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H. H. RUMBLER

H. H. RUMBLER 2017 · KATALOG 51


VERKAUFSBEDINGUNGEN Die Echtheit aller Graphikblätter wird ohne Einschränkung garantiert. Rückgaberecht bei Nachweis von Mängeln gegenüber Katalogangaben. Die Preise verstehen sich in Euro und sind Nettopreise. Bei Zahlung in ­fremder Währung gilt der uns auf dem Konto gutgeschriebene Euro-Betrag als geleistete Zahlung. (Bankkonto bei der Frankfurter Volksbank e.G., Börsenstraße 1, D-60313 Frankfurt am Main, BLZ 501 900 00, Konto 144100) EU-Standardüberweisung: IBAN: DE85 5019 0000 0000 1441 00, BIC (SWIFT): FFVBDEFF Der Galerie unbekannte Kunden bitten wir um Referenzangaben. Ansichtssendungen werden gerne ausgeführt, müssen jedoch 3 Tage nach Erhalt zurückgeschickt werden. Festbestellungen haben Priorität. Versand auf Kosten und Gefahr des Bestellers. Versicherung zu seinen Lasten. Alle Waren bleiben bis zur vollständigen Bezahlung unser Eigentum (§449 BGB). Erfüllungsort und ausschließlicher Gerichtsstand ist Frankfurt am Main.

CONDITIONS OF SALE The authenticity of all items is unconditionally guaranteed. If any print is found to be inaccurately described it will be taken back. The prices are payable in Euro and are net. If payment is made in foreign currency, only the amount in Euro is current, which is credited to our account at: Frankfurter Volksbank eG, Börsenstraße 1, D 60313 Frankfurt am Main, BLZ 501 900 00, account no. 144100 (IBAN: DE85 5019 0000 0000 1441 00, BIC (SWIFT): FFVBDEFF) Foreign clients are requested to remit payment net of bank charges. Items will be sent on approval to institutions or clients known to us, but must be returned within 3 days of receipt. Firm orders will take precedence. The client is liable for all costs and risks of shipping, including transit insurance. Title is reserved until complete payment of good (§449 Civil Code of Germany) If any dispute arises, the Court in Frankfurt is competent for both parties.

P. S. Rumbler

International Fine Print Dealers Association


Catalogue 51

2017


K ALEIDOSCOPE

Catalogue 51 2017

KU NST H A N DLU NG

H E L M U T H . RU M B L E R OW N E R : PET R A SI BI L L RU M BL E R

6 0 31 3 F R A N K F U R T A M M A I N · G O E T H E S T R A S S E 2 T E L E F O N + 4 9 (0 ) 6 9 ­ 2 9 11 4 2 · FA X + 4 9 (0 ) 6 9 ­ 2 8 9 9 7 5 d r weis@beha m35.de


JAN VAN AKEN

1 The Travellers at a River Bank.

1614 Amsterdam 1661

ca. 1650

Etching, 18,5 x 25,4 cm Hollstein 17/II (of V) Watermark: seven­pointed foolscap Collection: T. Graf (Lugt Suppl. 1092 a)

The beautiful single sheet in a splendid, deep black early impression of the 2 nd State, the earliest available, since Hollstein verifies only a single proof of the pure etching of the 1st state in Amsterdam. The completed composition still with the later erased signature of the artist. Before the number and its removal respectively. With margins around the borderline or with the complete plate mark at the bottom respectively. In a pristine condition, a few tiny brown stains are mostly visible on the reverse. Based on the artist’s own draft, the composition was executed under the dominant impression of Saftleven’s landscape art, after whose designs Aken also etched a series of 4 plates. Like him, also Aken may have travelled towards the South and saw the picturesque river valleys of the Rhine and the Moselle with his proper eyes. They served him as a source of inspiration for his atmospheric drawings and only few etchings.

1


HEINRICH ALDEGREVER

1502 Paderborn – Soest 1555/1561

2 The Virgin and Child on a Crescent Moon.   1553 Engraving. 11,6 x 7,4 cm Bartsch, Hollstein and New Hollstein 50 Provenance: Duplicate from the Albertina, Vienna (Lugt 5 e and 5h) The mature composition in an excellent delicately toned impression. Cut on the platemark. In pristine preservation. Like the early “ Virgin and Child with a Sceptre on a Crescent Moon” from 1527 (B. 51), the present composition executed in 1553 as well is influenced by Aldegre­ ver’s lasting engagement with his great hero Dürer. Again, he seems to be directly inspired by Dürer’s “ The Virgin on the Crescent with a Sceptre and a starry Crown” from 1508 (Meder 32) which he paraphrases in his characteristic way and amalga­ mates to something new. When we perceive Dürer’s Virgins as open in their expression and posture, Aldegrever’s figure appears to us as a cohesive silhouette, even cubically closed, whereas, however, the stiffness of motions of the early years (particularly of B. 51) turned into a representative serenity. Aldegrever’s inclination to representative forms and the strong tension between the flat landscape and the figure raises the Madonna, which Dürer depicted as maternal, to the queen of heaven, to a symbolic, visionary apparition. (H. Zschelletzschky)

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2


HEINRICH ALDEGREVER

1502 Paderborn – Soest 1555/61

3 Ornamental Panel with Latin Alphabet held by two Boys.

ca. 1535

Engraving. 7,5 x 12,4 cm Bartsch, Hollstein and New Hollstein 206 Provenance: Duplicate from the British Museum ( Lugt 303 und 305) Dr. Franz Becker, Unna (without stamp) Stephan List, Frankfurt, sale 58, 1967, no. 82 C. G. Boerner, Düsseldorf, Neue Lagerliste 55, 1970, no. 83

The extremely rare charming composition in an excellent impression showing rich contrasts. Cut on the platemark and minimally close at the left and on top with a tiny margin respectively. Traces of a former folding only perceptible on verso. Some minor damages at the edges carefully mended, otherwise in fine preservation. Executed perhaps in 1535, like “ Six nude Boys supporting a Panel with the Latin Alphabet” (B. 250), the artist’s present second alphabet, which represents the letters even in different variants, can be regarded, according to Zschelletzschky, as the more advanced one. In this case Aldegrever seems to have used Italian models by Nicolo da Modena (B. XIII, 286, 58) and Mantegna (B. 19) for instance.

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HEINRICH ALDEGREVER

1502 Paderborn – Soest 1555/61

4 Design for a Buckle.   1537 Engraving. 14,7 x 7,1 cm Bartsch; Hollstein and New Hollstein 263/II Provenance: D r. Franz Becker, Unna (without stamp) Stephan List, Frankfurt, sale 58, 1967, no. 116 C. G. Boerner, Düsseldorf, Neue Lagerliste 55, 1970, no. 96

Very fine, contrasty impression of the extremely rare ornament print. The back­ ground shaded with horizontal lines. U. Mielke could detect only 5 impression of the first state, on white background, all of them in public collections. Cut on the platemark. Some minor repairs in the edges extraneous regarding the great rareness of the composition. One of about 20 ornamental prints by Aldegrever especially designed for golds­ miths. Laid out as an one dimensional design drawing, the richly decorated buckle could be directly realized in an experienced gold- or silversmiths workshop.

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4


ALBRECHT ALTDORFER

ca. 1480 Regensburg 1538

5 The “Beautiful Virgin of Regensburg” on a Throne.

ca. 1519/20

Engraving. 6,0 x 4,1 cm Bartsch 13; Hollstein 14; Winzinger 137/a (of c); New Hollstein e.14

Very fine early impression printed in deep black ink prior to the scratches in the sky. With thread margins, at the bottom with the borderline. In absolutely perfect condition. The miniaturesque composition is closely connec­ ted with the pilgrimage to the “ Beautiful Virgin” of the so­called “ New Chapel” in Regensburg. On February 21, 1519 the city government of Regensburg decided to expel the Jews from Regensburg. The demolition of the synagogue, which is recorded by Altdorfer in two engravings (B. 63 and 64) when it was still intact, started the same day. The apparently quick recovery of a sto­ nemason who had an accident during the demoli­ tion was sensationally up valued on purpose to be declared as a miracle caused by the Virgin at the place of her forthcoming veneration. The pilgri­ mage to the “ Beautiful Virgin” presented on a pro­ visional altar in a wooden chapel, first in the form of a byzantine inf luenced painting, which was replaced by Hans Leinberger’s sculpture shortly afterwards, drew quickly large crowds and soon grew into a mass movement poked by the cathedral preacher Balthasar Huebmair again. The decline in 1522 and 1523 was as rapid as the rise had been feverish. Altdorfer met the demand of pilgrimage souvenirs in different kinds. Whereas he attempted to reproduce the cult image with his chiaroscuro woodcut (B. 51), he varied the theme in the present composition. The garment of the Virgin, enthroned in front of an altarpiece, adopts the byzantine encolpion, the headscarf set with stars, the characteristic element of both miraculous images venerated in the “ New Chapel”. Altdorfer’s pilgrimage print cites the “ Beautiful Virgin of Regensburg” as a type only and transferred it into a new context presen­ ting new associations for the contemplative devotion of the pilgrims when retur­ ning home. Winzinger felt confirmed in his supposition of a first Italian sojourn of the artist in 1518, because of the Venetian references of the altar architecture showing clo­ se relationship with Giovanni Bellini’s Frari altarpiece.

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EDMOND AMAN-JEAN

1858 Chevry-Cossigny – Paris 1936

6 Sous les fleurs.   1897 Lithograph, 34,9 x 26,9 cm Inventaire du Fonds Francais, Après 1800, tome I, pag. 120 Provenance: K unsthandlung Georg Andreas, Frankfurt am Main Dr. A. W. von Dietel (Lugt 2722b) F.A.C. Prestel, Frankfurt am Main, Auction on October 16 –17, 1928, no. 5

Rare proof impression of the shadowy composition which has an almost ephemeral effect. Printed from the purple stone only, without the green and yellow stone which complemented the composition for the publication in the January edition of the “ L’estampe morderne” in 1898. Mounted in a decorative passe-partout from the time with a narrow glued-on, lithographed vignette of a dragon-killing putto by Hans Thoma ( J. A. Behringer, Griffelkunst 928), the company brand of the art gallery Georg Andreas, Frankfurt am Main. Although being close friends with G. Seurat since his course of studies at the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Aman-Jean was inf luenced rather by the Symbolism than by the Pointilism of his former studio companion. At the suggestion of Léonce Bénédite, the director of the Musée Luxembourg, he began occupying himself with the lithography in the early 1890s and soon disco­ vered the potential of chromolithography for himself. As one of the prominent chromolithographers of his time he belonged to the artists, who were consulted by Ch. Masson and H. Piazza for providing the “ L’estampe moderne”, published by them since May 1897, with original-lithographs. Until April 1899, four chro­ molithographs appeared monthly, printed by F. Champenois.

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ANDREA ANDREANI

7 Virgin and Child.  

1558/59 Mantua 1629

ca. 1591 – 93

After F. Vanni

Chiaroscuro woodcut from 2 blocks. 26,4 x 20,9 cm Bartsch XII, 56,11 Watermark: Fleur de lis

Impressive delicate color-variant of black and beige. Perfectly printed, the two woodblocks fitting exactly, so that the highlighting system of lines have an especially brilliant effect. Significantly better than the impression having been on display at the exhibition “ In Farbe! Clair-obscur-Holzschnitte der Renaissance”, Vienna 2014, no. 204. The boderline completely visible. Perfectly fresh. The unsigned chiaroscuro woodcut is based on a painting from 1591 by Francesco Vanni – commissioned by the “Compania di Santa Caterina in Fontebrandia” in Siena – as well that he did an etching (B. XVII, 196, 1) in 1595. A. Gnann has recently confirmed E. Kolloff ’s and K. Oberhuber’s attribution to A. Andreani as opposed to the tradition based on Bartsch who regarded the mas­ terly chiaroscuro woodcut as the work of an anonymous artist only. In dieser wohl zwischen 1591 und 1593 entstandenen “Madonna mit Kind” setzt Andreani den linearen Stil von Antonio da Trento fort…Während in Antonios Blättern jedoch eine größere Distanz zwischen dem Betrachter und dem Sujet besteht, ist die Madonna in Andreanis Clair-obscur nahe an den vorderen Bildrand gerückt und ermöglicht dem Gläubigen, wie bei einem Andachtsbild, den direkten Kontakt mit den heiligen Personen und eine unmittelbare Vertiefung in den Bildgegenstand. (A. Gnann)

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ANON YMOUS NETHERLANDISH ARTIST, 17th CENTURY

8 Virgin and Child with a pear.  

ca. 1620

After L. van Leyden

Etching. 13,3 x 10,0 cm Bartsch VII, 436, 1 (Pièces gravées a l’eau forte dans le gout de Lucas van Leyden); Volbehr 175; Hollstein (Frisius) 193; Hollstein ( Engravings after Lucas van Leyden) 33; New Hollstein (After Lucas van Leyden) 5/II; New Hollstein (Frisius) R1/II Provenance: W. Roscoe (?) Sir Joseph Weld-Blundell Christie’s, London, sale December 1,1976, no. 55 with illustration C. G. Boerner, Düsseldorf, Neue Lagerliste 71, 1979, no. 28

Brilliant, deep black impression of great harmony and beauty. Since Orenstein could detect the first state, before the reduction of the plate, only in a single impression in Vienna, here the earliest available second state. Only six further impressions are known in public collections. The platemark visible on three sides and, at left, with 1 mm plate margin beyond the boderline. Anciently mounted onto a support sheet of a former collection. Except for a short tear at the upper left, and some glue stains coming through at the left margin, in excellent, untouched condition. So fine of utmost rarity. Counted by Bartsch among the “ Pièces gravées a l’eau forte dans le gout de Lucas van Leyden”, listet even by Volbehr among the artist’s own works, the print was regarded together with two other etchings after compositions by van Leyden as the work of S. Frisius until N. Orenstein revised this attribution in the New Holl­ stein. The carefully etched composition can be regarded as an important document of the perception of van Leyden’s art in the early seventeenth century. It refers to a painting by the master (Smith 23) which is in the Nasjonal Galleriet, Oslo.

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8


HANS BALDUNG GRIEN

9 The Virgin on the grassy Bank.  

1484/85 Gmünd (Swabia) – Strasbourg 1545

1505/07

Woodcut, 23,6 x 16,3 cm Bartsch VII, 178, 13/II (Dürer); Hollstein 65/II; Exhibition cat. “ Hans Baldung Grien”, Karlsruhe 1959, No. 18/II; Geisberg/Strauss 66/II; Mende 1/II Watermark: A in a circle with two arches and two M (Meder Wz 288) Provenance: Southwest German private collection

The early composition originating from the artist’s journeymanship in a very fine impression with the Dürer monogram. Powerful, without any weakness. Printed on paper with the watermark “A in a circle with two arches and two M”, like the examplar in the Augustinermuseum, Freiburg. With remarkable 8 – 15 mm paper margins around the borderline partially closed with ink. The devotional sheet was probably produced during Dürer’s second journey to Italy, when H. Baldung and H. Schäufelein represented the master in Nuremberg and continued the workshop. After Dürer’s return, he may have insisted on this woodcut being marked with his monogram just like all products of his workshop. With his “ Virgin on the grassy Bank” Baldung took up a popular subject of prints of this time. The inf luences of Schongauer’s engraving from 1475/80 (New Holl­ stein 36) and Dürer’s engraving “ Mary with the Guenon Monkey” from ca. 1498 (Meder 30) are unmistakable. Nevertheless the young artist modifies what is found in a manner characteristic for him: his Child is larger and fixes his stare at the viewer; the curls of his Virgin’s hair have a life of their own as they fly in the air in calligraphically animated lines; and the monumental and pyramidal forms of Baldung’s figures fill and truly dominate the picture field and landscape of his composition. (L. Karafel in: Exhibition cat. “ Hans Baldung Grien. Prints and Drawings”, National Gallery, Washington and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven 1981).

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HANS BALDUNG GRIEN

1484/85 Gmünd (Swabia) – Strasbourg 1545

10 The Lord with the Globe in his left Hand.  

1519

Woodcut, 22,1 x 15,4 cm Bartsch 40; Hollstein 57; Exhibition cat. >Hans Baldung Grien<, Karlsruhe 1959, no. 16; Geisberg/Strauss 78; Mende 44 Watermark: Small Augsburg coat of arms with pine cones and attached letter ,A’ (cf. Briquet 2117ff.) Provenance: Southwest German private collection

Brilliant deep black impression. As usual, already with small marginal gaps and beginning wormholes in the prin­ ting block, which are not retouched in the present exemplar. According to J. Lauts completely flawless exemplars of the paricular compositions … are apparently very rare … The woodcuts produced since 1510 already show cracks, gaps and other breaches even in relatively early impressions … The comparatively good printing quality of many exemplars with wormholes suggests that a number of Baldung’s woodblocks were reprinted after a longer time of not being used. Printed on the same paper as the most exemplars of the “ The Apostels” in the Augustinermuseum, Freiburg. With fully visible borderline and occasionally with fine margins beyond it. Some thin spots along the left-hand edge in the area of the cloud aureole, other­ wise in a beautiful, pristine preservation. This single sheet was produced in connection to or possibly immediately after “ The Apostels” and offers a variation of the “ Salvator” of this series. With his consciously simplified graphic texture of mostly linear and parallel cross­ hatchings, the present “ Lord with the Globe in his left Hand” exemplifies the change of style which became apparent in Baldung’s woodcuts from 1519, for the first time in “Adam and Eve”. One might…suggest that Baldung’s change of style to a broader graphic system could have been stimulated by his search for a woodcut technique of simpler and more durable characteristics, particularly after his earlier fascination with chiarioscuro and luminous effects had run its course. (Exhibition cat. “ Hans Baldung Grien. Prints and Drawings”, Natio­ nal Gallery, Washington and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, 1981)

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HANS SEBALD BEHAM

11 Adam and Eve.

1500 Nuremberg – Frankfurt am Main 1550

1529

Engraving. 7,9 x 5,1 cm Bartsch app.1; Pauli 5; Hollstein 5/I (of II) Provenance: Gordon Nowell­Usticke Christie’s, London, sale June 28, 1978, no. 3 David Landau Salomon Josefowitz, Pully­Lausanne

Excellent early impression of the extre­ mely rare composition. Before the scratch on Adam’s left leg and on Eve’s left arm respectively. Cut on the platemark. Minor small repairs at the edges are com­ pletely negligible considering the extraor­ dinary rareness of the print. Enjoying exceptional status by virtue of its provenance from Nowell­Usticke’s import­ ant H. S. Beham collection, the present impression was acquired for equally exqui­ site special collections of the Little Masters formed by D. Landau and S. Josefowitz. Who is seducing whom is not the question here. The almost restrained, calm courts­ hip between Adam and Eve, which Beham has staged so­to­speak across the borders of two separate prints in 1523/24, seems to have given way to a wild occasionally violently argued out dispute of the first human couple. The seed of discord has already been sowed by reaching for the forbidden fruit, the paradise has been lost. It almost seems that Adam claims to have picked the more beautiful, bigger apple. Or does he address first reproaches to Eve that she has seduced him?

