Page 1

2018 2


3


2


Nespresso, Co-host of the Official BAFTA Nominees’ Party and a Platinum Partner to the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2018, celebrates the launch of Nespresso Talents 2018.

www.nespresso.com/talents 3


congratulates our clients on their 2018 EE British Academy Film Awards nominations

Best Film DARKEST HOUR TIM BEVAN ERIC FELLNER ANTHONY MCCARTEN THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI MARTIN MCDONAGH* Outstanding British Film DARKEST HOUR JOE WRIGHT TIM BEVAN ERIC FELLNER ANTHONY MCCARTEN THE DEATH OF STALIN LAURENT ZEITOUN YANN ZENOU GOD’S OWN COUNTRY FRANCIS LEE* THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI MARTIN MCDONAGH* Director DENIS VILLENEUVE** BLADE RUNNER 2049 MARTIN MCDONAGH* THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Documentary CITY OF GHOSTS MATTHEW HEINEMAN

Original Screenplay JORDAN PEELE GET OUT MARTIN MCDONAGH* THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Adapted Screenplay AARON SORKIN MOLLY’S GAME Leading Actress ANNETTE BENING FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL MARGOT ROBBIE*** I, TONYA SALLY HAWKINS† THE SHAPE OF WATER SAOIRSE RONAN†† LADY BIRD Supporting Actress KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS††† DARKEST HOUR Supporting Actor HUGH GRANT PADDINGTON 2 WILLEM DAFOE THE FLORIDA PROJECT WOODY HARRELSON THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI EE Rising Star Award JOSH O’CONNOR†††

*Shared representation with The Knight Hall Agency Ltd †Shared representation with Conway van Gelder Grant ††Shared representation with MacFarlane Chard Associates **Shared representation with Claude Girard Agency ***Shared representation with Aran Michael Management †††Shared representation with Independent Talent Group


LE A RNING LINES

[1]

[2]

This year’s brochure cover artwork is not just a pretty picture, there’s meaning behind its design. It shows two sets of data* indicating the international impact and reputation of the British film industry. The red and white lines, which form the rings around the lens (fig. 1), illustrate the percentage spend on UK film production in 2016. This reached the highest level on record (since 1994) at £1.6bn, a 13 per cent increase on 2015, with the red lines representing the £180m growth. Inward investment films contributed more than £1.3bn towards this total, a 16 per cent increase year-on-year, setting another record high. While it would be shortsighted to believe everything in the industry is fine (the number of productions has decreased from 2015, for instance), the growth in investment does suggest confidence in the quality of British productions and the skill of its practitioners. This year’s Film Awards nominations are perhaps the most ‘British’ for more than a decade, with three of the five Best Film nominees having significant British investment and 40 per cent of the performance nominees being British. It is perhaps

fitting that the cover art’s next statistic should focus on UK acting talent (fig. 2). Since 2001, more than 60 per cent (121) of the top 200 films at the global box office have featured British actors in leading (52) or supporting (69) roles. That’s almost two thirds of the list, as represented by the combined white and red lines that fill a third of the camera’s rings. It’s noteworthy, too, that if animated titles are removed then the figure rises to an incredible 79 per cent. British talent, both in front of and behind the camera, are some of the most sought-after in the world and BAFTA is working hard to ensure that this remarkable legacy not only lasts but grows. Much of our work outside of the Awards is designed to support new and emerging talent, whatever their background, and at a grassroots level, we are also seeking to inspire children and young people to consider working in the moving image industries. Find out more about our activities on page 107 of this brochure and online: www.bafta.org

6

* Source: The BFI Statistical Yearbook 2017

T H E STO RY B EH I N D T H IS YE A R ÕS COV ER A RT WO R K...


CONTENTS

W E LCO M E

S P E C I A L AWA R D S

8 HRH The Duke Of Cambridge, KG

62 The Fellowship

Strong female characters, dystopias, corruption and what it means to be human are all elements that regularly feature in the exceptional filmography of this year’s Fellowship recipient: Sir Ridley Scott. Words by Rosie Fletcher

9 Amanda Berry obe / Jane Lush 11

Marc Allera

N O M I N AT I O NS 15

The Nominations in full

40

 Juries & Chapters

72

BEST FIL M NOM INEES 43 Call Me By Your Name

Life’s just peachy in this exquisite, sun-soaked romance of tantalising flirtations and acute pangs of the heart. Words by Matthew Turner

F O R Y O U R E Y E S O N LY: A P H O T O G R A P H I C E S S AY 81  The intimate narrative of the Film Awards,

47 Darkest Hour

A shadowy thriller about the uncertain early days of Winston Churchill’s first premiership. Words by Neil Smith

as seen through the eye of photographer Sarah Lee.

99

51 Dunkirk

In Memoriam

107 Focus on Film

With its interweaving stories and escalating momentum, Dunkirk ships a whole new approach to the classic war genre. Words by Christina Newland

117 Officers of the Academy 119 Partners of the Academy 121 Film Awards Partners

55  The Shape of Water

123 Film Awards Gift Providers

There’s a haunting nostalgia and deep love for the silver age of cinema swimming through this unique and whimsical fairy tale romance. Words by Clarisse Loughrey 59

Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema BAFTA goes back to school for this special award, celebrating the incredible contribution the National Film and Television School has made to the moving image. Words by Rich Matthews

125 Acknowledgements & Credits

 hree Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri T A savage black comedy that’s as sharp with its verbal barbs and bloody, visceral action as it is with its poignant moments of grief. Words by Charlotte O’Sullivan

7


H R H T H E D U K E O F C A M B R I D G E, KG President of the Academy

8


WELCOM E EE

BRITISH

TO

ACA DE MY

THE FIL M

AWA RDS

very warm welcome to this year’s EE British Academy Film Awards, our annual celebration of the very best achievement in film and recognising creative talent from across the globe. Congratulations to all our nominees: the outstanding films and performances nominated across all categories this evening demonstrate how our industry is thriving. It’s been a fantastic year for film and, in particular, for British talent - 71 Brits are among this year’s nominees. This success is captured on the brochure’s front cover, which is a visual representation of how the UK film industry is booming and illustrates the part our homegrown talent is playing within the industry internationally. This evening’s event is as much about shining a light on new voices and breakthrough performances as it is about honouring the contribution from those of you who have worked in the industry for decades. Each year, through categories such as Outstanding Debut, Short Film and Short Animation and EE Rising Star, we are able to identify and reward the next biggest names in film across a range of crafts. Celebrating and nurturing that talent – through activity and initiatives not only in the UK but in Los Angeles, New York and Asia – is at the heart of what we do. BAFTA is committed to making sure that talented individuals are given the opportunities and encouragement needed to succeed in the creative industries. The film industry has also been in the news for the wrong reasons in the last few months. BAFTA unequivocally promotes a professional environment that protects all who work in it from bullying or harassment, and alongside organisations such as the British Film Institute, Women in Film & Television, Equity and many others, we have pooled our knowledge and resources to create a unified set of principles and guidelines. At this watershed moment, let’s work together in resetting the tone and continuing to build a future where anyone – regardless of who they are, or where they are from – is able to flourish in the industry we love so much. We can be a catalyst for real and lasting change. Have a wonderful evening. •

A

A M AN DA BERRY

OBE

Chief Executive of the Academy

JANE LUSH

Chair of the Academy

FOLLOW US #EEBA F TA s

bafta.org

/BA F TA

9

@BA F TA

BA F TA

BA F TA


1 0


WELCOM E

FROM

CEO, EE

SPONSO R

elcome to the EE British Academy Film Awards, a celebration of another amazing year in British and global filmmaking. The last 12 months have continued the trend of thoughtful low-budget pictures sharing the limelight with studio blockbusters. We’ve seen Get Out using a traditional horror format to shine a torch on certain societal ills, and Blade Runner 2049 paint a stunningly beautiful picture of an often less-than-beautiful future. I remember watching the original Blade Runner and being amazed by the scene in which Deckard (Harrison Ford) zooms in and enhances a photograph to help his investigation. Now, of course, we do it on our mobile phones. As yet, I’ve not seen a commercial case for another feature of the movie – flying cars – but I’ve no doubt Tesla is working on something and they’ll need mobile connectivity when it eventually comes. I typically include in this message a reflection on how many years BAFTA and EE have been working together. You could say that, this year, our partnership has come of age. It’s 21 wonderful years that we’ve been celebrating the best in international filmmaking. Naturally, all of us at EE are THOUGHTFUL delighted to once again present the EE Rising Star award, which LOW-BUDGET last year went to the wonderfully energetic Tom Holland. This year, PICTURES HAVE a jury comprising of chair Marc Samuelson, Philippa Lowthorpe, SHARED THE Lucy Bevan, Leo Davis, Nadine Marsh-Edwards, Edith Bowman and LIMELIGHT Georgina Campbell whittled down a huge longlist to a commendable WITH STUDIO coterie of exciting emerging talent. Good luck to everyone that made BLOCKBUSTERS. this year’s shortlist. I want to sign-off by saying that the film that moved me most this year was Dunkirk, which made watching the human reality of Operation Dynamo a truly visceral experience. In 2018, we will increasingly enjoy video content on small screens while on the move; this, however, was one to be watched, heard and felt on the big screen. It’s one of the many reasons all of us at EE love cinema, and are so excited we get to work with BAFTA every year. Enjoy your evening! •

W

MARC ALLERA

OUR

1 1


Champagne for the Independently Minded

www.taittinger.com #TaittingerTime ď…Ş @TaittingerUK

Champagne Taittinger 1 2

taittinger_uk


TA I T T I N G E R T I M E The House of Taittinger is headed up by Pierre-Emmanuel Taittinger, along with his daughter Vitalie, and son Clovis. Taittinger is the only Grande Marque (famous Champagne House) owned and run by its eponymous family.

TI

M

E

FO

R

FA

M

IL

Y

With 288 hectares of their own vineyards, Taittinger is the second largest grower in the region and is passionate about nature and taking care of the environment. Being ‘Green’ is in their everyday DNA, working with Mother Nature to produce the best Chardonnay (for floral elegance), Pinot Noir (for regal richness) and E Pinot Meunier (for fruity roundness). R Pick too early, and the wines U T A would be lean; pick too late, and they N would lack structure and durability. R

M TI TIM

TI

ME

E

FO

TI

Some 18 metres underground the UNESCO 4 th Century Roman cellars form Ta i t t i n g e r ’ s heart. Here, E FOR AGEING their crème de la crème cuvée – Comtes de Champagne ‘Blanc de Blancs’ (100% Chardonnay) – is left to FO gently mature and is only released R after a minimum of 8 years. E

ME

LE

TO

GA

NC

CE LE BR AT

The blending o f Taittinger Brut Re s e r ve ’s th r e e grape varieties, from a range of vintages, is an art. The elegant balance of the Chardonnay rich Taittinger style is vital.

E

E

Champagne Officiel de BAFTA depuis 2003.

Official Champagne to BAFTA 1 3


WINE GROWER CREATOR FINE CHAMPAGNE 1 4


THE NO

M IN AT IONS

1 5


BEFORE YOU WALK THE RED CARPET, FLY IT.

Proud to be the official airline of the EE British Academy Film Awards.

1 6

American Airlines, the Flight Symbol logo and the Tail Symbol are marks of American Airlines, Inc. oneworld is a mark of the oneworld alliance, LLC. © 2016 American Airlines, Inc. All rights reserved.


A DA PTED SCREENPL AY

C A L L M E BY YO U R N A M E

T H E D E AT H O F S TA L I N

James Ivory

Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin, David Schneider

F I L M S TA RS D O N ’ T D I E

M O L LY ’ S G A M E

PA D D I N G T O N 2

IN LIVERPOOL

Aaron Sorkin

Simon Farnaby, Paul King

Matt Greenhalgh

ANIM ATED FIL M

COCO

LOVIN G VINCENT

Lee Unkrich, Darla K Anderson

Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Ivan Mactaggart

MY LI FE AS A COU RGET TE

Claude Barras, Max Karli

1 7


FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES & TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX would like to thank the BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS and proudly congratulate our nominees.

BEST FILM J. Miles Dale, Guillermo del Toro DIRECTOR Guillermo del Toro ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor LEADING ACTRESS Sally Hawkins SUPPORTING ACTRESS Octavia Spencer ORIGINAL MUSIC Alexandre Desplat CINEMATOGRAPHY Dan Laustsen EDITING Sidney Wolinsky PRODUCTION DESIGN Paul Denham Austerberry, Shane Vieau, Jeff Melvin COSTUME DESIGN Luis Sequeira SOUND Glen Gauthier, Nathan Robitaille, Nelson Ferreira, Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Dennis Berardi, Trey Harrell, Mike Hill, Kevin Scott

BEST FILM Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Martin McDonagh OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin DIRECTOR Martin McDonagh ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY Martin McDonagh LEADING ACTRESS Frances McDormand SUPPORTING ACTOR Woody Harrelson SUPPORTING ACTOR Sam Rockwell CINEMATOGRAPHY Ben Davis EDITING Jon Gregory

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Joe Letteri, Dan Lemmon, Daniel Barrett, Joel Whist

© All rights reserved.

