PCNZ Property Industry Awards Magazine 2021

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PROPERTY COUNCIL NEW ZEALAND RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS

MAGAZINE

FUTURE FOCUS

FOR PEOPLE & PLANET

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OF THE COUNTRY’S MOST

INNOVATIVE BUILDINGS

$10.90 INC GST


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Bringing imagination to life

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The exceptional standard of entries this year reflects the impressive adaptation and transformation across all property sectors. The 2021 finalists are commended for their outstanding contribution to their communities, stakeholders and the broader body of knowledge that advances our industry.

RLB.com


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1 Flare Bar, SkyCity Auckland 2 University of Auckland – Waiparuru Hall 3 Auckland High Court Refurbishment 4 University of Auckland Student Union Buildings B311-B312 5 University of Auckland Park West 6 Foodstuffs North Island, Auckland 7 Wellington East Girls College 8 Middlemore Hospital Tiaho Mai Acute Mental Health Unit, Auckland 9 SkyCity VIP Gaming, Auckland 10 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Auckland 11 Eccles Building, Dunedin 12 PwC Tower, Commercial Bay, Auckland 13 Food Republic, Auckland 14 CIAL AgriExport Precinct, Christchurch 15 Basin Reserve Museum Stand, Wellington 16 Stonefields School, Auckland 17 Te Hono – New Plymouth Airport Terminal 18 Rotorua Regional Airport 19 Christchurch Hospital Waipapa


The journey to a better space We’re working hard to make all of our new developments carbon neutral and 5 Star Green Star. Because sustainability’s not only good for New Zealand, it’s good for business.


Find out more: 0800 375 6060 SustainableGoodman.co.nz


Introduction

ABOUT THE AWARDS T

he Property Council New Zealand Rider Levett Bucknall Property Industry Awards are unique in that they recognise not just innovative design and construction, but also assess nominees on their economic and social contribution, sustainability, vision and owner and user satisfaction. Competition for the 2021 Supreme Award was fierce, with 109 properties in the running from around the country, culminating in New Zealand’s largest gala dinner with nearly 1600 guests gathered at Spark Arena, Auckland.

More than just another property, our award winners create communities, crafting spaces for New Zealanders to live, work and play.

THE JUDGING PROCESS Submissions are assessed on the following principles:

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

• • • • •

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Economic and financial criteria Project vision and innovation (includes degree of difficulty) Design and construction Owner and user satisfaction Sustainability and efficiency of operation

This year, there are 10 award categories and one Supreme Award winner:

• Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Community and Affordable Housing Property Award • Greenstone Group Education Property Award • RCP Commercial Office Property Award • Holmes Group Tourism and Leisure Property Award • Templeton Group Multi-Unit Residential Property Award • Yardi Retail Property Award • CBRE Industrial Property Award • Warren and Mahoney Civic, Health and Arts Property Award • Naylor Love Heritage and Adaptive Reuses Property Award • Resene Green Building Property Award • Rider Levett Bucknall Supreme Award

+ MERIT is awarded to properties that the judges deem to have ‘something special’ about the way in which the development or project was undertaken. There may be multiple Merit Award winners in each category.

+ EXCELLENCE awards are presented to properties that are

deemed to be among the best in their chosen category, and that symbolise excellence within the property industry across all aspects of the evaluation. There may be multiple Excellence award winners in each category.

+ BEST IN CATEGORY winners are awarded where a property

stands out as the ‘best of the best’ against the other entries in their category. There is only one Best in Category Award winner in each category, with these properties also in the running for the overall Supreme Award.


A GLITTERING AFFAIR

The property industry's annual awards night is not just about acknowledging beautiful buildings and deserving projects. It’s also an excuse for a lavish event. Last year’s was no exception. Held in Auckland’s Spark Arena, the Property Council New Zealand Rider Levett Bucknall Industry Awards attracted the industry's best for a night of celebration and revelry.

Centre Leonie Freeman, the Chief Executive of the Property Council New Zealand, congratulates the nominees and winners. Below Freeman with one of the deserving award winners.

Above and right Deserving winners and glamorous guests enjoy the festivities. Below The Supreme Winners of the Property Council New Zealand Rider Levett Bucknall Property Industry Awards 2020, the Waste Management HQ project team.

Huge thanks to our naming rights sponsor Rider Levett Bucknall for making these awards so illustrious. The global quantity surveying company was founded in England by Henry Cooper in 1785 and has gone on to work on some of the world’s most exciting landmark buildings, including the Sydney Opera House, the London Olympic Games park and the CityCenter in Las Vegas. The brand has become a powerhouse not only in quantity surveying but also cost management, project management and advisory services.

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DECIDING FACTORS

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ominees are invited to complete an awards submission that details all facets of the development, from project costs, potential return, design, construction, sustainability and efficiency to tenant and owner testimonials, project vision, innovation and category-specific criteria. All the properties are subject to a rigorous judging process by our panel of experts. Each of the judges brings his or her unique specialist skills to the evaluation process so we have an eminently knowledgeable panel well-versed

MEET THE JUDGES

in finding the very best-of-the-best properties in each awards category. The judging process is carried out both on paper and in person – the panel visits nearly 100 properties to thoroughly assess each project individually. When all the site visits have been completed, our judges reconvene to deliberate on their scores and reach an agreement on the Best in Category, Excellence and Merit Award winners in each group, as well as the Supreme Award winner.

CHIEF JUDGE

Property Council gives special thanks to our panel of judges, who have dedicated considerable time and expertise evaluating submissions and participating in site visits. Their diligence and knowledge ensure the process is robust and enables us to bring these awards to you each year.

Andrew Evans Independent Director

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

JUDGES

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Alaina Beattie Independent Consultant

Alex Cutler Director, Urban Constructs

Kelly Bunyan Business Lead, Property, Spark Director/Chair, First Light Capital

Mitchell Jefferson Director, Living Property

Brendon Dwyer General Manager – Building Services, Beca

Tristan Ilich Director, Tsquared

Alison Hunter Director, Hunter Hindmarsh

Chris Gudgeon Independent Director

Richard Anderson Director, Rider Levett Bucknall

Jeremy Whelan Managing Director, Ignite Architects

Andrew Eagles Chief Executive Officer, New Zealand Green Building Council

Rebecca MacDonald Senior Manager, Air New Zealand

Matt Lee Director, Mesh Consulting

Matt Wilson Director, Eco Insite

2022 KEY DATES CALL FOR NOMINATIONS Thursday 11 November 2021 NOMINATIONS CLOSE Thursday 27 January 2022 COMPLETED SUBMISSIONS DUE Wednesday 2 March 2022 AWARDS DINNER AND CEREMONY Friday 17 June 2022


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Welcome

KIA ORA WELCOME

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n behalf of Property Council New Zealand, it is my great pleasure to bring our industry together once again to showcase the contribution made across all sectors, in all corners of New Zealand. Despite the tumultuous year we have had, competition for these awards remains fierce, with 109 nominations received. Judging this many projects is no easy feat and I offer my sincere thanks to chief judge Andy Evans and the judging panel. The judging process is extensive, and the time required and level of attention to detail is extraordinary. The judges view every single property, evaluate it, and make their recommendations. It is a necessarily structured process, and the final deliberations are almost always a debate. I thank the judges for their time, expertise and dedication to a robust and transparent process. Property Council is proud to stand alongside you as we champion New Zealand’s largest industry. Our members shape cities, towns and spaces where Kiwis live, work, play and shop. That is the power of property, and this event is a celebration of property and its people. Ngā mihi,

Leonie Freeman

Chief Executive Property Council New Zealand

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

ABOUT PROPERTY COUNCIL NEW ZEALAND

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Property Council is the proud champion of New Zealand’s largest industry – property. A not-for-profit organisation, the Property Council connects more than 10,000 property professionals, championing the interests of over 500 member companies who have a collective $50 billion investment in New Zealand property. Our membership is broad and includes some of the largest commercial and residential property owners and developers in New Zealand. The property industry comes together at our 80-plus Property Council events, which offer professional development, exceptional networking and access to industry-leading research.


‘Despite the tumultuous year we have had, competition for these awards remains fierce...’

Above left Prebbleton School, Christchurch. Bottom left Wellington East Girls’ College. Above right Foodstuffs North Island, Auckland, designed by Monk Mackenzie. Bottom right The lobby of 59 France Street, a residential building in Auckland.


Contents

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS MAGAZINE PUBLISHER Brydie Canham ART DIRECTOR Susanne Baldwin DESIGNER Hayley Pearce WRITER Geraldine Johns SUB EDITING Fiona Barber Jo Bates

P23 COMMERCIAL OFFICE

RETOUCHING Mark Grogan ADVERTISING SALES Campbell Gulley Sylvia Dray PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR Jo Seakins EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Dylan Reid

B Media Ltd 09 308 9998 admin@bmedia.co.nz PO Box 47014 Ponsonby Auckland 1144 bmedia.co.nz

P79 GREEN BUILDING Property Council New Zealand 09 373 3086 PO Box 1033, Auckland 1140 propertynz.co.nz enquiries@propertynz.co.nz

PROPERTY COUNCIL NEW ZEALAND RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL

PROPERTY COUNCIL NEW ZEALAND RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS

MAGAZINE

FUTURE FOCUS

FOR PEOPLE & PLANET

COVER Supreme winner PwC Tower, Commercial Bay, Auckland

P127 EDUCATION

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OF THE COUNTRY’S MOST

INNOVATIVE BUILDINGS 12

$10.90 INC GST


P33 CIVIC, HEALTH & ARTS

P47 TOURISM AND LEISURE

P83 HERITAGE & ADAPTIVE RE-USES

P101 MULTI-UNIT RESIDENTIAL

P147 INDUSTRIAL

P169 COMMUNITY & AFFORDABLE HOUSING

The Property Council New Zealand Rider Levett Bucknall Property Industry Awards magazine is published by specialist custom publisher B Media Ltd, on behalf of the Property Council New Zealand. The Property Industry Awards is wholly owned and managed by the Property Council New Zealand. To find out more about Property Council New Zealand or the Property Industry Awards please call 09 373 3086 or visit www.propertynz.co.nz

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Winners

SUPREME WINNER PWC TOWER, COMMERCIAL BAY, AUCKLAND

For more of this property go to page 18.

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

INDUSTRIAL

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CIVIC, HEALTH & ARTS

EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY

EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY

EXCELLENCE

– Middlemore Hospital Tiaho Mai Acute Mental Health Unit, Auckland

EXCELLENCE – Mayfair Arts and Culture, Kaikōura, – Te Nikau, Grey Hospital and Health Centre, Greymouth – Te Puka O Te Waka | Rakiura Museum, Stewart Island

MERIT – Christchurch Hospital Waipapa (formerly Acute Services Building), Christchurch – Westhaven Promenade Stage 2, Auckland

– Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Auckland – Foodstuffs North Island, Auckland – Toll Tamaki Freight Forwarding Facility, Auckland

MERIT – 27 Timberly Road, Auckland – Allegion Warehouse and Manufacturing Facility, Auckland – Callaghan Innovation Measurement Standards Lab, Wellington – Mighty Ape, Auckland – Oak Industrial Park, Auckland – Onehunga Woollen Mills, Auckland


For more of this property go to page 26.

GREEN BUILDING EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY – Foodstuffs North Island, Auckland

EXCELLENCE

EDUCATION EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY

– University of Otago | Te Whare Wa-nanga o Ota-go Faculty of Dentistry, Dunedin

EXCELLENCE – Diocesan School for Girls Performing Arts Centre, Auckland – Manukau Institute of Technology – TechPark Campus, Auckland – New Shoots Children’s Centre Kerikeri, Kerikeri – Te Raekura Redcliffs School, Christchurch – The University of Auckland Park West, Auckland

– Scion Innovation Hub | Te Whare Nui o Tuteata, Rotorua – Te Kupenga, Auckland – The Hotel Britomart, Auckland

MERIT – St Patrick’s Catholic Church, Christchurch

For more of this property go to page 102.

MERIT – Eccles Building, Dunedin – Giraffe Early Learning Centre, Auckland – Stonefields School, Auckland

MULTI-UNIT RESIDENTIAL EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY

HERITAGE & ADAPTIVE REUSES EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY – The Hotel Britomart, Auckland

EXCELLENCE – 100 Cuba Street, Wellington – QT Hotel Auckland, Auckland

MERIT – Auckland High Court Refurbishment Project, Auckland – Takapuna Grammar School – Main Block Redevelopment, Auckland

– The Pacifica, Auckland

EXCELLENCE – 59 France, Auckland – Fabric of Onehunga, Auckland – OKLA Apartments, Auckland – The University of Auckland – Waiparuru Hall, Auckland

MERIT – FLiP Camperdown Road, Wellington – Ko-tuitui Terraces, Auckland – Latitude Residences, Tauranga – Paragon Apartments, Christchurch 15


Winners TOURISM & LEISURE EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY – The Hotel Britomart, Auckland

For more of this property go to page 18.

EXCELLENCE – QT Hotel Auckland, Auckland

MERIT – National Hockey Centre, Auckland – Rotorua Regional Airport, Rotorua – SkyCity VIP Gaming, Auckland – Te Hono – New Plymouth Airport Terminal, New Plymouth – Travelodge Hotel Wynyard Quarter, Auckland

COMMERCIAL OFFICE EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY – PwC Tower, Commercial Bay, Auckland

EXCELLENCE – Foodstuffs North Island, Auckland – Scion Innovation Hub | Te Whare Nui o Tuteata, Rotorua

MERIT

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

– 100 Cuba Street, Wellington – 55 Corinthian Drive, Auckland – CIAL AgriExport Precinct, Christchurch – Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Auckland – Fourteen Tamariki Ave, Auckland – MediaWorks Radio Broadcasting HQ, Auckland – Spark Square Christchurch, Christchurch

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COMMUNITY & AFFORDABLE HOUSING EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY – Ko-tuitui, Auckland

EXCELLENCE – Bader Drive and McKenzie Road, Auckland – Brookfield Avenue, Auckland

RETAIL

MERIT

EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY

– Airfield, Auckland – Galway Street, Auckland – Waterview Court, Auckland

MERIT

– Countdown Rototuna, Hamilton – Ballantynes Redevelopment, Christchurch


Adding value, every project, every time. RCP has been New Zealand’s leading provider of independent project management and strategic advisory services for over 25 years.

Congratulations to everyone involved in the successful completion of these projects and being nominated for the 2021 PCNZ Property Industry Awards. PwC Tower, Commercial Bay, Auckland Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Auckland Westhaven Promenade Stage 2, Auckland 246 Queen, Auckland 25 Hargreaves Street, Auckland Mayfair Arts and Culture, Kaikōura Eccles Building, Dunedin

Project Management | Infrastructure | Portfolio Management | Advisory


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

SUPREME WINNER 2021


Left The PwC Tower in Auckland’s CBD is an integral part of Commercial Bay and rises to 39 levels.

Above and right The building caters for staff, retailers and the public, as well as City Rail Link users.

‘'The PwC Tower redefines the way in which our clients work. They have access to an unsurpassed level of amenity.'

EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY

A TOWERING ADDITION TO THE SKYLINE

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ommercial Bay is a city-defining project occupying an entire CBD block on Auckland’s harbour. It sits at the point where the historic ‘mercantile axis’ meets the emergent ‘waterfront axis’, so it’s a place that connects Aucklanders and visitors to the Waitemata- Harbour, as well as reviving a rich history as a base of trade and commerce. At the heart of this mixed-use development is the striking 39-level PwC Tower. The $1b project extends to 97,500sqm of built form and encompasses the city centre block from One Queen Street. The brief was to create Auckland’s most desirable commercial address – a world-class workplace supported by unparalleled occupant amenities, best-inclass retail and food, and superb connection to transport. That has translated into a building accommodating 120 retailers and hospitality venues, and three levels of basement car parking. Built by Fletcher Construction, the highly complex and challenging build saw Precinct Properties entering into a development agreement with City Rail Link (CRL). As a result, Precinct constructed the tunnels running beneath Commercial Bay. These amalgamate bus, rail and ferry infrastructure through a series of new public lanes.

Commercial Bay’s location is a complex confluence of existing infrastructure and public space – four street edges with occupied commercial buildings, including an underground curved rail tunnel. The CRL tunnel, constructed as part of the project (beneath the PwC Tower), was fundamental to the development’s structure, floorplate shape, size, column distribution and side-core, which contains services. Auckland now has a building that has a striking effect on its skyline. The facade of the tower has a high-performance curtain wall with integrated aluminium inserts incorporating LED lighting. It terminates in a distinctive curved northern face and four-storey foil, which adds to the building’s skyline presence. To achieve a column-free ground-floor lobby, the roof has been cantilevered from the core and the facade is supported by 11m-high laminated glass fins – a globally unique engineering feat. The Sky Lobby is the antithesis of a traditional transitory foyer – occupiers and the public can collaborate and socialise here. Its elevated location means the street level remains a retail environment. Use of travertine, granite, stainless steel and timber create a premium experience throughout the precinct. 19


SUPREME WINNER 2021 PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above Offices, Sky Terrace, Sky Lobby and retail and hospitality outlets combine to form a worldclass commercial environment.

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Below The downtown position is the point where Auckland’s mercantile axis and waterfront axis meet.

State-of-the-art fire protection systems are integrated across Commercial Bay. These detect problems and provide real-time information to relevant parties. As part of a push to change the way we think about transport in the CBD, the project provides lower than permitted on-site carparking. Instead, it provides cycle parking (208 spaces) and world-class, end-of-trip (EOT) worker amenities (40 showers) as incentives to change driving behaviour. “The PwC Tower redefines the way in which our clients work. Clients have access to an unsurpassed level of amenity,” says the chief executive of Precinct Properties, Scott Pritchard. “The EOT facilities, landscaped Sky Terrace, publicly accessible Sky Lobby, and adjoining retail and hospitality, make this a world-class commercial environment in New Zealand.” The development is seen as the next stage in Auckland’s transformation into an internationally renowned waterfront city and the new commercial hub of the CBD. “Commercial Bay is the jewel in Auckland’s crown,” says Pritchard. “With approximately 10,000 people working within the five interconnected office buildings throughout the precinct, we are confident it will bring continued revitalisation to the economy, as well as reinforce the importance of workplaces as a central place for people to come together and collaborate,” he adds. +

PWC TOWER, COMMERCIAL BAY

15 Customs St West, Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER PRECINCT PROPERTIES NEW ZEALAND CONSTRUCTION FLETCHER BUILDING ARCHITECT WARREN AND MAHONEY IN PARTNERSHIP WITH WOODS BAGOT SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER NORMAN, DISNEY & YOUNG STRUCTURAL ENGINEER HOLMES CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER RCP OTHER CONSULTANTS LANDLAB, BARKER & ASSOCIATES


PwC Tower, Commercial Bay

Bringing imagination to life “A striking design that stands proudly on the Auckland skyline, PwC Tower is the final piece of the $1b mixed-use Commercial Bay precinct designed by Warren and Mahoney in collaboration with Woods Bagot.” Steve Gracey RLB.com


CONNECTING PEOPLE WITH PROPERTY

Bayleys is New Zealand’s largest commercial and industrial real estate organisation. We have experts in all commercial sectors, providing a superior level of service in industrial, office and retail properties for sale and lease, and hotels and tourism properties and businesses for sale throughout New Zealand. Our clients are at the core of everything we do and through our national connectivity and genuine commitment to excellence, we provide innovative solutions to deliver the best results.

Through our partnership with Knight Frank, we reap the benefits of a globally-connected network spanning 57 markets, connecting people with property on a global scale. Whether you’re an owner, occupier or investor, choose Bayleys to partner with on your commercial property journey.

0800 BAYLEYS | bayleys.co.nz/commercial LICENSED UNDER THE REA ACT 2008

Residential / Commercial / Rural / Property Services


COMMERCIAL OFFICE

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THIS MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR SECTOR INCLUDES AMBITIOUS DEVELOPMENTS THAT DELIVER INNOVATION AND DIVERSITY OF DESIGN. YOU’LL ALSO FIND PROJECTS OF VERY DIFFERENT SCALE IN THIS EXCITING CATEGORY.


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Commercial Office


The contemporary layout and fit-out enables superior integration and communication between teams.

Design elements, such as the tukutuku, represent the weaving together of police and community.

‘Illustrating the desire to move away from stereotypes, the traditional palette has been overhauled.’

PARTNERSHIPS FOR SUCCESS

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iki Ki Te Ao translates as “the aspiration of diversity; the coming together of communities” – and this is the name given to the refurbished home of specialist New Zealand Police services. The building is central to police operations throughout New Zealand, but also for the local community. Two distinct goals – transforming the dated building into a modern workspace and upgrading it to national standards for government facilities – have been addressed in this project. As well as representing a new approach for New Zealand Police, the project demonstrates the success of working closely with local iwi to achieve better outcomes for all. This refurbishment brings together a wide range of critical regional police functions that were previously dispersed across multiple Auckland locations. The layout has been changed from cellular floors to larger, open-plan spaces, enabling superior integration and communication between teams. Many of the building’s functions – including the 111 (Northcoms) and 105 Call Centres, as well as specialist departments such as photography and digital forensics, and offices – required detailed user briefs. As these individual groups had different desired outcomes, collaboration was key in successfully transforming the dated offices into modern, fit-for-purpose spaces.

Honouring the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi was also key to this project, an approach that is woven into its fabric. A tukutuku design represents the weaving together of the police and community; a turning-of-the tide-koru symbolises the vision of achieving better outcomes through working in partnership with iwi. The heart of the build contains the Whare Wananga space. Illustrating the desire to move away from dated stereotypes, the plain palette traditionally used by the police has been overhauled. At Piki Ki Te Ao, most floors have an earthy palette of yellows, oranges and greens. Colour psychology has been applied to the call centres where staff take 105 and 111 calls, with soft shades aiming to reduce the intensity of this environment. +

PIKI KI TE AO

- - maki Makaurau Auckland 482 Great South Rd, O ta huhu, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER NZ POLICE CONSTRUCTION WATTS AND HUGHES ARCHITECT GHDWOODHEAD CREATIVESPACES SERVICE, STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL ENGINEER GHD QUANTITY SURVEYOR RDT PACIFIC PROJECT MANAGER OCTA OTHER CONSULTANTS BLACKYARD ENGINEERING, HOLMES FIRE

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Commercial Office

EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

LANDING A TOP-FLIGHT PLAN IN SUSTAINABILITY

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T Top Architects Monk Mackenzie designed the sculptural arc for the head office, plus a mammoth distribution centre.

