Page 1

For Teachers and Parents

stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps.

Dear Grownups : Welcome to the NSO Kinderkonzerts, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to musical instruments of the orchestra. Please help your young concertgoers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience. The Concert Program The quartet will perform excerpts from the musical selections below (all written for string quartets). Before or after the concert, you may want to have the children listen to some or all of these musical selections if you have access to them in the library or online. Ask children to see whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time. String Quartet No. 12 in F major, “American,” movement 2. Lento (slow), by Antonin Dvorák ˘ (da-VOR-zhak)

Kinderkonzert

A Good Audience…

Have fun!

String Quartet No. 2 in C minor, movement 2. Allegro molto capriccioso (fast marching pace, unpredictable), by Béla Bartók (BAR-tock) "A Day in the Park" by David Teie and audience Quartettsatz (Movement for String Quartet) in C minor, D. 703, by Franz Schubert

More Fun With Music Here are some activities for children.

Complete the Song During the performance, the musicians change the song “If You’re Happy and You Know It” so that it describes what they feel and do. One is “If you’re nervous and you know it, shake your knees.” Before or after the performance, try it yourself. Fill in the blank: “If you’re happy and you know it, ____________ _______________ .” Then try choosing a word from the word bank on page 3 and thinking of an action to do: If you’re __________ and you know it, _________________ . With friends, take turns singing your new song lyrics.

Sound Check Before or after the performance, look around your classroom or home for different-sized plastic or cardboard containers that are the same shape. Turn them upside down and see how the sound changes when you tap them with a ruler or spoon.

Picture the Story During the music by Beethoven, the quartet tells a story or you imagine your own story. After the performance, draw a picture of something you saw in your “mind’s eye” as you listened. Share your drawings with a friend.

5

Michael M. Kaiser President

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director National Symphony Orchestra NSO Kinderkonzerts, Ensemble Concerts, and Children’s Concerts are supported in part by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Additional support is provided by the U.S. Department of Education, Verizon Foundation, Mr. Martin K. Alloy and Ms. Daris M. Clifton, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation, DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Fight for Children, The President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts, National Committee for the Performing Arts, and Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. J. Stolwijk.

Wait ! There’s More !

Divertimento in D Major, K. 136, “Salzburg Symphony No. 1,” movement 3. Presto (very fast), by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (MO-tzart) String Quartet No. 5 in A major, Op. 18, movement 3. Andante cantabile (walking pace and song-like), by Ludwig van Beethoven

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage. Pre-concert in Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Gifts and grants to the National Symphony Orchestra Education Programs are provided by Sandra K. and Clement C. Alpert; The Theodore H. Barth Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; Mrs. Diane Lipton Dennis; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Charles Engelhard Foundation; The Kiplinger Foundation; MLKA Foundation, Inc.; National Trustees of the National Symphony Orchestra; Park Foundation, Inc.; Mr. Albert H. Small; Washington Gas; the U.S. Department of Education; and the Myra and Leura Younker Endowment Fund.

“Preview ” the Concert Hall We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peak at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/nsoed.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please build on your Kinderkonzert experience by joining us at this season’s National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, which are performed by the full NSO:

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, a program of the Kennedy Center Education Department. ARTSEDGE is a part of Thinkfinity.org, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. www.artsedge.kennedy-center.org For more about the performing arts and arts education, visit the Kennedy Center’s Education Department online at www.kennedy-center.org/education The U.S. Department of Education supports approximately one-third of the budget for the Kennedy Center Education Department. The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

Ever wonder how music is made? Or why it sounds the way it does? Or how it makes us feel a certain way? You’re not the only one! At the concert, you and your friends will join four musicians from the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) to explore some of the wonders of music. Together, you’ll make music with friends…and that’s a really fun thing to do!

