted people heading to synagogue on Saturday and children eating ice cream while bounding down the streets. People still invite others over for coffee, walk their dogs in the evening and bargain for fresh produce. This was the Israel I started to really love and which I was so thankful to have found through my time spent in the MDA program. I hope some day there will be peace in the land, that the terror attacks will stop and that Palestinians will have the freedom they deserve under their own leadership. I have no easy solutions to the problem. Living in Israel made me realize how much more complicated it is. Big words such as colonialism, occupation and racism do not begin to convey the reality on the ground. I recommend that those interested visit Israel before they make up their minds about these issues because this is a spatial conflict over individual hills that cannot be easily intellectualized — to be understood, it must be seen up close.

open position:

UFB chair

Elections will take place TODAY at the Undergraduate Council of Students (UCS) meeting tonight at 8 p.m. in Petterutti Lounge, Faunce House.

Please prepare a two minute statement to present before UCS. All undergraduate students are welcome to run. For more information, please contact either: Rahim Kurji '05, UCS President Diana Jeffery '04, UCS Vice President Dan Le '04, UFB Chair


THE BROWN DAILY HERALD

SPORTS WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10, 2003 · PAGE 8

A-Rod: He now has Mandy and the U.S. Open

Where to go? The future of Maurice Clarett

I’M SURE YOU’RE SICK OF HEARING about it by now, but Andy Roddick is the future of men’s tennis in America. After winning his first Grand Slam at the U.S. Open last weekend and achieving a ranking of second in the world, the other A-Rod has announced his arrival on sports’ grand stage with no plans to leave anytime soon. “So what,” I’m sure some of you are saying. “He won a Grand Slam, big deal.” My goal here is to show you why Mr. Roddick will be CHRIS HATFIELD a star for years to SPORTS GUY come. The first thing you need to understand is how difficult it is for athletes in sports other than the big four — MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL — to become upper-echelon stars. Certainly die-hard fans of a particular sport will know its stars, but true crossover success requires more than wins. To become a household name in other sports, you need a certain extra something. As you will see, Roddick has several extra somethings. The Serve — Americans like their sports to be awe-inspiring. The SportsCenter era has made the dunk, the home run and the big tackle the only things some fans want to see. Excitement is what brings fans out to the games today, not necessarily the thrill of seeing a competition. Roddick has the most potent weapon in tennis in his monster serve clocked at 149 miles per hour. As much skill as it takes to play the slower, more deliberate tennis of clay courts, a player with that style has as much of a chance of winning America’s heart as professional soccer does. Honestly, what tennis moment is better than seeing some poor sap get clowned on the first serve? The Rival(s) — While Roddick does not yet have the Sampras to his Agassi, there are plenty of good, young players that have come into the tennis limelight with Roddick this year. Juan Carlos Ferrero of Spain and Roger Federer of Switzerland are ranked first and third in the world and are also in their early 20s. The only thing that increases an athlete’s profile better than absolute dominance is a great rivalry. If these three young stars can all continue to improve, they will be battling each other for years to come and give us some great moments in the process. The Look — To quote my friend Jill, who was the best tennis player at my high school, on why she is a fan of A-Rod: “I like Andy Roddick because he’s an awesome tennis player, obviously. He has a killer serve and forehand. He’s also only 21 and the best newcomer capable of winning majors, now that Sampras and Agassi are getting old … and he’s really hot, too, and kinda badass.” Women love this guy. He has potential to be the male Anna Kournikova, except he wins. I also want to include that he’s dating pop-star hottie Mandy Moore, which makes men want to be him and gives him an even higher profile. Don’t think a relationship can really help your profile? Check how Ashton Kutcher is doing these days. The Attitude — After mentioning Sampras we must look at the importance