Above inside the 77,500sqm distribution centre. Opposite Natural light streams into the head office.

his project marks the commencement of an enduring partnership between two iconic New Zealand brands – Auckland International Airport and Foodstuffs North Island. The aim: to deliver a transformational environment for Foodstuffs North Island store owners, customers, supply partners and employees, while creating a flagship investment. For Auckland Airport, the development was integral to its long-term strategy to expand its customer base, while maintaining its vision of The Landing being the country’s pre-eminent business park. And the result? A transformational environment for Foodstuffs staff and visitors alike. Meeting the landscape at its extremities, the expansive curved fascia and soffit combined with a fully glazed facade present a bold, sculpted presence. Terraces are accessed directly from the level-one office space and landscaped paths lead down to the surrounding land.


‘Meeting the landscape at its extremities, the expansive curved fascia and soffit present a bold, sculpted presence.’

This striking design, teamed with sustainability and operational efficiency at the forefront, serves to enhance The Landing’s already world-class reputation. The 15ha Landing Drive greenfield development comprises a 8500sqm head office, which sits on 2.8ha, plus a 77,500sqm distribution centre. Building information modelling was key during the construction phase, and being able to use this technology to assess and plan building tasks meant elements were built once and built right. From the outset, sustainable practices and renewable solutions were priorities, and integral to balancing project constraints. An integrated base-build and fit-out project, the facility has achieved a Green Star 5 Rating. A Green Star 6 Build Rating is now being worked towards. The design recognised Foodstuffs’ long-term commitment to the site, so selection of materials had to be robust yet beautiful. All were approved by the

Green Star consultant who assessed their contribution to the target rating. These aspirations illustrate the fundamentals of the relationship between Foodstuffs and Auckland Airport – trust, collaboration and an aligned desire to achieve excellence, says Daniel Byrne, head of property development Auckland International Airport. A range of sustainability measures were considered and assessed for design impact. This informed decisions related to solar performance, heating and cooling loads, thermal efficiency, rainwater-harvesting capacity, interior lighting levels for wellbeing, energy-saving and planting density. Rainwater harvested from the building’s roof is used for toilets and all plumbing fixtures are low-flow products. A 6000sqm photovoltaic array was installed on the adjacent distribution centre’s roof, offsetting 100 per cent of the office’s electricity needs. 27


Bringing imagination to life

Foodstuffs North Island

“A commitment to sustainable practices and renewable solutions was key to balancing project constraints.” Chris Haines

RLB.com

COMMERCIAL EXCELLENCE Our highly experienced team of outstanding construction professionals offer an integrated approach to construction. macrennie.com


Above Created to be worker-friendly, the complex is also at the leading edge of architectural and sustainable design.

From an urban design standpoint, all the ingredients necessary for a special building were available for the project – a location within a world-class, master-planned business park; a flat, north-facing site with multiple access points; and unimpeded elevated views over the Oruarangi estuary and reserve. The architectural vision was clear. The office design pushes the boundaries and reflects the shared vision for a landscape-integrated building that connects Foodstuffs with the land, as growers and producers. Inside, the building is designed for flexible working practices. Staff – as the most important user group – have conveyed a huge sense of pride in the knowledge that they are working within an environment at the leading edge of sustainable design. This ambitious project, the owners are delighted to report, was delivered three per cent under budget and four months ahead of schedule. “Auckland Airport Property is committed to sustainable development, not just in the physical built form, but insofar as developing places for businesses and their people to thrive,” says Byrne. “In Foodstuffs we have a partner who shares these long-term values. The 29


Commercial Office

Above Sweeping curves are repeated in the interior.

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Below The outside of the distribution centre.

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driver for Auckland International Airport was to create a transformational environment for our customer Foodstuffs North Island and their staff, with leading-edge sustainability at the forefront,” he adds. The plan also benefits the wider community. “The Landing is 150ha in total, 20ha of which will be dedicated to public spaces, with cycle paths and walkways integrated throughout.” The vision, however, remains singular – for The Landing to be New Zealand’s leading industrial business park. Auckland Airport believes that in addition to top-notch facilities, businesses need a location that offers staff world-class amenity and recreational space. “Foodstuffs North Island is the latest in a long list of businesses that have seen the value of locating to such an environment,” says Byrne. +

FOODSTUFFS NORTH ISLAND

- ngere, Ta - maki Makaurau Auckland Landing Drive, The Landing, Ma a

OWNER, DEVELOPER AUCKLAND INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION HAWKINS, MACRENNIE COMMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT MONK MACKENZIE, ECLIPSE ARCHITECTURE SERVICE ENGINEER ECS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER BGT STRUCTURES, DAY CONSULTING MECHANICAL ENGINEER ECUBED QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER TSA OTHER CONSULTANTS ASSEMBLE (BIM), PROTECH (FIRE PROTECTION)


Transforming cities. Building communities. Hawkins celebrates 75 years of building with pride in Aotearoa. Whether it be a school, hospital, university, theatre, airport, hotel or office, Hawkins has always been there to help build this great nation.

1946-2021

Transforming cities. Building communities.

www.hawkins.co.nz


Proud Design & Build Flooring contractor for Foodstuffs NIDC

0800 4 SLABS | www.conslab.co.nz

For over 20 years, Conslab have been leading the way in the New Zealand Construction industry when it comes to concrete floor slab design and construction. Conslab’s approach to floor construction is unique in the New Zealand market. Based on an inherent passion for concrete technology, Conslab offers a full end-to-end solution for concrete floors.


CIVIC, HEALTH & ARTS

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PROJECTS IN THIS DYNAMIC CATEGORY RANGE FROM PLACES OF WORSHIP THROUGH TO HOSPITAL FACILITIES, MANY WITH COMPLEX COMPLIANCE ISSUES, MULTIPLE PARTIES TO PLEASE AND INTENSE PUBLIC SCRUTINY TO CONTEND WITH.


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Civic, Health & Arts


Left The shape of the museum represents the anchor of a waka and the prow of a ship – two symbols that represent the

- ori and Ma European history of Rakiura. Above and right Inside the lightfilled museum at Oban.

‘The building also had to reflect the character of the island, its inhabitants and maritime association.’

HOME IS WHERE THE TAONGA IS

T

his project – to provide a purpose-built facility to rehouse Rakiura Stewart Island’s museum exhibition – has been a decade in the making. The design team’s ambition was to create a space that not only held pieces of the island’s history, but also showcased it in the physical form of the building itself, reflecting the character of the place, its inhabitants and maritime associations. It is the first piece of civic infrastructure constructed on the island in more than 25 years. It is the culmination of years of preparation and planning. The building method was tailored to both the remoteness of the island and the limited resources available. Te Puka O Te Waka is a 100 per cent timberframed building that sits atop driven timber piles. All construction modules for prefabricated components were designed to be transported easily across Foveaux Strait – if it could fit on a barge, it could come over. Well, almost. Materials and structures were also confined to what could be assembled with hand tools and hand-held power equipment. The materials were selected to be both enduring in the harsh marine environment and in natural colours so they were in harmony with the pristine bush-clad surroundings. They include sustainably sourced timber framing and

ethically sourced cladding. The distinctive form of Te Puka O Te Waka is derived from the wedge-shaped site, where every available metre of land has been used for the 530sqm building, plus the triangular shape of the harbour. The design also represents the anchor of the waka – the vessel that holds the taonga of Rakiura – as well as the prow of a ship, which pays homage to another maritime heritage. Two symbols representing the Ma-ori and European history of Rakiura Stewart Island proudly anchor the building to the Oban site. Further linking the building to the island’s history are the ‘ribs’ running down the side of the museum. Their size and style is indicative of a whale’s ribs, which acknowledge the local whaling history. Power generation on the island comes from a diesel boiler – at odds with the island’s ‘clean-green’ image and something the Rakiura Heritage Trust was at pains to resolve. The design includes features that reduce energy consumption – LED lighting, day-night sensors, an electric heat pump and rainwater-storage that also supplies the neighbouring fire station. Passive heating, including positioning the building to the north, using insulation with a high rating and installing solar panels all help the cause. 35


Civic, Health & Arts 36

Below To conserve energy, LED lighting, day-night sensors and solar panels have been installed.

The design of the striking building, which has floor-to-ceiling glass to bring natural light in and provide frames to the world outside, puts visitors’ needs as well as the planet’s to the fore. At the front entrance, for example, you’ll find concrete seats facing the building, and lockers off to one side. That’s because most visitors to Te Puka O Te Waka are wearing heavy-duty boots – often very dirty, tramping boots – so the facility provides a place for guests to remove and store their footwear. +

TE PUKA O TE WAKA / RAKIURA MUSEUM 11 Main Rd, Oban, Rakiura Stewart Island

OWNER, DEVELOPER RAKIURA HERITAGE TRUST CONSTRUCTION AMALGAMATED BUILDERS ARCHITECT; SERVICE, STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL ENGINEER; PROJECT MANAGER WSP QUANTITY SURVEYOR RAWLINSONS DUNEDIN OTHER CONSULTANTS EXHIBITION DESIGN BUILD CONSULTANCY

Photography Graham Warman

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above Floor-toceiling glass at the dramatic point of the building ushers in natural light.


www.wilkieandbruce.co.nz


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Civic, Health & Arts


The state-ofthe-art hospital, which borders Christchurch’s Hagley Park,

has been designed and built to remain operational in a disaster.

‘Constructed on a busy campus bordering Hagley Park, Waipapa is a “hospital-in-thepark, park-in-thehospital”.’

ALL ITS DUCKS IN A ROW

W

aipapa is NewZealand’s largest, most resilient public hospital. The 12-storey, 62,000sqm acute services building boasts stateof-the-art clinical facilities and innovative inpatient wards. With both the past and future in mind, it is designed to remain fully operational throughout a disaster. “Because it’s an acute-services building, seismic design was a significant part of the project rationale,” says Darryl Carey, director and lead design consultant at Chow:Hill Architects. “We took a low-damage approach to the design of fit-out and services. This meant a lot of bracing, special detailing and testing of equipment to make sure everything remains fully operational after a disaster,” he adds.

The new hospital also offers pandemic-mode isolation of two wards with 100 per cent fresh air and increased extraction. Constructed on a busy hospital campus bordering Hagley Park, Waipapa reflects a “hospital-in-the-park, park-in-the hospital” interior design concept, featuring well-connected public spaces and larger-than-usual windows with low sills. “We knew we had a great site, and the views were important,” says Carey. A hundred new trees were funded, and more than 2000 displaced daffodil bulbs replaced in Hagley Park. The site and layout have been planned and built to ensure important areas are easy to find and access. The landscape is seamlessly integrated with Hagley Park, 39


Civic, Health & Arts PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2020

‘Waipapa is a hospital of the future, replacing aged, damaged facilities with state-of-the-art buildings.’

40

and features a terrace at lower ground level, providing the option of “duck therapy” for patients, who can be wheeled on their beds into the park to see the birds. Seismic resilience features include a base-isolated IL4 steel-frame structure, allowing +/-650mm movement at the isolation plane, with smart design details for lifts, stairs and services throughout. There’s also passive fire protection, well in excess of code requirements. Operational since November 2020, Waipapa is a hospital of the future, replacing aged, damaged and inappropriate facilities with state-of-the-art buildings designed with the input of clinicians. Built to anticipate longterm needs, there is expansion capacity to accommodate 12 ICU beds and 160 inpatient beds.

Clinicians had input into the design of the hospital during a consultation process that was more intensive than usual.


Shaping Possibilities.

Auckland/Tāmaki Makaurau Studio Level 3, 135 Broadway, Newmarket Phone: +64 9 522 6460 Email: office@chowhill.co.nz Hamilton/Kirikiriroa Studio 119 Collingwood Street Phone: +64 7 834 0348 Email: hmlstudio@chowhill.co.nz Christchurch/Ōtautahi Studio 140 Level 1, 287-293 Durham Street North Phone: +64 9 522 6460 Email: office@chowhill.co.nz

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Civic, Health & Arts

Staff and patients have lauded the new facility and its layout.

Consultation and co-design with staff was carried out at an intensive level, says Carey. This significantly contributed to design of the new linear, multi-bed ward configuration, which is custom-designed using clinical principles – especially line-of-sight to patients for nursing staff. At the patient level, all bedrooms have excellent natural light and views of the park and distant mountains, elements proven to enhance healing. Since opening last year, Waipapa has been met with acclaim by staff and patients alike. +

CHRISTCHURCH HOSPITAL WAIPAPA 2 Riccarton Ave, Otautahi Christchurch

OWNER CANTERBURY DISTRICT HEALTH BOARD DEVELOPER MINISTRY OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION CPB CONTRACTORS ARCHITECT KATOA HEALTH DESIGN (CHOW:HILL ARCHITECTS, WARREN AND MAHONEY, THINC HEALTH) SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER BECA STRUCTURAL ENGINEER HOLMES CONSULTING GROUP QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER TURNER & TOWNSEND, THINC OTHER CONSULTANTS AURECON, MARSHALL DAY

Bringing imagination to life

Christchurch Hospital Waipapa “Innovative planning, adaptable design, wellness features and world-class technology come together to meet the challenges and opportunities ahead for human-centric care.” Neil O’Donnell RLB.com


Enriching the way people live, work and play through architecture and interior design - Hotels & Hospitality - Tourism & Leisure - Commercial & Retail - Council & Government - Churches & Community - Aged Care & Retirement - Apartments & Affordable Housing - Industrial & Logistics - Tertiary Education - Mixed Use Developments


Civic, Health & Arts PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

GOD’S HOUSE FINDS A GRAND NEW HOME

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A The new church is striking, thanks to the clever use of timber, a predominant feature of this remarkable design.

s a result of the Canterbury earthquakes, the old brick church in the rural township of Lincoln was demolished. It had sat uncomfortably between the existing presbytery and parish centre, with car parking, on the junction of Gerald Street and West Belt. The new St Patrick’s Church on the corner has a place of prominence on the site, acts as a beacon to the community and is not overshadowed by any other structures or facilities. As part of the project, the existing parish centre – undamaged by the quakes – was refurbished and upgraded. This provides a facility for parishioners to meet, socialise and enjoy community activities. The design follows the guiding principles outlined in the document ‘God’s Dwelling Place, Building Firm in Faith’, prepared for the Catholic Diocese of Christchurch rebuild programme. Due to the nature of church design and patterns of use, the planning team


‘The new church on the corner acts as a beacon and is not overshadowed by other structures.’

met some interesting challenges, says Shaun Mitchell, principal project manager for the Catholic Diocese of Christchurch. For example, the church’s voluminous interior and intermittent use doesn’t naturally allow for an energy-efficient approach to heating and air conditioning. This drawback has been minimised by controlling the amount of fresh air using CO2 sensors, ensuring the right amount for the number of users inside the church at any given time. There was also a desire to limit, or at least control, the level of natural daylight entering the main area to fit with church use. This is managed by an automated and dimming LED lighting system. Resilience was critical to the structure but so was creating something aesthetically lovely, so the design called for the enduring beauty of natural finishes. The vaulted timber ceiling gives the nave a sense of vertical scale that reinforces

the transcendence of the space. This contrasts with the lower ceiling of the narthex. On the outside, the base is made of precast concrete panels that ground the vertical cedar shiplap boarding above. This design provides parishioners with privacy while a creating the feeling of structural permanence. St Patrick’s Church also showcases the Diocese’s commitment to sustainability in its rebuild programme, says Mitchell. Most of the timber used in the build was sourced from certified sustainable forests. Timber plays a significant part in the design of the new church, and ensuring its sustainability through schemes such as the Forest Stewardship Council was important to the Diocese. Much of the furniture from the old church was brought out of storage. The re-use and refurbishment of existing timber pews and marble altar also helped to provide a link to the old church when establishing the new. 45


Civic, Health & Arts These two actions meant that the Diocese could reduce the carbon footprint significantly, compared to what it would have been if a more conventional steel structure was used, and if all the furniture was brand new. Efforts are already bearing fruit. This is the Diocese’s second Green Star-rated church. It has been awarded a 4 Green Star Design Rating and an As Built Rating is being sought. To the best of the Diocese’s knowledge, St Patrick’s is only the second environmentally rated church in New Zealand. +

ST PATRICK’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 31 Gerald St, Lincoln, Waitaha Canterbury

OWNER ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF THE CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF CHRISTCHURCH CONSTRUCTION ARMITAGE WILLIAMS ARCHITECT WSP STRUCTURAL ENGINEER RUAMOKO SOLUTIONS MECHANICAL ENGINEER TM CONSULTANTS QUANTITY SURVEYOR RAWLINSONS

Armitage Williams Construction is a market leader in commercial construction in the South Island of New Zealand; our name has been synonymous with professionalism, dedication and quality without compromise. With over three decades of experience of delivering awardwinning building solutions and our reputation for excellence means that Armitage Williams Construction remains the company that people want to work with. AWC thrives on challenges and simplifies complexity by focusing on innovative solutions. www.armitagewilliams.co.nz info@awgroup.co.nz

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THIS CATEGORY REPRESENTS A DYNAMIC INDUSTRY THAT IS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING AND INNOVATING. ENTRANTS ABLY DEMONSTRATE HOW THEY RISE TO CHALLENGES AND ADAPT TO A DIVERSE RANGE OF REQUIREMENTS.


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

VIP LOUNGE AT THE TOP OF ITS GAME

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The luxurious new oasis is designed for high-net-worth clientele who will stay, play and dine in opulence.

I

ntroducing 2890sqm of luxury, opulence and comfort. It comes complete with an abundance of curves and water features – designed to assist the flow of ch’i – and a custom-designed hanging chainmail feature. That’s just for starters. This is the private, landscaped oasis that is the new VIP Gaming area in the upper levels of SkyCity Hotel in Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland. “The motivation for undertaking the VIP gaming project on Levels H5 and H6 was to create a comfortable and beautiful ‘home-away-from-home’ for SkyCity’s valued clientele,” says Matt Ballesty, SkyCity chief casino officer. The new area – encompassing Ultra, VIP Black, EIGHT and Horizon lounges – is aimed at local and domestic high-net worth customers who, along with international visitors (once the borders reopen), will want to stay, dine and visit tourist attractions. It’s the first in a range of projects designed to create a truly


‘The design was formed around feng shui principles and a feng shui master was engaged to advise on key elements.’

international urban entertainment precinct in the heart of Auckland City. The design was formed around feng shui principles and a feng shui master was engaged to advise on locations for key elements, allowing ch’i to flow into spaces and be retained. Each material choice references the five elements in feng shui: wood, fire, earth, metal and water, while colour and forms reflect the changing hues as day moves from dawn to dusk. The spaces have dramatic lighting, beautifully detailed bars, luxurious bathrooms and comfortable seating areas, which are richly detailed but are not too much. Although they offer superb levels of luxury and comfort, they are compatible with the country’s casual, warm hospitality. Finishes were taken from a natural New Zealand palette and supplemented with luxurious accents in metal.

From an engineering and construction standpoint, this was a tricky project. For one, crane access provided a significant challenge. Risk assessment and structural analysis was undertaken before a very large mobile crane could be positioned in the Sky Tower Plaza and suspended over the tower entry below. Each outrigger supporting this crane was carefully positioned over strongpoints or supported on temporary frames. This enabled oversized and heavy objects, such as 4m-wide rolls of carpet and new glazing systems, to be lifted into position for installation. This also meant SkyCity’s main operations could continue without interruption. The project enjoyed many innovative engineering successes, says Ballesty. As well as crane access being ingeniously solved, there’s a cantilevered link bridge soaring over the roof of SkyCity Atrium. In terms of seismic ratings, the entire 49


Tourism & Leisure installation on H6 has been seismically braced to current standards. The VIP project has exceeded business expectations. It is a key strategy for achieving growth in gaming, which is the largest part of SkyCity’s business. It also makes SkyCity primed to compete in the international VIP gaming market and attract overseas guests to Auckland City and New Zealand, border restrictions permitting. +

SKYCITY VIP GAMING Corners Federal/Victoria/Hobson/Wellesley Sts, - maki Makaurau Auckland Ta

OWNER SKYCITY AUCKLAND CONSTRUCTION NAYLOR LOVE ARCHITECT WARREN AND MAHONEY SERVICE, MECHANICAL, STRUCTURAL ENGINEER BECA QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER GRAHAM KOCK

Bringing imagination to life

SkyCity VIP Gaming “Valued customers are at the heart of SkyCity VIP Gaming, which offers a luxury private environment to surpass all expectations.” Richard Anderson

RLB.com



Tourism & Leisure

TOP-FLIGHT TALE OF TRUE PARTNERSHIP PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

T The sculptural truss structure results in a light and open concourse and accommodates the stepped roof of Te Hono.