1 8


BEST FILM

C A L L M E BY YO U R N A M E

DARKEST HOUR

Emilie Georges, Luca Guadagnino, Marco Morabito, Peter Spears

Tim Bevan, Lisa Bruce, Eric Fellner, Anthony McCarten, Douglas Urbanski

DUNKIRK

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

THREE BILLBOARDS

Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas

Guillermo del Toro, J Miles Dale

O U T S I D E E B B I N G, M I S S O U R I

Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Martin McDonagh

BRITISH SHORT ANIM ATION

H AV E H E A R T

MAMOON

Will Anderson

Ben Steer

P O L E S A PA R T

Paloma Baeza, Ser En Low

1 9


We proudly congratulate our EE British Academy Film Awards Nominees LEADING ACTRESS

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

DARKEST HOUR

LADY BIRD

LISA BRUCE

GRETA GERWIG

FRANCES MCDORMAND LEADING ACTOR FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL

JAMIE BELL CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET BEST FILM CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

THE DEATH OF STALIN

ARMANDO IANNUCCI

ARMANDO IANNUCCI

PADDINGTON 2

PADDINGTON 2

SIMON FARNABY

SIMON FARNABY

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

CINEMATOGRAPHY

LADY MACBETH

ROGER DEAKINS

ALICE BIRCH WRITER

DARKEST HOUR

DOCUMENTARY

LISA BRUCE

ICARUS

FIRST THEY KILLED MY FATHER

THE DEATH OF STALIN

ALICE BIRCH

LADY MACBETH

PETER SPEARS

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

DAN COGAN BRYAN FOGEL AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL

ANGELINA JOLIE

BONNI COHEN JON SHENK

THE SALESMAN

JANE

ASGHAR FARHADI

ELLEN KURAS

2 0

BLADE RUNNER 2049

DUNKIRK

HOYTE VAN HOYTEMA EDITING BABY DRIVER

PAUL MACHLISS EE RISING STAR AWARD

TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET


BRITISH SHORT FILM

AAMIR

C O W B OY DAV E

Vika Evdokimenko, Emma Stone, Oliver Shuster

Colin O’Toole, Jonas Mortensen

A DROWNING M AN

WORK

W R E N B OYS

Mahdi Fleifel, Signe Byrge Sørensen, Patrick Campbell

Aneil Karia, Scott O’Donnell

Harry Lighton, Sorcha Bacon, John Fitzpatrick

CINEM ATOGR A PHY

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

DARKEST HOUR

Roger Deakins

Bruno Delbonnel

DUNKIRK

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

THREE BILLBOARDS

Hoyte van Hoytema

Dan Laustsen

O U T S I D E E B B I N G, M I S S O U R I

Ben Davis

2 1


HERE’S TO A VICTORIOUS EVENING Working Title would like to thank the EE British Academy Film Awards and congratulates all the outstanding nominees

2 2


COSTUME DESIGN

BEAUT Y AND THE BEAST

DARKEST HOUR

Jacqueline Durran

Jacqueline Durran

I , T O N YA

PHANTOM THREAD

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

Jennifer Johnson

Mark Bridges

Luis Sequeira

DIRECTOR

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

C A L L M E BY YO U R N A M E

Denis Villeneuve

Luca Guadagnino

DUNKIRK

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

THREE BILLBOARDS

Christopher Nolan

Guillermo del Toro

O U T S I D E E B B I N G, M I S S O U R I

Martin McDonagh

2 3


C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S T O A L L

NOMINEES AND WINNERS

www.pinewoodgroup.com 2 4


DOCUM ENTA RY

CITY OF GHOSTS

I A M N OT YO U R N E G R O

Matthew Heineman

Raoul Peck

ICARUS

AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL

JANE

Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan

Bonni Cohen, Jon Shenk

Brett Morgen, Bryan Burk

EDITING

BA BY D R I V E R

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss

Joe Walker

DUNKIRK

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

THREE BILLBOARDS

Lee Smith

Sidney Wolinsky

O U T S I D E E B B I N G, M I S S O U R I

Jon Gregory

2 5


2 6


FIL M NOT IN THE ENGLISH L A NGUAGE

ELLE

FIRST THEY KILLED MY FAT H E R

Paul Verhoeven, Saïd Ben Saïd

Angelina Jolie, Rithy Panh

THE HANDMAIDEN

LOVELESS

THE SALESMAN

Park Chan-wook, Syd Lim

Andrey Zvyagintsev, Alexander Rodnyansky

Asghar Farhadi, Alexandre Mallet-Guy

LEA DING ACTOR

D A N I E L D AY- L E W I S

D A N I E L K A L U U YA

Phantom Thread

Get Out

GARY OLDM AN

JA MIE BELL

TIMOTHÉ E CHAL AMET

Darkest Hour

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool

Call Me by Your Name

2 7


FILM4 PROUDLY CONGRATULATES ALL OUR 2018 BAFTA NOMINEES

I AM NOT A WITCH OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER Rungano Nyoni (Writer/Director), Emily Morgan (Producer)

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI BEST FILM OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM DIRECTOR Martin McDonagh ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY Martin McDonagh LEADING ACTRESS Frances McDormand SUPPORTING ACTOR Sam Rockwell SUPPORTING ACTOR Woody Harrelson CINEMATOGRAPHY Ben Davis EDITING Jon Gregory

WORK BRITISH SHORT FILM Aneil Karia, Scott O’Donnell


LEADING ACTRESS

ANNETTE BENING

FR ANCES McDORMAND

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

MARGOT ROBBIE

S A L LY H A W K I N S

SAOIRSE RONAN

I, Tonya

The Shape of Water

Lady Bird

MAKE UP & HAIR

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

DARKEST HOUR

Donald Mowat, Kerry Warn

David Malinowski, Ivana Primorac, Lucy Sibbick, Kazuhiro Tsuji

I , T O N YA

VICTORIA & ABDUL

WONDER

Deborah La Mia Denaver, Adruitha Lee

Daniel Phillips, Lou Sheppard

Naomi Bakstad, Robert A Pandini, Arjen Tuiten

2 9


3 0


ORIGINAL MUSIC

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

DARKEST HOUR

Benjamin Wallfisch, Hans Zimmer

Dario Marianelli

DUNKIRK

PHANTOM THREAD

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

Hans Zimmer

Jonny Greenwood

Alexandre Desplat

O RI GINA L SCREENPL AY

GET OUT

I , T O N YA

Jordan Peele

Steven Rogers

L A DY B I R D

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

THREE BILLBOARDS

Greta Gerwig

Guillermo del Toro, Vanessa Taylor

O U T S I D E E B B I N G, M I S S O U R I

Martin McDonagh

3 1


Congratulations to tonight’s nominees GOD’S OWN COUNTRY I AM NOT A WITCH KINGDOM OF US LADY MACBETH WREN BOYS

#BFIBacked #NationalLottery bfi.org.uk/filmfund

3 2


OUTSTA NDING BRITISH FIL M

DARKEST HOUR

T H E D E AT H O F S TA L I N

GOD’S OWN COU NTRY

Joe Wright, Tim Bevan, Lisa Bruce, Eric Fellner, Anthony McCarten, Douglas Urbanski

Armando Iannucci, Kevin Loader, Laurent Zeitoun, Yann Zenou, Ian Martin, David Schneider

Francis Lee, Manon Ardisson, Jack Tarling

L A DY M AC B E T H

PA D D I N G T O N 2

THREE BILLBOARDS

William Oldroyd, Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly, Alice Birch

Paul King, David Heyman, Simon Farnaby

O U T S I D E E B B I N G, M I S S O U R I

Martin McDonagh, Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin

OUTSTA NDING DEBUT By a British Writer, Director or Producer

THE GHOUL

I AM NOT A WITCH

Gareth Tunley (Writer/Director/Producer), Jack Healy Guttmann, Tom Meeten (Producers)

Rungano Nyoni (Writer/Director), Emily Morgan (Producer)

JAW B O N E

KINGDOM OF US

L A DY M AC B E T H

Johnny Harris (Writer/Producer), Thomas Napper (Director)

Lucy Cohen (Director)

Alice Birch (Writer), William Oldroyd (Director), Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly (Producer)

3 3


SONY PICTURES RELEASING (UK) THANKS THE BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS NOMINEES

EMILIE GEORGES, LUCA GUADAGNINO, MARCO MORABITO, PETER SPEARS BEST FILM

CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER SUPPORTING ACTOR

LUCA GUADAGNINO DIRECTOR JAMES IVORY ADAPTED SCREENPLAY TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET LEADING ACTOR

DENIS VILLENEUVE DIRECTOR BENJAMIN WALLFISCH, HANS ZIMMER ORIGINAL MUSIC ROGER DEAKINS CINEMATOGRAPHY JOE WALKER EDITING

JONATHAN AMOS, PAUL MACHLISS EDITING

DENNIS GASSNER, ALESSANDRA QUERZOLA PRODUCTION DESIGN

TIM CAVAGIN, MARY H. ELLIS, DAN MORGAN, JEREMY PRICE, JULIAN SLATER SOUND

DONALD MOWAT, KERRY WARN MAKE UP & HAIR RON BARTLETT, DOUG HEMPHILL, MARK MANGINI, MAC RUTH, THEO GREEN SOUND RICHARD R. HOOVER, PAUL LAMBERT, GERD NEFZER, JOHN NELSON SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

www.sonypictures.co.uk

© 2018 Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved.

3 4


PRODUCTION DESIGN

BEAUT Y AND THE BEAST

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer

Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola

DARKEST HOUR

DUNKIRK

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer

Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis

Paul Austerberry, Jeff Melvin, Shane Vieau

SOUND

BA BY D R I V E R

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

Tim Cavagin, Mary H Ellis, Dan Morgan, Jeremy Price, Julian Slater

Ron Bartlett, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill, Mark Mangini, Mac Ruth

DUNKIRK

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

S TA R WA R S : T H E L A S T J E D I

Alex Gibson, Richard King, Gregg Landaker, Gary A Rizzo, Mark Weingarten

Christian Cooke, Nelson Ferreira, Glen Gauthier, Nathan Robitaille, Brad Zoern

Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick, Stuart Wilson, Matthew Wood

3 5


CONGRATULATIONS SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS NOMINEES

JOE LETTERI DAN LEMMON DANIEL BARRETT JOEL WHIST

3 6

© 2017 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation


SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

BL ADE RUNNER 2049

DUNKIRK

Richard R Hoover, Paul Lambert, Gerd Nefzer, John Nelson

Paul Corbould, Scott Fisher, Andrew Jackson, Andrew Lockley

T H E S H A P E O F WAT E R

S TA R WA R S : T H E L A S T J E D I

Dennis Berardi, Trey Harrell, Mike Hill, Kevin Scott

Stephen Aplin, Chris Corbould, Ben Morris, Neal Scanlan

WA R F O R T H E P L A N E T OF THE APES

Daniel Barrett, Dan Lemmon, Joe Letteri, Joel Whist

SUPPORTING ACTOR

CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER

HUGH GRANT

All the Money in the World

Paddington 2

SAM ROCKWELL

WILLEM DAFOE

WO O DY H A R R E L S O N

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

The Florida Project

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

3 7


UK RootMetricsÂŽ Report H1 2017

3 8


SUPPORTING ACTRESS

ALLISON JANNEY

KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS

I, Tonya

Darkest Hour

L AURIE METCALF

LESLEY MANVILLE

O C TAV I A S P E N C E R

Lady Bird

Phantom Thread

The Shape of Water

THE EE RISING STA R AWA RD Voted for by the public

D A N I E L K A L U U YA

JOSH O’CON N OR

FLORENCE PUGH

TESSA THOMPSON

TIMOTHÉ E CHAL AMET

Nominations are correct at the time of going to print. BAFTA reserves the right to make changes to the names listed at any time up until 18 February 2018.

3 9


J URIES

&

CHA PTERS

JURIES

BRITISH SHORT A N I M AT I O N Iain Harvey (Chair)  Julie Baines Gaëlle Denis Mario Cavalli Danny Hambrook Akiya Henry Dave Ingham Robin Lyons Loraine Marshall Magdalena Osinska Chris Rose BRITISH SHORT FIL M Andrew Curtis (Chair) Bola Agbaje Ole Birkeland Rupert Evans Kevin Loader Nat Luurtsema Úna Ní Dhonghaíle Allon Reich Nitin Sawhney With thanks to Anna Duffield, Hong Khaou, Kelly Valentine Hendry and Penny Woolcock for their help in the shortlisting stage, and the 200 BAFTA members who took part in the longlisting groups.

O U T S TA N D I N G BRITISH FIL M Marc Samuelson (Chair) Amma Asante Sean Ellis  Jo-Jo Ellison Sally El Hosaini Andrew Haigh Rob Hardy Gillian Hawser Abi Morgan Nisha Parti Matthew Penry-Davey

CHAPTERS

O U T S TA N D I N G D EB U T BY A B R I T I S H W R I T ER, D I R E C TO R OR PRODUCER Tanya Seghatchian (Chair) Babak Anvari David Arnold Anthony Chen Lucinda Coxon Charles Gant Tony Grisoni Dixie Linder Wendy Mitchell Clare Stewart Matthew Warchus Ruth Wilson With thanks to Jinx Godfrey, Elizabeth Karlsen and Gabrielle Tana for their help in the longlisting stages.

E E R I S I N G S TA R Marc Samuelson (Chair) Matt Bagwell Lucy Bevan Edith Bowman Georgina Campbell Robbie Collin Leo Davis Lena de Casparis Larushka Ivan-Zadeh Philippa Lowthorpe Tom Macklin Nadine Marsh-Edwards With thanks to Charles Gant, Kate Buckley and Pippa Markham for their help in the longlisting stages.

4 0

CR A F T CHA PTERS Cinematography Costume Design Directing Editing Make Up & Hair Music Production Design Screenplay Sound Special Visual Effects O P T- I N CH A P T ERS Animation British Short Animation and British Short Film Documentary Film Not in the English Language Outstanding British Film Craft chapters consist of Academy members with specialist experience in the relative field. Opt-in chapters are open to all members who are willing to commit to watching the eligible films. Special Award recipients are selected by the Film Committee. For full details of the voting process, please visit: www.bafta.org/film/awards


Film Finances congratulates all this year’s BAFTA Nominees and is proud to have been the Completion Guarantor of Blade Runner 2049 I, Tonya, Jawbone Molly’s Game Phantom Thread Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri Wonder

Film Finances, world leader in the provision of Completion Guarantees For the Film and Television Industry since 1950


ENHANCE

MOMENTS

Tastefully Italian

sanpellegrino.com

4 2


C A L L M E BY YO U R N A M E WO R DS BY M AT T H E W T U R N ER

4 3


BEST

FI LM

NOM I N E E

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Emilie Georges, Luca Guadagnino, Marco Morabito, Peter Spears

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Adapted Screenplay, Director, Leading Actor

arly on in Luca Guadagnino’s exquisitely romantic sexual awakening drama, Michael Stuhlbarg’s professor of archaeology observes a piece of sculpture and remarks, “There’s not a straight line in any of these statues; they’re all curved, as if daring you to desire them.” These themes of desire and playfulness are central to Guadagnino’s film, an achingly tender portrait of first love that has every element working in perfect harmony. Set ‘somewhere in northern Italy’ in 1983, the film depicts the burgeoning relationship between 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and 24-year-old graduate student Oliver (Armie Hammer), who’s been invited to the professor’s summer home to assist with his research. At first, Elio is irritated by Oliver (not least because he has to give up his bedroom), but his disdain quickly transforms into erotic obsession and he’s thrilled to discover that his feelings are reciprocated. Adapted from André Aciman’s 2007 coming-of-age/coming out novel by screenwriter and producer James Ivory, Guadagnino’s film

E

4 4

THIS IS AN INTENSELY SENSUAL FILM THATÕS FULLY ALIVE TO THE PLEASURES OF LIFE.