© 2010 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

The Trumpet and the Swan, March 27, 2011

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Beethoven Lives Upstairs, May 15, 2011

6

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Performed by The Kennedy String Quartet : Holly Hamilton, violin Jane Bowyer Stewart, violin James Deighan (pronounced DEE-gun), viola David Teie (pronounced TIE), cello

Hello, teachers and parent s! Please see page 5 for information and activities.


During the performance, the NSO musicians will help you see and hear how to put music together and how music can communicate feelings and stories. To help you get ready, here are some things to think about. Imagination

Directions

Inspiration

Feelings

Ever wonder whether music can tell a story?

Ever wonder how a composer writes a piece of music?

Ever wonder what it would be like to compose music?

Ever wonder why some music sounds sad or happy?

Composers (people who write music) tell musicians what notes to play. They also tell the musicians how to play them. Think about “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” Are there different ways you can sing it? How about fast? Slow? Loud? Soft? Composers use tools just like that. During the performance, the audience will help the musicians add directions to music—and just wait until you hear what happens.

Composers sometimes start with an inspiration, or a good idea, before they write music. During the performance, you get to be the composer with good ideas! You, the audience, will decide who the story is about and where it takes place—then the musicians will create the music to match.

Composers have learned how to put music together so that it can make us feel a certain way. Songs with long, slow notes sometimes sound sad, and music with quick, rising notes (like when we laugh) can sound happy. The quartet will help you learn more about this, but to get ready, think of a song you know that makes you feel sad and one that makes you feel happy. Sing a little of both. How are the songs different?

The music in this performance doesn’t have any spoken words. But like most music, it is full of ideas—if you just use your imagination. To help you get started, the performers will play music by Beethoven and share the story their friend imagined when he heard it. His story is about a girl named Emily who doesn’t want to do her chores. At the concert, see whether you can picture this story, too, or if not, silently create your own story to go along with this music. (You can try this with any music you hear!)

Extra Credit

Fun Fact

Surprised Scared _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart started his musical career when he was very young! He could play the violin when he was 4 years old, and he wrote his first music when he was 5. During the performance, you’ll hear the quartet play music written by Mozart. Mozart thought this music would sound good at a party.

What do you think?

2

The Musical Team

Look at the instruments played by the quartet— two violins, one viola, and one cello. They all are made of wood and have strings. Musicians play them by using a bow (a stick of wood with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand.

The four musician friends in the Kennedy String Quartet have played together for more than 10 years. They got together to play music written just for string quartets (like all the music you’ll hear at the concert) and to help introduce people like you to what makes music fun.

3

They are also a team. When you play on a team, you work together as a group to do more than you can by yourselves, right? It’s the same with the quartet and music. The musicians play different parts that work together to make music with different sounds, moods, and feelings. And to perform together well, they need to communicate, but they can’t talk during the music. So watch how they communicate silently, like watching each other to know when to start playing.

But these instruments are not exactly the same— they are different sizes. That means they sound a little different. The smaller the instrument, the higher the sound it makes. Guess which instrument will sound the highest and which will sound the lowest?

Viola

During the performance, think of words that describe the feeling the different music gives. Use this word bank for help. Feel free to add your own words on the blank lines.

Happy Sad Bad Silly Funny Shy Calm Playful

The Beethoven music has a pattern (called a theme) that repeats a few times. The first time you can hear it is at the very beginning of the piece. See whether you can hear it again later in the music. (Hint: Listen for the 7 notes that sound like they are slowly going “down,” followed by 6 notes going “up,” then 6 notes going back “down.”)

Meet the Instruments

Cello

Violin

Try This ! During the music by Schubert, close your eyes and listen for a few moments. Can you identify the sound of each instrument as the quartet plays together? (It’s okay to peek to check.)

Jane (violin), Holly (violin), David (cello), and Jim (viola) play together as the Kennedy String Quartet. A “string quartet” is a group of four musicians who all play stringed instruments.