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Outside, durable powder-coated aluminium was installed to manage exposure to sea spray, wind and fuel vapour.

he transformation from an ageing 1960s airport into a 21st-century regional gateway is a success story with collaboration at its heart. The motivation behind the project was to bring two groups of people together: local hapu- Puketapu and the New Plymouth District Council. Early involvement of tangata whenua laid the foundations for a genuine partnership. Beca Design Practice worked at the nexus of this partnership, and the airport’s design responds to the ambition of the relationship by representing Puketapu’s origin story of two beings joining together and creating Awa-nui-a-rangi, the original ancestor. Six design principles from the Puketapu creation narrative are woven into the shape and materials of the building: The celestial and terrestrial aspects are represented by the stepped roofs and the embrace (awhi) of these entities is reflected by the curved facades; care (manaakitanga) is expressed through the


‘The building exhibits a design coherency to our social and cultural reality – both past and present.’

interior floor delineation; the visual connection to Mount Taranaki is achieved by the building orientation and position on site; and the joining (te hiringa-te tuhonohono) is represented by two roofs intersecting. “Having our narrative drive the design process means that the building exhibits coherency to our social and cultural reality – both past and present – and also a sense of fidelity to the land upon which it sits,” says iwi artist Rangi Kipa. “The benefits of a joint relationship or joint approach to the terminal is a restoration of some trust, and that’s been a healing process,” says Kipa. The considered way in which narratives are woven into the make-up of the building means the layered experience can take time to explore. The design team was deliberate about not being too literal or obvious, using subtle gestures to tie into the sophistication of the architecture. The aim was to represent important ancestral stories in the fabric of the

building. “We wanted to create a place that resonated profoundly with its cultural context, and one which eschewed superficial adornment,” says Campbell Craig, Project Architect. While many users of the terminal and its grounds may not at first pick up on the built aspects and their relevance to the cultural context, they will be drawn to the art. For example, a 70m tukutuku work is a bold backdrop to numerous airport operations, hospitality and retail. “The end result is a unique building, a gateway to the region that tells the story of Taranaki from a modern perspective and embraces and engages visitors,” says project director Gaye Batty. “The building is light, open and offers a clear vista from maunga to moana along the ancient hunting trail.” For Kipa, being part of the planning and design process was pivotal. “Our involvement throughout all aspects of the project is seen as an act of restorative 53


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Puketapu was involved in every stage of the process. The stepped roof was designed and

54

built to represent the celestial and terrestrial aspects of the - ’s Taranaki hapu creation narrative.

justice to be visible and present on this sacred site, by integrating our creation narrative throughout the whole build,” he says. Te Hono is also garnering international attention. The project has recently been selected as a finalist in UNESCO’s prestigious Prix Versailles awards, which recognise architecture that responds strongly to its cultural heritage, and Te Hono is one of six 2021 finalists in the airports category. It’s in good company – other finalists include the upgrade to New York’s LaGuardia, Berlin’s Brandenburg and international airports in Athens, Kazakhstan and the Philippines. +

TE HONO – NEW PLYMOUTH AIRPORT TERMINAL 192 Airport Dr, Nga- motu New Plymouth

OWNER, DEVELOPER PAPA RERERANGI I PUKETAPU (PRIP) CONSTRUCTION CLELANDS CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT BECA DESIGN PRACTICE SERVICE, STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL ENGINEER; PROJECT MANAGER BECA QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL, SAUNDERS STEVENSON OTHER CONSULTANTS PUKETAPU (RANGI KIPA & FERN BRAND), LETTRE (JASON TREWEEK)


Bringing imagination to life

Te Hono – New Plymouth Airport Terminal

“The design of the new airport was created with the stories of the ancestral land and people woven throughout to provide a gateway that welcomes the future and honours the past.” Steve Gracey RLB.com


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

SCORING A DOUBLE FOR TURF & TRAFFIC

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Top and above Strict competition standards require facilities to be north-south oriented.

Opposite The firstfloor layout allows for more than one function at a time, with folding walls to divide spaces.

W

hen major roading works were needed for the extension of the Northern motorway in Auckland, North Harbour Hockey had to up sticks. Its old premises were impeding the path of vehicular progress. As a result, the National Hockey Centre was built on a new site. It has been designed to international standards and includes four new hockey turfs and a two-storey pavilion with changing rooms, clubrooms, offices and community spaces. There are 370 carparks at the north and south ends, plus a new footbridge across Alexandra Stream, which connects to Rosedale Park North. The project has proved a winner, says Andrew Thackwray, senior manager for project delivery at Waka Kotahi (NZ Transport Agency). “It’s a great new facility for the sport and its completion will ultimately help our motorway construction schedule, as we can now use the old hockey centre


‘It’s a great new facility for the sport and its completion will help our motorway construction schedule.’

land,” he says. “We are extremely pleased with how it has all come together.” Building the new centre meant adhering to some rigid codes that went beyond conventional building and environmental requirements. As an example, the International Hockey Federation’s Global Elite standards necessitated a northsouth building axis, with large glazing to the east and west facades providing centreline commentary and camera views of the main pitches. This curtain-wall glazing was prefabricated off-site, delivered and installed for optimum viewing of the games. The building is naturally ventilated with supplementary heating, ventilation and air conditioning for peak temperatures. Acoustic baffles and attenuation further reduce noise from the clubroom building. Then there was the question of crowds. There’s permanent seating for 450, but the facilities needed to have temporary seating for 5000 during international

competitions, and 10,000 during Commonwealth Games or World Cup events. Ground-floor undercroft spaces allow for growth, without any disruption – spatial agility was a challenging but important requirement of the design brief. The clubroom building was constructed concurrently with the pitch-forming works, which required thorough construction planning to sequence their overlap. An early decision to use concrete blocks allowed for minimal additional construction-site requirements. Concrete-block walls have been left exposed and linings only added to wet areas. The roof is serrated at key points to accommodate natural light and ventilation. The first-floor layout allows for conventions and seminars to be held simultaneously, and folding walls can divide larger rooms. A commercial kitchen, bar and canteen provide multiple dining options. Hockey pitches require irrigation before and during games to ensure an even 57


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above The new centre required hockey-specific features, such as pitch-side pop-up sprinklers to dampen the artificial turf.

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Below Extensive use of glass on the east and west of the centre ensures uninterrupted views of the main hockey pitches and the action.

surface and minimise player injury from friction burns from the artificial surface. This is provided by pitch-side pop-up sprinklers that deliver water at a lower level than traditional cannon irrigators. Car parking has been divided between the north and south of the facility to allow for daytime access to offices and bulk parking for night hockey games. A path and bridge connect to overflow parking. In the northern car park between pitches three and four, visitors are greeted by pou whenua, signifying the meeting of mana whenua and hockey in the common pursuit of serving the wider community. +

NATIONAL HOCKEY CENTRE

- maki Makaurau Auckland Rosedale Park,159 Bush Rd, Rosedale, Ta

OWNER NORTH HARBOUR HOCKEY ASSOCIATION DEVELOPER WAKA KOTAHI (NZ TRANSPORT AGENCY) CONSTRUCTION FULTON HOGAN, HEB CONSTRUCTION, DOMINION CONSTRUCTORS ARCHITECT PACIFIC ENVIRONMENTS NZ QUANTITY SURVEYOR RDT PACIFIC SERVICE, STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL ENGINEER AURECON


PACIFIC ENVIRONMENTS

Helping you PACIFIC ENVIRONMENTS build quality, Helping you sustainable build quality, communities sustainable communities

ARCHITECTS URBAN DESIGNERS INTERIORS 09 308 0070 info@penzl.co.nz ARCHITECTS pacificenvironments.co.nz URBAN DESIGNERS INTERIORS

09 308 0070 info@penzl.co.nz pacificenvironments.co.nz


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

REMARKABLE INSPIRATION FOR HOTEL

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W The Safari Group didn't have to look far for inspiration for its LQ Kawarau River hotel. The Central Otago landscape and

river provided the colour palette for the 91 guest rooms and 97 residential apartments, built with sustainability in mind.

ith a long-standing presence in the Queenstown Lakes District, it only made sense for the Safari Group to extend its connection with the region. The hotel development pioneers (Ramada Remarkables, Wyndham Garden, Ramada Queenstown Central) have now added LQ Kawarau River to their portfolio. The 7181sqm mixed-use development comprises 91 hotel guest rooms, 97 residential apartments and one ground-floor food facility. The group did not have to look far for design inspiration. “The built form fits within the captivating landscape, with the roof designed and constructed to mirror the backdrop of the Remarkables mountain range. The cladding and colour palette were carefully selected to fit the environment. And we took inspiration from the beautiful blue colours of the Kawarau River for the internal artwork, walls and character of each unit,” says Damien Taylor, director of Safari Group and project manager for LQ Kawarau River. The motivation for the project was driven from the group’s love for the region.


‘The built form fits within the captivating landscape... The colour palette was carefully selected to fit the environment.’

Throughout the project, the group made use of both tried and true techniques, as well as new innovative materials and construction technologies. The concrete and steel superstructure has cross-laminated stairwell materials. Efficient building dimensions create a central corridor with units all around the perimeter. An integrated aluminium and glazed facade system, including the balconies, serves two purposes. It achieves an appealing look of a modern building, while also enabling a quick, efficient and cost-effective construction programme to be conducted. “Despite the Covid pandemic in 2020, we were able to deliver this development only two weeks behind the initial schedule,” says Taylor. The hotel building has a clear entry with a wind lobby canopy form that mimics the roof above. This separates the hotel from the residential apartments. Sustainable features, including LED lighting controlled on sensors and recyclable water and cladding can be found throughout. Sustainability carries through to the hotel’s use of durable products which can be recycled.

Landscaping is consistent with, and builds upon, the landscape theme created within the wider Remarkables Park development. Mountain ash trees, interspersed with red oaks, stand at both east and west ends of the building and along the street frontage. Cherry trees are evident along the west and north boundaries. Whatever way you look at it, LQ Kawarau is picture-perfect. +

LQ KAWARAU RIVER

- huna Queenstown 16/18 Mountain Ash Rd, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER MOUNTAIN ASH TRADING TRUST CONSTRUCTION, QUANTITY SURVEYOR, PROJECT MANAGER SAFARI CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT PLUS ARCHITECTURE SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER ALEXANDER ELECTRICAL STRUCTURAL ENGINEER ENOVATE CONSULTANTS OTHER CONSULTANTS HOLMES FIRE, ENGEO

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Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

ABOVE AND BEYOND EXPECTATIONS

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R Timber has been used extensively throughout, which serves as a reference to the importance of the material to local history and the economy.

otorua was built on manaakitanga (hospitality). And so it is that the city’s new airport terminal is a gateway that reflects the region, enabling people to be welcomed and farewelled in the manner that reflects Rotorua’s heritage. As much as a nod to the past as to what lies ahead, this significant upgrade modernises and future-proofs the airport. The existing terminal building had undergone several extensions over the years, and the relationships between departments within the airport needed to be reconfigured to increase efficiency. Due to the high cost of seismic strengthening required to make the original, centrally located 1960s terminal safe and code compliant, it was removed. The remodelled internal spaces create a more efficient layout. Existing solid walls have been replaced with expansive glass areas, which encourage a sense of space. A lightweight glass link spans the new public space, connecting departures and arrivals.


‘Culturally significant landmarks are referenced throughout the building.’

The design concept includes details that reflect terraced landforms, lake-edge wave patterns and the relationship between lake, mountain and sky. The space on both air and land side was landscaped with native plants, creating a visual link to Lake Rotorua and Mokoia Island. These culturally significant landmarks are referenced throughout the building, creating a sense of place and showcasing Rotorua’s rich natural and human history. It was important to reinforce the connection between the terminal, Lake Rotorua and Mokoia Island, says Tim Mein of Tim Mein Architects. “The design concept was to increase transparency through the terminal and reinforce connections to Lake Rotorua. As passengers move through the terminal interior, the runway and lake can be seen from all angles. The new glass link provides transparency and a visual connection. The landform of Mokoia Island was the inspiration for the translucent pattern on the glazed link walls and landscape design concepts by artist Kereama Taepa.”

The design provides straight-line passenger movement and processing with clear way-finding, correctly sized passenger processing areas and flexible, light-filled terminal spaces. These all comply with Civil Aviation Authority New Zealand regulations and meet International Civil Aviation Organisation standards and recommended practices designed for future flexibility. A key feature of the project was creating a range of income-generating opportunities for both Rotorua and the Bay of Plenty. The upgrade includes new timber-clad rental-car booths in the arrivals hall and a Business Lounge. The Terrace Airside cafe in the departures lounge, funded by the tenant, showcases the highest standards in Rotorua’s food and beverage sector. Perhaps the biggest challenge in this significant rebuild lies in cost. “With finite funds to upgrade a large terminal area, the budget was used carefully with the key objectives being to enhance the passenger experience and position the 63


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

‘The extensive use of native timber provides a cultural reference to the importance of timber to the local economy.’

64

Above The timber-clad carrental booths. Over the page The light-filled corridor encourages a sense of space.

terminal for future passenger growth. The redeveloped airport creates a flexible, low-maintenance facility. The renovation and rebuild meets new security and seismic strengthening requirements, while the design caters for growth in passenger numbers and improves the airport experience for visitors. The extensive use of native timber throughout the facility provides a cultural reference to the importance of timber to the local economy and to tell the historical stories of the region and Rotorua’s wood-product manufacturing, forestry and logging sectors. Where possible, timber has been sourced locally or recycled. Native totara and Abodo timber cladding and screens from the Bay of Plenty were introduced in both the interior and exterior of the terminal, in particular at entry and exit points, says Mein. The project also provided new lighting, fire protection services and new outdoor air-conditioning units connected to existing interior ductwork. Due to proximity to the control tower, fire constraints and regulations were incorporated into the design. Future-proofing includes provisions for increased visitor numbers, but with the Civil Aviation Authority indicating security screening could be required for domestic airports with short notice, the design also allows space for these to be added – without the need for a further design and construction project. Clearly, the sky’s the limit.


Building better solutions

“We do build buildings, but we build so much more than that. We’re empowering businesses, transforming cities and regions, and enriching communities. We are building better solutions the ‘Marra’ way.”

07 543 0774 office@marra.co.nz www.marraconstruction.co.nz


Heritage & Adaptive Reuses “The refurbished terminal is designed to cater for a forecast growth of 234 passengers an hour, which allows for additional 70-seat Turboprop services in the morning and evening peak hours, as well as catering for future Airbus A320 or Boeing 737 domestic jet services,” says Mein. +

ROTORUA REGIONAL AIRPORT 837 Te Ngae Rd, Rotorua

OWNER, DEVELOPER ROTORUA REGIONAL AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION MARRA CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT TIM MEIN ARCHITECTS SERVICE, STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL ENGINEER GHD QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER RDT PACIFIC OTHER CONSULTANTS, COSGROVES

Bringing imagination to life

Rotorua Regional Airport

“This significant upgrade modernises and future-proofs Rotorua Airport, while meeting new security and seismic strengthening requirements.” Richard Anderson

RLB.com


NO ASSUMPTIONS. BETTER OUTCOMES. DESIGN + CONSTRUCTION apolloprojects.co.nz


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

ALL THAT GLITTERS, PLUS GOLD

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Despite numerous challenges, the extensive refurbishment was completed on

time and within budget. The result is a luxurious experience for SkyCity’s clientele.

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t was time to replace Aces. The SkyCity bar in Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland had only received minor refurbishments over the past 25 years, and was in need of reinvention. Enter, then, designers of Flare Bar – the newly refurbished and substantially expanded, full-format, high-end 640sqm bar on the main gaming floor. Encompassing three efficient yet stylish food and beverage offerings, it announces itself with features including multi-layered gold mesh screening, lit from within by RGB LED lighting. Rotating mirror balls provide movement and colour variation through computer-programmed sequencing. There’s also a boutique champagne bar and an entertainment space with a stage that can host up to 250 guests. The layout is designed to maximise efficiency, particularly with large crowds. The adjacent champagne bar provides a quieter


‘Luxury materials are combined with fabrics and colour to provide a rich tapestry of visual delight.’

place to sit and enjoy the sophisticated hospitality. Flare can cater for a wide range of functions and clientele – it can provide a party atmosphere with live music or big-screen sports action, or it can be a respite for a glass of bubbles and quiet contemplation, or for a quiet morning cup of coffee. Nothing has been scrimped on in the bar, which was designed to serve the needs of existing customers and attract a new clientele. Luxury materials include brass, hardwood timbers, marble, granite and stainless steel. These are combined with quality fabrics and colour to provide a rich tapestry of visual delight. The refurbishment was no easy task. SkyCity is a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week operation and access was challenging, due to the inner-city location of the site. The project was undertaken when New Zealand was in Covid-19 level-3

lockdown. Despite this, construction was carried out with little impact on customers and other areas of the business, says Arron Money, SkyCity general manager of capital development. “Materials were carefully and considerately transported at off-peak times using well-planned routes to minimise the impact to customers. Noise and dust factors were closely managed and monitored,” he says. Despite these challenging working conditions, the project was delivered on time and under budget. Considerable effort was also made to graft new fittings to existing services with minimal impact. Sustainability was a major consideration: timbers come from sustainable sources, and, where possible, water-based coatings and materials, rather than solvent-based products, were used. 69


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Flare serves up a shiny tapestry of light, colour and luxury in its facilities, which range from party spaces to boutique bars.

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New Zealand-made and fabricated design elements reduced transport costs and the carbon footprint. Imported products needed for specific performance and appearance, and which were not available in New Zealand, were carefully analysed for sustainable manufacturing pedigrees, says Money. Minimising demolition, reusing materials where possible and installing plant and equipment that was flexible enough to accommodate future renovations with minimal work were also hallmarks of this project. +

FLARE BAR – LEVEL 2 SKYCITY CASINO Corners Federal/Victoria/Hobson/Wellesley Sts, Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER SKYCITY AUCKLAND CONSTRUCTION COMPLETE CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT MOLLER ARCHITECTS SERVICE, MECHANICAL, STRUCTURAL ENGINEER AECOM QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER RUTH SMART


Bringing imagination to life

Flare Bar – Level 2 SkyCity Casino

“Behind Flare Bar’s glamorous finish – and its bar that stretches to almost 50 metres – is an innovative design that inspires.” Richard Anderson

RLB.com

Property & Construction Consultants

www.whiteassociates.co.nz


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Tourism & Leisure


The history of the once-industrial site was a catalyst for planning and choosing materials for the striking Travelodge

Wynyard Quarter. You will find precast concrete panels, steel columns and stainless steel mesh screens.

‘The completed building is exceptionally well resolved and based on simplicity and clarity of form.’

THE TRAVELLER’S REST IS HISTORY

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ravelodge Wynyard Quarter is the first of six buildings that comprise the masterplan for the redevelopment of a 18,266sqm downtown site that longterm Auckland residents would know as the former home of NZ Bus. The catalyst for the development – bounded by Halsey, Pakenham, Gaunt and Daldy Streets – was the Government’s acquisition of land to the north-west of the site for conversion into Central Park on the site controlled by Infratil Infrastructure Property. Travelodge Wynyard Quarter has 385 carparks ‘sleeved’ by a 154-room, 3.5-star hotel with ground-level office, restaurant and retail space. “Our design sought to celebrate the precinct’s industrial heritage, while embracing its rebirth as a vibrant destination precinct,” says Manuel Diaz, Director at Peddlethorp Architects. The thinking that generated the building’s aesthetics and material choices hails from extensive research into the historical uses of the area. Materials selected blend the industrial and commercial activities of the site by combining charcoal precast concrete panels and structural steel columns with frameless glass canopies and stainless steel woven screens. The material palette was

deliberately kept simple and in alignment with the internal building programme. From both a planning and design perspective, the carpark facade required a great deal of thought to realise a solution that addresses urban design and pragmatic brief goals. This was achieved by adopting a holistic design approach where Infratil, Peddlethorp, RDT Pacific, Holmes Consulting Group and NDY collaborated to arrive at an optimised solution. A stainless-steel mesh, tensioned top and bottom provides natural ventilation and light, as well as acting as a safety barrier. The hotel elevation facing Pakenham and Halsey Streets has a serrated top as a nod to the industrial facilities that still occupy the precinct. The ground floor is entirely devoted to retail and commercial activities, with the Travelodge lobby placed on the north-facing side of the building. A generous stud height at ground level maximises street-level appeal and sunlight, complements the street upgrade and results in superior amenity for both tenants and pedestrians. “The completed building is exceptionally well resolved and based on simplicity and clarity,” says Diaz. “Material selection was informed by a desire to provide 73


Tourism & Leisure

Above The lobby of Travelodge Wynyard Quarter. Below Tensioned mesh screens are a practical design

solution, but also add a layer of interest. The material palette is practical yet beautifully assembled.

TRAVELODGE HOTEL WYNYARD QUARTER - maki Makaurau Auckland 100 Halsey St, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER INFRATIL INFRASTRUCTURE PROPERTY CONSTRUCTION NZ STRONG ARCHITECT PEDDLETHORP SERVICES ENGINEER NORMAN DISNEY & YOUNG STRUCTURAL ENGINEER HOLMES CONSULTING GROUP QUANTITY SURVEYOR CUESKO PROJECT MANAGER RDT PACIFIC OTHER CONSULTANTS HOLMES FIRE, LAUTREC

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Photography Patrick Reynolds

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

robust and durable finishes, while minimising onging maintenance costs in a coastal setting.” Views and natural light were prioritised in the hotel rooms and motion and temperature sensors throughout the building enable energy use to be rationalised, while also controlling illumination in the carpark and hotel areas. +


QUANTITY SURVEYORS & CONSTRUCTION COST CONSULTANTS AUCKLAND:

09 477 4880

NORTHLAND:

09 777 0941

TAURANGA:

07 777 0388

cuesko.com enquiry@cuesko.co.nz


Tourism & Leisure PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

ALL HAIL THE NEW REPUBLIC OF DINING Detailed thinking and planning went into transforming an underused hospitality offering

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into a celebration of casual dining. A series of wellarticulated spaces provide diners with quality options.

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onsider the Martindale rub test. This international measure of fabric durability was applied to upholstery at Food Republic, SkyCity’s revamped principal food offering on its main gaming floor. It passed with flying colours, achieving a figure of 60,000 rubs or better (three times the measure for heavy-duty use), thus ensuring excellent long-term performance. This is the sort of detail that went into the thinking behind transforming underutilised Sammy’s Bar in Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland, into a fresh and natural food and beverage environment that offers a wide variety of cuisine styles. All materials and finishes were chosen for their quality, performance and efficiency of fabrication and construction. The architectural design for the 460sqm area uses timbers for the open trellis ceiling, a solid timber floor interspersed with ceramic tiling and natural planting.


‘SkyCity’s Food Republic is about a celebration of casual dining, with a rich variety of styles and tastes.’

The theme and layouts illustrate a careful collaboration between SkyCity and Moller Architects to maximise efficiency for food preparation, cooking, display and delivery to customers. “Food Republic is about a celebration of casual dining, with a rich variety of styles and tastes,” says Callum Mallett, the chief operating officer of SkyCity New Zealand. “Design has been carefully considered and created to provide a restful series of spaces incorporating banquette seating, planter divisions to articulate the spaces and precise detailing for food display and menu presentation.” In its new guise, Food Republic comprises three outlets and seats 200 to 250 guests. The space connects seamlessly into the back-of-house facilities. From an engineering perspective, the services design philosophy was to meet the requirements of the new fit-out as efficiently and sustainably as possible.