CALL

ME

perfectly captures the intoxicating rush of first love, from the thrill of casual physical contact to the tantalising possibilities of flirtatious conversation and the deathly sharp pangs of heartache and jealousy. The director’s masterful choreography of the flirtation scenes is just one of the film’s many delights – think of the images of the pair weaving towards and away from the camera on their frequent bike rides; or the wide shot scene at the Battle of the Piave monument on a piazza, the out-of-shot characters circling the statue and coming closer together, just as their still-coded conversation finally confirms their mutual attraction. It’s not just the love story that captivates, however. This is an intensely sensual film that’s fully alive to the pleasures of life. Guadagnino’s transportive direction allows you to experience each and every one of them, from the warm Italian sunlight on your face to the buzz of the insects in the summer haze to the indulgent taste of ripe fruit. In the film’s most amusingly outrageous scene, this last artifice is taken to deliriously sensual

BY

Y O U R

N A M E

heights with a sequence involving the erotic use of a peach that would make even Philip Roth blush. (If there was an award for 2017’s Best Prop, that peach would win hands down.) On top of everything else, Guadagnino has cast the film to perfection. Relative newcomer Chalamet is simply mesmerising as Elio, conveying complex, powerful emotion with his expressive eyes and body language and generating palpable chemistry with his co-star. Similarly, Hammer (who continues to make interesting choices) delivers perhaps his best performance to date, dialing his all-American golden boy charisma up to 11 and putting his chiselled physicality to crowd-pleasing effect, cheerfully spending the entire movie in a pair of tiny shorts. Stuhlbarg is equally wonderful as Elio’s dad, delivering a heartfelt, compassionate fatherson speech towards the end of the film that limbers up the tear ducts just in time for Guadagnino’s devastating final shot, a heart-breaking close-up of Elio’s face that’s destined to go down as one of the all-time great film endings. • Matthew Turner is a freelance film journalist and the critic for iNews

4 5


N Zealan New Z d’s Most M Awarded r Wine rded W ry r

Full-bodied, with distinct undertones of independence. When you’re independent, you get to decide your own path and follow your dreams. This means that we can give free rein to our creativity, because whether in the world of film or wine, that’s when the magic happens. For us, it’s about choosing only what is good enough for our family and friends. See for yourself, next time you open a bottle of Villa Maria.

OPEN ANOTHER WORLD

TM

George Villa Maria Founder, Owner

CELEBRATING OUR 10TH YEAR OF PARTNERSHIP WITH BAFTA4 6


DA RKEST HOUR WO R DS BY N EI L S M I T H

4 7


BEST

FI LM

NOM I N E E

oe Wright’s Darkest Hour is not the only Best Film nominee at this year’s Awards to involve Operation Dynamo, the mass evacuation of more than 330,000 British and Allied troops from French soil in MayJune 1940. Nor is it the only Joe Wright film to feature this pivotal World War II episode, the director having already taken us to Dunkirk in Atonement (2007), winner of the Best Film BAFTA in 2008. And it is certainly not the first work to have an actor portray Winston Churchill and be BAFTAnominated as a result (Simon Ward was shortlisted for Most Promising Newcomer for Young Winston, while John Lithgow was recognised for playing Churchill in The Crown as recently as last year). Faced with a mountain of familiarity, though, Wright and his team set out to conquer it anew. Beginning on 9 May 1940 and ending on 4 June, Darkest Hour imagines the early days of Churchill’s first prime ministership as a taut political thriller, with the newly installed PM facing opposition to his ‘fight on’ policy from his party, his king and an appeasement-seeking War Cabinet. Rather than taking us again to the beaches of Dunkirk, Wright takes us into the Houses of Parliament, the Cabinet War Rooms and even the London Underground: shadowy, crepuscular places that mirror the dire situation facing Britain and its allies. In Gary Oldman, meanwhile, it has a Churchill who is flawed, self-doubting and only too human: a tetchy, sly and combative soul who can bring the Commons to its feet with his inspirational oratory yet can’t coax a cat out from under his bed at Chartwell.

J

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Tim Bevan, Lisa Bruce, Eric Fellner, Anthony McCarten, Douglas Urbanski

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Cinematography, Costume Design, Leading Actor, Make Up & Hair, Original Music, Outstanding British Film, Production Design, Supporting Actress

4 8


DAR KES T

Oldman’s Churchill is one for the ages and marks another career highpoint for an actor who already has indelible portrayals of Joe Orton, Sid Vicious and Lee Harvey Oswald under his belt. His, though, is not the only performance of note in a film that also boasts Dame Kristin Scott Thomas conveying empathy and compassion as his loyal spouse, Clemmie; Australia’s Ben Mendelsohn emoting regal unease as George VI; and Stephen Dillane making a scarily credible case for peace talks as the wily Viscount Halifax. Credit should go to Lily James as well for the way she nurtures Churchill’s secretary Elizabeth Layton from nervous novice to invaluable helpmate, and to Ronald Pickup for bringing a crumpled, embattled dignity to

HO U R

GARY OLDMANÕS CHURCHILL IS FLAWED, SELFDOUBTING AND ONLY TOO HUMAN: A TETCHY, SLY AND COMBATIVE SOUL.

the ailing Neville Chamberlain, a role originally intended for the late Sir John Hurt. Much has been and will be written on the astounding make up wizardry that aided Oldman’s central transformation. Yet, Darkest Hour also deserves plaudits for its masterful production design, Bruno Delbonnel’s prowling cinematography and a score from Dario Marianelli that prickles with urgency and tension. At one point in the story, screenwriter Anthony McCarten has Churchill and his family make an irreverent toast, “To not buggering it up”. It goes without saying that there is no buggering up in a riveting drama that makes the events of 78 years ago feel as relevant as this morning’s headlines. • Neil Smith is a contributing editor of Total Film magazine

4 9


WARNER BROS. PICTURES WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE

BRITISH ACADEMY OF FILM AND TELEVISION ARTS AND PROUDLY CONGRATULATE OUR NOMINEES

BEST FILM

EMMA THOMAS, p.g.a. CHRISTOPHER NOLAN, p.g.a.

SOUND

RICHARD KING GREGG LANDAKER GARY A. RIZZO ALEX GIBSON MARK WEINGARTEN

DIRECTOR

CHRISTOPHER NOLAN

CINEMATOGRAPHY

HOYTE VAN HOYTEMA, ASC, FSF, NSC

EDITING

LEE SMITH, ACE

PRODUCTION DESIGN NATHAN CROWLEY GARY FETTIS

W W W.W A R N E R B R O S 2 0 1 7. C O M

5 0

ORIGINAL MUSIC HANS ZIMMER

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS ANDREW JACKSON SCOTT FISHER PAUL CORBOULD ANDREW LOCKLEY


DUNKIRK WO R DS BY CH R IST I N A N E WL A N D

5 1


BEST

FI LM

NOM I N E E

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Cinematography, Director, Editing, Original Music, Production Design, Sound, Special Visual Effects

n the summer of 1940, an embattled, plucky Britain faces the thundering might of potential Nazi invasion. Trapped on the beaches at Dunkirk and awaiting rescue, some 330,000 British and Allied troops do what they can to stave off death by air or sea. Among them, a young British Army private (Fionn Whitehead) desperately searches for any means to cross the Channel, a constant target for German torpedoes and the Luftwaffe. As the boys on land try to escape, the RAF pilots in the air (Tom Hardy and Jack Lowden) do their best to protect them, often to little success. Meanwhile, some courageous British civilians (Mark Rylance, Barry Keoghan) sail their small vessel across the channel to see if they can offer some help. Using a triptych structure to tell the Dunkirk evacuation story by land, sea and air (also known as Operation Dynamo), Christopher Nolan applies a deeply modern approach to the most classical of subjects. With its incremental time slippages and pummelling, near-constant momentum, Dunkirk bears little resemblance to Second World War films of times past. With Hans Zimmer’s dissonant, nerve-shredding soundtrack ticking away in the background, the effect is overwhelming and immersive. Nolan’s approach to characterisation is also unusual – his subjects are frequently wordless and archetypal, plucked seemingly at random from the hundreds of

I

5 2


DUNKI RK thousands of individuals surrounding them. The simple humanity of their ordeal is highlighted by the lack of specificity; there’s a sense that these young men are strangers to us but we are nonetheless compelled by their fight for survival. If there was any doubt that something novel could be done with the subject and genre, Nolan soon banishes it. This is the first feature film to use handheld IMAX cameras, and one of very few to be so predominately filmed on 65mm. Made in natural light, there’s a remarkable tactility to Dunkirk – real vintage bombers and creaking warships of the era were a must for the filmmaker, with CGI avoided wherever possible. The film’s clever combination of physical effects and technological modernity amount to what is ultimately an old-fashioned story: one of underdog glory. But Dunkirk is also a trying – even traumatising –

THESE YOUNG MEN ARE STRANGERS TO US BUT WE ARE NONETHELESS COMPELLED BY THEIR FIGHT FOR SURVIVAL.

viewing experience. The sensory and emotional barrage is relentless. Men line up on a pier in a vast column of olive drab and steel helmets; heads tilting upward one by one in slow horror as a German plane descends. Splinters and seafoam fly. Machine guns strafe and warplanes arrive with a menacing high-pitched whine. Water rushes into the side of a damaged warship like a Biblical flood, tossing the soldiers around like ragdolls. ‘Spectacle’ might seem like a dirty word these days, but Dunkirk proves that spectacle can exist in its finest sense. Here, Nolan uses it in service of illuminating this desperate, harrowing moment in 20th century history. • Christina Newland is a freelance journalist on film and culture for The Guardian, Sight & Sound and Little White Lies magazine

5 3


KARLIE KLOSS

I N S P I R E D BY N AT U R E, C R A F T E D BY S WA ROVS K I

ATELIERSWAROVSKI.COM


T H E S H A P E O F WAT ER WO R DS BY CL A R IS SE LO U G H R E Y

5 5


BEST

FI LM

NOM I N E E

oneliness is an odd, dreadful curse: a cruel joke that can leave someone feeling utterly abandoned in the middle of a crowded room. It descends like a dreary haze on the inhabitants of Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water, their souls chained down as if they were trapped at the bottom of the ocean. An image conjured thanks to Dan Laustsen’s murky, dreamy cinematography, partnered with Alexandre Desplat’s twinkling score, which strikes like sunbeams breaking through the surface. To del Toro, loneliness isn’t always about physical isolation, it can feel like speaking a language no one else understands. A fact more literally true of the film’s mute heroine Elisa, “a princess without a voice”, delivered to screen with aching passion by Sally Hawkins. Her each gesture vibrates with the potency of a thousand words, but they’re largely lost on those around her. She feels lonely because she cannot speak, but so does her friend Zelda (Octavia Spencer), despite filling their days cleaning the halls of a secretive laboratory with nothing but words, only to return home to a husband who barely acknowledges her existence. Their overseer (Michael Shannon), a brash individual, may possess the picture perfect family and a brand new Cadillac, but those things could

L

5 6

THE LANGUAGE OF LOVE [IS] SO MYSTICAL, SO OVERWHELMING, IT FEELS CONCEIVABLE ONLY THROUGH DREAMS, FAIRY TALES AND THE SILVER SCREEN. never possibly fill the aching void that constitutes unfulfilled ambition. He is a monster created out of loneliness, feverishly convinced his own brutality will pave the way to power – and to a sense of rightful place. A scientist (Michael Stuhlbarg), too, feels isolated, but here by his own dedication to a cause that ultimately fails to believe in him. Elisa’s neighbour (Richard Jenkins), meanwhile, is outright rejected by the world due to his sexuality. But within these dark caverns, something grows. A strange attraction,


TH E

SH APE

OF

W A TE R

shared so unexpectedly between Elisa and the aquatic creature (Doug Jones) held captive as the laboratory’s latest experiment. They may not speak each other’s language, but their communication transcends words: it is the language of love. One so mystical, so overwhelming, that it feels conceivable only through dreams, fairy tales and the silver screen. How else could Elisa comprehend such vast emotions? How else could she communicate them, other than with the vocabulary she learnt inside the darkened cinema located right below her own apartment? She has no choice but to take those cues, culminating in the film’s romantic peak: a fantasy sequence in which she sings “You’ll Never Know” from 1943’s Hello, Frisco, Hello, her and her creature swirling on a black-and-white soundstage like Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire reborn. Cinema’s own beguiling language has a way of communicating things that feel beyond individual B EST FI L M N O M I N EES words, or individual thoughts. It becomes a force, Guillermo del Toro, J Miles Dale one that radiates out from screen to audience. Elisa’s love has its own aura; people are drawn to its OT H ER N O M I N AT ED magnitude, are compelled to protect it and, in a way, C AT EG O R I ES are restored themselves by it. Certainly, The Shape of Cinematography, Costume Design, Director, Water – the most beautiful, pure and open-hearted of Editing, Leading Actress, Original Music, love stories – itself possesses that power. • Original Screenplay, Production Design, Sound, Special Visual Effects, Supporting Actress

Clarisse Loughrey is a film journalist for The Independent

5 7


5 8


THREE BILLBOA RDS OUTSIDE EBBING, M ISSOURI WO R DS BY CH A R LOT T E OÕSU L L I VA N 5 9


BEST

FI LM

NOM I N E E

t’s an anomaly. Unlike the other contenders in the Best Film category, this effort from London-Irish writer-director Martin McDonagh is set in the here and now. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is topical, too, chiming as it does with the #MeToo moment. A hilarious black comedy about misogyny (as well as racism, homophobia, xenophobia, class prejudice, and, last but not least, heightism), it boasts an American protagonist who’s sick of toxic males. In the words of Mildred Hayes (played by Frances McDormand), “This time, the chick ain’t losing.” For Mildred, it’s a crime that, seven months after the rape and murder of her teenage daughter, no one’s been caught. So, she advertises the fact that Ebbing’s chief of police, Willoughby (Woody Harrelson), is clueless. Which, because Willoughby is dying, causes outrage. Particularly vexed is Willoughby’s redneck deputy, Dixon (Sam Rockwell), who starts to treat whistle-blowing Mildred as public enemy number one. It’s tempting to dwell on the moments where Mildred lets rip. Like her savaging of a Catholic priest, which involves the verbal curveball of the decade. Or the visceral sequence where she succumbs to ‘drill rage’. As for her fire-bombing skills... if Mildred was a movie, she’d be Apocalypse Now. Yet, it’s when Mildred lets down her guard, ironically, that McDormand does her best work. During a conversation with Willoughby (and, later, a deer) Mildred’s voice is so laced with love it makes you dizzy. The scene where she explains the method behind her madness (she’s actually running with an idea suggested by the ‘guidebooks’) is equally wrenching. When Mildred’s eyes widen, she looks as gullible, and eager to please, as a child.