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HANS SEBALD BEHAM

1500 Nuremberg – Frankfurt am Main 1550

12 Judith walking to the left, and her Servant.  

ca. 1531/35

Engraving. 11,6 x 7,2 cm Bartsch 11; Pauli 12; Hollstein 12/I (of II) Watermark: imperial orb Provenance: H . Stiebel (Lugt 1367) F. Quiring (Lugt Supplement 1041c)

Superb early impression of hardly surpassable brilliance and clarity of the spa­ ring lineament. With delicate platetone, the nude body of Judith, however, per­ fectly clear. Before the scratch above the breast of Judith. Mostly with tiny margins beyond the inky platemark. Flawlessly perfect. Of greatest rarity, particularly in such exquisite printing quality and state of pre­ servation. With its almost monumental conception of figure, subtle interleaving of the two protagonists und psychological apprehension of the horrible occurrence, the present composition can be regarded without any doubt as the most mature one Beham did of this subject: The stealth and the conspirational closeness of the two women are emphasized, with both looking in the same direction and the maid scowling, half hidden by Judith’s arm. Judith is shown completely nude, and her servant is dressed in a clinging garment, … pointing up the power of sexuality of women in general, but making it clear that Judith is the active party. She strides forward as she turns back to look at the scene of the murder or make certain that the two have not been discovered. She holds the sword firmly, and its position against the maid’s body gives it a phallic appearance, which, along with the nudity, only reinforces the idea that Judith seduced Holofernes in order to over­ power him. Judith wears a wreath like a victor, and carries Holofernes’ head like a prize. (H. D. Russel)

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HANS SEBALD BEHAM

13 Head of Christ.

1500 Nuremberg – Frankfurt am Main 1550

1535

Engraving, 5,2 x 3,8 cm Bartsch 29; Pauli and Hollstein 31 Provenance: David Landau Salomon Josefowitz, Pully­Lausanne

Excellent, evenly printed impression of the early composition. With fine margins around the plate mark. In pristi­ ne freshness. Under Dürer’s inf luence the young H.S. Beham was repeatedly occupied with the subject of the head of Christ crowned with thorns in 1519/20. In addition to the popular monumental woodcut (Pauli 829), which Bartsch still considered as Dürer’s work, three engravings were produced, which approach the popular devotional picture in very different ways. In contrast to the head of Christ (Pauli 30) which was also produced in 1520 and in its strict frontality and its reduction to the head directly refers to Dürer’s >The Sudarium held by two angels< (Meder 26), the man of sorrows in the present, slightly larger composition seems quasi brought to life. The visage of Christ does not encounter as the icon arisen by a miracle, but the illustration of the historic person, quasi as a snapshot of the derision or the presentation to the people. Beham’s focus on the head of Christ being slightly turned aside, directed to an indefinite distance, does not completely blind out the exposed torso. The purple coat appearing on the right side presented a clue to the devotional beholder for his contemplation into a certain sequence of the passion. Of great rarity.

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HANS SEBALD BEHAM

14 Coat of Arms of H.S. Beham.

1500 Nuremberg – Frankfurt am Main 1550

1544

Engraving, 6,8 x 5,9 cm Bartsch 254; Pauli and Hollstein 265; Exhibition Cat. >The World in Miniature. Engravings by the German Little Masters 1500­1550<, Kansas 1988, pag. 223, Fig. 53 (the present exemplar) Provenance: David Landau Salomon Josefowitz, Pully­Lausanne

Brilliant and richly contrasting impression of the sought­after com­ position. Cut on the hexagonal plate mark. Except for a tiny brown stain, in a flaw­ lessly fresh condition. In such beauty extremely rare. The confident ,relocation announce­ ment’ of the artist was executed four years after he acquired citizenship in Frankfurt am Main in 1540. As a result of the spectacular litiga­ tion at the beginning of the year 1525, Sebald had to f lee from his hometown together with his brother Barthel and G. Pencz. While Barthel soon followed a new career path in Munich notwithstanding the official permission from November of the same year to return to Nuremberg, Sebald apparently settled in Nuremberg again before he relocated to the Frank­ furt region probably at the beginning of the 1530s. In 1535 he renounced his citizenship in Nuremberg and established himself in Frankfurt as a painter, engraver and draughtsman for book illustrations. In 1544 Sebald produced an emblematic selfportrait, an engraved coat of arms with the universal symbol of artists’ guilds of St. Luke, three silver shields...Sebald’s personal heraldic memento implies that he was eager to assert his own high social standing (even if Sebald was not actually awarded a patent of nobility). (Exhibition Cat. Kansas 1988)

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HANS SEBALD BEHAM

15 Female genius holding a coat of arms.

1500 Nuremberg – Frankfurt am Main 1550

1535

Engraving, 8,5 x 5,5 cm Bartsch 258; Pauli and Hollstein 269 Provenance: G. Nowell­Usticke Christie’s, London, June 28, 1978, from no. 141 David Landau Salomon Josefowitz

The extraordinarily rare composition in a marvellously brilliant clear impression. Cut on the plate mark or with thread margins beyond. A tiny brown stain in the left­hand margin, otherwise pristine. Enjoying exceptional status by virtue of its provenance from the famous special collection of works by Hans­ Sebald­Beham previously owned by G. Nowell­Usticke. The sheet was produced in 1535, when the artist, relocated to Frankfurt, gave up his citizenship in Nuremberg. The heraldic shield presented by the female genius shows the universal symbol of artists’ guilds of St. Luke, three silver shields.

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HANS SEBALD BEHAM

1500 Nuremberg – Frankfurt am Main 1550

16 The Virgin with the Pear and Child on the Bank.  

1521

Woodcut, 17,0 x 10,8 cm Bartsch 122; Pauli 888; Hollstein 888/II; Collection: D  r. Otto Wedekind (Lugt Suppl. 2595 a) F. Quiring (Lugt Suppl.1041c)

Remarkably fresh and – especially regarding the fine surface structure – untou­ ched impression of the second state, the earliest available on the market, since the 5 known impressions of the first state, before the date, are all in public collec­ tions. Described in the sale catalogue 39 at Hollstein + Puppel, Berlin 1928, lot 112, as prachtvoller Abdruck wie er selten vorkommt (very fine impression rarely to be found on the market). Mentioned by Hollstein as one of the only 11 impressions having been on sale during the period of 1905 – 1954. This magnificent illustration, in all parts deep black and accordingly with the most beautiful contrasts, was executed by Beham with an independent interpre­ tation of Dürer’s correspondent engraving executed ten years earlier (Meder 33). One of the most important differences is the strict profile posture on the one hand, which grants the Mother of God a more dignified charisma, and on the other hand the significantly more intimate conception, showing the gathering of Mother and Child filled with a very earnest, human warmth and intimacy.

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JEAN-JACQUES DE BOISSIEU

1736 Lyon 1810

17 Landscape with Huntsman and Dogs.   1806 After J. Wijnants

Etching, drypoint, engraving and roulette. 45,3 x 62,8 cm Nagler 28/III; Le Blanc 129/III; Perez 133/III (of IV) Provenance: Princes of Liechtenstein

The first of two sheets produced by Boissieu for the Mannheim art dealer D. Artaria in a magnificent, finely balanced impression. Almost opaque in the velvety black of the dense shadowed areas and at the same time gossamer-light in the leaves of the trees, where Boissieu’s quasi exuberantly vibrating etching needle, supported by the delicate surface tone of the roulette, knows how to suggest a purring breeze. Prior to the modification of the indication concerning the owner of the model. With narrow margins around the plate mark. Mounted on the original support sheet of the Princely Liechtenstein Collection. The renowned Mannheim art dealer D. Artaria approached Boissieu in 1806 with the request to transmit the painting “ Landscape with Huntsman and Dogs” by J. Wijnants which was in his possession at that time, into the print medium. What Boissieu created was much more than a slavish reproduction of the original which Artaria could sell a few years later to the collection of Count Franz Erwein von Schönborn: He so to speak caught and transmitted the “spirit” of the original and the painter’s manner. Although the model as such remains recognizable …, also Boissieu’s handwriting is distinguishable: Not imitatio but aemulatio is his rhetorically leading category during the analysis of the Old Masters; Not their imitation but the attempt of surpassing them led him. (C. S. Klein)

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JEAN-JACQUES DE BOISSIEU

18 Great Landscape with Cattle Herdsmen.  

1736 Lyon 1810

1806

After J. Van Ruisdael

Etching, Drypoint, Engraving and Roulette. 45,4 x 62,9 cm Nagler 27/III; Le Blanc 134/III; Perez 134/IV Provenance: Princes of Liechtenstein

Splendid, richly nuanced impression of Boissieu’s etching which was designed as a counterpart to the previous number. With the corrected indication D’apres le Tableau de Ruysdael, qui est dans la Galerie de S. E. Monsieur le Comte F. de Schoenborn. With narrow margins around the plate mark. Mounted on the original support sheet of the Princely Liechtenstein Collection. From the beginning, D. Artaria had in mind to order two counterparts when addressing Boissieu in 1806 with the request to reproduce the painting by J. Wijnants which was in his possession at this time. Although the price of 6.000 Livres for both plates was agreed on already in June, it should last until August that Artaria chose a painting by J. van Ruisdael, known today under the name “ Herdsman with two Cows near Grainsfield” (Slive 431; private collection USA), as a matching counterpart. The f lourishing graphic market was not the only reason for ordering those two counterparts. A clever instrument of marketing for the sale of the originals seems to have been at least as important for Artaria. His plan worked out. He succeeded in selling both paintings together to the Count Franz Erwein von Schönborn.

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FERDINAND BOL

19 The Family in the Room.

1616 Dordrecht – Amsterdam 1680

1643

Etching, engraving and drypoint. 18,5 x 21,8 cm Bartsch, Rovinski and Hollstein 4 Watermark: basilisk (similar to Heawood 845) Provenance: F. A. Buck (not in Lugt)

Velvety, deep black early impression perfectly emphasizing the sensitively diffe­ rentiated chiaroscuro of the rare composition. With the clearly visible signatur ,F Bol 1643’ in the right wing of the window. Cut on the plate mark. In magnificent preservation. Rarely this beautiful. With his mundane interpretation of the “Holy Family in the Room” F. Bol directly refers to Rembrandt’s “St. Jerome in a dark Chamber” (B. 105) executed one year earlier. Bol’s image makes the Holy Family more accessible by emphasizing mundane domestic detail. Mary gives her breast to the Child, while Joseph solicitously hovers, holding out a towel, diaper, or swaddling cloth. A cat studies the intimate family scene from the fireplace corner. At left rear is a Dutch bed of the built-in cupboard type and, standing on end before it, a >wicker bakermat<, a kind of legless couch or cradle that was placed on the floor for a nursing mother to sit in. (C. S. Ackley)

19


GIULIO BONASONE

ca. 1498 Bologna – Rome 1580

20 Pomona and Pan.   before 1561 After G. Romano

Engraving (and etching?). 27,7 x 22,6 cm Bartsch 170; Massari 121/I (of II); Exhibition cat. >Giulio Romano pinxit et delineavit<, Rome 1993, No. 63/I (of II) Watermark: Shield with Ladder (similar Briquet 5929, dated Fabriano 1559) Provenance: R . Fischer (Lugt 2205) Kunsthandlung Helmut H. Rumbler, Catalogue 4, 1973, No. 34 Southwest German private collection

Extraordinarily fine and very early impression. Especially in the sky with numerous fine traces of wiping disappearing soon afterwards. Before the rework and the modification of the name ,I. Bonasonio f.’ into ,I. Bonasio f.’ With fine margins around the borderline and partially still inky plate mark. The impression from the Fischer collection whose collection of important Italian prints, particularly prints by Bonasone, is especially mentioned by Lugt. The composition may be undoubtedly counted to Bonasone’s most mature etchings. Occasionally seen as the artist’s own pictorial invention, it, however, presumably bases on a model by G. Romano which is lost today. In this context Massari refers to close stylistic parallels to the decoration of the Camera delle Aquile in the Palazzo del Te.

40


20


PAUL BRIL

1553/54 Antwerp or Breda – Rome 1626

21 Riverlandscape with a Shepherd on a Hill to the right.  

1590

Etching, 20,7 x 27,7 cm Hollstein 2/I (of IV)

Excellent, extraordinarily rare early impression, only with the inscription of the place of publication ,Romae’ in the lower left edge. Prior to the later addresses of the publisher. With pointed plate corners and inky plate marks. With ca. 1 cm paper margins slightly stained, otherwise impeccable. One of the artist’s few single-handed etchings and together with its counterpart (Hollstein 1) actually one of his earliest dated landscapes. Domiciled in Rome since 1582, P. Bril discovered the landscape as his actual arti­ stic subject at the end of the decade, being occupied with works by P. Bruegel t.E. or by his brother Matthijs, by H. Bol, G. van Coninxloo and G. Muziano. His main interest has been dedicated rather to a subtle composition of an ideal pictorial whole of different motifs of nature than to the accurate reproduction of what he has seen. It is remarkable, that by applying this genuinely mannered composition principle, Bril at the same time shows forward-looking possibilities to its overcoming. The forms worked out with strict composition rules do not end in themselves for him, but serve the emotionalisation of the landscape, thus the emotionally determined interpretation of reality. ­T herefore, in his images the nature of Italy never seems different than idealized and percolated by a pastoral atmosphere. It is essentially this stringent, commonly called Arcadian landscape interpretation, which lends artistic individuality to Brils OEuvre and legitimate his reputation as “Ancestor of the classic Roman landscape art of the 17th century”. (E. Wiemann)

42


21


JACQUES CALLOT

22

1592 Nancy 1635

Entrée de Monsieur de Couuonge et de Monsieur de Chalabre. – The entry of Monsieur de Couuonge and Monsieur de Chalabre.   1627 Etching, 15,3 x 24,2 cm Lieure 579 Watermark: Angel (L. 27)

Plate 5 of the series “Combat à la Barrière” in a superb early impression of utmost brilliancy. The corners of the plate sharp and the edges partially still inky. As specifically mentioned by Lieure with reference to the premier tirage, printed on paper with the watermark Angel (L. 26). Deep, saturated black, with a remarkab­ ly beautiful plate tone. With c. 1 cm paper margin around the strikingly imprinted plate mark. Except for some residues of a former mounting on a collector’s support sheet on the reverse, impeccable. Probably the most dramatic composition of the “Combat à la Barrière”, where Callot documented decorations and sceneries of a great celebration, which Duke Charles IV of Lorraine arranged in honor of his cousin Duchess of Chevreuse on February, 14 1627 in the Salle Neuve of the Nancy castle. The festival began with the ceremonial entry of the participants of the subse­ quent show-,tournament at the barrier’. The present composition describes the entry of the Messrs. de Couuonge and Chalabre. Dressed as Minos and Radaman­ te, sons of Zeus and Europa and standing on a grotto wagon, they are being dra­ wn by a fire-spitting dragon through a f lame inferno. Demons are accompanying them, three women with snake heads, who, according to Humbert, form the court of the Princess of Hell, are advancing them.

20


ANTON ALEXANDER JOSEPH CARDON

23 Signing the Marriage Contract and a Country Dance.  

1739 Brussels 1822

ca. 1770

After A. Watteau

Etching. 50,5 x 72,4 cm (Size of the illustration) Dacier & Vuaf lart 292

Trial proof, undescribed by Darcier & Vuaf lart – UNICUM ?. Before the comple­ te rework of the composition, before the sky and before all letters. The lower margin completely visible blank, before the later engraved title, cut on the plate mark; the remaining 3 sides with 2– 3 cm margins beyond. Due to the size of the sheet with an unobtrusive printing fold in the lower margin and in the sky respectively, otherwise in perfect preservation. In the left foreground of the illustration one can see the bride’s parents signing the contract while bride and groom are waiting below the canopy to the left of the middle. Watteau’s oil painting was executed on the occasion of his journey to Valencien­ nes. It was a commission of the d’Arenberg family, who owned a seigneury in this region and in whose possession the image is until today.

46


ANTON ALEXANDER JOSEPH CARDON

23 La Signature de Contrat de la Noce de Village.  

1739 Brüssel 1822

Um 1770

Nach A. Watteau

Radierung. 50,5 x 72,4 cm (Größe der Darstellung) Dacier & Vuaf lart 292

Bei Dacier & Vuaflart unbeschriebener Probedruck – UNIK AT ? – vor der gesamten Überarbeitung der Darstellung, vor dem Himmel und vor aller Schrift. Im Unterrand, mit dem voll sichtbaren leeren Tablett (später dort mit dem gestochenen Titel), auf der Plattenkante geschnitten. An den übrigen drei Seiten mit 2 – 3 cm Papierrand. Bedingt durch die Größe des Papiers mit leichter, nicht weiter störender Papierquetschfalte im Unterrand, bzw. im Himmel, ansonsten ganz perfekt erhalten. Auf der Darstellung sieht man links vorne die Brauteltern beim Unterschreiben des Kontrakts, während das Brautpaar links in der Mitte, unterhalb der zeltartigen Überdachung wartet. Das Ölbild von Watteau entstand anläßlich einer Reise des Künstlers nach Valenciennes. Es handelt sich um einen Auftrag der Familie d’Arenberg, die in dieser Gegend eine Domaine besaß und in deren Besitz sich das Bild noch heute befindet.

23

46


GIOVANNI BENEDETTO CASTIGLIONE

1606 Genoa – Mantua 1664

24 The philosopher Diogenes searching for a honest man.  

ca. 1645 – 47

Etching. 22,0 x 30,7 cm Bartsch 21; Percy E 15; Bellini 16/II; T.I.B. 46 commentary 021 S2 Watermark: Fleur de lis in a circle below a crown Provenance: Colnaghi, London, stock-number ‚c 35165‘

Une des plus belles choses de Bénédette. (A. Bartsch) Fine impression. Printed in deep black ink, marvelously clear, with slightly emphasized platetone towards the edges. With the dedication to the Roman art dealer and passionate collector Nicolo Simonelli and the address of D. Rossi. With fine margins around the partially inky platemark. In perfect condition. Castiglione mastered in this composition, executed shortly after his return to Rome in 1647, a special lightening situation as prescribed by the subject difficult to represent: according to the tradition by Diogenes Laërtius, the Greek philoso­ pher Diogenes of Sinope went to the market in Athens lightening a candle at noon in order to look for an honest man. The philosopher’s indistinct left hand seems to be so-to-speak eclipsed by the light of the lamp. Thus, its unfinished character does not inevitably indicate an unfinished composition, but it fits to the artist’s intention of representing the effect of a source of light at daylight. In addition, J. Standring referred in this connection to an iconographic aspect: the fact that Diogenes hand is unfinished, whether intentionally or not, may relate to the meaning of the Composition: the light casts its rays on the only honest man alive, Diogenes himself. Castiglione combined the representation of Diogenes, the Cynic, with several objects, a bucranium beside of a pumpkin, an antique vase in front of a leaning herm of Pan and three symbolic animals (a monkey, an owl, a turtle) to an imme­ diately touching version of the vanitas theme that preoccupied the artist so often.

50


24


GIOVANNI BENEDETTO CASTIGLIONE

25 Man wearing a plumed fur cap and a scarf.  

1609 Genoa – Mantua 1665

ca. 1645/50

Etching. 17,7 x 14,7 cm Bartsch 52; Bellini 45/II; TIB 46 Commentary, 052 S3

Very fine Impression exemplifying the close relationship to Rembrandt’s ‘oriental heads’. With fine margins around the platemark. The virtuoso and masterly shadowed study belongs to the series of character heads with oriental headdresses begun in Genoa and completed in Rome during the artist’s second stay 1647 – 51. This would explain the adjective ‘GENOVESE’ added by the artist to his signature which makes sense only for an artist working away from home. Regarding the subject as well as the etching technique, Castiglione refers to Dutch prototypes. The knowledge of the so-called ‘Tronjes’ by Rembrandt and Lievens is unmistakable (cf. exhib. cat. “ Rembrandt et les painters-graveurs ­italiens …”, Epinal 2003/04, no. 6 and 7). Executed as model-like studies of cha­ racter in the late 1630s, they may arrived at Italy shortly afterwards. Etchings by Rembrandt were highly esteemed in Italy since the second third of the seven­ teenth-century. His inf luence on Castiglione’s work is impressively noticeable in the 1650s, thus S. Welsh proposed a dating about 1650 whereas Bellini considers an earlier date to be possible.