And how has this been achieved? Considerable effort was taken to graft new work to existing services with as little impact as possible, says Mallett. “Minimising services demolition, re-using where possible and installing plant and equipment that was flexible enough to accommodate future renovations with minimal rework highlighted the efficiency and sustainability of the services,” he says. The project certainly posed some challenges. Food Republic is in a 24/7 customer environment, so noise and dust factors had to be closely managed and monitored. Ingenious techniques were employed to minimise the impact. Case in point: access to the site was via a car lift, direct from SkyCity’s main loading dock. “Customers and other areas of the business were minimally impacted, if at all,” Mallett adds. 77


Tourism & Leisure The end result cannot be faulted. In place of a dated, dark and underused bar is a series of light, attractive restful spaces that serve up superb casual dining. Patrons who haven’t been to SkyCity in Auckland for a while are in for a very pleasant – and delicious – surprise. +

FOOD REPUBLIC – LEVEL 2 SKYCITY CASINO Corners Federal/Victoria/Hobson/Wellesley Sts, - maki Makaurau Auckland Ta

OWNER SKYCITY AUCKLAND CONSTRUCTION COMPLETE CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT MOLLER ARCHITECTS SERVICE, MECHANICAL, STRUCTURAL ENGINEER AECOM QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER DIANE OBRIEN

Bringing imagination to life

Food Republic – Level 2 SkyCity Casino

“Food Republic is a fresh new area, with a light and open space offering a range of international cuisines for SkyCity casino visitors to enjoy.” Richard Anderson

RLB.com


GREEN BUILDING

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STRINGENT COMPLIANCE IS REQUIRED FOR A BUILDING TO BE CLASSIFIED AS GREEN. EFFICIENT, SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND MATERIALS, PLUS MINIMAL WASTE MEAN THAT VERY FEW PROJECTS MAKE THE GRADE.


Green Building PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

MIGHTY BY NAME, MIGHTY FINE BY NATURE

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T A modernist design approach was extended to the building’s three primary functions. Landscaping softens

the built form within the environment and, at night, a creative LED lighting solution also serves this purpose.

his new 10,500sqm sustainably designed and built industrial space is home to one of New Zealand’s largest online retailers. The Mighty Ape development in Silverdale, Auckland, has been awarded a 5-Green Star Industrial Built rating – only the third 5-Green Star Industrial rating to be issued in New Zealand. “The building embodies the Mighty Ape brand elements synonymous with innovation, quality, technology and design through the considered selection of materials, detailing and colours,” says Marilyn Storey, Head of Development for Argosy Property, the owner and developer of the project. In pursuit of the Green Star rating, construction minimised waste and utilised innovative materials and products chosen for their sustainability. From the main entry, sustainable timber provides a sense of warmth, which differentiates Mighty Ape from other industrial buildings. External shading of the expansive glazing is provided with horizontal louvres and oversized canopies – this moderates heat


‘The building embodies the company brand & elements synonymous with innovation, quality, technology and design.’

gain and glare, while still providing generous natural light. The overall effect of this design approach creates a transparent and inviting facade. The highly efficient, low-maintenance glazing and cladding system has been achieved through the use of thermally broken aluminium joinery, with tinted low-e glass filled with argon gas, and combined with fritted glazing through the spandrel sections. When night falls, a creative LED lighting solution displays an inviting interior, and softens the built form. A daylight- and occupancycontrol system allows for future flexibility. A modernist architectural approach has been extended to the three primary functions of showroom, administration and staff facilities. Spaces to the side of the main showroom serve as multifunctional meeting zones with operable (moveable) walls and video conferencing facilities, as well as presentation spaces – all of which are acoustically rated. A large outdoor area is attached to the staffroom and has a retractable canopy

to provide shelter when it rains. This feature provides a multitude of benefits, says Mighty Ape general manager Alistair Burns. “Public events are regularly hosted in our lunch and showroom spaces and large meeting rooms have encouraged more face-to-face meetings with suppliers. Having space to run company-wide gatherings has been a massive boost to staff culture,” he adds. +

MIGHTY APE 24-28 Highgate Parkway, Silverdale, Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER ARGOSY PROPERTY CONSTRUCTION ASPEC CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT DESIGN GROUP STAPLETON ELLIOT PROJECT MANAGER RESONANT QUANTITY SURVEYOR BBD OTHER CONSULTANTS ENSOR CONSULTANTS, EARCON ACOUSTICS, ECUBED

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Christ Church Cathedral CAB Apartments, Auckland

Wellington Town Hall Dunedin Railway Station

Craftsmanship, collaboration & commitment... since 1910

There are times on every heritage & refurbishment project when we peel back the layers and reveal problems that nobody could ever have anticipated. With over a century in construction and an absolute commitment to finding best-for-project solutions, Naylor Love have got your back, no matter what we uncover. It will probably look worse before it looks better. But it’s going to be amazing.


HERITAGE & ADAPTIVE RE-USES

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RESTORING, PROTECTING AND CELEBRATING NEW ZEALAND’S HERITAGE IS CRUCIALLY IMPORTANT. ENTRANTS IN THIS CATEGORY HAVE MET COMPLEX COMPLIANCE AND MULTI-INTEREST REQUIREMENTS TO CONSERVE HISTORY AND ACHIEVE SUCCESS.


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Heritage & Adaptive Re-uses


This stretch of Wellington’s Cuba street is an example of how run-down character

buildings can be revitalised and brought up to standard, while still retaining their heritage features.

‘This Wellington landmark has been restored to its former glory. It now plays a part in revitalising economic activity in the area.’

A RENEWED LEASE OF LIFE

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t was once a very sorry sight. This stretch of Cuba Street had three buildings that dated back to the early 1900s. Time, and the Kaiko- ura earthquake, had not been kind. The buildings were quake-prone, in a state of severe disrepair and not fit for ongoing use. Now, 100 Cuba Street is an exceptional, re-strengthened and refurbished heritage building that has been cleverly adapted into 6000sqm of open-plan, modern office space and 1000sqm of retail outlets. The project incorporates the existing building at 94-102 Cuba Street with a new structure behind the retained heritage facades at 104 and 106 Cuba Street. This creates one unified modern office interior and separate ground-floor units that appear as three separate buildings from the street. The ground floor comprises commercial and retail spaces; the upper floors are open-plan offices with break-out spaces, desk areas, meeting rooms – all featuring heritage elements. “The project has enabled the buildings and their heritage attributes to be

retained, restored and future-proofed so they can be enjoyed by the public and serve the city as revitalised, resilient central-city retail and office spaces for decades to come,” says David McGuinness, director of property developer Willis Bond, which is responsible for the project. “With careful consideration, this Wellington landmark has been restored to its former glory. It now plays a major role in revitalising economic activity in the wider Cuba Street area,” he says. Leased to Greater Wellington Regional Council, the expansive office floors are complemented by original heritage features, including roof lights, matai flooring and pressed-tin ceilings, alongside additions such as a new roof and western facade with double-glazed windows for increased thermal performance. The most striking feature is the fully restored original 1914 facade, which has been painstakingly repaired and conserved, with its original green ceramic tiles and lion-head features reinstated for the public to enjoy from Cuba Street. The aim was to make the heritage envelope as energy efficient and thermally 85


Heritage & Adaptive Re-uses PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Inside the revamped precinct, you’ll find retail and commercial

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spaces, a large, open office, desk areas, meeting rooms and breakout spaces.

comfortable as possible, and the retention of the huge original roof lights provide ample natural light to the very large floor plates. Large end-of-trip facilities on the ground floor provide bike storage, lockers and showers to encourage low-carbon journeys, while the project strategy to retain as much of the original building matter as possible has delivered a building that is 33-39 per cent lower in embodied carbon than a new build. PwC partner Robert Cameron, who was involved in the project, says: “This is an exemplar project that has respectfully restored and given longevity to an important piece of the fabric of the Cuba quarter.” +

100 CUBA STREET 100 Cuba St, Whanganui-a-tara Wellington

OWNER ARTHUR INVESTMENT GROUP DEVELOPER WILLIS BOND CONSTRUCTION LT MCGUINNESS ARCHITECT ATHFIELD ARCHITECTS SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER CORA STRUCTURAL ENGINEER DUNNING THORNTON CONSULTANTS QUANTITY SURVEYOR BBD PROJECT MANAGER RCP/WILLIS BOND OTHER CONSULTANTS TONKIN + TAYLOR, URBAN PERSPECTIVES, P w C


Proudly associated with Athfield Architects and Willis Bond on the Cuba Precinct Redevelopment.


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Heritage & Adaptive Re-uses


The heritagelisted stadium is a landmark, which cuts a striking form in the landscape. Once pegged for

demolition, it will be enjoyed for generations to come, thanks to extensive restoration.

‘The scope of the work included seismic strengthening of the entire 2151sqm structure.’

GRANDSTAND’S FRESH INNINGS, 97 NOT OUT

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t wasn’t just about breathing new life into the ageing and threatened Basin Reserve Museum Stand. Prevention was also part of the cure when the Category 2 Heritage New Zealand-listed building underwent a substantial restoration. Built in 1924, the stand was saved from demolition in 2018, when a $7.78 million restoration and strengthening project was confirmed to bring it up to building code. The restoration project has prolonged the lifespan of the building by at least 50 more years. There is also a significant environmental chapter to this story, with hundreds of tonnes of potentially contaminated material being prevented from going to landfill. “The only other option for the building was for it to be demolished. Avoiding any demolition altogether is a positive for our environment. We are proud to preserve the building’s heritage through refurbishment and re-use of many building elements,” says Tony Doile, director at Armstrong Downes Commercial, the construction company responsible for the restoration.

The scope of work carried out by Armstrong Downes Commercial included seismic strengthening of the entire 2151sqm structure, as well as reuse and refurbishment of heritage timber, steel windows, tiles, and doors that were nearly 100 years old. Only about 20 per cent of the damaged timber, caused by borer and rot, had to be replaced. Sprayed concrete was used for most of the interior strengthening works, which helped contain costs by limiting the amount of formwork in areas that were difficult to access. The completed project allows the building to serve its primary role as a grandstand for the iconic Basin Reserve. The project also re-purposed and enhanced the interior to accommodate the New Zealand Cricket Museum (requiring high-quality climate control) and provide first-class office space for Cricket Wellington. The ground floor also has public facilities – toilets, food and drink amenities and a meeting room for community use. 89


C O N S U L T I N G E N G I N E E R S WWW.SILVESTERCLARK.CO.NZ

HELPING WITH STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS THROUGHOUT NZ RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / INDUSTRIAL / SEISMIC ASSESSMENT & STRENGTHENING Proud to be associated with Cricket Wellington and the Basin Reserve Old Pavilion restoration

Bringing imagination to life

Basin Reserve Museum Stand

“A key focus of the build was sustainability within tight budget and programme parameters. The project included the salvage and reuse of existing heritage features and finishes to preserve the past and create a new asset for the future.” Cameron Whyte RLB.com


Above Where possible, steel-frame windows were refurbished and re-used.

However, there is much more going on with this inspiring project than initially meets the eye. Although the building may look the same, beneath the exterior is modern and economic lighting, re-designed HVAC systems and a fire-suppression set-up – all hidden from public view. “The refurbished building creates a bright gateway to Newtown, and the now open stand will help encourage more events for the community,” says Doile. “It provides an opportunity to grow the already fantastic atmosphere for events held at the Basin, helping to make this part of town much more exciting,” he adds. The expertise and efficiency displayed in this complex project was not lost on the owner, Wellington City Council. Warwick Hayes, project manager Economic & Commercial, says the council raised the stakes further by calling for the grandstand to be ready for an international test cricket match (Blackcaps versus India) – a very demanding timeframe. With no contingency (time or budget) and an inflexible delivery date, there was no room for error or delay. Armstrong Downes Commercial 91


Heritage & Adaptive Re-uses PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above The marble columns and staircase lend grandeur to the building, which was built in 1924.

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Below The twin peaks above the seating area are not only elegant but functional in providing light.

demonstrated their determination and know-how to upgrade the (then) 94-year-old Museum Stand in time for this important event,” says Hayes. The team was nimble and creative in its approach, which was something the council valued. “The end result is a fantastic-looking stand that the city can be proud of and that was delivered on time and on budget,” says Hayes, who would work with Armstrong Downes Commercial again – any time. The grand old facility, which cuts a striking form, isn’t the only landmark that needed tender loving care. The centenarian that warranted recognition and protection: the po- hutukawa that was in residence before the Basin was even built. Ensuring the protection of this precious tree was a further consideration when the project was undertaken. +

BASIN RESERVE MUSEUM STAND 2 Rugby St, Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington

OWNER WELLINGTON CITY COUNCIL CONSTRUCTION ARMSTRONG DOWNES COMMERCIAL ARCHITECT, PROJECT MANAGER SHAND SHELTON SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER ECUBED STRUCTURAL ENGINEER SILVESTER CLARK QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL


Design Architects and Project Managers for the Basin Reserve Museum Stand Leading by example with creativity and commitment www.shandshelton.co.nz

C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s t o We l l i n g t o n C i t y C o u n c i l on choosing to complete the full heritage restoration as a legacy for the future, and to Armstrong Downes Construction for their dedication to the project

Proud construction partner behind the restoration of the Basin Reserve Museum Stand

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Heritage & Adaptive Re-uses PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

HISTORY PLUS SMARTS EQUALS TOP RESULTS

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F The historical main block at Takapuna Grammar School has undergone a major revamp, without its character being compromised.

The interior is now comfortable, thanks to retrofitting the joinery and solving weathertightness, durability and structural issues.

or many generations, Takapuna Grammar School’s main block has been seen as its crowning glory. Built in 1926, the North Shore landmark sits on an expansive 9.7ha site overlooking the Hauraki Gulf and Rangitoto Island in Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland. But the shine had worn off the architectural gem because of its deteriorated condition. Due to both external and internal moisture issues, teaching spaces were damp and suffered from mould. Rooms were cold in winter and insufferably hot in summer. In short, they were no longer suitable as classrooms. Demolition of the main building was never considered because of the block’s Grade-A listed heritage status and the hallowed position it holds in the school community and beyond. Instead, a comprehensive redevelopment project was launched and involved restoration of the facade; solving complex weathertightness, durability and structural issues; and upholding the building’s heritage values.


‘Design decisions were made through a conservation lens and the need for heritage values to endure.’

The project included retrofitting a mixture of tinted and low-e double-glazed units into the existing 60-year-old window joinery to manage heat loss in winter and heat and solar glare in summer. Cross ventilation was encouraged by the new layout and supplemented by ceiling fans, night-purge ventilation and extra cooling in some areas. The weathertightness and structural issues were resolved with an interior refit that provides flexible learning environments and allows for the evolution of technology and teaching practices. Sustainability is inextricably linked to conservation, so design decisions were made through a conservation lens and the need for heritage values to endure. The reuse of materials, including bricks, steel window joinery and internal timber doors, flooring and skirtings, was critical. The building has been discretely strengthened, successfully adapted to meet the principles of a modern learning environment, and conserved to ensure its

exceptional heritage features remain a key element within the school and wider community. To mark the end of the project, the hall and plaza area – a connected space for school and community events – was blessed and renamed Te Poho o te Raiona – the heart of the lion. +

TAKAPUNA GRAMMAR SCHOOL MAIN BLOCK REDEVELOPMENT - maki Makaurau Auckland 210 Lake Rd, Belmont, Ta

OWNER MINISTRY OF EDUCATION CONSTRUCTION WOODVIEW CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT RESPOND ARCHITECTS SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER STEPHENSON & TURNER STRUCTURAL ENGINEER PRENDOS NEW ZEALAND QUANTITY SURVEYOR MALTBYS PROJECT MANAGER RUBIX OTHER CONSULTANTS ARCHIFACT

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Heritage & Adaptive Re-uses PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

A GEM THAT’S POLISHED TO PERFECTION

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R Above The artful entrance. Top A building covenant prevented wholesale changes to the exterior, but

planters, lighting and revamped entrances have made an appreciable difference. Opposite Esther restaurant.

epurposing an existing building may be the most cost-, time- and energy-efficient form of development, but it comes with challenges. And converting 4 Viaduct Harbour Avenue, Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland, from an office block to a hotel presented plenty of them. Built in 2001 as one of five classically designed buildings, the prominent corner property on leasehold land, was covenanted to restrict external alteration. That went right down to the colour and overall structure, so changes could only be minimal. The vision was to deliver a hotel that engages with its commercial and residential neighbours, while complementing and enhancing the precinct tucked between the Viaduct Harbour and Wynyard Quarter.


‘The oyster drove the overall narrative of the waterfront hotel – a shell hiding the luxury within.’

“Wanting to still make a statement, we worked with the architect and interior designer to retain and maximise the building’s features inside and out, and create an inviting interior that reflects the proximity to the sea through artworks and design,” says Brett Russell, managing director of Russell Property Group. With an oyster as the narrative – a shell hides the luxury within. The hotel’s connection to the harbour is made through colour, art, carpet, wallpaper, bespoke fittings and surfaces. Exposed concrete ceilings and natural textures give the rooms distinct character. The end result is a five-star, 150-room boutique hotel, with two special hospitality offerings. Esther restaurant and the Rooftop at QT have enlivened the precinct and remain sensitive to the history of the area they inhabit. Outside,

the ground-floor extension to Esther has brought the plaza to life. Lights and movement have transformed the area and increased activity has created a greater sense of safety at night. To begin this remarkable rejuvenation, the building was laser-scanned, which gave the lead consultant the ability to provide accurate base modelling and documentation. All consultants and subcontractors had constant access to live design information through 3D co-ordination. Through mobile devices, they could discuss co-ordination issues in context, resulting in faster decision making and changes. The L-shaped building was stripped to only lift and stair cores. Rooms were then designed to abut existing exterior curtain walls for fire separation and the 97


www.russellpropertygroup.co.nz

Russell Property Group & Dominion Interiors Partners Delivering Quality QT Hotel, Auckland

www.constructors.co.nz


‘Right from the start, long-term sustainability was a major factor in the project.’

rebuild began. Curved walls in hallways provide privacy and interest, but are functional in supporting fire and acoustic protection within the existing building envelope. The street entry has been enhanced with planters and a dramatic, illuminated portal with a cantilevered canopy and full-height sliding timber doors. The exterior was enhanced with the addition of window boxes, planters and rough-cast render to the ground floor. Alucobond and black mesh cladding were added around and above the new restaurant creating a statement entry. Seismic strengthening was also undertaken. From the start, sustainability was a major factor in the project. The building envelope was retained, service cables and cabinets reused, and waste was recycled where possible. Natural gas boilers work with the heat-recovery system to preheat rooms and are programmed for efficient operation during low and peak demand.

Left One of the hotel’s sumptuous rooms.

Following page The revamped entry to the hotel.

Above The rooftop bar is a welcome addition to the Viaduct precinct.

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Heritage & Adaptive Reuses

Shower heads, tapware and cisterns designed to minimise water use were installed, and separate north and south air-conditioning zones allow the temperature to be adjusted when the sun warms the northern part of the building, without affecting comfort levels to the south. Fresh air is warmed by heat recovery from the bathrooms, while auto-shading ‘smart glass’ in the restaurant reduces cooling demand without interrupting views or light. Low-volume kitchen extractors minimise ducts and energy consumption. LEDs and DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) controls in the restaurant, conference rooms and bar help conserve energy. Part of the attraction of this development was the condition and classic style of the exterior. Minimal modernisation was required to set it apart from similar neighbouring buildings. The team used lighting, planter boxes and revamped entries to create a statement that remains sympathetic to its surroundings. +

QT HOTEL AUCKLAND

- maki Makaurau Auckland 4 Viaduct Harbour Ave, Ta

OWNER 4VH DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER RUSSELL PROPERTY GROUP CONSTRUCTION DOMINION CONSTRUCTORS ARCHITECT JASMAX (BASEBUILD)/NIC GRAHAM & ASSOC (INTERIORS) SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER AGILE ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER BGT STRUCTURES QUANTITY SURVEYOR BARNES BEAGLEY DOHERR OTHER CONSULTANTS STANDING ROCK TECHNOLOGIES, CROSSFIRE

ENGINEERING SUCCESS WITH AN INNOVATIVE TEAM AKL +64 9 357 8100 WGT +64 4 815 8310

.www.agile-eng.co.nz


MULTI-UNIT RESIDENTIAL

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AS SPACE BECOMES MORE VALUABLE IN OUR CITIES AND THEIR FRINGES, ENTRIES IN THIS CATEGORY NEED TO CLEARLY DEMONSTRATE COMMITMENT TO CREATING QUALITY, HIGH-DENSITY PRIVATE HOUSING.


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Multi-unit Residential

EXCELLENCE & BEST IN CATEGORY


Left The tower’s hue and form are inspired by the rolling waves of the region’s beaches and pouwhenua.

Above Many apartments have sweeping views of the harbour. Right Level 7’s poolside terrace.

‘The Pacifica is an architectural jewel and has amenities that make it a perfect place for a community to thrive.’

PACIFIC EXCELLENCE

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ew Zealand’s tallest residential tower redefines quality inner-city living. Rising 178m above the Waitemata- Harbour, the 57-storey Pacifica connects to and interacts with the city. Its striking form and hue are inspired by the rolling waves of the region’s beaches, and exude the strength of pouwhenua, anchoring the building within the skyline. The glass facade was designed to reflect the surrounding city and waterfront, while the twist pattern on the exterior is inspired by the Ma-ori pikorua motif of two intertwined pikopiko ferns. Pixel-glass patterns reference motifs in Pasifika and Ma-ori woven artworks and tapestries. The Pacifica is an architectural jewel, delivering high-end apartments, luxurious amenities and common areas that make it an ideal place for a residential community to grow and thrive. Owner Hengyi, project manager AECOM, construction firm Icon and Plus Architecture worked together, resulting in an innovative construction and design culture. While the building meets the New Zealand Building Code, an extra

measure to validate the robustness of the design – the Tall Building Initiative guidelines for Performance – was also used. The resulting perimeter jumpform was a first for New Zealand and won the build team an excellence in building award. These efficiencies meant Icon could complete a floor every week. “A project of this scale on a compact footprint of 1237sqm was always going to require a skilled delivery team, says Liz Scott, General Manager Hengyi Pacific. “Watching the Pacifica Tower grow and become a Pacific icon in Auckland has been hugely rewarding for all those involved in its build.” Podium parking is accessed by two car lifts and is managed by a 24/7 on-site valet parking team, the first of its kind in New Zealand. Podium parking eliminated the need for a basement which, given the site’s proximity to the harbour, would have been at risk of seawater seepage. On level 7, residents enjoy facilities such as a gym, yoga space, pool, spa, sauna, steam room, barbecue terrace and dining spaces. Entertainment and communal facilities, including a cinema, library and a lounge – designed to 103


Creating Possibilities Icon are delighted to be Hengyi Pacific’s construction partner on this truly iconic project. Thank you to the entire project team for the exemplary delivery of this unique addition to Auckland’s skyline.

icon.co


Above The twisting form on the tower’s facade takes its cue from Ma-ori symbols.

foster a strong sense of engagement and community – can be found on Level 25. It hasn’t taken long for residents of this “vertical community” to form bonds. “What sets Pacifica apart from other residential buildings, is its sense of community, its amenities, innovation and management team, says an apartment owner in the building. Another resident is also impressed with the sense of belonging. “The Pacifica has developed a community where I feel known and acknowledged by name each time I walk out the door. There is a warmth and intimacy to the atmosphere of The Pacifica’s high-rise residential living that breaks the barriers of isolation.” It’s no coincidence that the complex has engendered a sense of home, something that’s not always achieved in large-scale projects. “The vision was always about creating a sense of place,” says Sarah Kingsford, Interiors and Marketing Manager Hengyi Pacific. “The end of the project meant the next chapter of The Pacifica as a home and 105


Multi-unit Residential PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above The sophisticated lobby area sets the tone for the building.