I

B EST FI L M N O M I N EES Graham Broadbent, Pete Czernin, Martin McDonagh

OT H ER N O M I N AT ED C AT EG O R I ES Cinematography, Director, Editing, Leading Actress, Original Screenplay, Outstanding British Film, Supporting Actor (x2)

6 0


T HRE E

BI LLBOAR D S

McDormand is hardly a secret weapon, but not since Fargo has she seemed so galvanised. And Rockwell, somehow, keeps up. That Mildred and Dixon come to an understanding makes sense, not least because the pair seem separated at birth. All cheekbones and overbite, they resemble raddled chipmunks. Beautiful, raddled chipmunks. Meanwhile, Peter Dinklage is a joy as James, the only man in Ebbing smart enough to realise that Mildred is hot. Though James isn’t integral to the plot, Dinklage (sporting crestfallen eyes and a humongous moustache) is crucial to the mix. It’s still rare for a male star to be romantically linked, on screen, with an actress older than himself, but Dinklage (as in The Station Agent) breaks the mould with style. If you find cussing painful (or, indeed, jokey references to “retards”), you will be in need of liquid morphine

OUTS I D E

E B B I N G ,

MILDREDÕS SAVAGING OF A CATHOLIC PRIEST INVOLVES THE VERBAL CURVEBALL OF THE DECADE.

M I SSO U RI

by the time the credits roll. Others will grimace during the upbeat third act (practically an advertisement for the all-new, diversity-friendly South). Many brilliant writer-directors have shown guilt-ridden parents reacting, furiously, to the death of a child (see Andrea Arnold’s Red Road or Kenneth Lonergan’s Manchester by the Sea). What’s different about McDonagh’s project is that it’s determined to be fun. Mildred is fond of the word “betwixt”. Betwixt you and me, this film is destined to provoke rows. But that’s OK. The right to take umbrage. That’s what Three Billboards is all about. • Charlotte O’Sullivan is a film critic for the Evening Standard

6 1


6 2


SIR RIDLEY S COT T T H E FEL LOWS H I P Words by Rosie Fletcher Portrait by Gavin Bond/BAFTA

• Stills courtesy of BFI

ir Ridley Scott is a self-confessed workaholic and he has no plans to slow down anytime soon. At age 80, he’s already created a legacy that will be part of cinematic history forever – giving us images, moments and characters that have defined and shaped the landscape of film, from the slow-burn terror and iconic feminist hero of Alien (1979), the stunning skylines of Blade Runner (1982), Thelma and Louise’s (1991) heartbreaking and uplifting heroes’ ending to Maximus Decimus Meridius’ rousing “father to a dead son” speech in Gladiator (2000). Versatile, outspoken, comfortable traversing genres and budgets, Scott has set up two companies, won numerous awards, been given a knighthood and made some of the most important films of the last 40 years. But he insists the best could be yet to come. Ask him about how he would define his career to date and he’s not looking back. “I’d like to have done 60 movies. I’m heading towards my 30th,” he says. “I’m a chronic worker. I love it.” Scott was fascinated with film from an early age, spending most of his weekends in local cinemas watching black and white Hollywood classics. But growing up mostly in the north east of Britain at a time before film schools existed meant he had to forge his own path into an industry he didn’t really understand. “I had no idea what a director was or how you’d even get to become a director,” he says. “There were not a lot of films happening in England at the time when I was a real youngster, it was as distant as going to Mars.” Instead Scott, artistic and talented at drawing, set his sights on becoming an ‘art director’ after seeing the job title listed in the credits of those weekend movies.

S

6 3


TH E

FELLOWSHI P

In 1958, Scott went to the Royal College of Art to study Graphic Design where he managed to borrow its one camera (a Bolex wind-up clockwork model) and made his first 20-minute short, Boy and Bicycle. “That was the beginning,” he says. “It was a DIY process of saying, ‘Gosh, I really like this, now how do I get to do this as a living?’” This is what Scott is like: a determined self-starter who still prides himself on delivering on-time and under budget. His is a career built on creativity, graft and excellent business sense. Out of college and Scott became a trainee set designer with the BBC before moving into advertising and television. “It was the golden age of British advertising with commercials almost treated

Right: The Martian (2015) Below left: Gladiator (2000) Bottom left: Thelma & Louise (1991) Bottom right: Blade Runner (1982)

like an art form. We were the English Mad Men,” he recalls – indeed Scott’s Hovis ad, featuring another boy and a bicycle and accompanied by Dvorak’s New World Symphony, is still iconic. Scott set up his own company, Ridley Scott Associates (RSA), with his director brother Tony – RSA turns 50 this year – before eventually making his feature directorial debut with The Duellists (1977), aged 40. The film was a critical hit, winning the Jury prize for best first work in Cannes, though it didn’t score big at the box office. “Who would want to see a film about the Napoleonic armies? Way too arty!” Scott reflects. However, The Duellists earned two BAFTA nominations – for Costume Design and Cinematography. The film didn’t win either at the time but Scott seems to enjoy the symmetry of being awarding the Fellowship now four decades later. “Well, you know, it’s taken a while!” he laughs. “It’s great to be acknowledged


TH E

by your peers, that’s very important. I’m thrilled to bits actually.” Scott has always been happy juggling awards fare with blockbusters. In the last year alone he brought us a big budget franchise sequel, Alien: Covenant, as well as true life JP Getty drama, All The Money in the World, which has earned more BAFTA love for its star Christopher Plummer. A massive fan of Star Wars (“It blew me out of the water and I was depressed for two months!”), Scott began his love affair with science fiction with Alien, which was a huge commercial and critical hit, and then Blade Runner, which became a genre classic. That both franchises are still going in 2018 is testament to Scott’s ability to create timeless stories that resonate with audiences of all ages across the decades.

FELLOW SHI P

ÒAS DIRECTOR, YOU ARE THE CHEERLEADER, YOU ARE THE FATHER FIGURE, YOU ARE THE ADVISOR, YOU ARE THE PSYCHOLOGIST, YOUÕRE ALSO AN EXPERT ON BOOTLACES AND HAIRCUTS.Ó Thelma & Louise gave Scott his first Best Director Oscar and BAFTA nominations, followed by more for Gladiator, and later an Oscar nomination for Black Hawk Down (2001). More BAFTA recognition came in 1995 when the Scott brothers were together celebrated for their Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema (shortly after their purchase of an ailing Shepperton Studios); then his knighthood came in 2003. An expert storyteller with an incredible visual eye, Scott says the most important thing he’s learned throughout his career is the importance of hard work.

6 5


TH E

FELLOW SHI P

Above: All the Money in the World (2017) Right: G.I. Jane (1997)

“A lot of the job of a director is about mental and physical stamina. You need both,” he says. “If you don’t, one way or another, one of them is going to get you. You are the cheerleader, you are the father figure, you are the advisor, you are ÒITÕS GREAT TO BE the psychologist, you’re also an expert on bootlaces and haircuts. So, if you don’t like ACKNOWLEDGED BY YOUR pressure, don’t do the job!” PEERS, THATÕS VERY IMPORTANT. No kidding. In 1980, Scott set up production company Percy Main IÕM THRILLED TO BITS ACTUALLY.Ó Productions, with Tony Scott. This transformed into Scott Free Productions in 1995 and the company has produced scores of films and television shows since, with many more in development. Scott’s own projects under the Scott Free banner have included crime dramas such as 2007’s American Gangster (which earned a Best Film BAFTA nomination in 2008) and Body of Lies (2008), sword and sandal epics Kingdom of Heaven (2005) and Exodus: Gods and Kings (2014), as well as more smart science fiction fare in Alien prequel, of sorts, Prometheus (2012), and The Martian (2015), the latter earning his most recent BAFTA nomination for Director. Meanwhile, Scott Free and Scott himself are attached to dozens more potential projects.

6 6


S ON Y PIC T U RE S REL E A SING ( U K ) is proud to congratulate

SIR RIDLEY SCOTT recipient of

THE BAFTA FELLOWSHIP

www.sonypictures.co.uk

© 2018 Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved.

6 7


TH E

FELLOWSHI P

It’s an extraordinary body of work from one of the greatest and most influential filmmakers working today. Ask Scott if he has one defining moment, though, in a career so far so epic, and it’s a personal memory from years ago, way before he took us to new worlds and ancient civilisations. “Standing on a beach in Redcar with my younger brother and a little clockwork camera. I’m standing in the morning and it’s freezing cold and I’m saying, ‘Right, what we’re going to do is make this movie’,” he reminisces. “That’s still the biggest moment for me.” •

SELECT FILMOGRAPHY AS DIRECTOR

2017 All the Money in the World 2017 Alien: Covenant 2015 The Martian 2014 Exodus: Gods and Kings 2013 The Counsellor 2012 Prometheus 2010 Robin Hood 2008 Body of Lies 2007 American Gangster 2006 A Good Year 2005 Kingdom of Heaven 2003 Matchstick Men 2001 Black Hawk Down 2001 Hannibal 2000 Gladiator 1997 G.I. Jane 1996 White Squall 1992 1492: Conquest of Paradise 1991 Thelma & Louise 1989 Black Rain 1987 Someone to Watch Over Me 1985 Legend 1982 Blade Runner 1979 Alien 1977 The Duellists

Rosie Fletcher is Movies Editor at Digital Spy

B A F TA AWA R D S & N O M I N AT I O N S

1995  Outstanding British Contribution

to Cinema, with Tony Scott 1992 Special Award 2016 Director nomination, The Martian 2008 Best Film nomination, American

Gangster, with Brian Grazer 2001 Direction nomination, Gladiator 1992 Best Film nomination,

Thelma & Louise, with Mimi Polk 1992  Direction nomination,

Thelma & Louise

Left: Behind the scenes on Alien (1979)

6 8


‘Exodus: Gods and Kings’ © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox. All rights reserved.

PINEWOOD WARMLY CONGRATULATES OUR FRIEND AND LONGSTANDING ASSOCIATE

RIDLEY SCOTT

ON RECEIVING THE BAFTA FELLOWSHIP www.pinewoodgroup.com 6 9


FELLOWS

O F

THE

1971 Alfred Hitchcock 1972 Freddie Young obe 1973 Grace Wyndham Goldie 1974 David Lean 1975  Jacques Cousteau 1976 Sir Charles Chaplin 1976 Lord Olivier 1977 Sir Denis Forman 1978 Fred Zinnemann 1979 Lord Grade 1979 Sir Huw Wheldon 1980 David Attenborough cbe 1980  John Huston 1981 Abel Gance 1981 Michael Powell 1981 Emeric Pressburger 1982 Andrzej Wajda 1983 Sir Richard Attenborough cbe 1984 Sir Hugh Greene 1984 Sam Spiegel 1985  Jeremy Isaacs 1986 Steven Spielberg 1987 Federico Fellini 1988 Ingmar Bergman 1989 Sir Alec Guinness ch, cbe 1990 Paul Fox 1991 Louis Malle 1992 Sir John Gielgud 1992 David Plowright 1993 Sydney Samuelson cbe 1993 Colin Young cbe 1994 Michael Grade cbe 1995 Billy Wilder 1996 Jeanne Moreau 1996 Ronald Neame cbe 1996 John Schlesinger cbe 1996 Dame Maggie Smith 1997 Woody Allen 1997 Steven Bochco 1997  Julie Christie 1997 Oswald Morris obe 1997 Harold Pinter cbe 1997 David Rose 1998 Sean Connery 1998 Bill Cotton cbe 1999 Eric Morecambe & Ernie Wise 1999 Elizabeth Taylor

ACA DE MY

2000 Michael Caine 2000 Stanley Kubrick (posthumous) 2000 Peter Bazalgette 2001 Albert Finney 2001  John Thaw 2001 Dame Judi Dench 2002 Warren Beatty 2002 Merchant Ivory Productions 2002 Andrew Davies 2002 Sir John Mills 2003 Saul Zaentz 2003 David Jason 2004  John Boorman 2004 Roger Graef 2005  John Barry obe 2005 Sir David Frost obe 2006 Lord Puttnam cbe 2006 Ken Loach 2007 Anne V Coates obe 2007 Richard Curtis cbe 2007 Will Wright 2008 Sir Anthony Hopkins cbe 2008 Bruce Forsyth cbe 2009 Terry Gilliam 2009 Nolan Bushnell 2009 Dawn French & Jennifer Saunders 2010 Vanessa Redgrave cbe 2010 Shigeru Miyamoto 2010 Lord Bragg 2011 Sir Christopher Lee cbe 2011 Peter Molyneux obe 2011 Sir Trevor McDonald obe 2012 Martin Scorsese 2013 Sir Alan Parker 2013 Gabe Newell 2013 Michael Palin cbe 2014 Dame Helen Mirren 2014 Rockstar Games 2014 Julie Walters cbe 2015 Mike Leigh 2015 David Braben obe 2015  Jon Snow 2016 Sir Sidney Poitier 2016  John Carmack 2016 Ray Galton obe & Alan Simpson obe 2017 Mel Brooks 2017  Joanna Lumley obe

Names and honours correct at time of presentation. 7 0


PAUL EDMONDS LONDON IS PROUD TO BE THE OFFICIAL HAIR PARTNER TO THE EE BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS IN 2018

WWW.PAULEDMONDS.COM 7 1


7 2


THE NATIONAL FILM AND TELEVISION SCHOOL O U TS TA N D I N G B R I T I S H CO N T RI B U T I O N TO CI N E M A Words by Rich Matthews