52


25


GIOVANNI BENEDETTO CASTIGLIONE

26 Circe changing Ulysses’ Men to Beasts.  

1609 (?) Genoa – Mantua 1664

ca. 1650

Etching. 21,6 x 30,1 cm Bartsch 22; Percy E. 23; Bellini 60/I (of II) T.I.B. 46 commentary 022 S1 (of S2) Watermark: Lily in a crowned circle (Heawood 1628, dated: Rome, 1650)

Castiglione’s most brilliant (in both senses) etching (T. J. Standring and M. Clayton). Superb early impression with an exceptionally dense atmosphere. Prior to the scratch through the tuft of grass beneath the helmet in the lower left. Printed in a saturated deep black showing the Rembrandtesque chiaroscuro of the composi­ tion to its best advantage. Cut on the partially still inky plate mark or with tiny margin beyond. Pristine and f lawless. Rarely that beautiful and in such a perfect preservation. Circe, who – as told by Homer in the Odyssey –  transforms Ulysses’ companions into animals, certainly belonged to the magic figures of the antique literature which Castiglione appreciated the most and thus inspired him to one of his most fascinating compositions: In Castigliones print, frames by a decaying architectural niche and with a pile of magical or astrological volumes before her, Circe gazes at the gagle of beasts, their discarded armour composing an informal still life in the foreground. Castiglione used every mark – making technique in his arsenal to create this compelling image, and those marks were faithfully captured by the unusually successful acid-bite of the plate…

54


26


GIOVANNI BENEDETTO CASTIGLIONE

27 Noah and the Animals entering the Ark.  

1609 (?) Genoa – Mantua 1664

ca. 1650/55

Etching. 20,5 x 40,4 cm Bartsch 1; Percy E. 24; Bellini 61; T.I.B. 46 commentary 001 Watermark: Countermark ,FB’ (?) Provenance: K unsthandlung Helmut H. Rumbler, Katalog 25, 1989, No. 10 Brandenburg private collection

Superb early impression of probably the most important sheet of Castiglione’s œuvre. As it can be seen only in the best exemplars: the horse’s body shining in a bright white as central point of view. The remaining areas, especially on the left, cover­ ed with light tint and traces of wiping, as if air and vegetation breathed a tropi­ cal-sultry atmosphere. The deeply engraved, burry shadows immersed in a picturesque light and dark, a quasi Rembrandtesque chiaroscuro-effect, like already Percy and Bellini especially pointed out: The animals stream from their dark wood towards a bright horizon on which the Ark, Noah and his family are delicately outlines. Although the sunlight flank of the horse is essentially blank paper relieved with just a light stippling of dots, it remains the most compelling feature of the entire print. (T. Standring and M. Clayton) Surrounded by 3 mm margins. In a rarely beautiful, pristine preservation.

56


GIOVANNI BENEDETTO CASTIGLIONE

27 Der Einzug der Tiere.

1609 (?) Genua – Mantua 1664

Um 1650/55

Radierung. 20,5 x 40,4 cm Bartsch 1; Percy E. 24; Bellini 61; T.I.B. 46 commentary 001 Wasserzeichen: Nebenmarke ‚FB‘ (?) Provenienz: Kunsthandlung Helmut H. Rumbler, Katalog 25, 1989, Nr. 10 Brandenburgische Privatsammlung

Superber Frühdruck des wohl bedeutendsten Blattes in Castigliones Œuvre. Wie lediglich auf den besten Exemplaren zu sehen: der Pferdeleib als zentraler Blickpunkt rein weiß leuchtend. Die übrigen Partien, speziell links, mit leichtem Ton und Wischspuren überzogen, so als ob Luft und Vegetation eine tropischschwüle Atmosphäre atmen würden. Die tief radierten, gratigen Schatten in malerisches Hell-Dunkel getaucht, ein gleichsam rembrandtesker Chiaroscuro-Effekt, auf den schon Percy und Bellini besonders hinwiesen: The animals stream from their dark wood towards a bright horizon on which the Ark, Noah and his family are delicately outlined. Although the sunlight flank of the horse is essentially blank paper relieved with just a light stippling of dots, it remains the most compelling feature of the entire print. (T. Standring und M. Clayton) Rings mit 3 mm Papierrändchen. In selten schöner, unangetasteter Erhaltung.

27

56


DIRCK VOLKERTSZ. COORNHERT

28 The Agony in the Garden.  

1519 Amsterdam – Gouda 1590

1548

After M. van Heemskerck

Etching. 25,3 x 19,7 cm Hollstein (Heemskerck) 12; New Hollstein (Heemskerck) 286 Watermark: Episcopal coat of arms

Plate 14 of the series “ Fall and Salvation of Mankind through the Life and Passi­ on of Christ” Excellent impression with still strong wiping scratches. With full margins. Impeccable preservation. The preliminary drawing (Garff 7) is dated 1548 and can be found in Copenha­ gen today. The question, if Heemskerck etched personally, is unsolved. As one of the most important representatives of the Dutch Romanism he was an extremely prolific draughtsman for the graphic art. Many of Heemskerck’s impressive works were produced in the closest cooperation with Dirck Volkertsz. Coornhert, the engraver, important author, poet and statesman, whose ideas are said to have inf luenced Brueghel; Goltzius was his student.

60


28


JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT

29 Souvenir de Toscane.  

1796 Paris – Ville d’Avray 1875

ca. 1845

Etching. 13,2 x 17,9 cm cm Delteil 1/II (of IV) Provenance: ex Coll. Bracquemond – with his initial ‚B‘ in pencil

Fine impression of the second state which is, according to Delteil, trés rare. Still before the corners were rounded in the third state and before the letters of the fourth state which was published in “Gazette des Beaux-Arts” in 1875 and in “ Etudes sur l’Ecole Française” in 1903.

62


29


JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT

30 Souvenir d’Italie.  

1796 Paris – Ville d’Avray 1875

1871

Autography. 13,1 x 18,1 cm (image); 39,2 x 52,2 (sheet) Delteil 27/I (of II)

Superb impression of the first state described by Delteil as très rare. Probably only ten impressions in total are known. Before the no. ‘10’ at top left and the address ‘Lemercier et Cie’, below the subject. Exceptionally impressive, printed in a delicately shaded red-brown (‘en Bistre’) on a soft grey-tinted chine collé. In perfect condition, on fully preserved, untrimmed support sheet of wove paper (sheet size: 39,2 x 52,2 cm). The series “ Douze Croquis et Dessins originaux sur Papier Autographique” inclu­ ding the present composition was published in 1872. It belongs to Corot’s most impressive graphic works. These prints are called Autographs (rather than litho­ graphs) as Corot drew the images on a specially prepared paper which was subse­ quently squeezed onto the stone. Apart from the few proof impressions – like the present one – an edition of 50 was printed by Lemercier. Les autographies de Corot sont tout particulièrement adorables; elles renferment en plus haut degrés de charme, de style et le science naive propres à Corot. (L. Delteil)

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30


JEAN-BAPTISTE-CAMILLE COROT

31 La Coup de Vent.  

1796 Paris 1875

1871

Autography. 21,3 x 27,1 cm (Darstellung); 39,8 x 53,0 cm (sheet) Delteil 23/II

Plate 5 from the series “ Douze Croquis et Dessins originaux sur Papier Autogra­ phique” Very fine impression, printed in brownish-red on a soft ivory chine collé. The first state is known in 4 – 5 impressions only. The second state – as here – is with Corot’ name, stamped in light grey color at lower right corner. The series “ Douze Croquis et Dessins originaux sur Papier Autographique”, pub­ lished in 1872, belongs to Corot’s most impressive graphic works. These prints are called autographs (rather than lithographs) as Corot drew the images on a specially prepared paper which was subsequently squeezed onto the stone. Apart from the few proof impressions an edition of 50 was printed.

31


CORNELIUS VAN DALEN

32 Bust of a Negress.  

1638 Amsterdam 1664

ca. 1650/55

After G. Flinck

Etching and engraving. 27,4 x 21, 8 cm Wurzbach 60/I (of II); Hollstein 33/I (of II) Watermark: Seven provinces Provenance: V. Weisbach (Lugt Suppl. 2539 b) F. Quiring (Lugt Suppl. 1041c)

Excellent early impression remarkably rich in contrasts. Almost opaque in the deep black shadows and of the most beautiful brilliance in the highlights on the skin and on the pearls. Before the later address of the publisher A. Blooteling. With 7 mm paper margins around the still inky plate mark. In magnificent condi­ tion. Published by C. van Dalen the Elder for the first time, the younger van Dalen‘s etching reworked with a burin may be counted to the artist’s very early works. A today lost painting by G. Flinck, one of the well esteemed portraitists of the Amsterdam prosperous bourgeoisie of his time, served him as a model. However, the “ Bust of a Negress” is not meant to be an authentic portrait but one of the so called ,Tronjes’, charming character studies combining exotic dresses with expressive physiognomies. Orientals or men and women dressed like orientals were especially popular subjects in the 17th century Netherlands. Dark-skinned persons however served as a model only very rarely. For example Rembrandt, in whose workshop Flinck was trained, etched an expressive head of a black woman in profile only once in 1630 (New Hollstein 56).

68


32


JOHANN ADOLPH DARNSTEDT

33 The Morning.  

1769 Auma – Dresden 1844

1813

After J. C. Klengel

Etching and engraving. 47,0 x 63,8 cm Le Blanc 2; Andresen 3/before I (of IV); Rümann pag. 86; missing at A. Fröhlich Provenance: C arl Ernst Sieber, Dresden, auction of the artist’s estate on January 11, 1847, No. 234

Extremely rare trial proof from the artist’s estate which has not been referenced in the literature to date. With the first address of the artist ,Klengel pinx. J. A. Darnstedt sc. 1813’ on the right below the image which has not been referenced in the literature to date. Prior to the later addresses of artists, the title, the indication of the owner of the model, Prince Paul Wolkonski in St. Petersburg, and the dedication to King Frederick of Saxony. Printed on the reverse of an impression of “ Le Mage” (Andresen 1/IV) which was produced in 1801 after a design by C.W.E. Dietrich called Dietrici and which the artist has made the first furor in Dresden with. According to the present trial proof, the composition which was highly appreciated by Goethe was produced already in 1813, three years before the artist sent an impression to Weimar for an examination by the prince of poets. According to his diary entry from December 11, 1816 Goethe expressively thanked Darnstedt for the ,Klengelsche Landschaft’ in a letter and dedicated a detailed critical analysis to the engraving, which he published in 1818 in the first volume of “ Über Kunstund Altertümer”: A sheet of many effects, by the light shining from the rising sun and the whole great dimension of middle- and foreground, wastefully equipped with human figures, animals, cliffs, trees, bushes and herbs illustrated immensely powerful. Comparing the work of Mr. Darnstedt, one of the best contemporary engravers in the landscape subject, with Mr. Gmelins previously reported sheet after C. Poussin, then the clear air in the present piece might be better, more cheerful and purer … Mr. Darnstedt worked out the remaining parts, the distance and the middle- and foreground with laudable diligence, very gossamer and delicate, only in a few spots in the foreground the power of the shadows is superfluous big …

70


33


LODEWIJK DE DEYSTER

34 Three scenes from the History of Hagar.  

before 1656 Bruges 1711

ca. 1780/90

Hagar in the Desert Angel inviting Hagar to Return Hagar comforted by the Angel

Set of 3 plates. Etching. Each c. 16,7 – 17,1 x 12,6 – 12,9 cm Bartsch and Wurzbach 1 – 3; Hollstein 5 – 7 Provenance: T. Graf (Lugt 1092a) S. Scheikewitsch (Lugt 2264) and T. Graf (Lugt 1092 a) F. A. Maglin (Lugt 1777) and T. Graf (Lugt 1092 a)

Rarely complete set of the three scenes from Hagar’s life in throughout magni­ ficent impressions, all from the T. Graf collection. Each with the entire texts in the lower margin and fine margins around the plate mark or the borderline respectively. In excellent condition. De Deyster’s graphic œuvre comprising only 16 sheets was presumably produced during his stay in Italy for several years (1682 – 1688) or shortly afterwards, when he settled in his hometown Bruges as a painter and instrument maker. In their f lamboyant dynamism the compositions are committed to the Roman Late Baroque era. The poses of the protagonists are complex, the sketchy linea­ ment full of energy, now and then coupled with subtle tonal effects like for example in the final sheet of the series “ Hagar comforted by the Angel”. De Deys­ ter seems to have deliberately roughened the plate in order to emphasize the gloomy-nightly atmosphere which he chose for the salvation scene. Apparently being doomed to die, the expelled Hagar with her son Ismael experiences help in the last minute by the appearance of the Angel in the desert. He shows her a source and promises a great future for Ismael. De Deysters preliminary drawing to this sheet is in the Groeninge Museum, Bruges.

72


34


34


34


ABR AHAM-LOUIS-RODOLPHE DUCROS GIOVANNI VOLPATO

35 Palazzina Borghese.  

Yverdon 1748 – Lausanne 1810 Bassano 1735 – Rome 1803

ca. 1782

Hand-colored outline etching, 51.2 x 73.5 cm Marini 254; exhib. cat. Images of the grand tour: Louis Ducros 1748 – 1810, Lausanne 1985, no. 65 Watermark: crowned coat of arms with the lilies and “J HONIG & ZOONEN” Priovenance: Private collection Switzerland

One of the particularly charming depictions of gardens from the celebrated “Vues de Rome et de ses environs,” published by Ducros together with G. Volpato beginning in 1780. As a hand-colored outline etching having uncommonly large dimensions, it encountered exceptional acclaim, as reported by J. G. Meusel as early as 1781 in his “Miscellaneen artistischen Inhalts”. As late as 1805, J. H. Meyer found it worth mentioning in Goethe’s “Winkelmann und sein Jahrhundert” that the outlines of Roman views engraved in copper after original drawings by Ducros and painted lightly in watercolor… sold well to foreigners visiting Rome for several years, roughly from 1780 to 1786. An impression whose color is still marvelously fresh. Mounted on an old support sheet and with narrow, glued-on strips of paper. Impeccable. The novelty of Ducros and Volpato’s “Vues de Rome et de ses environs” (1780) lay principally in the fact that they were contemporary views produced on very large format. They etched the outlines of the site to be depicted, paying particular attention to the architecture, which was drawn with great precision … Certain parts – foliage, the water of fountains and cascades – were not always engraved as the print had to be coloured. Once the prints had been taken, they were coloured with water-colour and sometimes a light application of gouache, by assistants or students working in the studio, using as a basis the original drawing which they had in front of them. Since the lines of the engraving are covered with paint the prints have a quality which can make them pass for original hand-coloured drawings. (P. Chessex) Ducros’ original drawing is found today in the Musée cantonal de Beaux-Arts in Lausanne, whereas the group of figures in the foreground – women dancing around a pan’s herm – was slightly modified by the artist during the transforma­ tion of the drawing into the etching.

76


ABR AHAM-LOUIS-RODOLPHE DUCROS GIOVANNI VOLPATO

35 Palazzina Borghese.

1748 Yverdon – Lausanne 1810 1735 Bassano – Rom 1803

Um 1782

Kolorierte Umrißradierung. 51,2 x 73,5 cm Marini 254 Wasserzeichen: Bekröntes Lilienwappen und ‚J HONIG & ZOONEN‘ Provenienz: Schweizer Privatsammlung

Eine der besonders reizvollen römischen Gartendarstellungen der berühmten >Vues de Rome et de ses environs<, die Ducros gemeinsam mit G. Volpatpo seit 1780 publizierte. Als kolorierte Umrißradierungen in ungewöhnlich großem Format fanden sie, wie J. G. Meusel bereits 1781 in seinen >Miscellaneen artistischen Inhalts< berichtete, ungemein Beyfall. Und noch 1805 fand es J. H. Meyer in Goethes >Winkelmann und sein Jahrhundert< der Erwähnung wert, daß die nach Ducros Originalzeichnungen in Kupfer gestochenen Umrisse Römischer Aussichten auch in Aquarellmanier leicht ausgemalt ... einige Jahre lang, ohngefähr 1780 bis 1786, unter den Rom besuchenden Fremden viel Absatz fanden. Herrlich farbfrisch bewahrtes Exemplar. Auf alter Unterlage und mit schmalen aufkaschierten Papierstreifen montiert. Tadellos. The novelty of Ducros and Volpato’s >Vues de Rome et de ses environs< (1780) lay principally in the fact that they were contemporary views produced on very large format. They etched the outlines of the site to be depicted, paying particular attention to the architecture, which was drawn with great precision ... Certain parts – foliage, the water of fountains and cascades – were not always engraved as the print had to be coloured. Once the prints had been taken, they were coloured with water-colour and sometimes a light application of gouache, by assistants or students working in the studio, using as a basis the original drawing which they had in front of them. Since the lines of the engraving are covered with paint the prints have a quality which can make them pass for original hand-coloured drawings. (P. Chessex) Die Originalzeichnung Ducros’ befindet sich heute in Musée cantonal de BeauxArts, Lausanne, wobei der Künstler bei der Umsetzung in die Radierung die Figurengruppe der um eine Pans-Herme tanzenden Frauen im Vordergrund rechts leicht abgeändert hat.

35

76


K AREL DUJARDIN

36 The Savoyard.  

1622 Amsterdam – Venice 1678

1658

Etching. 16,4 x 11,9 cm Bartsch, Dutuit and Hollstein 52/I (of II) Watermark: Seven-pointed foolscap

The charming composition in a magnificent early impression before the later number. Cut on the plate mark or with tiny margins around it. Except for three unobstru­ sive pin holes, in impeccable, pristine freshness. Dujardin belonged to the most qualified Italianates of the second half of the 17th century. In contrast to Berchem, whose student he was according to Houbraken, he travelled to Italy several times and spent the last years of his life there. His main subject was the southern country life, for the most part the herdsman’s milieu. But in the present composition it is a little Savoyard boy playing the violin for his well trained dog while two wild, yapping street dogs jump around his legs.

80


36


ALBRECHT DÜRER

37 St. Jerome in his Study.  

1471 Nuremberg 1528

1514

Engraving. 24,7 x 19,0 cm Bartsch 60; Dodgson 74; Meder 59/a (of f); Schoch-Mende-Scherbaum 70 Provenance: E arl of Aylesford (Lugt 58) R. S. Holford (without stamp) (cf. Lugt 2243) M. J. Perry (Lugt 1880) H. G. Gutekunst, Stuttgart, Auction 65, 1908, no. 350 North German private collection

Exquisite early impression. Wiped utterly clean, almost burry in its effect, of the most beautiful harmony in the soft, silver-sunny light ref lections, which are of the utmost importance for this composition. As especially described by Meder for the earliest and best impressions, without water­ mark. Prior to all later scratches. In addition, enjoying exceptional status by virtue of its illustrious provenance: coming from the celebrated collection of the Earl of Aylesfords, the present impression was especially mentioned by Lugt with a price of £130 in the Hol­ ford-Sale in 1893 and accordingly it received the highest possible praise from H. G. Gutekunst in the auction catalogue of the M. J. Perry collection, Stuttgart in 1908: Key work of rare beauty, with delicate margin. Extremely rare. Residues of an old mounting on the reverse along the edges. Rarely that beautiful. “ St. Jerome in his Study” was produced during the same time as the “ Melancholia” and Dürer repeatedly gave them away as a present together. It is commonly consi­ dered being the connecting link between the three master engravings. In cont­ rast to the extroverted activity of the “ Horseman”, he follows the contemplative path to God. Unlike the “ Melancholia”, he does not embody the brooding human genius competing with God, but the philosopher in the service of God. The actual content of this engraving communicates itself in the compositional and graphical treatment of space, light and objects. The study room with wooden wall and ceiling and equipped with simple, practical furniture, appears calm and organized. It protectively embraces the researcher working in a concentrated manner, being faded into the background but at the same time staying the central figure of the image. The room becomes his attribute and constitutes the protected sphere of his mind. The light causes the same effect by coming through the bull’s-eye glass window warmly and gently. The graphically masterly reflections in the window elements render him colorfulness and thus contrast to the lightest spot of the graphic, the supernatural shining of the halo. In the light, the differentiating materiality of the objects like the pillow, plaster, wooden paneling or the fur develops to the full and fills the room with a consistent atmosphere of silent intensity. (M. Sonnabend)

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ALBRECHT DÜRER

38 Knight, Death and Devil.  

1471 Nuremberg 1528

1513

Engraving. 24,6 x 18,9 cm Bartsch 98; Dodgson 70; Meder 74 a–b (of g) Provenance: R . Leendertz, Kreefeld C. G. Boerner, Neue Lagerliste 66, 1976 North German private collection