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Below The pool is one of the many sublime facilities for residents of The Pacifica.

a community. Welcoming residents into their new space after their commitment to purchase off the plans has been a really satisfying milestone,” she says. While the Pacifica might be a great place to live, it has also been designed to be considerate of its environment. Locally sourced joinery reduced dependency on international suppliers. Key sustainability and efficiency-driven features include: centralised heating, cooling and hot-water distribution services; smart metering; LED lighting throughout; water-efficient sanitary fixtures; a rubbish chute on every level with recycling facilities; EV car-charging stations, 230-plus bike parking and e-bike charging points. Key systems, including security and EV charging can be operated remotely, improving the building’s performance. The development of bespoke software VLOBBY, with a resident CRM, and building-management application, is also a game changer. On top of all that, the building is a striking addition to the skyline. “The totem form and blue hue of The Pacifica embed it in Auckland’s City-of-Sails heritage,” says Hengyi’s Liz Scott. “We hope that a locally inspired design provenance is something we will see more of in our urban settings going forward.” +

THE PACIFICA

- maki Makaurau Auckland 10 Commerce St, Auckland Central, Ta

OWNER HENGYI (10-12 COMMERCE) LP DEVELOPER HENGYI PACIFIC (NZ) CONSTRUCTION ICON CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT PLUS ARCHITECTURE SERVICE, MECHANICAL ENGINEER STANTEC AUSTRALIA STRUCTURAL ENGINEER BGT STRUCTURES & WSP QUANTITY SURVEYOR BARNES BEAGLEY DOHERR PROJECT MANAGER AECOM OTHER CONSULTANTS POSITIVE PLANNING, INHABIT GROUP; HOLMES FIRE


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Multi-unit Residential PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

A WELCOME FIRST PORT OF CALL

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F Above Waiparuru Hall offers students a home, with facilities such as a gym and self-catering and dine-in options.

Opposite Before the new facility could be built, more than 7000sqm of soil and rocks had to be removed.

irst-year students at The University of Auckland often face a number of challenges – and that’s before they embark on a quest to find a place to live. Now they can rest a little easier. Waiparuru Hall is the new hall of residence and offers fully catered accommodation for school leavers in 786 stylish bedrooms across two towers. The Whitaker Place site, located on the edge of the university campus, required some engineering genius to prepare it for its new residents. The tight-cul-de sac of 3070sqm is on a 45-degree bank, with the north-western motorway at its base. To create the flat site ready for piling, more than 7000sqm of soil, rock and rubble was removed. From this emerged two towers of 12 and 14 storeys respectively, constructed above a common two-storey podium.


‘The new hall of residence offers catered accommodation for school leavers in 786 stylish bedrooms in two towers.’

Some history: In 2015, 35 Whitaker Place was acquired by the university for future student accommodation development. This enabled not only the development of a catered hall of residence on that site, but also made the redevelopment of neighbouring 27 Whitaker Place – already under university ownership – more feasible. Planning controls designed to protect daylight in the area had previously hampered the potential for 27 Whitaker Place, which had only 172 beds. But ownership of both sites meant they could be redeveloped. Waiparuru Hall includes provision for kitchen and dining facilities that can eventually serve both sites. Each floor has shared bathroom facilities and communal space for both recreation and study. This is further enhanced by

gyms, meeting rooms, laundries and a ‘my kitchen’ (self-catering) area – in addition to a large commercial kitchen that can cater for up to 1200 students per dining session. A new dining concept, called ‘destination dining’, offers students a wide variety of food from different cuisines. The repeating nature of this project meant that main contractor Dominion Constructors were able to maximise efficiency, with prefabrication of bathroom pods, facades and services installed off-site. This helped speed up construction while also ensuring quality. Aggregate and admixture continues a colour scheme common to the wider university campus. Post-tensioned concrete supports the building fabric. 109


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PACIFICA TOWER

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The hall, conveniently sited on the fringe of the university campus, has accommodation for 786 school leavers. The facilities are spread across two multi-level towers joined by a twostorey building.

The efficient and resilient frame sits within two excavations and stretches between them to avoid the in-ground cables. The search for efficiency, along with the site complexity, contributed to a procurement strategy that enabled the design team to benefit from early contractor involvement. From the outside, the two towers offer a muted skin to the city’s edge. Precast concrete cladding panels provide acoustic performance, while remaining authentic to their origin in appearance. The facade texture is brought to life as the sun tracks across the sky. Construction method choices resulted in Dominion Constructors using locally sourced materials with less waste and fewer truck movements. Their long-term performance reduces ongoing impacts of replacement, repair and maintenance. 111


Multi-unit Residential PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Every effort has been made to make the students feel at home. Spaces are provided so

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they don’t have to go back to the university to study. This also reduces pressure on areas of the campus.

Top acoustic and thermal performance is balanced with user control, offering students flexibility and choice while maintaining comfort. The learning spaces reduce pressure on the university’s existing on-campus spots by providing a home that is also place of study – something that’s particularly valued in a city familiar with lockdowns. This building provides a resilient and high-density living solution in the city centre, leveraging existing infrastructure and encouraging greater wellbeing for the students who live here. +

THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND – WAIPARURU HALL - maki Makaurau Auckland 35 Whitaker Place, Grafton, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND CONSTRUCTION DOMINION CONSTRUCTORS ARCHITECT WARREN AND MAHONEY SERVICES, MECHANICAL ENGINEER BECA STRUCTURAL ENGINEER STRUCTURE DESIGN QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER TSA OTHER CONSULTANTS CROSSFIRE, BOFFA MISKELL, EARCON


Bringing imagination to life

University of Auckland – Waiparuru Hall

“The project creates an environment that fosters learning with the design of communal space influenced by pedagogy, workplace and hospitality design.” Chris Haines

RLB.com


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

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Richmond 6’s terrace houses and apartments were built as affordable yet stylish offerings for

first-home buyers. The architectdesigned dwellings also foster a feeling of community.

‘Stylish yet attainable homes are important to first-home buyers, but so is belonging to a community.’

HAPPY DAYS FROM SENSE OF BELONGING

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his is a story with a number of episodes. It also involves happy days for home hunters and the return of Fonzie. Richmond 6 is the second of five precincts to be completed in the Richmond subdivision, a 10.5ha former quarry site in Mount Wellington, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland. The newest development features 47 terrace homes and 21 apartments set over a hectare. The developers wanted to meet the housing demand by building quality medium-density homes, as well as create a safe community atmosphere. But before building even began, a couple of challenges needed to be overcome. The linear shape of the site presented one, and then there was the large shotcrete retaining wall dominating the entire west side. Innovation was key to solving this conundrum, says DKO Architecture director, Ed Hosken. “We came up with a solution for homes that could hug the wall and utilise it to form a unique backyard coming off level one. This allowed us to maximise the sun and the internal layout of the homes.” Where does the Fonzie fit into all this? It’s the name of a competitively priced two-bedroom terrace home. “It successfully activates laneway edges, provides passive surveillance within the depth of the masterplan and is a small, two level ‘up and over’ apartment block,” explains Hosken. Richmond 6 was designed with first-home buyers in mind. Stylish yet

attainable homes are important to this group, but so is belonging to a likeminded community. This objective was achieved with architecture and community assets such as pocket parks, ‘bump’ spaces and even a cardio room. Internally, all homes are equipped with LED lighting, energy-efficient induction cooktops, low-pressure plumbing fittings and power points for electriccar charging in garages. Exterior materials are low-maintenance. The development is made up of one- to four-bedroom dwellings and includes seven terrace and three apartment designs. Homes complement those in the preceding stage and have similar materials, but with the odd tweak. Owners encourage friends and family to buy into the community, and some existing owners upsize or downsize, but choose to stay. Happy days indeed. + RICHMOND 6

- maki Makarurau Auckland 33 Panama Rd, Mt Wellington, Ta

OWNER WILSHIRE RYBURN DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPER WILSHIRE GROUP CONSTRUCTION CAPRI CONSTRUCTION SERVICES ENGINEER MAVEN CONSULTING STRUCTURAL ENGINEER BLUEPRINT CONSULTING ENGINEERS QUANTITY SURVEYOR, PROJECT MANAGER KINGSTON PARTNERS

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Multi-unit Residential PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

BIG WHEELS KEEP ON TURNING

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O Above and opposite Quality materials inside and out create striking appeal.

Top The building is conveniently located to provide residents with a range of facilities.

ne of the most iconic buildings in the Albany Centre, OKLA is recognisable and distinguishable, yet blends into the surrounding environment seamlessly. The mixed-use development in Albany comprises 117 apartments of one, two and three bedrooms, plus ground floor retail units that face the street. Sitting on a 5577sqm site, and with a floor area of 11,089sqm, the building has been designed to take advantage of stunning bush views in the Albany Basin. The apartments, which enjoy generous decks, are positioned so that all of them enjoy a good level of sunlight. The building’s placement is partly inspired by the developer’s vision to create high-quality apartments with good connectivity to public transport. This responds to Auckland Council’s Park and Ride planning. Situated within walking distance of Albany Bus Station, Westfield Shopping Centre and various


‘The street-frontage presentation is designed to be welcoming and inviting to both residents and guests.’

other amenities, the location is highly desirable, says Brett Heaven, director of project management company Rubix. Residents enjoy an urban lifestyle in a high-quality apartment development, he says. OKLA is not only a successful development, it is also a testament to the popularity of contemporary urban living. This is evidenced by the rate at which apartments were bought off the plans. From a value-gained perspective, they were sold at a very reasonable price – achieving 90 per cent in pre-sales, with valuations prior to settlement all well above the asking price. This offered purchasers great satisfaction, along with the reassurance that it was worth the wait to invest their money in this project. The street-frontage presentation is designed to be welcoming and inviting to both residents and guests, and creates a picture of quality and elegance that’s continued throughout the building.

Careful consideration was given to the northern and western aspects when designing this “shaped” building. Residents have been provided views towards Hooton Reserve on the north-facing side and outlooks to Riverhead, while also enabling them to enjoy afternoon sun on the west-facing balconies. The superstructure was designed in steel to keep the overall weight of the building low and cost-efficient. In the interests of coordinating services, the project was documented into Revit to allow building information modelling (BIM). This provided a common model across all consultant teams when documenting the building. The key benefits of BIM lay in detecting clashes and confirming locations of penetrations through the main structure. This significantly reduced the amount of time for peer review during the shop drawing process and also ensured any design flaws were corrected and made Building Code compliant. 117


Multi-unit Residential PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

‘Steel significantly reduces the reliance on concrete, which reduces the overall carbon footprint.’

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The building exterior is a mix of cladding and terracotta tiles, with the earthy nature of the latter providing a great visual contrast. The variation in tone not only breaks up the heavy look of the metal cladding, but also acts as a feature wall to present a welcoming facade. Although a mid-range development, OKLA punches well above its weight in terms of apartment size and quality of finish. Key interior features include fully tiled bathrooms with underfloor heating, timber flooring in living areas, air-conditioning, smart-home ventilation, security intercom and high-quality kitchens. A seismic joint between the two building wings provides a restraint for mechanical and hydraulic units, ensuring OKLA offers the greatest level of safety during a seismic event. Sustainability is also reflected in the project. Steel significantly lessened the reliance on concrete, which reduced the overall carbon footprint. The lighting utilises energy-efficient LED luminaires. Lights within lobbies, corridors and stairwells are on occupancy sensor control.

Above The lobby is welcoming. Left Sunlight and views were key design outcomes.

Opposite Tonally different terracotta tiles lend an earthy quality alongside other cladding.


All mechanical ventilation units are controlled by timers to avoid energy waste, and all exterior walls are well insulated to minimise any heat loss in winter and heat gain during the summer months. All plant rooms are positioned at the same location across the floors, which ensures there is only one centralised duct to carry services through each level. These rooms are located in the lobby area on each floor, which means ease of access for technicians to carry out maintenance. Photocell and timers control external lighting so that it operates only in darkness. This provides additional ambience and security. The commuting component of this project extends beyond the Park and Ride proposal. Well thought-out bike facilities and cycle lanes in the area make two wheels an attractive option for people to access local destinations. That makes it easy not only to get to the bus station and shopping area, but also the numerous nearby bars and restaurants. And – just in case you were wondering – OKLA stands for On Kaipiho Lane Albany. +

OKLA APARTMENTS

- maki Makaurau Auckland 3 Kaipiho Lane, Albany, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER KINGSMAN DEVELOPMENT CONSTRUCTION HAYDN & ROLLETT CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT IGNITE ARCHITECTS SERVICE ENGINEER ECS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER WSP/OPUS MECHANICAL ENGINEER THURSTON CONSULTING SERVICES QUANTITY SURVEYOR MALTBYS PROJECT MANAGER RUBIX


Multi-unit Residential PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

SMALL BLESSINGS FOR PEOPLE & PLANET

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E FLiP Homes has built three compact, healthy homes where one house formerly stood. The Miramar

development is a showcase for homes that are affordable and minimise environmental impact.

veryone has the right to high-quality, healthy homes, according to FLiP Homes. Its team is determined to increase the supply of homes that address today’s issues of environment, community, land supply and affordability. Introducing FLiP Camperdown – a three-home development on a 506sqm site previously occupied by a single dwelling. It’s made up of one three-bedroom (90sqm) home and two one-bedroom (42sqm) homes, each on their own title. Built on sand, and with screw piles, the houses are both structurally robust and also easy on the planet. They’re also quick to build – the foundation system was installed in less than a day. Although designed for off-site construction, the houses were largely built on site, allowing the project management team to remain flexible throughout a time of uncertainty in the supply chain. This was largely due to the stop-start nature of the Covid environment, as well as a shortage of labour and subcontractors in the region.


‘ The company is committed to delivering truly healthy homes that focus on the fabric first, so they are warm and dry.’

“The transformation of the site increases density of high-quality and healthy homes, and the one-bedroom homes provide a sought-after model of housing in the heart of the film production hub on the eastern edge of Wellington city,” says Paul Swift, chief operating officer, FLiP Homes. Described as compact in footprint, the homes are modest in size, smart and energy-efficient. This means lower energy and resources used during construction, enjoying low-maintenance requirements over the life of the buildings and lower running costs for the owner or occupier. A good result for residents and the environment. FLiP Homes design manager Nick Officer says: “The company is committed to delivering truly healthy homes that focus on fabric first, so that New Zealand’s new houses are warmer, drier and healthier than what we have been used to.” To ensure these outcomes, FLiP home designs are underpinned by science and quality design. The attractive development, a sought-after model of one-

bedroom detached houses on separate titles, provides an appealing alternative to apartments and townhouses. To ensure nothing went to waste in the development, even the original home was re-purposed. It was sold and removed. Number two FLiP development is currently underway. + FLIP CAMPERDOWN ROAD 46 Camperdown Rd, Miramar, Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington

OWNER, DEVELOPER JUSTIN RAKENA CONSTRUCTION FLIP HOMES ARCHITECT FIRST LIGHT STUDIO SERVICE ENGINEER CUTTRISS CONSULTANTS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER CGW CONSULTING ENGINEERS QUANTITIY SURVEYOR FLIP HOMES/MALTBYS PROJECT MANAGER BPM OTHER CONSULTANTS ENGEO

121


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The building is home to 108 apartments across nine levels, which enjoy views to the city, out to the

west and across a large landscaped courtyard. The interiors have been given an industrialstyle edge.

‘The distinct design form features a brick base that reflects the heritage of the city-fringe area.’

AN OH-SO CHIC FRENCH CONNECTION

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very home base was covered when 59 France St was designed for this inner-city corner of Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland. The vision was to provide immaculately appointed contemporary homes to cover a wide range of living requirements – from affordable first homes to luxury penthouse apartments. Apartments range in size from one to three bedrooms. Located on a 2112sqm site in Eden Terrace, the building comprises 108 apartments across nine levels, with two levels of basement car parking and cycle parks. The ground floor includes commercial tenancies. The distinct design form features a brick base that reflects the heritage of the area; modern and innovative features at the top of the building reflect developer Urban Collective’s overall vision for future development of the area. The L-shaped building takes advantage of unobstructed views toward the Auckland City skyline and Waita-kere Ranges and enabled the creation of a north-facing landscaped courtyard for residents and commercial tenants. A key objective of the project was to ensure low ongoing maintenance costs and efficiencies for the body corporate. This has been achieved through the

design, together with specification of durable materials and high-quality construction methods. Careful consideration was given to the performance of the building. Multiple energy modelling simulations were conducted to facilitate efficiencies in apartment design, to reduce energy consumption and ensure the building met or exceeded H1 energy efficiency standards as prescribed by the Building Code. This input informed the design of the facade, as well as the building’s mechanical ventilation and air-conditioning systems – resulting in a high thermal performance and excellent heating and cooling capacity throughout. The building is 100 per cent New Building Standard, achieved using reinforced concrete floor diaphragms connecting to sheer concrete walls. Precast walls and prestressed slabs were utilised. Inside, the apartments have been given an industrial look, with exposed concrete walls and ceilings. Rough-finish plywood was used in the moulds to create texture in the exposed concrete ceilings. This has been coupled with high-finish exposed concrete walls. Galvanised ducting and exposed mechanical 123



Above The concrete walls have been cast in rough-finish plywood.

Below Surfaces in the sleek kitchen, pick up on the exposed concrete and industrial finishes of the ceiling.

services complete the look. Energy-efficient LED lighting and sensor lighting has been incorporated in all common areas to reduce energy consumption within the building. The exterior envelope has a high thermal performance which – combined with glass-wool insulation – also reduces energy consumption. Other energy-efficient features include load-sensitive fans in laundries. The fans are activated when appliances are in use, and basement ventilation is operated by carbon monoxide sensors to minimise energy consumption when there’s minimal vehicle activity in the car park. The residential building is a successful example of medium-density living. It’s handy to the vast range of social and cultural amenities of Auckland’s vibrant inner-city fringe; an abundance of dining and entertainment options are within walking distance. Commuting is quick and convenient too, with transport links and cycleways practically on the doorstep. Although the building has 95 car parks across two basement levels, more than half the apartments were sold without car parks, which reduces subsequent vehicle emissions and infrastructure load. Residential developments on brownfield sites such as 59 France are inherently sustainable, using and supporting existing infrastructure, services, schools, public transport, local shops and restaurants. The design and density of the 125


Multi-unit Residential

Left High-end designer features in the lobby are offset by bandsawn floorboards.

building reduces land consumption, urban sprawl and the destruction of arable land for housing. This densely populated urban environment has brought approximately 200 new residents to the area, who now support local business, social and cultural activities. Additional stand-out features for residents of 59 France include the vast landscaped community garden area, beautiful art installations in the lifts and nine-level stairwell, the generous and comfortable lobby, and an innovative courier delivery box. +

59 FRANCE

- maki Makaurau Auckland 59 France St South, Eden Terrace, Ta

OWNER 59 FRANCE DEVELOPER URBAN COLLECTIVE CONSTRUCTION CMP ARCHITECT PAUL BROWN & ASSOCIATES SERVICE ENGINEER HSC NZ STRUCTURAL ENGINEER SULLIVAN HALL MECHANICAL ENGINEER THURSTON CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYOR BBD PROJECT MANAGER RCP OTHER CONSULTANTS HEGLEY ACOUSTIC CONSULTANTS, EC SERVICES

URBAN COLLECTIVE LLECTIVE reimagining urban living for over twenty years.

Urban Collective are experienced multi awardwinning developers who focus on building freehold high-end and boutique residential developments. Established to fill a gap in the market for attainable luxury, with bespoke architecture, sophisticated interiors and distinctive design, we recognize the importance of creating buildings that endure by investing in an architectural and design strategy based on quality, durability and honesty.

Email info@urbanco.nz Phone 0800 217 838 Address 286 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby, Auckland, NZ


EDUCATION

+

EDUCATION FORMS THE FOUNDATION OF A NATION’S FUTURE. THROUGH INNOVATIVE DESIGN AND BUILDING SOLUTIONS, FACILITIES CAN ENRICH TEACHING AND FEED THE HEARTS AND MINDS OF STUDENTS AND EDUCATORS ALIKE.




Education PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

STICKING TO THE OBJECTIVE & THE CAMPUS

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Y Top and opposite MIT’s TechPark Campus lounge achieves the desired effect of looking like a floating black box with portals.