4


During the performance, the NSO musicians will help you see and hear how to put music together and how music can communicate feelings and stories. To help you get ready, here are some things to think about. Imagination

Directions

Inspiration

Feelings

Ever wonder whether music can tell a story?

Ever wonder how a composer writes a piece of music?

Ever wonder what it would be like to compose music?

Ever wonder why some music sounds sad or happy?

Composers (people who write music) tell musicians what notes to play. They also tell the musicians how to play them. Think about “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” Are there different ways you can sing it? How about fast? Slow? Loud? Soft? Composers use tools just like that. During the performance, the audience will help the musicians add directions to music—and just wait until you hear what happens.

Composers sometimes start with an inspiration, or a good idea, before they write music. During the performance, you get to be the composer with good ideas! You, the audience, will decide who the story is about and where it takes place—then the musicians will create the music to match.

Composers have learned how to put music together so that it can make us feel a certain way. Songs with long, slow notes sometimes sound sad, and music with quick, rising notes (like when we laugh) can sound happy. The quartet will help you learn more about this, but to get ready, think of a song you know that makes you feel sad and one that makes you feel happy. Sing a little of both. How are the songs different?

The music in this performance doesn’t have any spoken words. But like most music, it is full of ideas—if you just use your imagination. To help you get started, the performers will play music by Beethoven and share the story their friend imagined when he heard it. His story is about a girl named Emily who doesn’t want to do her chores. At the concert, see whether you can picture this story, too, or if not, silently create your own story to go along with this music. (You can try this with any music you hear!)

Extra Credit

Fun Fact

Surprised Scared _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart started his musical career when he was very young! He could play the violin when he was 4 years old, and he wrote his first music when he was 5. During the performance, you’ll hear the quartet play music written by Mozart. Mozart thought this music would sound good at a party.

What do you think?

2

The Musical Team

Look at the instruments played by the quartet— two violins, one viola, and one cello. They all are made of wood and have strings. Musicians play them by using a bow (a stick of wood with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand.

The four musician friends in the Kennedy String Quartet have played together for more than 10 years. They got together to play music written just for string quartets (like all the music you’ll hear at the concert) and to help introduce people like you to what makes music fun.

3

They are also a team. When you play on a team, you work together as a group to do more than you can by yourselves, right? It’s the same with the quartet and music. The musicians play different parts that work together to make music with different sounds, moods, and feelings. And to perform together well, they need to communicate, but they can’t talk during the music. So watch how they communicate silently, like watching each other to know when to start playing.

But these instruments are not exactly the same— they are different sizes. That means they sound a little different. The smaller the instrument, the higher the sound it makes. Guess which instrument will sound the highest and which will sound the lowest?

Viola

During the performance, think of words that describe the feeling the different music gives. Use this word bank for help. Feel free to add your own words on the blank lines.

Happy Sad Bad Silly Funny Shy Calm Playful

The Beethoven music has a pattern (called a theme) that repeats a few times. The first time you can hear it is at the very beginning of the piece. See whether you can hear it again later in the music. (Hint: Listen for the 7 notes that sound like they are slowly going “down,” followed by 6 notes going “up,” then 6 notes going back “down.”)

Meet the Instruments

Cello

Violin

Try This ! During the music by Schubert, close your eyes and listen for a few moments. Can you identify the sound of each instrument as the quartet plays together? (It’s okay to peek to check.)

Jane (violin), Holly (violin), David (cello), and Jim (viola) play together as the Kennedy String Quartet. A “string quartet” is a group of four musicians who all play stringed instruments.

4


During the performance, the NSO musicians will help you see and hear how to put music together and how music can communicate feelings and stories. To help you get ready, here are some things to think about. Imagination

Directions

Inspiration

Feelings

Ever wonder whether music can tell a story?

Ever wonder how a composer writes a piece of music?

Ever wonder what it would be like to compose music?

Ever wonder why some music sounds sad or happy?