• Images from NFTS, BAFTA/Guy Levy

any 47-year-olds, facing down the barrel of the big five-oh, have been prone to a little emotional wobble – the infamous mid-life crisis – questioning what they have done with their lives and whether they have achieved all that they had hoped. Thankfully, there’s no such existential angst hanging in the Beaconsfield studios of the National Film and Television School (NFTS), the UK’s top film, television and games production school, which is building towards its own half century in 2021. Just shy of that big birthday, the NFTS is being presented with this year’s Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema award, a testament and tribute to the school’s unerring ability to find, nurture and educate the finest UK talent for almost five decades. What’s the secret behind its robust 50 years in the industry? NFTS director Dr Jon Wardle believes it comes down to one, simple factor: adaptability. “When we started we were a film school; now we have television in our name,” Dr Wardle explains. “We also cover short form and streaming, and now we have games in the curriculum. Beyond our contribution to film, I love the idea that one day we’re making an outstanding contribution to games, the next to television. Whatever the new storytelling platforms are that come along, we produce the people who can tell the stories for that platform. Like with virtual reality, we’re not starting a silo-ed course; we’re working across all our disciplines to work out what VR truly means for each of them.” The National Film School (as it was first known) was originally co-founded in 1971 by the school’s first director Colin Young on the site of the Beaconsfield Film Studios, with an immediate vocational

M

7 3


focus, offering more craft courses and specialisations than any of its competitors around the globe. Its focus on key specialisms, previously only the purview of studio apprenticeships and ‘learning on the job’, immediately saw the school gain national, then international recognition. It has trained the likes of Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts director David Yates, We Need to Talk About Kevin filmmaker Lynne Ramsay, master cinematographer Roger Deakins and multi BAFTAwinning animator and creator of Wallace and Gromit, Nick Park – to name only a handful of its dozens of famed graduates. NFTS alumni have hauled in 10 Oscars and 49 nominations, and no less than 129 BAFTA wins between them. Today, the 20,000 square-foot campus boasts a 93 per cent graduate employment rate for its annual

ÒTHE NFTS HAS AN UNPARALLELED TRACK RECORD IN PRODUCING PEOPLE OF THE VERY HIGHEST QUALITY IN EVERY ROLE YOU CAN THINK OF.Ó

7 4

turnover of 400-plus full-time students – with 600 more attending its range of short courses every year. With the creative industries bringing in upwards of £80bn a year to the UK economy, it’s the only British film school to be consistently ranked in The Hollywood Reporter’s top international film schools list. And, allegedly, you can even get a nice cup of tea in the canteen (which we all know is the real key to success in the UK film trade). Given the level of acclaim the school has garnered over the years and its lofty standing within the global film industry, it’s perhaps surprising to learn that receiving this kind of tribute from BAFTA still proved surprising and humbling for the school and its faculty. “I think it’s the first time it has been awarded to an educational institution,” says Wardle, “so to be recognised alongside filmmakers, companies and organisations that have made a


NF TS:

THE

FACTS

• More than 100 NFTS graduates were credited on 2017’s BAFTA and Academy Awards nominated films.

&

FI GURES

• NFTS students Khaled Gad (producer), Anushka Kishani Naanayakkara (director and co-writer) and Elena RuscombeKing (co-writer) won the British Short Animation BAFTA for A Love Story in 2017 (pictured below). It’s the fourth year in a row that the category has been won by NFTS students. A further 11 graduation films have gone on to win a BAFTA, either in the Short Film or Short Animation categories: Dreamland Express (in 1983); Careless Talk (1986); The Hill Farm (1989); The Candy Show (1990); A Grand Day Out (1990); Say Good-bye (1991); Balloon (1992); Until the River Runs Red (2011); Sleeping with the Fishes (2014); The Bigger Picture (2015); and Edmond (2016).

• The alum with the most BAFTA wins is animator Nick Park, who has eight BAFTAs to his name across all our Awards. • The school currently runs 18 MA courses, 14 Diplomas and four certificate courses, as well as various short courses. The most recent addition was an MA in Games Design and Development in 2012. • More than 43 per cent of its MA students are female and almost 17 per cent are from a black and mixed ethnic (BME) background. The school runs diversity schemes, including free directing workshops, to help increase the number of women and people from BME backgrounds working in screen directing. • NFTS alum and cinematographer Roger Deakins has been nominated for eight BAFTAs (not including this year’s nomination for Blade Runner 2049), winning three for The Man Who Wasn’t There (in 2002), No Country for Old Men (2008) and True Grit (2011). • Drowning Man, directed and produced by Directing Fiction graduate Mahdi Fleifel and edited by NFTS alum, Michael Aaglund, was one of just nine films selected from 4,843 submissions to compete for the Short Film Palme d’Or in 2017. • Films with NFTS graduate involvement grossed $11bn at the worldwide box office in 2016. • NFTS alum and filmmaker Lynne Ramsay was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 2017 for her film You Were Never Really Here. It won two awards in total for Best Screenplay, for Ramsay, and Best Actor, for Joaquin Phoenix. Ramsay is a two-time BAFTA winner.

7 5

• Together NFTS students and alumni have won an incredible 129 BAFTAs across the organisation’s numerous Awards. These include 20 wins at the Film Awards, 37 at the Television Awards, 19 at the Television Craft Awards, two at the Games Awards, 16 at the Children’s Awards and 21 at the BAFTA Cymru and BAFTA Scotland Awards. With thanks to the NFTS for their help in compiling these facts


significant contribution to the industry is really fantastic. Skills and talent are often secondary in people’s minds, so this is a welcome acknowledgement of the importance of what the staff and the graduates have achieved over the 47 years, and the indelible mark they’ve left on the industry.” From the beginning, the NFTS has focused on film’s true resource: people. “You need studios and equipment and all those kind of practical things, but in the end it comes down to writers, directors, producers, script supervisors,

T H E 2 018 F I L M A W A R D S N O M I N AT E D N F T S A L U M N I

• Aneil Karia, in British Short Film for Work • Dario Marianelli, in Original Music for Darkest Hour • Emily Morgan, in Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer for I Am Not a Witch • Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly, in Outstanding British Film and Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer for Lady Macbeth • Hugh Welchman, in Animated Film for Loving Vincent • Mahdi Fleifel, in British Short Film for A Drowning Man • Paloma Baeza and Ser En Low, in British Short Animation for Poles Apart • Roger Deakins, in Cinematography for Blade Runner 2049 • Stuart Wilson, in Sound for Star Wars: The Last Jedi

7 6

gaffers…,” says Wardle. “The NFTS has an unparalleled track record in producing people of the very highest quality in every role you can think of. We offer training you can’t get anywhere else – there’s nowhere else in Europe where you can train to be a script supervisor or an assistant director. Nobody else is doing that.” With Brexit and its myriad unknowns just around the corner, Wardle thinks that UK talent development has never been more vital. He believes that the NFTS’s tradition of nurturing its students’ resilience and skill means it is primed and ready to pump out the top drawer behind-the-camera talent needed to maintain the current turnover of work being brought to the UK by the likes of HBO, Netflix and Amazon, let alone the major US film studios and their mammoth blockbuster productions. “My predecessor, Nik Powell [Wardle took over in 2017], used to say that if we were turning people out into the industry who weren’t as good as or better than the people who were already working then we’ve failed,” Wardle says. “Fortunately for us, the latest generation thinks about the industry differently. This creates opportunities for them that perhaps previous generations weren’t ready to take, future-proofing the industry through a group of people coming up who are happy to work in a different way, and move between areas, as part of the rich tapestry of freelance work. Our students are as excited about the release of series two of The Crown as they are about the release of


YOU DON’T JUST STAY A T T H E S A V O Y. THE SAVOY ST A YS W I T H Y O U.

A place where iconic elegance mingles with chic sophistication. A world-famous name, where Art Deco rubs shoulders with English Edwardian. The definitive destination in the heart of London. Unforgettably‌ The Savoy. To discuss your stay, please call +44 (0)20 7836 4343 or email savoy@fairmont.com fairmont.com/savoy

7 7


ÒWHATEVER THE NEW STORYTELLING PLATFORMS ARE THAT COME ALONG, WE PRODUCE THE PEOPLE WHO CAN TELL THE STORIES FOR THAT PLATFORM.Ó

Battle of the Sexes in cinemas. They want to work across all of it. “We teach all students a few key things,” Wardle continues. “First, that it’s a collaborative business. That sounds really obvious but they don’t necessarily know that is a really important skill. “Second, in a world where lots of people think that you can go shoot a film and edit it, do sound and script supervise it yourself, all on your own because modes of production are so cheap, that the self-shooter is a myth. Having a specialism, being fantastic at it, then working out how you bring that together with other specialisms is key. The myth creates a culture of amateurism and people not really understanding modes of production in a way that will enable them to be successful. Our focus on craft, specialisation, and being really good at collaboration, combines with

7 8

the next generation’s mindset of wanting to be involved in all forms of production to create quite a potent mix for the future.” We started this feature stating that turning 50 can cause some to wobble. But if its history is anything to go by, the NFTS’s 50th anniversary will reveal just how much of a rock the school has been in driving the success of British film, television and, most recently, games talent, on a global scale. There’s no doubt the coming years will showcase a whole new generation of outstanding creative practitioners. Mid-life crisis – what mid-life crisis? •

Find out more about the NFTS at www.nfts.co.uk or follow @NFTSFilmTV (Twitter/ Facebook/Instagram)


The Official Chocolatier to the British Academy of Film and Television Arts

Rare & Vintage collection now available 23 bars, 6 countries, upgrade to the best chocolate in the world.

hotelchocolat.com 7 9


EXPERIENTIAL PHOTOGRAPHY & LUXURY PHOTOBOOTHS P R O U D PA R T N E R S o f BA F TA S I N C E 2 0 1 0

republicofphotography.com

republicofphotography 8 0

BoothnationUK

republicofphotography


F OR YOUR EY E S O N L Y A P H O TO G R A P H I C E S S A Y BY SA RA H LEE n 2015, photographer Sarah Lee was commissioned by BAFTA to officially document its Awards ceremonies over a period of a few years. Given unprecedented access, she was briefed to photograph whatever she wanted, however she liked, to capture the unique narrative of these extraordinary gala events. “It was a particularly lovely and open brief,” Lee says, “almost unheard of for a photographer.” Lee, whose work has been featured in the likes of TIME, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair, chose to shoot the series in digital black and white with the aim of securing moments of semi-private intimacy and emotion in what is otherwise a very public forum. Over the next few pages, we feature a selection of these unguarded, playful and sometimes surreal moments, with commentary from the photographer herself.

I

8 1


M I C H A E L FA S S B E N D E R & K AT E W I N S L E T

The Red Carpet, Film Awards 2016 (previous page)

Sarah Lee says: “I was lurking behind the branding boards in the press photography pit to take this. It feels otherworldly and has that ‘old Hollywood’ look I like. The reality is there are a 100-plus photographers pointing their cameras and shouting, many of whom later complained that I was in their shot. But visually, I love creating that classic Hollywood look. There was more mystique back then, I suppose, and I like playing around with that. And I like that she’s dominant and he has his head slightly bowed.”

8 2


M I C H A E L FA S S B E N D E R

The Red Carpet, Film Awards 2016

“I very rarely shoot in black and white because I’m fascinated by colour and how that works in composition. But as soon as I got this commission, I knew I wanted to do it in black and white. There’s a huge amount of visual noise at the Awards and black and white is a very specific device to cut down on that noise and help put the focus on the people. Ideally, these images are all about intimacy in this very noisy, very public space.”

J O H N B OY E GA

The Red Carpet, Film Awards 2016

“One of the things I love about the BAFTA Awards is the interaction with the fans, it’s quite magical. I’m interested in trying to capture private-but-public moments and it all starts on the Red Carpet. The Red Carpet is like this incredibly genteel prison riot, with the fans all banging on the side and screaming names to get [the star’s] attention. It’s all really good-natured though. I wanted to get that feel of the drama of the Red Carpet. The selfie has a real importance to these fans. They get such pleasure from it. Every single face in this picture, including John Boyega’s, looks delighted.”

8 3


E D D I E R E D M AY N E

The Red Carpet, Film Awards 2017

“Eddie looks so urbane and charming and cool in his Humphrey Bogart white dinner jacket, which is in contrast to the desperate shoving of fans thrusting memorabilia at him. As a photographer, I’m not concerned about whether someone’s famous or, because I’m shooting in black and white, what they’re wearing, even though I love how glamorous they all look. The fans all want that benediction of an acknowledgement or a handshake or a signature or a selfie. I’m amazed at how generous everyone is with their time.”

8 4


C AT E B L A N C H E T T

The Red Carpet, Film Awards 2016

“I went low to take this. I was crouching and kind of scuffling backwards. There’s a movement to the Red Carpet, as the publicists or agents try to ensure their clients don’t get stuck somewhere too long. I was just trying to get a different perspective and angle. Not everyone photographs well from knee height, but Cate Blanchett looks radiant – her bone structure can withstand it.”

8 5


ALICIA VIKANDER

The Auditorium, Film Awards 2016

“I don’t know who she’s hugging, but this was taken during that period where they are all catching up and talking before the ceremony begins. It surprised me when I first saw it, but it’s only natural. Often, they haven’t seen each other in a long time, so they’re all just chatting away. It’s almost like they’re on a school trip. It’s just so nice to see.”

8 6


LEONARDO DICAPRIO

The Red Carpet, Film Awards 2016

“This sums up the big star Red Carpet experience. DiCaprio was in very good spirits, signing autographs and everything, but he had these enormous minders with him. I only work on Leica cameras, which are manual focus. This adds a technical challenge because it’s all moving so fast and is in low light. I think he’d noticed that I was walking backwards, desperately trying to focus my little camera while the minder in front ensured I didn’t get too close. There was a momentum pushing me backwards, which caught his eye. From DiCaprio’s expression, the joke’s on me.”

8 7


CUBA GOODING JR

The Auditorium, Film Awards 2015

“He looks very much the movie star here, wearing sunglasses inside, even though it was dark in there. He was just sitting there, waiting for the show to begin. I think he knew he was being photographed though; I’d been spotted. What’s great is when people choose to give you the shot – he didn’t look away or anything like that, he found his light and turned up the intensity.”

