Issuu on Google+

29

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013


For best experience, view in full screen We recommend reading BLUR in full-screen mode, especially when viewed on a PC. This removes the PDF reader controls and sets the background canvas to black. However, if you use a very high resolution monitor, you might experience a slight reduction of quality of the displayed images when viewing in full screen.

Interactive elements in BLUR issues Tablet and smartphone devices offer various ways of previewing PDF documents, but not all support the full feature set of interactive elements used by BLUR. For best viewing pleasure on the iPad and similar devices, please install the free Adobe Acrobat Reader app from your App Store. Starting with issue 29, BLUR’s interactivity features and hyperlink support have been optimized for viewing on tablets and smartphones as well as the PC. Some of these optimizations include: • The Contents page features large buttons for elegant navigation to a certain page, while the Home hyperlink is the simplest way to get back to Contents. • Gallery 36 contains interactive thumbnails that open the image in full size, while the full size images hyperlink back to the gallery. • Every section of the magazine that features an author now has a dedicated hyperlink button to navigate the reader directly to the promoted author’s webpage. • The upper third of every page in BLUR is a hyperlink leading back to the Contents, while tapping the left and right edges of the screen enables you to browse through the magazine.

CELEBRATING FIVE YEARS OF BLUR MAGAZINE

2


BLUR magazine is published by Photography Association CREATUS (F.U.C.*), a nonprofit association founded in August 2009 with the aim of contributing to the development of the photography scene in Croatia, while promoting and connecting Croatian photographers with their international colleagues.

ISSN: 1847-7410 Publisher: F.U.C.* Address: street Ljubičica 19, 10 360 Sesvete, Croatia Contact: info@blur-magazine.com Bank account: Privredna banka Zagreb 2340009 – 1110540685 MB: 2580837 OIB: 39145219372

Parental advisory Artistic and educational photographic discoveries in BLUR Magazine often feature artistic imagery that might not be suited to underage children. Although none of the content featured in BLUR could possibly be regarded offensive, it does contain artistic nude photography which is an integral part of photography since its beginnings. We recommend that minors explore the content under adult guidance.

Publishing and distribution of ‘’Blur magazine’’ is supported by Zagreb City and City Office for Education, Culture and Sports

3


A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

photo: Borut Peterlin

O

ver the last few months, the BLUR team has been working hard and probably under more pressure than ever before. On the eve our fifth anniversary, things started to get complicated really quickly. It wouldn’t be honest of me to claim it was completely unexpected; however, I did expect certain events to occur a bit further down the line. As with everything in life, the future always finds a way to creep up sooner than we think. For reasons still unknown to us (well, we’re being modest), the number of downloads of our free issues skyrocketed toward the end of 2012, putting us between a rock and a hard place. Our small server began to crash under the influx of tens of thousands of requests, reaching our bandwidth caps and resulting in frequent downtime, which is unacceptable for a digital magazine of any kind, let alone one that serves gigabytes of photo-heavy PDF downloads. We tried switching to Dropbox, but we reached bandwidth caps in mere days, and all other solutions seemed temporary at best.

After five years, there was simply little left to give. The rest of the story you know: BLUR decided to find a rather drastic solution for this crisis; we reached out to you.

Huge readership is a reason to celebrate for any magazine, and yet there we were, completely dead in the water with no finances, relying only on server space borrowed from friends to distribute free material in the midst of a financial crisis eating away at the savings and morale of most of the team.

And we’ve started immediately.

Implementing a payment system that allowed our readers to freely donate $1.00 or more to download our issues proved to be one of the best decisions we’ve ever made. Although the influx of cash was modest in these first two months, not only did it give us breathing room in terms of server resources and save us from closing down entirely, but it also gave us new wings and a much-needed morale boost. Although it’s too early to make any financial plans, as much of our readership still needs to come to terms with the new order of things, there is reason for optimism. We’ve invested as much as we can to expand, showing that we’re not here for the profit but to offer a better BLUR experience to a wider international audience as well as to grow into a bigger promotional platform for even more photographers in search of exposure.