Composers (people who write music) tell musicians what notes to play. They also tell the musicians how to play them. Think about “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” Are there different ways you can sing it? How about fast? Slow? Loud? Soft? Composers use tools just like that. During the performance, the audience will help the musicians add directions to music—and just wait until you hear what happens.

Composers sometimes start with an inspiration, or a good idea, before they write music. During the performance, you get to be the composer with good ideas! You, the audience, will decide who the story is about and where it takes place—then the musicians will create the music to match.

Composers have learned how to put music together so that it can make us feel a certain way. Songs with long, slow notes sometimes sound sad, and music with quick, rising notes (like when we laugh) can sound happy. The quartet will help you learn more about this, but to get ready, think of a song you know that makes you feel sad and one that makes you feel happy. Sing a little of both. How are the songs different?

The music in this performance doesn’t have any spoken words. But like most music, it is full of ideas—if you just use your imagination. To help you get started, the performers will play music by Beethoven and share the story their friend imagined when he heard it. His story is about a girl named Emily who doesn’t want to do her chores. At the concert, see whether you can picture this story, too, or if not, silently create your own story to go along with this music. (You can try this with any music you hear!)

Extra Credit

Fun Fact

Surprised Scared _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart started his musical career when he was very young! He could play the violin when he was 4 years old, and he wrote his first music when he was 5. During the performance, you’ll hear the quartet play music written by Mozart. Mozart thought this music would sound good at a party.

What do you think?

2

The Musical Team

Look at the instruments played by the quartet— two violins, one viola, and one cello. They all are made of wood and have strings. Musicians play them by using a bow (a stick of wood with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand.

The four musician friends in the Kennedy String Quartet have played together for more than 10 years. They got together to play music written just for string quartets (like all the music you’ll hear at the concert) and to help introduce people like you to what makes music fun.

3

They are also a team. When you play on a team, you work together as a group to do more than you can by yourselves, right? It’s the same with the quartet and music. The musicians play different parts that work together to make music with different sounds, moods, and feelings. And to perform together well, they need to communicate, but they can’t talk during the music. So watch how they communicate silently, like watching each other to know when to start playing.

But these instruments are not exactly the same— they are different sizes. That means they sound a little different. The smaller the instrument, the higher the sound it makes. Guess which instrument will sound the highest and which will sound the lowest?

Viola

During the performance, think of words that describe the feeling the different music gives. Use this word bank for help. Feel free to add your own words on the blank lines.

Happy Sad Bad Silly Funny Shy Calm Playful

The Beethoven music has a pattern (called a theme) that repeats a few times. The first time you can hear it is at the very beginning of the piece. See whether you can hear it again later in the music. (Hint: Listen for the 7 notes that sound like they are slowly going “down,” followed by 6 notes going “up,” then 6 notes going back “down.”)

Meet the Instruments

Cello

Violin

Try This ! During the music by Schubert, close your eyes and listen for a few moments. Can you identify the sound of each instrument as the quartet plays together? (It’s okay to peek to check.)

Jane (violin), Holly (violin), David (cello), and Jim (viola) play together as the Kennedy String Quartet. A “string quartet” is a group of four musicians who all play stringed instruments.

4


For Teachers and Parents

stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps.

Dear Grownups : Welcome to the NSO Kinderkonzerts, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to musical instruments of the orchestra. Please help your young concertgoers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience. The Concert Program The quartet will perform excerpts from the musical selections below (all written for string quartets). Before or after the concert, you may want to have the children listen to some or all of these musical selections if you have access to them in the library or online. Ask children to see whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time. String Quartet No. 12 in F major, “American,” movement 2. Lento (slow), by Antonin Dvorák ˘ (da-VOR-zhak)

Kinderkonzert

A Good Audience…

Have fun!

