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NEWS + POLITICS + ENTERTAINMENT / MARCH 7, 2013 / ARKTIMES.COM

Kathleen Sebelius helps Gov. Beebe help the Arkansas ledge help the working poor. PAGE 14


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COMMENT

‘Robin Hood in reverse’ The recent budget cuts prove that Regressives are so out of touch with the people that they will sacrifice us for their pig-headed principles. They spent decades destroying primary education to the point of creating an Idiocracy of drooling, slack-jawed morons, and now those morons are in charge. And you people put them there because you don’t understand history. FDR used a lot of borrowed money to bring us out of the Depression, but all progress was lost in the mid’30s when the Austerity Movement brought about by bankers pulled the funding from the New Deal programs that got the country back on track. We went into the deepest recession ever seen in 1938 because of their shortsightedness, and only Lend-Lease and World War Two pulled us out of it. Now the Teabaggers have closed their eyes to history, and, as usual, the little guy suffers. Congressmen are wealthy. Congressmen won’t lose anything. The victims will be small business, the military, teachers, students, and the poor. It’s Robin Hood in reverse. It reminds me of a year ago when drooling, slack-jawed morons stood on street corners yelling “NO HEALTH CARE!” Lord, how stupid can you people be? The stock market continues to climb, proving once again that the rich grease the treads of their tanks with the guts of the working class. Here in Arkansas the drooling, slack-jawed morons in the statehouse are at war with progressive thinking.

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ARKANSAS TIMES

Where are Fulbright, Pryor, Bumpers, Mills, Robinson and McClellan when we need them? James King Roland

Creepy legislation This is my list of four of the creepiest pieces of Republican legislation now being proposed at the Arkansas 89th Assembly. And I’m not including all the predictable anti-abortion bills, voter I.D. bills, guns in church/school bills or unemployment pee-test bills. These bills are even creepier. HB 1348. A version of Oklahoma’s Anti-Sharia legislation quietly inserted into the current Arkansas legislative session. Kinder, gentler language with the same xenophobic overtones of the Oklahoma law. HP 1352. Allows for the allocation of state money from the Arkansas Better Chance Program to private religious schools. And don’t just give it to them any old time. Give it to them now. HR 1004. A resolution recognizing “the many contributions made by citizens of the Republic of Azerbaijan” that mentions the bravery of the Azerbaijanis during Khajoly massacre in all the “whereas” sections of the resolution, and mentions that Arkansas welcomes all those who come in friendship and commerce. Is it just coincidence that Azerbaijan happens to have the richest oil fields in the world right now? With big oil companies like BP and Exxon/Mobil given 30-year contracts to drill there? Or that Azerbaijan has rich mineral deposits in the lesser Caucasus? Has anyone made note of the fact that Azerbaijan has

come under heavy criticism from international bodies such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch for its record on human rights, in particular the treatment of homosexuals and the media? Not content to just pass this resolution, sponsor Rep. Jonathan Barnett wants a copy of it sent to the U.S. speaker of the House, the president, the U.S. secretary of state, the Arkansas congressional delegation and the U.S. ambassador to Azerbaijan. Can you kiss any more butt than that? If so, relay the info to Representative Barnett. I’m sure he’ll look into it. SR 2: It basically states that Israel was given its land by God himself because the Old Testament says so. And because Israel has been such a great pal of the U.S. and because we both have so much in common, it’s just hard to tell where one ends and the other begins. So we need to show our love to Israel by supporting its every policy and action. I can’t help but wonder how many of these and other 89th Assembly bills were handed down as models from the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). In a December 2011 opinion piece in The Nation magazine, John Nichols described ALEC as a “collaboration between multinational corporations and conservative state legislators.” In May 2012, Brendan Greely wrote in BusinessWeek that “part of ALEC’s mission is to present industry-backed legislation as grassroots work.” Seriously! Who’s running the show? Arkansans or the Koch brothers? Brad Bailey Fayetteville

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More bike safety measures Due to recent accidents, I have become concerned over the issue of bicycle safety in Little Rock. With increased participation in the sport, it is important that this issue be taken care of now versus later. I want to praise the city for maintaining the River Trail, but avid bicyclists have become bored with the same trails every day. Shared lane markings, or sharrows, are symbols painted on the road that consist of a bicycle and arrows pointing the way of traffic. Sharrows are intended to warn road users that bicyclists are sharing the road and traveling a certain direction. The Bicycle Advocacy Club of Arkansas has an online petition to the city to try and get these sharrows on busy roads. Increasing bicycle safety awareness is important and can provide benefits such as making Little Rock a more desirable destination for bicyclists and tourists, further increasing economic development downtown. Currently, Arkansas is ranked 50 out of 50 for bicycle-friendly communities and this embarrassing title should motivate city officials to think about installing these cheap fixes. Brisa Bartczak North Little Rock

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EDITORIAL

Pound foolish

ou didn’t need to be a psychic to anticipate that a consultant hired by two institutions that want to merge would conclude that merger is highly desirable. It would have been a great surprise had the consultant reported back to his patrons “Hey guys, this is a terrible idea. Forget about it and move on. You really should have been able to figure this one out by yourself. Maybe we’ll return some of those consultant fees. Maybe not.” Everyone should be suspicious of the consultant’s finding that a merger of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, a public institution, and St. Vincent Health System, a Roman Catholic institution, would save the combined institutions $38 million to $63 million annually. St. Vincent and UAMS commissioned the study to get results like this. But even if the alleged saving was found to be authentic, it would still be irrelevant. This proposed merger is not about dollars and cents. It’s about freedom, and you can’t put a price tag on that, not in this country. The USA was founded on the principle of religious freedom, on separation of church and state. Public tax dollars may not, must not, be used to support sectarian institutions — hospitals, schools, monasteries, what have you. Religious dogma must not be allowed to dictate public policy, to impose birth-control restrictions in public hospitals, to influence instruction at public teaching hospitals. One of the Catholic church’s oldest arguments for getting public money for parochial schools is that if the parochial schools closed, the public schools would have to educate those children using public money only; that the parochial schools are in fact saving money for the taxpayers. Again, the argument is irrelevant, as is the argument that some or all of the parochial schools provide education that is as good as or better than that at some or all of the public schools. The founders of the republic believed, and rightly, that no citizen should be forced to support a religion that was not his own. They were willing to pay to prevent it. So should we be. A combined UAMS-St. Vincent could not operate without violating the boundaries between church and state. Even proponents admit the merger could not take place without the approval of church authorities. What would be the quid pro quo? We doubt the Pope would submit to examination by the Legislative Joint Auditing Committee. The old saying about a cynic is that he knows the price of everything and the value of nothing. The proposed UAMS-St. Vincent merger is a highly cynical venture. If merger of two hospitals at Little Rock is needed for cost efficiency, let St. Vincent and Baptist Health get together. The community needs one hospital that provides non-sectarian medical treatment, where priests and preachers do not make the rules.

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MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

Y

EYE ON ARKANSAS

WHERE IN ARKANSAS?: Know where this slice of life in Arkansas is? Send along the answer to Times photographer Brian Chilson and win a prize. Once a month in this space, we’ll post a shot from a relatively obscure spot in Arkansas for Times readers to identify. We also invite photographers to contribute submissions of both mystery and other pictures to our eyeonarkansas Flickr group. Write to brianchilson@arktimes.com to guess this week’s photo or for more information.

A civil rights sequel

M

aybe you read the article here about the battle to integrate the state Capitol cafeteria. That was in 1964. These days, we shake our heads at state officials who believed, even then, that a public facility inside the state Capitol could stay segregated forever. But customs can still beget blindness, especially among those whom they comfort. The fact that some comforts rest upon the denial of others’ civil rights can still pass unnoticed by those in power. Consider a more current blindness. Instead of the capitol cafeteria, this involved a custom of the Arkansas Supreme Court. Instead of citizens being denied service at a state institution, a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment, they were denied free speech by a state institution, in violation of the First. Just as state police once enforced segregation, the state Supreme Court has silenced discussion of complaints filed against attorneys. No kicks, punches or billy clubs were needed to enforce the prohibition. The Supreme Court sustained its custom with power uniquely its own. The judicial system is self-regulating, under the Supreme Court’s control. Attorneys and members of the general public may file complaints against attorneys whom they believe have acted unethically. The court’s rules required that complaints be kept confidential. Persons who filed a complaint about an attorney with the court’s Office on Professional Conduct were immediately informed of this by mail. Anyone violating that rule, the letter warned, could be found in contempt of court and fined or jailed. You can see how such a caution, delivered on “Supreme Court of Arkansas” letterhead, might be intimidating, and how it could tend to stifle discussion of lawyers who might be running for office. The rule on confidentiality arose from an effort to protect attorneys from the need to defend themselves from frivolous complaints that became publicly known. Most attorneys appreciate that. Few questioned the requirement for them to report misbehavior — but not to disclose it publicly—as the need to maintain confidence in courts was drummed into them at law schools and reinforced by sessions on ethics. The problem is that, while this rule comforted the profession, it came at the public’s expense. I learned

this firsthand after filing complaints with the Office of Professional Conduct and receiving those not-so-nice warnings. It all struck me as wrong. But when I wrote of my concerns MARA about the rule’s constitutionalLEVERITT ity to Stark Ligon, the office’s GUEST COLUMNIST director, I received no response. In November 2011, I filed a civil rights lawsuit challenging the Supreme Court’s rule. My attorney, Jeff Rosenzweig, argued in federal court that the rule was an unconstitutional restraint of speech. The Arkansas attorney general’s office represented Ligon and the court’s Committee on Professional Conduct. A trial was scheduled for later this year. But at the end of last year, we agreed to settle out of court. I dropped my lawsuit in January, after the Supreme Court ordered one brief (but big) change to its rules: Now, “a complainant may disclose the fact that he or she has submitted a complaint to the Office of Professional Conduct and the contents of the complaint.” What Ligon’s office does with a complaint will still remain confidential, unless a sanction is issued, in which case that action is public. But for the first time, attorneys and ordinary citizens are free to report behavior they consider unethical and to speak and write of it without fear of court-imposed punishment. I hope the commission that regulates judges will announce a similar change soon. And, like the cafeteria, I hope this overdue freedom will be used. Exercising it will not transform the quality of justice in Arkansas, any more than integrating the Capitol’s cafeteria transformed race relations here. But both changes mark a start. At last, elections of prosecutors and judges may become more open and informed — as the First Amendment intended. The change will make some folks uncomfortable. But, like the integration of the cafeteria, Arkansas will survive.

Max Brantley is on vacation.


OPINION

Cheer the exchange, lament the higher cost

I

f you followed the tumult over implementing the part of health insurance reform that covers Arkansas’s poor working people, the big Republican victory last week must have you fighting contrary impulses, whether to weep or cheer. Cheer is the right reaction, unless you are one of those taxpayers who frets that the government is spending too much of your money on the freeloading poor who do not earn enough money to buy their own insurance. Then lamentations may be in order. The tax bill for insuring the working poor is going up, not down, thanks to the Republican initiative that Gov. Beebe last week persuaded the Obama administration to accept. Before commiserating with the weepers, let’s explain why, to most people, the Republican legislators have done a good thing, even if for the wrong reason. Guaranteeing ready access to medical care for up to 250,000 low-income adults next January will be a huge gain for Arkansas, which has one of the unhealthiest populations in the country

by every measure, and now that coverage seems nearly assured. Only 10 days ago, it appeared that ERNEST a minority of the DUMAS legislature, mostly Republicans, would stand in the way because they had run against “Obamacare” and vowed to block whatever part they could from taking effect in Arkansas. They may still block insurance for that last segment of people, but that is a more remote prospect today. When the issue was whether to extend Medicaid to all adults below 138 percent of the poverty line — an option the U.S. Supreme Court said the states had — authorizing the expenditure of the federal grant funds to do that required the votes of threefourths of the legislature. Republican leaders implied that if those people, rather than sign up for Medicaid, were required to buy insurance on the new exchanges like everyone else, even if the federal gov-

Centrist enablers

R

epublican strategy during the sequestration fight depends upon two political givens: widespread public ignorance, and the extreme reluctance of the traditional Washington news media to exhibit “liberal bias” by stressing inconvenient facts. After all, aren’t “both sides” equally responsible for the current budgetary impasse? And shouldn’t President Obama lead by making the GOP the proverbial offer it can’t refuse? Exactly what such an offer might consist of remains vague. Mostly, it’s coulda, shoulda, woulda stuff from celebrity pundits like Bob Woodward, the Washington Post editor who spent much of last week on national TV demonstrating that he can’t distinguish a warning from an apology. “You do not ever have to apologize to me,” Woodward had responded to an allegedly intimidating e-mail from longtime White House source, Gene Sperling. “I also welcome your personal advice. I am listening.” Wow, that must have been scary! Faced with incredulity after the inoffensive e-mail became public, Woodward alibied that he’d never exactly called it threatening. Which begs the question of why he was talking about it on TV. Look, people frequently wander into newspaper offices describing government plots against them — often spelled out in all caps, with lots of

red ink underlining and rows of exclamation points. Most often they’re gently shown the door. But I digress. GENE Sperling’s point was LYONS that Woodward was completely off-base in saying President Obama had “moved the goal posts” by seeking to close tax loopholes enabling guys like Mitt Romney to pay lower income tax rates than his wife’s horse trainers. Could there be anybody in America who didn’t know that? Certainly not Bill Keller. To the New York Times editor, Obama’s big sin was building “a re-election campaign that was long on making the wealthiest pay more in taxes, short on spending discipline, and firmly hands-off on the problem of entitlements.” Keller thinks that had President Obama campaigned on Simpson-Bowles-style austerity so beloved of “centrist” pundits whose own finances are secure, “he could now claim a mandate from voters to do something big and bold.” Instead, a weakened president now sounds “helpless, if not acquiescent.” True, Keller does concede that “much of the responsibility for our perpetual crisis can be laid at the feet of a pigheaded Repub-

ernment paid the premiums, they might go along. Beebe flew to Washington and took it up with Kathleen Sibelius, Obama’s secretary of health and human services. Sure, she said, be our guest. House and Senate Republican leaders sounded jubilant. Now, if the rank-and-file Republicans, including the tea-party contingent, will only go along. There seemed to be a chance they wouldn’t be needed. A majority passes enabling legislation that does not carry an appropriation, and if Washington and not the state dispensed the money to insurers, as in the case of the regular exchange, an appropriation would not be needed. State Department Human Services people believe Washington will send the money for premium support through the state, which would necessitate an appropriation and the three-fourths vote. But no one knows for certain how the exchange will operate since Washington will essentially run it. So the Republicans may have kicked over the obstacle to medical coverage that they had erected. By now, everyone knows why universal coverage is a good thing: mainly healthier, productive people. The 100 percent reimbursement by the federal

government for three years and 90 percent afterward will pull billions of dollars into the state, a robust stimulus for the economy and a healthy infusion of taxes for the state treasury. Hospitals, which faced a financial crisis if the legislature blocked the Medicaid expansion, now will be even better off. So will doctors and other providers. They will be paid more for treating the poor through the exchanges than under Medicaid, which is the most tightly run medical insurance program in the country. Many doctors will not take Medicaid patients because they are paid so poorly. The happiest of all should be the working poor. Their medical care will cost them no more than whatever copays the insurance policies or Medicaid will require, and the Medicaid stigma will be lifted. Every doctor should be happy to treat them because he will be paid the same for treating them as for his other patients. Medicaid has always borne that stigma. The government always said, essentially, that if you treat the poor who are dependent on government you do not deserve as much money as when you minister to the well-to-do. But no longer in Arkansas, at least for this class of patients. For once, let’s thank the GOP.

lican Party, cowed by its angry, antispending, antitaxing, anti-Obama base.” But nowhere in all this sonorous muck will you find a factual account of exactly what the White House proposes to resolve the sequester that congressional Republicans find so abhorrent. To do so would endanger the whole centrist enterprise enabling Washington wise men like Woodward and Keller to masquerade as nonpartisan and above the battle. Which brings us back to Ezra Klein, boy pundit. When last we encountered the 28 year-old Washington Post blogger, he’d done the unthinkable: phoned David Brooks and informed him that his column lampooning the Obama White House for proposing no plan was bollocks. He directed Brooks to the White House website, where a detailed deficit reduction proposal based upon spending cuts, entitlement reforms and revenue increases has been posted for months. Also unthinkable, and much to his credit, Brooks admitted the error in the lede of his next column. Evidently, he’d been taken in by Speaker John Boehner, who’s been doing TV interviews for weeks now urging Obama and the Democrats to get off their collective asses. So was it really possible, Klein wondered, that Republicans didn’t actually know about President Obama’s offer? He got himself invited to a GOP background briefing “with one of the most respected Republicans in Congress.” As a policy wonk,

Klein was astonished to learn that Republicans in attendance had no idea that the Obama administration had put “chainedCPI,” for example, on the table. That’s a way of restraining the growth in Social Security payments by reconfiguring inflation. Most liberals bitterly oppose it. Indeed, Klein found that on a whole range of issues “top Republicans simply don’t know the compromises the White House is willing to make on Medicare and Social Security.” So it’s all a big misunderstanding? Or was Klein simply being naive? The latter, chided friendly rival Jonathan Chait at New York magazine. “If Obama could get hold of Klein’s mystery legislator and inform him of his budget offer,” he predicted, “it almost certainly wouldn’t make a difference. He would come up with something — the cuts aren’t real, or the taxes are awful, or they can’t trust Obama to carry them out, or something.” That’s precisely what happened. Klein posted a series of Twitter posts from influential GOP consultant Mike Murphy, downgrading “chained CPI” from an essential reform to a meaningless “gimmick” within hours of learning that the White House proposed it. It’s all quite funny, from a cynical perspective, but perfectly illustrative of today’s GOP. Meanwhile, Klein and Chait’s brand of irreverent, fact-driven journalism is a refreshing change in the clubby world of Washington political reporting. www.arktimes.com

MARCH 7, 2013

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ARKANSAS TIMES

PEARLS ABOUT SWINE

Mike Anderson and the long game

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henever this aggravating 201213 basketball campaign finally goes into the annals, regardless of the manner in which it concludes, a handful of head-scratching performances will be at the locus of the reflective discussion: Shoulda beaten South Carolina, Vandy, Alabama, etc. In a season of 30 games, give or take a few, the Hogs are most likely NIT-bound instead of NCAA-bound because of about three or four losses that still seem absurd weeks after the fact. Let’s not belabor the home-road dichotomy any further. College basketball has been tarnished to a large extent by the NBA’s poaching, and as a result the team that travels is often the team that unravels. It’s not a uniquely Razorback trait: inexperienced players are susceptible to wilting when the crowds are unkind, just as much as they are jacked up by a supportive bunch. We’ve seen it all year, and as documented here previously, for the better part of the past two decades generally. Arkansas gave another feeble first-half showing against LSU in the mid-week game, falling behind by more than 20 points and then flopping in the closing minutes after admirably nudging its way back to a draw. That’s when BJ Young, characterizing the aforementioned imbalance, tried to replicate his heroics in the waning moments of home wins against Missouri and Georgia the week before. Instead he committed a critical turnover and chucked a hideous, off-line three, and the Hogs caved in by a final margin of five. The Hogs followed that clunker with a strange but spirited win over Kentucky, and even if they shot terribly all game, they delivered a mature, composed performance in almost every other way. They rebounded, hustled after loose balls, tormented the hell out of Kentucky’s able but untested backcourt and did everything in their collective capacity to drive virtual icepicks into John Calipari’s eye sockets. It was, in a word, fun. But this season has, on balance, not been enjoyable. The Hogs’ on-court bipolar performance is maddening in the instant, but it’s also hard to comprehend how Mike Anderson could possibly correct it. Even if you assume that the Hogs’ roster returns unscathed for the 2013-14 season, how much optimism does that generate? Young is a dynamic player who also received a callous virtual sendoff from message board posters who were livid at his decision-making. I’m guilty of it, too, I guess — my Facebook obser-

vation the night of the LSU game was that Young simply doesn’t elicit much confidence from me from game to BEAU WILCOX game, even if he’s admittedly had some spectacular snippets in his sophomore year. There’s not much cause for confidence about any of the other ballyhooed members of Young’s class elevating their play significantly for next season, either. Anderson is an immensely patient man who has weathered this kind of storm before in every stop he’s made. Nolan Richardson’s first two years in Fayetteville were unremarkable at best, and even if the dynamics of the college game have transformed dramatically since that time, it’s still a relevant point of reflection. Some of my earliest memories watching Hog basketball games were of the team lighting it up at Barnhill Arena and then getting inexplicably worked over at TCU or Baylor the next week. We weren’t happy with it then, and when you think about that controversial game against ASU in the NIT in 1987, you are reminded that a program that had an extended stretch of dominance had the same very humbling prologue as the one we see now. That, for this columnist’s money, is the intangible aspect of Anderson’s coaching career that made him so coveted when John Pelphrey was excused two years ago. It wasn’t just that he was an essential cog in an early 1990s winning machine, but also the fact that he was on the bench for a lot of just plain bad days (mostly in the State of Texas, natch) in the 1980s. The value of the “system” or the coach’s persona is often an inflated construct of PR departments. What may be more instructive, when all else is boiled down, is whether that coach’s personal trials are both relative and relevant to the program he’s about to command.  If this seems like a paean to Anderson, it probably is. From the day of his hiring I felt he was not brought home to win 20 in year two, but to win 30 in year four or five. That objective is still within reach and he still looks like a guy who, when contrasted with his predecessor especially, will diagnose wheat and chaff pretty well. Even if this latest chapter ends in the second-tier tournament, we cannot neglect the memory that a program was reconstructed masterfully in that same invitational a quarter-century ago.