The first of the so-called “ Meisterstiche” (Master engravings) in a splendid impression of rare beauty. Strong and with a burry effect in the background, like Meder references especially for the first impressions. The parallel lines through the short tree-trunks at the upper left are only faintly perceptible. Rich in half-to­ nes and with a delicate plate tone appearing utterly clearly wiped especially in the lights of the horse’s fur, the armor and the shroud and thus perfectly empha­ sizing the light effects. As usual without watermark. Mostly with tiny paper margins around the inky plate mark. In magnificent pre­ servation. Called by Dürer simply “ Reuter” (Horseman), named interpretively by Sandrart “Christian Knight”, the engraving produced with an unprecedented effort (Winkler) belongs to the most popular compositions of the master under the title “ Knight Death and Devil” given by H.S. Hüsgen in 1778. Within the diverse interpretations of the “ Horseman”, the most plausible and accepted one seems to be the reading as Miles Christianus (Christian soldier). The idea of the Christian chivalry as described in the Epistle to the Ephesians (6,11 – 17) becomes strongly valid in the pre-Reformation, humanistic and reformatory dispute – with Savonarola, Erasmus von Rotterdam and Luther – and passes through the whole Protestant literature of the 16 th century. Within this development there are some remarkable motifs which define Dürer’s engraving in terms of content. Paulus already reported on “the wiles of the devil”, on enemies in the “darkness of this world” and on “spiritual wickedness in high places”; he writes about the strength which is needed to stand against them and having the loins girt with “truth” and having on the breastplate of “righteousness”, the “helmet of salvation” and the “sword of the Spirit”. This use of metaphors is being varied and expanded by the mystics. He mentions the animosity of the world, the flesh and the devil as well as the whole “armor of God united with courage, prudence, ... and confidence”. Later death appears and the “Castle of God” as protection and refuge. The closest equivalent to Dürer is Erasmus, reporting on the rough and desolate path of virtue, far away from the world’s conveniences; on fright and ghostly apparitions which seem to guard the gates to hell; on the contempt against these empty shadows and overcoming them with safe and tense eyes on the matter itself. (H. Theising)

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38


ALBRECHT DÜRER

39 MELENCOLIA I – The Melancholia.  

1471 Nuremberg 1528

1514

Engraving. 14,0 x 18,8 cm Bartsch 74; Dodgson 73; Meder 75/IIa (of f); Schoch-Mende-Scherbaum 71 Provenance: C . G. Boerner, Neue Lagerliste 64, 1974, no. 42 North German private collection

The image of images. (K. Schuster) The sought-after key work in a splendid early impression. As specifically intended for early impressions, silvery-black and with the deep shadowed face and the bright white of the eyes of the Melancholia. With the most beautiful harmony especially in the effects of light and shadow. Before all later scratches mentioned by Meder: i.e. on the white portion of Melan­ cholia’s left thigh, above the nails and on the sphere respectively. Printed on a paper without watermark, as usual for the IIa variant. With the seldom completely visible plate margins, on the upper edge with 2 mm paper margins beyond it. Faint stains at the upper edge hardly perceptible on recto and an inconspicuous retouch in the creases of the gown beneath the bunch of keys, otherwise in a beautiful, fresh condition. Still the most puzzling composition within Dürer’s so-called “ Meisterstiche” (“ Master-Engravings”) that received a plenty of interpretations down to the present day. Thausing for example regarded “ Melencolia I” in connection with “ Knight Death and Devil”, “ St. Jerome in His Study” and a further missing composition as the depiction of the ‘Four Human Temperaments’. Panofsky interpreted the sitting woman as a melancholic genius being depressed and paralyzed by the sense of powerlessness of his technical and scientific abilities regarding the divine mysteries. Contrary to that, P. Schuster considered the subject as a depiction of virtue accor­ ding to which the melancholic is raised to a so-to-speak divine creature using properly his talents given by god. At left, traditional symbols of unsteady fortune are assembled: The hidden death, the sphere the sea, the abyss, the ladder and the instable sitting of the blind putto representing an only short-time state of happi­ ness. The Melancholia, however, has been seated at right, which is the side of vir­ tue, on a firm cubical seat. She is sitting at the foot of the ,Tower of Wisdom’ symbolizing the virtue in general. Traditional symbols of vanity, an hour glass and a bell, are demonstrating the insight into everybody’s transience. Restrai­ ning the envy in the tamed hound, she takes victoriously steps against vice. Being creator of her own and the world around her, she is residing as “ Dea in Terris” by unlimited control. According to Dürer’s notes the artist himself interpreted the existence of the bunch of keys as a symbol of that.

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ALBRECHT DÜRER

40 Five Soldiers and a Turk on Horseback.  

1471 Nuremberg 1528

ca. 1495

Engraving, 13,1 x 14,5 cm Bartsch 88; Meder 81/a-b (of e); Dodgson 6; Schoch-Mende-Scherbaum 4 Provenance: Rhenish propriety

Early, sharp impression, clear and bright including the shadows, just like claimed by Meder for the early impressions. Before the two arc-shaped scratches through the halberd, and before the scratch from the monogram to the halberdier’s foot. With the completely visible borderline or cut on it. Executed in 1495 and signed with the early monogram, the composition belongs to the earliest examples of the lansquenet-genre. The adventurously costumed soldiers have always exalted the imagination: During the times of the German era “Sturm und Drang”, Hüsgen saw Dürer himself as the protagonist, assaulted by a robber band. Heller – contemporary of the Romantics – had Wilhelm Tell in mind, analogous to the Berlin drawing of the “three soldiers” (W. 18) from 1489, interpreted as the >Rütli Oath<, which besides has to be considered an important preliminary stager of the engraving. Also Flechsing and Winkler could deduce the sense of the group of figures only in a scenic context: as assistance figures for a planned multi-figured crucifixion. Only Wölfflin was content with the formal interpretation as “Collection of standing motives, already assuming the awareness of Italy. Modern motion and modern costume...” As a genre-like depiction of interesting or exotic contemporary phenomena, the sheet assimilates the group of small compositions of figures like the “The Turkish Family”, “The lady on horseback and the lansquenet”, “The cook and his wife” and “The peasants”. (R. Schoch)

88


40


ALBRECHT DÜRER

41 The Standard-Bearer.

1471 Nuremberg 1528

ca. 1501

Engraving, 11,5 x 7,0 cm Bartsch 87; Meder 92/a (of c); Dodgson 27; Schoch­Mende­Scherbaum 31 Provenance: Rhenish propriety

Magnificent early impression rich in contrast. Deep black and utterly clean, before the later wiping traces in the air, as Meder especially mentions for the a­variant. Cut on the platemark and with tiny margin beyond respectively. Impeccable. The composition bears on Dürers struggle with the ideal proportion of human figure: Although it was with the “Adam and Eve” of 1504 that Dürer chose to demonstrate the new mastery of human figure … the influence of his theoretical drawings is also evident in several earlier works. The “St. George” from the Paumgärtner Altarpiece, the Moorish king in the Uffizi, and the “Standard Bearer” all incorporate the classical ‘contraposto’ attitude which Dürer had acquired by studying copies of the “Apollo Belvedere”. Of these the “Standard Bearer”, because of his close fitting costume and strictly frontal pose, most closely resembles the actual proportion drawings. In contrast to the statuesque immobility of his early constructed nudes, however, this figure is strikingly informal and suggestive of movement. This is partly the result of the billowing flag and colourful costume, but it derives mainly from the more relaxed stance with the head turned in the direction of the bearing leg, while the eyes take a lively glance at the observer. (Exhibition cat. “Dürer in America...”, Washington 1971).

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ALBRECHT DÜRER

42 Christ crowned with Thorns.

1471 Nuremberg 1528

ca. 1509

Woodcut. 12,7 x 9,7 cm Bartsch 34; Meder 143/I (of V); Schoch­Mende­Scherbaum 204 Provenance: Kunsthandlung Helmut H. Rumbler, catalogue 23, 1988, no. 32 North German private collection

Plate 19 from the series “ The small Woodcut Passion” Magnificently brilliant proof, before the Latin text on verso. With 2 – 3 mm margins around the borderline. Pristine. Dürer uses architecture to subdivide this scene. In the right foreground sits the lacerated Christ, surrounded by three myrmidons. They mock him, forcing the crown of thorns onto his head with brute force. In the left-hand background, Caiphas negotiates with Pilate, who is indecisive about whether to impose a death sentence on the prisoner. (M. Haas)


ALBRECHT DÜRER

43 The Crucifixion.

1471 Nuremberg 1528

ca. 1509

Woodcut. 12,9 x 9,8 cm Bartsch 40; Meder 149/I (of V b); Schoch­Mende­Scherbaum 210 Watermark: Bullshead (M. 70) Provenance: North German private collection

Plate 25 from the series “ The small Woodcut Passion” Very fine proof, before the Latin Text on verso. With 1 mm margins around the borderline. Perfect. Against a darkened sky, Dürer shows us Christ’s lacerated body on the cross. Soldiers are grouped to the right, while Christ’s followers stand on the left, near the cross. John raises his hands in a gesture of lamentation. A trio of women mourn in a more subdued fashion, while Mary Magdalene throws herself at her savior’s feet. (M. Haas)


ALBRECHT DÜRER

1471 Nuremberg 1528

44 The Holy Family with Joachim and Anne under a Tree.   1511 Woodcut, 23,7 x 19,9 cm Bartsch 96; Meder 215/a (of e); Schoch-Mende-Scherbaum 160 Provenance: P rinces of Liechtenstein George and Marianne Khuner Christie’s, New York, Auction May 8, 1985, no. 512

Magnificent early impression rich in contrasts. Before all the later damages of the woodblock described by Meder. Brilliantly deep black and razor sharp. The borderline slightly cut in at the upper left, otherwise in a f lawless condition. The single sheet dated 1511 originates from an – regarding woodcuts – extraordi­ narily efficient creative period of the artist who published his three large books and the small woodcut passion the same year. Wölff lin counted them in particu­ lar to the “Prachtholzschnitte” (magnificent woodcuts) of those years. Among the burghers of late medieval European cities, where small families and kinship association assumed increasing importance, the Holy Family was regarded as exemplary. Dürer relates his Christian theme closely to motifs from everyday life, allowing believers to experience divinity in an emotionally tinged, highly personal manner. At the same time, the scene reflects the popular piety of the time, with its emphasis on venerating the Virgin and the cult of St. Anne. Using clear lines and broad surfaces, Dürer balances the woodcut’s interplay of light and dark. He arranges the members of the family around the tall tree which rises at the center of the composition, framing it with the figures of Joseph and Joachim. Their heartfelt gestures underline the loving relationship between Mary, her mother Anne, and the infant Jesus, who climbs into Anne’s arms. (M. Haas)

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44


CLAUDE GELLÉE Called LE LORR AIN

45 The Flight into Egypt.

1600 Chamagne (Lorraine) – Rome 1682

ca. 1630/33

Etching, 10,5 x 17,2 cm Robert­Dumesnil 1/I (of II); Blum 2/I (of II); Russell 9/I (of III); Mannocci 9/I (of III) Provenance: J. Gerbeau (Lugt 1165) Dr. AR (Lugt 786)

Excellent early impression with the incomplete borderline at the top edge and before the later numbering. Almost burry in the left foreground. The sky with its full richness of subtly diffe­ rentiated azure lines and cloud contours and the distinctive traces of the burni­ sher in the centre at left of the group of trees, which –according to Mannocci – can be considered a characteristic for the earliest impressions of this state. With deli­ cate, sensitively spread plate tone, which beautifully supports the atmospheric charm that was especially requested for this composition. With fine margins around the plate mark which is preserved in an unf lattened state. Impeccable and pristine. The composition is considered to be one of the earliest etchings of the artist: The lack of refinement in technique clearly suggests an early date, although hints of Claude’s talent as an etcher are also evident. The plate has been meticulously worked; the resulting image is rather dense in areas, particularly the group of figures that is difficult to distinguish from the background, a problem he overcame in later prints. Claude also seems to have had difficulty with the sky, which shows evidence of burnishing and accidental scratches. But despite the technical complications, a closer look reveals a marvelous effect of fresh air in the freely etched lines of the wind-tussled palm and an unequaled ability to describe effects of sunlight through sensitive manipulation of gradations of tone. (M. B. Cohn).

45


CLAUDE GELLÉE Called LE LORR AIN

46 The Dance on the River-Bank.  

1600 Chamagne (Lorraine) – Rome 1682

ca. 1634

Etching, 13,2 x 20,0 cm Robert-Dumesnil 6/III; Blum 19/IV; Russell 24/III; Mannocci 13/VI B (of VII); Provenance: G alerie Kornfeld, Bern, Auction 197, 1988, no. 82 Gérard de Palézieux

The sought-after composition with the beautiful bucolic idyll in a magnificent impression. Printed in a brilliant deep black. The slightly overbiten parts, especially at the tree on the left side, as usually somewhat paler. With the number 2 on the left and with the scratch in the right edge. Before the extensive rework, especially at the lower left corner. Cut right up to the plate mark or with extremely fine margins around it. Impeccable. It is never wild and ecstatic but gentle and elegiac at the rural dance of the herdsmen, one of Claude’s favorite motifs. The >Dance on the River-Bank< shows a couple dancing to the sound of a bagpipe while other herdsmen watch them abstractedly. Two goats jump towards each other; cow and calf watch this parody of dancing with an indifferent eye ... A horseman saturates his animal and on the path leading to the mill there are packed donkeys and creatures with bundles. The working world and the plight are opposed to the cheerful Arcadian idleness accentuated by the music. (M. Sonnabend)

98


46


CLAUDE GELLÉE called LE LORR AIN

47 The Cowherd.  

1600 Chamagne (Lorraine) – Rome 1682

1636

Etching and drypoint. 13,0 x 20,0 cm Robert-Dumesnil 8/IV; Blum 18/IV; Russell 27/III-IV; Mannocci 18/IVA (vof VI) Provenance: H. Baron de Triqueti, Paris (Lugt 1304)

This may be Claude‘s most beautiful print (D. Russell). Excellent impression of utmost clarity and transparency. Before the scratch crossing the defoliated branch at top right. With tiny margins around the platemark. Completely untouched in preservation. The peaceful bucolic motif is set in a placid composition built by diagonals where Claude has placed some of his favorite motifs: the rampant foliage, the ancient ruins, the reflective water surface, unaffected motions of animals, the figure against the light, the sun in the fields. The summery light floods through all parts of the composition and connects them; it creates an atmospheric effect which has been described by most scientists as the early evening of a hot summer day. This effect is the result of a highly differentiated etching process using very short strokes interweaved in varied density, in some cases one superimposing on the other in distinctly etched layers. (M. Sonnabend)

100


47


CLAUDE GELLÉE called LE LORR AIN

48 The Country Dance, large Plate.  

1600 Chamagne (Lorraine) – Rome 1682

ca. 1634/35

Etching. 20,0 x 26,3 cm Robert-Dumesnil 24/II (of III); Blum 34/II (of III); Russell 20/II (of III); Mannocci 20/II (of IV) Watermark: Crown topped with a star (Russell, Appendix B fig. 19) Provenance: T. Graf (Lugt Suppl. 1092 a) Galerie Gerda Bassenge, Berlin, Auktion 75, 2000, Nr. 5308 German private collection

One of Claude’s most boldly experimental etchings. (H. D. Russel) Extremely rare period impression of the only slightly etched composition in which the artist experimented with the generation of atmospheric surface tones. Exemplarily fine and lightly printed from the plate which got some minor dama­ ges soon. Still with the delicate tonal effects of the experimental lavis-etching and traces of partially roughening the plate by using a pumice stone respectively. Before the later rework. Mannocci listed only five impressions of this early state in public collections with mentioning i.a. the watermark “Crown topped with a star” as in the present impression. With ca. 1 cm margins around the platemark still visible in strong relief. Except for some brown stains, predominantly at the edges, f lawless and untouched. The “Country Dance“ is perhaps the earliest example of this favorite motif of Claude in the printed medium. The etching reproduces a painting in mirror image which is in the Uffizi today. In the shadow of two large trees, there are two women and a garlanded herdsman dancing to the sound of a bagpipe and a tambourine. Other sitting and standing figures are watching and talking. A herd of goats is depicted at the left; two he-goats are springing equally like dancing. (M. Sonnabend)

102


CLAUDE GELLÉE Genannt LE LORR AIN

48 La Danse villageoise.

1600 Chamagne (Lothringen) – Rom 1682

Um 1634/35

Radierung. 20,0 x 26,3 cm Robert-Dumesnil 24/II (von III); Blum 34/II (von III); Russell 20/II (von III); Mannocci 20/II (von IV) Wasserzeichen: Krone unter einem Stern (Russell, Appendix B fig. 19) Provenienz: T. Graf (Lugt Suppl. 1092 a) Galerie Gerda Bassenge, Berlin, Auktion 75, 2000, Nr. 5308 Deutsche Privatsammlung

One of Claude’s most boldly experimental etchings. (H. D. Russel) Einer der wenigen noch zeitgenössischen Abzüge der nur schwach geätzten Komposition, bei der sich der Künstler in der Produktion von atmosphärischen Flächentönen versuchte. Ganz ausgezeichneter, lichter Druck von der bereits sehr bald leicht beschädigten Platte. Noch mit den zarten tonalen Effekten der experimentellen Lavisätzung bzw. den Spuren der partiellen Aufrauhung der Platte mit Hilfe eines Bimssteines. Vor den späteren Überarbeitungen. Mannocci verzeichnete lediglich 5 Exemplare dieses frühen Zustandes in öffentlichem Besitz, wobei das hier vorliegende Wasserzeichen ‚Krone unter einem Stern‘ speziell Erwähnung findet. Mit ca. 1 cm Papierrand um die in deutlichem Relief sich abzeichnende Plattenkante. Bis auf wenige Braunf leckchen, überwiegend im Randbereich, tadellos und unberührt. Der >Ländliche Tanz< ist das wohl früheste druckgraphische Beispiel für dieses Lieblingsmotiv Claudes. Die Radierung gibt seitenverkehrt ein Gemälde wieder, das sich heute in den Uffizien in Florenz befindet. Im Schatten zweier großer Bäume tanzen ein bekränzter Hirte und zwei Frauen zum Klang von Dudelsack und Tamburin. Andere stehende und sitzende Gestalten sehen zu und unterhalten sich. Links ist eine Ziegenherde dargestellt, zwei Ziegenböcke springen gleichfalls wie im Tanz. (M. Sonnabend)

48

102


CLAUDE GELLÉE Called LE LORR AIN

1600 Chamagne (Lorraine) – Rome 1682

49 Shepherd and Shepherdess conversing in a Landscape.  

ca. 1651

Etching, 19,6 x 25,9 cm Robert-Dumesnil 21/II (of V); Blum 37/II (of V); Russell 48/III (of VII); Mannocci 41/III (of VII) Provenance: J. Carmichael J. Barnard (Lugt 1419) P & D Colnaghi, London, Catalogue 9.10. – 3.11.1962, no. 21

Exquisite early impression of the composition described by Robert Dumesnil as suberbe paysage and doubtlessly can be counted to the most beautiful etchings of the artist. Of great rarity. Mannocci mentions only six other examples of the present third state in public collections. The third state conveys an especially revealing insight in the development of the composition and Claude’s technical procedure: Whereas the previous two states differ only insignificantly, the III. state marks the beginning of an energetic simplification process, to which Claude subjected his sketchy composition. In a first step he massively reduced the central group of trees. Yet the posterior opulent foliage is missing. The clouds are burnished down only in parts; the town view on the right is still existent. Before the complete rework of the foreground and befo­ re the inscription. D. Russel characterized the fundamental transformation process of the composition as follows: The artist has moved from an image which has the vibrant and erratic qualities of a brilliant sketch to one which has the stable and finished qualities of a fine painting.

106


49


HENDRICK GOLTZIUS

50 The Adoration of the Shepherds.  

1558 Mühlbracht – Haarlem 1617

1594

Engraving. 47,9 x 35,7 cm Bartsch 17; Hollstein 11/III (of V); Strauß 319/III (of V); New Holstein 10/II Watermark: Bird in a circle Provenance: D r. Julius Hoffmann, Vienna (Lugt 1264) C. G. Boerner, Leipzig, sale 138, 1922, from no. 573

Very fine impression. Remarkably sharp and brilliant in printing, thus the subtle effects of light of the night piece are shown to their best advantage. As especially mentioned by Strauss, printed on paper with the watermark ‘Bird in a circle’. Except for a minute brown stain at the lower left, impeccably fresh. With 6 mm margins. One of the so-called “ Six master engravings from the Life of the Virgin”. All of them are regarded as masterpieces of the artist. In 1591 Goltzius travelled to Italy and visited Venice, Florence and Rome. Here he may have got his first inspirations for the famous six important compositions. He wanted to compete with the great masters of the sixteenth century and, accor­ ding to van Mander, to imitate with his own hand the characteristics of different hands in compositions designed by himself respectively. The model for the pre­ sent composition was Jacopo Bassano. Oberhuber described these works executed in different manners to be one of the most interesting phenomenon of the sixteenth century. Without imitating slavis­ hly, the paraphrase was one of many possibilities of artistic expression the artist could deliberately play with in order to demonstrate his versatility and technical brilliance.