As soon as we were able, we launched a completely new, special edition called BLUR Gallery 2012, which is freely available for download from our website. Also, you might have noticed that this issue came out a month early. There’s

nothing wrong with your calendar—indeed, we’re going to ramp up production to a bi-monthly cycle, churning out at least six issues in 2013. Our new issues have been redesigned and optimized for viewing on the iPad and other tablets. We’ve increased the amount of whitespace, enlarged the font, enlarged all hyperlinks and improved the navigation. We’ve expanded Gallery 24 into Gallery 36 and introduced three new editorials covering photography genres previously less prominent in BLUR. And as a cherry on top, we’re now able to afford a proper dedicated web server and are working on a brand new website that will be launched in the coming weeks, equipped with a responsive HTML theme compatible with PCs, tablets, and smartphones alike. And that’s just the beginning; we’re preparing to launch many more surprises from this upgraded platform in the coming months. In a way, you could say that, thanks to you, we get to thank you even more—by giving you more of what we do best: great photography, more accessible, more often. So let’s keep those shutters clicking.

Robert Gojević

4


impressum Robert Gojević

founder | chief editor | design | art director | desktop publishing

Michael McAllister

proofreading

e-mail: robert.gojevic@blur-magazine.com

Ivan Pekarik

acting executive editor | PR

Dario Devčić

programmer | web developer

e-mail: ivan.pekarik@blur-magazine.com

Željka Hubak

marketing and PR

Želimir Koščević

expert associate

e-mail: zeljka.hubak@blur-magazine.com

Denis Pleić

columnist | translator

Igor Kalendaric

e-mail: igor.kalendaric@blur-magazine.com

e-mail: denis.pleic@blur-magazine.com

Maurício Sapata

editor of Pinhole & Playstick

motion graphics+composting

Zsolt Scheffer

Blur collaborator and Japanese translator

e-mail: mauricio.sapata@blur-magazine.com

5


Erin McGuire

PLAYSTICK

Andrea Tonellotto

INSTANTION

Ed Ross

WET PLATE

ulien Mauve & Pauline Ballet

PROJECT

Eolo Perfido

CLOSE UP

Mohammadreza Rezania

GALLERY 36

7


Simon Lalia

PROEYECT

Yurian Quintanas Nobel

OPEN

Deon Reynolds

WIDE

Yury Bird

TETRA

Mika Kitamura

ANALOG WABI SABI

Victor Senkov

PINHOLE

8


February | April | June | August | October |

December | 2013

1

COVER PAGE

5

IMPRESSUM

73

PROJECT Julien Mauve & Pauline Ballet

132

PINHOLE Victor Senkov

186

OPEN Yurian Quintanas Nobel

2

INTERACTIVE ELEMENTS

6

CONTENTS

90

WET PLATE Ed Ross

144

ANALOG WABI SABI Mika Kitamura

201

PROEYECT Simon Lalia

3

BLUR INFO

9

GALLERY 36

108

INSTANTION Andrea Tonellotto

159

TETRA Yury Bird

4

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

CLOSE UP Eolo Perfido

119

PLAYSTICK Erin McGuire

171

WIDE Deon Reynolds

CONTENTS

49

6


What made you decide to do nude photography using the wet plate process? What was the most interesting aspect for you? It was never “a decision,” in a narrow sense. I’ve been shooting nudes for a long time and some years back wanted to try wet plate. When I did, I was hooked. I love the slow, deliberate nature of the process and, of course, the unique look of the plates.

Is there anything in the whole process you would change if you could? Is there anything annoying in the process, or do you simply enjoy it exactly as it is? Wet plate photography is relatively difficult to do well consistently. And by “to do well” in this context, I mean to create plates with good contrast and artifactfree, or “clean.” The literature, historic and modern, is replete with “problem solving” recipes for one ailment or another. I have had my fair share of headscratching problems. Those problems are a frustration when you are trying to work your way through to a resolution, especially when they are spoiling a shoot. But there is also satisfaction in that problem-solving process. No, I would not change a thing.

GALLERY 24

Despite the recent popularity of wet plate, there are still not many photographers using the process, and only very few do nudes. I’d say we could count them on one hand. How do you feel about that, and is it, perhaps, also one of the reasons why you do what you do? I think the vast majority of current wet plate practitioners are hobbyists, and most of them are not doing nudes. Of the more limited group of practitioners that I might consider “committed” to the method, whether hobbyist or professional, I think “nudity” is pretty well represented. For example, two of your seven past wet plate contributors to this magazine focus on nudes. Once you throw me in, it’s up to three-eighths. And I think that’s great. But your greater point remains true – in the grand scheme of photography, there are relatively very few that do wet plate nudes. Do I strive to be in that niche? No. I’m driven by a passion to shoot what I love using a method I love.