8 8


JULIANNE MOORE

The Auditorium, Film Awards 2015

“She was sitting in the front row and I had my camera bag on the floor between her and the stage. I bent down to change a lens and I heard this little yelp. I’d knelt on Julianne Moore’s foot. It was my first year working for BAFTA and I was horrified. But then I saw she was in this incredible light with her haunting, beautiful face and that powerful Garbo-esque stare. As I apologised, I was desperately trying to focus my lens. She just looked up and found her light. It looks like she’s glancing over at a friend, but I think that was her being very generous to a panicked photographer.”

8 9


ROONEY MARA

The Auditorium, Film Awards 2016

“Rooney Mara was just having a quiet moment to herself while waiting for the show to start. Only the house lights were on at this moment, so it was very dim in there. Some people were sitting in terrible light, with awful shadows and impossible to photograph. And then some people, like Rooney, were in these little pools of beautiful light.”

M AT T H E W G O O D E

Backstage, Film Awards 2015

“Matthew was waiting outside Gavin Bond’s portraiture studio backstage, messing about on his vape after presenting an award, before heading back to his seat. His silhouette looked so good. His beautiful dinner jacket and bone structure makes this image work. I like that the vape-ring looks like a jelly fish.”

9 0


9 1


9 2


ISABELLE HUPPERT

Backstage, The Green Room, Film Awards 2017

“Women in general are not overly keen on having someone lurk over their shoulder when they do their makeup, so I took this very carefully and quickly. I’m in complete awe of Isabelle Huppert. She looks magnificent, but it’s that look she’s giving herself that I particularly like, as if she’s appraising herself. I like the intimacy, and yet she looks a million dollars – Bacall-esque. I love that mixture of glamour, femininity and immense strength. It’s what I like about her and, in particular, about her here.”

9 3


LÉ A SEYDOUX

Backstage, Film Awards 2015

“This was also by Gavin Bond’s studio. I was being a little cheeky shooting into the studio, but I couldn’t resist it. Léa Seydoux looks amazing in her fairy tale dress, but I love the cuff beckoning her – I think it’s her management. This moment feels so natural, with Léa worried about the train of her dress. There’s a dynamism to it. It’s rare that I use a flash, but I couldn’t have gotten it otherwise.”

9 4


E M I LY B L U N T & S T A N L E Y T U C C I

The Stage Wings, Film Awards 2017

“This was in the wings. They were chatting to each other while waiting to present an award. They really looked like family nattering away [Tucci is Blunt’s brotherin-law]. It was a less guarded moment and the kind of thing you don’t get to see watching on television at home. I love being backstage and watching people take that huge breath before they step out in front of the world. It’s endlessly fascinating to me, seeing how people approach that moment of stepping into the light.”

D E V PAT E L & V I O L A DAV I S

Winners’ Photography, Onstage, Film Awards 2017

“This was just before the group winners photograph, taken after the ceremony has finished. This shot must be a BAFTA photography department headache, in the nicest possible way. Everyone is adrenalised, validated and delighted, so marshalling 100 faces to all look one way is an unenviable task. But for my purposes, it’s great – there’s an overwhelming air of delight all round.”

9 5


THE AUDIENCE

The Auditorium, 2016

“This was taken on stage, just before the televised recording started. What surprised me was how the audience only really take their seats when the announcement has happened for the second or third time, usually a minute before the recording. I had to quickly run off stage as soon as it was done. I wanted to capture that sense of everyone sitting there in anticipation, waiting for the show to begin.�

ESSAY

CREDITS

Photographer Sarah Lee www.sarahmlee.com @sarahmlee47 BAFTA Photography Director Claire Rees Interview Toby Weidmann Venues The Royal Opera House and the Royal Albert Hall

9 6

V ISI T T H E E X H I B I T I O N Most of the images in this essay, and many more taken by the photographer, will be on display at the Sarah Lee: Leica LA Exhibition from 23 February to 2 April at the Leica LA Gallery, 8783 Beverly Blvd, West Hollywood, California


OFFICIAL POSTPRODUCTION PARTNER TO BAFTA PROVIDING AWARDWINNING POSTPRODUCTION SINCE 1998

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF THIS YEAR’S WINNERS AND NOMINEES

Farm Lond

on

9 7


Exterion Media, proud to be a supporter of the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2018 noel.nallen@exterionmedia.co.uk T: 020 7428 5544 @ExterionMediaUK

9 8

www.exterionmedia.co.uk


IN M EMO R I AM The following pages honour the esteemed contribution to the film industry by those individuals who have sadly died in the last 12 months. To learn more about their many achievements, visit bafta.org/heritage/inmemoryof

9 9


IN

M E MORIA M

J O H N G AV I L D S E N

RODNEY BEWES

BILL BUTLER

Director

Actor

Editor

21 December 1935 – 16 June 2017

27 November 1937 – 21 November 2017

16 October 1933 – 4 June 2017

MICHAEL BALLHAUS

BILL BLUNDEN

GLEN CAMPBELL

Cinematographer

Editor

Singer, Actor

5 August 1935 – 12 April 2017

3 December 1934 – 3 January 2018

22 April 1936 – 8 August 2017

KEITH BARRON

MANOLO BOLOGNINI

STEVE CHRISTIAN

Actor

Producer

Producer

8 August 1934 – 15 November 2017

26 October 1925 – 23 December 2017

14 December 1963 – 18 February 2017

T E R E N C E B AY L E R

MICHAEL BOND

CHRIS CORNELL

Actor

Writer

Singer, Songwriter

24 January 1930 – 2 August 2016

13 January 1926 – 27 June 2017

20 July 1964 – 18 May 2017

ANN BEACH

POWERS BOOTHE

PEG GY CUM M I NS

Actress

Actor

Actress

7 June 1938 – 9 March 2017

1 June 1948 – 14 May 2017

18 December 1925 – 29 December 2017

JOHN BERNECKER

BRENT BRISCOE

A N DY C U N N I N G H A M

Stunt Performer

Actor

Writer, Actor, Puppeteer

2 March 1984 – 13 July 2017

21 May 1961 – 18 October 2017

13 May 1950 – 5 June 2017

1 0 0

c be


IN

M E MORIA M

DANIELLE DARRIEUX

JOHN FORGEHAM

ROBERT GUILL AUME

Actress

Actor

Actor

1 May 1917 – 17 October 2017

14 May 1941 – 10 March 2017

30 November 1927 – 24 October 2017

FRED DE BR ADENY

C H A R L E S FR AT E R

J O H N N Y H A L LY D AY

Producer

Sound Recordist, Editor

Singer, Actor

22 July 1964 – 28 January 2017

21 January 1941 – 8 June 2017

15 June 1943 – 6 December 2017

J O N AT H A N D E M M E

ROBERT GETCHELL

R O B E R T H A R DY

Director, Producer, Writer

Writer

Actor

22 February 1944 – 26 April 2017

6 December 1936 – 21 October 2017

29 October 1925 – 3 August 2017

PETER DUFFELL

BOB GIVENS

MICHAEL HARM

Director

Animator

Location Manager

10 July 1922 – 12 December 2017

2 March 1918 – 14 December 2017

25 December 1965 – 19 January 2017

CHRISTIAN EISENBEISS

GERALD B GREENBERG

R I C H A R D H ATC H

Producer

Editor

Actor

11 September 1955 – 30 March 2017

29 July 1936 – 22 December 2017

21 May 1945 – 7 February 2017

PA M E L A E N G E L

BRAD GREY

G E O R G E H AW K E S

Film Distributor and Programmer

Producer

Technical Director, Film Processing

12 November 1934 – 15 July 2017

29 December 1957 – 14 May 2017

24 April 1924 – 10 June 2017

1 0 1

c be


IN

M E MORIA M

G L E N N E H E A D LY

SIR JOHN HURT

Actress

Actor

Actor

13 March 1955 – 8 June 2017

22 January 1940 – 25 January 2017

11 February 1941 – 17 August 2017

JOHN HEARD

CLIFTON JA MES

W A L T E R L A S S A L LY

Actor

Actor

Cinematographer

7 March 1946 – 21 July 2017

29 May 1920 – 15 April 2017

18 December 1926 – 23 October 2017

J O H N H E YM A N

SHASHI KAPOOR

ROSEM ARY LEACH

Producer

Actor, Producer

Actress

27 April 1933 – 9 June 2017

18 March 1938 – 4 December 2017

18 December 1935 – 21 October 2017

JOHN HILLERMAN

TERRENCE KELLEHER

SUZ ANNA LEIGH

Actor

Producer

Actress

20 December 1932 – 9 November 2017

2 July 1948 – 18 April 2017

26 July 1945 – 11 December 2017

GER ALD HIRSCHFELD

FR E D J KO E N E K A M P

J ERRY LEWIS

Cinematographer

Cinematographer

Actor, Producer, Director, Writer

25 April 1921 – 13 February 2017

11 November 1922 – 31 May 2017

16 March 1926 – 20 August 2017

TOBE HOOPER

M ARTIN L ANDAU

CHING LI

Director, Writer, Producer

Actor

Actress

25 January 1943 – 26 August 2017

20 June 1928 – 15 July 2017

29 October 1945 – 9 December 2017

1 0 2

c be

SONNY LANDHAM


IN

M E MORIA M

COLIN LOMA X

DINA MERRILL

SIR ROGER MOORE

Executive and Distributor

Actress

Actor

12 August 1961 – 28 December 2017

29 December 1923 – 22 May 2017

14 October 1927 – 23 May 2017

VICTOR LOWNES

R AY M E R R I N

JEANNE MOREAU

Producer

Re-recording Mixer

Actress

17 April 1928 – 11 January 2017

19 November 1937 – 15 January 2018

23 January 1928 – 31 July 2017

AL AN M ACDONALD

MARK MILSOME

CHARLIE MURPHY

Production Designer

Camera Operator

Actor, Writer

23 June 1956 – 30 August 2017

23 May 1963 – 18 November 2017

12 July 1959 – 12 April 2017

DOROTHY MALONE

JOHN MOLLO

HARUO NAKAJIMA

Actress

Costume Designer

Actor

30 January 1925 – 19 January 2018

18 March 1931 – 25 October 2017

1 January 1929 – 7 August 2017

TERENCE MARSH

Y VONNE MONL AUR

OMID NOOSHIN

Production Designer

Actress

Writer, Director, Producer

14 November 1931 – 9 January 2018

15 December 1939 – 18 April 2017

2 May 1974 – 15 January 2018

H E AT H E R M E N Z I E S

M ARY T YLER MOORE

BARRY N OR M AN

Actress

Actress

Film Critic

3 December 1949 – 24 December 2017

29 December 1936 – 25 January 2017

21 August 1933 – 30 June 2017

1 0 3

c be

k be


IN

M E MORIA M

M I C H A E L N YQV I S T

M O L LY P E T E R S

JEAN ROCHEFORT

Actor

Actress

Actor

8 November 1960 – 27 June 2017

15 March 1942 – 30 May 2017

29 April 1930 – 9 October 2017

PAT R I C K O ’C O N N E L L

T I M P I G OT T-S M I T H

Actor

Actor

Director, Writer, Producer

29 January 1934 – 10 August 2017

13 May 1946 – 7 April 2017

4 February 1940 – 16 July 2017

QUINN O’HAR A

STEVE PRICE

FR ANCO ROSSO

Actress

Sound Engineer, Music Recording Engineer

Director

3 January 1941 – 5 May 2017

17 February 1967 – 8 September 2017

obe

GEORGE A ROMERO

29 August 1941 – 9 December 2016

A N I TA PA L L E N B E R G

STEVE REEVIS

PETER SALLIS

Actress

Actor

Actor

6 April 1942 – 13 June 2017

14 August 1962 – 7 December 2017

1 February 1921 – 2 June 2017

M I C H A E L PA R K S

DON RICKLES

RICHARD SCHICKEL

Actor

Actor

Film Critic, Writer, Director

24 April 1940 – 9 May 2017

8 May 1926 – 6 April 2017

10 February 1933 – 18 February 2017

B I L L PA X T O N

E M M A N U E L L E R I VA

JA MES SHARKEY

Actor, Director

Actress

Agent

17 May 1955 – 25 February 2017

24 February 1927 – 27 January 2017

5 January 1930 – 13 October 2017

1 0 4

obe


IN

M E MORIA M

ALLISON SHEARMUR

STEVE TRUGLIA

ANNE WIAZEMSKY

Producer

Stunt Coordinator

Actress

23 October 1963 – 19 January 2018

3 October 1962 – 17 November 2016

14 May 1947 – 5 October 2017

S A M S H E PA R D

FR ANK VINCENT

JENNY WILKES

Actor, Writer

Actor, Producer

Director, Writer

5 November 1943 – 27 July 2017

4 August 1937 – 13 September 2017

1 August 1941 – November 2017

H A R RY D E A N S TA N TO N

NEER A J VOR A

HUGH WILSON

Actor, Musician

Actor, Writer, Director

Director, Writer, Producer

14 July 1926 – 15 September 2017

22 January 1963 – 14 December 2017

21 August 1943 – 14 January 2018

HARRY STR ADLI N G J R

M O R AY W A T S O N

ERIC ZUMBRUNNEN

Cinematographer

Actor

Editor

7 January 1925 – 17 October 2017

25 June 1928 – 2 May 2017

4 November 1964 – 1 August 2017

A N DY T H O M S O N

MICHAEL WEARING

Art Director

Producer

19 June 1969 – 27 January 2017

12 March 1939 – 5 May 2017

FR A N K T I DY

ADA M WEST

Cinematogropher

Actor

17 May 1932 – 27 January 2017

19 September 1928 – 9 June 2017

1 0 5

The Academy has made every effort to compile an accurate In Memoriam listing of film practitioners between 15 January 2017 and 20 January 2018.


The BAFTA for best Special Visual Effects 2036 goes to... The next generation needs your support. To do this, we’ve launched an ambitious fundraising campaign to redevelop BAFTA’s home, 195 Piccadilly, and greatly enhance our charitable learning programmes. We believe talented individuals, from all backgrounds, should be given an equal chance to shine and receive the vital encouragement they need to succeed in our industries. To make a donation contact Andrew Overin, Head of Fundraising andrewo@bafta.org.