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50


PETER RODELSTEDT called GOTTLANDT 

active in Saxony 1548 – 1572

51 Portrait of Nikolaus von Amsdorff, Bishop of Naumburg.   1558 Engraving, 17,1 x 13,2 cm Passavant IV, pag. 58 No. 12; Hollstein 12

The extremely rare reformer-portrait in a hitherto undescribed state, printed from the slightly reduced plate. Compared to the London impression (18, 8 x 13,0 cm) solely mentioned by Holl­ stein, the lower margin is reduced vertically by 1,7 cm in order to give the tablet a better proportion. This alteration was probably made at an early date, because the horizontal guiding lines for the letters in the lower margins are distinctive even in this impression. With a 3 – 11 mm margins around the plate mark. With slight discolorations and sporadically with thin glue residues – traces of usage which have to be accepted considering the great rarity of this sheet. The artist, presumably originating in Gothland, was a scholar of Lucas Cranach the Elder. After having been active at his workshop for a while, Frederick I, Elector of Saxony, assigned him as court painter in 1553. Gottlandt’s printed oeuvre com­ prises only 12 engravings, all of them very rare. Among the six portraits engraved by Gottlandt this one is the only one not depic­ ting a member of the Saxon Princely House. Nevertheless, Nikolaus von Ams­ dorff was strongly connected with the Saxon Princely House, since it was Fre­ derick I. who knew how to force through Luther’s close fellow campaigner against Julius von Pf lug, preferred by the Naumburg chapter, as successor for the decea­ sed Bishop Philipp of the Palatinate. Ordained as first Protestant Naumburg Bis­ hop, the events of the Schmalkaldic war forced him to escape already in 1546, whereas his opponent von Pf lug could eventually resume the Naumburg Bishop’s seat. Gottlandt’s portrait of the reformer was executed in 1558, when Amsdorff lived in Eisenach as general superintendent and was occupied with the edition of Luther’s works in the so called Jena Edition. Amsdorff died in 1565 at the age of 81 years.

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51


FR ANCISCO DE GOYA

52 Self-portrait.  

1746 Fuendetodos – Bordeaux 1828

ca. 1797/98

Etching and aquatint. 21,8 x 15,3 cm Delteil 38/II (of IV); Harris 36/III.1 (of III.12) Provenance: French private collection

Plate 1 from the series “ Los Caprichos”. The sought-after self-portrait of the artist in a magnificent impression of the first edition, the only one printed during his lifetime. Still with undiminished delicacy in the subtly nuanced aquatint, in particular on the cravat and the lapel. With almost full margins. The portrait shows the ca. 51-year-old Goya. The serious features of the sharply analyzing social critic seem to unite with the mocking smile of an artist reserving the freedom of speech against the authorities for himself.

112


52


FR ANCISCO DE GOYA

53 Pobrecitas! Poor little girls!  

1746 Fuendetodos – Bordeaux 1828

ca. 1797/98

Etching and aquatint. 21,5 x 15,1 cm Delteil 59/II (of III); Harris 57/III.1 (of III.12) Provenance: Hessian private collection

Plate 22 of the series “ Los Caprichos”. First edition (1799) of altogether 12 editions, the only one printed during the artist’s lifetime. Superb early impression especially showing the intensive aquatint without any wear, so that the white of the fresh paper in the few untreated spots in the backg­ round and in the veil of the girl in the front stand out exceptionally effectively and bright, as especially intended by the artist. With almost full margins. Sympathy for the “poor little girls” predominates in the commentaries, solely Prado raises his voice against them in his manuscript: “One should teach these slovenly women some discipline. Catch them, they were loose long enough.” The other interpretations rather see it as a hard accusation of the difference between poor and rich: “The unfortunates, who might have become prostitutes out of their misery, go into prison whenever the henchmen want them to; the well-situated live their lives as they want to, because laws are made only for the poor.” (A. E. Pérez Sanchez)

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53


BARTOLOMEO DI ANTONIO GR ASSI PUBLISHER

1553 Rome (?) after 1595

54 Altro modo d’andar in posta. – Another mode of transportation for a noble Congolese.  

ca. 1591

Etching, 19,9 x 29,3 cm Margerite Hutchinson, >A Report of the Kingdom of Congo, and of the surrounding Countries; Dawn out of the Writings and Discourses of the Portugese Duarte Lopez, By Filippo Pigafetta, in Rome 1591<, London 1881, Bibliographical Note upon the 16 th -Century editions of Pigafetta I, plate 8

The early ethnographical illustration in a magnificent, contrasty impression from the first edition of Filippo Pigafetta’s inf luential “ Relatione del Reame di Congo e della circonvicine contrade” published in 1591 by B. Grassi in Rome With small margins around the bordering. Impeccable. Filippo Pigafetta’s description of the Kingdom of Kongo was based on the oral narratives from the Portuguese merchant Duarte Lopez. The first time he left for a journey to Central Africa was in 1578 in order to settle in S. Salvador, the Capital of the Kingdom of Kongo. As ambassador of King Alvaro I. he returned to Euro­ pe in 1583, in order to establish contacts in Rome between the Apostolic See and the Congolese Crown, in the hopes that this would help Congo to escape from the growing dependence on Portugal. Even if this mission failed, on this occasion Duarte Lopez became acquainted with the Venice diplomat Filippo Pigafetta from Vicenza, who had been accredited at the Apostolic See since 1585. In close collaboration, the manuscript of the “ Relatione del Reame di Congo...” was exe­ cuted even before Duarte Lopez returned to Africa in 1589. Published for the first time in 1591 by B. Grassi in Rome with altogether 8 etched illustrations, their oeuvre experienced three further editions until the end of the century in Dutch, English and German translation. The actual composition of the first edition vividly illustrates one of the modes of transportation described by Duarte Lopez and Filippo Pigafetta for the Congole­ se nobiles, who liked being carried around by their subordinates – either lying on stretchers, wherefore four bearers were necessary, or in hammocks which were attached to a pole carried by two bearers, or seated in a swing-like mounting which also was bearable only by two men. Due to a frequent change of bearers, occasionally a strikingly rapid travelling velocity was possible.

116


54


PIETER DE JODE II

1601 Antwerp – England (?) 1674

55 The Infant Christ with the Serpent standing at a Globe.  

ca. 1661

After A. Van Dyck

Engraving. 50,7 x 36,4 cm Hollstein 4/II; New Hollstein (Antony van Dyck) 554 copy a Provenance: Princes of Liechtenstein

Sooty deep black impression perfectly emphasizing the impressive lighting effects of the popular composition. Of most beautiful brilliancy. The only known state. The Amsterdam exemplar which Hollstein still listed as first state – before the completion of the infant Christ and the head of the snake – was identified as an independent composition (554 copy c) of an anonymous artist by S. Turner in the New Hollstein. In contrast to the most impressions listed by Hollstein, without any damages or cuttings, with paper margins measuring 1,5 cm around the plate mark. Occasional­ ly tiny brown stains, otherwise in pristine freshness. P. Jode again proves himself in this composition produced in 1662 as master of the dramatic chiaroscuro. The sheet is based on a painting by van Dyck which is in the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden today.

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55


CARL WILHELM KOLBE

56 Damon and Phillis.  

1759 Berlin – Dessau 1835

1805

After S. Gessner

Etching. 31,6 x 38,5 cm Jentsch 296; Martens 284/III (of IV)

One of the artist’s first etchings after Gessners gouaches in a splendid, richly con­ trasting early impression before the letters. The complete sheet (46,8 x 63,0 cm). Occasionally tiny brown stains mainly in the margins and traces of dampness far outside the composition, otherwise pristine. Prince Francis of Anhalt granted Kolbe leave of absence of his official duties as drawing teacher in Dessau for transmitting the celebrated landscape-gouaches by Salomon Gessner into etchings in Zurich on behalf of Salomon’s son, Hein­ rich Gessner. The relatives of the painter-poet deceased in 1788 established the so called “Gessnerische Gemälde-Kabinett” in their residence in the Münstergas­ se, which attracted visitors from near and far. Kolbe was very familiar with Gessners etchings since his student days in Berlin. The idyllic-Arcadian landscape interpretation of the Swiss had sustained influence on his own perception of nature. Like him, also Kolbe looked for the intimate, cozy and peaceful side of isolated natural small woods and gardens – an Arcadian paradise busy with nymphs, satyrs and herdsmen. The present composition, published in 1805 in the first of altogether six issues of four sheets each edited until 1811, was still produced in Dessau after a gouache by Gessner in the possession of Princess Amalie of Dessau. It illustrates Gessner’s bucolic poem ,Damon and Phillis’ published for the first time in 1756, where a young shepherd and shepherdess copy the kissing from billing doves: The scene is illustrated where Damon points out for the first time to his beloved the goingson between the dove couple: Look Phillis, look, what is it, there on the tree? Two doves, – look – look how they gently beat their wings against each other; listen how they coo; Now – they prick the colorful neck, and now the small head, and around the small eyes. Come on, Phillis! Come on, we also want to embrace ourselves with our arms, just like they do it with their wings; pass me your neck and your eyes, so that I can bill you – and Phillis responds: Hold your lips onto mine, then Damon, both are billing.

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56


CARL WILHELM KOLBE

57 The bucolic Concert.  

1759 Berlin – Dessau 1835

1806

After S. Gessner

Etching. 46,3 x 37,5 cm Jentsch 304; Martens 291/II (of IV)

Exquisite early impression before all letters. Saturated, deep black, and at the same time beautifully clear in the lineament, just as intended by the artist. The complete sheet (63,7 x 46,0 cm). Except for a tiny tear in the margin, far out­ side the composition, and occasionally small brown stains, pristine. Kolbe published his etching after Gessner’s gouache, which is in the Kunsthaus Zurich today, in the third issue of the “ Tableaux en gouache, demi-gouache et dessins au lavis de Salomon Gessner, gravées à L’eauforte par W. Kolbe…” in 1806. In the small guidebook through the “Gessnersche Gemälde-Kabinett” published already in 1803 by Gessner’s son Heinrich, which opens up the remaining landscape gouaches of the inf luential painter-poet in the possession of the family in their residence in the Münstergasse in Zurich to the interested public, the idyl­ lic composition is celebrated especially because its attractive lighting effect: The three great trees, the sparkling and due to the reflection magically-transparent water, the boulders decorated with a velvet carpet of moss, are covered in shadows which only now and then are moderated by reflections; one single sunbeam almost furtively pushes from behind through the swaying branches and over the hem of dancing silver waves and touchingly shines on the beautiful forms of the two girls and the youth resembling Apollo. In the etched transmission, it logically appears to L. Fernow, who acknowledges Kolbe‘s etchings in a detailed discussion in the “ Journal des Luxus und der Moden” in 1807, that the composition is rather a study after nature than an idealistic invention of Gessner! The thought is insignificant; meanwhile the arrangement of the parts is good, and the execution of the particular is excellent…

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57


HANNS LAUTENSACK

58 Jesus healing the blind Man.  

ca. 1520 Bamberg – Vienna 1565

1559

Etching. 15,4 x 22,2 cm Bartsch 49; Schmitt 72/II; Hollstein 38/II Provenance: P. Visscher (Lugt 2115 and 2116) P. Demany (Lugt Suppl. 780b)

Excellent impression of the extremely rare composition. Schmitt references a total of only 9 copies, all found today in public collections and only four of them with the modified date from ,1555’ into ,1559’, like the pre­ sent exemplar. With 5 mm margins around the tonally distinct plate mark. At the upper edge mounted on the support sheet of P. Visscher’s collection. Except for hardly perceptible pin traces at the lower right, impeccable. Lautensack came to Nuremberg – the city of Dürer – already in 1525 with his father, who converted to the Protestantism, where he experienced his artistic education so to speak in the entourage of the Master. Being familiar with Dürer’s engravings, which have reached highest perfection, he devoted himself predomi­ nantly to the more spontaneous, graphic etching as one of the first German artists. The present composition was produced shortly after the artist moved to Vienna. It illustrates the healing of the blind man from Jericho as it is told in three Gospels, however the reference to the Gospel according to St. Luke is not quite correct. A chapter XXVIII does not exist. The healing of the blind man is described in chapter XVIII. Although put into the foreground, this biblical event is not in the focus of Lau­ tensack’s artistic interest. It is the picturesque-fantastic landscape, which he spreads out in an overwhelming diversity in front of the beholder’s eyes behind a pine tree effectively placed in the foremost plane of the image. The eye wanders from mountains, rivers, vegetation and architecture to an almost endless depth of an imaginary space.

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58


LUCAS VAN LEY DEN

59 The Standard-Bearer.

1494 Leiden 1553

ca. 1510

Engraving. 7,8 x 6,9 cm Bartsch 140; Volbehr 136; Hollstein 140; New Hollstein 140/a (of b) Provenance: P. Mariette 1672 (Lugt 1788) Prince Max Egon zu Fürstenberg (Lugt 995) Kurt Klemperer (not in Lugt)

Fine impression of beautiful transparency and clarity. With tiny margins around the borderline and cut on the plate mark respectively. In pristine freshness. With his self­confident stan­ dard­bearer placed in front of a coastal landscape, Lucas van Leyden directly competes with the great Nuremberg Master who is about half a generation older. His charming compositi­ on is a virtuous paraphrase of Dürer’s popular engraving with the depiction of a stan­ dard­bearer, executed about 1501 (M. 92) [c.f. cat. no. 41]. Engaged and free leg are chan­ ged. The more slender propor­ tioned, lesser statuesque taken body is being most elegantly turned slightly to the right, whereas the young man’s pen­ sive glance is facing to the left. It seems almost as if the ensign steps from a minor height towards the observer, whereby the f lag impressively molds the background for him with its marvelous, space constituting motion motif that is conducive to the dynamization of the composition.

126


JAN LIEVENS

60 The Virgin presenting a Pear to the Child.  

1607 Leiden – Amsterdam 1674

ca. 1635/38

Etching. 25,5 x 20,2 cm Bartsch 1; Dutuit and Rovinski 1/V; Hollstein 8/VI Provenance: T. Graf (Lugt Suppl. 1092a) G. Rosen, Berlin, Auction XXIV, 1955, no. 1521 German private collection

One of only three initially self-published etchings of the artist in a magnificent impression of the reduced plate and with the artist’s monogram ,IL fe’ at the upper left. With 3 – 5 mm margins around the plate mark which has been preserved in an unf lattened state. Two slight crease marks only perceptible on verso, otherwise impeccable and utterly pristine. The devotional picture unmistakably ref lecting the art of van Dyck, may have been executed shortly after the artist’s move to Antwerp with regard to its predo­ minantly Catholic public. It is probably based on a painting by Lievens which is lost today, but mentioned in the artist’s estate inventory in 1674. S. S. Dickey accordingly presumes: The relatively tight, controlled technique of the etching may thus reflect his attempt to capture the tonal qualities of the painting. The moiré pattern created by closely spaced hatching in the background indicates that he studied the conventional methods by reproductive printmakes, including those in Van Dyck’s circle.

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60


MELCHIOR LORCH 

61 The crucified Man (Haman).  

ca. 1526/27 Flensburg – Copenhagen (?) after 1583

ca. 1550

After Michelangelo

Engraving. 16,4 x 9,8 cm Bartsch 8; Harbeck pag. 36; Hollstein 11; B. Barnes, >Michelangelo in Print<, Farnham 2012, no. 15 Watermark: Walking bear Provenance: South German private collection

Brilliant impression of the most beautiful clarity and transparency. With partially inky plate mark. In a magnificent condition. Dated 1550, Lorch’s engraving after Michelangelo’s fulminant crucified Haman from the southwestern squinch of the Sistine Chapel was produced in the year of publication of Vasari’s “ Le vite dei più eccellenti architetti…”, in which the popu­ lar biographer praised the fresco for its boldness of contractions and the figure as certamente fra le difficili [e] belle bellisima e difficilissima. Lorch might not have seen the fresco with his own eyes by this time. He came to the Eternal City one year later. In 1550 he stayed in Nuremberg with a travel grant from the Danish King where he became acquainted with the Mannerist figure composition, possibly due to an engraving by C. Bos (Hollstein 27). Haman nai­ led to a dead trunk corresponding to the description in Dante’s “Divine Comedy”, now appears in the same orientation as in Michelangelo’s fresco again. The foot­ rest of the right foot got a new interpretation. In Lorch’s composition it is an additional snag and not a board nailed to the tree. Like Bos, he transfers the scene into a landscape. The extremely low placed mountainous horizontal line of the slightly engraved landscape deliberately emphasizes the monumentality of the dramatically turned figure. Although being nailed to the tree, Haman seems to be in an ecstatically rising movement – an impression which is – in contrast to the model – emphasized by the prominently expanded drapery.

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61


MONOGR AMMIST FG 

62 Two putti with Lioness and her cub.  

Active in Germany and Italy (?) during the first half of the 16 th century

1537

After Tommaso Vincidor and Giovanni da Udine

Engraving. 12,0 x 21,5 cm Bartsch IX, pag. 27, Nr. 8; Nagler Monogrammisten 2914, no. 8 Watermark: Flower with letters (?) Provenance: A . von Lanna (Lugt 2773) H. G. Gutekunst, Stuttgart, sale 66, May 11 – 22, 1909, no. 2234

Excellent impression of the exceedingly rare composition. Cut on the platemark, occasionally minimally close. In fine preservation as dis­ tinguished from the impressions at the British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. The composition is based on a design for the today lost extensive series of ­Tapestries >Giuochi di Putti< commissioned by Pope Leo X for the Sala di Cons­ tantino of the Vatican Palace in Brussels about 1521. The drolleries of playing putti concealed a thoroughly grave political subtext. Disguised allegorically, the Medici regimen, particularly the pontificate of Leo X should have been propaga­ ted as the new ‘Golden Age’. According to Vasari, the designs originate from Gio­ vanni da Udine whereby it is unresolved to date to what extend the project was still based on a conception by Raffael. The supervision of the project in Brussels, where the tapestries were produced in the workshop of Pieter van Aelst, resided with Tomaso Vincidor, who had been part of the Raffael’s workshop together with Giovanni. The original cartoons are lost today like the twenty tapestries as well. But Vinci­ dor’s drawings survived. One of these drawings, today in the British Museum, London, shows the group of putti playing with a lioness and her cub in reverse to the present engraving underneath a sumptuous festoon, the combining motif of all the tapestries. The Monogrammist FG, however, left it aside focusing on the suggestive motif by which Leo X may have felt appealed to. Despite several attempts to decipher the monogram, the artist’s circumstances of life are still unknown. Due to the close relationship of some of his engravings dated 1534 – 1537 to the circle of the Little Masters of Nuremberg, it has been supposed, that he had German roots.