What kind of future do you foresee for the process, given the current state of affairs in the world of photography? I foresee a continued increase in popularity, but I think it will always remain at the margins given the practical difficulties associated with the process.

by Robert Gojević

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

10


6

Blue Dimitri Bogachuk http://dimitribogachuk.com Ukraine


7

Lady In Red Mohammadreza Rezania http://www.sensecreator.com Iran


Close-up | brings readers closer to a photographer by providing extensive insight into his work. The photographer is presented through a wide selection of photographs, a detailed interview, and by highlighting important biographical information. Imagine talking with a photographer whom you admire over a cup of coffee. This is exactly what BLUR’s editor-in-chief does in this section—virtually, of course.

49


by Robert Gojević

EOLO PERFIDO Inspiration is everywhere

http://eoloperfido.com represented by Sudest57.com

Italy

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

50


>

ence of the campaign. Personally, I don’t find it any more challenging to take photos of a woman over taking photos of men. What I find really interesting is to always bring out the hidden potential they’ve got, no matter who the subject is. Everybody deserves a well thought out portrait, since the secrets and potential for a good photo can be found in everyone, and bringing out that emotion is the key to a great portrait. In my own experience, women have more facial expression; they get into the modeling role easier, and they love being photographed, while male models like this are harder to find. We’re talking about amateur models, but I’ve had a chance to see how many faces a professional model can have. What are your own experiences with this, and are your models amateurs or do you find them through agencies? I’m comfortable with both professional models and those who are just starting out. When I’m working on an advertisement campaign, as you might know, the models are almost always professionals. And in most cases, the difference is quite obvious. The professional models are used to spending long hours in front of the camera and know how to pace themselves throughout the shoot. They are aware of their strengths and know how to highlight them, helping the photographer do his job.

How important is costume design as an element of a good photo? I am personally enchanted by your clowns, so I have to ask, did you have professional help with this series? Even in this case, there’s quite a difference between advertising jobs, where I often get help from professional stylists, and my personal work. In my own creative photo shoots, I personally choose costumes and build the sets. I often draw some sketches beforehand and then spend a lot of time at flea markets and shops looking for old clothes and costumes. I also personally choose hair and makeup. The make up artist behind the Clownville series (along with many other projects and series) is Valeria Orlando. I’m very grateful for the intuition, sensibility, and the amazing technical quality that she has demonstrated over the years.

How much do you allow for external elements to affect your vision? Could you say that you are open to new ideas, or do you prefer to set your goal and not stray from it until your idea is completely executed? I used to be more focused on defining every single detail, but these days I let myself be fascinated by all the random things that happen during shooting. I also try to preserve my energy by keeping a little distance from all the organizational dynamics. It’s probably because my mind searches for stimulation and is on the lookout for new ways to enjoy this profession, with curiosity, where unpredictability lies.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

>

52


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

69


Project | is a section that presents a photographer through a series of photos united by a particular theme that works as a cohesive whole and is elaborated on by an artist statement.

73


by Robert Gojević

JULIEN MAUVE & PAULINE BALLET Hopeless Romantic

http://julienmauve.com/HopelessRomantic/ France

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

74


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

77


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

78


PLA

W

WET PLATE is a section dedicated to an antique photographic process discovered in the mid 19th century, which was also a primary photographic method used until the 1880s. It refers to a process of pouring a solution collodion onto a plate of thin iron or glass, then placing the plate into a camera and exposing it to the light and, at the end, developing that plate while it is still wet, which is the reason of naming the process (and our section) “wet plate�. The images resulting from this process can be ambrotypes, glass negatives or tintypes. Although quite a demanding, expensive and lengthy process, wet plate collodion technique is gaining back its popularity among many contemporary photographers.

90


W

PLA

by Robert Gojević

ED ROSS to do well

http://edrossphotography.com/ USA

91


What made you decide to do nude photography using the wet plate process? What was the most interesting aspect for you? It was never “a decision,” in a narrow sense. I’ve been shooting nudes for a long time and some years back wanted to try wet plate. When I did, I was hooked. I love the slow, deliberate nature of the process and, of course, the unique look of the plates.