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Alias Kolkata Whose hole is the blackest? “KOLKATA, India — A fire broke out at an illegal six-story plastics market in the Indian city of Kolkata early Wednesday, killing at least 19 people, police said. ... Kolkata is formerly known as Calcutta.” Formerly? I was aware that Bombay had become Mumbai in the news media, or some of the news media, but I didn’t realize that Calcutta was now Kolkata. I wonder if historians refer to the Black Hole of Kolkata. Seems like rewriting history. In recent years, India has officially changed some names that were left over from British rule, but even inside India, some people cling to the old names by choice, and outside India, many people don’t know any better. I once read an article by the author Salman Rushdie in which he said that Bombay was his favorite city, and he refused to call it Mumbai. It happens that the Arkansas Times has an in-house expert on Indian affairs, Darielle D’Mello. Darielle has first-hand recollections of the renaming craze. “I would have to agree with Mr. Rushdie. ... I think the names were changed when I was 8, and I too refuse to call Bombay, Mumbai. It was part

of a radical nationalist movement that emerged in the late ’80’s and they tried to rename the cities based DOUG on the indigenous SMITH dougsmith@arktimes.com tribes/cultures in that area before colonial rule. They even renamed the airports and train terminals, which were clearly British architectural structures. Instead of embracing the fact that colonialism was part of our history (India was a bunch of feuding states before then), they are trying to erase any evidence of it.” So yes, the transformation of Calcutta into Kolkata sneaked up on me. But as a result I’m keeping an eye out for these conversions. I’m almost certain that now it’s Istanbul not Constantinople. “Memberg struck out solo and moved back to Arkansas. Dude is hella prolific, having recorded several EPs and albums of bedroom lo-fi pop since 2011 ... ” Robert Bell, the Times’ entertainment editor, says that hella has come into use as an intensifier. It appears to be derived from “a hell of a” but not used exactly the same way.

WEEK THAT WAS

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ARKANSAS TIMES

It was a good week for ...

It was a bad week for ...

EXPANSION. The federal government has agreed to give Arkansas unprecedented flexibility in expanding health coverage to residents. Employing an obscure provision of the Social Security Act, Arkansas has permission to offer health coverage to the entire Medicaid expansion population through the healthcare exchange. Instead of expanding the Medicaid program, the government will pay for low-income people to purchase private health insurance. The deal appears likely to tip previously reluctant Republican legislators towards agreeing to expansion. WALTER HUSSMAN. In a letter to shareholders, Warren Buffett said the “main exemplar for local newspapers is the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette,” published by Hussman.

WOMEN. Arkansas’s congressional delegation was nowhere to be found among the 87 Republicans in the U.S. House who joined 199 Democrats to pass the Senate’s bipartisan reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. The measures reauthorizes a 1994 law that provides support for organizations that serve domestic and sexual violence victims. Reps. Rick Crawford, Tim Griffin and Steve Womack each refused to support the bipartisan legislation. Instead, they voted in favor of an amendment to the bill that would remove specific protections for gay, bisexual or transgender victims and strip protections of Native American women living on reservations. Rep. Tom Cotton voted against the bipartisan legislation AND the Republican amendment.

THE ASCENDANCY OF JASON RAPERT. To a woman on Twitter who disagrees with his 12-week abortion ban, Sen. Rapert tweeted, “If you are a Christian, and you believe God’s word, then our beliefs would be the same.” REYNIE RUTLEDGE. Gov. Mike Beebe appointed Rutledge, chairman and CEO of First Security Bank, to the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees. Rutledge is a longtime friend and neighbor of Beebe in Searcy. He replaces John Tyson, who resigned last month.

MINIMUM WAGE EARNERS. A measure to raise the state’s minimum wage from $6.25 to $8.25 failed by one vote in the House Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committee. One former Republican state representative who testified against the bill called the pay raise “cruelty in the guise of compassion,” arguing that history (1890-1930, for example) shows that businesses won’t hire the undereducated — minorities and students — if they have to pay their workers more.


UALR Grads @ Work THE OBSERVER NOTES ON THE PASSING SCENE

Born free STROLLING THROUGH THE RIVER MARKET in the dawn toward the desk the other day, The Observer saw it lying in the street in front of the Main Library: a rain-colored brassiere, adorned with a spray of tiny crystals. It was a fancy number, clearly more show than substance, not one of those space-age uplift jobs designed by balding, slide rule-toting engineers at Hughes Engineering and Aircraft; not one of those serious chunks of foundation, all steel and blind rivets and beige, three-way stretch. No, this was the unmentionable of a lass who thought she might have a fair-to-middling shot at having it mentioned by someone she sought to impress before the night was through. Whoever she was, she’d unhooked it, let it flutter down here in the street below the face of the library like a paper bird. The Observer stopped, and stared at it in the gray morning. We thought of smiling girls in cars, racing the night. We thought of women we have known, faces half-lit in dashboard glow. We thought of the kind of girl who would think nothing of shedding her underthings — which is to say, our kind of woman — first throwing out her elbows to unhook in the back, then performing that sweet bit of acrobatics unique to the double-X chromosome: losing her bra without taking off her shirt, arms darting up first one sleeve, then another, like disappearing rabbits. Ah, the mysteries of women, with answers unknown to man should he live a thousand years! Standing there on the sidewalk, we thought of her rolling down the window of a fast-moving car. We thought of alcohol burning blue in her veins — alive, amazing human being, smiling, eyes half-lidded. Into the chill night, she tipped her hand, still smiling, the bit of cloth streaming out in the wind for just a second before it left her fingertips and found the dark. To flutter down. To land there. To be discovered by an older-by-the-second Observer in the harsh daylight of a drizzling morning. Whoever you are, thank you. There is no gift like the gift of the imagination. As for the rest of you: if you happened to see a portly man with a gray beard staring

fixedly at a forlorn and discarded brassiere by the library one day last week, let us say: The Observer is not a pervert. It’s just that the most forgettable of things strike us as beautiful sometimes. It’s both a blessing and a curse. THE OBSERVER WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF WRITING a piece for the paper last week when the unthinkable happened: the office Internet went down, and the great, bubbling font of information went dry and stayed that way for a long time. The Observer has grown up as a reporter in the age of instant answers, and that has spoiled us rotten. When we watch some old-timey newspaper movie — “All the President’s Men,” say — the thing that strikes us is never the dogged determination or how reporters dressed like reporters even back then, it’s the lack of computers on their desks. Though The Observer often jokes with a colleague that, as soon as a solar flare fries the worldwide electrical grid and plunges the world back to the 1880s, we’re going to make a killing in the newspaper business, the fact is: the thought of doing it The Old Fashioned Way is straight up terrifying. We have no idea how newspaperfolk got it done in the old days, much less got it done on deadline. A telephone, a bottle of whiskey and directory assistance, we guess. So it was something like a nightmare when the Internet went on the blink the other day, Yours Truly on deadline, and in desperate need of a definition of the word “polity.” First, we thought of shouting around the newsroom, asking if anybody knew the definition. Then we remembered that more than entertainment can be gleaned from objects called “books.” Since we started here, there has been a 20-pound dictionary on a stand in the corner, gathering dust. Sheepishly we approached it, sniffed at it, turned a few pages just to get a feel for the action. Soon, with growing confidence, we flipped through to the “P” section, and the definition of “polity” rose before us: “a politically organized unit within a religious denomination.” We knew that! Still, we fear for our post-Apocalyptic career plan.

• Wright, Lindsey & Jennings • Aristotle • Nabholz Construction • Northwestern Mutual • LM Windpower • KARK • Baptist Health • Entergy • American Chemistry • FIS • Arkansas Department of Health • Molex • Southern Bancorp Inc. • Stephens Inc. • Acxiom • UAMS • AT&T • KTHV • Jones Productions • Clinton Presidential Library • eStem High School • Searcy Daily Citizen • Endodontic Associates of Arkansas, PLLC • BKD • Welspun • Arkansas Supreme Court • Caterpillar • VCC • Windstream • LockheedMartin • Delta Trust & Bank • Historic Arkansas Museum • St. Vincent Infirmary • Verizon • ESPN • Mitchell Williams • U.S. Marshals Museum • Arkansas Attorney General’s Office • Hewlett-Packard • U.S. Army • Arkansas Democrat-Gazette • Southwest Power Pool • Mosaic Templars Cultural Center • Little Rock School District • Raytheon • U.S. Bank • Walmart • The Communications Group • Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield • Frazier, Hudson & Cisne • Arkansas Governor’s Office • Arkansas History Commission • Central Arkansas Library System • William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace National Historic Site • KATV • BAE Systems • Heifer International • Arkansas Department of Information Systems • Arvest Bank • Pulaski County Special School District • Schueck Steel • Friday, Eldredge and Clark • Clinton School of Public Service • North Little Rock Police Department • Arkansas Children’s Hospital • Arkansas Business • Arvest Mortgage • North Little Rock School District • Arkansas Department of Human Services • MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History • Arkansas State Police • Central High School • Arkansas Department of Workforce Services • Williams and Anderson • Little Rock Central High National Historic Site • Arkansas Times • KLRT • Arkansas Historic Preservation Program • State of Arkansas • Mainstream Technologies • Old State House Museum

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Arkansas Reporter

THE

IN S IDE R

Last week, Rep. John Walker (DLittle Rock) took to the House well to speak in favor of a resolution to honor Teen Jeopardy winner (and Arkansas Times favorite) Leonard Cooper, sponsored by Rep. Warwick Sabin (DLittle Rock). Walker, who is black, like Cooper, used his remarks to remind his colleagues of the persistence of racial bias. He said, in part: “I take the occasion to join with Representative Sabin, and the others, in acknowledging the tremendous accomplishment of this wonderful young man. One may look at him and understand that he is an ordinary teenager. He has an Afro. And for many of you here, he would be a threat. Remember that. And understand this, if we have good education and afford opportunity to our people, people like Leonard will be readily presented in our public domain. There are many persons like him, but Leonard stands out among most people irrespective of his haircut or his attire.” At least two Republican representatives weren’t happy with Walker’s speech. Rep. Justin Harris of West Fork tweeted that Walker “needs to be called out for his racial tones and discrimination in the State House.” Later, Rep. Nate Bell of Mena added via Twitter, “I’m disturbed by Rep. Walker’s racially divisive speech in the well of House. I hope someday we will all view each other as equals.” Talk Business’ Michael Cook caught up with Harris to get him to elaborate further. Harris told Cook, “This was a resolution to honor a young man, who is a genius, very smart and it doesn’t matter about the color of his skin or what his hair looked like. And he [Walker] made it very racial, he told us we were racial today and I found that very offensive.” Worth noting: Harris and Bell are from two of the least racially diverse counties in the state (Washington and Polk).

Heart Hospital layoffs Arkansas Heart Hospital, owned by a group of cardiologists who purchased the hospital from struggling MedCath Corp. of Charlotte, N.C., in 2011, had a decrease in patient volume in 2012 and has laid off seven employees, Dr. Bruce Murphy, president and CEO, confirmed last week. Employees had written the Times about the layoffs, though no total was provided. A nurse who left because her hours were reduced and another man who was laid off said the hospital had also decided it would no longer CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

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KIM TRAYNOR/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Talk of racial bias offends Republicans

Conflict resumes over animal rights Bills would limit humane-society activities. BY DOUG SMITH

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fter years of contention, the legislature four years ago approved a new law against cruelty to animals, strengthening the penalties for offenders and bringing Arkansas more in line with other states on this issue. The new law was something of a compromise between animal-rights activists on one side, and agricultural and business interests, particularly the Arkansas Farm Bureau, on the other. Attorney General Dustin McDaniel played a large part in negotiating the compromise. The fight, it turns out, is not over. Two bills that opponents say would weaken the protection of animals, and of consumers and workers too, have been introduced in the legislature. The bills, SB 13 and 14, have been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee. Jake Hillard of Little Rock, executive director of Arkansans for Animals, says: “In my opinion, these bills represent a wholesale assault on many fundamental values shared by all people in Arkansas. Not only would these bills perpetuate individual animal abuse as well as abuse on industrial farms and mills, they would also threaten workers’ rights, individual rights, consumer health and safety, law enforcement investigations and the freedom of

journalists, employees and the public at large to share information about animal cruelty and something as fundamental as our food supply.” Betty Jones of Kingston, president of the Arkansas Horse Council, which is an instigator of the new bills, said that a number of states have passed laws similar to SB 13 and 14. “Our board feels that farmers and agricultural people need to be protected from humane organizations,” Jones said. “There are a lot of criminals in the humane movement that need to be dealt with. We’ve had instances where representatives of different humane groups, mostly HSUS [the Humane Society of the United States], have confiscated animals that were used in business ventures, presented bad evidence to judges, and disposed of the animals before the real owners ever appeared in court. The owners have never been paid.” Jones, a member of the Madison County board of the Arkansas Farm Bureau, said that a representative of the state Farm Bureau told her that the Farm Bureau supported SB 13 and 14. Steve Eddington of Little Rock, director of public relations for the Farm Bureau, said, “We are aware of the bills, but we

were not part of drafting them. We don’t have a position at this time.” A spokesman for Attorney General McDaniel said that McDaniel too was monitoring the bills but had not taken a position on them. SB 13 would prohibit anyone but a certified law enforcement officer from conducting an animal-cruelty investigation or coercing a person to surrender his or her property through threat of criminal investigation or prosecution. (Much of the work of animal cruelty investigations is done by humane society employees and volunteers.) The bill prohibits the spaying, neutering, gelding or euthanizing of an animal without the owner’s consent. It says that support for allegations of criminal abuse by an animal owner must be given by two veterinarians, one of whom is chosen by the person alleged to have committed the offense. Hillard says that SB 13 will penalize animal welfare organizations and private persons “seeking to alert law enforcement to animal abuse,” and “will make the investigation of any case of suspected abuse by law enforcement impossible ...” SB 14 creates the offense of “interference with a livestock or poultry operation.” It says that a person commits such interference if he obtains access to a livestock or poultry operation under false pretenses, or if he records an image of or sound from the operation by leaving a recording device on private property “with the purpose to cause harm to the operation.” Hillard calls SB 14 “a whistle-blower suppression law” that would “criminalize the use of undercover investigative techniques often employed to expose both animal abuse and unhealthy practices associated with even the most basic protections of our food supply.” Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson of Benton was the original sponsor of SB 13 and 14, at the request of a horse-owning constituent. After what he called “an avalanche of response,” he decided that an urban-area lawyer was perhaps not the best person to handle the legislation, so he handed it off to Sen. Gary Stubblefield of Branch (Franklin County), a farmer. Jones said that people around Little Rock tend to think of horses as pets, like cats and dogs. To rural dwellers, horses are livestock, she said, most of them used in business-related ventures, such as trailriding operations. “It’s sad that it’s come to this,” Jones said. “People want to give animals equal rights to humans.”


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THE

BIG

INSIDER, CONT.

PICTURE

EXPANSION’S NEW CHEERLEADERS: Republicans like Sen. Jonathan Dismang and Rep. John Burris like the new deal.

EXPANSION FAQ Last week, Gov. Mike Beebe announced that the feds have given Arkansas permission to pursue a unique plan for expanding health coverage, turning the Medicaid expansion debate upside down. Here’s your one-stop shop for the basics on the game-changing, name-changing Arkansas healthcare deal. So what’s the deal? If you want lots of details, see arktimes.com/privateoption, but here’s the short version: Instead of covering low-income, uninsured folks via Medicaid, this plan would have the government paying the full premiums of private health insurance plans for those very same low-income, uninsured people. These are people who earn less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level. What should we call it? It’s still expansion, but no longer expands the Medicaid program. We’ve been going with the “private option” because the feds have given the legislature the option to expand coverage via private insurance. Does this make expansion more likely to pass the legislature? Big time. Getting a super-majority is hard. Getting a super-majority with a General Assembly dominated by anti-Obamacare, Medicaid-hating true believers was probably impossible. The new expansion deal looks likely to pass. Who benefits from the new deal? Insurance companies, who just got more than 200,000 new customers. And hospitals and providers, who will presumably get higher reimbursement rates from private insurance companies than they would have from Medicaid. What about low-income, uninsured folks? Just as with the old deal, they will gain coverage. Among other benefits, having health coverage leads to better health outcomes and saves lives. It could even be a better deal for them than Medicaid expansion. Private insurance may not be cost-effective (more on that below), but the expansion pool won’t be bearing the costs (though there are some who might be subject to small co-pays). That could mean better access and better health outcomes. Republican lawmakers are convinced of this. But even if it’s not so, given the dire prospects for full Medicaid expansion, it’s worth repeating: under this deal, more than 200,000 low-income uninsured people would gain health coverage. What about people who meet current eligibility requirements for Medicaid? They stay on Medicaid, though there are some transfer populations getting limited coverage from Medicaid, such as pregnant women, which would move to private insurance.

Will it cost more for taxpayers? Almost certainly, yes. Paying for private health insurance is more expensive than Medicaid. There is a lot of empirical evidence that this kind of approach is more costly. How much more? Nobody knows. The Congressional Budget Office has projected recipients on the exchange to cost 50 percent more than recipients on Medicaid, which amounts to $3,000 more per person to pay for them on the exchange. For various reasons, that’s not likely to be a perfectly applicable estimate, but it’s too early to say whether it’s too high or too low. But the extra cost could amount to hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Wait a second, don’t Republicans hate government spending and high costs? Whether their reasons are philosophical or cynical, local Republicans have a massive preference for routing the money through private companies instead of expanding a public program. It doesn’t hurt that they can plausibly say it’s NOT OBAMACARE.

contribute to 401(k) retirement accounts, which Murphy confirmed. “We are being careful. We made a conscious decision to see how this year turns out before we decide on what match we’re going to make,” he said. But Murphy said the Heart Hospital is healthy, and admissions since September 2012 “have been relatively brisk.” But, he added, “We have, in fact, had a decrease in volume in the fall that coincided with a couple of things,” including the implementation of electronic records for the hospital and clinics. He said the move to electronic records meant that three jobs were no longer needed. Murphy said there is a nationwide decrease in admissions to hospitals, a trend that is certainly true in Arkansas. However, he said, things have picked up at the Heart Hospital, “volumewise.” Last year, the Heart Hospital’s CFO, Mark Hartman, gave figures to Arkansas Business showing the hospital had increased its 2011 revenues over 2010, netting $10.9 million in income in 2010 and $16.4 million in 2011. Murphy declined to give figures for 2012, but said the numbers were “very close.”

CORRECTIONS

NEWS + POLITICS + ENTERTAINMENT / FEBRUARY 21, 2013 / ARKTIMES.COM

Who pays for this? As before, the feds are offering 100 percent match rates for the first three years. After that, the state will have to start chipping in, and the fed match rate will gradually fall to 90 percent by 2021.

AMERICAN DREAMERS

Undocumented young people share their stories of sacrifice, hope and love in their quest for a college education. BY DAVID KOON PAGE 14

Sounds like a lot of money coming into the state? It’s a massive stimulus that will help the state’s bottom line. Republicans used to call that “funny money” but have changed their tune. So it’s a good deal for the state? Yes, just like Medicaid expansion, it’s likely a net fiscal positive because of additional state tax revenues, reductions in uncompensated care and some Medicaid populations transitioning to higher match rates. Again, Republicans used to think these offsets were baloney, but their reading of the math has evolved thanks to the “private option.” Wait a second, is this legal? Based on an obscure section of the Social Security Act, probably. Won’t other states want this? Seems like it, and rumors have floated about Ohio, Texas and Florida. No word from HHS about whether it’s on the table elsewhere, though other states will be unhappy campers if this was an Arkansas-only “Razorback Rule.”

Not all of the young people who appeared on our Feb. 21 cover “American Dreamers” — which was subtitled: “Undocumented young people share their stories of sacrifice, hope and love in their quest for a college education” — were undocumented. Adriana Alvarez (far right) is a U.S. citizen, and Andrea Gomez (third from right) is a legal permanent resident. Alvarez and Gomez spoke at events in support of undocumented students seeking in-state college tuition. We regret any misunderstanding this may have caused. In last week’s cover feature “Welltraveled chef with a local focus,” we incorrectly identified the Capital Hotel’s Korey Dupree as a sous chef. He’s a line cook. www.arktimes.com

MARCH 7, 2013

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BRIAN CHILSON

FARRELS: Living one day at a time.

TAKING CARE OF OUR OWN Arkansas’s working poor hope the state says yes to expansion. BY DAVID RAMSEY

BEST DOCTORS 2013

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his week’s issue focuses on changes in health care brought on by the Affordable Care Act’s expansion of coverage and its goal of providing some form of insurance to all Americans. Articles here look at what the lack of insurance means for families, how the act affects hospital reimbursement, and how the state is preparing to handle the influx of newly insured Arkansans. Accompanying these stories is the peer-generated Best Doctors Inc. list for Pulaski County. The list can be found in a special supplement that begins on page 25.