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62


JAN HARMENSZ. MULLER

63 Arion, on a Dolphin.  

1571 Amsterdam 1628

ca. 1590

After C. Cornelisz. Van Haarlem

Engraving. 35,3 x 35,4 cm Bartsch 32; Hollstein 48/II (of III); New Hollstein 32/II Provenance: August Riedinger (Lugt 167)

Magnificent impression of rare brilliancy. With the address of Claes Jansz. Visscher. Cut on the platemark, with the complete text in the lower margin. Some traces of a former folding on verso and unobtrusive repairs in the edges, otherwise in very fine condition. One of Muller’s early engravings after designs by Cornelisz. van Haarlem executed soon after he left the Goltzius workshop. The impressive Mannerist composition depicting Arion on a Dolphin was com­ missioned by the Amsterdam poet Hendrik Laurensz. Spieghel (1549 – 1612) and bears his Flemish motto ‚DUEGHD VERHUEGHT‘ (Virtue gives delight) in the lower margin. The Greek poet and singer Arion who was active around 620 bc represented for him the ideal man, a figure with whom Spieghel willingly identified himself. According to one of the legends recounted by Herdot, Arion mastered a dange­ rous situation by his virtue, when threatened with death by the skippers during the passage from Italy to Corinth. Without hesitation, he requested permission to sing a last song with his lyre and then leapt into the sea where Dolphins attrac­ ted by his singing recovered him and brought him to the land. Spieghel describes his ideal of a self-sufficient Stoic sage by his Latin verses in the lower margin that reads in English translation: Who then is free? The wise man who is master of himself, who remains undaunted in the face of poverty, chains and death,

134

who stubbornly defies his passions and despises positions of power, a man complete in himself, smooth and round


63


GEORG PENCZ

64 The Works of Mercy.  

ca. 1500 Nuremberg – Leipzig (?) 1550

ca. 1534

Feeding the Hungry Giving Drink to the Thirsty Sheltering Pilgrims Clothing the Naked Curing the Sick Visiting Prisoners Burying the Dead

Set of seven plates. Engraving. Each ca. 5,6 cm in diameter Bartsch 58–64; Landau 61–67 ; Hollstein 69–75 Provenance: Duplicate from the Albertina (Lugt 5 e and 5h)

The complete series – except for the title, which is known only in a unique impres­ sion in Coburg – in a homogeneous set of brilliantly deep black early impressions showing all the characteristics of the very first pulls as particularly mentioned by Hollstein: H. 69 still with the second monogram to be seen clearly at upper right of the window; H. 70 still with the correction of the letter ‘B’ into ‘R’ in ‘GEDRENCKT’ clearly vilsible; H. 74 still with the fine vertical hatchings on the rings that imprison Christ’s hands visible. Throughout cut on the platemark, occasionally minimally close and with tiny margin beyond respectively. All of them marked as duplicates from the Albertina. Except for some residues of glue on verso, in impeccable condition. Extremely rare in such homogeneity and excellent printing quality. One of the artist’s series with particular reference to the Reformation. The sub­ ject of “ The Works of Mercy” is realized here as a cycle of prints for the first time. Struggling against the Roman sale of indulgences, Luther explicitly emphasized the value of the Works of Mercy and Charity. He supposed them but not the indulgencies acquirable for purchase to be what actually ameliorates the hum­ ans. Accordingly, Pencz illustrated, with reference to Christ’s divination speech on the Last Judgment as recorded in the 25th chapter of the Book of Matthew, the works of Mercy in small, vivid and psychologically well-conceived compositions. Using the varied lighting for the modeling of the figures, the artist composed each of them with great sensitivity into the circular shape and achieved not only the structural resemblance that is necessary for a series but also the coherence of each image. Using common attire of those days for all the acting persons… provided the engravings with specific intensity and actuality of statement. Compliant with Christ’s sentence that generalizes his ethical demand: “Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it onto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me”, the seeking help protagonist, to whom a work of mercy is rendered, is Christ himself each time. (H. Zschelletzschky).

136


GEORG PENCZ

65 Thetis and Cheiron.  

Um 1500 Nuremberg – Leipzig (?) 1550

1543

Engraving. 13,4 x 18,8 cm Bartsch 90; Landau 78 ; Hollstein 119 Provenance: Duc d’Arenberg (Lugt 567)

Superbly magnificent showpiece of almost unsurpassable brilliancy. Velvety deep black in the dense crosshatchings but at the same time of utmost transparency and clarity. Cut on the platemark. Some thin spots on the reverse side. Traces of a former multiple folding hardly disturbing and are neglectable regarding the outstanding printing quality. Among the Nuremberg Little Masters it was particularly Georg Pencz who dealt with subjects from the ancient mythology to a special degree. The present com­ position illustrates a seldom depicted incident from the life of Achilles recounted by P. P. Statius in the first book of his unfinished epic poem “Achilleid”. Concerned about her son Achill, the nymph Thetis visits the centaur Cheiron in his cave at Mount Pelion. On behalf of her husband, he has taken care of the boy’s education. The preparations for the Trojan War are already in full progress and the mother, who, due to her visionary abilities, knows that her son is destined either for a long comfortable life at home or an early but glorious death faraway at Troy, is coming in order to take him away and to bring him to the court of Lycomedes on the Skyros Island where he should hide himself in women’s clothes. As described by Statius, Pencz depicts Achill together with his friend Patroclus returning from the lion hunt while his mother takes his teacher into her confi­ dence. Achill has laid down his quarry, a mighty lioness, and is going to f ling his arms around his mother’s neck. Pencz’s classically educated contemporaries, however, did know about the futility of Thetis’ maternal precaution. Achill will die as the hero of Troy. An equilateral pen and ink drawing on blue paper, heightened with white is at the Universitätsbibliothek Erlangen.

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65


FERDINAND PILOT Y

66 Italia and Germania.  

1786 Homburg/Palatinate – Munich 1844

ca. 1837/42

After F. Overbeck

Lithograph. 41,4 x 46,3 cm Weigel XIII, p. 13, No 12211 from 40; Nagler of 2; not in Boetticher Provenance: Princes of Liechtenstein

Magnificent impression. Printed on cream-colored chine collé. With the full spectrum of gray and black shades which the lithograph technique makes possible. The complete sheet (paper size 62,0 x 90,9 cm). Occasionally some brown stains solely in the margins, otherwise impeccable, especially the image pristine and brilliant. Overbeck’s “ Italia and Germania” is commonly considered the epitome of the Nazarene art. Originally entitled “ Sulamith and Maria” and planned as a friendly gift for Franz Pforr, the composition was meant to illustrate the imaginary wives of the two painter friends. Due to Pforr’s early death the execution of the painting did not happen until F. Wenner, a publisher from Frankfurt, saw the carton in Rome and ordered it in 1815. He received the painting in Frankfurt in 1829. The two women became Italia and Germania, who, intimately devoted to each other, illustrate the Nazarene ideal of art as a symbiosis of the Italian and German inter­ pretation of art. After “ Italia and Germania” was acquired by King Ludwig I. in 1834, Piloty litho­ graphed the composition for his work “ Königl. Bayerische Pinakothek zu Mün­ chen und Gemälde-Galerie zu Schleissheim”, published in 1837 – 42. With the smooth gradations of the broad chalk strokes Piloty’s lithograph fully corres­ ponds to the softness of the painting.

140


FERDINAND PILOT Y

66 Italia und Germania.  

1786 Homburg/Pfalz – München 1844

Um 1837/42

Nach F. Overbeck

Lithographie. 41,4 x 46,3 cm Weigel XIII, p. 13, Nr. 12211 aus 40; Nagler aus 2; Fehlt bei Boetticher Provenienz: Fürsten zu Liechtenstein

Brillanter Abzug. Auf creme-farbigen chine collé gedruckt. Mit dem vollen Spektrum an Grau- und Schwarztönen, wie sie die Lithographie erlaubt. Der volle Bogen (Papiermaß 62,0 x 90,0 cm). Lediglich im Papierrand mit einzelnen Braunf lecken, sonst tadellos, insbesondere die Darstellung unberührt frisch und strahlend. Overbecks >Italia und Germania< gilt gemeinhin als Inbegriff der nazarenischen Kunst überhaupt. Ursprünglich unter dem Titel >Sulamith und Maria< kon­ zipiert als Freundschaftsgabe für Franz Pforr, sollte die Komposition die ima­ ginären Ehefrauen der beiden Malerfreunde darstellen. Die Ausführung als Gemälde unterblieb zunächst nach dem frühen Tod Pforrs bis der Frankfurter Verleger F. Wenner den Karton in Rom sah und das Bild 1815 bestellte. 1829 konnte er es in Frankfurt in Empfang nehmen. Die beiden Frauen waren nun zu Italia und Germania geworden, die einander innig zugetan, das nazarenische Kunstideal als Symbiose italienischer und deutscher Kunstauffassung veranschaulichen. Nachdem >Italia und Germania< 1834 von König Ludwig I. erworben worden war, lithographierte Piloty die Komposition für sein 1837 – 42 erschienendes Werk >Königl. Bayerische Pinakothek zu München und Gemälde-Galerie zu Schleissheim<. Mit den weichen Übergängen der breiten Kreidestriche entspricht Pilotys Lithographie vollkommen der Sanftheit der Gemäldefassung.

66

140


FR ANCESCO PIR ANESI

1758/59 Rome – Paris 1810

67 Veduta del Tempio d’Iside quale oggi esiste fragli avanzi dell’antica Citá di Pompei.   1779/88 After L.-J. Desprez

Etching. 52,0 x 71,1 cm Wollin 7/II Watermark: Double-eagle with countermark letters (Robison Wz. 90 and 81)

One of the four archaeological views from Pompeii etched by F. Piranesi after designs by L.-J. Desprez. Fine impression of the II. State, i.e. the former outline-etching reworked with further details and shadings, the title and the addresses of the artist added. Wollin could only detect 11 impressions of the first state, the colored outline-etching, mostly in public collections. Desprez won the Rome award of the ‚Académie Royale d’architecture’ in 1776. When reaching Rome, Desprez was enlisted by the Abbé de Saint-Non for a team of artists to execute illustrations for his project “ Voyage pittoresque ou Descripti­ on des Royaumes de Naples et de Sicile”. Fragonard and H. Robert already provi­ ded contributions since 1760. In December 1777, Saint-Non started for the south together with Vivant Denon, C. L. Châtelet and Desprez. During this trip Desprez drew several watercolor-views of the Isis-Temple in Pompeii. One of these drawings, today in the Musée de Beaux-Arts, Besançon, was used by P. G. Bertault as model for his engraving published for the first time in SaintNons’s “ Voyage pittoresque…” in 1781 – 86) For another publication of views from Rome and southern Italy at that time pro­ jected by Desprez himself and in close collaboration with F. Piranesi, the artist chose a different perspective, slightly moved sideward to the central position. This way he was able to emphasize the picturesque character of the excavation scene. In contrary to the watercolor, now in the Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, he idealized the design for the etched version omitting the protective roods above the buildings and inserting a group of ‘tourists’ admiring the ancient monuments having been excavated only a few years before. When Francesco Piranesi published the drawing by Desprez as an outline-etching it was planned for hand-coloring by Desprez. As the title of the set “Catalogue de différentes vues coloriées” published in July 1783 announces the prints were sold as so-called dessins coloriés. Perhaps such multiplicated watercolors required a great deal of expenses. Perhaps Piranesi was searching for new markets when he newly approached the plates for re-etching. Completing the depictions he trans­ lated Desprez’ splendid effects of light and shadows adequately into the blackand-white of the etching medium.

144


67


FR ANCESCO PIR ANESI

68 The Serapis Temple in Pozzuoli.  

1758/59 Rome – Paris 1810

ca. 1781

After L.-J. Desprez Hand-colored outline-etching. 47,7 x 69,7 cm Wollin 5 Magnificent specimen. Wollin referenced only six impressions, two of them in public collections. As usual, without margins. Somewhat cut inside the borderline all the way round. In a remarkably fresh preservation, especially the hand-coloring brilliant. As suggested by the term ,dessin colorié’, which Piranesi and Desprez chose in their advertisement, the composition looks at the first sight like a watercolor. In fact, the views of the series announced by both artists in July 1783 comprised large outline-etchings by F. Piranesi after designs by Desprez, who then colored them with watercolors and gouache in a very elaborate way. The pamphlet lists forty-eight sheets showing views from the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily as well as from Rome. Finally only ten views of this ambitious project were ever realized before Desprez was employed by King Gustav III of Sweden and left Rome for Paris in April 1784. His definite move to Sweden in July of the same year meant the end of this joined project. Until then, obviously only a few exemplars have been colored by Desprez, which explains the great rarity. Desprez experienced the so-called Serapis-Temple of Pozzuoli, which belonged to the attractions of a classic Grand Tour since its excavation between 1750 and 1756, during his journey through South Italy in 1777/1778 and captured it in a sketch which can be found today in the Nationalmuseum, Stockholm. As we know today, the ancient ruins with the three imposing pillars still standing upright, are the remains of a marketplace called Marcellum of the Roman port Puteoli near the Gulf of Naples, founded by the Greeks.

146


FR ANCESCO PIR ANESI

68 Der Serapis-Tempel in Pozzuoli.

1758/59 Rom – Paris 1810

Um 1781

Nach L.-J. Desprez

Altkolorierte Umrißradierung. 46,8 x 66,0 cm Wollin 5

Prachtexemplar. Wollin verzeichnet lediglich sechs Abzüge, zwei davon in öffentlichem Besitz. Wie üblich ohne Rand. Ringsum leicht innerhalb der Einfassung geschnitten. In bemerkenswert frischer Erhaltung, namentlich das Kolorit von ungeminderter Strahlkraft. Wie der Begriff dessin colorié zunächst nahelegt, den Piranesi und Desprez in ihrer Anzeige vom Juli 1783 verwendeten, erscheint die Komposition auf den ersten Blick wie ein Aquarell. Tatsächlich handelte es sich bei den annoncierten Blättern jedoch um großformatige Umrißradierungen Francesco Piranesis nach Entwürfen von Louis-Jean Desprez, die von letzterem mit Aquarell- und Deckfarben aufwändig und individuell koloriert wurden. Ursprünglich waren 48 Blätter mit Veduten aus Neapel, Sizilien und der Stadt Rom vorgesehen. Tatsächlich wurden jedoch nur zehn Ansichten realisiert, bevor Desprez in den Dienst von König Gustav III. von Schweden trat und Rom im April 1784 in Richtung Paris verließ. Seine endgültige Übersiedlung nach Schweden im Juli desselben Jahres besiegelte das Ende des gemeinsamen Unternehmens. Bis dahin waren offensichtlich nur wenige Exemplare von Desprez koloriert, was die große Seltenheit erklärt. Desprez hatte den sogenannten Serapis-Tempel von Pozzuoli, der seit seiner Ausgrabung zwischen 1750 und 1756 zu den Sehenswürdigkeiten einer klassischen Grand Tour gehörte, auf seiner 1777/78 unternommenen Reise durch Süditalien kennengelernt und in einer Skizze festgehalten, die sich heute in Nationalmuseum, Stockholm befindet. Wie wir heute wissen, sind die antiken Ruinen mit den drei imposanten, noch aufrecht stehenden Säulen die Überreste des Marcellum genannten Marktes der am Golf von Neapel gelegenen römischen Hafenstadt Puteoli, die auf eine griechische Gründung zurückgeht.

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146


GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIR ANESI

69 Vue des restes interieurs d’un des Pronaos du Temple de Neptune…   

1720 Venice – Rome 1778

1778

Etching. 50,2 x 68,3 cm Focillon 595 ; Hind pag. 87; Wilton Ely 730 Watermark: Fleur-de-Lys in a double circle (Robison 36)

Plate XIII of the series “ Differentes vues de quelques restes de trois grands édifices qui subsident encore dans l’ancienne ville de Pesto” Excellent, sooty deep black impression from the first edition published in Rome. Before the later numbering for the second edition published in Paris 1835. With 3 – 6 cm margins all round, showing full margins at two sides. With crisp, unpressed platemark. Fresh and sparkling, lacking the usual central fold. One of Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s last etchings. Piranesi, who until now had devoted himself entirely to Roman antiquities, realized a year before his death, in a rare combination of business acumen and scientific interest, growing enthusiasm of foreign travelers and collectors for the ancient Greek city of Paestum, 70 km south of Naples. Although he undoubtedly knew of the temple site before, it must have been this knowledge which – despite his ill health – led him to go on a study tour there at the end of 1777 or latest in spring 1778 in order to prepare a new “Vedute” project. He was accompanied by his son Francesco, the architect A. Rosa and the architec­ tural specialist from his workshop, B. Mori. During his last months to live Piranesi etched 18 more plates on the basis of pre­ paratory drawings executed on site, one of them being the present work showing the temple of Neptune. On 15 September 1778, only two months before his death, Piranesi received the papal permission for printing the complete series. Frances­ co completed the set with two further plates and the title page. In the vibrant energy of the lines and the surface, so characteristic of his prepara­ tory drawings and the etchings executed by himself, which is visible everywhere.

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ARTHUR POND

70 Self-portrait.  

ca. 1705 (?) England – London 1758

1739

Drypoint. 18,8 x 14,1 cm Bartsch Appendix 66; Nagler 1; Le Blanc 35; Exhibition Cat. “ Rembrandt in 18 th Century England”, Yale 1983, no. 149 Provenance: Chevalier de Damery (Lugt 2862)

This self-portrait scratched in drypoint in vigorous but heavy-handed emulation of Rembrandt was especially pointed out by R.T. Godefrey due to its unaffected realism. Bartsch notes in the appendix of his “Catalogue Raisonné de toute des Estampes qui forment l’Oeuvre de Rembrandt”: gravé à la pointe sèche, dans le goût de la manière noire. Magnificent early impression that has not been referenced in the literature to date; with beautifully deep burr in the distinct drypoint works: before the later strokes at the shoulder and the chest, just like the exemplar of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, shows it. A. Pond is considered one of the most important and inf luential art dealer, collector, painter and graphic artist regarding the Rembrandt reception in Eng­ land in the 18th century. Pond’s enthusiasm for the Dutch art of the 17th century even got him to learn the Dutch language. With a great connoisseurship he gathered together a superb col­ lection of etchings by Rembrandt – partially acquired directly from the Willem Six-auction in 1734. Finally, Sir Edward Astley acquired the significant collection in 1756. Although Pond is not known to have directly copied Rembrandt’s prints, he executed several drypoints described by George Vertue as ‘scrape-art’ prints in the ‘scritch-scratch’ manner of Rembrandt. (E.G. D’Oench)

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REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RIJN

71 The Three Trees.  

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

1643

Etching, engraving and drypoint. 20,8 x 27,8 cm Bartsch, Rovinski, Seidlitz and White-Boon 212; Hind 205; Biörklund-Barnard 43-B; New Hollstein 214 Watermark: Strasbourg Lily (Hinterding, variant F.b.) Provenienz: Westphalian private collection The coronation of Dutch landscape etching demonstrating magnificently Rembrandt’s expressive temperament. Exceptionally imposing impression showing excellent contrasts. The drypoint work with fine burr. The sulpur tinting in the clouds and especially around the birds at the left of the trees still beautifully distinct. The almost opa­ que black marvelously transparent without any ‘blind’, i.e. wear areas in the fore­ ground. With fine margins around the platemark. In remarkably fine condition. …it is an ambitious synthesis of various observations about Nature and humanity’s relation­ship to it. It is the only Rembrandt etched landscape that presents nature as ever changing, as an ongoing process… The sky in “The Three Trees” occupies almost two-thirds of the image and is the principal source of the sense of dynamism that the landscape conveys. In the upper foreground dark clouds hover and at the left we see the ruler-straight diagonal streaks of passing rain shower. In the distance towering clouds draw up moisture from the earth. The depth of the sky’s cloudscape and the alternating bands of cloud-shadow cast over the land contribute greatly to the sense of mobile light and majestic scale… Though the grand movements of nature are dominant here – the streaming rain and roiling clouds or the wind whipping through the foliage of the stands of trees – one slowly discovers that this is an inhabited or lived-in landscape… (C. S. Ackley) According to C. Campbel (in “ Kroniek van het Rembrandthuis”, 1980, Nr. 2, pag. 2 – 33) the scenery can be identified with the view from the Haalemerdijk with Amsterdam in the background.

154


REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RIJN

71 Die Landschaft mit den drei Bäumen.

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

1643

Radierung, Kupferstich und Kaltnadel. 20,8 x 27,8 cm Bartsch, Rovinski, Seidlitz und White-Boon 212; Hind 205; Biörklund-Barnard 43-B; New Hollstein 214 Wasserzeichen: Straßburger Lilienwappen (Hinterding, Variante F.b.) Provenienz: Westfälische Privatsammlung

Die Krönung der Niederländischen Landschaftsradierung, in der sich Rembrandts expressives Temperament in großartiger Weise manifestiert. Außerordentlich wirkungsvoller, herrlich kontrastreicher Abzug. Die Kaltnadelarbeiten mit schönem Grat, die Schwefelstaubätzung im Bereich der Wolken, speziell aber um die Vögel links von den drei Bäumen noch sehr schön ausgeprägt. Das fast opake Schwarz wunderbar transparent, ohne die häufig sichtbaren ‚blinden‘, d.h. ausgedruckten Partien im Vordergrund. Mit schmalem Papierrand um die Plattenkante. In ganz ausgezeichneter Erhaltung. ... it is an ambitious synthesis of various observations about Nature and humanity’s relationship to it. It is the only Rembrandt etched landscape that presents nature as ever changing, as an ongoing process ... The sky in >The Three Trees< occupies almost two-thirds of the image and is the principal source of the sense of dynamism that the landscape conveys. In the upper foreground dark clouds hover and at the left we see the ruler-straight diagonal streaks of passing rain shower. In the distance towering clouds draw up moisture from the earth. The depth of the sky’s cloudscape and the alternating bands of cloud-shadow cast over the land contribute greatly to the sense of mobile light and majestic scale ... Though the grand movements of nature are dominant here – the streaming rain and roiling clouds or the wind whipping through the foliage of the stands of trees – on slowly discovers that this is an inhabited or lived-in landscape ... (C. S. Ackley) C. Campbel (in >Kroniek van het Rembrandthuis<, 1980, Nr. 2, pag. 2 – 33) zufolge, kann die Szenerie als Sicht vom Haarlemerdijk, mit Amsterdam im Hintergrund, identifiziert werden.