Above The new facility in Manukau Central has been built at the right time, when there is an increasing demand for skilled trades staff.

ou could call it perfect timing. Skills shortages in construction and other trades are acute, and vocational education is undergoing something of a renaissance. Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) has come to the party with its new TechPark Campus in Manukau, South Auckland. The state-of-the-art facility is purpose-built to house MIT’s school for professional engineering and trades, such as carpentry, plumbing, gas fitting, electrical, mechanical, refrigeration, automotive, fabrication, civil and landscape construction. It marks a true marriage of minds: TechPark was developed as a partnership between MIT, with Haydn & Rollett as developer, builder and owner, together


‘The brief was for a student-centric design that supports aspirations for Ma-ori and Pasifika success in South Auckland.’

with Auckland Council’s urban regeneration agency Panuku Development. Panuku made this vacant 1.85ha site available for TechPark, an important early project for its Transform Manukau plan. The decision to work with a private developer to deliver and own this facility has clear benefits, says Haydn & Rollett development manager, Hagen Gibbes. “Haydn & Rollett’s innovative delivery strategy minimised the required capital costs, maximised asset valuation and reduced rental costs. It provided an integrated delivery of base-building and tenant hard fit-out, and also funded the tenant hard fit-out for MIT.” The institute wanted a modern, fit-for-purpose facility, aligned to industry

and emerging technologies, that would support its vision to be a leading engineering and trades tertiary education provider. TechPark includes the latest technology and innovations designed to extend a new centre of excellence for engineering and trades education. MIT’s project brief was for a student-centric design that optimises space. This was important to ensure the new facility supports educational aspirations for Ma-ori and Pasifika success in South Auckland. MIT sought a long-term partner that would provide more than the typical landlord-tenant relationship. A key requirement of the brief was to do more with less and provide flexible, open-plan spaces and facilities that could be shared between schools. 131


ASC Architects, delivering exceptional projects for over 60 years +64 9 377 5332

Proudly associated with 12 projects nominated 59 France St, Auckland

www.ascarchitects.co.nz

team@ascarchitects.co.nz

Your property and construction cost consultants

25 Hargraves St, Auckland Onehunga Woollen Mills, Auckland QT Hotel, Auckland 1550 Great North Road, Auckland Prebbleton School, Christchurch The Pacifica, Auckland Fabric of Onehunga, Auckland On Point Apartments, Auckland LQ Kawarau River, Queenstown Te Raekura Redcliffs School, Christchurch Galway Street, Auckland

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Above MIT’s ‘sticky campus’ encourages students to stay around between classes for vocational training. It is also close to public transport and has on-site changing facilities and showers.

Environmentally sustainable designs were also regarded as critical requirements. MIT has achieved its objective of creating a ‘sticky campus’, one that encourages students to stay on-site between classes, find support and focus on study. The CBD location allows MIT to build an educational precinct around its existing Manukau Campus and acknowledges the growing acceptance and importance of vocational training in society. The site provides great access to public transport, with on-site changing rooms and showers allowing students to move from work, to study, to home – easily and quickly. The entire building is divided into bookable spaces, including the flexible teaching spaces, the workshop floor and outdoor teaching spaces. The front and rear yards provide secure teaching areas during the day, as well as a ‘ring-road’ for flexible after-hour deliveries to all parts of the building. 133


Education PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above The facility is practical and flexible, allowing different trades students to share resources such a welding workshop.

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Below The challenge for the designers was to come up with an industrial-style shed that fitted into the Manukau CBD environment.

Constructing an industrial-style shed in the CBD presented urban design challenges. The designers and developer worked with both Panuku’s technical advisory group and the Auckland Urban Design Panel to refine the design, providing a great outcome on this site. The opening of the campus has provided much-needed vocational training in South Auckland and has come just in time for an influx of trades students. The development is a flexible and practical facility that can keep up with new technologies and ways of working, and allows for co-location of trades both now (fabrication and plumbing share specialist welding workshops) and in the future (automotive and electrical). The new building is a great contribution to the neighbourhood and with other local developments, this is a vibrant and exciting part of Manukau. +

MANUKAU INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY – TECHPARK CAMPUS

- maki Makaurau Auckland 58 Manukau Station Rd, Manukau Central, Ta

OWNER HAYDN & ROLLETT PROPERTY FUND DEVELOPER CONSTRUCTION, PROJECT MANAGER HAYDN & ROLLETT ARCHITECT ASC ARCHITECTURE QUALITY SURVEYOR KINGSTONS SERVICE ENGINEER ECS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER MSC CONSULTING MECHANICAL ENGINEERS THURSTON CONSULTING OTHER CONSULTANTS WHAKAARO-KINGSMAN, KLU’DUP


CIVIL ENGINEERING • Subdivision & Land Development • Commercial & Industrial • Schools • Resource Consents • Construction Management • Planning

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING • Structural Engineering • Multi-Storey Structures • Earthquake Engineering • Technical Reports • Peer Reviews • Specialist Seismic Analysis • Forensic Engineering

PROUD TO SUPPORT EDUCATIONAL GROWTH IN NEW ZEALAND

Ph: 09 296 5543

admin@doddcivil.co.nz

www.doddcivil.co.nz


Education PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

FLEXIBLE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

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Prebbleton School’s new extension needed to work for both flexible teaching practices and community use. Despite

challenges such as limited space at the school, the new block has been deemed a success and more such spaces are planned.

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rebbleton School’s new classroom block – a 540sqm extension to the existing school – has vibrant, versatile spaces for flexible learning, as well as community and school events. It accommodates 150 students from years 4 to 6 in six class groups and caters for the school’s growing roll. A lack of space at the Otautahi Christchurch primary school meant the new building needed to be built upwards, while providing open areas for outdoor activities. An excellent working relationship between the architects and structural engineers resulted in both being integrated seamlessly into the building. You’ll find natural transitions between different teaching environments, indoor and outdoor spaces and break-out areas. Outside areas are created with large covered balconies for teaching and play, and to provide options for community recreation and sports events.


‘The move from traditional to flexible learning environments was a significant cultural shift.’

“This project was to put the school’s values of ‘Create, Think, Grow’ into practice and link pedagogy to space by creating flexible learning areas and strong community presence,” says Eduardo Fernandez-Moscoso, senior architect for the project. “The silhouette of the building envelope combines a traditional pitched roof shape with a contemporary shelter form, metaphorically embracing and protecting those inside, while the aesthetic of the covering reflects the use of the space, with soft and welcoming materials. Sheltered outdoor areas link internal teaching spaces with the sport fields and playground, and create areas for outdoor activities,” says Fernandez-Moscoso. There’s plenty of room to move: the structure is based on three long-span portal frames, creating internal floor depth, uninterrupted by internal load-

bearing walls. This design, complete with sliding doors, accommodates a variety of room configurations. There was another advantage: shades could be attached to the portal frames and didn’t have to be built as separate structures. Windows, positioned to allow natural daylight into the building, block the high sun, while allowing low winter sun through. Exterior louvres on the north-facing side provide shade, but allow views of the adjacent school fields. A mixed-mode ventilation system is paired with an oxygen sensor, which works on a traffic-light system and alerts those inside when readings rise above favourable levels. When the orange light comes on, doors can be opened or the automatic ventilation system activated. This includes heat recovery, which reduces costs and warms the space quickly. Heat pumps have also been installed. Project complications were minimised, thanks to the building-friendly site. 137


Education PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

It was important that indoor teaching spaces linked seamlessly with those outside, as well as sports fields and playgrounds.

Easy road access helped construction stay within budget, and the existing stormwater, sewer and electrical infrastructure could be used. Although construction was during school hours, the school, Ministry of Education, project manager and contractor collaborated to minimise disruption. The move from traditional to flexible learning environments was a significant cultural shift, requiring a greater level of collaboration between teachers. This meant it was critical to bring teachers along on the design journey. They, along with their students, are excited about the new block and the changes it brings. The project has been described as a new architectural language, which Prebbleton School is determined to continue speaking. Confident in its students’ ability to learn in this new environment, it wants to transform remaining traditional classrooms, creating flexible learning for all. +

PREBBLETON SCHOOL

8 Blakes Rd, Prebbleton, O tautahi Christchurch

OWNER, DEVELOPER MINISTRY OF EDUCATION CONSTRUCTION COOK BROTHERS ARCHITECT GHDWOODHEAD CREATIVESPACES SERVICE, STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL ENGINEER GHD QUANTITY SURVEYOR BARNES BEAGLEY DOHERR PROJECT MANAGER GREENSTONE OTHER CONSULTANTS ACOUSTIC CONSULTANTS, IGNITE FIRE


Creating lasting impressions through design ghdwoodhead.com


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PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Education


Wellington East Girls’ College has maintained its heritage facade and features but now

has flexible and tailored spaces for teaching. The two have been married with skill and finesse.

‘There are tangible links to the school’s heritage, as well as 21st-century educational spaces.’

SUPERB FUSION OF PAST & PRESENT

W

ellington East Girls’ College has educated young women for the best part of a century. So when it came to a major redevelopment of the school, some key decisions about preserving its heritage and defining the future needed to be made. “The main ambition of the project was to shift the school from an Edwardian, segregated model of education that was highly internal and inaccessible to many, to one that is open, vibrant and alive,” says project architect Frances Vessey of WSP. Key was the retention of the three-storey unreinforced masonry Category 1 Heritage-listed facade and entry vestibule of the main building. These have been integrated seamlessly into the new main block and provide tangible links to the school heritage, as well as 21st-century educational spaces that support the continued growth and success of the school. An important factor in planning was Innovative Learning Environment

(ILE) design. The new facilities provide excellent ILE opportunities with a balance of expansive and flexible open-plan areas, smaller break-out and study settings, and tailored specialist teaching spaces. The project consolidates the school around the new main entrance and quad, or the ‘heart’ of the school, providing key vertical circulation between the floors and creating a vibrant, active space where people can connect. This is particularly significant when you consider the topography of the school. From its lowest point to its highest, there is a difference of 10 storeys, but these are inter-connected at every level. To foster a more inclusive learning environment, the Supported Learning Centre was brought from the fringe of the school into its heart. Previously, students’ ability to interact, learn and grow was limited, putting them at a further disadvantage. The new design puts them in the thick of the action – 141


Education PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

From its lowest point to its highest, there is a difference of 10 storeys, but these are interconnected at every level.

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The project has consolidated the school around the new main entrance and quad, described as the heart of the school.

improving their access to every part of the school and the college community. Additional contemporary touches include a cultural centre available for use during weekends and holidays, a prayer room and gender-neutral bathrooms. The verdict: “The project has resulted in a remarkable rejuvenation of the school buildings and site,” says Bruce Curtain, head of WSP Architecture. “These now reflect the vibrant school culture, which celebrates educational excellence and cultural diversity, takes pride in its heritage and provides innovation and a forward focus in its teaching.” +

WELLINGTON EAST GIRLS’ COLLEGE Austin St, Mt Victoria, Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington

OWNER, DEVELOPER MINISTRY OF EDUCATION CONSTRUCTION NAYLOR LOVE CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT; SERVICE, STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL ENGINEER WSP QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER THE BUILDING INTELLIGENCE GROUP


Wellington East Girls College

Bringing imagination to life “The historic vestibule has been painstakingly and beautifully restored, and reconnected to the daily life of the school.” Tony Sutherland

RLB.com


Education PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

A CLEAN & ENDURING BILL OF HEALTH

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Light and bright is the prevailing impression of The University of Auckland's new Park West building. It has a

reflective exterior, a landscaped courtyard and a sun-filled atrium around which academic spaces have been built.

O

nce they were miles apart. Now they sit in perfect harmony as next-door neighbours. This is The University of Auckland’s new building for the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences. The building – known as Park West – brings together the Schools of Medicine and Population Health on a 6114sqm site, completing the consolidation of the faculty on the inner-city Grafton campus. The University’s primary requirement was to relocate the School of Population Health at the T āmaki Campus, to Grafton, which was located 10km away, by the end of 2019. The vision for the new building was to create a flexible space with high-end facilities and a positive working environment for both staff and students. This – and much more – was accomplished by participating parties taking a collaborative approach to achieving tight deadlines and meeting budget.


‘The durability of materials and quality of construction mean the building will long outlast its 50-year design life.’

The project, which maximises the development potential and value of the 6114sqm site, was designed and delivered in just 36 months by a motivated, experienced team. And it came in $8 million under the construction budget – an impressive and satisfying result for all parties involved. Containing a range of academic spaces built around a generous atrium, the building responds thoughtfully to its surroundings, providing an elegant addition to Park Rd and the university. It comprises learning and teaching spaces, places for academic work, collaboration spaces and a teaching and research facility that includes audiology, nutrition, speech, cardiovascular, bone and joint clinics. The need for space drove an intentionally simple layout based on two road-facing blocks, extending four levels above the street and connected by

an atrium. Framed by the buildings and neighbouring properties, a beautiful outdoor courtyard delivers light to below-ground levels. The exterior provides a contemporary foil to heritage neighbours with details such as generous street canopies. A protected po- hutukawa tree provides a defining feature of the building entry. The university’s brief called for a generic academic building that enabled future flexibility. The Park West building is designed with floor plates to house current ‘dry’ activities in the short-to-medium term, but future-proofed to accommodate ‘wet’ research laboratories, if needed. The generous 4.2m floor-to-floor height makes this outcome more achievable. The durability of materials and quality of construction mean the building will long outlast its 50-year design life. And with opportunities for adaptive 145


Education

Flexible spaces and high-end facilities create a positive environment for staff and students.

reuse, it will provide the university with an asset that is energy-efficient and adaptable. Park West offers a fantastic environment for students and staff, while also serving an important community function, providing access to a range of subsidised clinical treatments. And it has been met with neighbourly approval. Feedback from those around the building has been overwhelmingly positive. +

THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND PARK WEST

- maki Makaurau 26-30 Park Ave, Grafton, Auckland Central, Ta Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND CONSTRUCTION HAWKINS ARCHITECT JASMAX SERVICE, STRUCTURAL MECHANICAL, ENGINEER BECA QUANTITY SURVEYOR RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROJECT MANAGER PRECON OTHER CONSULTANTS BARKER & ASSOCIATES, TONKIN + TAYLOR

University of Auckland Park West

Bringing imagination to life

“As universities evolve to meet the challenges of the 21st century, this fit-for-purpose facility is enhancing the health of local, national and global communities through excellence in teaching, research, service and engagement.” Chris Haines RLB.com


INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY

+

AS THE CALL FOR QUALITY DESIGN AND INNOVATION INCREASES, MORE IS BEING ASKED OF THIS GROWTH SECTOR. INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS ARE EXPECTED TO WORK FOR STAFF WHO SPEND SO MUCH TIME IN THEM, AS WELL AS DELIVER TOP RESULTS.


Industrial Property PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

WHERE FOUR GOES INTO ONE BEAUTIFULLY

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M When Toll Group replaced four facilities around Auckland with one central hub, the building had to satisfy many objectives.

The building has light, bright work environments, plenty of space for workers to dine and relax in, and a handsome, striking frontage.

acrennie Commercial Construction and RDT Pacific had a big job on their hands. The contractor and project management firm were hired to develop a new facility for logistics company Toll Group, which wanted to bring three separate freight-forwarding depots, plus a national head office, together on a single site in Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland. Macrennie and RDT Pacific contracted Williams Architects to come up with a design. The resulting purpose-built facility ticks every single box – no small task when you consider that the Auckland depots form the backbone of the freight company’s New Zealand operation. They contribute about 40 per cent of the group’s total domestic road and rail freight revenue and represent a critical node for nationwide business growth. Achieving the goal involved finding a suitable site, which was close to Toll’s customer base and the rail network. After a long and detailed assessment of


‘The principle applied to the project was to create a place – rather than just a building.’

locations during 2015, the company found what it was looking for on James Fletcher Drive in Favona, South Auckland. Toll then had to reach an agreement with the vendor so it could get cracking on preparing the land. A subsequent land swap with a neighbouring owner was then negotiated to optimise the layout of the new complex. In order for the exchange to take place, Toll had to construct a new water treatment plant and then satisfy resource consent conditions. After these conditions had been met, work on the beautiful new two-storey building began. The overarching principle applied to the project was to create a place, rather than just a building. The result: a development that positively adds to the precinct with a high-quality design in an industrial environment. The complex represents a collaborative effort between Toll Group, Macrennie, RDT Pacific, the team of architects and contractors.

“The main innovation is the way we have adapted and utilised standard construction methods and materials to create a very special building,” says Simon Williams, director of Williams Architects, the company responsible for the striking design, which includes a 24,800sqm warehouse. The corporate office component of the building, an eye-catching structure that delights in colour and linear forms, is sited near the street to engage directly with the public. It has also been built to Toll’s corporate office specifications and makes full use of the north-westerly aspect, creating a pleasant working environment with ample natural light. Extensive discussions between the parties highlighted the need for ‘positive’ facilities for workers, particularly during breaks. So there is an expansive cafeteria for staff meals, and an outdoor area so they can be enjoyed alfresco. All of the available space upstairs was devoted to these staff-focused areas. The office has 149


BUILDING EXCELLENCE A strong 40 year legacy giving our clients a multi-disciplined approach to every project we undertake.

macrennie.com


Materials were chosen for their durability, low maintenance and ease of installation, but also to make the building an attractive addition to the industrial neighbourhood.

suspended ceilings; exposed soffits; and carpet tile, vinyl, rubber and honedconcrete flooring. Glass partitions capture natural light and ensure visibility, while maintaining confidentiality and noise control. A central elevated walkway links the office to the rear of the transport facility. Natural light filters through to both areas. Exterior materials, such as trough-profile metal cladding, boarded precast concrete and aluminium windows and framing, were chosen for their durability, low maintenance, value and ease of installation. They will retain their appearance over time. This development is the fulfilment of an objective born six years ago. Three out-of-date depots and a national corporate office have been replaced with a single purpose-constructed building that will suit Toll and its workers for years to come. “Toll has been able to combine its freight-forwarding palletised services 151


Industrial The front of the complex is devoted to office space, including Toll’s New Zealand corporate headquarters. A central walkway links the office to the rear of the transport facilities.

and the parcels business unit into one facility – ultimately improving its speed and consistency of services throughout the North Island, and making full use of the New Zealand rail network through a dedicated rail spur for north-south containerised freight connections,” says Daniel Taylor, national property development manager of Toll Group. +

TOLL TAMAKI FREIGHT FORWARDING FACILITY

- maki Makaurau Auckland 223 James Fletcher Dr, Favona, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER TOLL NETWORKS (NZ) CONSTRUCTION MACRENNIE COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT WILLIAMS ARCHITECTS SERVICE ENGINEER, MECHANICAL ENGINEER WSP/OPUS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER DAY CONSULTANTS QUANTITY SURVEYOR BQH PROJECT MANAGER RDT PACIFIC OTHER CONSULTANTS SOIL & ROCK CONSULTANTS, ECS

152


FOODSTUFFS NI

GALWAY ST

WATERVIEW COURT

MIT TECHPARK CAMPUS

TOLL TAMAKI FREIGHT

27 TIMBERLY

ALLEGION

OAK INDUSTRIAL

59 FRANCE

OKLA

RICHMOND 6

PACIFICA

It’s been a busy year! ECS and TCL have provided building services solutions for many quality projects. ECS Thurston offers a wide range of practical, innovative, sustainable and cost effective building services solutions to multiple diverse projects across various market sectors.

ecservices.co.nz

thurston.co.nz

We appreciate the opportunity our Clients have given us to be part of their design team on these award nominated projects.

• Building Science • Electrical • Fire Protection • Hydraulics • Mechanical • Solar • Sustainable Buildings



Excellence Together


Industrial Property PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

A TEAM BASE WITH A LEGION OF FANS

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T Environmental sustainability strongly influenced Allegion’s building design and the scope of siteimprovement works. Natural

light and increased levels of ventilation create a pleasing work environment within the offices and on the factory floor.

he company motto is ‘One Team, One Allegion’. Add to that 11,500 native plants and the remediation of land on which this new complex sits, and you have something special in the industrial space. The facility in Avondale, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland, is owned and developed by security product and solution company Allegion. The building comprises offices, a warehouse and a factory on a 14,346sqm site. Designed by Williams Architects and built by Haydn & Rollett, the development provides a connected and inspiring work environment that’s conducive to innovation – something that reinforces the company’s culture. Allegion’s original factory was built in the 1970s and no longer met the company’s needs. The business had outgrown the office area, there was too much non-productive factory space and the low-stud warehouse was highly inefficient. The decision was made to develop a new, bespoke facility on vacant land at


‘The owners wanted a building with “spirit” that served as a showpiece for the construction industry.’

the rear of the existing site. The objective was to future-proof the business, allowing for growth of local manufacturing, sales and distribution. As well as creating a pleasant and stimulating environment for its workers, the owners also wanted a building with “spirit” that would serve as a showpiece for the construction industry. Other requirements included maximising the site’s potential (with opportunities for expansion), following sustainable principles and guidelines, and using quality, low-maintenance building materials. Within the work environment, there had to be natural movement flows and connections throughout (for both people and functions) and a visual connection between the office and factory. Environmental sustainability and corporate social responsibility strongly influenced the building design and scope of site-improvement works.

Improving the low-ecological value of the land to set a new benchmark for the area was both a significant undertaking and achievement. Erosion was uncontrolled and the coastal margin was overgrown with noxious weeds and undesirable trees. This called for extensive groundwork and regeneration. And the result? “Full-site remediation addressed all the issues and included planting 11,500 native plants to create an area for wildlife and the wider community to enjoy,” says Brendon Simpson, managing director of Allegion. Both the factory and warehouse have been designed so that staff can operate in an open and vibrant workplace. The majority of the office areas have indirect lighting, which provides lower levels of glare and improves comfort. Bright colours and timber finishes provide a warm and welcoming feel. On the factory floor, the new look delivers a comfortable environment, achieved with a high level of natural light, coupled with natural and forced ventilation. 157


Leading the pack, keeping it local It is imperative for homes and businesses to have contemporary, quality security hardware solutions. At Allegion, we take our leadership in the industry seriously and pride ourselves on being a local manufacturer, continually developing contemporary products to meet the needs of New Zealanders. To further set us apart in the market, we offer an extensive selection of special finishes to complement architectural designs with a fully automated, leading edge electroplating plant*. With Allegion, you can be assured your door hardware specification combines innovation with style from start to finish.

www.allegion.co.nz

*Electroplating plant opening soon. © Allegion 2021


Above Plywood finishes and rich colours result in a warm and welcoming interior.

Clear roofing panels provide ideal levels of natural light, reduce heat loss, but don’t allow the space to overheat in summer. The results are a significant improvement when compared to the old complex. The factory has performed extremely well through the seasons, with staff comfort levels achieved and the benefits recognised. Services and plant rooms are easily and safely accessed. The new warehouse footprint is smaller than the previous one, but has 50 per cent more pallet storage capacity. This has been achieved with more efficient six-pallet bay high racking, compared to the previous warehouse that had a low stud and only allowed three-pallet bay high racking. Exterior lighting is controlled by photocells and sensors, which ensure 159


Industrial PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above Local manufacturing is a key focus with the introduction of a fully automated electroplating plant.