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elissa Farrell was at the end of her rope several years ago, battling a drug addiction and unable to find a job. Along with her two children, she checked herself into Our House, a Little Rock shelter that provides housing and job training. Today, she has a job and an apartment, and she’s been clean for more than two years. “I still live one day at a time,” she told me when I visited her recently in her east Little Rock apartment. “I crossed a lot of barriers. Not everybody gets to do what I’ve done. It’s by the grace of God.” When I asked her what prompted her to turn her life around, her son Kaleb happened to come in the room and joined her on the couch. “There’s one,” she said. “Where’s the other?” Her daughter Zadie came in and sat down next to them. Farrell put her arms around her children. “That’s why we had to do better,” she said. With little education and a felony arrest in her background, it wasn’t easy, but she was willing to work.

While at Our House, she got her highschool diploma and got her conviction expunged. Initially unable to find a job, she started working through a paid internship program at Our House that features on-the-job training to gain work experience. The stipend was $500 a month. In an unusual turn, she convinced Our House to hire her to work a weekend shift as shelter supervisor at minimum wage, on top of her internship. She would eagerly volunteer to cover for folks and pick up extra hours, thankful for the opportunity to work. She still can’t believe “the blessings that God gave me there at that place.” But once she started working, Farrell lost her health care because her income was almost three times too high to qualify for Medicaid in Arkansas. How much did she make that first year that booted her off the rolls? Around $9,000. “I try to be self-sufficient,” she said. “You’re damned if you do, damned if you don’t.” Arkansas has the second stingiest Medicaid program in the nation, and

many low-income parents find themselves in a position like Farrell’s: uninsured and too poor to purchase their own health insurance or health care but not poor enough to qualify for Medicaid in the state. Farrell had knee surgery while she still had coverage but lost it before she could start her physical therapy. She paid for one visit out of pocket. “They had some compassionate people that tried to teach me what to do at home,” she said. “But I probably need physical therapy.” Nowadays she works just under 40 hours a week in a supervisory role at a residential rehab center. She makes $8 an hour and gets no benefits. Paying the bills and providing for two kids, she doesn’t have money left over for private insurance. “There’s no way,” she said. “I’m doing good to get by.” She avoids seeking any sort of medical care because of cost concerns. If she ever had a major health issue, “I’d just have to go to the emergency room. And then they tell you to follow up with your primary care physician. But I can’t afford that.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 22


WHITE COUNTY MEDICAL CENTER

HOSPITALS FEEL THE PINCH Struggling institutions view expansion as needed boost. BY DAVID RAMSEY

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henlawmakerscraftedthe federal Affordable Care Act, they struck a deal with hospitals. The law cuts Medicare reimbursements to hospitals by more than $700 billion over the next 10 years. The hit to Arkansas hospitals is around $2 billion. These savings are a key part of funding the law’s attempt to offer near-universal health coverage. In order to withstand the cuts, hospitals would get something back: A whole lot more people would have insurance, which would mean a whole lot more paying customers for the hospitals. Then the Supreme Court threw everyone a curveball. In its ruling last summer, it upheld the ACA, but gave the states the option of whether or not to participate in Medicaid expansion. For hospitals, that meant a big source of necessary funding was suddenly in jeopardy. In states like Arkansas, where many Republican lawmakers campaigned on an anti-Obamacare platform, hospitals are worried about harmful cuts in service — and even fear for their survival — if the legislature says no to expansion of coverage. Hospitals are feeling even more vulnerable after the “fiscal

cliff” deal in January that slashed reimbursement rates even more, with Arkansas hospitals projected to take an additional cut of more than $400 million. “It’s absolutely critical that [expansion] gets passed by the state legislature,” White River Health System CEO Gary Bebow said. WRHS, which includes hospitals in Batesville and Mountain View, as well as clinics in various rural communities in the state, has projected a loss of $90 million over the next 10 years in Medicare reimbursement cuts. Meanwhile, if expansion goes through, they project to bring in an additional $45 million over the next decade. Things will be tight either way, but without expansion the situation begins to look dire. Other hospitals are feeling the same financial pressure. White County Medical Center (WCMC) in Searcy projects $42 million in cuts over the next five years, which would be offset by $13 million from expansion; Conway Regional projects $42 million in cuts over the next 10 years, offset by $16 million from expansion. In total, the Arkansas Hospital Association projects that hospitals stand to gain $200 million per year from Medicaid expansion.

“This state is paying for the federal cuts under Obamacare,” Bebow says. “The point is this is one way that’s been a gift back to us ... if we don’t take advantage of it, that’s unfortunate.” Another curveball came last week with the announcement that the federal government will allow Arkansas to expand coverage to uninsured people below 138 percent of the federal poverty level (about $15,000 for an individual) via the private health-insurance exchange instead of the Medicaid program. For hospitals, this makes accepting the federal money to expand coverage an even better deal, because reimbursements will theoretically be higher from private insurance companies than from Medicaid. It’s too early to speculate just what the reimbursement rates will be on the exchange, but presumably those revenue projections listed above will be going up. The reason that hospitals stand to gain so much from expanding coverage is the problem of uncompensated care. When folks get treatment and can’t afford to pay for it, hospitals typically eat most of the cost. Ray Montgomery, CEO of WCMC, said that because of the increased lever-

age of private insurance companies — as well as Medicare and Medicaid — it is “difficult to impossible for hospitals to be able to cost shift those charity care and uncompensated costs off to other payers.” Based on AHA estimates, hospitals are losing $338 million per year at cost to uncompensated care, and those costs are growing at around 10 percent per year. A major driver of uncompensated care is low-income people without insurance, precisely the group that would gain coverage under expansion. “We’re already seeing these patients,” Bo Ryall, CEO of the AHA, said. “They’re uncompensated care now. Most of those will be eligible [for expansion], so we will in turn get some kind of payment, whereas we got close to zero in the past.” In other words, even under the low reimbursement rates of Medicaid, which pay hospitals below cost, “something is better than nothing on the patients who come to the hospital that we’re going to treat no matter what,” as Bebow put it. (And of course, higher reimbursements through the exchange under the “private option” are even better.) As Montgomery CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 www.arktimes.com

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HOSPITALS FEEL THE PINCH Continued from page 15

explained, for both ethical and legal reasons, “we don’t turn patients away.” The status quo has uninsured folks showing up to the emergency room and no clear societal plan for how to pay for them. Hospital administrators see expansion as a first step toward resolving this issue. From a hospital standpoint, Montgomery said, “philosophically, we have always been interested in health care for all paid for by all.” And it’s not just dollars and cents. In a state in which a quarter of its population between the ages of 19 and 64 is uninsured, it’s about the health of our citizens. “People are going to get sicker because they don’t have access to health care,” Montgomery said. In addition to being costlier, when the uninsured go to the emergency room instead of seeing a primary care physician — or avoid getting care at all because they can’t afford it — health outcomes suffer. A study by the RAND corporation projected that expansion would save 2,300 lives a year in Arkansas. “From a societal perspective, it’s hard to argue that it’s justifiable to have more than 200,000 people uninsured that could be insured by expansion,” Bebow said. “Statistics show very clearly that people that don’t have insurance don’t have access to the medical system.” “Seeking care before you end up in the emergency room is certainly a benefit,” Ryall said. “I use the example of a diabetic that may not be seeing the doctor, may not be taking their medicine [or] taking care of themselves. They end up in the emergency room instead of going to their primary care physician. They’re discharged from the hospital and they do not follow up or have a primary care phy-

MONTGOMERY

LAMBERT

sician. Three months later or six months later, they end up back at the emergency room. So it’s very costly to all of us.” What happens if the legislature turns down the federal money to expand coverage? “We’ll have to reassess what services we can provide, and how we can move forward and maintain the service to the community that we feel is appropriate,” Conway Regional Health System CEO Jim Lambert said. “It’s going to challenge us.” That means the potential for cuts in staffing, as well as services. “The fear is that you’re going to be forced to make decisions that put patients and the community at risk,” Lambert said. “No one wants to do that and we’re going to do everything we can to prevent those decisions from being made but it’s hard to avoid that that’s potentially out there.” Bebow has concerns about WRHS’s clinics in rural areas surviving. “We felt strongly that those communities should have access to primary care,” he said. “We

are the provider for those people and those communities.” “[Arkansas] is a state predominantly made up of rural, small hospitals,” he pointed out. “[They] are the most vulnerable. Can this state possibly let that happen? In many cases our hospitals are the only provider, they’re the safety net provider for large communities. If you remove those you’re talking about a tremendous reduction in access.” The AHA released a study last summer finding that hospitals contribute more than $10 billion per year to the state economy and employ more than 40,000 Arkansans. If hospitals start laying people off or shutting down, that could have negative ripple effects throughout the economy. “Hospitals are a key economic engine that keeps our communities intact,” Lambert said. “We’re a heavily employment-related industry,” Bebow said. “We’re a service industry. Over 50 percent of our costs at

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our hospitals are really tied up in employment costs. ... You can’t take $50 million out of White River Medical Center without having an adverse effect on employment.” Some legislators would like to see copays and other forms of cost-sharing as part of an expansion deal, but this makes hospitals nervous if they’re going to be the ones stuck trying to collect. “From a general consumer, those make a lot of sense,” Montgomery said. “From a provider [base], here’s my concern. If we have additional co-pays that are required by these poor patients that have to pay, it’s kind of like squeezing blood out of a turnip. They probably don’t have much money. If that’s borne by the hospitals and the providers ... those co-pays will end up translating to our bad debt or our uncompensated care bottom line. Those dollar shortfalls will get bigger.” As for drug testing, another idea popular among some lawmakers, Montgomery is skeptical. “Let’s say a patient who has been on drugs [is] drug tested and they’re kicked off the Medicaid rolls,” he said. “What’s going to happen to those patients when they get sick? Where are they going to go? They’re going to come back to the emergency room. ... Once again, they’re going to become uncompensated care or bad debt or charity care and it continues to add to the deficit in reimbursement that we have.” Now that Arkansas has the option to expand coverage using the exchange, the chances of the legislature saying yes to the federal money are looking much rosier. Still, to date no Republican legislator has endorsed the plan. Many of them — including representatives of the districts home to the hospitals mentioned in this article — campaigned against Obamacare and have been resistant to the idea of expansion since the session started.


Hospital administrators remain cautiously optimistic (even more so after the news of the new offer from the feds). Montgomery said he had been in frequent contact with lawmakers. “I look at their perspective, they were voted in on a conservative platform, they were voted in to keep government as small as possible,” he said. “I truly understand their positions ... but this is [an opportunity] to save lives, to be able to meet their communities’ needs. If there was any reason to justify making some slight modification to that platform, this is the most important reason. This is just right for their constituents and the people in their community.” “If we can convince them that you’ve got to go past your political dogma and look at what’s in the best interest of the community ... you hope that people are willing to hear the numbers and understand the issue,” Lambert said. “Instead of just, ‘oh, this is Obamacare, I don’t like Obamacare’ ... because I don’t think anybody wants to see hospitals curtail services or close in various communities across the state. ... I think that’s a real possibility and we’ve got to convince them that that’s a real possibility.” Hospital administrators agreed that given the generous federal match rates — 100 percent for the first three years, slowly going down to 90 percent in 2021 — the deal was simply too good to pass up. They noted that the state can always opt out if cost becomes a concern or the feds don’t keep their promises down the road. And, similar to Gov. Mike Beebe’s oftmentioned point that a no to expansion means that federal tax dollars will flow out of the state to pay for expansion elsewhere, hospital administrators point out that the reimbursement cuts are coming to hospitals in Arkansas no matter what, so why turn down the benefits to expansion that other states will enjoy? “I’ve made a lot of decisions that I’ve changed my mind on after I received more information and more facts,” Bebow said. “So a person who’s run for office based upon opposition to Obamacare — Obamacare got passed at the federal level and it’s going to be implemented. That water has gone under the bridge ... our elected officials need to respond in accordance with what is occurring, not what they hoped would occur.” Bebow offered a frame for thinking about the issue that might appeal to legislators that still feel strongly opposed to the law overall. Expansion is a component of the law, he said, “that can help our state survive Obamacare, and to turn our back on it given what we know today and have the hospitals and people in this state not benefit from this opportunity — well, I hope that they see the difference.”

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Doctors explain how expanding insurance coverage makes health and economic sense. BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

D

r. Sara Ghori Tariq, an internist and medical director of the Center for Clinical Skills at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (and named by her peers as a “Best Doctor”), described her encounter with an uninsured patient she saw as a volunteer physician at Harmony Health Clinic. “I saw a gentleman a couple of weeks ago with a large abscess in his leg, a pocket of infection. ... It was extremely painful,” Tariq said. He was employed as a dishwasher and couldn’t afford insurance, so he’d waited to seek medical attention. His diabetes was a contributing factor, but he couldn’t “consistently afford” insulin. He needed treatment, blood sugar tests and antibiotics. Had his blood sugar been too high, Tariq would have needed to send him to the UAMS Emergency Room for care. Patients who don’t have insurance “tend to be absolutely more sick, more challenging” to treat, Tariq said. They put off doctor visits to avoid the cost 18

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ARKANSAS TIMES

of paying out of pocket. The man with chest pain, the woman with a lump in her breast — had they come to the doctor at the first sign of trouble, they would have been better outcomes, both physically and financially. The effect of poverty, low health literacy, the lack of social support and homelessness on patient health is one of the things Tariq addresses in her clinical skills classes at UAMS. If Tariq’s patient (and others) had access to Medicaid, he wouldn’t have had trouble paying for the medicine he needed, thus avoiding the complications from his disease as well as lost wages. UAMS could have been spared the cost of treating him in its ER. Taxpayers would have paid less, with contributions to Medicaid on the front end alleviating the need for emergency care. Doctors at UAMS treat all comers, insured and uninsured; 12 percent of its admitted patients — 3,120 last year — are among the latter. Outpatient visits by the uninsured numbered 61,426 in 2012. Charity and unreim-

bursed care rose from $175 million in 2011 to $202 million in 2012. Those numbers would be less if Arkansas, which has the most stringent rules for Medicaid eligibility in the country, would agree to accept federal dollars to expand Medicaid — now limited largely to children, the disabled and impoverished pregnant women — to a wider group of Arkansans too poor to pay for private insurance. Two plans are under consideration: extending Medicaid to all Arkansans at or under 138 percent of the federal poverty level ($11,490 for individuals, $23,550 for a family of four) or a deal Gov. Beebe and the federal Health and Human Services Department worked out to extend the private insurance exchange option to that same group of people at no cost, with premiums picked up by Medicaid. (The Affordable Care Act allows tax credits to certain persons earning between 138 percent and 400 percent of the poverty level tax credits to pay for private premiums on the insurance exchange. Arkansas is the only state so far to be

offered exchange coverage for persons whose income puts them under 138 percent.) Tariq said she hoped the legislature would act to expand access to health care quickly.

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t’s been noted that putting off acting on Medicaid expansion by a year — something the legislature is, as of this writing, considering — would mean the state would sacrifice one of the three years in which expansion will cost it no money (2014, 2015 and 2016 are the years the federal government would pick up the tab; after that, states will contribute 10 percent). But the monetary loss is not the main concern of Dr. Joe Thompson, director of the Arkansas Center for Health Improvement. Thompson cited the Rand Corp. study that found that offering insurance to the 200,000 Arkansans not now insured would save 2,300 lives a year. “I don’t know whose family


members we’d want to sacrifice” by putting off expansion, Thompson said. Expanding access to basic health care is “where I start” in the conversation about expansion, he said. Anecdotal evidence — the man with the abscess, the patient with advanced-stage cancer that another of this year’s Best Doctors, surgeon John Cone, saw — is one thing. Numbers are another. Dr. Joe Bates, the deputy state health officer and chief science officer for the Arkansas Health Department, recently assembled statistics showing the difference in mortality rates between persons insured under Medicare (65 and over) and those ages 45-64, who are still working and contributing to Arkansas’s economy. The numbers are worrisome. Arkansas is an unhealthy state, with mortality rates higher across the board than the nation’s. But consider this: The rate of death from stroke among Arkansans ages 45-65 for the years 2005-2010 was 54 percent higher than the national rate. (In fact, Arkansas has the highest death rate from stroke of any state in the nation.) For Arkansans ages 65 and up, the death rate for that period was only 25 percent higher. Take heart disease: The rate of Arkansans ages 45-65 who died of heart disease in that period was 62 percent higher than the national rate in that age group. But among the 65-plus age group, the rate of death was only 8 percent higher than that of all Americans. Age-specific death rates from cancer for 2005-2010: the younger group’s mortality rate is 26 percent higher than the nation’s, its older group is only 6 percent higher. The difference: health insurance. One of four Arkansans in the 45-65 age range does not have health insurance. Those 65 and over are eligible for Medicare. The lack of insurance is only one of many things that play into Arkansas’s low rankings in health. Another is culture: Arkansans are “more apt to wait until they have advanced disease” to see a doctor, whether they are insured or not, Dr. Paul Halverson said. Arkansans are less likely, nationally, to take advantage of free or lowcost preventative screens that would lower mortality rates — like colon screenings and mammograms. “If we wait until people are sick [to treat their health needs] we’ll never pull Arkansas up,” Bates said; the culture has to change.

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ronically, while health providers worry about the adults who’ll be left out in the cold if the legislature decides to leave the Medicaid roll as is, they’ve got another concern: How to handle the estimated 220,000 Arkansans who are now uninsured but are expected to buy into the insurance exchange. The delivery of American health care in general needs an overhaul, thanks to skyrocketing costs, an increasingly sick population thanks to aging baby boomers, the need for more doctors in rural (and mostly uninsured) areas and myriad other problems. And as the state with the third highest population of retirees, Arkansas has more than its fair share of an aging population. But while we are among the sickest states — coming in at No. 48 on the United Health Foundation’s scale — Arkansas is getting accolades for its attempt to tackle the issues, from the Payment Improvement Initiative devised by the state Department of Human Services, Arkansas Medicaid, Blue Cross Blue Shield and Arkansas QualChoice; to steps to increase physician assistant and nurse practitioner enrollment, to the Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative, the patient-centered medical home idea being tested by 69 primary care clinics who provide Medicare services. The four-year initiative is being funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), which recently awarded Arkansas $42 million to test its State Health Care Innovation Plan, and private insurers Blue Cross Blue Shield, QualChoice and Humana. At the crux of all these ideas is “team-based care,” in which a doctor, nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant, community health workers and pharmacists work together to both treat and educate patients. “Primary care doctors spend most of their time treating chronic diseases,” Halverson said. Once a patient’s treatment has been established, he or she “can be cared for as well by a nurse practitioner. That’s going to be our answer.” In the medical home model, doctors will spend more time with their sickest patients — “practicing at the top of their license,” as Halverson described it. Physician assistants will too, handling chronic, controlled cases. Pharmacists will play a greater role in the management and tracking CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

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of medicine, which is what they are trained for. Community health workers will educate, answer questions. All will coordinate the care of each patient, not just within the medical home but with specialists and hospitals through electronic record-keeping and shared data bases. The Payment Improvement Initiative addresses how we pay for health, shifting today’s fee-for-service system — paying for each doctor visit — to paying for the treatment of the illness, an “episode” of care. This year, Medicaid and private insurers are tracking costs and outcomes in five areas of care; providers with good outcomes at lower costs will be rewarded, but those whose costs are excessive will have to pay a portion of that back. Thompson and Andy Allison, who heads Arkansas’s Medicaid program, presented ideas for cost containment to the Arkansas State Medical Board. Allison, Thompson said, told the board that Medicaid was spending $4.5 billion a year and only 8 percent of that was going to physicians. “If you help me manage the other 92 percent, I’ll share the savings with you,” Thompson quoted him as saying. Providers have told Allison and Thompson that under the current system, about 10 percent of costs are due to waste, such as duplication of services; some doctors estimated waste at 30 percent.

Two state legislators — both wives of doctors — recently expressed their objections to DHS’ payment overhaul, complaining that nurse practitioners would take the place of doctors and that doctor pay would be cut “to the bone.” Thompson, on the other hand, said the medical home and payment initiatives have “surprising support from both physicians and hospitals. ... The opportunity for the primary care physician, I think, is to reorganize his practice so his net revenue is greater.” The Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative will pay participating clinics an amount based on the number of Medicare patients each practice sees to add the personnel they need to coordinate care and create a medical home. After two years, the practices will share in the savings. Seven Robert Wood Johnson Foundation models have shown that primary practice medical homes reduce hospitalizations and ER savings, with a cost reduction of $7 to $640 per patient. UAMS will begin offering a doctorate of nursing practice in the fall, and advanced-practice nurse degree programs have begun at UA Fayetteville and the University of Central Arkansas at Conway. Nurse practitioner programs at UAMS and Arkansas State University are expected to ramp up, Thompson said. The pressure of new patients may come before the medical home becomes the standard, but state agencies are scrambling to meet the demand.