ILLUM INATING BA F TA

Building a brighter future for generations to come.

1 0 6


Mudbound writer-director Dee Rees delivered a Screenwriting lecture at the British Museum

F OCUS ON F I L M hen the Awards season comes around, with all its wonderful hullabaloo, it’s easy to let the focus slip away from BAFTA’s other vital work to support, promote and develop the industry. We believe in the power of excellent films, games and television to creatively and culturally enrich the lives of everyone and so we work to share expert industry knowledge with a range of audiences, both industry and public, in the UK and overseas. Over the next few pages, we highlight some of BAFTA’s recent charitable activities, including a fantastic new photographic exhibition, our tentpole new talent events and initiatives, how we’re engaging with the public to enthuse them about film and its myriad facets, and what we’re doing to help not only level the playing field for talented wannabes but also make that playing field a safer place to be. This is just a small snapshot of the important work we do outside of our Awards all year round. So, please do take the time to visit our website to find out more, including how you can support our mission...

W

1 0 7


FE M A L E FI RSTS E X H I B I T I O N The next photographic exhibition to be installed at our headquarters, BAFTA 195 Piccadilly, is titled ‘Female Firsts: Women Making BAFTA History’. Coinciding with the national centenary of the first women’s vote in the UK, we have selected more than 50 individuals who have made an invaluable contribution to film, games and television, as seen through the prism of BAFTA. The exhibition celebrates both them and their remarkable work through rare imagery, sourced from private collections, external libraries and BAFTA’s own photography archive. Women have played a key role in BAFTA from the earliest days of the Academy, with pioneering documentary filmmaker Jill Craigie joining its Council in 1950 – the only woman among 13 representatives. Things have changed since those days – BAFTA currently has a female chair, deputy chair, chief executive and vicepresident (for film) – but even so, women

remain underrepresented across numerous industry professions. While Female Firsts celebrates women’s priceless contribution to film, games and television, it also highlights the ongoing need to champion underrepresented groups within our industries. THE WINNERS ARE…

The Film Awards have evolved over the years, with the introduction of new categories and the retirement of others. Some categories celebrated female practitioners early on – Claire Bloom was the very first winner of Most Promising Newcomer (for Limelight) in 1953, for instance, while Margaret Furse collected British Costume Design (Colour) (Becket ) and Carmen Dillon won British Art Direction (Colour) (The Chalk Garden) in those categories’ inaugural year, 1965. A few years earlier, British Screenplay was won by Shelagh Delaney with co-writer Tony Richardson for A Taste of Honey in 1962, and actress Eva Green was the second ever person to win the publicly voted EE Rising Star award in 2007. Female directors have been celebrated in several of our debut awards, but it wasn’t until 2010 that Kathryn Bigelow made history by winning the Director category for The Hurt Locker; she remains one of only six female directors to be nominated in the category. The exhibition also celebrates the first female winners of Art Direction (Natasha Kroll, 1974), Editing (Dede Allen, 1976), Documentary ( Joan Churchill, 1982) and Adapted Screenplay (Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, 1984).

Top: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala receiving a Fellowship as part of the Merchant Ivory team in 2002. Middle: Kathryn Bigelow wins the Director category in 2010. Left: Dilys Powell receiving the Special Award in 1984. Opposite page: Natasha Kroll collects her BAFTA from president HRH Princess Anne in 1974

1 0 8


THE SPECIAL ONES

Actress Vivien Leigh was the first woman to be presented with a Fellow certificate, at the British Film Academy Awards dinner in 1953. This was a very different, more academic honour than today’s Fellowship, with the recipient elected by existing Fellows and expected to deliver a lecture to members. It was retired in 1958, with the current annual Fellowship award introduced in 1971. As such, actresses Jeanne Moreau and Dame Maggie Smith were the first film-related Fellows of the Academy (both presented in 1996), although legendary television producer Grace Wyndham Goldie was the first woman to officially be presented with the award in 1973. The recipient of the Academy’s inaugural Special Award was journalist Dilys Powell in 1984, for her services to the art of film criticism. The organisation’s current second highest honour, the Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema, was presented to producer Joyce Herlihy in 2000, followed by casting director Mary Selway the next year. I N T E R N A L A F FA I R S

BAFTA’s first female (and longest serving) president was HRH Princess Anne (19722001), while Amanda Berry is our longest serving chief executive (2000-present, see box out). Television producer Hilary Bevan Jones became BAFTA’s first female chair in 2006. Finally, film producer Barbara Broccoli was made vice-president (for film) in 2016. Five of the 11 members of our Board of Trustees are women.

TO P

SECRE TS

A S CH I EF E X ECU T I VE, A M A N DA B ER RY, EN T ERS H ER 20 t h YE A R AT BA F TA , WE D ISCOVER H OW T H E O RGA N ISAT I O N H A S CH A N G ED U N D ER H ER ST E WA R DSH I P... What did you know about BAFTA before you started? It may sound a little corny, but I always aspired to be a BAFTA member. When I started in the industry, my first boss was a member and I hoped one day that I would be qualified enough to join, too. When I became a producer, I moved up to Scotland and joined BAFTA Scotland. I actually produced a number of BAFTA Awards ceremonies for ITV, so I got to know BAFTA well. I admired it as an organisation, so when the job of director of development and events was advertised in 1998, I knew I wanted to do it, even though it meant a pay cut and a move from Glasgow back to London. What do you think you brought to BAFTA? When I joined, there was a very small number of staff – around 15 or 20. There’s more than 100 of us now. The staff were incredibly dedicated, working hard to deliver numerous events, but financially the organisation wasn’t robust. Although incredible events were being delivered and the BAFTA brand was strong, ambitions for the organisation were understandably limited. I wanted us to be as ambitious as we possibly could, and one way we could achieve this was to bring in more commercial partners. There was a feeling at the time that it wasn’t right for BAFTA, but I believed that if we found the right partners – those who believed in BAFTA’s values – it would allow us to grow and develop our amazing activities and initiatives. We now work with 60 partners and each and every one of them helps us deliver our mission. I know this is a cliché, but in many ways it was about daring to dream.


How has BAFTA evolved since you started? I was very passionate about BAFTA, and I spent time working with the Board and committees to ensure that our relationships, and relevance, to the industry were incredibly strong. One of the major turning points was the Strategic Review in the mid-2000s. From that, it became very clear that our priority, as a charity, was for our work to benefit the public. We had our Awards, where we recognise excellence, signpost the films, games and television people should see and hopefully inspire them to explore further. But we could do so much more. Our public reach has grown, with people engaging with us beyond our Awards. In 2017, we reached 104 million people across our online channels. Our learning website, BAFTA Guru, offers inspiration and advice from BAFTA winners and nominees; we run a number of new talent initiatives – last year alone we identified 800 talented individuals, with more than 100 of them given bespoke support; we produce more than 250 events a year in the UK, LA, New York and Asia. More people are engaging with us than ever; some because they want to join the industry and some just because they’re film, games or television fans. How would you like to see BAFTA evolve in the future? We are constantly evolving. In the last few years, we’ve grown our activities and expanded internationally. We want to keep growing our reach with the public, and ensure that our industries are open to all. If you are talented and we can support you, we want to do that. That’s very important to us. We’re continuing to be involved in social change. Where we can identify a need in the industry, we are looking at what BAFTA’s role should be in that. Do you have a personal highlight? The BAFTA team. There are lots of things I am incredibly proud of, but if I had to pick one it would be the incredible team I work with at BAFTA. Finally, what makes our Awards so special? Our Awards are globally respected and we are showcasing an incredibly talented industry. Our British-ness makes us unique and we don’t shy away from celebrating that. Despite the February weather, people really enjoy coming to our Awards. •

1 1 0

BA F TA EL E VAT E This new initiative was introduced in 2017, aimed at elevating individuals from underrepresented groups to the next stage of their career. The first group we chose to focus on was female directors, hoping to address the disparity between the malefemale ratio of film school graduates (50:50) and those subsequently employed in the industry (87:13). Fifteen experienced female directors were selected from almost 250 applicants to take part in this bespoke year-long programme, which included networking introductions, mentoring, tailored panel discussions, masterclasses and workshops. The BAFTA Elevate female directors programme is delivered in association with Pia Pressure, a production company that champions underrepresented filmmakers. T H E N E X T G EN ER AT I O N One of our tentpole initiatives of the past few years is Breakthrough Brits, which seeks to highlight talented individuals, who have already made a significant contribution to film, games and television and are looking to take that next step up the ladder. In 2017, 20 recipients, including two duos, were selected to enjoy the full support of BAFTA, in


B U L LY I N G & H A R A S S M E N T

It would be blinkered to say everything is fine within our industries, as the events of the past 12 months and the #MeToo campaign have demonstrated. It is BAFTA’s belief that everyone deserves to work in a safe environment, free from bullying, harassment and abuse. We have been working closely with the British Film Institute and 40 other industry organisations to develop a set of principles and guidance that can be adopted by the industry, which will be issued shortly. BFI CEO, Amanda Nevill, said: “The collective determination of so many of us, individuals and organisations, to make changes to create a better, safer environment for everyone working in film has been extraordinary. It speaks volumes about the positivity at the heart of our industry. It has been so rewarding for the BFI to work in partnership with BAFTA, BECTU, Equity, the Cinema and Television Benevolent Fund and many others, to jointly create a new set of principles and guidelines to eliminate bullying and harassment. Of course, there is more to be done, but I am optimistic because there is real energy behind the commitment to become the industry we really aspire to be, inclusive, fair, open and offering opportunity equally to everyone.”

partnership with Burberry, as they seek to progress their careers. The talented newcomers were selected by a jury of industry experts after a UK-wide open call for applications and nominations, and will receive one-to-one mentoring, an international travel bursary, guidance sessions and networking opportunities, as well as free access to BAFTA events, for 12 months. Every year, BAFTA awards scholarships to students in the UK, China, Los Angeles and New York. As part of our remit to support and nurture new talent, we provide financial assistance for students on a post-graduate course related to a career in film, games or television. There are a range of scholarships available, many including mentorship opportunities, access to BAFTA events throughout the year and a bursary. The scholarships are made possible by the generous support of a number of individuals, foundations and partnerships.

1 1 1

Above: The new crop of UK and Chinese BAFTA scholars. Top Left: Southbank Centre’s artistic director, Jude Kelly, delivers the key note speech at a BAFTA Elevate event. Left: Four of this year’s 20 Breakthrough Brits


Left: One of the career development panels from BAFTA Guru 2017. Below: Director and producer Ron Howard offers advice at The Film Sessions in 2017

winners and nominees and are aimed at career starters and emerging talent. As well as being open to the public (with more than 3,500 tickets sold), 120 career starters (with six months to two years’ experience) were also selected to participate in Guru Labs in London. They were provided with a bespoke programme of round tables, one-to-ones and discussions tailored to their needs and careers. Digested podcasts of all the sessions are now available on our BAFTA Guru site. With 98 per cent of polled attendees rating their overall experience as ‘Good’, ‘Very Good’ or ‘Excellent’, Guru Live 2018 will be one of the must-attend events in the forthcoming BAFTA calendar. T H E CR A F T I N G TA B L E

L EC T U R ES & S CR EEN I N GS

Our Learning programme is underpinned by a commitment to sharing the expertise of BAFTA winners and nominees to the wider public. For us, The Film Sessions – a series of craft panels held the day before the Awards and featuring a selection of the incredible nominees – is a key way of putting this guiding principle into practice. This year’s sessions, held at BAFTA 195, on 17 February, marked the event’s seventh year, and featured sessions on costume design, production design and make up and hair. All sessions were filmed, alongside bespoke career interviews with the guests, with the footage made available on our learning website, BAFTA Guru. In May last year, BAFTA staged 45 events over two days in London and Glasgow for our second annual Guru Live. These panels, masterclasses and round tables feature BAFTA

BAFTA hosts a huge number of lectures, panels and Q&As throughout the course of the year all over the UK and internationally, either with experts in their field and/or BAFTA-winning or nominated talent. The recent Screenwriters series, held in November 2017 and supported by the JJ Charitable Trust, saw four internationally acclaimed writers delivering lectures about their craft: Mark Boal, Sean Baker, Dee Rees and Anthony McCarten. Founder of the series, Jeremy Brock, noted: “The talent and vision on display this year was breathtaking and unmissable... We celebrate

1 1 2


Go Inside the Story with Breakthrough Sound

contentservices@dolby.com

Dolby, Dolby Atmos, and the double-D symbol are registered trademarks of Dolby Laboratories. Š 2016 Dolby Laboratories, Inc. All rights reserved.

1 1 3


OUR NEW HOST

Our new host of the Film Awards, Joanna Lumley, is also making BAFTA history. Several of our Awards have had female hosts in the past (including Esther Rantzen, Sue Lawley, Anna Ford and Ruby Wax), but Lumley is the first woman to host the Film Awards as its sole presenter.

all five of this year’s screenwriters in the knowledge that great films begin and end with a great screenplay.” The David Lean Lecture, supported by the David Lean Foundation, was delivered by Greek auteur, Yorgos Lanthimos, in February 2018. A master of absurdity and surrealist filmmaking, Lanthimos’ lecture provided an informative insight into his creative process and thoughts on the industry. BAFTA also plays host to numerous screenings throughout the year, often touring films around the country and beyond to provide a platform for new and established creators to showcase their work. A prime example is BAFTA Shorts, which collects together the nominated films from the British Short Film and British Short Animation categories. This year’s package started touring the UK on 6 February through an exclusive partnership with Curzon. The films have also been made available

on Curzon Home Cinema, the video-on-demand service, and later in the year the British Council will tour them in more than 100 countries, giving the filmmakers international exposure. Many of our short form nominees go on to greater fame, examples include Martin McDonagh (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri), Sam Taylor-Johnson (Nowhere Boy), Joe Wright (Darkest Hour) and writer-director Rungano Nyoni, who was nominated for Short Film in 2012 (Mwansa the Great) and this year received an Outstanding Debut nomination (I Am Not a Witch). •

The Florida Project’s Sean Baker at the Screenwriters’ Lecture Series 2017

To find out more about all of the above events and activities, plus many more, including how you can help the next generation of talent, please visit: www.bafta.org

1 1 4


As official scrutineers, when BAFTA needs our help we act. Providing them with confidence in the results during the awards season. It’s what we do that makes the difference. Many congratulations to all of tonight’s nominees and winners.