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Below Bright, new kitchen facilities are just some of the advantages for workers in Allegion’s new warehouse and office space.

lighting is in operation only when the site is active, or in darkness. Other nods to the future include the installation of electric-vehicle chargers. “The entire building has many environmentally sustainable development features and a strong emphasis on creating an enjoyable work environment,” says Simpson. On completion of the complex, the owners were delighted that all the elements of the brief had been met or exceeded. +

ALLEGION WAREHOUSE AND MANUFACTURING FACILITY - maki Makaurau Auckland 437 Rosebank Rd, Avondale, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER ALLEGION CONSTRUCTION, PROJECT MANAGER HAYDN & ROLLETT ARCHITECT WILLIAMS ARCHITECTS SERVICE ENGINEER ECS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER MSC CONSULTING GROUP MECHANICAL ENGINEER THURSTON CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYOR HAYDN & ROLLETT, ALLEGION OTHER CONSULTANTS ENGEO, PLANNING FOCUS


SET YOUR PROJECT UP FOR SUCCESS CBRE offers a wide range of services that will elevate your development, from market analysis to operational planning, project feasibility to tenant identification and product optimisation to building mobilisation and commissioning. Whether you are looking for inspiration for your next development, have the idea for a project germinating, are in detailed planning phase, or have a construction team on-site, contact CBRE for the best local knowledge and global insight to make your development a success. www.cbre.co.nz


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The architects took an innovative approach to designing the

property and specified quality materials in the build.

‘It is now a modern, master-planned estate with two state-of-the-art office and warehouse facilities.’

GREAT OAK GROWS WITH TIME & CARE

T

he vision was to create a high-value industrial business park that generates strong returns over time. It was a plan that looked like it could be easily realised when land came up for sale next door to the owner’s property in an industrial precinct in Wiri, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland. Then came the hard part: the complex matter of multiple resource consents. “It’s far easier to build on greenfield land than on a site that requires improvement,” says David Chafer, general manager of owner and developer Chalmers Properties. The company worked through the consent processes and Oak Industrial Park is the impressive result. It is a modern, master-planned estate with two state-of-the art office and warehouse facilities and a blue-chip tenant on a multi-decade lease. Sustainability, efficiency, low energy, low maintenance and long-term are words that underpin all the owner’s projects – achieved through the design, build and maintenance of their assets. At Oak Park, materials were chosen for their life cycle, cost efficiency and ease of installation, even if the initial cost was greater. For example, you’ll find concrete yards and driveways instead of asphalt, and premium Alucobond pre-finished cladding rather than cheaper cement-board, which needs ongoing painting. Choosing an architect and design team was integral to taking a creative approach to this 185 per cent New Building Standard development.

A post-tension warehouse slab and fibre-reinforced yard were selected for durability and floor loadings. Other features include a double-pitch roof that maximises height; polycarbonate material that lets light in, but not too much heat; and horizontal aluminium louvres on two sides for shade. Tenants played a big part. “Key to our tenants’ requirements were accessibility and during tenant fit-out, the ability to add specialist plant, plant rooms, service ducts, monitoring and control equipment – all to meet exacting standards,” Chafer says. +

OAK INDUSTRIAL PARK

- maki Makaurau Auckland 21A Oak Rd, Wiri, Ta

OWNER, DEVELOPER CHALMERS PROPERTIES CONSTRUCTION CALDER STEWART CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT WOODHAMS MEIKLE ZHAN ARCHITECTS SERVICE ENGINEER HYDRAULIC SERVICES CONSULTANTS NZ STRUCTURAL ENGINEER CALIBRE CONSULTING MECHANICAL ENGINEER THURSTON CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYOR CONSULT QS PROJECT MANAGER OCTA ASSOCIATES OTHER CONSULTANTS ECS, BARKER & ASSOCIATES

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Industrial Property


Auckland Airport has transformed challenging sites into investments by developing land and attracting

top-shelf tenants. Zeta, a healthproduct exporter, has set up its base in several units at one such site at 27 Timberly Rd.

‘The combined efforts knit everything into one strong and coherent architectural form.’

PROOF POSITIVE OF AIRPORT’S PROJECTS

I

t was a difficult site and a difficult time, but the 27 Timberly Road development has turned two negatives into one very positive outcome. The purpose for undertaking the development was to add to Auckland International Airport’s established speculative build programme. Here, difficult sites – generally due to complicated shapes – are ‘solved’ by undertaking speculative build projects during strong market conditions. The 23,000sqm greenfield site is finger-shaped, located on a peninsula overlooking an inlet of the Manukau Harbour. The primary design consideration was for the development to integrate with its surroundings. The brief was also to create a general-purpose, multi-unit facility that could be adapted for a variety of tenants, while delivering an aesthetically striking working environment for employees and visitors. That prescribed a 9700sqm clear-span warehouse and 1000sqm of ancillary office space. The narrow 200m-long building was subdivided into six units. Stretching from west to east, the architectural design maximises site coverage, while reducing visual impact to the northern suburban areas, including Pukaki Marae.

While design resolved the problems the site presented, then came Covid. However, from this emerged the ideal tenant – Zeta Group, which occupies five units. The business manufactures health-related products for export, and experienced exponential growth throughout 2020 due to the pandemic. The development’s adaptable style is a perfect fit for Zeta, which uses each unit for a different manufacturing function. The offices utilise precast concrete, metal and composite claddings, and aluminium windows. All construction materials are durable, long-lasting and low-maintenance. The warehouse has precast concrete with pre-painted metal cladding in standard colours, which can be readily recycled. Translucent polycarbonate roofing on the warehouses and canopies maximises natural light. Completion of this development shows how quickly the subdivision has matured since the land was originally purchased. Daniel Byrne, Head of Property Development, Auckland Airport says: “Timberly Road subdivision has been rapidly developed since the land was 165


Industrial Property PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

The 200m-long building is located on a peninsula, overlooking wetlands on a Manukau Harbour inlet.

166

purchased nine years ago and is now home to household brands Fonterra and Coca-Cola, among others. With 27 Timberly Road now complete, there remains only one site and this was recently signed up by international freight company Geodis Wilson.” More positives have emerged from this original concept. The brief also called for efficient construction costs and durable materials to maximise the build’s longevity. The highly desirable ‘A grade’ industrial investment asset was delivered 3.5 per cent under budget and ahead of programme. +

27 TIMBERLY ROAD

27 Timberly Rd, Ma- ngere, Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER AUCKLAND AIRPORT CONSTRUCTION MACRENNIE COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT ECLIPSE ARCHITECTURE SERVICE ENGINEER ECS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER DAY CONSULTING MECHANICAL ENGINEER THURSTON CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYOR BQH PROJECT MANAGER RTD PACIFIC OTHER CONSULTANTS PROTECH, CROSSFIRE


BUILDING EXCELLENCE A strong 40 year legacy giving our clients a multi-disciplined approach to every project we undertake.

macrennie.com


QT HOTEL AUCKLAND

27 TIMBERLY ROAD

QT HOTEL AUCKLAND

UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND – WAIPARURU HALL

Proudly supporting and associated with the 2021 Property Industry Awards Finalists

TRUSTED FIRE ENGINEERING P​ 09 948 4403 | E​ admin@xfire.co.nz

www.xfire.co.nz


COMMUNITY & AFFORDABLE HOUSING

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SUSTAINABLE, INCLUSIVE AND THRIVING COMMUNITIES ARE THE ULTIMATE GOAL FOR AGENCIES IN THIS SECTOR. AROUND THE COUNTRY, WARM, DRY AND ATTRACTIVE HOMES AND VILLAGES ARE SPRINGING UP IN PLACES THEY’RE NEEDED.


Community & Affordable Housing PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

REACHING FOR THE SKIES & THOSE IN NEED

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Quality design and finishes exemplify this development of 16 one-bedroom and three twobedroom homes.

Design maximises privacy, warmth and natural light, and all apartments have private outdoor areas.

W

ith a mission to provide good homes for all, CORT Community Housing (Community of Refuge Trust) has come up with a great example of income diversity integration into a neighbourhood. Because CORT housing caters for tenants in need – people who typically spend more time in their homes than others – the design aims for low cost of occupation and high levels of accessibility. And this is what has been achieved with ‘Airfield’, the organisation’s new housing community in Takanini, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland. The development is named after the road on which it sits – and there’s a story behind that. The neighbouring reserve is where brothers Vivian and Leo Walsh launched the first-ever controlled powered flight in New Zealand in 1911. The reserve features a plaque honouring their accomplishment.


‘The design aims for low cost of occupation and high levels of accessibility.’

The project consists of four buildings, with 16 one-bedroom and three two-bedroom homes covering 732sqm across a 2078sqm site. With a total landscaped area of 915sqm, this development provides tenants with ample green space and generous outlooks, while seamlessly blending into the surrounding parks and neighbourhood. In order to reduce ongoing costs for both the tenants and owner, the building design focuses on the use of passive systems and efficient fittings to conserve power and water. No systems that require bespoke operation or maintenance have been used. Additionally, all materials are not only aesthetically pleasing but also durable and practical. Efficiently catering to residents’ needs, all ground units are accessible, with adaptability for those with higher needs. They have level entries, wet-area

bathrooms and prioritised accessible parking. Ground-floor units have been designed with private gardens, while upper units are serviced by large balconies. All units have open-plan living areas. “Being on a corner site of unusual proportions provided significant additional challenges,” says Julia Te Hira, development manager for CORT. “The design needed to address multiple public domains, while protecting privacy, providing security and offering accessibility.” All decisions have led to homes that are safe, secure and comfortable. They are designed to be both sustainable and efficient throughout their life cycle. This is the first apartment project within the wider development, and it has proved a tremendous success, says Te Hira. “This project represents a great balance between CORT’s core criteria and the 171


Community & Affordable Housing

overall requirements of the surrounding community and environment.” Communal facilities within the complex include bike racks and clothes lines, all of which have been designed to create a sense of community. Quality landscaping and the high level of external finishes are an asset to the built community. +

AIRFIELD

1 Airfield Rd, Takanini, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER CORT COMMUNITY HOUSING CONSTRUCTION, ARCHITECT MILES CONSTRUCTION STRUCTURAL ENGINEER CONSTRUCTURE QUANTITY SURVEYOR ESC GROUP OTHER CONSULTANTS CKL, HOLMES FIRE

CKL values our partnerships with our clients. We are proud to work with CORT to achieve their vision to provide community housing and build cohesive and diverse neighbourhoods.

09 524 7029 | www.ckl.co.nz


PROJECT: Kāinga ora, 25-31 Porchester Rd, Papakura redevelopment

NOMINATED FOR: PCNZ Community and Affordable Housing Property Award 2020

MALTBYS ROLE: Engineer to the Contract

PROJECT: Ministry of Education, Takapuna Grammar School Main Block remediation

NOMINATED FOR: PCNZ Heritage and Adaptive Reuses Property Award & The Education Property Award 2020

MALTBYS ROLE: Full quantity surveying services on a very complex and challenging staged project.

PROJECT: Luxury Infinity Group, OKLA Apartments, Albany

Construction Cost Managers and Quantity Surveyors Auckland (09) 3034394 Wellington (04) 499 1468 Hamilton (07) 211 7926 Queenstown (03) 442 5965

www.maltbys.co.nz

NOMINATED FOR: PCNZ Multi-Unit Residential Property Award 2020

MALTBYS ROLE: Full quantity surveying services and Engineer to the Contract.


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The dwellings are designed to maximise solar access as a means of passive heating.

Living areas are angled towards the north or northwest for optimal solar gain.

‘The homes address a shortfall in one- and two-bedroom homes for older residents and make use of mixed-use urban zoning.’

A VERY WARM WELCOME

C

ustomers of the Porchester Road development in Papakura, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland were treated to a feast for more than the eyes on moving into their new homes. With the support of the local marae, Ka-inga Ora – Homes and Communities arranged a potluck lunch as a welcome. As well as handwritten invitations to the resoundingly successful lunch, customers received a gift of food parcels following the event. Feedback was positive – one customer who had experienced severe anxiety at her previous place spoke about how much she loved her new home. “This is just one example of how our Community Development Team facilitates the creation of a connected community,” says Ka-inga Ora General Manager of Construction and Innovation, Patrick Dougherty. Designed for older residents, the Porchester Road development, made up of apartments and terrace units, has shifted the paradigm for public housing. Eight existing dwellings have been replaced with 36 new homes, made up of 12 two-bedroom duplexes and 24 one-bedroom units in a three-storey lift-accessible apartment building. The development addresses a significant shortfall in one- and two-bedroom homes for older residents, and utilises the Mixed Use (Urban) zoning status to achieve intensification. Fruit trees, lawns and landscaping create an attractive outdoor space on the 4228sqm site.

The development features concrete-tilt slabs, which have been given different finishes to create visual interest and appeal, and a brick-and-wood-look finish interspersed with russet and cream on exterior walls. The juxtaposition of colour and texture allows for clear differentiation between spaces. The eight street-level apartments and the shower areas within are all wheelchair accessible. Given the age of the residents, safety of movement was a key concern and has been achieved at vehicle entrances with unit paving insets to alert drivers they are entering a shared pedestrian environment. +

PORCHESTER ROAD

25-21 Porchester Rd, Papakura, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION MCMILLAN LOCKWOOD ARCHITECT DESIGNGROUP STAPLETON ELLIOTT STRUCTURAL ENGINEER KIRK ROBERTS MECHANICAL ENGINEER 22 DEGREES QUANTITY SURVEYOR MALTBYS OTHER CONSULTANTS WOODS

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This aesthetically pleasing housing development represents highdensity design at its best, adding

amenity to the street, while providing solutions to a significant housing shortage in the region.

‘One of the key strengths is the way it is indistinguishable from other quality apartment complexes delivered by the private sector.’

ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF LIFE

T

he Brookfield Ave and Onehunga Mall development replaces three existing dwellings with 16 new, beautifully designed homes. This Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities project brings much-needed housing stock to the suburb of Onehunga, in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland, and acts as a fine example of how state housing can look and function. The project has seen the creation of 12 one-bedroom units in a three-storey walk-up, plus four two-bedroom units in two duplexes. With high visual appeal, the new homes are a handsome addition to the area. Sustainability is key here and the development employs best-practice solutions. With a 6 Homestar rating, it has double glazing, thermal insulation and energy efficient lighting. A key design decision was how to arrange two fundamentally different building types – the freestanding duplex units and multi-storey apartment blocks – on the site. The duplexes are complementary to the scale of the existing residential dwellings along Brookfield Ave, and the multi-unit apartment buildings are located around the corner and alongside an arterial route. These larger-scale apartment buildings make a positive contribution to the street by solidly defining this key corner. Landscaping on the northern side of the development works successfully with existing mature trees. Many of the apartments look out to the sunny northern landscape and also have a view to tree canopies through south-facing windows.

The saw-tooth shape of the apartment buildings encourages the perception that the overall development is made up of a number of smaller and discrete building blocks, and helps to reduce its perceived scale. Careful consideration has been applied to external and internal finishes, with materials that deliver attractive aesthetics and achieve efficient use of budget. External finishes include brick, linear weatherboard and Titan cladding. “One of the key strengths of this public housing development is the way it looks and feels indistinguishable from other quality apartment complexes delivered by the private sector,” says Patrick Dougherty, Kāinga Ora General Manager Construction and Innovation. + BROOKFIELD AVENUE 1-3 Brookfield Ave, 432 Onehunga Mall, Onehunga, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION HOME ARCHITECT MONK MACKENZIE STRUCTURAL ENGINEER SENZ MECHANICAL ENGINEER HOMETECH OTHER CONSULTANTS NORMAN DISNEY & YOUNG, PASSIVE SOLUTIONS

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GREEN LIGHT FROM THE COMMUNITY

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T Above and opposite A range of dwellings ensures diversity in the new residential community. A pocket park, play areas, passive

solar design, vegetable gardens and a community room are some of the many assets in - inga Ora the Ka development.

his high-density development in Waterview, T āmaki Makaurau Auckland, is proof that modern design, intensification and functionality is an attainable and desirable combination. The Ka- inga Ora – Homes and Communities development, which was undertaken in partnership with Waipareira Trust, comprises 120 new dwellings across two to five levels in an area of high visibility on a major arterial road. The terraces and apartments cater for a range of family sizes, as well as individuals. There are 33 one-bedroom, 64 two-bedroom and 23 threebedroom units. On top of this, the development has a community room, green space and a Ka-inga Ora office. It also features traffic lights at the entrance to ensure the safety of residents,


‘Local input was vital. Iwi and community groups were involved at the early stage of the design process.’

and a pedestrian crossing for children to walk to the local primary school. The development was completed successfully despite some major challenges, including a sloping site with a steep drop-off into the Oakley Creek gully, main sewerage lines criss-crossing the land and structural engineering hurdles due to the site being positioned over part of the Waterview Tunnel. When it looked like the project’s budget was likely to be exceeded, Ka- inga Ora worked closely with the architect and builder to simplify the design and reduce the floor area, without compromising on quality. Patrick Dougherty, Ka- inga Ora General Manager, Construction and Innovation, is delighted with the project’s outcome which has also maximised development potential through intensification.

“These beautifully designed new homes replace 20 existing units for older adults, with 120 warm, dry and safe homes,” says Dougherty. They are of an equal standard to many private developments taking place in the city.” The development predominately used precast concrete for construction, cost-effective material that rates highly for fire compliance, acoustics and weather tightness. It is also energy-efficient and allows for a significant reduction in power use throughout the development. The dwellings are concentrated around the perimeter of the site in mid-rise buildings, providing green space for a large central pocket park for residents to enjoy. Crime prevention is tackled through excellent environmental design. All public spaces have passive surveillance from the living areas of their apartments. 179


Community & Affordable Housing PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Above Precast concrete was used because of its many advantages, including heat retention and cost effectiveness.

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Below The 120 new apartments and terrace houses in Waterview Court replace 20 units for older residents on the site.

The project also includes a number of sustainable features, such as excellent passive solar design, natural ventilation, covered outdoor clothes lines, community vegetable gardens, rainwater run-off control and extensive native re-planting of adjacent Oakley Creek reserve. “Right from the start, local input was vital to the project’s success,” Dougherty says. Iwi and community groups, such as Friends of Oakley Creek, were involved in the process and their feedback helped shape the final design. +

WATERVIEW COURT

1550 Great North Rd, Waterview, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KA INGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION LATHAM CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT ASHTON MITCHELL STRUCTURAL ENGINEER MSC MECHANICAL ENGINEER ECS/THURSTON CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYOR AECOM/BBD OTHER CONSULTANTS CKL


FABRIC of Onehunga

Galway Street

Waterview Court

Architecture Delivered. Client Collaboration. Aspirational Design. Quality Management.

astonmitchell ltd. e info@astonmitchell.com p +64 9 366 1751

105 Wellesley Street West. PO Box 90674 AMSC Auckland 1142, New Zealand

astonmitchell.com


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The four-storey apartment blocks are an attractive addition to the neighbourhood.

The 71 new units are warm, dry, quality homes with communal areas for all to enjoy.

‘The precast concrete panels used in the build are long-lasting, durable, energy efficient and take on a range of finishes.’

COMMITMENT TO QUALITY

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he Galway Street development sits down a long right of way in the suburb of Onehunga, Ta- maki Makaurau Auckland. The previously vacant Ka-inga Ora – Homes and Communities site now boasts 71 new units, including 51 one-bedroom and 19 two-bedroom homes in two four-storey blocks. There are also 41 car-parking spaces and bike stands, and a community room that doubles as office space. The Galway Street development is located on a 4965sqm land parcel, and given the site’s excellent location – close to public transport, shopping centres and employment opportunities – it was seen as suitable for an intensive apartment development. Construction involved the use of precast concrete, a robust, long-lasting, durable and energy efficient material that is fire compliant, and both sound and weather tight. Use of this material allowed the build to proceed quickly and achieve council compliance without complication. It can also take on a range of attractive finishes, such as the band-sawn look used here. The development features an appreciable outdoor component with extensive planting, community gardens and outdoor covered seating areas. Residents can enjoy native plants, fruit trees and eight vegetable gardens. The attractive housing precinct illustrates a real commitment to the

community, says Patrick Dougherty, Ka-inga Ora General Manager Construction and Innovation. “This was evidenced in the care and consideration we have shown to existing residents. After a lot of consultation, we were able to undertake the build with minimal impact on the peace and privacy of those living in the area.” The development also has many sustainable features, such as excellent passive solar design, natural ventilation, covered outdoor clotheslines and rainwater run-off control. What a difference a new development makes. +

GALWAY STREET

64 Galway St, Onehunga, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION BRACEWELL ARCHITECT ASHTON MITCHELL QUANTITY SURVEYOR BARNES BEAGLEY DOHERR SERVICE, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER ECS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER MSC CONSULTING GROUP OTHER CONSULTANTS CAMPBELL BROWN ASSOCIATES, GREENSTONE GROUP

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FAST FORWARD WITH CASSETTE INNOVATION

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T Innovative building methods fast-tracked the completion of this development that includes landscaped

areas, covered bike parking, off-street parking, communal spaces and private outdoor areas for residents.

he Stanmore Road, Swanns Road and Sorensens Place development in Otautahi Christchurch reflects a first for Ka- inga Ora – Homes and Communities. It comes in the form of a new construction method for the public housing agency: cassette flooring. This is assembled offsite and brought in by crane, allowing for a much faster build process. As well as shaving about six weeks off the building time, cassette flooring serves another purpose: a greater level of soundproofing than regular flooring, resulting in more peace and privacy for residents. The walls were also assembled offsite. “This reflects our commitment to addressing New Zealand’s housing crisis through innovative and creative solutions,” says Patrick Dougherty, Ka- inga Ora General Manager, Construction and Innovation. Located on a 1806sqm land parcel near the Ota- karo Avon River, the


‘The development utilises innovative and high-quality materials to deliver new, attractive residential units for those in need.’

development comprises 14 one-bedroom units split over two, two-storey buildings. The village includes wheelchair-accessible units, off-street parking and private outdoor spaces for all residents. There are also large areas of communal space at the rear of the buildings, car parking, storage sheds and covered bike parking. The Stanmore Road site is located at the boundary of red-zoned land in a Residential Suburban Density Transition zone. Due to its location in a liquefaction management area, extensive geotechnical reports were undertaken. These concluded the land was suitable for a large-scale development, with the proviso that appropriate hazard reduction techniques were put in place. Accordingly, and following the closure of a nearby school, it was decided that the homes should be single bedrooms, catering to single people or couples, and designed to be lightweight to avoid expensive ground works.