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CONE

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rauma surgeon John Cone, who has been at UAMS since the 1980s, has played a pivotal role in the establishment of the state’s Trauma System, sees yet another problem with access to care: The reluctance of younger doctors to put up with the “terrible lifestyle” of the surgeon and other specialists. “People don’t schedule their illnesses,” Cone said; “they get sick at 3 in the morning. ... What people want out of a specialty has changed.” The situation, Cone says, puts emergency room care “in a bind,” as it becomes more difficult to attract “almost any of the specialties.” Nor is it easy to see a primary care physician as it once was, Cone said. Even Cone had a hard time getting his father-in-law an appointment with a primary care doctor to treat a low-grade infection. Criticism of the government-run health care in

Great Britain that patients must wait a long time to see a doctor doesn’t make much sense anymore, given what patients go through here, and “the horror stories about the National Health Service are grossly exaggerated,” Cone added. But extending health insurance to more patients should mean fewer desperately sick people presenting at the ER with preventable problems. “I see a lot of people who wait until they’re in late stage cancer they’ve neglected for one and a half years.” Only recently he’d treated a patient whose tumor was “visible to the naked eye.” Why did he wait so long to come in? “Money, maybe. Ignorance. Denial.” Professionals working in Arkansas to change the way medicine is delivered believe that insurance extended through Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act, plus the medical home idea, will address all three of those barriers to care.

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TAKING CARE OF OUR OWN Continued from page 14

Farrell, a working mother of two struggling to make ends meet, is the sort of person who stands to gain health insurance if the Arkansas legislature is willing to accept federal money to expand coverage. (Arkansas already offers insurance to children in poverty, through the ARKids program.) I asked what it would mean to her. “Wow,” she said. “It would take a lot

of stress off of me to start with. I’m 44 years old and I have little kids to get grown. It’s hard to plan the future with the uncertainty.” She told me she worries about not being able to have routine checkups. And she worries about what would happen if she had a medical problem that she couldn’t afford to treat. “I could be right back where I started.” Health care reform in general, and Medicaid expansion in particular, is a complicated issue. There are a lot of moving parts. A lot of numbers, a lot of projections. Policy wonks trade

charts and graphs and fight over solutions. It can get confusing, and you’d be forgiven for throwing up your hands. But it’s important to remember that this is an issue that has a real impact on real people, people like Farrell. One in four Arkansans between the ages of 19 and 64 does not have health insurance. There are honest disagreements about the best way to address that, or even whether to address it at all. Nothing you read about Melissa, or anyone else among the more than 200,000 people that would gain coverage under expansion, can resolve any of that. But surely

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our debate on this issue will be wiser if we hear their stories.

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ep. John Burris (R-Harrison) recently tweeted, “The debate about expansion is not about working poor.” The truth is more complicated. Yes, unemployed adults without income would gain coverage if the state opted for Medicaid expansion. But there are tens of thousands of working Arkansans in the coverage gap between the stingy eligibility lines in the current Medicaid program and the 100 percent federal poverty line (above which folks will be eligible for subsidized insurance on the healthcare exchange even if the state doesn’t expand). People like Farrell. People like Charles Lott, whose family of four lives on an income of $23,000 a year. “Everyone I’ve talked to on the subject, unless they’ve gone through it themselves, they don’t understand what the Medicaid situation in Arkansas is,” Lott said. “It’s wonderful that we have ARKids that covers kids. But we have such a lacking Medicaid program other than that.” Let’s take a look at just who qualifies now for Medicaid in Arkansas. There are a few nuances not fully elaborated here, but the following paints the general picture for non-disabled, non-pregnant adults. First off, childless adults, no matter how poor, are not currently eligible for Medicaid in the state. If you’re an individual without kids and no income, or make less than $11,000, there will be no coverage if the state turns down expansion. For parents, if you make more than 17 percent of federal poverty level (FPL), your income is too high to qualify. For a family of two, that’s 17 percent of $15,510, or around $2,600 a year. For a family of four, that’s 17 percent of $23,550, or $4,000. If Arkansas chooses not to expand, people above 100 percent of the federal poverty level would be eligible for subsidized, low-premium insurance on the healthcare exchange. If you’re a parent anywhere in between 17 and 100 percent — like Farrell and Lott — you’re out of luck. One of the most frustrating aspects of the current system is that parents are actually discouraged from working and trying to better their situation. Rick Wells makes $8 an hour working in a retail store to support his 13-yearold son and his fiancee, who is pregnant. Unable to afford private insurance but above the income line for Medicaid, he believes that the current


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laudia Reynolds-LeBlanc has only one kidney, which she says has made her uninsurable since she was a little girl. “I can’t be touched by an insurance company with a 10-foot pole,” she said. She’s periodically had coverage if she was working for a company that provided it to all employees, but she now works a retail job part-time because she is assisting in the education of her son, who has a neurological disorder and is unable to attend a traditional school. “I have to dedicate a lot of time to him,” she said. “Being a single parent, it limits what you can do in order to take care of your child.” The Affordable Care Act’s reforms will keep insurance companies from discriminating against people like Reynolds-LeBlanc with pre-existing conditions, but she’ll still likely fall in the coverage gap if Arkansas doesn’t go forward with expansion. She hasn’t been to a doctor in years, and says she feels like she’s “playing a gamble game.” Back in 2000, she suffered major system organ failure

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CANCER DE SENO: S MUCHA AFECTA A SE NO: NCER S CALAT INADE MUCHAS ECTA AFPAG .4 ASENO: DE R AS TIN NCE CALA HAS TA A MUC ECG.4 AFPA AS N TI LA PAG.4

Foto por Brian Chilson

+++

The 2014 Subaru Forester

Chilson

“We’ve talked about it. There’s not a whole lot of options.” I asked Lott what he would tell lawmakers trying to decide what to do about expansion. “If you’re getting federal funding,” he said, “if you have the chance to take tax money that has been paid in by higher-income states to assist you in paying for costs for health care for the citizens in your state, which is lower-income, than saying no means you’re condemning them to have medical problems that aren’t being treated. It doesn’t seem appropriate.”

Foto por Brian

system “essentially says, unless I’m going for welfare, I can’t have medical coverage. It’s either stop working and be a lazy schmuck or you won’t have any medical coverage at all. I find this ridiculous. I’m trying to support my family and do things right. “It’s not like I’m trying to live off the system ... the system tries to direct me to be a welfare case. It’s actually forcing me to go in that direction. I don’t want to be that type of person. I try to avoid any government help as much as I possibly can. We’re talking health here.” Wells has multiple reccurring health problems that have hospitalized him in the past, but said that seeking care “is not an option. I cannot seek medical help unless it’s an emergency. Making enough money to support myself and my family is complicated enough, let alone things like medical bills.” “We’re worried, that’s an understatement,” he said. “I can’t explain to you my stress level every day. If something happens to me, if I’m going to be able to afford it, if I’m going to lose everything.” Like Wells, Charles Lott knows that fear. Around five years ago, complications from his wife’s diabetes led to multiple hospitalizations. She was unable to work. Because of her medical situation, they were desperate to maintain insurance, and tried to keep up with premiums they couldn’t afford. Out-of-pocket costs came on top of that. They tried to keep up with medical bills with credit cards, but eventually they couldn’t make ends meet and had to file for bankruptcy. They’ve gotten back on their feet, but what would happen if a medical problem cropped up for Lott, who is uninsured? “I don’t know,” he said.

Let Your Love Grow.

Foto por Brian

“It’s not like I’m trying to live off the system. The system tries to direct me to be a welfare case. It’s actually forcing me to go in that direction. I don’t want to be that type of person. I try to avoid any government help as much as I possibly can. We’re talking health here.”

DO: PATRICIA GUARDA : DO IO DASAR ARVER ANI A GU MER TRICI PAPRI : O D AR A RS RD ERTE IO AIVE MU U ERGAN IMIASU IC TRDE PAPR SARIO ERTE NIVER SU.5AMU ER IMPAG PRDE G.5MUERTE DEPASU PAG.5

Free publication available at 200 locations in Central Arkansas www.ellatinoarkansas.com • Facebook.com/ellatinoarkansas 201 E. MARKHAM, SUITE 200 | LITTLE ROCK | 501.374.0853 www.arktimes.com

MARCH 7, 2013

23


TAKING CARE OF OUR OWN due to sepsis and her organs are now stuck together by scar tissue. Pain is a daily struggle, and she should be under a doctor’s care. “I can’t overemphasize how difficult it is for a person to need to see a doctor and they can’t afford to get there,” she said. If she has further health problems that demand attention, she said, “I’d be up a creek without a paddle, and do a lot of praying.” She worries that her son will find himself in the same trap. He’s already had a surgery for his rare disorder, a brain malformation, when he was a young boy. He may need another operation in the future. “From a mother’s perspective — he is on ARKids, but what happens when he turns 19? I think he’s going to have the academic scores to go to college. But then if he has to have surgery and he doesn’t have medical coverage.” Reynolds-LeBlanc said she would consider trying to move to another state that offered coverage expansion if Arkansas fails to. “I just can’t see staying in a state if they can’t take care of their people,” she said. “It’s the moral thing to do.”

24

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

Continued from page 23

‘ONE DAY AT A TIME’: That’s Melisa Farell’s slogan.

+++

M

elissa Farrell is hoping to go to school to become a drug counselor and help folks in the same situation that she has managed to struggle out of. Several times she mentioned the slogan of recovery: “one day at a time.” She’s tough — you can see right away the dogged resolve that allowed her to buck the odds and build a life for herself. She’s matter-of-fact in tone,

but quick to smile. Her kids are polite, quiet at first but they warmed up quickly. Who knows what’s to come, but spend a little time with the Farrells and you can’t help but feel hopeful. You can’t help but feel inspired. The legislature is giving signals that it’s more open to expansion now that the feds have given the state the option of doing it via private insurance companies on the healthcare exchange. Premiums would be paid by the government. Farrell told me that it didn’t make any difference to

her whether it was private coverage or public coverage, she was just hoping for something. “You’d have a lot healthier people that could live a little longer,” she said. “Everybody needs to see a doctor, especially at my age.” Laughing, she added, “But I quit smoking cigarettes and I quit doing drugs and I quit drinking, so that gives me a little bit more leeway.” “You worry, ‘what would I do if I get sick?’ ” she said. “It would take the worries away.”


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Addiction Medicine FORREST B. MILLER

St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-562-4838

Allergy and Immunology TERRY O. HARVILLE

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-7511

STACIE M. JONES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

ELEANOR A. LIPSMEYER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Rheumatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-4939

AMY M. SCURLOCK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Anesthesiology

INDRANIL CHAKRABORTY

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6119

W. BROOKS GENTRY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6114

VICTOR MANDOFF University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-7918

CHARLES A. NAPOLITANO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St, Rm 515 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6114

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6119

Cardiovascular Disease JOSEPH K. BISSETT

Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Department of Cardiology 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-257-5795

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BEN JOHNSON 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-9535

JAMES D. MARSH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Internal Medicine Outpatient Center, 2nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-7000

DAVID L. RUTLEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Cardiovascular Medicine Outpatient Center, 2nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8000

EUGENE S. SMITH III University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Cardiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5311

BARRY F. URETSKY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Cardiovascular Medicine 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8000

Clinical Pharmacology LAURA P. JAMES

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1418

Colon and Rectal Surgery J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR.

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6114

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Department of Surgical Oncology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8211

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Critical Care Medicine

CARMELITA S. PABLO

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1100

ABID UL GHAFOOR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-2933

DANNY L. WILKERSON University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology

PAULA JEAN ANDERSON

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Pulmonary and Critical Care Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-603-1400

JOHN B. CONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8000

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Dermatology

RENIÉ EDWARD BRESSINCK

Dermatology Group of Arkansas Medical Towers Bldg, Ste 690 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8422

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Eating Disorders

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Endocrinology and Metabolism

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Family Medicine

RALPH FARRIS JOSEPH

St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-562-4838

FORREST B. MILLER St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-562-4838

WILLIAM H. RILEY, JR. St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-562-4838

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STEVE L. SIMPSON St. Vincent Family Clinic 10000 Rodney Parham Rd Little Rock, AR, 72227 501-221-0888

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4301 W Markham St, Ste 783 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-5747

A. REED THOMPSON University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Lymphedema Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-296-1200

Geriatric Medicine/Hospice and Palliative Medicine A. REED THOMPSON

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Lymphedema Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-296-1200

Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section of Genetics and Metabolism 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

MICHAEL M. MOORE

Infectious Disease

Pediatric Gastroenterology Associates 1515 S Bowman Rd, Ste B Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-228-7171

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Infectious Diseases 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-603-1616

D. DEAN KUMPURIS

GERALD R. SILVOSO Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

Geriatric Medicine PHAM H. LIEM

ROBERT W. BRADSHER

JOHN E. DIETRICH Infectious Disease Resource Group 9600 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 280 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-661-0037

DWIGHT A. LINDLEY Infectious Disease Resource Group 9600 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 280 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-661-0037

MICHAEL SACCENTE

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Senior Health Center Geriatrics and Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6219

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Infectious Diseases 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-603-1616

PRIYA MENDIRATTA

Internal Medicine

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ANN T. RIGGS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Senior Health Center Geriatrics and Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6219

T. SCOTT SIMMONS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Reynolds Institute on Aging 28

PAUL WILLIAM ZELNICK Physicians Group Doctors Bldg, Ste 615 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-666-3666

Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics Arkansas Specialty Hand and Upper Extremity Center 600 S McKinley St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-663-3647

Gastroenterology

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SUE A. ULMER Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

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G. THOMAS FRAZIER, JR.

Autumn Road Family Practice 904 Autumn Rd, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-227-6363

HELEN B. CASTEEL

SARA GHORI TARIQ University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine South Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5311

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DANIEL W. WATSON

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AMY J. FITZGERALD Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

ROBERT HOWARD HOPKINS, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine South Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5311

ROBERT CHARLES LAVENDER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

MARCH 7, 2013 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER

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MARIANN HARRINGTON Little Rock Hematology Oncology Associates 9500 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 330 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-537-9009

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MARY LOUISE POWELL CORBITT Arkansas Headache Clinic 2215 Wildwood Ave, Ste 105 North Little Rock, AR, 72120 501-833-3833

M. BETUL GUNDOGDU University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine and Neurosciences Institute 501 Jackson Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5838

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BASHIR S. SHIHABUDDIN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine and Neurosciences Institute 501 Jackson Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5838

Nuclear Medicine JAMES E. MCDONALD University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Nuclear Medicine 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5750

University Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Center Freeway Medical Tower, Ste 7-400 5800 W 10th St Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-296-1800

EVERETT F. MAGANN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine Freeway Medical Tower, 7th Fl 5800 W 10th St Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-526-7425

STEPHEN RAY MARKS 3343 Springhill Dr, Ste 1005 North Little Rock, AR, 72117 501-758-9251

CHARLES E. PHILLIPS Central Clinic for Women Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 500 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-5885

ROSEY SEGUINď&#x161;şCALDERONE Arkansas Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center 9500 Kanis Rd, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-224-6699

PAUL J. WENDEL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences University Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Center Freeway Medical Tower, Ste 7-400 5800 W 10th St Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-296-1800

Ophthalmology

KATHY LYNN THOMAS

LAURIE D. BARBER

Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Department of Nuclear Medicine 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-257-6100

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4301 W Markham St, Ste 523 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5822

DAVID W. WEISS Radiology Consultants of Little Rock Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 1100 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-5240

Obstetrics and Gynecology ALEXANDER F. BURNETT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oncology Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8522

KAY H. CHANDLER Cornerstone Clinic for Women 1 Lile Ct, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-224-5500

STEPHEN M. CHATELAIN Arkansas Perinatal Services Medical Towers Bldg 2, Ste 810 9501 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-217-8467

KAREN JEAN KOZLOWSKI Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Young Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-8337

CURTIS L. LOWERY, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

J. DAVID BRADFORD Retina Specialists of Arkansas 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 201 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-978-5500

WADE BROCK Arkansas Oculoplastic Surgery 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 500 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-223-2244

CAROL W. CHAPPELL 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-661-1123

RICHARD A. HARPER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4301 W Markham St, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5822

RICKEY D. MEDLOCK Retina Associates 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-219-0900

A. HENRY THOMAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4301 W Markham St, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5822

CHRISTOPHER T. WESTFALL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4301 W Markham St, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5822

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MARCH 7, 2013 29


There’s a reason CARTI ranks in the top five percent nationally for patient satisfaction amongst cancer centers.

Dr. Larry Mendelsohn Hematologist/Oncologist

Dr. Mariann Harrington Hematologist/Oncologist

Dr. Diane Wilder Hematologist/Oncologist

Dr. Scott Stern Head & Neck Surgeon

Dr. Michael Talbert Radiation Oncologist

You’re looking at five of them. Thank you to our patients for recognizing Dr. Larry Mendelsohn, Dr. Mariann Harrington, Dr. Diane Wilder, Dr. Scott Stern and Dr. Michael Talbert as the Best Doctors in the State. Because of these physicians, along with all of our medical staff and 340 colleagues throughout the state, CARTI brings the fight to cancer to more than 20,000 patients each year. Congratulations on this well-deserved honor.

c a r t i .c o m 30

MARCH 7, 2013 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

1 .8 0 0. 482 .85 61


Orthopaedic Surgery C. Lowry Barnes

Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S McKinley St, 1st Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-666-2824

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1225

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5170

Brendan C. Stack, Jr.

Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S McKinley St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-663-8900

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8224

Kenneth A. Martin

Scott J. Stern

Wayne Bruffett

Martin Knee and Sports Medicine Center 8907 Kanis Rd, Ste 330 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-975-5633

David Gordon Newbern

Little Rock Hematology Oncology Associates 9500 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-219-8777

James Y. Suen

Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics Arkansas Specialty Hand and Upper Extremity Center 600 S McKinley St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-663-3647

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-296-1200

Richard W. Nicholas, Jr.

Emre Vural

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4301 W Markham St, Ste 531 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-296-1200

Richard A. Nix OrthoArkansas 10301 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-604-6900

Richard D. Peek Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S McKinley St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-663-8900

Ruth L. Thomas University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6067

John L. Vander Schilden University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-7823

Otolaryngology

Jeffrey L. Barber

Arkansas Otolaryngology Center 10201 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-5050

Joe B. Colclasure Arkansas Otolaryngology Center 10201 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-5050

John Roddey Edwards Dickins Arkansas Otolaryngology Center 10201 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-5050

John L. Dornhoffer University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic Jackson T. Stephens Spine and Neurosciences Institute 501 Jackson Stephens Dr, 3rd Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5878

Otolaryngology

Gresham Richter

Arkansas Children’s Hospital ENT Clinic

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5140

Pathology

Murat Gokden

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services Shorey Bldg, 4th Fl, Rm 4S-09 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-603-1508

Aubrey Hough, Jr. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5369

Jennifer Hunt University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5170

Laura W. Lamps University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services Shorey Bldg, 4th Fl, Rm 4S-09 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-603-1508

Robert Lorsbach University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services Shorey Bldg, 4th Fl, Rm 4F-09 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5170

Fred G. Silva II NephroPath 10810 Executive Center Dr, Ste 100 Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-604-2695

Bruce Robert Smoller University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services

D. Melissa Graham

Arkansas Allergy and Asthma Clinic 10310 W Markham St, Ste 222 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-5210

Stacie M. Jones

ArCom Systems Delivers Top HCAHPS Scores!

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Tamara T. Perry Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1400

Amy M. Scurlock Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Rauland-Borg Responder 5 and ArCom Systems deliver the results you need on your HCAHPS Survey… Always! • Increase Reimbursement Dollars • 40% Improvement in HCAHPS Scores • Develop a “Culture of Always”

Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Karen Jean Kozlowski

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Young Women’s Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-8337

Pediatric Anesthesiology Jesus (JoJo) Apuya

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

James Grady Crosland Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-2933

Jayant K. Deshpande Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-8006

Timothy W. Martin Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1100

Anna-Maria Onisei Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1100

Michael L. Schmitz Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1100

M. Saif Siddiqui Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1100

1-800-811-9776 www.arcomsys.com

Abid Ul Ghafoor Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-2933 special supplement to ARKANSAS TIMES march 7, 2013 31


why diagnoses go

WRONG and what you can do about it

A Q&A with Best Doctorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vice-Chairman, Evan Falchuk Q: If someone asked you to explain in 20 seconds what Best Doctors does, how would you answer? A: We are turning traditional notions of health care on their head. In todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s confusing maze of a health care system, we get people the right answers to their medical questions. We do this in lots of different ZD\VEXWDOORILWLQYROYHVÂżJXULQJRXWZKDWLVDFWXDOO\ wrong, asking the right questions, and getting the right answers from the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best expert physicians. Today, we serve 30 million members around the world, and we believe that through our work we are on our way to changing health care forever. Q: Can you give us an example of a case where Best Doctors corrected a diagnosis? A: My favorite example is close to home â&#x20AC;&#x201D; my own brother, Brad. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the co-creator of the TV show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glee,â&#x20AC;? and before coming to Best Doctors, he was incorrectly diagnosed with a malignant tumor in his spinal cord. His doctors had scheduled him for radiation and surgery to get rid of the tumor, which is actually the right thing to do for that kind of condition. The trouble is, that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the condition he had. So we reviewed all of his medical information and family medical history, and our doctors found a clue that ended up being lifesaving for him. It turned out we have a family history of a condition that could easily be confused for a malignant tumor. Best Doctors recommended some additional tests, which FRQÂżUPHGWKDWKHGLGQÂśWKDYHDWXPRUDWDOO7KH treatment that was originally planned was in fact very dangerous, given his actual condition. Today, having received both the right diagnosis and right treatment from Best Doctors, he is doing great. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing about my brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s case is that stories like his are more common than most of us think.