String Quartet No. 2 in C minor, movement 2. Allegro molto capriccioso (fast marching pace, unpredictable), by Béla Bartók (BAR-tock) "A Day in the Park" by David Teie and audience Quartettsatz (Movement for String Quartet) in C minor, D. 703, by Franz Schubert

More Fun With Music Here are some activities for children.

Complete the Song During the performance, the musicians change the song “If You’re Happy and You Know It” so that it describes what they feel and do. One is “If you’re nervous and you know it, shake your knees.” Before or after the performance, try it yourself. Fill in the blank: “If you’re happy and you know it, ____________ _______________ .” Then try choosing a word from the word bank on page 3 and thinking of an action to do: If you’re __________ and you know it, _________________ . With friends, take turns singing your new song lyrics.

Sound Check Before or after the performance, look around your classroom or home for different-sized plastic or cardboard containers that are the same shape. Turn them upside down and see how the sound changes when you tap them with a ruler or spoon.

Picture the Story During the music by Beethoven, the quartet tells a story or you imagine your own story. After the performance, draw a picture of something you saw in your “mind’s eye” as you listened. Share your drawings with a friend.

5

Michael M. Kaiser President

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director National Symphony Orchestra NSO Kinderkonzerts, Ensemble Concerts, and Children’s Concerts are supported in part by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Additional support is provided by the U.S. Department of Education, Verizon Foundation, Mr. Martin K. Alloy and Ms. Daris M. Clifton, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation, DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Fight for Children, The President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts, National Committee for the Performing Arts, and Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. J. Stolwijk.

Wait ! There’s More !

Divertimento in D Major, K. 136, “Salzburg Symphony No. 1,” movement 3. Presto (very fast), by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (MO-tzart) String Quartet No. 5 in A major, Op. 18, movement 3. Andante cantabile (walking pace and song-like), by Ludwig van Beethoven

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage. Pre-concert in Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Gifts and grants to the National Symphony Orchestra Education Programs are provided by Sandra K. and Clement C. Alpert; The Theodore H. Barth Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; Mrs. Diane Lipton Dennis; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Charles Engelhard Foundation; The Kiplinger Foundation; MLKA Foundation, Inc.; National Trustees of the National Symphony Orchestra; Park Foundation, Inc.; Mr. Albert H. Small; Washington Gas; the U.S. Department of Education; and the Myra and Leura Younker Endowment Fund.

“Preview ” the Concert Hall We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peak at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/nsoed.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please build on your Kinderkonzert experience by joining us at this season’s National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, which are performed by the full NSO:

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, a program of the Kennedy Center Education Department. ARTSEDGE is a part of Thinkfinity.org, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. www.artsedge.kennedy-center.org For more about the performing arts and arts education, visit the Kennedy Center’s Education Department online at www.kennedy-center.org/education The U.S. Department of Education supports approximately one-third of the budget for the Kennedy Center Education Department. The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

Ever wonder how music is made? Or why it sounds the way it does? Or how it makes us feel a certain way? You’re not the only one! At the concert, you and your friends will join four musicians from the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) to explore some of the wonders of music. Together, you’ll make music with friends…and that’s a really fun thing to do!

© 2010 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

The Trumpet and the Swan, March 27, 2011

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Beethoven Lives Upstairs, May 15, 2011

6

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Performed by The Kennedy String Quartet : Holly Hamilton, violin Jane Bowyer Stewart, violin James Deighan (pronounced DEE-gun), viola David Teie (pronounced TIE), cello

Hello, teachers and parent s! Please see page 5 for information and activities.


For Teachers and Parents

stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps.

Dear Grownups : Welcome to the NSO Kinderkonzerts, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to musical instruments of the orchestra. Please help your young concertgoers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience. The Concert Program The quartet will perform excerpts from the musical selections below (all written for string quartets). Before or after the concert, you may want to have the children listen to some or all of these musical selections if you have access to them in the library or online. Ask children to see whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time. String Quartet No. 12 in F major, “American,” movement 2. Lento (slow), by Antonin Dvorák ˘ (da-VOR-zhak)

Kinderkonzert

A Good Audience…

Have fun!