Is there anything in the whole process you would change if you could? Is there anything annoying in the process, or do you simply enjoy it exactly as it is? Wet plate photography is relatively difficult to do well consistently. And by “to do well” in this context, I mean to create plates with good contrast and artifactfree, or “clean.” The literature, historic and modern, is replete with “problem solving” recipes for one ailment or another. I have had my fair share of headscratching problems. Those problems are a frustration when you are trying to work your way through to a resolution, especially when they are spoiling a shoot. But there is also satisfaction in that problem-solving process. No, I would not change a thing.

Despite the recent popularity of wet plate, there are still not many photographers using the process, and only very few do nudes. I’d say we could count them on one hand. How do you feel about that, and is it, perhaps, also one of the reasons why you do what you do? I think the vast majority of current wet plate practitioners are hobbyists, and most of them are not doing nudes. Of the more limited group of practitioners that I might consider “committed” to the method, whether hobbyist or professional, I think “nudity” is pretty well represented. For example, two of your seven past wet plate contributors to this magazine focus on nudes. Once you throw me in, it’s up to three-eighths. And I think that’s great. But your greater point remains true – in the grand scheme of photography, there are relatively very few that do wet plate nudes. Do I strive to be in that niche? No. I’m driven by a passion to shoot what I love using a method I love.

What kind of future do you foresee for the process, given the current state of affairs in the world of photography? I foresee a continued increase in popularity, but I think it will always remain at the margins given the practical difficulties associated with the process.

PLA

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

W

92


PLA

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

W

102


INSTANTION is a section dedicated to instant analog photography. The name of this se-ction combines the words instant and station, or as we call it, a place for instant photography. Instant photography refers to any photographic process that allows photo development without the darkroom. Instant photography was developed in the 1930s by Edwin Land, founder of the Polaroid Corporation. Because of its popularity, most of the photographers in this section use Polaroid film, but artists using Impossible or Fuji instant film are certainly welcome.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

108


by Jennifer Rumbach

Andrea Tonellotto nobody. is there anybody out there?

http://www.andreatonellotto.com/ Italy

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

109


Please tell us something about yourself. (Name, age, where you come from? Are you a professional photographer? What you do besides photography? A small introduction!) My name is Andrea Tonellotto, and I was born in 1974. I live in Piazzola Sul Brenta, province Padova. I’m married to Chiara and the father of a beautiful baby girl named Margherita. My other great passion, in addition to photography, is rugby. I work in construction design, although my goal, in a short time, is to dedicate myself totally to my photo projects.

How and when did you start with photography? And when was the first time you discovered Polaroid materials? I liked making pictures since I was very young, taking hundreds of photos in all my travels and on all occasions that presented interesting situations. Then one day, taking “random” photos was no longer enough. And thanks to “the match” with my first Leica (a used M6), I started to shoot with a project in mind. Photos had to be connected, part of a novel, no more single episodes. So I began to experiment with digital and medium format. The steps were made quickly. But I felt that something was missing with medium format. In that moment Polaroid came to the stage. The instant shot gave the format that magical atmosphere that only Polaroid, and now Impossible, is able to give. But I have to say that I had my first meeting with Edwin H. Land’s products when I saw family photos. Very typical of my generation. Everyone had a Polaroid camera sitting around the house at the end of the 70s or early 80s!

Which Polaroid material do you like the most and why? My favorite Polaroid camera is the original SX-70: its manageability and simplicity are essential for a lazy person like me! For film, my vote goes to TZ-Artistic. Its colors and atmosphere create a lot of emotion for me … pure magic.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

110


INSTANTION by Jennifer Rumbac Copy editor: Michael McAllister

118


PLAYSTICK is a section dedicated to “toy camera� photography. The name Playstick comes from a well known simplified male figure illustration called Play Stick. The name also contains the word plastic as an association to plastic (or toy) cameras like Diana, Holga, Lomo LC, Lubitel, and others.