32

MARCH 7, 2013 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

Our U.S. data from 2011 showed 29% of people had been misdiagnosed, while 60% required a change in treatment.

Q: The public is starting to hear more about how often people are misdiagnosed, and about getting second opinions. In this day and age, why is PLVGLDJQRVLVKDSSHQLQJVRRIWHQLQWKHÂżUVWSODFH" A: Doctors today are the best educated and best trained than at any time in history. They have the best technology out there, and every year more and more treatments are available. So how can misdiagnoses still happen? The problem, we believe, is in how our health care system works. Doctors sometimes have to see 30 or more patients a day, and often can spend only 15 minutes or less with each one. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening is that doctors and patients just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the time together that they need to ask all the right questions, and make the best decisions. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why we believe that misdiagnosis is a public health problem that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get the attention it absolutely deserves. Q: How long has Best Doctors been around? What was the genesis of the company? A: Best Doctors has been doing this work for almost 25 years. My father is one of the founders. He is an internist and professor of medicine and saw the problem of quality in medicine from his work as a doctor. He knew that as a doctor and a teacher he could only reach so many people. His vision in creating Best Doctors was to reach millions more. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspiring to be part of a team that is making this vision a reality.


WHAT CAN PEOPLE DO TO AVOID BEING

MISDIAGNOSED?

1. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to ask questions. You should never be a spectator in your own care. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your health, and your life. 2. Always get a second opinion and focus on sharing your symptoms, rather than the diagnosis you received from your initial treating doctor. 3. Take the time to get to know your family medical history â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and make sure your doctor knows about it. 4. Take someone with you to your doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visits to help listen, take notes, and ask questions. 5. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been diagnosed with a type of cancer, always have your pathology re-checked.

Q: What makes doctors the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best?â&#x20AC;? How does Best Doctors choose its physicians? A: We think the very best doctors are the ones who make good, thoughtful decisions. Now, one way to do this would be to watch every doctor practice, but obviously thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not practical. So what we set out to do over two decades ago was ambitious and gamechanging. We wanted to ask doctors all across the country, and across all of the many specialty areas of medicine who, in their experience, they thought were the best at what they do. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little bit like what doctors do themselves when they look for doctors â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they ask their peers for their honest perspective. Today, we have assembled a respected database of nearly 50,000 doctors that represent the top 5% of doctors across 45 specialties and more than 400 subspecialties of medicine. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an incredibly powerful tool. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completely independent. Doctors can never pay to get on our Best Doctors in America list, nor are they (or we) ever paid if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re voted on to the list. The only way to be on the list is for their SHHUVWKHEHVWLQWKHLUÂżHOGVWRQDPHWKHPWRLW,WLV in fact, a singular honor to be a Best Doctor. Q: What would you give as the #1 reason why Best Doctors continues its efforts to improve health care? A: The biggest reason why we come to work each day at Best Doctors is because we believe everyone should get the right care. While most people get the right care, far, far too many people still do not. There LVQÂśWDQHDV\ZD\WRÂż[WKHKHDOWKFDUHV\VWHPEXWZH know we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to wait for that â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we can help people through our approach and physiciansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; expertise today, and so we do. Q: What can people do to avoid being misdiagnosed? A: The best thing you can do is to ask questions. You should never be a spectator in your own care. Ask

why your doctor thinks your diagnosis is right. Find out what else could be causing your problems. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to ask â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your health, and your life. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get surgery or you have a serious illness, always get a second opinion. Making sure you are comfortable that you understand what is happening and what is being planned for you is a really important way to avoid problems. Focus on telling your second-opinion doctor all of your V\PSWRPVUDWKHUWKDQLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFLQJKHUWKLQNLQJULJKW RIIWKHEDWE\UHSHDWLQJZKDW\RXUÂżUVWGRFWRUVDLG\RX have. Take the time to get to know your family medical history â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and make sure your doctor knows about it. ,WÂśVKDUGWROLVWHQWRGLIÂżFXOWPHGLFDOQHZVDQGSD\ close attention to details at the same time, so take someone with you to doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visits to help listen, take notes, and ask questions. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been diagnosed with a type of cancer, always have your pathology re-checked. If you had a biopsy and your diagnosis is based on your original pathology report, be sure to get it reviewed again. We all have the power to make a real difference in our own care or that of a loved one.

Best Doctors, Inc. (www.bestdoctors.com) is a global health company founded by Harvard Medical School professors in 1989. Around the world, Best Doctors provides people access to WKHH[SHUWLVHRIWKHEHVWÂżYHSHUFHQWRISK\VLFLDQVIRUWKH right care and right treatment. For further information, call (800) 223-5003. Unsure if you have access to Best Doctors DVDQHPSOR\HHEHQHÂżW"7DNHWKLVDUWLFOHWR\RXU+XPDQ Resources Department.

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MARCH 7, 2013 33


Ark off tech 307-C J. Michael Vollers

Richard Thomas Fiser

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-2933

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1845

Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Michiaki Imamura

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-5858

Pediatric Cardiology Thomas H. Best

PHysIcIans:

HealtH InformatIon excHange is alive and growing in arkansas

Just ask the 2,400+ health care professionals, and 12 hospitals and clinics that have already joined SHARE - the Arkansas State Health Alliance for Records Exchange. SHARE securely gathers your patients’ clinical data from other SHARE health care providers and gives you an overview of their health history, treatment and progress. That’s powerful insight that can improve the way you plan, deliver and coordinate patient care. Sign up now to qualify for a free, one-time connection to SHARE. Call 501.410.1999 or visit www.SHAREarkansas.com to learn more.

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Renee Adams Bornemeier Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Brian K. Eble Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Eudice E. Fontenot Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Elizabeth A. Frazier

Your next vehicle is already in the huge selection at

www.arkansas autobuyer.com But hurry!

they don’t stay around too long!

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

W. Robert Morrow Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

M. Michele Moss Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Christopher Ratnasamy Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Paul Michael Seib Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Pediatric Clinical Genetics Stephen G. Kahler

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Genetics and Metabolism 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

ARKANSAS

34

march 7, 2013 special supplement to ARKANSAS TIMES

.com

Pediatric Critical Care Adnan Tariq Bhutta

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Xiomara Garcia-Casal Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Jerril W. Green Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1845

Mark J. Heulitt Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1845

M. Michele Moss Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Parthak Prodhan Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1479

Ronald Sanders, Jr. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1845

Stephen M. Schexnayder Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1845

Pediatric Dermatology Jay M. Kincannon

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Dermatology Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-686-5960

Pediatric Developmental and Behavioral Problems Patrick H. Casey

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Pediatrics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-3300

Jill Fussell University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences James L. Dennis Developmental Center 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-3866

Eldon Gerald Schulz University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences James L. Dennis Developmental Center Department of Pediatrics 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1830

Pediatric Emergency Medicine Rhonda M. Dick

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1050

Mary Huckabee Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1050

Laura P. James Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1418

Rebecca Latch Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-964-1050

Rebecca A. Schexnayder Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1050

Steven W. Shirm Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1050

Kendall Lane Stanford Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1050

Elizabeth Anne Storm Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1050

Tonya Marie Thompson Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1050

Pediatric Endocrinology John L. Fowlkes

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Endocrinology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1430

Stephen Frank Kemp Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Endocrinology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1430

Alba E. Morales Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Endocrinology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1430

Kathryn M. Thrailkill Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Endocrinology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1430

Pediatric Gastroenterology Juliana C. Frem

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition


1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1004

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

GEORGE J. FUCHS III

G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Genetics and Metabolism 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

TROY E. GIBBONS

Pediatric Medical Toxicology

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology DAVID L. BECTON

LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1418

Pediatric Nephrology

THOMAS G. WELLS

ROBERT DALE BLASIER

GRESHAM RICHTER

RICHARD T. BLASZAK

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1847

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital ENT Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1225

RICHARD E. MCCARTHY

Pediatric Pain Management

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1847

EILEEN N. ELLIS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Neurological Surgery GEORGE T. TIM BURSON Neurosurgery Arkansas Medical Tower 1, Ste 310 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-224-0200

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Otolaryngology

KAREN M. REDWINE

JAMES ARONSON

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1847

CHARLES MICHAEL BOWER

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Otolaryngology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1100

Pediatric Physical Medicine and Rehab VIKKI A. STEFANS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Developmental, Behavioral and Rehabilitation

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1494

AMIR R. MIAN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1494

CAROLYN SUZANNE SACCENTE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

ROBERT L. SAYLORS III Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

KIMO C. STINE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Infectious Disease NADA S. HARIK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1416

RICHARD F. JACOBS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1442

JOSE R. ROMERO Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1416

J. GARY WHEELER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1416

Pediatric Interventional Radiology CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1175

Pediatric Medical Genetics STEPHEN G. KAHLER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Genetics and Metabolism SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MARCH 7, 2013 35


1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-3728

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Pulmonology

GULNUR COM

MARTIN L. BAUER

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

ARIEL BERLINSKI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1006

JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

SUPRIYA K. JAMBHEKAR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Radiology

CHARLES ALBERT JAMES

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-7511

Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-2680

PAULA K. MORRIS

Pediatric Specialist/ Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1175

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Rheumatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Rheumatology

JOHN LEE CARROLL

JASON A. DARE

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Rheumatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

ROBERT H. WARREN

TERRY O. HARVILLE

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology

Pediatric Sleep Medicine Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Specialist/ Abused Children JERRY G. JONES

Arkansas Children’s House 1600 Maryland Ave

ELTON R. CLEVELAND

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

BRIAN H. HARDIN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

J. DARRELL NESMITH Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Adolescent Medicine

Future Best Ken Martin, M.D., is pleased to announce the association of Clay Riley, M.D., with Martin Knee and Sports. Dr. Riley’s orthopedic expertise focuses on shoulder and elbow repair and rehabilitation enhanced through his Fellowship at the Foundation for Athletic and Reconstructive Research, Texas Orthopedic Hospital, Houston. In addition, Dr. Riley is active in research and has authored numerous orthopedic book chapters and scientific papers. Martin Knee and Sports welcomes

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

MARIA G. PORTILLA

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Specialist/Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine ROBERT W. ARRINGTON

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-1548

R. WHIT HALL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-603-1255

ROBERT E. LYLE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1028

ASHLEY S. ROSS III Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

JOANNE S. SZABO Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1028

BONNIE J. TAYLOR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

BILLY RAY THOMAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-296-1397

DONNAL C. WALTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Dr. Clay Riley, sure to be a future

Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, General

“Best Doctor” in orthopedic surgery.

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neurology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

BERNADETTE M. LANGE

GREGORY B. SHARP Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neurology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Ken Martin, M.D. (left), with Clay Riley, M.D.

36

MARCH 7, 2013 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

8907 Kanis Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 501.227.9994

ROLLA M. SHBAROU Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neurology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000


Pediatric Specialist/Pediatric Metabolic Diseases STEPHEN G. KAHLER

Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section of Genetics and Metabolism 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatric Surgery

M. SIDNEY DASSINGER

Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1446

RICHARD J. JACKSON Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1446

VINCENT CALDERON, JR. St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72204 501-562-4838

DALE W. DILDY, JR. Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

ROSANA DIOKNO Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4366

JOSEPH M. ELSER Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital

General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

CHARLES ROBERT FEILD University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences James L. Dennis Developmental Center Department of Pediatrics 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1830

CHARLOTTE A. HOBBS

JAMES S. MAGEE

Arkansas Center for Birth Defects Research and Prevention 13 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-5001

Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

ANTHONY DALE JOHNSON Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 200 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-4117

DIANE FREEMAN

SUSAN A. KEATHLEY

Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 200 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-4117

Little Rock Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clinic Doctors Park Bldg, Ste 360 9600 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-6727

LAURA R. MCLEANE Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

EDUARDO R. OCHOA, JR. Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-2858

A. LARRY SIMMONS Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital

General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1202

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation KEVIN J. COLLINS

Rehabilitation Medicine Consultants of Arkansas Springhill Medical Plaza 3401 Springhill Dr, Ste 460 North Little Rock, AR, 72117 501-945-1888

KEVIN M. MEANS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-221-1311

R. TODD MAXSON Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1446

SAMUEL D. SMITH Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1446

Pediatric Urology STEPHEN J. CANON

Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section of Urology 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

Pediatrics/General MARY E. AITKEN

Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

RONALD L. BALDWIN Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

SHELLY L. BALDWIN Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

LANESSA D. BASS Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

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Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

CARRIE M. BROWN Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-1548

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MARCH 7, 2013 37


Healing is in our nature.

Plastic Surgery

Radiology

THOMAS R. MOFFETT

ALBERT S. ALEXANDER

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Associates 11300 N Rodney Parham Rd, Ste 210 Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-663-4100

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

KRIS B. SHEWMAKE Arkansas Plastic Surgery 9500 Kanis Rd, Ste 502 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-219-8388

JAMES C. YUEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8711

EDGARDO J. CHUA ANGTUACO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5750

TERESITA L. ANGTUACO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5762

Psychiatry

Our physicians strive to provide the best pediatric care, to seek the latest medical research breakthroughs, to offer specialized pediatric training and to prevent illness and injury for the children of Arkansas and surrounding states.

JAMES A. CLARDY

JODI M. BARBOZA

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 3916 W Capitol Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-8286

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

JEFFREY L. CLOTHIER

BENJAMIN JOSEPH BARTNICKE

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Psychiatry 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-8100

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

TIM A. KIMBRELL

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

F. KEITH BELL

Congratulations to all of the Arkansas Children’s Hospital physicians named to the Best Doctors in Arkansas list.

Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Department of Psychiatry 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR, 72114 501-257-3468

IRVING KUO Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Department of Psychiatry 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR, 72114 501-257-3131

LAWRENCE A. LABBATE Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Service 2200 Fort Roots Dr, Rm 116 North Little Rock, AR, 72114 501-257-3131

WILLIAM C. CULP University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6910

C. WILLIAM DEATON Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

STEVE A. DUNNAGAN Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

JOHN SPOLLEN Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Department of Psychiatry 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR, 72114 501-257-3131

Pulmonary Medicine F. CHARLES HILLER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Pulmonary and Critical Care Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-603-1400

Radiation Oncology MICHAEL L. TALBERT

archildrens.org 38

CARTI Baptist 9500 Kanis Rd, Ste 150 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-312-1733

MARCH 7, 2013 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

EREN ERDEM

Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5750

CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-1175

AARON L. JANOS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

DON KUSENBERGER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

ROBERT W. LAAKMAN Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

W. JEAN MATCHETT Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 511-686-2681

JOHN N. MEADORS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

GEORGE A. NORTON Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

AARON M. SPANN

GREGORY S. KRULIN

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Sleep Lab 11300 Financial Pkwy, Ste 1200 Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-526-6090

DAVID E. TAMAS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 604 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

SHANNON R. TURNER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

Rheumatology JAMES HOWARD ABRAHAM III Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

ROBERT M. BREWER Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

RICHARD W. HOUK Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

S. MICHAEL JONES Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

ELEANOR A. LIPSMEYER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Rheumatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-526-4939

JOHN P. SCURLOCK CUMMINS LUE

RAJESH SETHI

LAURA B. TRIGG

JONATHAN F. FRAVEL

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

Radiology Associates (RAPA) St. Vincent Breast Center, Ste 114 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-661-9766

KATHLEEN M. SITARIK KEDAR JAMBHEKAR University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave

RONALD ROBERTSON University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6648

EMILIO TIRADO THOMAS M. KOVALESKI

CHRISTIE B. PHELAN

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5750

JOHN B. CONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8000

JOHN C. JONES

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Neuroradiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-5750

JEROME J. GEHL

CHRIS M. CATE The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-9080

The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-9080

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

HEMENDRA R. SHAH

HUGH F. BURNETT The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-9080

STEPHEN DACOSTA HOLT

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-3914

Surgery

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

ROGERICH T. PAYLOR Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-2614

Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-202-1902

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-8000

Sleep Medicine JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-364-4000

DAVID GEORGE DAVILA Baptist Health Sleep Clinic Hickingbotham Outpatient Bldg 9500 Kanis Rd

500 S University Ave, Ste 808 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-664-2174

WILLIAM EVERETT TUCKER The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-9080

Surgical Oncology J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Department of Surgical Oncology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8211

RONDA S. HENRYTILLMAN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Second Floor Oncology Clinics 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-296-1200

JOHN C. JONES The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd


Thoracic Surgery

Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-9080

Frank Michael Bauer III

V. Suzanne Klimberg University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Women’s Oncology Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-296-1200

Kent C. Westbrook University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Department of Surgical Oncology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-8211

St. Vincent’s Cardiovascular Surgeons 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 501 Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-666-2894

Hugh F. Burnett The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-227-9080

H. Gareth Tobler University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery 4301 W Markham St

Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-7884

Urology Gail Reede Jones Arkansas Urology 1300 Centerview Dr Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-219-8900

D. Keith Mooney Arkansas Urology 1300 Centerview Dr Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-664-4364

Vascular Surgery Gary W. Barone University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Surgery

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6645

John F. Eidt University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Vascular Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-686-6176

Mohammed M. Moursi Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Department of Vascular Surgery 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR, 72205 501-257-6917

These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2013 database, which includes over 45,000 doctors in more than 40 medical specialties. The Best Doctors in America® database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site. Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. Copyright 2013, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.

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special supplement to ARKANSAS TIMES march 7, 2013 39

A


Arts Entertainment AND

A voyage to ‘Treasure Island’ Arkansas Rep premieres new musical based on the classic tale.

R

obert Louis Stevenson’s “Treasure Island” is responsible for establishing many of the foundational pirate-adventure archetypes — the peglegged captain with a parrot on his shoulder, rum-soaked mutinies, X marks the spot, secret maps for buried treasure. In the 130 or so years since the classic children’s book was published, there have been dozens of swashbuckling, epic adaptations for film, TV, radio and theatre. So you could be forgiven for overlooking the fact that there are also some timeless moral questions subtly woven into the work. Those quandaries — what would I do and how far would I be willing to go for riches? — are the central themes in a brand new musical version of “Treasure Island” that will have its world premiere this week at The Arkansas Repertory Theatre. It’s an impressive cast and crew, with actors who’ve appeared in some of the most popular Broadway and traveling shows in recent years, including “Dreamgirls,” “Wicked,” “Billy Elliot” and many others. The production is directed and choreographed by Brett Smock, with the book by Smock and Carla Vitale, and music and lyrics by Corinne Aquilina. Stanley Meyer is the set designer, Rafael Colon Castanera (in his 12th season at The Rep) designed the costumes and Dan Ozminkowski is the lighting designer. It’s a seasoned creative team, several of whom made some time recently to discuss the production and offer a sneak-peek of the set and costumes. Smock, Vitale and Aquilina began work on the adaptation in 2006 at a small workshop in New York. “We’ve always seen this story as one lone boy against overwhelming odds in the face of moral and physical adversity,” Smock said. As the world economy nearly melted down in 2008 — due in no small part to selfishness on scales grand and small — “it simply sharpened and honed the focus for us,” he said. “We’ve always put greed at the front, and we’ve leveraged the show against what 40

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

people do in the face of having more, wanting more, getting more. When 2008 hit, it became clear that we had a very relevant story on our hands.” Of course, another effect of the 2008 crisis was that money became tight everywhere. Theatre companies were no exception. “These are tough times to produce new works in,” Smock said. “And even though they are being done, The Rep certainly steps into risky waters financially and artistically, and I think that we have a great sense of respect and thanks to them, because they’re taking a bold step producing a world premiere of a new piece. There’s a lot to be said for that.” “The Stevenson story itself is a grand, epic story with iconic characters, and you can’t ignore that it’s a huge story,” Vitale said. “What we needed to do was make it as personal as possible. So through economic constraints for theater in general, we can’t have a story with 40 pirates.” Thus, while staying true to the original work, the creators honed the story down to 12 actors, in the process synthesizing or combining some of the original’s characters. The music of this new version of “Treasure Island” also looks at issues relevant to today’s audiences, and the songs and instrumentation will be geared toward contemporary theatergoers, Aquilina said. “I’ve chosen to use strings because it’s such a flowing show. It takes place on water, it goes from land to water to the island, and I like the strings because it’s almost like a movie score brought to life,” she said. Smock echoed that assessment. The score has “some really contemporary qualities to it that, I think, allow us to live in that time without ever stepping too far backward.” “ ‘Treasure Island’ the way we could’ve done it might have been with a squeezebox and a lot of white wigs and a bird, you know?” Smock said. “And you will not find that here. We were never interested

JUSTIN BOLLE/THINKDERO PHOTOGRAPHY

BY ROBERT BELL

TREASURE ISLAND, A NEW MUSICAL: Richard B. Watson stars as Long John Silver in The Rep’s production.

in sea chanties.” The look of the set and the characters also drive that fact home. Castanera’s costumes combine haute couture and grindhouse horror, with a result that is compelling and even chilling, certainly not cutesy or anachronistic. The shapes of the costumes suggest traditional notions of pirate garb, but they’re also otherworldly, intense and, in a few cases, scary looking. That many-things-at-once vibe is also present in Meyer’s spectral, evocative set design, which is fairly far removed from his work on the Broadway production of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” or the premiere of Elton John and Tim Rice’s “Aida.”