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REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RIJN

72 Self-portrait with Saskia.  

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

1636

Etching. 10,4 x 9,4 cm Bartsch 19; Rovinski, Seidlitz and White-Boon 19/II (of III); Hind 144/II (of III); Biörklund-Barnard 36 -A/II (of III); New Hollstein 158/II (of III) Provenance: Unidentified Russian collection (not in Lugt) Duplicate from the Hermitage, Leningrad (Lugt 2681a) C. G. Boerner, Leipzig, sale CLXVII, November 11 – 13,1930, lot 872 Unidentified collection ‚H E O‘ in a square (not in Lugt)

The always very sought after double portrait of the artist and his wife in a remark­ ably fine impression of the second state showing a rare beauty and harmony in its extraordinarily striking printing quality. Before the later retouch of the fail biting in the shadow next to Rembrandts cheek. The etching with the self-confident and famous artist is of extreme personal mes­ sage. Representing a daily aspect of the domestic life, this composition remains the only one in the graphic work showing Rembrandt together with his wife Saskia van Uylenburg. It was executed in 1634, the year of the couple’s marriage.

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REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RIJN

73 The Holy Family.  

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

ca. 1632

Etching. 9,5 x 7,2 cm Bartsch, Rovinski, Seidlitz and White-Boon 62 Hind 95; Biörklund-Barnard 32–2; New Hollstein 114 Provenance: F ürstlich Waldburg Wolffegg’sches Kupferstichkabinett (Lugt 2542) H. G. Gutekunst, Stuttgart, sale 56, 1902, Nr. 756

Excellent impression of the charming composition which is extremely rare ­because the plate went lost at a very early date. Printed in homogeneously deep black ink without any weakness. The brightly lightened parts wiped totally clean whereas, otherwise, a delicate platetone which intensifies slightly towards the edges provides the composition with an extraordinary atmospheric appeal. With 5 mm margins around the platemark which borders the composition like a frame. Except for some tiny traces of pins at the corners, perfect. The etching is so lacking in traditional symbols of divinity such as haloes that one might mistake it for an ordinary scene of tranquil Dutch domestic life… The background of the featureless interior is enveloped in a transparent web of shifting shadow, while Rembrandt uses areas of blank white paper to focus light on Mary and the child. The delicate play of light and shadow over Mary’s features subtly heightens her musing, reflecting expression. One can choose to view her as simply a mother who has fallen into a dreamy trance while nursing her child, or as the mother of the Savior meditating on this particular child’s special destiny. The monogramed but undated etching, typical of Rembrandt’s 1630s etchings in its wiry calligraphic line, looks forward to etchings such as “The Pancake Woman” of 1635. It is, however, usually dated about 1632, the last year in which Rembrandt is known to have used the RHL monogram seen here. (C. S. Ackley)

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REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RIJN

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

74 The Rest on the Flight into Egypt: lightly etched.  

1645

Etching and drypoint. 13,1 x 11,5 cm Bartsch, Rovinski, Seidlitz and White-Boon 58; Hind 216; Biörklund-Barnard 45-E; New Hollstein 227 Watermark: Basilisk (Hinterding Variante A.a) Provenienz: P & D Colnaghi, London, stocknumber c 27595 Kunsthandlung Helmut H. Rumbler, Catalogue 14, 1983, no 49 Westphalian private collection

Unusually fine impression of the lightly etched composition which has an effect not unlike a silverpoint drawing. Early impressions… seem to be printed with greyish ink. (Hinterding-Rutgers) – a criterion that the present impression fully meets and is verified by the Basilisk-watermark of the paper used. Hinterding mentions it especially for the first printing campaign. With fine margins beyond the platemark distinguished with tone. Perfect. In 1645, Rembrandt published a few similar lightly etched compositions in which the artist intentionally sought the utmost delicacy of line. The refined simplicity of the etching perfectly corresponds with the peaceful mood of the scene. The depiction is based on Lucas van Leyden of whom Rembrandt adopted Joseph peeling a fruit. Since the plate went lost early, proofs are very rare, the more in such fine prin­ ting quality and preservation. Here the Holy Family is seen enjoying a picnic rest stop (at right a saddle rests on the ground) rather than collapsing with exhaustion after their travels. Mary and Joseph are seated companionably side by side. Mary raises the baby’s blanket so that Joseph, who is in the act of peeling an apple, can gaze fondly at his son. The landscape setting is deliberately vague, but at upper left a pair of birds visually allude to the theme of family harmony. (C. S. Ackley)

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REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RHIJN

75 Landscape with Cottage and large Tree.  

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

1641

Etching. 12,6 x 31,8 cm Bartsch, Rovinski, Seidlitz and White-Boon 226; Hind 178; Biörklund-Barnard 41-B; New Hollstein 198 Provenance: D r. Roth (Lugt 2172) Westphalian private collection

Harmonically balanced impression still showing the vertical wiping marks in the sky as an important criterion for early proofs. In addition to this, the delicate plate tone produces a remarkably fine atmospheric effect. Without an usually disturbing center fold. With tiny margins beyond the platemark. Perfect. The idyllic composition belongs to the first period of landscape etchings created by Rembrandt prior to 1645. Mastering the problem of combining harmoniously the different dimensions of space, this print marks a decisive turning point in the art of Dutch landscape prints. The subject, the size of the plate and the composition as well may be inspired by Jan van de Velde. However, this is Rembrandt’s first, but instantaneously successful attempt to break with Dutch tradition of landscape etching. Placing the cottage right in the left foreground, juxtaposing with the far horizon, Rembrandt gives his composition a spontaneous vividness. He solves the problem of combining the different areas by etching successively in stages. Some parts especially in the foreground were etched very deeply whereas the lightly biten, almost calligraphic lines of the horizon appear to dissolve in the sunlight. These elements are well-balanced and combined together by the seemingly irregularly ondulating lines of the water. Several attempts were made identifying the site. However, M. Royalton-Kisch aptly characterized this ambitious landscape etching as an imaginary distillation or ‚capricco‘ of the countryside around Amsterdam.

164


REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RHIJN

75 Die Hütte bei dem großen Baum.

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

1641

Radierung. 12,6 x 31,8 cm Bartsch, Rovinski, Seidlitz und White-Boon 226; Hind 178; Biörklund-Barnard 41-B; New Hollstein 198 Provenienz: Dr. Roth (Lugt 2172) Westfälische Privatsammlung

Harmonisch ausgewogener Abdruck mit noch gut sichtbaren vertikalen Wischspuren in der Himmelspartie als wichtiges Kriterium der frühen Abzüge. Der delikate Plattenton verleiht der Darstellung darüber hinaus eine besonders schöne atmosphärische Wirkung. Ohne eine sonst häufig störend in Erscheinung tretende Mittelfalte. Mit hauchfeinem Rändchen um die Plattenkante. Tadellos. Die idyllische Darstellung entstammt der ersten Periode von Landschaftsradierungen, die Rembrandt bis 1645 geschaffen hat. Bei dem Problem, die verschiedenen Raumdimensionen miteinander harmonisch zu verbinden, bildet das Blatt einen entscheidenden Wendepunkt in der holländischen Landschaftsgraphik. Plattenformat, Sujet und Kompositionsschema dürften von Jan van de Velde beeinf lußt sein. Nach dessen Vorbild ist es Rembrandts erster und sogleich geglückter Vorstoß, mit der traditionellen Auffassung der Gliederung einer Landschaft zu brechen. Indem er die Hütte links stark in den Vordergrund setzt, verleiht er der Darstellung eine unmittelbar zugängliche Lebendigkeit. Das dadurch entstandene Problem, die verschiedenen Raumschichten kompositorisch zu einer Einheit zusammenzufassen, löst Rembrandt durch ein virtuos eingesetztes Stufenätzverfahren. Bestimmte Partien wie z.B. der Vordergrund wurden dabei tiefer geätzt, während die fast kaligraphisch anmutenden Linien des Horizonts sich gleichsam im Licht aufzulösen scheinen. Die verschiedenen, mit Detailfreude geschilderten Einzelheiten und die scheinbar regellos sich hin und her schlängelnden Linien des Wasserlaufes sind dabei entscheidende Bindeglieder, die es dem Auge des Beschauers ermöglichen zwischen Nähe und fernem Horizont eine Verbindung zu schaffen. Es hat verschiedene Versuche gegeben, die Örtlichkeit genauer zu lokalisieren. M. Royalton-Kisch charakterisiert die Komposition sicher zutreffend als an imaginary distillation or ‚capricco‘ of the countryside around Amsterdam.

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REMBR ANDT HARMENSZOON VAN RIJN

76 Old Man shading his Eyes with his Hands.  

1606 Leiden – Amsterdam 1669

ca. 1639

Etching. 13,5 x 11,2 cm Bartsch 259/I (of II), Rovinski und Seidlitz 259/I (of V); White-Boon 259; Hind 169/I (of II); Biörklund-Barnard 38-3; New Hollstein 175/I (of III) Provenienz: E . Schultze (Lugt 906) Hugo Helbing, München, sale 7.–15. Februar 1901, no. 1801 Duplicate from The Art Institute of Chicago (Lugt 32b and 702 h) Westphalian private collection

Very rare unusual composition especially charming by the contrasts of minutely executed and deliberately unfinished parts. Exquisitely fine impression printed with delicate platetone. With 2–3 mm margins. Totally untouched. …there are many reasons to suppose that when Rembrandt lifted his hand from this plate he regarded the print as complete, not only finished in its essence, but suggestively enhanced by what is left largely to the imagination. Rembrandt’s etching raises the conceptual problem of finish in a manner that is unprecedented in the history of printmaking. More than simply experimental, his approach is distinctive for its sustained reflection on the process of moving from initial idea to final resolution. (P. Parshall in: exhib. cat. “ The unfinished Print”, Washington 2001) About 1770 the original plate came to the engraver Georg Friedrich Schmidt who ‚completed‘ the composition.

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JUSEPE DE RIBER A

77 The Poet.  

1588 Valencia – Naples 1652

ca. 1620/21

Etching. 15,9 x 12,2 cm Bartsch 10 ; Brown 3 Watermark: crown with star Provenance: C hevalier J. G de Camberlyn (Lugt 514) A. Hyatt Major

Superb early impression of the magnificent capital piece. As especially mentioned by Brown as a characteristic of the very first impressions: the shadows are remarkably rich deep, especially around the face, where the ink is almost caked between the lines. With the fail-bitten parts not having been covered up with brush and ink as often. Otherwise in deep almost metallic blackness, with the traces of the sulphur tint of the fail-biting between the branch and the tree trunk and on the stone pedestal at right being unusually distinct. The borderline completely visible all around and with fine margins beyond. Completely untouched. With two pale glue stains coming through and some traces of an old sanguine squaring only visible on verso. Brilliant. Furthermore especially qualified by its provenance, coming from the private col­ lection of A. Hyatt Mayor (1901 – 1980), the former curator of the Department of Prints and Drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and president of the Hispanic Society of America. Ribera’s “Poet”, dressed in voluminous robes, crowned with laurel, and leaning on a stone with head in hand, is one of the most striking images of the artist’s early career. Although Ribera painted numerous isolated figures of philosophers, this moody portrayal of a writer stands apart. The image is particularly compelling in early impressions… The iconography, a synthesis of the attributes of Melancholy and poetry, has been explored in detail by scholars who have found literary parallels ranging from verses by Walter von der Vogelweide (1170? – 1230) to works by Petrarch and Lorenzo de’ Medici… Attempts to identify the poet as a specific historical figure have not been convincing… The pose of the figure is derived from that of Heraclitus in Raphael’s “School of Athens” in the Stanza della Segnatura. Richard Wallace has suggested further that the block on which Heraclitus and this poet lean may be the “cube of reason” (in contrast to the “sphere of fortune” by Andrea Alicanti in his emblem “Ars naturam adiuuans”) and that the great crack in the masonry block in the etching may be a subtle vanitas symbol. ( J. Brown)

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77


BERNHARD RODE

78 The Fortunate Age.  

1725 Berlin 1797

1778

Etching. 22,6 x 35,4 cm Nagler 29; Jacobs 26 Provenance: Princes of Liechtenstein

Splendid impression of the luminous composition. Powerful, almost burry black in the deeply etched areas of the mighty tree in the foreground and at the same time marvelously subtle in the deliberately slightly etched lineament of the middle- and the background. The fine grinding traces produced by the artist in order to suggest a delicate surface tone, still develop their full atmospheric effect. With fine margins around the borderline and with the inky plate mark at the bottom respectively. In the margins occasionally mounted on the original support sheet of the Princes of Liechtenstein. In impeccable preservation. In the present composition Rode, devoting himself more and more to the etching technique since the late 1760s, illustrates the biblical vision of the messianic Kingdom of peace as described by Isaiah: The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them. And the cow and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together: and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. And the suckling child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice’ den. (Isaiah 11, 6 – 9). Without being able to fall back upon iconographic tradition, Rode created his image of “ The fortunate Age” obviously inspired by the arcadian-bucolic compo­ sitions by Castiglione (B. 28, B. 29 and B. 30) as a peaceful, quasi timeless, rural idyll, fulfilled with southern light and atmosphere.

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78


ROELANT ROGHMAN

79 Eight Landscapes with views in various Provinces.   

1627 Amsterdam 1692

ca. 1650

Byten Naerden Buyten Haerlem Buyten Uytrecht Buyten Campen aen Uytrecht int Seuniger bos In Maerseveen Aerckel

Set of 8 Plates. etching. C. 13,1 x 21,0 cm Dutuit 9-16; Hollstein 9/I (von III), 10/II (von III), 11/II, 12-16 Watermark: Serpent, Jug and seven-pointed fools cap Provenance: A . Morrison (Lugt 151) J. P. Heseltine (Lugt 1508)

One of the three important topographic series by the artist in a complete, homo­ geneous set of the first edition published by Clement de Jonghe in Amsterdam. Throughout very fine impressions. Plate 1 and 2 before the later rework and number respectively. Plate 3 in the earliest state available, since the first state, before the number, could be referenced only in a unique impression in London. With uniform 4 – 5 mm margins, only supplemented in plate 5 at left, outside the image, by a backed stripe of paper, otherwise completely untouched. Commissioned by an unknown lover of art, the almost twenty year old Roghman had to execute 220 drawings from castles from Utrecht and Holland grounding his fame as one of the most important topography artist of his time. The extensive sketches that had emerged quasi en passant during this castle tours inspired the artist to create three series of etchings depicting Dutch places and landscapes. Characterized by their expressively unconstrained, diversified etching technique, they are really charming portraits of villages or sometimes very personal, rather unconventional travel sketches that animated the public to discover its own coun­ try.

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79


79


79


JOHANNES SADELER

1550 Brussels – Venice (?) ca. 1600

80 Passion of Christ in ovals with grotesque ornaments.

ca. 1580

After M. Gheeraerts

Set of title and 13 plates. Engraving. Each c. 16,3 x 11,5 cm Guilmard, pag. 483; Hollstein (after Marcus Gerards) 87­99; Hollstein ( J. Sadeler) 207­220; E. Hodnett, pag. 72; M. de Jong, I de Groot, “Ornamentprenten in het Rijksprentenkabinet I, 15de & 16de Eeuw”, s’Graevenhage 1988, no. 85 Watermark: Gothic ‚P‘ below a post horn (Briquet 8835, dated Cologne 1587) Provenance: Alfred Henry Huth

The rarely complete series in a homogenous set of marvelous, sooty deep black impressions printed with delicate platetone. All of them with fine 2 – 3 mm margins around the square plate­ margins. Each fixed at the left onto the support sheet of a former collector’s album coming from the library of Alfred Henry Huth (1850 – 1910), a bibliophile who always went in for highest quality and perfect preservation. The different Passion scenes are imaginatively combined with gro­ tesque scrollwork and strapwork here. Clamped like a tracery to the oval contour of the respective composition, the ornament defi­ nes so­to­speak in a virtuoso man­ ner the architectonic framework of the biblical occurrence taking place in an imaginary narrow space in front of an evenly dark shadowed background. M. Gheeraerts, who also left behind a remarkable printed œuvre as an etcher, acted as a designer for several publis­ hers like C. Plantin, G. de Jode and J. Sadeler during his stay in Antwerp. J. Sadeler who is explicitly named as publisher on the plates can be regarded, according to M. de Jong and I. de Groot, as the engraver of the compositions as well. Extremely rare so complete and in such fine quality.

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80


80


80


80


HANS SCHÄUFELEIN

ca. 1480/1485 Nuremberg – Nördlingen ca. 1539/40

81 The large Carrying of the Cross.  

ca. 1507

Woodcut. 30,6 x 21,5 cm Bartsch VII, 251, 28; Dodgson II, pag. 18, no. 32; Schreyl 388; Hollstein 18 Watermark: Double tower (Briquet 15939) Provenance: J. V. Novák (Lugt 1949) H. G. Gutekunst Stuttgart, auction 59, 1904, no. 1233 A. L. Blum (Lugt 79 b)

One of the best of Schäufelein’s early works. (C. Dodgson) Magnificent impression printed evenly and clearly. Accordingly it received the hig­ hest praise from H. G. Gutekunst in the auction catalogue of the Novák collection in 1904, where it is described as brilliant impression of the utmost purity and sharp­ ness… With the fully visible borderline, whose tiny areas of imperfection appeared already very early and have been retouched with pen and ink very carefully. Thin spots reinforced on verso, two tiny tears mended. Hardly perceptible f laws which are of negligible importance considering the great rarity which already the auction catalogue pointed out in 1904. The great single sheet with the artist’s monogram and his symbol, the two cros­ sed shovels, was probably executed shortly after the woodcuts for Ulrich Pinders “ Speculum passionis domini nostri Ihesu Christi”. Drafted and executed by Schäufelein during Dürer’s absence, they were published only a few months after the master’s return from Italy in 1507. According to Winkler, “ The large Carrying of the Cross” surpasses the drastically and vividly explaining series of the Speculum sheets in its even, delicate execution and charming presentation of details.

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HANS SCHÄUFELEIN

ca. 1480/85 Nuremberg – Nördlingen ca. 1539/40

82 St. Anne with the Virgin and the Infant Christ.   1510 Woodcut. 23,4 x 15,7 cm Bartsch VII, 248, 12/I (of II); Dodgson II, pag. 24, no. 54; Schreyl 390/I (of II); Hollstein 23/I (of II) Watermark: Small bull’s head (similar to Briquet 15271) Provenance: C . G. Boerner, Düsseldorf, Neue Lagerliste 31, 1961, no. 90 South German private collection

Splendid, exceptionally rare early impression. Prior to the later deletion of the year and before the erasure of the artist’s monogram respectively. Homogeneously deep black, the thrifty and strict lineament nearly without cross hatchings beauti­ fully clear and precise which lends a certain monumental expression to the com­ position. With fine margins around the borderline. The left lower corner carefully reatta­ ched, insignificant traces of humidity along the edges mainly visible on the rever­ se, otherwise pristine and impeccable. One of the straightest and most obstinate creations of the master from the most pro­ ductive phase of his woodcut production in Augsburg.

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CHRISTOFFEL VAN SICHEM I

83 Young Man Zither-playing and four Singers.  

1546 Amsterdam 1624

ca. 1605

After H. Goltzius

Woodcut, 30,9 x 21, 8 cm Bartsch III. 126.4; Hollstein 134; New Hollstein (Goltzius) 737 Watermark: Jug with f lowers and superimposed crescent Provenance: K ing Frederick August II from Saxony (Lugt 971) C. G. Boerner, Leipzig, Auction CLIV, 1927, No. 1133

The elegant depiction of a musician in a beautiful impression. With tiny margins around the borderline. Old-mounted in the upper margin on the support sheet of the collection King Frederick August II from Saxony. Impeccable. One of the artist’s principal sheets after drawings by H. Goltzius. The model has to be considered lost but it decidedly belongs to a group of drawings where Goltzius was occupied with the shaping of Lukas van Leiden and his cont­ emporaries. After the master-engravings from 1594, where Goltzius gave proof of his expertise in different style-modes, different drawings in the so-called engra­ ving-style’ were produced in a deliberately ancient manner. They were, according to Reznicek, intended as autonomous artworks. It is admirable how skilfully Sichem transferred the master’s systems of swelling and diminishing lines, rather reminding of an engraving, into the woodcut medium.