119


by MaurĂ­cio Sapata

ERIN McGUIRE On the Surface

http://erinmcguirephotography.com/ USA On The Surface is a new and ongoing body of work that explores my feelings of deception and abandonment. The recent discovery and diagnosis of a lifethreatening illness for a beloved family member, along with the realization that the illness had gone unnoticed for some time, has forced me to look at my life and my work in a new way. These images of abandoned homes are digital composites made from Holga negatives to intentionally deceive the viewer. How the deception manifests itself is left to the personal history, emotions, and imagination of the individual viewing the image.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

120


122


123


PINHOLE | is a section, as its name says, dedicated to pinhole photography. This type of photography is created with a pinhole camera, a camera that uses a small aperture, usually the size of a pinhole, instead of a lens. Basically, the smaller the hole, the sharper the resulting image. Because of their simplicity, pinhole cameras are often handmade. The concept behind the pinhole camera—the camera obscura—dates back to the time of the ancient Greeks and Chinese. It was even mentioned by great thinkers like Aristotle, Euclid, and Mo Jing. However, the first photograph created with a pinhole camera was by a Scottish scientist, Sir David Brewster in the 1850s.

132


by Maurício Sapata

VICTOR SENKOV Legacy

http://portfotolio.net/viktarsenkou Belarus I mostly used medium format cameras and was never interested in pinhole photography before. When I had my Bronica stolen, I ordered a new camera.But for a month I had only an old Lubitel in my hands. I decided to make a pinhole on its base. The idea was to use it independent of the main glass waist level finder. It took about an hour to remove the glass, cut a plate from a can, and make a hole with a needle and hammer. I didn’t make any calculations. It was a pure act of creation. I used different types of film, however, the most beautiful and interesting results, in my opinion, were created by vintage 30-year-old Soviet “Svema.” The formula was found:  the worse the film, the better the result. The broken structure of old film separates the image from reality, making us forget about the time. I’ve shot pinhole for six years now, and it still surprises me and gives me pleasure.

133


134


136


ANALOG WABI-SAB | is a concept in Japanese aesthetics characterized by simplicity, asymmetry or irregularity, unpretentiousness, tranquility, imperfect quality and love of old, weathered objects – all leading to a meditative appreciation of the impermanence and transience of things, with overtones of desolation and solitude. In this regard, it is also closely related to another Japanese concept, mono no aware, which describes a “gentle sadness� for the transience (and beauty) of things. Therefore, Analog Wabi-Sabi is a section which presents analog photography through the wabisabi prism and perspective, with particular emphasis on Japanese photography and photographers.

144


by Denis Pleić

KITAMURA MIKA Penumbra

http://www.mikakitamura.com/ Japan As I look at photographs, what comes to my mind is always the same: what is it that’s not there? What is it that the photographer chose to omit? Thinking about these things helps me to see the photographs a little bit more precisely. The next thing I consider is that we live surrounded by the enormous number of things that we did not choose, as opposed to the things that we did. How is it that we don’t see/choose them? This is exactly how we reach the point of seeing/choosing, by permission and not through refusal.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

145


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

155


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

156


TETRA | is a section dedicated to a specific type of photography: black and white, square-format images that are recognizable for their minimalism and high aesthetic value, often making use of long exposures. The section name comes from the Greek word for the number four, which symbolizes the four equal sides of the format.

159


by Robert Gojević

YURY BIRD meditative minimalism

http://yurybird.com/ Ukraine I was born in 1972 in Skadovsk, Ukraine. My entire childhood was spent near the sea, which resulted in an abundance of scenic photographic themes, such as seascapes and sky. I was educated in Dnepropetrovsk, where I live and work. Long exposures, sharp light transitions, meditative minimalism, and a theme of loneliness – all come together in my photographic style. I don’t have any heroes in photography, but I really enjoy the masterpieces of Ansel Adams, Michael Kenna, and David Fokos. In some ways, I could call them my teachers. I prefer works in black and white, but I also work joyfully with color as well. Photography is a lifestyle, a form of self-expression, and a meditation, while at the same time it’s sorrow and gladness.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

160


161


162


WIDE | section devoted to promoting landscape photography. This section strives to expand our presentation of these kind of photos, which have been somewhat underrepresented in BLUR magazine in their classical form. Sometimes it seems that landscape photography isn’t very creative because it relies mostly on Nature’s beauty and is, therefore, more technical than artistic. In this section we want to prove that human creativity, indeed, plays a major role in capturing the beauty of Nature in its full glory. Since “landscape photography” is a rather general term, we will try to present various approaches to this genre in this section, regardless of techniques used.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