“It’s not a palm tree, it’s not a ship, it’s not an island, it’s not the ocean, but yet it’s all those things,” he said of the set. “From the very beginning we wanted to approach this as nonliteral. The space would be all of those things and also this big platter to present the actors and the action.” The action begins with the opening of “Treasure Island” at 8 p.m. Friday, with a champagne reception and a cast meet-andgreet in the lobby afterward. The show runs through March 31, 7 p.m. WednesdayThursday, 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $30$60, with a half-price discount for students with ID.


JUSTIN BOLLE/THINKDERO PHOTOGRAPHY

ROCK CANDY Check out the Times’ A&E blog arktimes.com

A&E NEWS A RECONCEIVED VERSION of the Rodgers & Hart classic “Pal Joey” kicks off the Arkansas Repertory Theatre’s 2013-2014 season next fall. The play will run Sept. 6-29. Next up: “Red” (Oct. 25-Nov. 10), a bio-drama about a tense period in the life of painter Mark Rothko, produced in partnership with the Arkansas Arts Center, which has an upcoming Rothko exhibit called “Mark Rothko in the 1940’s: The Decisive Decade.” The world premiere musical, “Because of Winn Dixie” (Dec. 6-29), based on the Kate DeCamillo novel and created by a Tony-winning team, including Grammy-winning songwriter Duncan Sheik, is the third in the lineup. The show will be “the first pre-Broadway musical starring a live dog as the central character,” according to The Rep. “Clybourne Park” (Jan. 24-Feb. 9, 2014) is a “bitingly funny and fiercely provocative new play about the volatile combination of race and real estate.” “Les Miserables,” that unstoppable juggernaut of musical theater, returns (March 7-30, 2014) and with it, actor Douglas Webster in the role of Jean Valjean. You can get your yucks on with The Second City (April 21-May 4, 2014). The laughs continue with the season closer, “The Compleat Wrks of Wllm Shkspr (Abridged)” (June 6-22, 2014). The widely loved truncation is “a parody of the 37 plays written by William Shakespeare, with all of them being performed in shortened, and side-splitting, form.” CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS also released its 2013-2014 lineup last week, and first up is a “back-by-popular-demand” run of the hit “Wicked,” Sept. 25-Oct. 6. There’s no question that “Wicked” has been one of the most popular Broadway shows in recent memory, and it looks like folks who missed out when the show was last in Little Rock will get another chance at finding out how the Wicked Witch of the West got that way. The show was here in 2010 and broke box-office and sales records, according to Celebrity Attractions. Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” comes to town Dec. 3-5. “Hello Dolly” is Jan. 14-16 and “Hair” closes out the season Feb. 18-20. IT’S ALMOST THAT TIME AGAIN, WHEN HORDES OF MUSICIANS and music fans will swarm Hot Springs for the annual Valley of the Vapors Independent Music Festival, which is organized by the good people at Low Key Arts (full disclosure: The Arkansas Times is a sponsor of the VOV, because it is an awesome event). As in years past, the VOV (March 15-19) will offer a plethora of diverse and engaging live music for the adventurous listener. Bands from many corners of the globe will perform, including some from Iran, Sudan, The Netherlands, Canada, Ireland, Japan and South Korea. There’ll be workshops as well. Topics include: block printmaking, illustration, breakdancing, and “the logistical considerations of compiling a mixed cassette tape.” So hey, you can rock out and expand your skillset at the same time. Efficiency! More at valleyofthevapors.com.

e c n e i r pe

ex G I C MA ILM

the

F F O

M L I F F O e c C n I e i G r A e exp T H E M Movies are magic. Ever since I was a little girl, it seemed to me a miracle that you could see moving pictures that told a story…you watched and fell totally into the world of the movie. But the most miraculous thing to me was one moment I was inside a story, laughing crying, being scared, being thrilled. And the next moment I looked behind me and all it was was a beam of light heading toward the screen. Think about that!”

Joan Darling

director, acting professor, Film Forum faculty

March 21-24 Petit Jean Mountain near Little Rock

Whether you are a writer, director, film or acting student, or just a dedicated lover of film, you will find something and someone to inspire you at the Film Forum. Our award winning faculty of Hollywood insiders will share their knowledge in intimate, hands-on workshops and panels.

L I V E T H E L E G AC Y. O RG

Support for the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute Film Forum is provided, in part, by the Arkansas Arts Council, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage and the National Endowment for the Arts. www.arktimes.com

MARCH 7, 2013

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THE TO-DO

LIST

BY ROBERT BELL & DAVID KOON

THURSDAY 3/7-SATURDAY 3/9

ARKANSAS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS

3:30 p.m. Barton Coliseum. $8.

While football is probably always going

to be the king sport of Arkansas, there’s something to be said for a great game of high school basketball. Sure, nobody on the basketball court is getting his or her teeth rattled by a bone-crushing hit (or shouldn’t, anyway), but you also don’t have to plant

your butt on a liquid-nitrogen-cooled aluminum bleacher in order to watch a game. That counts for a lot in my book. Even beyond being out of the weather, though, there’s just the poetry of the five best of our’n against the five best of your’n, with

young folks dueling it out for a fleeting moment of victory under the lights. Here, the state’s best B-ball teams go head to head for all the marbles, with what’s sure to be copious amounts of soaring triumph and heartbreaking defeat on display. DK

THURSDAY 3/7

THURSDAY 3/7

WATER LIARS, THE SEE

‘CHALLENGING THE POLITICS OF (IN) VISIBILITY: MODERN MUTUAL AID SOCIETIES, WOMANIST POLITICS, AND GLOBAL FUNKSTRESS JANELLE MONAE’

9:30 p.m. White Water Tavern.

Mississippi duo Water Liars have been road-doggin’ it extra hard for the last couple years now. These guys know from cheap coffee and chaffed asses and hangovers and road dust and the other assorted afflictions that vex the traveling musician. They’ve played hereabouts a handful of times and I’m betting they’ve earned some fans with their songs, which are of fine quality and mostly range from wistful to pensive to sweetly sad. There are some really good tunes and some really nice harmonies on their new album, “Wyoming,” out this week on the plucky Big Legal Mess/Fat Possum imprint, which has brought us many enjoyable albums over the years. “Wyoming” is a good record, maybe a bit sadder than

6 p.m. Philander Smith College.

MISSISSIPPI DUO: Water Liars play at White Water Tavern Thursday.

their first one, maybe like a less precious/more world-weary Fleet Foxes, if I were forced to make a comparison.

Also performing will be Little Rock’s The See. You already know them and love them. RB

SATURDAY 3/9

BLUES REVOLUTION TOUR

9 p.m. Stickyz. $10.

Back during my younger years, I was nuts on the subject of the blues, up to and including spending Spring Break 1995 driving around the Delta with my then-girlfriend in search of the best jukebox in Mississippi. Never did find it, but I did get to listen to a lot of great music — and eat some damn fine tamales — in the heart of the land that begat the genre. Opportunities to see blues-fueled music in Little Rock are mostly of the traveling roadshow variety, and a sure bet might be the upcoming appearance by Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, which promises a mix of “Delta blues and hillbilly fervor,” also generally known as good ol’ rock ’n’ roll. The band is on a 14-city swing through Texas, Arkansas and Missouri in support of its new album “Between the Ditches,” which debuted at No. 1 on the iTunes Blues chart. Also on the 42

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

BLUES TOUR: The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band plays at Stickyz Saturday.

bill at this 18-and-older affair will be Jimbo Mathus, still hot on the heels of his scorching recent album, “White

Buffalo,” and Grammy Award-winning guitar player Alvin Youngblood Hart. Sounds like a good time to me. DK

It was back in the fall of ’11 that, while compiling the week’s calendar events, I came across the following lecture title, by Professor Lisa Corrigan of the University of Arkansas: “Afrofuturism and the Politics of Possibility: Radical Social Love and the Career of Michael Jackson.” I noted then that it was “the most badass, intriguing title ever. If you were wondering how you should go about picking a name for your lecture, this is how it is done, folks.” Well now Corrigan is coming back to Central Arkansas for two more lectures, which also have rad and interesting titles. The first is “Challenging the Politics of (In)visibility: Modern Mutual Aid Societies, Womanist Politics, and Global Funkstress Janelle Monae.” Now that’s the kind of lecture title that will make you want to get out of the house and go learn something. And there’s more: At 7 p.m. Friday at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Little Rock, Corrigan will deliver “The Old Jim Crow and The New Jim Crow: Tracing the Contours of Black Incarceration,” with a Q&A to follow. The lecture is in conjunction with a discussion of civil rights attorney and scholar Michelle Alexander’s critically acclaimed and award-winning book “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.” RB


IN BRIEF

THURSDAY 3/7

SATURDAY 3/9

BARD BALL 2013: ‘TAMING OF THE BREW’

7 p.m. Argenta Community Theater. $75.

William Shakespeare was not only a genius writer, but also an actor, a doublewhammy of a profession that — in my

considerable experience with writers and actors — probably means he could drink an alcoholic polar bear right under the table. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Celebrating the connection between booze and Billy Shakes is Bard Ball 2013, a benefit in support of Arkansas Shakespeare Theatre. Up for grabs will be

a Falstaff-worthy slate of food, live entertainment and suds, with Starving Artist Cafe supplying the grub and several local breweries, including Vino’s, Diamond Bear and Marshall Brewing Co., filling the taps. Would I were in an alehouse in North Little Rock! I would give all my fame for a pot of ale, and safety. DK

FRIDAY 3/8

MONDAY 3/11

MAINLAND DIVIDE, GUARDIAN ALIEN, ZS, FISTER

7 p.m. Downtown Music Hall. $3.

I have spent a goodly amount of time listening to Guardian Alien’s singularly mind-exploding psychedelic rock album “See the World Given to a One Love Entity,” released in 2012. The 38-minute, single track album doesn’t just explode your mind (though it does, for sure). It puts it back together. After all the bits of your mind have been jettisoned to unfathomable reaches of the cosmos by the violent initial blast of this beautiful yet intensely jarring music, those trillions upon trillions of bits of consciousness are pulled back toward the center — toward your empty head — almost as fast, until all the pieces are put back in place and a shimmering sense of eternal calm and wellbeing washes over you as the album fades out and the multiversal oneness smiles in pure, loving benevolence. And that’s what it’s like to listen to Guardian Alien’s excellent record “See the World Given to a One Love Entity.” I must point out that the band’s founder Greg Fox (formerly of the band Liturgy) is not so much a “drummer” in the traditional sense as he is an eruption of kaleidoscopic rhythmic energy that goes from blast-beat blur to waves of rolling/crashing/thundering musicality, utterly transcending the antiquated yet well-meaning

ONE LOVE ENTITY: Guardian Alien performs at Downtown Music Hall Monday night.

notions of timekeeping and “what a drummer is supposed to do,” if that makes sense. And my goodness, the other band members are no slouches either, as is evident from recorded material. So it’ll be rad to see the band play live. On tour with them is their friend-band Zs. Even though they’ve been around more than a decade, I only just now a few minutes ago listened to Zs (sorry!) but it makes me think of The Contortions at one of those Halloween coverup shows and they’re playing the

music of Conlon Nancarrow somehow? I’m thinking specifically of the Zs song “In My Dream I Shot a Monk.” I don’t know, there are saxophones and yelling and turn-on-a-dime acrobatics and skronk all over the damn place. Little Rock’s Mainland Divide will headline the show, bringing the instrumental, ambient-informed post-rock for your listening enjoyment. St. Louis’s Fister will bring the bleak, heavy-riff crushing-ness. In all, an intriguing bill and hey — it’s $3! RB

MONDAY 3/11

CLUTCH

9 p.m. Juanita’s. $22 adv., $25 day of.

According to my sources, the forthcoming Clutch album “Earth Rocker” is a more straight-ahead rocker, with any jamming tendencies reined in. I listened to the title track (the record’s not

At noon, the Clinton School of Public Service hosts a panel discussion about the Arkansas Repertory Theatre’s new world premiere musical “Treasure Island.” The creative team will discuss the show (see page 40 for more details). Maxine’s has a free night of folky Americana, with Star & Micey and Carolina Story, 8 p.m., free. Audrey Dean Kelly plays a free show at The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m. Ballet Arkansas performs its “Beyond Category” show in Hot Springs Village at Woodlands Auditorium, 7:30 p.m., $18. AT UCA’s Reynolds Performance Hall, Nai-Ni Chen Dance and The Ahn Trio present “Temptation of the Muses,” 7:30 p.m., $10-$40.

out until March 19) and it’s definitely a rocker. In their bio, the band members cite Professor Longhair as a big influence, along with Thin Lizzy, Motorhead, Fugazi and Bad Brains which, hell yes. “Maybe people expected us to go more acoustic or bluesy, but this album definitely showcases a riffs-

in-your-face kind of style,” guitarist Tim Sult said. “These songs ended up being faster and a bit more rocking.” Of course, it’s still Clutch, so expect big, groove-heavy riffin’ galore. Openers are ultra-bitchin’ British doom-meisters Orange Goblin, Lionize and Scorpion Child. RB

It’s time once more for the FOCAL Used Book Sale, in which paperback books are $.50 and hardback books are $1, 10 a.m. Friday and Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday. Downtown Music Hall has a packed bill of Christian metalcore, with Oh Sleeper, Fit For A King, Indirections, Every Knee Shall Bow, Dear Karma and More Than Sparrows, 6 p.m., $10 adv., $15 day of. Party all night with The 17th Floor, playing an 18-and-older show at Revolution, 9:30 p.m., $10. Blues-rocker Shannon Boshears plays at The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. Down in the Spa City, The Rocketboys, Mike Mains and The Branches and Dinner and a Suit play Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. Mountain Sprout brings the wild-ass hillbilly sounds to Stickyz for an 18-and-older show. College hoops fans take note: The Sun Belt Basketball Championship is at Summit Arena in Hot Springs. It starts at 6 p.m. Friday, with Western Kentucky taking on Louisiana-Monroe. Games continue that night, and start again at 6 p.m. Saturday and 6:30 on Sunday. The championship game is Monday night at 6 p.m. and will be televised on ESPN.

SATURDAY 3/9 Discovery has your all-damn-night partying needs covered, with DJs Joel Allenbaugh, Phillip Dixon, Crawley, Bobby Kuta and Brandon Peck, plus Dominique Sanchez & The Disco Dolls and a Salsa dance party, 9 p.m.-5 a.m., $10. Revolution brings in bigtime producer and songwriter Butch Walker, with Nikki Lane, 18-and-older, 9 p.m., $15. Ohio Alt-country rockers Two Cow Garage play at White Water Tavern with singer/songwriter Lydia Loveless and new local band Mad Nomad, 9:30 p.m., $7.

SUNDAY 3/10 It’s the biggest thing in contemporary Christian Music. Winter Jam 2013 rolls through town to save your soul with TobyMac, RED, Matthew West, Jamie Grace, Sidewalk Prophets, Royal Tailor, speaker Nick Hall, Jason Castro, OBB and Capital Kings, Verizon Arena, 6 p.m., $10.

www.arktimes.com

MARCH 7, 2013

43


AFTER DARK All events are in the Greater Little Rock area unless otherwise noted. To place an event in the Arkansas Times calendar, please e-mail the listing and all pertinent information, including date, time, location, price and contact information, to calendar@arktimes.com.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7

MUSIC

Alize (headliner), Brian Ramsey (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Audrey Dean Kelly. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www.thetavernsportsgrill.com. Blaggards. Hibernia Irish Tavern, 9 p.m., free. 9700 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-246-4340. www. hiberniairishtavern.com. Country Karaoke and Line Dance Lessons with Ron Powell. W.T. Bubba’s Country Tavern, 9 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-244-2528. Drew Holcomb, Cliff Hutchison. Juanita’s, 8:30 p.m., $10 adv., $12 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. How to Sing in a Rock Musical. Led by Michael Heavner, musical director for the Theatre Arts and Dance Department at the University or Arkansas at Little Rock. University of Central Arkansas, Snow Fine Arts Center Recital Hall, 6:30 p.m., free. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. “Inferno.” DJs play pop, electro, house and more, plus drink specials and $1 cover before 11 p.m. Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Irish Song Session. Sing and share Celtic songs. Dugan’s Pub, 7 p.m. 401 E. 3rd St. 501-244-0542. www.duganspublr.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, through March 28: 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Jocko Deal. Denton’s Trotline, 8 p.m.; March 28, 8 p.m., free. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Krush Thursdays with DJ Kavaleer. Club Climax, free before 11 p.m. 824 W. Capitol. 501-554-3437. Open jam with The Port Arthur Band. Parrot Beach Cafe, 9 p.m. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. Rusty White. Thirst n’ Howl, 8:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirst-n-howl. com. Star & Micey, Carolina Story. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www.maxinespub.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Third Degree (headliner), Richie Johnson (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Water Liars, The See. White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m. 2500 W 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com.

COMEDY

Steve McGrew, Dwight York. The Loony Bin, 7:30 p.m., $8-$12. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501228-5555. www.loonybincomedy.com.

DANCE

Ballet Arkansas: “Beyond Category.” Woodlands Auditorium, 7:30 p.m., $18. 1101 De Soto Blvd., Hot Springs Village. 501-922-

44

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

‘DOWN THE RIVER’: North Carolina singer/songwriter and White Water Tavern fave Malcolm Holcombe returns to the WWT, Monday at 9 p.m. 4231. www.hsvwoodlands.com. “Temptation of the Muses.” With Nai-Ni Chen Dance and The Ahn Trio. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA, 7:30 p.m., $10-$40. 350 S. Donaghey, Conway.

EVENTS

“Challenging the Politics of (In)visibility: Modern Mutual Aid Societies, Womanist Politics, and Global Funkstress Janelle Monae.” Lecture is in Elder’s Hall in the Kendall Building. Philander Smith College, 6 p.m. 900 W. Daisy L. Gatson Bates Drive. Hillcrest Shop & Sip. Shops and restaurants offer discounts, later hours, and live music. Hillcrest, first Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. P.O.Box 251522. 501-666-3600. www.hillcrestmerchants. com. “Treasure Island,” a panel discussion. With the creative team from the Arkansas Repertory Theatre. Clinton School of Public Service, noon, free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu.

SPORTS

2013 Arkansas High School Basketball Championships. Two boys basketball teams and two girls basketball teams from each of the seven divisions will compete for their respective state division championship. There will be 28 total competing teams. Barton Coliseum, 3:30 p.m.; March 8, 3:30 p.m.; March 9, 3:30 p.m., $8. 2600 Howard St. www.arkansasstatefair.com. Live horse racing. Thu.-Sun. every week until April 13, plus Memorial Day. Oaklawn, $2. 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-623-4411. www.

oaklawn.com.

FRIDAY, MARCH 8

MUSIC

The 17th Floor. 18-and-older. Revolution, 9:30 p.m., $10. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. revroom.com. Aces Wild. Denton’s Trotline, 9 p.m., $7. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Adam and Cole. W.T. Bubba’s Country Tavern, 9 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-244-2528. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. Dance night, with DJs, drink specials and bar menu, until 2 a.m. 1620 Savoy, 10 p.m. 1620 Market St. 501-2211620. www.1620savoy.com. Comfortable Brother. The Squid & Whale Pub, 8 p.m. 10 Center St. / 37 Spring St., Eureka Springs. 479-253-7147. www.squidandwhalepub.com. Crash Meadows. West End Smokehouse and Tavern, 10 p.m., $5. 215 N. Shackleford. 501-2247665. www.westendsmokehouse.net. Dan & Chris. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m., $3. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www.beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock. Friday night at Sway. Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Handmade Moments. Voulez Vous, March 8-9, 9 p.m. 63A Spring St., Eureka Springs. 479-3636595. www.voulezvouslounge.com/index.html. The Hi-Balls. Thirst n’ Howl, 8:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirst-n-howl. com. Mountain Sprout. 18-and-older. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com.

No Commercials. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Oh Sleeper, Fit For A King, Indirections, Every Knee Shall Bow, Dear Karma, More Than Sparrows. Downtown Music Hall, 6 p.m., $10 adv., $15 day of. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Patrick Sweany. White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m. 2500 W 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. The Rocketboys, Mike Mains and The Branches, Dinner and a Suit. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www. maxinespub.com. SCM Electrix, Grown Up Avenger Stuff, Gnarly Charlies, The Revolutioners. Vino’s, 9 p.m., $5. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. Shannon Boshears. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. Synergy, DJ Sleepy Genius. Montego Cafe, 8:30 p.m. 315 Main St. 501-372-1555. www.montegocafe.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Third Degree (headliner), Richie Johnson (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Thomas East. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. “YOLO.” Featuring four DJs and beach volleyball, 18-and-older. Flying DD, $5. 4601 S. University. 501-773-9990. flyingdd.com.

COMEDY

The Main Thing: “The Last Night at Orabella’s.” Original two-act comedic play about the residents of tiny, fictional Dumpster, Ark. The Joint, 8 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-3720205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Matt McClowry. UARK Bowl, 8 and 10:30 p.m., $7. 644 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-301-2030. www.uarkballroom.com. Steve McGrew, Dwight York. The Loony Bin, through March 9, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $8-$12. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www. loonybincomedy.com.