188


83


HANS SPRINGINKLEE

84 St. Jerome. ca.

1490/95 Nuremberg – (?) 1527

1515

Woodcut. 5,9 cm in diameter Bartsch VII, 139, 115; Meder 229/ a­b (of c); Dodgson I, pag. 357, no. 21; T.I.B. 10 commentary [B. 115 (139)] / a­b (of c); Hollstein 8; Schoch­Mende­Scherbaum A16 Provenance: Arthur H. Harlow & Co., New York Edwin A. Seasongood, without stamp (c.f. Lugt Suppl. 907a) Parke­Bernet Galleries Inc, New York, auction 1281, 1951, no. 113 Dr. A. L. Blum (Lugt Suppl. 79 b)

Magnificent impression of the composition described by R. Schoch as virtuoso masterstroke. Not completely deep black, as mentioned by Meder as a characteristic for the a­variant and thus presumably prior to the damages in the left edge which never­ theless occasionally seems to be cut down slightly, like the most exemplars. Before the white gap on the upper side and the small black spot on the right next to the middle. One tiny tear carefully mended, otherwise in very good preservation. Extremely rare. D. Beaujean references a total of only 7 copies in public collec­ tions and the impression of the Rijksprentenkabinett, which was selected for the illustration in Hollstein, is partially cut inside the illustration and shows major damages in the edges. The woodcut, small like a miniature and cut very delicately, has always been connected with Dürer and his school. Dodgson was the first one who considered H. Springinklee as the draughtsman, who cooperated very closely with Dürer in the 1510s and lived in his house. Panofsky con­ firmed his attribution to Springinklee which is undisputed today. The composition obviously enjoyed great popularity since it has been copied by Lambert Hopfer already very early (Hollstein 25).

190


HANS SPRINGINKLEE

85 St. George as the Emperor’s Patron Saint.   

1490/95 Nuremberg – (?) 1527

ca. 1516 – 18

Woodcut. 23,7 x 21,0 cm Bartsch VII, 329, 58; Dodgson I, pag. 404, no. 75; Hollstein 308 Watermark: Fragment, tied up letters ,IO‘ (?) Provenance: C . Wiesböck (Lgt 2576) Unidentified collection A.T. in a circle (Lugt 183) F. von Hagens (Lugt 1052 a) C.G. Boerner, Leipzig, auction 152, 1927, no. 514 A. Stroelin, Paris P. & D. Colnaghi, London, stock no. c. 17196

Excellent impression of the rare sheet. As usual already with the crack through the f lag and with the wormholes in the printing block carefully retouched with pen and ink. According to Dodgson and Hollstein early impressions from the time are unknown. The borderline occasionally cut in slightly, otherwise in pristine, fresh preservation. Bartsch yet considered the composition as a part of one of the prestigious book projects of Emperor Maximilian, the “ Heilige aus der Sipp- Mag- und Schwäger­ schaft des Kaiser Maximilians I.” (“Saints in the kinship of Emperor Maximilian I”), which remained imcomplete after the death of the commissioner. Consequently he incorporated it in his edition of the work with the title “ Images de Saints et Saintes issues de la Famille de L’Emperor Maximilian I.” which was printed from the original printing blocks and published in 1799 at Stöckl in Vienna. However, Bartsch’s attribution is considered disproved since Laschitzer’s detailed examination in 1887, without having given information about the connection in which the sheet signed with Springinklee’s monogram was produced. It shows the Emperor adoring the Saint as a member of the St. George’s chivalric order founded by his father Frederic III. Maximilian’s special relationship to St. George as miles christianus (Christian soldier) is related to his idea of leading a Christian crusade against the Ottom­ ans. After his father’s death he remained very grateful to the chivalric order and founded his own St. George-fraternity in 1493. In 1511, he entered the chivalric order and in his testament drafts he allocated a special role to it in connection with his planned funeral monument at the Falkenstein near St. Wolfgang. Since this plans could not be realized, the Emperor devised his interment in the order’s habit at St. George’s Cathedral in Wiener Neustadt which was the order’s second legal seat beside Milstadt shortly before his death on January 12 th, 1519.

192


85


GIOVANNI DOMENICO TIEPOLO

1727 Venice 1804

86 Old Man with a Turban. 1771 – 74 After G.B. Tiepolo

Etching. 11,1 x 9,1 cm De Vesme 150; Rizzi 194/I (of II) Watermark: coat of arms with three (?) stars [fragment] Provenance: F. Goldstein (Lugt 1105 b)

Plate 3 of the series “ Raccolta di Teste…Libro secondo” Furious early impression hardly imaginable better. Before the later number ‘3’ in the lower left. With unusual wide 6,4 – 9,8 cm margins around the inky plate mark conserved with its impressive relief imprinted in the fine structured laid paper. Among the 60 etchings of the series “ Raccolta di Teste..”, published in its whole expansion for the first time in 1774, this is one of only few compositions looking for the direct eye-contact with the viewer. Considered to pay Tiepolo’s last respects to his father, who died in 1770, the series is regarded to be the grand finale to Domenico’s printmaking activity (M. Symmes). The ambitious project refers directly to the tradition of Castiglione’s huge etched series with oriental dressed heads stimulated by Rembrandt’s etched composi­ tions with portraits of Orientals and bearded figures. The Venetian publisher and print dealer A.M. Zanetti wrote: …there are some…for which Rembrandt and Gio: Benedetto Castiglione, could they but rise from their graves, would embrace the man who made them. (L. Wolk-Simon)

194


86


WOLF TR AUT

ca. 1485 Nuremberg 1520

87 Christopher Scheurl with St. Christopher in front of the Mercy Seat.   1515 Woodcut. 17,3 x 12,0 cm Heller 2014; Passavant III, pag. 203, Nr. 249; not in Dodgson; F.T. Schulz in Thieme-Becker XXXIII, pag. 353 Watermark: High Crown Provenance: P. Davidsohn (Lugt 654) C.G. Boerner. Leipzig, auction CXXIX, 1920, no. 1647

Brilliant early impression of the composition formerly attributed to Dürer. With the Latin text, masthead and date 1515. Mese April on the reverse. With fine margins around the borderline. Impeccable. The composition was probably commissioned by the Nuremberg humanist Christo­ pher Scheurl and served as a frontispiece for the Latin first edition of the “ Epis­ tola Doctoris Scheurli ad Charitatem Abbatissam S. Clarae de laudibus familiae Pyrckheymer…”, where it also figures as final sheet with the colophon on the reverse, like in the present exemplar, as well as for the German edition of the “ Vierzig sendbriefe aus dem Latein ins Teutsch gezogen, durch etlich gelert gots­ forchtig und gaistlich personen zueinander geschrieben…”. Both were published in 1515 by F. Peypus in Nuremberg, first the Latin edition in April, then the Ger­ man edition on July 25th, the festival in honor of St. Christopher. It is a collection of ecclesiastical letters of his uncle Sixtus Tucher to the abbess of the Nuremberg convent of St. Claire, Caritas, a sister of Willibald Pirckheimer, and Apolonia Tucher, the prioress of the convent, from 1498/99 until 1506. It concludes with a letter seeming like a tract about the right life and death, which Scheurl himself wrote to the whole convent of St. Claire in 1507 after his uncle’s death. Being initially connected to Dürer himself by Heller and Passavant, this portrait of the author showing the coat of arms of the Scheurl family on the left side and the coat of arms of the Tucher family on the right side, is considered the work of Wolf Traut, who cooperated very closely with Dürer on the woodcuts for the tri­ umphal arch. Very rare, as already emphasized in the auction catalogue for the Davidsohn-col­ lection in 1920.

196


87


JONAS UMBACH

88 Resting Shepherd with a Shawm.  

1624 Augsburg 1693

ca. 1675

Etching. 14,3 x 11,1 cm Nagler 149; Haas 206/I (von II) Provenance: Prince Liechtenstein

Exquisit impression showing the characteristics of a very first pull: uncleaned, rough plate edges and the distinctly visible foul biting particularly at the cows. According to the safe keeping in a former album of the Prince Liechtenstein col­ lection, in extremely fresh preservation; fixed at the corners onto the original support sheet. Nagler mentioned the artist’s etchings as brilliant and predominantly uncommon. Umbach certainly did an educational trip to The Netherlands. From his journey­ man years in Italy, considered by Haas as assured, namely Castiglione with his effects of light, Rosa regarding the subject and especially Claude Gellé with his compositional coherence and the serene, idyllic atmosphere mesmerized and thus crucially inf luenced the artist. In his independently formed, distinctive etchings, the artist achieved an extraor­ dinarily atmospheric, picturesque style by working directly on the plate. According to Haas, light and air seem to be versatile in these compositions, the shadows are momentary and can change with the light. Creating this way a special connectedness of figure and landscape, Umbach made his essential contribution to seventeenth-century South German printmaking as Schönfeld did for the art of painting.

198


88


JOHANNES VISSCHER

89 Abraham van der Hulst.  

1633 Haarlem – Amsterdam (?) 1692

After 1515

Engraving and etching. 49,1 x 34,4 cm Hollstein 131/II Watermark: Shield with bend under f leur de lis with countermark ADS

The impressive admiral’s portrait in a splendid deep black impression. The earliest available state, since only one impression before the text and the coat of arms and before the completion of the sea battle is referenced in the Fon­ dation Custodia, coll. F. Lugt. With delicate margins measuring 2 mm around the borderline. One or two tiny brown stains, otherwise in an impeccable freshness and brilliance. The greatest and surely the most important one among the engraved portraits by the artist was executed as a memorial sheet shortly after the death of the Dutch vice-admiral Abraham van der Hulst, who was hit by a an enemy musket ball on his f lagship “ Spiegel” on June 12 th, 1666, during the famous Four Days’ Battle against the English. His services for his country are praised by the following ver­ ses on the pedestal: So many times he defended the Dutch on the high seas Robbed the treasures of the West with his sword: The pirate flees from this Hercules-like leader, The Spanish and the wild Barbary fear him, Who fears no hell. Like the ocean’s miracle he stroke the Thames And the fleeing English with terror And victorious he took away the trophies. See this Dutch! This was his countenance; this was how he invaded his enemies, This is how he gave his soul to the sky and his bones to the earth. It is great and honorable to die for one’s country.

200


89


LUCAS VORSTERMAN

90 Peasants fighting over a Game of Cards.  

1595 Zaltbommel – Antwerpen 1675

ca. 1620

After P. Bruegel d. Ä. [After P. P. Rubens ?]

Etchnig and engraving. 42,8 x 52,1 cm Hollstein 126; Lebeer 89; Hollstein (After Bruegel) 128; New Hollstein (Bruegel) A 67 Provenance: K önig Friedrich August II. von Sachsen (Lugt 971) C. G. Boerner, Leipzig, sale CLVII, 1928, no. 1242

Exquisite impression of the very rare, large masterpiece. Printed in deep black without any wear. Of unsurpassable brilliancy and beauty. With the complete verses and the names of the artists at the bottom margin and with tiny margins beyond respectively. The usual vertical centerfold carefully smoothed down and perceptible only on verso. Except for some thin spots at the upper margin, perfect. The print reproduces one of the last compositions by P. Bruegel the Elder which was in the possession of his son Jan according to the dedication in the bottom margin. Perhaps Vorsterman worked after Bruegel’s original, or he possibly used a drawing or oil sketch executed by Rubens after Bruegel’s design because “Een gevegt van boeren, gemaakt naer een teekening van den oude Bruegel“ is men­ tioned in the estate inventory of Rubens in 1640. The etching style can be taken as one of the starting points for his [Vorstermans] technique in the twenties. (C. Schuckman) Set in the peasant genre by Bruegel, the subject of the quarrel as a result of drin­ king wine – anger as a result of gluttony – received a new sophisticated interpreta­ tion by the under title of the print which ignores the composition’s general morals. The everyday life figures of Bruegel’s estimated composition has been mythologically new interpreted with reference to the ancient pastorals as Titus and Melibaeus armed with threshing f lail and pitchfork having a fight while drin­ king, whereas Daphne, Baucis and Corydon are trying to calm them down.

202


LUCAS VORSTERMAN

90 Der Bauernstreit über ein Kartenspiel.

1595 Zaltbommel – Antwerpen 1675

Um 1620

Nach P. Bruegel d. Ä. [Nach P. P. Rubens ?]

Radierung und Kupferstich. 42,8 x 52,1 cm Hollstein 126; Lebeer 89; Hollstein (After Bruegel) 128; New Hollstein (Bruegel) A 67 Provenienz: König Friedrich August II. von Sachsen (Lugt 971) G. G. Boerner, Leipzig, Auktion CLVII, 1928, Nr. 1242

Exquisiter Abzug des großen Hauptblattes, vorzüglich, tiefschwarz, ohne jede Schwäche. Von unübertreff licher Brillanz und Schönheit. Mit dem vollständig erhaltenen Text-Tablett unter der Darstellung, bzw. mit hauchfeinem Papierrändchen um die Plattenkante. Die übliche Vertikalfalte sorgsam geglättet. Rückseitig bis auf geringfügige Papierausdünnungen am oberen Rand vom Lösen alter Falze, perfekt. Höchst selten in so schöner, strahlender Qualität. Der Stich reproduziert eine der letzten Kompositionen von P. Bruegel d.Ä., die sich, wie die Widmung im Unterrand besagt, im Besitz seines Sohnes Jan befand. Möglicherweise arbeitete Vorstermann unmittelbar nach dem heute verschollenen Original Bruegels, vielleicht aber auch nach einer Zeichnung oder Ölskizze, die Rubens nach Bruegels Entwurf angefertigt hatte. Zumindest wird 1640 im Nachlaßinventar von Rubens >Een gevegt van boeren, gemaakt naer een teekening van den oude Bruegel< erwähnt. The etching style can be taken as one of the starting points for his [Vorstermans] technique in the twenties. (C. Schuckman) Das von Bruegel im Bauernmillieu angesiedelte Thema des Streits als Folge des Weingenusses – die Todsünde des ,Zorn‘ als Folge der ,Völlerei‘ – erfährt durch die Bildunterschrift des Stiches eine gelehrte Umdeutung, die nichts von der ursprünglichen Moral ahnen läßt. Die Alltagsfiguren der wegen ihrer formalen Qualitäten geschätzten Komposition werden neu im mythologischen, der antiken Hirtenidylle entlehnten Sinn interpretiert als Titus und Melibaeus, die beim Trinken während des Kartenspiels mit Dreschf legel und Mistgabel aneinandergeraten sind, während Daphne, Baucis und Corydon die beiden zu besänftigen versuchen.

90

202


ANTONI WATERLOO

91 Landscapes.  

1609 Lille – Utrecht 1690

ca. 1640

Two Hermits The Mule Driver The Man sleeping beside a Road A River with rocky Banks The Chapel The Plank Bridge

Set of 6 plates. Etching. 12,4-12,9 x 14,4-14,9 cm Hollstein 47, 48, 49/I (of II), 50/II (of IV), 51-52/I (of II) Watermark: Partially foolscap Provenance: Earl Spencer, Althorp (Lugt 5130–5132, without stamp)

The today seldom complete set. Throughout in the earliest possible states. Only Hollstein 50 in the second state, since the first state – before the name of Waterloo – exists as an unique impression in Hamburg only. Extremely fine impressions printed in deep black ink. Partially on paper with the watermark foolscap, mentioned by P. Morse for earliest impressions. Before the later printing by Basan. All with tiny margins or cut on the platemark. Printed with slight platetone. Plate 5 with some brown spots visible only on verso, otherwise perfect and fresh.

206


91


91


91


INDEX OF ARTISTS J. van Aken H. Aldegrever

1

P. de Jode II

55

2 – 4

C. W. Kolbe

56, 57

A. Altdorfer

5

H. Lautensack

58

E. Aman-Jean

6

L. van Leyden 

59

7

L. van Leyden -›

A. Andreani

8

Anonym8

J. Lievens

60

H. Baldung Grien 

9, 10

M. Lorch

61

H. S. Beham

11-16

Michelangelo -›

61

J.-J. de Boissieu

17, 18

Monogrammist FG

62 63

F. Bol

19

J. H. Muller

G. Bonasone

20

F. Overbeck -›

66

P. Bril

21

G. Pencz -›

64, 65

P. Bruegel -›

90

F. Piloty 

J. Callot

22

F. Piranesi

23

G. B. Piranesi

69

A. Pond 

70

A. A. J. Cardon

66 67, 68

G. B. Castiglione

24 – 27

D. V. Coornhert

28

Rembrandt

71 – 76

63

J. de Ribera

77

B. Rode 

78

C. Cornelisz. Van Haarlem -› J.-B.-C. Corot

29 – 31

C. van Dalen

32

R. Roghman

79

J. A. Darnstedt

33

G. Romano -›

20

J. Sadeler

80

L.-J. Desprez

67, 68

L. de Deyster

34

H. Schäufelein

81, 82

A.-L.-R. Ducros

35

C. van Sichem

83

36

H. Springinklee

K. Dujardin

84, 85

G. D. Tiepolo

86

W. Traut 

87

G. Flinck -›32

J. Umbach

88

C. Gellée, Le Lorrain

45 – 49

G. da Udine -›

62

S. Gessner -›

56, 57

F. Vanni -› 7

M. Gheeraerts -›

80

T. Vincidor -›

62

H. Goltzius

50

J. Visscher

89

H. Goltzius -›

83

G. Volpato

35

P. Rodelstedt gen. Gottland 

51

L. Vorsterman

90

A. Waterloo

91

A. Watteau -›

23

A. Dürer  A. van Dyck -›

F. de Goya

37 – 44 55

52, 53

B. di Antonio Grassi Verlag 

54

M. van Heemskerck -›

28

Catalogue: Michael Weis

210


VERKAUFSBEDINGUNGEN Die Echtheit aller Graphikblätter wird ohne Einschränkung garantiert. Rückgaberecht bei Nachweis von Mängeln gegenüber Katalogangaben. Die Preise verstehen sich in Euro und sind Nettopreise. Bei Zahlung in ­fremder Währung gilt der uns auf dem Konto gutgeschriebene Euro-Betrag als geleistete Zahlung. (Bankkonto bei der Frankfurter Volksbank e.G., Börsenstraße 1, D-60313 Frankfurt am Main, BLZ 501 900 00, Konto 144100) EU-Standardüberweisung: IBAN: DE85 5019 0000 0000 1441 00, BIC (SWIFT): FFVBDEFF Der Galerie unbekannte Kunden bitten wir um Referenzangaben. Ansichtssendungen werden gerne ausgeführt, müssen jedoch 3 Tage nach Erhalt zurückgeschickt werden. Festbestellungen haben Priorität. Versand auf Kosten und Gefahr des Bestellers. Versicherung zu seinen Lasten. Alle Waren bleiben bis zur vollständigen Bezahlung unser Eigentum (§449 BGB). Erfüllungsort und ausschließlicher Gerichtsstand ist Frankfurt am Main.

CONDITIONS OF SALE The authenticity of all items is unconditionally guaranteed. If any print is found to be inaccurately described it will be taken back. The prices are payable in Euro and are net. If payment is made in foreign currency, only the amount in Euro is current, which is credited to our account at: Frankfurter Volksbank eG, Börsenstraße 1, D 60313 Frankfurt am Main, BLZ 501 900 00, account no. 144100 (IBAN: DE85 5019 0000 0000 1441 00, BIC (SWIFT): FFVBDEFF) Foreign clients are requested to remit payment net of bank charges. Items will be sent on approval to institutions or clients known to us, but must be returned within 3 days of receipt. Firm orders will take precedence. The client is liable for all costs and risks of shipping, including transit insurance. Title is reserved until complete payment of good (§449 Civil Code of Germany) If any dispute arises, the Court in Frankfurt is competent for both parties.

P. S. Rumbler

International Fine Print Dealers Association


H. H. RUMBLER

H. H. RUMBLER 2017 · KATALOG 51

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Kunsthandlung Helmut H. Rumbler: Catalogue 51 | 2017 | Kaleidoskope (EN)  

Kunsthandlung Helmut H. Rumbler: Catalogue 51 | 2017 | Kaleidoskope (EN)