String Quartet No. 2 in C minor, movement 2. Allegro molto capriccioso (fast marching pace, unpredictable), by Béla Bartók (BAR-tock) "A Day in the Park" by David Teie and audience Quartettsatz (Movement for String Quartet) in C minor, D. 703, by Franz Schubert

More Fun With Music Here are some activities for children.

Complete the Song During the performance, the musicians change the song “If You’re Happy and You Know It” so that it describes what they feel and do. One is “If you’re nervous and you know it, shake your knees.” Before or after the performance, try it yourself. Fill in the blank: “If you’re happy and you know it, ____________ _______________ .” Then try choosing a word from the word bank on page 3 and thinking of an action to do: If you’re __________ and you know it, _________________ . With friends, take turns singing your new song lyrics.

Sound Check Before or after the performance, look around your classroom or home for different-sized plastic or cardboard containers that are the same shape. Turn them upside down and see how the sound changes when you tap them with a ruler or spoon.

Picture the Story During the music by Beethoven, the quartet tells a story or you imagine your own story. After the performance, draw a picture of something you saw in your “mind’s eye” as you listened. Share your drawings with a friend.

5

Michael M. Kaiser President

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director National Symphony Orchestra NSO Kinderkonzerts, Ensemble Concerts, and Children’s Concerts are supported in part by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Additional support is provided by the U.S. Department of Education, Verizon Foundation, Mr. Martin K. Alloy and Ms. Daris M. Clifton, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation, DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Fight for Children, The President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts, National Committee for the Performing Arts, and Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. J. Stolwijk.

Wait ! There’s More !

Divertimento in D Major, K. 136, “Salzburg Symphony No. 1,” movement 3. Presto (very fast), by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (MO-tzart) String Quartet No. 5 in A major, Op. 18, movement 3. Andante cantabile (walking pace and song-like), by Ludwig van Beethoven

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage. Pre-concert in Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Gifts and grants to the National Symphony Orchestra Education Programs are provided by Sandra K. and Clement C. Alpert; The Theodore H. Barth Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; Mrs. Diane Lipton Dennis; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Charles Engelhard Foundation; The Kiplinger Foundation; MLKA Foundation, Inc.; National Trustees of the National Symphony Orchestra; Park Foundation, Inc.; Mr. Albert H. Small; Washington Gas; the U.S. Department of Education; and the Myra and Leura Younker Endowment Fund.

“Preview ” the Concert Hall We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peak at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/nsoed.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please build on your Kinderkonzert experience by joining us at this season’s National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, which are performed by the full NSO:

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, a program of the Kennedy Center Education Department. ARTSEDGE is a part of Thinkfinity.org, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. www.artsedge.kennedy-center.org For more about the performing arts and arts education, visit the Kennedy Center’s Education Department online at www.kennedy-center.org/education The U.S. Department of Education supports approximately one-third of the budget for the Kennedy Center Education Department. The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

Ever wonder how music is made? Or why it sounds the way it does? Or how it makes us feel a certain way? You’re not the only one! At the concert, you and your friends will join four musicians from the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) to explore some of the wonders of music. Together, you’ll make music with friends…and that’s a really fun thing to do!

© 2010 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

The Trumpet and the Swan, March 27, 2011

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Beethoven Lives Upstairs, May 15, 2011

6

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Performed by The Kennedy String Quartet : Holly Hamilton, violin Jane Bowyer Stewart, violin James Deighan (pronounced DEE-gun), viola David Teie (pronounced TIE), cello

Hello, teachers and parent s! Please see page 5 for information and activities.

Making Music with Friends: National Symphony Orchestra Kinderkonzert  

Ever wonder how music is made? Or why it sounds the way it does? Or how it makes us feel a certain way? You’re not the only one! Check out t...

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