EVENTS

“End of Hi-BEAR-Nation” Debate Tournament. Debate tournament hosted in McCastlain Hall and sanctioned by the International Public Debate Association. University of Central Arkansas, March 8-10, 2 p.m. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. www.uca.edu. FOCAL Used Book Sale. Paperback books are $.50 and hardback books are $1. Main Library, March 8, 10 a.m.; March 9, 10 a.m.; March 10, 1 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us. LGBTQ/SGL Youth and Young Adult Group. Diverse Youth for Social Change is a group for LGBTQ/SGL and straight ally youth and young adults age 14 to 23. For more information, call 244-9690 or search “DYSC” on Facebook. 800 Scott St., 6:30 p.m. 800 Scott St. “The Old Jim Crow and the New Jim Crow: Tracing the Contours of Black Incarceration.” Presented by Lisa M. Corrigan, Ph.D., of the University of Arkansas. Unitarian Universalist Church of Little Rock, 7 p.m., free. 1818 Reservoir Road.


Robert Walden. The actor presents a lecture titled “The Power of Film in Public Service and Social Change.” Clinton School of Public Service, noon, free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu.

SATURDAY, MARCH 9

vocal soloists, the SoNA Singers and regional choirs. Walton Arts Center, 7:30 p.m., $5-$48. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Thomas East. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, through March 9, 7 p.m.; March 29, 7 p.m.; March 30, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-3242999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Thread. West End Smokehouse and Tavern, 10 p.m., $5. 215 N. Shackleford. 501-224-7665. www. westendsmokehouse.net. Two Cow Garage, Lydia Loveless, Mad Nomad. White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m., $7. 2500 W 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Vinyl Thief, Cosby, Nerves Junior. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www.maxinespub.com.

MUSIC

COMEDY

SPORTS

2013 Arkansas High School Basketball Championships. See March 7. Live horse racing. See March 7. Sun Belt Basketball Championship at Summit. Check website for schedule. Summit Arena, March 8-11. 134 Convention Blvd., Hot Springs. 501-620-5001. www.sunbeltsports.org/. Trey Johnson. The Tavern Sports Grill, 8:30 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www. thetavernsportsgrill.com.

5 Point Cove. Denton’s Trotline, 9 p.m., $6. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Arkansas Brothers. W.T. Bubba’s Country Tavern, 9 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-244-2528. Black Cadillacs, Good Field. Bear’s Den Pizza, 9:30 p.m., free. 235 Farris Road, Conway. 501328-5556. www.bearsdenpizza.com. Blu-82. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Blues Revolution Tour. With Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Jimbo Mathus and Alvin Youngblood Hart. 18-and-older. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $10. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com. Butch Walker, Nikki Lane. 18-and-older. Revolution, 9 p.m., $15. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. See March 8. Darril “Harp” Edwards. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Handmade Moments. Voulez Vous, 9 p.m. 63A Spring St., Eureka Springs. 479-363-6595. www. voulezvouslounge.com/index.html. Joel Allenbaugh, Phillip Dixon, Crawley, Bobby Kuta, Brandon Peck. Plus, Dominique Sanchez & The Disco Dolls and a Salsa dance party. Discovery Nightclub, 9 p.m., $10. 1021 Jessie Road. 501-664-4784. www.latenightdisco.com. K.I.S.S. Saturdays. Featuring DJ Silky Slim. Dress code enforced. Sway, 10 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-492-9802. Pickin’ Porch. Bring your instrument. All ages welcome. Faulkner County Library, 9:30 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org. Rustenhaven (headliner), Jim Mills (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Singer/Songwriters Showcase. Parrot Beach Cafe, 2-7 p.m., free. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. Sirraf Project. The Tavern Sports Grill, 8:30 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www. thetavernsportsgrill.com. Smokey Emerson. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m., $3. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www.beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock. Stereo Down, Sychosys, Monoxide Project. Juanita’s, 10 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Symphony of Northwest Arkansas: Masterworks III Concert. Featuring a rendition of Verdi’s “Requiem,” joined by four guest

The Main Thing: “The Last Night at Orabella’s.” See March 8. Steve McGrew, Dwight York. The Loony Bin, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $8-$12. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www.loonybincomedy.com.

DANCE

Little Rock West Coast Dance Club. Dance lessons. Singles welcome. Ernie Biggs, 7 p.m., $2. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-247-5240. www. arstreetswing.com.

EVENTS

Argenta Farmers Market. Argenta, 7 a.m.-noon. Main Street, NLR. Arkansas Shakespeare Festival’s Bard Ball 2013: Taming of the Brew. Fundraiser for Arkansas’s only live professional Shakespeare Theatre. Argenta Community Theater, $75. 405 Main St., NLR. 501-428-4165. argentacommunitytheater.org. “End of Hi-BEAR-Nation” Debate Tournament. See March 8. Falun Gong meditation. Allsopp Park, 9 a.m., free. Cantrell & Cedar Hill Roads. FOCAL Used Book Sale. Paperback books are $.50 and hardback books are $1. Main Library, March 9, 10 a.m.; March 10, 1 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us. Hillcrest Farmers Market. Pulaski Heights Baptist Church, 7 a.m.-noon. 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd. John Lott. The author and Fox News contributor will discuss his book, “More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws.” Clinton School of Public Service, noon, free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu. Organic Gardening and Farming Seminar. Featuring Sue and Rusty Nuffer of Armstead Mountain Farm with a few words from Sam Hedges, director of operations of Arkansas Local Food Network. Unitarian Universalist Church of Little Rock, 9 a.m. p.m., $6. 1818 Reservoir Road. Rev. Dr. Allan Aubrey Boesak. The South African civil rights leader will also deliver a sermon on Sunday at New Millennium Church during the 9:00 a.m. worship service. New Millennium Church, 1 p.m. 21 Lakeshore Drive. 501-4161917. newmillenniumchurch.us.

SPORTS

2013 Arkansas High School Basketball Championships. See March 7. Jason Greenlaw. Thirst n’ Howl, 8:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirst-

n-howl.com. Live horse racing. See March 7. Sun Belt Basketball Championship at Summit. Check website for schedule. Summit Arena, through March 11. 134 Convention Blvd., Hot Springs. 501-620-5001. www.sunbeltsports.org/.

BOOKS

Arkansas Author Connection: Prof. Adjoa Aiyetoro. Aiyetoro will share the details of her recent nine-day tour to Africa and explain the importance of connecting with the continent. Pyramid Art, Books & Custom Framing, 1:30 p.m. 1001 Wright Ave. FOL Spring Book Sale. Faulkner County Library, through March 16: 9 a.m.; March 10, 1 p.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org. Wil Tustin. Book signing with the author of “Ambushed.” WordsWorth Books & Co., 1 p.m. 5920 R St. 501-663-9198. www.wordsworthbooks.org.

SUNDAY, MARCH 10

MUSIC

All Shall Perish, Descended from Wolves, Legions Await, Killing Souls. Downtown Music Hall, 7:30 p.m., $10 adv., $12 day of. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. The Black Lillies, The Fable & The Fury. Juanita’s, 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. The Getaway, Deadstring Brothers. Bear’s Den Pizza, 9:30 p.m., free. 235 Farris Road, Conway. 501-328-5556. www.bearsdenpizza.com. Michael Eubanks. Lone Star Steakhouse and Saloon, 7 p.m. 10901 N Rodney Parham Road. 501-227-8898. www.lonestarsteakhouse.com. North Little Rock Community Concert Band. Patrick Henry Hays Center, 3 p.m., free. 401 W. Pershing, NLR. www.northlr.org/departments/ senior-citizens.asp. Successful Sunday. Featuring live music and DJs. Montego Cafe, 7 p.m. 315 Main St. 501-372-1555. www.montegocafe.com. Sunday Jazz Brunch with Ted Ludwig and Joe Cripps. Vieux Carre, 11 a.m. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.vieuxcarrecafe.com. Winter Jam 2013. With TobyMac, RED, Matthew West, Jamie Grace, Sidewalk Prophets, Royal Tailor, speaker Nick Hall, Jason Castro, OBB and Capital Kings. Verizon Arena, 6 p.m., $10. 1 Alltel Arena Way, NLR. 501-975-9001. verizonarena.com.

BOOKS

FOL Spring Book Sale. Faulkner County Library, through March 16: 9 a.m.; March 10, 1 p.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org.

MONDAY, MARCH 11

MUSIC

Ben Sollee. Concert in Worsham Performance Hall, no tickets required. Hendrix College, 7:30 p.m., free. 1600 Washington Ave., Conway. www. hendrix.edu. Clutch, Orange Goblin, Lionize, Scorpion Child. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $22 adv., $25 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Irish Traditional Music Session. “SloPlay” begins at 6 p.m. Public session begins at 7 p.m. Hibernia Irish Tavern, Fourth and second Monday of every month. 9700 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-2464340. www.hiberniairishtavern.com. Jazz at The Afterthought: Dave Williams. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., $5. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Mainland Divide, Guardian Alien, Fister, Zs. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m., $3. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Malcolm Holcombe. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m. 2500 W 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Skeptics in the Pub. Topic: Ghosts and Alien Sightings. The Joint, 7:30 p.m. 301 Main St. No. CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

EVENTS

“End of Hi-BEAR-Nation” Debate Tournament. See March 8. FOCAL Used Book Sale. Paperback books are $.50 and hardback books are $1. Main Library, 1 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us. “Live from the Back Room.” Spoken word event. Vino’s, 7 p.m. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www. vinosbrewpub.com. Weekend Theater Company Meeting. Company-wide meeting of anyone and everyone who wants to be involved with the theater. The Weekend Theater, 5 p.m. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-374-3761. www.weekendtheater.org.

SPORTS

Live horse racing. See March 7. Sun Belt Basketball Championship at Summit. Check website for schedule. Summit Arena, through March 11. 134 Convention Blvd., Hot Springs. 501-620-5001. www.sunbeltsports.org/.

www.arktimes.com

MARCH 7, 2013

45


AFTER DARK, CONT.

The Sound of the Mountain wins it all

102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. University of Central Arkansas Concert Choir. University of Central Arkansas, Snow Fine Arts Center Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m., free. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway.

Russellville band takes Times Musicians Showcase.

COMEDY

The New Movement Theater Comedy Tour. Vino’s. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com.

BY ROBERT BELL

O

46

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

SPORTS

Sun Belt Basketball Championship at Summit. Check website for schedule. Summit Arena, through. 134 Convention Blvd., Hot Springs. 501-620-5001. www.sunbeltsports.org.

BOOKS BRIAN CHILSON

ver the course of the evening, several people said to me, “This is the best showcase finals yet,” or something approximating that sentiment. Now, I haven’t been to all 21 showcase finals, nor have those other folks, it’s safe to assume. But, the 2013 Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase finals boasted five bands that were absolutely bringing it: Terminus, Damn Arkansan, The Stephen Neeper Band, The Revolutioners and The Sound of the Mountain. Ultimately, The Sound of the Mountain emerged victorious. The Russellville band’s instrumental post-rock boasted playing that was technically proficient. But it was also the remarkably passionate performances that made the difference. Showcase judge CT wrote, “Flawless victory. Shards of wood off the drum sticks flying at the crowd. We need more original bands from Arkansas like this. Hopefully, Terminus and The Sound of the Mountain do a split 7” together.” Guest judge Pete Campos thought that “if the Russian Circles, Isis and Pelican were to conceive, it would surely spawn what is known as The Sound of the Mountain.” Grayson Shelton wrote, “Best performance by a drummer in the showcase. They really let this cat shine!” Guest judge Bill Solleder reflected thusly: “Overall, both sides of the brain are represented by SOTM. Both imagination and fundamentals — a notch above the rest.” Fayetteville’s Terminus kicked off the evening with a set that included some new material and some they hadn’t played during the semifinals. CT called the band “the perfect hybrid of Rush and High on Fire. The bassist is amazing, a monster. Drummer is solid as a mountain.” Shelton noted the massive amount

SOUND OF THE MOUNTAIN: Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase winners.

of stage sound, which caused some of the vocals to get lost in the mix. “Rhythm section is ultra-tight and talented. Guitar player is gonna be a staple in the scene for a long time.” Damn Arkansan followed up with a manic set of melodic alt-country rock. Campos wrote: “Rambunctious, heartfelt music that sticks to your ribs. Damn good stuff.” Solleder called Damn Arkansan “exactly what a band should be — a unit working in harmony, time and gut feeling.” Anchoring the middle of the bill was The Stephen Neeper Band, who again dished up soulful Southern blues-rock. Shelton wrote, “One guitar player in a band that can tear ass is good, but Drew [de France] and Stephen [Neeper] both can rage.” CT took the occasion to offer audiences the following reminder: “actually knowing more than a few chords makes you a big boy.” Then he wrote in all caps, “I LOVE LISTENING TO NEEPER PLAY GUITAR.” It should be noted too that the Neepers and Co. inspired not one, not two, but three ladies to climb up on their beaus’ shoulders for a better view. The Revolutioners followed up with a blast of polished, radio-ready rock. As

Campos put it, “Unabashedly in-yourface rock ’n’ roll, not too far removed from anything I imagine one would hear on The Strip 20+ years ago, and I mean that as a grand compliment.” Shelton wrote, “Put these dudes on the radio … save me a few channel surfs!” Solleder wrote, “If you are talking money, this band has 6 zeroes to the right of the 1.” As with previous years, the Times Musicians Showcase reminded us that Arkansas has a wealth of homegrown musical talent across a wide swath of styles and sounds. Also: it was a ton of fun. I want to thank all of the bands, the folks who came out to the shows, all of the sponsors and our fantastic hosts Stickyz and Revolution. Congrats to The Sound of the Mountain. The band wins a bevy of prizes, including recording time at Blue Chair Studio, a gift certificate to Jacksonville Guitar, a T-shirt package from Section 8, a photo shoot with Times photographer Brian Chilson, and spots playing at Riverfest, Valley of the Vapors, the Arkansas State Fair and the Arkansas Sounds music festivals. They also get a victory party and a drink named after them at Stickyz.

FOL Spring Book Sale. Faulkner County Library, through March 16: 9 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org.

CLASSES

Finding Family Facts. Rhonda Stewart’s genealogy research class for beginners. Arkansas Studies Institute, second Monday of every month, 3:30 p.m. 401 President Clinton Ave. 501-320-5700. www.butlercenter.org.

TUESDAY, MARCH 12

MUSIC

Aly Tadros, Treva Blomquist, Darien Clea. Juanita’s, 7:30 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Ghost Thrower (acoustic), Foreign Tongues. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, through March 28: 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Lucious Spiller Band. Copeland’s Restaurant of Little Rock, 6-9 p.m. 2602 S. Shackleford Road. 501-312-1616. www.copelandsrestaurantlittlerock.com. Open Jam. The Joint, 8 p.m., free. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Ricky David Tripp. Rocket Twenty One, 5:30 p.m. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-9208. www. ferneaurestaurant.com. Tim Easton, Megan Palmer. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. TJ Kong & The Atomic Bomb. Bear’s Den Pizza, 9:30 p.m., free. 235 Farris Road, Conway. 501328-5556. www.bearsdenpizza.com. Tuesday Jam Session with Carl Mouton. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh CONTINUED ON PAGE 49


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE

SOUND OF THE MOUNTAIN winner of the 2013 musicians showcase

MANY THANKS TO SOME OF ARKANSASâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST BANDS! Annalisa Nutt, Trey Hawkins Band, Collin vs Adam, Damn Arkansan, Tom & Hebron, Flint Eastwood, Stephen Neeper Band, The Bad Years, Freedom Bureau, Gwendlyn Kay, The Revolutioners, Mothwind, Miles Rattz, This Holy House, Peckerwolf, Terminus, Bartin Memberg, Sound of the Mountain, Knox Hamilton, The Midnight Thrills

arktimes.com/showcase THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS FOR DONATING PRIZE PACKAGES

brian chilson


ake LL iquor

Since 1966

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SOURCE: THE MEDIA AUDIT, JAN. 2012 48

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

Market Street Cinema times at or after 9 p.m. are for Friday and Saturday only. Complete showtimes for Breckenridge, Chenal 9, Lakewood 8, and McCain Mall were not available by press deadline. Find up-to-date listings at arktimes.com. NEW MOVIES Dead Man Down (R) — Bullet-riddled revenge thriller, with Noomi Rapace, Terrence Howard and Collin Farrell. Rave: 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:50, midnight. Riverdale: 9:00 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:00, 6:20, 8:40, 11:05. Oz the Great and Powerful (PG) — How the Wizard of Oz got that way. Chenal 9: 10:00 a.m., 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 (IMAX 3D), 10:30 a.m., 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30. McCain Mall:4:30, 10:25 (2D), 12:30, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 7:30, 9:55 (3D). Rave: 10:30 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:30, 3:15, 4:45, 6:30, 8:00, 9:45, 11:15 (2D), 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30 (3D), 11:00 a.m., 2:15, 5:30, 8:45, midnight (3D eXtreme). Riverdale: 9:20 a.m., noon, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00, 10:40. West of Memphis (R) — Acclaimed new documentary about the West Memphis Three case, from director Amy Berg. Market Street: 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30. RETURNING THIS WEEK 21 & Over (R) — D-bags behaving badly, from the writers of “The Hangover,” because of course it is. Rave: 10:45 a.m., 12:25, 1:50, 2:50, 4:25, 5:25, 6:50, 7:50, 9:15, 10:15, 11:45. Riverdale: 9:35 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:45, 3:50, 5:55, 8:05, 10:15. Argo (R) — A group of Americans in revolutionary Iran make an improbable escape, based on actual events, from director Ben Affleck. Market Street: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:15. Broken City (R) — Marky Mark is an ex-cop PI hired by Gladiator to see if his wife is cheating on him. Movies 10: noon, 5:05, 10:15. Bullet to the Head (R) — Rambo’s a vengeanceseeking hitman in this one. Movies 10: 2:35, 7:45. Dark Skies (R) — Bunch of terrifying something or other invades the suburbs. Rave: 10:10 p.m. Escape from Planet Earth (PG) — Animated aliens have to escape from the planet Earth. Rave: 10:40 a.m., 3:00, 7:45 (2D), 12:30, 5:20

(3D). Riverdale: 9:15 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 1:25, 3:30, 5:35, 7:40, 9:45. A Good Day to Die Hard (R) — “Die Hard” goes to Russia in search of a paycheck. Rave: 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00. Riverdale: 5:05, 7:20, 9:35. The Guilt Trip (PG-13) — It’s exactly like “The Road,” except with Seth Rogen and Barbara Streisand and the world hasn’t ended yet and it’s supposedly a comedy. Movies 10: 12:20, 2:40, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40. The Hobbit (PG-13) — Slate’s headline: “Bored of the Rings – The Hobbit looks like Teletubbies and is way too long.” Ooh … burn. Whatever, it’ll probably gross bajillions. Movies 10: 12:30, 2:15, 4:00, 5:45, 7:30, 9:15. Identity Thief (R) — Yeah, real cute Hollywood. We’ll see how funny it is when somebody steals your debit card number and uses it to buy a bunch of iPads. Rave: 10:55 a.m., 1:40, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05. Riverdale: 9:05 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 1:35, 3:50, 6:05, 8:20, 10:35. The Impossible (PG-13) — Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts star in this tale of a family that survives the 2004 Asian tsunami. Riverdale: 9:25 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 2:25. Jack the Giant Slayer (PG-13) — Basically, it’s “Jack and the Beanstalk” with a bunch of CGI monsters and Ewan McGregor. Rave: 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 2:00, 4:50, 5:35, 7:40, 10:35, 11:20 (2D), 1:15, 2:45, 4:05, 6:55, 8:25, 9:50 (3D). Riverdale: 9:05 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:20, 6:45, 9:10, 11:35. The Last Exorcism Part II (PG-13) — Spoiler alert: It’s not really gonna be the “Last Exorcism.” Rave: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30, 11:55. Riverdale: 1:30, 3:25, 5:30, 7:35, 9:40. Life of Pi (PG) — Based on the smash-hit book of the same name, from director Ang Lee. Market Street: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15. Monsters Inc. (G) — Pixar film about a group of monsters contending with a precocious, fearless youngster. Movies 10: 12:05, 9:35 (2D), 4:50 (3D). Movie 43 (R) — Probably not as good as “Movie 42,” but most likely better than “Movie 44” will be. Movies 10: 12:15, 2:30, 5:00, 7:40, 10:00. Quartet (PG-13) — Bunch of retired British singers in an old folks home have to get the band back together to save the orphanage,

er, sorry, the old folks home. Market Street: 2:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:15. Rave: 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15. Rise of the Guardians (PG) — Animated adventure story about a group of heroes who protect the imaginations of children from an evil spirit who wants to take over the world. Movies 10: 12:10, 2:25, 4:45, 7:15, 9:30. Safe Haven (PG-13) — Sorry dude, but you are definitely going to have to take your girlfriend to see this soft-focus yawn-fest. Rave: 11:30 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8:20, 11:10. Silver Linings Playbook (R) — Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence star as two dysfunctional yet charming weirdoes who are just trying to make their way in this crazy world, OK? Jeez! Market Street: 1:45, 4:20, 6:45, 9:15. Riverdale: 1:15, 3:50, 6:25, 9:00. Snitch (R) — The Rock has to go undercover in order to save his son. Rave: 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20, 12:05. Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 2 (PG-13) — Vampire movie sequel starring the girl who cheated on the guy, plus the other guy, the werewolf one. Oh yeah, get this: It’s the last one in the series! Movies 10: 1:00, 4:15, 7:10, 9:45. Warm Bodies (PG-13) — Pretty much “Twilight,” but with zombies instead of whatever it was “Twilight” had. Rave: 12:55, 3:25, 5:55, 8:30, 11:00. Wreck-It Ralph (PG) — Animated movie about a video game character. Movies 10: 12:24, 3:30, 6:10, 9:20 (2D), 2:20, 7:05 (3D). Chenal 9 IMAX Theatre: 17825 Chenal Parkway, 821-2616, www.dtmovies.com. Cinemark Movies 10: 4188 E. McCain Blvd., 945-7400, www.cinemark.com. Cinematown Riverdale 10: Riverdale Shopping Center, 296-9955, www.riverdale10.com. Lakewood 8: 2939 Lakewood Village Drive, 7585354, www.fandango.com. Market Street Cinema: 1521 Merrill Drive, 312-8900, www.marketstreetcinema.net. Rave Colonel Glenn 18: 18 Colonel Glenn Plaza, 687-0499, www.ravemotionpictures.com. Regal Breckenridge Village 12: 1-430 and Rodney Parham, 224-0990, www.fandango.com. Regal McCain Mall 12: 3929 McCain Blvd., 7531380, www.regmovies.com.