171


WHERE COWBOYS ROAM Investigating and documenting the rich history of the American West has become a passion of mine. What appears to be a desolate, abandoned, corral most of the time, comes to life in the Spring when cattle are gathered and the annual ritual of sorting and branding occurs. I am drawn to the stark landscape of the Great Basin where ranching still happens the old fashioned way. My father was a prolific artist and Portland Art Museum instructor of

drawing and design. He shaped my art path through art history and constant practice. I am influenced by painters Klee, Matisse, Miro, and Modigliano. I create these images with a plastic camera. Its simplicity and spontaneity allows me to be more emotionally responsive to my everchanging environment. My camera of choice is a Kodak Fun Saver Panoramic 35 disposable camera. I recycle the cardboard cover,

remove the color film and modify the interior. Using a darkroom tent, I reload the camera with Tri-X black & white film. I use filtration while shooting and adjust aspects of processing to maximize the film’s potential. Photographs are made on Hahnemuhle Fine Art Pearl paper with archival pigment inks.

by Robert Gojević

DEON REYNOLDS where cowboys roam

http://www.deonreynolds.com/ USA

172


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

173


WIDE by Robert Gojević Copy editor: Michael McAllister

185


OPEN | section in which we try to widen our horizons by crossing the boundaries of themes we’ve emphasized in BLUR during the past few years. This section will host street, documentary, concert, experimental, and other types of photography, and even photo manipulation. The creative approach is still the most important aspect in choosing photographers, but we will show preference for those who could be described as “different.”

186


by Robert Gojević

YURIAN QUINTANAS NOBEL GRABARKA: Between Earth and Heaven

http://www.yurianquintanas.com Netherlands / Spain Every year, on the 19th of August, thousands of Orthodox, moved by faith, flock to the holy mountain of Grabarka to celebrate the Transfiguration. Many of them arrive on foot, on their knees or carry the traditional Orthodox cross for many miles as a sacrifice to God. On their arrival, the pilgrims place their crosses into the ground and start to pray. They continue their prayers throughout the night, hoping to receive health for themselves and their families and salvation for their dead ancestors.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

187


GRABARKA: Between Earth and Heaven

Every year, on the 19th of August, thousands of Orthodox, moved by faith, flock to the holy mountain of Grabarka to celebrate the Transfiguration. Many of them arrive on foot, on their knees or carry the traditional Orthodox cross for many miles as a sacrifice to God. On their arrival, the pilgrims place their crosses into the ground and start to pray. They continue their prayers throughout the night, hoping to receive health for themselves and their families and salvation for their dead ancestors. The Holy Mount of Grabarka, also known as “The Mountain of the 6000 Crosses,” is the largest center of worship for the Orthodox community in Poland. The story goes that in the 18th century, a man suffering from cholera had a dream and put a cross on top of the mountain and was miraculously healed. Since that day, people have not stopped carrying crosses to the sanctuary, and, year after year, the mountain has been filled with thousands of them. Grabarka is a place full of mysticism and spirituality, a sacred place that, for its devotees, serves as a link between the world of the living and the dead. Death in human society The concept of death as an end or as a transition, the idea of immortality and the belief in an afterlife, appear in one form or another in practically all societies and times of history. Death is a daily fact, implicit in life, and is possibly the only certainty that humans have. However, the idea of death remains remote and is even avoided by most people, and just the mention of it is considered taboo. It is essentially considered a personal failure, and it fills us with fear, pain and suffering because we don’t know how to react to it or accept it as natural. This is where we find religion, myths, and the different belief systems which can give hope to people facing this great mystery: death.

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

188


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

189


PROEYECT | is a little brother to the PROJECT section. Its purpose is to present mini projects, i.e. sets of photos, which are too few to included under PROJECT, but by their quality, unified theme, and story, deserve collective publication. Photographers often tell a kind of story through several photos, and this is the place for such stories. The number of photos is not a primary concern, so in this section, we may publish several unrelated stories.

201


by Robert Gojević

SIMON LALIA last meal

http://simonlalia.com/ Germany The last meal is a customary part of a condemned prisoner’s last day. photographed on expired polaroid film and written on dried up polaroids with an olivetti war model typewriter

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

202


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

203


BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

204


www.blur-magazine.com

BLUR magazine | ISSUE 29 | February 2013

216


BLUR 29