1 1 5


1 1 6


OFFICERS

O F

THE

ACA DE MY

OFFICERS

COM M IT TEES

HRH The Duke of Cambridge, KG Academy President

ELECTED MEMBERS

Barbara Broccoli obe Vice President, Film

Marc Samuelson ‒ Chair Alison Thompson ‒ Deputy Chair Simon Chinn Noel Clarke Alexandra Ferguson Derbyshire * Gillian Hawser Pippa Markham Lynda Myles Andrew Orr David Thompson

OF THE FILM COMMITTEE

Greg Dyke Vice President, Television David Gardner obe Vice President, Games BOARD OF TRUSTEES

 Jane Lush Chair of the Academy Dame Pippa Harris dbe Deputy Chair of the Academy

ELECTED MEMBERS OF THE TELEVISION COMMITTEE

Nick Button-Brown Chair, Games Committee

Krishnendu Majumdar ‒ Chair Hannah Wyatt ‒ Deputy Chair Richard Boden Laurence Marks Elizabeth McIntyre Emma Morgan Sara Putt Beryl Richards * Liz Trubridge Maxine Watson

Krishnendu Majumdar Chair, Television Committee Sara Putt Chair, Learning & New Talent Committee Marc Samuelson Chair, Film Committee Alison Thompson Deputy Chair, Film Committee Hannah Wyatt Deputy Chair, Television Committee

ELECTED MEMBERS OF THE GA MES COMMIT TEE

 John Smith Chair, Finance and Audit Committee and Chair, Commercial Committee

Nick Button-Brown ‒ Chair Tara Saunders Lee Schuneman * Mike Simpson  Jo Twist

Paul Morrell obe Co-optee Lloyd Dorfman Co-optee

*Children’s

Amanda Berry obe Chief Executive Kevin Price Chief Operating Officer

1 1 7

Representatives


ASIA PACIFIC EUROPE MIDDLE EAST NORTH AMERICA

Creative ideas technical reality

Tel: +44 (0)1293 582000 | www.ct-group.com Digital

Display

Audio

Email: nmaag@ctlondon.com

Video

AD Events Ltd are especially proud to support BAFTA with the design and production of tonight’s dinner and after-party

T: +44(0) 20 7635 7372 E: enquiries@adevents.co.uk W: www.adevents.co.uk 1 1 8


PA RTNERS

O F

THE

ACA DE MY

BAFTA’s partners have shown great loyalty in their year-round association with the BAFTA brand, and share our commitment and passion for the industries we represent. We warmly thank them for their commitment to the Academy and our mission to support, develop and promote excellence in the film, television and games industries.

A C A D E MY PA RT N ERS Acqua Panna Audi UK Champagne Taittinger Hotel Chocolat S.Pellegrino Taylor Bloxham Villa Maria A C A D E MY S U P P O RT ERS Alpha Grip Barco Channel 4 CTV Outside Broadcast Deloitte Dolby The Farm Group Portaprompt Republic of Photography B A F TA C YM R U AB Acoustics Aberystwyth University Acqua Panna Audi UK BBC Cymru Wales Bluestone Buzz Magazine Capital Law Cardiff BID Cardiff & Vale College Champagne Taittinger Channel 4 Chapter Arts Centre Cineworld Cardiff Clarins Cuebox Curzon

Dà Mhìle Distillery The Social Club, Agency Deloitte DRESD ELP Galeri Caernarfon Genero Glyndwr University Gorilla Hotel Chocolat Iceland ITV Cymru Wales Ken Picton Mad Dog 2020 Media Access Solutions Mint Motion Pinewood Pontio Radisson Blu Hotel, Cardiff Rekorderlig S4C S.Pellegrino Sony UK Technology Centre St David’s Hall Sugar Creative Tiny Rebel Trosol University of South Wales University of Wales Trinity Saint David Villa Maria Welsh Government Working Word B A F TA S COT L A N D Acqua Panna Audi UK BBC Scotland Blue Parrot Company British Airways Champagne Taittinger

Channel 4 Cherry Blossom Cineworld Creative Scotland Deloitte Edit 123 The Galashan Trust Glenfiddich Grosvenor Cinema Hotel Chocolat M.A.C Cosmetics Material Works MCL Create Radisson Blu Hotel, Glasgow Rainbow Room International S.Pellegrino Skills Development Scotland Staropramen STV Taylor Bloxham Villa Maria Wire

The GREAT Britain Campaign Heineken The Hollywood Reporter  Jaguar Land Rover Laika Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park London Mark Pigott Newegg Pinewood Studios Group Ruffino Screen International Swarovski VER The Wrap

B A F TA LOS A N G EL ES

B A F TA I N A S I A

Ace Hotel Los Angeles AFEX AKA Hotel Residences AMD American Airlines Bank Leumi BBC America British Film Commission Burberry Dana and Albert R Broccoli Charitable Foundation Deadline The Farm LA The Four Seasons Hotel Los Angeles at Beverley Hills

Champagne Taittinger M·A·C Cosmetics Swarovski

B A F TA N E W YO R K HBO The Hollywood Reporter Retro Report Variety VisitBritain

For further information about partnership opportunities, please contact: Louise Robertson +44 (0)20 7292 5844 louiser@bafta.org

Natalie Moss +44 (0)20 7292 5846 nataliem@bafta.org

1 1 9


1 2 0


FIL M

AWA RDS

PA RTNERS

With enduring thanks to all the official partners to the EE British Academy Film Awards in 2018.

P L A T I N U M T I E R PA R T N E R NESPRESSO

Co-Host ‒ Official Nominees’ Party

O F F I C I A L PA R T N E R S AC Q UA PA N N A

LANCÔME

Official Bottled Water

Official Beauty

AMERICAN

PAU L E D M O N D S

AIRLINES

LONDON

Official Airline

Official Hair Stylist

AT E L I E R

RÉ MY M ARTI N

S WA R OV S K I

Official Spirit

Official Jewellery AUDI

REPUBLIC OF

Official Car

PHOTOGR APHY

Official Photobooth BOT TLETOP

S.P E L L E G R I N O

Official Bag

Official Bottled Water

C H A M PAG N E

T H E S AVOY

TA I T T I N G E R

Official Hotel

Official Champagne D I G I TA L

T AY L O R B L O X H A M

CINEMA MEDIA

Official Cinema Media

Official Printer and Paper Supplier

EXTERION MEDIA

VILLA MARIA

Official Outdoor Media

Official Wine

H OT E L C H O C O L AT

Official Chocolate

1 2 1


Official Bag Partner to the EE British Academy Film Awards

Welcoming you to the new BOTTLETOP flagship store at 84 Regent Street, London

#SUSTAINABLELUXURY bottletop.com 1 2 2


FIL M

AWA RDS

GIF T

PROVIDERS

NESPRESSO

A huge thanks to the following brands, which have generously provided gifts for this year’s nominees and citation readers.

The new Nespresso Lattissima One enables you to enjoy cappuccinos and lattes in your own home. www.nespresso.com

AT E L I E R S WA R OV S K I

PAU L E D M O N D S L O N D O N

A white lacquered metal crystalline ballpoint pen featuring 540 very delicate crystals. www.atelierswarovski.com

A luxury lifestyle collection of beautifully scented hand lotions and hand washes. pauledmonds.com

BOTTLETOP

RÉ MY M ARTI N

An elegant basket tote, created from woven pandan leaves by skilled artisans in Bali. bottletop.org

Bottles of Rémy Martin 1738 Accord Royal, Bruichladdich Classic Laddie and The Botanist Gin. www.remymartin.com

C H A M PAG N E

S.PELLEGRINO

TA I T T I N G E R

A magnum of sparkling water. www.sanpellegrino.com

Bottle of Champagne Taittinger Brut Réserve NV in a gift box. www.taittinger.com

H OT E L C H O C O L AT

T H E S AVOY

Rare And Vintage: The Curated Collection, a library of the finest chocolate crafted from highlyprized cocoa. www.hotelchocolat.com

Note cards, featuring McAlpine Miller’s A Time for Reflection for The Savoy. www.fairmont.com/savoy-london

LANCÔME

VILLA MARIA

La Vie Est Belle L’Eclat EDP fragrance – the essence of beauty, disguised in a bottle. www.lancome.co.uk

A tour, wine tasting and lunch at the Villa Maria winery, Auckland. www.villamaria.co.nz

1 2 3


Trusted to deliver Outside Broadcasts for the world’s greatest events

CTV Outside Broadcasts Ltd - 3 The Merlin Centre, Lancaster Road, High Wycombe, HP12 3QL Adam Berger: adam@ctvob.co.uk / Bill Morris: bill@ctvob.co.uk / hello@ctvob.co.uk / 020 8453 8989 / www.ctvob.co.uk Photo credits: London Marathon: Ian Davidson/Alamy Stock Photo. Burghley Horse Trials: Paul Marriott/REX/Shutterstock. NFL International Series: Action Plus Sports Images/Alamy Stock Photo Cricket: Pakistan Tour of England: Matt West/BPI/REX/Shutterstock. BAFTA Awards: BAFTA/Richard Kendal. Boat Race: Duncan Grove/Alamy Stock Photo 1 2 DDP 4 USA/REX/Shutterstock. Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show: WENN Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo Brit Awards – Robbie Williams: David Fisher/REX/Shutterstock. Golf Open Championship:


ACKNOWLEDGE M ENTS

T H E A C A D E MY W I S H ES TO T H A N K É

Film voting juries and members

EE Our title sponsor

Film companies and distributors for their invaluable assistance

Marc Samuelson, Alison Thompson and members of the Film Committee

Joanna Lumley obe our Host

Jane Lush Chair of the Academy

Edith Bowman, Dermot O’Leary BAFTA Online Hosts

Dame Pippa Harris dbe Deputy Chair of the Academy

All staff at the Academy

AD Events International Limited Design of the Awards dinner and after party BBC

www.royalalberthall.com

Ovo by Cirque Du Soleil

West Design Royal Albert Hall Red Carpet and Press Area production

Creative Technology Limited Whizz Kid Entertainment freuds Grosvenor House A JW Marriott Hotel

Film Awards trailer created by Über Design for BAFTA Supported by DCM, Dolby, Pearl & Dean, Pinewood and The Farm Group

1 2 5


BAFTA 195 PiccAdilly

PresTigious heAdquArTers oF The BriTish AcAdemy oF Film And Television ArTs lead your guests up the red carpet into this glamorous and unique venue with versatile entertaining spaces and state-of-the-art screening facilities.

For events and reservations: 195piccadilly@bafta.org 020 7292 5860 www.bafta.org/195-piccadilly @bafta195

screenocean FOOTAGE THAT BRINGS STORIES TO LIFE

Screenocean brings you BAFTA’s unique footage archive, instantly available to license online. With over 1,000 clips now available, the collection will continue to grow with new and exclusive content.

www.screenocean.com E: info@screenocean.com

T: +44 (0) 1954 262 052 1 2 6


END

CREDITS

A T B A F TA

Director of Production Clare Brown

Director of Awards & Membership Emma Baehr

Awards Event Producer Lucy Waller

Head of Film Awards Jim Bradshaw

Head of Production Cassandra Hybel

Film Awards Coordinator Imogen Faris

Production and Event Team Ryan Doherty, Daniel Dalton, Georgina Cunningham, Ciara Teggart, Ian Lowe, Brogan Wallace, Jo Cole, Keren Eliot, Helen Preece, Looloo Murphy

Awards and Voting Team Kelly Smith, Dale Ellis, Gemma Thomas, Sam D’Elia, Harriet Humphries, Timothy Hughes, Natalie Gurney, Serena Deakin, Jessica Rogers, David Lortal

Director of Partnerships Louise Robertson Partnerships Team Natalie Moss, Amy Elton, Charlie Perkin, Georgi Taroni

Communications Team Nick Williams, Clare Isaacs, Jess Lenten, Eleanor Pickering, Emma Raczkowski, Liz Tresidder, Joel Freeman

Ticketing Gabby Taranowski Accounts Lucy Burks

1 2 7


BRO CHURE

CREDITS

A T B A F TA

PRINTING

Editor Toby Weidmann

Taylor Bloxham www.taylorbloxham.co.uk

Design  Joe Lawrence

The Academy chooses Soporcet and Symbol, supporting excellence in print. Printed on Symbol Matt Plus 350gsm (cover), Soporcet 150gsm (text) and Symbol Freelife Gloss 170gsm (photo essay). Supplied by Taylor Bloxham.

Ad Sales Amy Elton Charlie Perkin

The carbon impact of this paper has been measured and balanced through the World Land Trust, an ecological charity.

Contributors Rosie Fletcher Clarisse Loughrey Rich Matthews Christina Newland Charlotte O’Sullivan Neil Smith Matthew Turner

Published by British Academy of Film and Television Arts 195 Piccadilly London w1j 9ln Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 0022 reception@bafta.org www.bafta.org

Photography Director Claire Rees Picture Editor  Jordan Anderson

All nominees imagery used with kind permission from the distributors/filmmakers. Rising Star images courtesy of EE. Jane Lush portrait photography by Caroline True. ‘Focus on Film’ images: Jamie Simonds (Dee Rees), Greg Williams (Kathryn Bigelow), Steve Vas/Featureflash/SilverHub/REX/Shutterstock (Amanda Berry), Jordan Anderson ( Jude Kelly), Charlie Clift (Breakthrough Brits), Jamie Simonds (scholars); Jonny Birch (Guru Live), Laura Palmer (film sessions), Matt Holyoak ( Joanna Lumley), Danny Cozens (Sean Baker)

CRE AT IVE D I REC T I O N & COVER I L LUST R AT I O N

AKQA www.akqa.com +44 (0) 207 780 4786 info@akqa.com

Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, the Publishers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of BAFTA. © BAFTA 2018

1 2 8


Our congratulations to all nominees. From your friends at iTunes Movies.

Celebrate this year’s nominees and winners at iTunes.com/bafta


2

EE British Academy Film Awards in 2018 programme  

The official programme given to attendees of the EE British Academy Film Awards on 18 February 2018. The brochure includes exclusive intervi...

EE British Academy Film Awards in 2018 programme  

The official programme given to attendees of the EE British Academy Film Awards on 18 February 2018. The brochure includes exclusive intervi...

Advertisement