“The development utilises innovative, high-quality materials to deliver new and attractive residential units for people in need,” says Dougherty. And not even lockdown could impede progress. The project, which began in late 2019, was completed by mid-2020, helping people in need to be housed quickly. Customer satisfaction is at the heart of this development, and additional features have been designed specifically for residents. Every unit has private external spaces that residents can access. There are small courtyards on the ground floor and terraces for the second-storey dwellings. The build adheres to the New Zealand Green Building Council’s 6 Homestar requirements, meaning the homes far exceed Building Code standards for warmth, dryness and health. The roadside units feature a muted scheme of white and grey. Meanwhile, from the central carpark and landscaped spaces, brightly coloured front doors create visual appeal. The doors are 185


Community & Affordable Housing PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

The modest-sized development has a communal garden and fruit trees for all residents to access.

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bordered by dark blue dividing panels, which act both as a unifying visual device and provide privacy. There’s a garden space with fruit trees for all residents to access. And by working in collaboration with appropriate agencies, a bus stop was relocated outside the development, giving residents ready access to public transport around the city. The Stanmore Road site is also within walking distance to shops. The wellbeing of residents is a priority. Ka- inga Ora conducted door-to-door interviews with customers after they settled in to their new homes and shared the results with the residents’ group that had been established in the community. +

STANMORE ROAD

224 Stanmore Rd, Richmond, Otautahi Christchurch

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION CONSORTIUM CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT GRAVITY ARCHITECTURE STRUCTURAL ENGINEER HFC GROUP QUANTITY SURVEYOR WT PARTNERSHIP OTHER CONSULTANTS KGA GEOTECHNICAL, ACOUSTIC ENGINEERING SERVICES


2 TIWAIWAKA LANE

182 CHESTER ST

78 CASHEL STREET

392 MOORHOUSE AVE

RIVERSIDE MARKET

We’re building Christchurch’s landmarks. Commercial or multi-unit Residential, from demolition to handing over the keys – our highly experienced and pragmatic team are ready to partner with you to provide cost effective, efficient construction and project management. LET’S TALK Brooke Whiting - General Manager / Director 027 337 7267 / brooke@consortium.net.nz consortium.net.nz


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Quality building materials ensure the long-term relevance and lifespan of the attractive range of homes.

Landscaping and colour have been used to beautify and define different aspects of the development.

‘There are 82 units and stand-alone dwellings that help address the housing shortage in the area.’

COMMUNITY LINKS FLOURISH

H

igh demand for housing in the West Auckland area has resulted in the transformation of a previously underutilised site in New Lynn. The site originally comprised 16 units, built more than 65 years ago. This new development by Ka-inga Ora – Homes and Communities features 82 units and stand-alone homes on the same site. The development contains one-bedroom, two-bedroom, three-bedroom and five-bedroom dwellings, a community room, and a Ka- inga Ora office. You’ll also find six three-storey walk-up units and seven stand-alone dwellings. “This does much to address the housing shortage in the area,” says Patrick Dougherty, General Manager Construction and Innovation at Ka-inga Ora. To accommodate the development, a jointly owned access lot (JOAL) was created to link Thom Street, Islington Avenue and Margan Avenue – a connection that demonstrates excellence in urban design, says Dougherty. “Ka-inga Ora worked alongside Auckland Council to create the access-way, while being considerate of the needs of existing residential units and adhering in full to the relevant standards.” The attractive design and implementation of this residential development has redefined housing for people in need. Landscaping is a significant component, and a small hill was created at the park inside the development to form the centrepiece of the community. Vertical strips of colour provide a modern aesthetic

to the development’s exterior and define different areas for residents and visitors. “We’ve made the most of this site with good design, not only to ensure our homes and communal areas for residents are safe and attractive, but to also give them the opportunity to build connections with their community,” Dougherty says. The project has realised its vision to ensure high-quality urban design within a development, and homes that are desirable, flexible and efficient. Quality materials include prefabricated structural timber framing and a variety of cladding. Clay-brick veneer, profiled roofing, ribraft slabs and balustrade systems were also used in the build. “These durable low-maintenance materials ensure this project has long-term relevance and lifespan,” says Dougherty. + THOM STREET 1-11 & 2-12 Thom St, 14-16 Islington Ave, 47 & 51 Margan Ave, New Lynn, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION DOMINION CONSTRUCTORS ARCHITECT YOUNG+ RICHARDS+ QUANTITY SURVEYOR MALTBYS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER THL DESIGN GROUP OTHER CONSULTANTS EARCON

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NEW VILLAGE A CHAMPION EFFORT

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R The new development maximises vacant land, and adds attractive amenities to the street and existing buildings.

Most importantly, however, Champion Street provides muchneeded, quality new homes for residents with restricted mobility.

ising from a previously vacant tract of land in Cannons Creek, Porirua, are 14 attractive, one-bedroom homes designed for customers with restricted mobility. This Ka- inga Ora – Homes and Communities development has been delivered in partnership with Nga-ti Toa and Porirua City Council, and addresses the shortfall of one-bedroom units in the area. “We’ve been able to create quality, high-density housing in the middle of an existing community, an outcome which demonstrates the importance we place on working with our communities,” says Patrick Dougherty, Ka-inga Ora General Manager of Construction and Innovation. By redeveloping vacant land in this area, Ka-inga Ora has also created an attractive gateway to Cannons Creek and raised the amenity value of the suburb. These beautifully designed homes respect and enhance the form, layout and amenity of the neighbourhood through attention to


‘These beautifully designed units respect and enhance the form, layout and amenity values of the neighbourhood.’

quality urban design and a commitment to architectural excellence. The project team overcame the issue of soft soil within the 1953sqm site, due to a leaky infrastructure pipe. Water was leaking from the pipe and running down the hill to the flat part of the site, causing the surrounding ground to become sodden. The pipe was fixed and the build team undertook additional excavation, bringing in hard fill to raise the ground level. The homes integrate seamlessly with existing buildings in the neighbourhood. When viewed from the street, the development conveys an appropriate sense of scale and size; its bulk mitigated by a facade that expresses the individual scale of each unit. The combination of materials and colours enhances the visual quality of the development, and particularly the painted concrete panels with decorative rebates, which add visual energy and appeal.

Ensuring the location of the development was near good public transport services, and a wide range of amenities, services and opportunities for its residents were key considerations. “Customer satisfaction is at the heart of the Champion Street build,” Dougherty says. +

CHAMPION STREET 178-184 Champion St, Te Whanganui-a-Tara Wellington

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION HOMESTEAD CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT DESIGNGROUP STAPLETON ELLIOTT STRUCTURAL ENGINEER MIYAMOTO QUANTITY SURVEYOR MALTBYS PROJECT MANAGER MATT SERLE OTHER CONSULTANTS STEPHENSON & TURNER, FIRE HQ, COOK COSTELLO

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Community & Affordable Housing PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

COSY & COMFY AT THE FOOT OF THE MOUNTAIN

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S This development comprises 30 one-bedroom, 29 two-bedroom and six fourbedroom homes. Community interests,

residents’ safety and pedestrian movement have all been carefully considered to provide an optimal living environment.

ome 60 years ago, 16 state houses sat on this site. Now 65 new warm, dry homes have taken their place. The Bader Drive, McKenzie Road and Cessna Place development sits on a land parcel of 6802sqm. This project is part of the Mangere Development, a large scale project led by Ka-inga Ora. The public housing development features 30 one-bedroom and 29 twobedroom apartments spread over four three-storey blocks. Six four-bedroom homes are allocated across four terraces and a duplex. Features of the development have been designed to encourage a sense of community. An outdoor recreation area – located adjacent to a common room that provides facilities to accommodate community-based activities – is included. Landscaped areas feature level-access spaces to ensure the safety and wellbeing of residents and members of the community. The build also adhered to the New Zealand Green Building Council’s 6 Homestar requirements, which means homes comply with a wide range of environmental, health and energy efficiency features.


‘The bold and ambitious development is intended to change the paradigm around how state housing looks and functions.’

The apartment blocks face the intersection of McKenzie Rd and Bader Dr, and are close to Te Pane o Mataoho maunga (Mangere mountain). The terrace houses nearby provide the development with a look and feel of transitioning down in scale to a more suburban setting. As with any development, there were obstacles to navigate. In this case, the receivership of the original company contracted to complete the build opened up the opportunity for Precision Construction Limited (PCL). Earlier workmanship from the previous company required remediation, and alongside Ka- inga Ora, PCL successfully navigated issues around sub-contractors and suppliers to ensure they weren’t left out of pocket, says Patrick Dougherty, Kainga Ora General Manager, Construction and Innovation. Opened by Housing Minister Megan Woods, the development is bold and ambitious and intended to help change the paradigm around how state housing looks and functions.

Residents are delighted with their homes and believe their future neighbours can look forward to many happy years to come. One of the new residents at the development says: “We couldn’t believe it. We thought, ‘Wow! This is us!’” +

BADER DRIVE & MCKENZIE ROAD 1-5 Bader Dr, 26-32 McKenzie Rd, 1-7 Cessna Pl, Mangere, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION PRECISION CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT PEDDLETHORP STRUCTURAL ENGINEER MICHAEL NEWCOMBE OTHER CONSULTANTS BARK LANDSCAPE DESIGN

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RANGE OF HOMES EARN PRIDE OF PLACE

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O Fourteen threebedroom homes were built on this site in the 1970s. What stands in their place are 45 new homes that cater for a wide

range of family configurations. All have been designed and built to a high standard, and are a proud addition to the area.

n a 10,291sqm land parcel in Manurewa, sits an attractive development designed for small-to-medium-sized families. It has delivered healthy, dry homes and thriving neighbourhoods as part of a wider Ka-inga Ora – Homes and Communities programme in Ta- maki Makaurau, Auckland. In the 1970s, 14 three-bedroom houses once stood where 45 homes stand today. These homes comprise 12 two-bedroom apartments, plus 14 twobedroom, 13 three-bedroom and six four-bedroom stand-alone homes. All have been designed and built to modern standards, with double glazing, insulation and high-end materials inside and out. The three-and four-bedroom homes have garages and off-street parking, and each of the two-bedroom houses has a dedicated parking space. The ground-floor apartments have level entrances with custom breezeways and disability access bathrooms. The larger homes have accessible front and garden entrances, as well as an accessible bathroom.


‘Tenant satisfaction is at the heart of the build... The development makes a positive contribution to the community.’

The project team worked through a number of infrastructure challenges during the build, while also ensuring the homes were low maintenance, says Patrick Dougherty, General Manager Construction and Innovation at Ka- inga Ora – Homes and Communities. An underground stormwater tank was redesigned to ensure that infrastructure serviced the increased number of dwellings and neighbouring sites. Special steel roof beams were designed to support the complex apartment roof design included in the original plans. Artificial turf was installed to provide a durable surface for outdoor living. Robust claddings such as James Hardie weatherboard and panels were used on the upper floor, while pre-finished cladding and weatherboard were used elsewhere. In the interests of residents’ wellbeing, safety and security, a number of provisions were put in place, such as security grills with remote electronic release for communal areas, off-street parking for all units, an integrated

fire-alarm system and a covered outdoor communal space with a picnic table. The project has been deemed a success by those who live there. “Tenant satisfaction is at the heart of the Wordsworth and Awakino build,” says Dougherty. “The development enhances the quality of the built form in the neighbourhood, and makes a positive contribution to the community.” +

WORDSWORTH ROAD & AWAKINO PLACE 106-132 Wordsworth Rd and 17 Awakino Pl, Manurewa, Ta-maki Makaurau Auckland

OWNER, DEVELOPER, PROJECT MANAGER KAINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES CONSTRUCTION HOME ARCHITECT IGNITE STRUCTURAL ENGINEER MICHAEL NEWCOMBE OTHER CONSULTANTS BARK LANDSCAPE DESIGN

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Awards Nominations

PROPERTY COUNCIL NEW ZEALAND RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS WARREN AND MAHONEY

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

Civic, Health and Arts Property Award

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– Auckland High Court Refurbishment Project – Christchurch Hospital Waipapa (formerly Acute Services Building) – Eccles Building – Mayfair Arts and Culture – Middlemore Hospital Tiaho Mai Acute Mental Health Unit – St Bede’s College Chapel and Performing Arts Centre – St Patrick’s Catholic Church – Te Nikau, Grey Hospital & Health Centre – Te Puka O Te Waka / Rakiura Museum – University of Otago/Te Whare Wānanga o Otāgo Faculty of Dentistry – Westhaven Promenade Stage 2

RCP Commercial Office Property Award – 25 Hargreaves Street – 55 Corinthian Drive – 100 Cuba Street – 143 Durham Street – 246 Queen

– CIAL AgriExport Precinct – Fisher & Paykel Healthcare – Foodstuffs North Island – Fourteen Tamariki Ave – MediaWorks Radio Broadcasting HQ – Piki Ki Te Ao – PwC Tower, Commercial Bay – Scion Innovation Hub ‘Te Whare Nui o Tuteata’ – Spark Square Christchurch

KĀINGA ORA – HOMES AND COMMUNITIES Community and Affordable Housing Property Award – Airfield – Bader Drive & McKenzie Road – Brookfield Avenue – Champion Street – Galway Street – Ko-tuitui – Porchester Road – Stanmore Road – Thom Street – Waterview Court – Wordsworth Road and Awakino Place

GREENSTONE GROUP Education Property Award – Christchurch Boys’ High School Caddick & Caldwell Buildings – Diocesan School for Girls Performing Arts Centre – Eccles Building – Giraffe Early Learning Centre – Manukau Institute of Technology – TechPark Campus – New Shoots Children’s Centre Kerikeri – Prebbleton School – Stonefields School – Takapuna Grammar School – Main Block Redevelopment – Te Raekura Redcliffs School – The University of Auckland Park West – University of Auckland Student Union Buildings. B311-B312 – University of Otago/Te Whare Wānanga o Otāgo Faculty of Dentistry – Wellington East Girls’ College


RESENE Green Building Property Award – 55 Corinthian Drive – Fisher & Paykel Healthcare – Foodstuffs North Island – Mighty Ape – Scion Innovation Hub ‘Te Whare Nui o Tuteata’ – St Patrick’s Catholic Church – Te Kupenga – The Hotel Britomart – Toll Tamaki Freight Forwarding Facility

NAYLOR LOVE Heritage and Adaptive Reuses Property Award – 100 Cuba Street – 246 Queen – Auckland High Court Refurbishment Project – Basin Reserve Museum Stand – Mayfair Arts and Culture – QT Hotel Auckland – Takapuna Grammar School – Main Block Redevelopment – The Hotel Britomart – University of Auckland Student Union Buildings. B311-B312 – University of Otago/Te Whare Wānanga o Otāgo Faculty of Dentistry – Wellington East Girls’ College

CBRE Industrial Property Award – 27 Timberly Road – Allegion Warehouse and Manufacturing Facility

– Callaghan Innovation Measurement Standards Lab – Fisher & Paykel Healthcare – Foodstuffs North Island – Mighty Ape – Oak Industrial Park – Onehunga Woollen Mills – Toll Tamaki Freight Forwarding Facility

TEMPLETON GROUP Multi-Unit Residential Property Award – 59 France – CA9, Catalina Precinct, Hobsonville Point – Stage 1 – Fabric of Onehunga – FLiP Camperdown Road – Fourteen Tamariki Ave – Kōtuitui Terraces – Latitude Residences – LQ Kawarau River – OKLA Apartments – On Point Apartments – Paragon Apartments – Richmond 6 – The Antipodean – The Pacifica – University of Auckland– Waiparuru Hall

HOLMES GROUP Tourism and Leisure Property Award – Flare Bar – Level 2 SkyCity Casino – Food Republic– Level 2 SkyCity Casino – LQ Kawarau River – National Hockey Centre – QT Hotel Auckland – Rotorua Regional Airport – SkyCity VIP Gaming – Te Hono – New Plymouth Airport Terminal – The Hotel Britomart – Travelodge Hotel Wynyard Quarter

YARDI Retail Property Award – Ballantynes Redevelopment – Botany Toyota Showroom and Service Centre – Countdown Penrose eStore – Countdown Rototuna – Rototuna Village

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Thank you to our sponsors

PRINCIPAL SPONSOR AND SUPREME AWARD Rider Levett Bucknall (RLB) is an independent global consultancy practice with a commitment to delivering commercial certainty outcomes, through advice focused on cost, quality and sustainability within property, infrastructure, construction and facilities. The group is one of the largest providers of cost management and advisory consulting services in New Zealand and globally. With more than 110 staff across seven national offices, RLB has the resources and flexibility to meet the demands of any project.

COMMUNITY AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROPERTY AWARD Ka-inga Ora – Homes and Communities is a Crown agency that was established on 1 October 2019, bringing together the people, capabilities and resources of KiwiBuild, Housing New Zealand and its development subsidiary HLC. The organisation aims to create sustainable, inclusive and thriving communities that support access to jobs, amenities and services, while providing quality, affordable housing choices – from single homes to terraces and apartments, we partner with local and central government.

HERITAGE & ADAPTIVE REUSES PROPERTY AWARD

Naylor Love is the country’s largest privately owned construction company and we’re proud to have served New Zealand since 1910. We work with a valued network of clients, consultants, subcontractors and suppliers. With more than 700 staff and offices in Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Wellington, Nelson, Christchurch, Queenstown and Dunedin, we call on our specialist teams to participate in projects all over the country, as we build our impressive portfolio of restorations and refurbishments.

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY AWARD

At CBRE we focus relentlessly on creating winning outcomes for our clients, employees and shareholders, offering strategic advice and execution for property sales and leasing; corporate services; property, facilities and project management; mortgage banking; appraisal and valuation; development services; investment management; and research and consulting. Our capabilities extend broader than any other realestate services provider, offering unparalleled global tools and resources, leverage, credibility and market coverage coupled with local expertise.

MULTI-UNIT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY AWARD

Templeton has a significant track record and reputation as developers of carefully curated, quality places for people, their families and lifestyle. Common to all projects is a strong focus on design aesthetics, while always delivering places where people want to live. Our portfolio focuses on creating communities and lifestyles, from apartments and student accommodation to quality homes and masterplanned communities. Led by Nigel McKenna, we are one of New Zealand’s largest and fastest growing property developers.

CIVIC, HEALTH & ARTS PROPERTY AWARD

Warren and Mahoney is a 350-strong international design team working as one studio across seven locations, weaving together the strands of culture, sustainability and technology to create influential client outcomes. Backed by a 65-year history and originating from Aotearoa New Zealand, our work is informed by Te Ao Ma-ori and measured by its impact on people, culture, our natural world and the future.

GREEN BUILDING PROPERTY AWARD TOURISM & LEISURE PROPERTY AWARD

Holmes Group has more than 500 people across New Zealand, Australia, Netherlands and USA. We deliver expert structural, civil and fire engineering, and product development and testing. We’ve built our exceptional reputation on creative, premium designs and consulting advice that stands the test of time. Our high-performing Holmes team has helped deliver an elegant, compelling built environment across thousands of high-profile projects, leaving a proud legacy in New Zealand and beyond.

COMMERCIAL OFFICE PROPERTY AWARD

RCP is the leading provider of independent project management services to New Zealand’s property and construction industry. We have more than 25 years’ experience delivering prominent and award-winning property developments. Our diverse portfolio of projects spans the commercial, retail, residential, stadia, education, infrastructure and healthcare sectors. There are few challenges we haven’t seen or applied our skills to. Delivering on time, within budget, and to the highest quality is simply the baseline for us.

Since 1946, Resene has forged a reputation of excellence and quality in manufacturing paint and specialist coatings for residential and commercial buildings. Our products are designed to meet the demanding standards of architectural and building industry professionals. Working hard to stay ahead of market trends, Resene has an international reputation as a leader in paint research, technology and technical support for projects. We are delighted to continue our support of the Property Council New Zealand and its awards programme to encourage and celebrate excellence in property.

RETAIL PROPERTY AWARD By its nature, our business is all about change – creating change through people. We use smart people and smart processes to drive successful outcomes. Our philosophy is to create environments in which teams excel and projects thrive. We are leaders of change, and trusted property and project advisors.

Yardi Systems is a leading provider of solutions and services for the global real estate industry. To put it simply, we bring process to real estate. Our solutions include investment, asset and property-management software. By providing one fully integrated platform, Yardi provides solutions for multiple sectors including commercial (office, industrial, retail), as well as buildto-rent, residential and student housing. Yardi offers an integrated end-to-end real estate platform, enabling clients to improve their customer engagement, drive efficiency and scale across their operations.

ENTERTAINMENT SPONSOR

WELCOME FUNCTION SPONSOR

PROPERTY INDUSTRY AWARDS 2021

EDUCATION PROPERTY AWARD

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With a new name and identity, Fagerhult NZ has a proud history of delivering high-quality lighting solutions to the New Zealand market. Now working with our Australian colleagues as Eagle Lighting, we provide industry-leading local support. Our expertise, portfolio of products and collaborative nature has made us a valuable and respected partner to our customers. As the global Fagerhult Group continues to grow, here in New Zealand we continue to keep our customers front and centre, with new ways to serve the market.

As a leading provider of consulting and engineering services, we address our clients’ most complex needs. Our local team remains at the forefront of their specialisation, providing geotechnical, environmental, project management, engineering and climate-change services. We deliver technical excellence to manage complex risks and create innovative opportunities for our clients – providing value throughout the asset life cycle in transport and property infrastructure, energy and resource sectors.

MASTER OF CEREMONIES SPONSOR

We plan and design human-centred solutions, harnessing the power of new technology to create a better tomorrow. As a trusted partner in creating sustainable communities, facilities and environments, we stay curious, act locally and think globally. With unrivalled local knowledge from 150 years of pioneering local infrastructure and built environments, we’re proud of the unique value we bring to our clients. WSP is a world-leading professional services firm, with a global network of 54,000 people across 44 countries.


NXN Kingsland, nxnkingsland.co.nz

CREATING QUALITY PLACES FOR PEOPLE

ELEMENTUM LO N G B AY

light-box.co.nz

elementumlongbay.co.nz

magma.co.nz

COLLEGE&MASON collegeandmason.co.nz

bremnerridge.co.nz

TEMPLETONGROUP.CO.NZ

magma.co.nz kahuatlongbay.co.nz


Travelodge Hotel Wynyard Quarter

Foodstuffs North Island

Auckland High Court Refurbishment

55 Corinthian Drive, Albany

Toll Tamaki Freight Forwarding Facility

Onehunga Woollen Mills

Scion Innovation Hub “Te Whare o Tuteata”

Christchurch Boys’ High School Caddick & Caldwell Buildings

Navigating the complex world of large property assets rdtpacific.co.nz Project and Cost Management Auckland | Wellington | Christchurch | Rotorua | Hamilton