(The Washington Post) — The kid never seemed as though he wanted to be at Ohio State in the first place, and maybe he shouldn’t have been. Even in what one would think were the best of times, such as the night of the national championship victory in Arizona, Maurice Clarett didn’t appear particularly happy. He was off to the side, his mind somewhere else, perhaps even wanting to be somewhere else. He was upset that the school, making so much money off him, wouldn’t pay for him to travel home to a friend’s funeral. He was agitated about college football being a oneway street, about the way the adults made all the money and the kids got used up. A lot of stuff that you have to put up with to play college football, Clarett wanted no part of and it was written all over his face, his body language, his answers to questions. The things Clarett objected to are simply an inextricable part of the culture of college football, and if you feel so strongly about it, then Ohio State isn’t the place you ought to be. So it is a divorce of convenience now. Coach Jim Tressel said Tuesday that the school is ready to cut ties with Clarett, that he would recommend Ohio State release Clarett from his scholarship. So, it’s over for Clarett and Ohio State. The last time he’ll have worn that scarlet-and-gray uniform, he scored the winning touchdown in the Fiesta Bowl. The powers that be at Ohio State feel they have no other choice now that Clarett has been formally charged with a misdemeanor falsification for lying to police about items allegedly stolen from his car. What he had in the car, how a kid with limited means had use of such a car, what the stuff in the car was worth and who stole it is the undoing of Clarett — just as the throwback jersey and the Hummer would have been the undoing of his buddy, LeBron James, except for one difference. James plays basketball, a sport where the gap between kids and grown men is reduced every day. Clarett plays football, a sport where kids aren’t even allowed to play with grown men for fear they would get mangled. This is the critical point of the Clarett story, because if he shot a jumper, he would have been Carmelo Anthony — one and gone to the pros. But the NFL isn’t having him now, isn’t having him next year and is, from all indications, quite happy to duke it out in a court if that’s what the kid wants. So where is Clarett supposed to go from here? It’s not practical to transfer to another Division I-A school because he’d have to sit out one full season, plus whatever games he’ll have to miss as a result of NCAA sanctions. Forget about suing the NFL for early entry because while he could possibly win that battle for the next guy, it would not speed up Clarett’s arrival in the NFL. He could play for pay in the Canadian Football League, but the fields up there make old Veterans Stadium look cushy. It’s a blanket spread atop concrete north of the border. The NFL players I talk to say Clarett should absolutely not go to Canada, lest he ratchet up his chance of serious injury before getting a shot at the NFL. So here’s what he can do, if the NCAA leaves him with a year of eligibility: Attend a Division I-AA school, where he wouldn’t have to sit out a season. He could transfer tomorrow and play next September. I know a coach who would take him in a heartbeat, and a place he might find a warm hug and a kick in the butt upon arrival, a place where he might not be inclined to feel

see HATFIELD, page 5

dspics

Robertson ’05 hopes to build on her experience this summer as a member of the Canadian Junior National Team. Last season she averaged 7.4 points a game.

Robertson ’05 tests her skills against international foes BY ROBBY KLABER

You usually do not see Canada and basketball in the same sentence. But that may soon change — thanks to Brown women’s basketball center Holly Robertson ’05. After an excellent sophomore season with the Bears, Robertson, a native of Cochrane, Canada, attended a regional tryout. She was then selected as one of only 12 Canadian women to play for the Canadian Junior National Team. “Playing for the Canadian National Team and then eventually in the Olympics have been dreams of mine all my life,” Robertson said. In August, Robertson and the team participated in the Junior Olympics in Daegu, Korea. The Canadian women’s team fought its way to a 3-5 record, competing against teams from Mexico, Thailand, Hungary, Taiwan, Slovenia, Japan, South Africa and South Korea. “It was an honor to be selected from my country and play in Korea,” Robertson said. While abroad, she was able to hone in on specific aspects of her game and now hopes to continue developing these areas at Brown. Robertson said

her Canadian teammates have taught her the importance of doing the best she can do in areas she can control, and not to worry about areas outside her reach. She also wants to maintain a high level of intensity and enthusiasm throughout the year. “Two of our top goals for the season are to beat Harvard (which placed first last year) and win the Ivy League championship,” she said. Robertson averaged 7.4 points and 6.6 rebounds last year as she helped lead Brown to a 15-12 record. Brown Head Coach Jean Burr said she believes that Robertson’s experience with the Junior National Team will elevate her game as well as the play of her teammates. “Not only is Holly very enthusiastic and fun to play with, she is also a very solid inside player,” Burr said. “She is very dedicated whether it be during training, practice or a game. She leads through action. … Her experience of going against some of the best players at an international level should improve her game,” she said. “With just three seniors on this year’s team, it will be a challenge bringing the team together,” Robertson said.

see CLARETT, page 5

Wednesday, September 10, 2003  

The September 10, 2003 issue of the Brown Daily Herald

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