MOVIE REVIEW

AFTER DARK, CONT. Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. We Are Voices, State & Madison. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www. maxinespub.com.

DANCE

“Latin Night.” Revolution, 7 p.m., $5 regular, $7 under 21. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. www.revroom.com.

EVENTS

‘JACK THE GIANT SLAYER’: Nicholas Hoult stars.

‘Jack’ doesn’t slay It’s an across the board failure. BY SAM EIFLING

Y

ou might be forgiven for assuming the best about “Jack the Giant Slayer,” what with its capable cast, proven director and reliable folk tale source material. Surely no one could muck up a story that has enthralled — tens of millions? hundreds of millions? — countless children over the past couple of centuries. And with the director of “The Usual Suspects” and the first two “X-Men” movies at the helm? What, exactly, could go wrong? The short, depressing answer to that question is, just about everything. This “Jack” is a botch on the order of being given a thousand dollars to invest in a grilled cheese sandwich and failing even to make proper toast. Aside from the effects on the beanstalk and on the giants, who are occasionally decent, “Jack” looks to be a visual homage to made-forTV movies. Bryan Singer, a director who should know better, sets his camera seemingly wherever. The actors are roundly leaden. The score is tepid. What you have here is a bombastic adventure movie for kids that may indeed work for kids, but not without reminding adults of every cheap kids’ movie they were at one time plonked in front of while adults wandered off, thankful for a quiet moment and vowing they would one day parent better. “Jack” begins with the fairy tale, told to a farmer’s boy (that’d be Jack) and a young princess separately at bed time: beanstalk (check), giants (OK), monks who melt a giant’s heart into a crown used to control the giants (uh …) and magic beans as holy relics (seriously). Jumping ahead a few years, we find that Jack (the perfectly pleasant Nicholas Hoult) has been tasked with selling a nag and cart inside the local castle. There he runs

across said princess (Eleanor Tomlinson) and is shooed away by the royal guards (notably Ewan McGregor). A monk on the run gives him a baggie of beans and hops on the horse, leaving Jack to trudge back home virtually empty-handed. His irritable, reasonable uncle scatters the beans. One gets under the house and after a while sprouts violently to the heavens, as magic beans are wont to do. Meanwhile we gather that courtly skeeze Stanley Tucci is set to marry the princess, despite her protestations to her father, the king, Ian McShane. Tucci’s robbed a tomb to get the magic crown and magic beans and intends to use them to command an army of giants. But when the princess runs away, stops by Jack’s house and is transported to the clouds by the sprouting stalk, his evil plans get folded into an ostensible retrieval mission. Once Jack and the king’s guards and the princess and the bad guy and the giants are all in the cloud realm, running around, getting in fights, tempting danger, killing one another, the movie finds a few moments of honest excitement. But too much else is plain baffling. Why if the legend speaks of giants do villagers flock to the bottom of the beanstalk? Why do you cast the vampiric McShane as the king and then stuff him into goofball robes and armor? Even though we’re stuck in a rescue-a-princess storyline, does that mean she can’t have any personality, wit or development? What motivates these giants to pillage and terrorize anyway? What marvels could this story have borne if Terry Gilliam had directed? Alas, these all will go unanswered. From a magic bean of a bedtime story, this ungainly mass grew. Nothing to do now but chop it down and flee.

Political Animals Club: Kay C. Goss — “Mr. Chairman: The Life and Legacy of Wilbur D. Mills.” Lunch will be served. Governor’s Mansion, 11:30 a.m. p.m., $20. 1800 Center St. 501-377-1121. Tales from the South. Authors tell true stories; schedule available on website. Dinner served 5-6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Call for reservations. Starving Artist Cafe, 5 p.m. 411 N. Main St., NLR. 501-372-7976. www.starvingartistcafe.net. Trivia Bowl. Flying Saucer, 8:30 p.m. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www.beerknurd. com/stores/littlerock.

FILM

“Time in Fear.” In conjunction with “Wendy Maruyama: Executive Order 9066.” Arkansas Arts Center, 6 p.m., free. 501 E. 9th St. 501-3724000. www.arkarts.com.

BOOKS

FOL Spring Book Sale. Faulkner County Library, through March 16: 9 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13

MUSIC

Acoustic Open Mic. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. Arliss Nancy. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Brian & Nick. Cajun’s Wharf, March 13, 5 and 9 p.m.; March 20, 5 and 9 p.m.; March 27, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Diemonds, Glittercore, Jab Jab Suckerpunch. All-ages Revolution, 9 p.m., $5 21 and older, $7 20 and younger. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501823-0090. revroom.com. Dueling Pianos. Denton’s Trotline, 8 p.m., $5. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, through March 28: 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Ricky David Tripp. Rocket Twenty One, 5:30 p.m. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-9208. www.ferneaurestaurant.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. UCA jazz ensemble concert. Featuring three of UCA’s student bands: Dixieland, Jazz Ensemble I and Jazz Ensemble II. University of Central Arkansas, Snow Fine Arts Center Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m., free. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. Walk Off The Earth, The Cons of Formant. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $10 adv., $12 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Young Widows, Falling Awake, Wreckless Endeavor. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m., $9. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com.

COMEDY

The Joint Venture. Improv comedy group. The Joint, 8 p.m., $5. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR.

501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Standup Open Mic Night. Hosted by local come­di­ans of the com­edy col­lec­tive Come­di­ ans of NWA. UARK Bowl, 9 p.m., free. 644 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-301-2030. uarkbowl.com. Tony Tone. The Loony Bin, March 13-14, 7:30 p.m.; March 15-16, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www. loonybincomedy.com.

DANCE

Little Rock Bop Club. Beginning dance lessons for ages 10 and older. Singles welcome. Bess Chisum Stephens Community Center, 7 p.m., $4 for members, $7 for guests. 12th & Cleveland streets. 501-350-4712. www.littlerockbopclub.

EVENTS

Kay Goss. The author of “Mr. Chairman: The Life and Legacy of Wilbur D. Mills” will discuss her book. Clinton School of Public Service, 6 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu.

POETRY

Rocktown Slam. Featured poet is Tank, one of the members of Team SNO, defending champions of the 2012 National Poetry Slam. Arkansas Arts Center, 7 p.m. 501 E. 9th St. 501-372-4000. www.arkarts.com. Wednesday Night Poetry. 21-and-older show. Maxine’s, 7 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-321-0909. maxineslive.com/shows. html.

SPORTS

Binary Marketing Show, Lost Coves. Vino’s, 8 p.m. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com.

BOOKS

FOL Spring Book Sale. Faulkner County Library, through March 16: 9 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org.

CLASSES

Crystal Bridges Studio Studies Series: Watercolor Painting. With instructor Carol Cooper. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 6:30 p.m., $80. 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org.

THIS WEEK IN THEATER

Arkansas Arts Center Children’s Theatre: “The Princess and the Pea.” Arkansas Arts Center, through March 24: Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 3 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m.; March 19-22, 2 p.m., $10-$12. 501 E. 9th St. 501-372-4000. www. arkarts.com. “Company.” The award-winning musical from Stephen Sondheim about a contemplative bachelor on the night of his 35th birthday. The Weekend Theater, through March 24: Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-374-3761. www.weekendtheater.org. “On Golden Pond.” Cabot Community Center, March 8-10, 6:30 p.m.; Sun., March 10, 2 p.m.; March 15-17, 6:30 p.m.; Sun., March 17, 2 p.m., $10-$25. 204 N. First St., Cabot. “Til Beth Do Us Part.” Comedy about a marriage that threatens to come undone after years of complacency on the part of meteorologist Gibby Hayden, whose ambitious, career-driven wife has hired an assistant to help out. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, through March 10: Tue.-Sat., 6 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m., $15$35. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-562-3131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. CONTINUED ON PAGE 54 www.arktimes.com

MARCH 7, 2013

49


Dining ROCK ’N TACOS AND TAMALES is now open in the Market Place Shopping Center. Billed as “Californian cuisine,” it’s an order-atthe-counter, assemble-to-order establishment (not unlike Chipotle or Blue Coast), in which you select your salad, burrito, or tacos and the staff put together the food to your specifications. It’s located at 11121 North Rodney Parham Road, Suite 40 B. Hours are 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. The phone number is 812-3461. AFTER ANNOUNCING IN FEBRUARY that he was leaving Arkansas to return to New Jersey to help with his family’s business, PR whiz “Hot Dog” Mike Juiliano has now announced that he’s returning to Little Rock with an expanded business plan — multiple Hot Dog Mikebranded hot dog carts as well as Hot Dog Mike-branded hot dogs. Initially, Juliano will base his business out of NYPD Pizza, where he says owner Ron Logan will help him with his expanded business plan.

DINING CAPSULES

AMERICAN

4 SQUARE CAFE AND GIFTS Vegetarian salads, soups, wraps, paninis and a broad selection of smoothies. 405 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-244-2622. BLD daily. ALL AMERICAN WINGS A small chain of wing shops that feature 13 flavors of wings, from hot to not. 801 W. Markham. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-375-0000. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat. 7706 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-223-3355. Serving LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat. APPLE SPICE JUNCTION A sandwich and salad spot with sit-down lunch space and a vibrant box lunch catering business. 2000 S. University Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-663-7008. L Mon.-Fri. (10 a.m.-3 p.m.). ARGENTA MARKET Features a daily selection of big sandwiches along with fresh fish and meats and salads. 521 N. Main St. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-379-9980. L daily, D Mon.-Sat., B Sat., BR Sun. ARKANSAS BURGER CO. Good burgers, fries and shakes, plus salads and other entrees. 7410 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-663-0600. LD Tue.-Sat. ASHLEY’S Marries Southern traditionalism and haute cuisine. The menu is often daring and always delicious. 111 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-3747474. BLD Mon.-Sat. BR Sun. BELWOOD DINER Traditional breakfasts and plate lunch specials are the norm at this lost-in-time hole in the wall. 3815 MacArthur Drive. NLR. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-753-1012. BL Mon.-Fri.

50

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

DANIEL WALKER

WHAT’S COOKIN’

FISHBOAT SUPREME: Fried tilapia sandwich from Simply Najiyyah’s Fishboat and More.

Fishboat does fish sandwich right Mouthful of a name, menu.

S

ome areas of Little Rock may get a bit of a bad rap for being a little rough around the edges. But if your restaurant selections are based solely on the median price of homes in the neighboring vicinity, you’re inevitably going to miss out on some of the city’s finest foods. Located a few blocks south of Arkansas Children’s Hospital on Wright Avenue (after a recent move from a location on South University near UALR), Simply Najiyyah’s Fishboat and More may be a mouthful in name alone, but this attitude towards immoderation is continued in its straightforward yet well-executed menu. You may go in expecting big portions, but even so, there’s still likely to be a few “wow” moments when the food actually hits the table. The “Fishboat Supreme” sandwich is probably the most recommended and often celebrated item on the menu. Now, there’s an old adage that goes something like, “fish is fine and cheese a treat, but never the twain shall meet.” Simply Najiyyah’s is throwing that pesky proverb right out the window. The idea of fish and cheese sandwiches may conjure up images of a greasier version served up by The Clown from the Golden Arches, but rest assured, this is a much finer creation in all regards. Patrons choose from one of three fish types: catfish, tilapia, or whiting (a mild-flavored white fish, comparable to cod). These are served either grilled or fried. We sampled the fried tilapia sandwich ($7.95), which came with two large fish filets on a long buttered

Simply Najiyyah’s Fishboat and More

1717 Wright Ave. 562-3474 najiyyahsfishboat.com

QUICK BITE Simply Najiyyah’s is a place with a knack for seafood, but gives similar attention to its beef, chicken, and pork dishes as well. Portions are hearty, great for filling up around the lunch hour, and prices are reasonable enough to warrant regular return visits. Come for their noteworthy fried fish sandwiches and pair them with fried okra or crispy corn fritters — you’re nearly guaranteed to leave satisfied. But head back regularly to sample excellent smoked brisket, substantial burgers, pastas and barbecue chicken. Relax, it’s all smooth sailing on this boat. HOURS 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. OTHER INFO No alcohol, credit cards.

and grilled roll. The crispy fried fish was crowned with two slices of melted cheese and a tangy dill tartar sauce — this all sat on a bed of shredded lettuce, onion, and tomato. Our initial trepidations towards the marriage of fish and cheese quickly faded away as we worked our way through this delightful sandwich. The creamy tartar sauce worked well with the crunchy, salty, and flaky fish. The melted cheese

definitely helped, rather than hindered the experience. The sandwich was fresh and overall satisfying. Next we sampled the barbecued beef brisket sandwich ($7.25), one of our favorite items from any traditional barbecue joint. Simply Najiyyah’s smokes the brisket in-house, and slices it thin, piling it high on a sturdy sesame seed bun. A scoop of crunchy coleslaw completes the sandwich. The long, thin slices of brisket give it the mouthfeel of a smoked roast beef, flavorful and meaty. The brisket comes pre-slathered in a sweet and faintly spicy tomatobased sauce — a flavorsome addition, but it tended to mask the beef a little more than we’d have liked. But overall, we still found it to be one of the more successful brisket sandwiches we’ve eaten in Little Rock, despite its minor flaws. Sandwiches are best enjoyed with one of their classically Southern sides. You could go the mundane route and choose fries or onion rings, but we’d recommend sticking with the crunchy fried okra or better yet, the crispy, golden corn fritters — large cubes of corn cake speckled with nuggets of whole corn and bits of diced pepper. After a dip in the deep fryer, they come out with a crispy exterior, and soft, almost creamy, interior. Lastly, after hearing positive words regarding their cheeseburger ($4.75), we could not resist its temptation. These, again, are sizable — ordering a double would border on the excessive. The thick patties are cooked to order, with a diameter large enough to just protrude past the rim of the hamburger bun. Double cheese, lettuce, tomato, mayo, onion, pickle, and mustard round out the standard set-up. It’s a delicious burger, to be sure — a little plain, but it’s nice sometimes to enjoy a burger without pretense or a painful price tag. As it is, this is surely one of the finest burger under $5 we’ve eaten in recent memory. Simply Najiyyah’s Fishboat and More surprised us in many ways. We may be some distance from the nearest ocean, but many landlocked restaurants still manage to prepare fish exceptionally well. The folks at the Fishboat are no exception. While frying the fish, and dousing it in mayo and cheese may not be earning anyone a Michelin star, diners are rewarded with humble food, as comforting and satisfying as any high brow, white-linen establishment. This Fishboat is reeling in a number of delicious catches — trust us, you won’t want to let this place be the one that got away.


Information in our restaurant capsules reflects the opinions of the newspaper staff and its reviewers. The newspaper accepts no advertising or other considerations in exchange for reviews, which are conducted anonymously. We invite the opinions of readers who think we are in error.

BEV & GUYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FISH & CHICKEN Specializes in fried catfish fillets and chicken and all the trimmings. 3319 John Barrow Road. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-224-2981. L Fri.-Sat. D Thu., Sat., Sun. BRAVE NEW RESTAURANT The foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great, portions huge, prices reasonable. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great fun, and the fish is special. 2300 Cottondale Lane. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-2677. LD Mon.-Fri. D Sat. BRAY GOURMET DELI AND CATERING Turkey spreads in four flavors and homemade pimiento cheese are the signature items. Also serves sandwiches, wraps, soups, stuffed potatoes and salads and sells the turkey spreads to go. 323 Center St. Suite 150. No alcohol, All CC. 501-353-1045. BL Mon.-Fri. CAFE@HEIFER Serving fresh pastries, omelets, soups, salads, sandwiches and pizzas. 1 World Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-907-8801. BL Mon.-Fri. CAPITAL BAR AND GRILL Big hearty sandwiches, daily lunch specials and fine evening dining. 111 Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-374-7474. LD daily. CAPITOL BISTRO Serving breakfast and lunch items, including quiche, sandwiches, coffees and the like. 1401 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-371-9575. BL Mon.-Fri. CATERING TO YOU Painstakingly prepared entrees and great appetizers. 8121 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-614-9030. Serving meals to go: LD Mon.-Sat. CATFISH HOLE Downhome place for wellcooked catfish and tasty hushpuppies. 603 E. Spriggs. NLR. Beer, All CC. $-$$. 501-758-3516. D Tue.-Sat. CIAO BACI The focus is on fine dining in this casually elegant Hillcrest bungalow, though excellent tapas are out of this world. 605 N. Beechwood St. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-6030238. D Mon.-Sat. CRAZEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COOL CAFE Good burgers, daily plate specials and bar food amid pool tables and TVs. 7626 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-221-9696. LD Mon.-Sat. CUPCAKES ON KAVANAUGH Gourmet cupcakes and coffee, indoor seating. 5625 Kavanaugh Blvd. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-664-2253. LD Mon.-Sat. 11525 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-2253. LD Tue.-Sat. DEMPSEY BAKERY Bakery with sit down area, serving coffee and specializing in gluten-, nutand soy-free baked goods. 323 Cross St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-375-2257. Serving BL Tue.-Sat. DOEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EAT PLACE A skid-row dive turned power brokersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; watering hole with huge steaks, great tamales and broiled shrimp. 1023 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-3761195. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat. EJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EATS AND DRINKS The sandwiches are generous, the soup homemade and the salads cold. Vegetarians can craft any number of acceptable meals from the flexible menu. 523 Center St. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-6663700. LD Mon.-Fri. FILIBUSTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BISTRO & LOUNGE Sandwiches, salads in the Legacy Hotel. 625 W. Capitol Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-3740100. D Mon.-Fri. FLYING FISH The fried seafood is fresh and

BELLY UP

B Breakfast L Lunch D Dinner $ Inexpensive (under $8/person) $$ Moderate ($8-$20/person) $$$ Expensive (over $20/person) CC Accepts credit cards

crunchy and there are plenty of raw, boiled and grilled offerings, too. 511 President Clinton Ave. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-375-3474. LD daily. GRUMPYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TOO Music venue and sports bar with lots of TVs, pub grub and regular drink specials. 1801 Green Mountain Drive. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-225-3768. LD Mon.-Sat. HOMERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Great vegetables, huge yeast rolls and killer cobblers. 2001 E. Roosevelt Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-374-1400. BL Mon.-Fri. 9700 N Rodney Parham. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-6637. LD Mon.-Sat. THE HOUSE A comfortable gastropub, where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find traditional fare like burgers and fish and chips alongside Thai green curry and gumbo. 722 N. Palm St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$.

Check out the Timesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; food blog, Eat Arkansas arktimes.com

501-663-4500. D daily, BR, L Sat.-Sun. IRONHORSE SALOON Bar and grill offering juicy hamburgers and cheeseburgers. 9125 Mann Road. Full bar, All CC. $. 501-562-4464. LD daily. JIMMYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SERIOUS SANDWICHES Consistently fine sandwiches, side orders and desserts for 30 years. 5116 W. Markham St. No alcohol, CC. $-$$. 501-666-3354. L Mon.-Sat., D Mon.-Sat. (drive-through only). KRAZY MIKEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Boys, catfish and shrimp and other fishes, fried chicken wings and all the expected sides served up fresh and hot to order on demand. 200 N. Bowman Road. Beer, All CC. $$. 501-907-6453. LD daily. LOCA LUNA Grilled meats, seafood and pasta

LITTLE ROCKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST AWARD-WINNING RESTAURANT 1619 REBSAMEN RD. ÂŹsÂŹTHEFADEDROSECOM

dishes . â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gourmet plate lunchesâ&#x20AC;? are good, as is Sunday brunch. 3519 Old Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-4666. BR Sun., LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat. LULAV Comfortably chic downtown bistro. 220 A W. 6th St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-3745100. L Mon.-Fri., D daily. MILFORD TRACK Healthy and tasty are the key words at this deli/grill. Hot entrees change daily and there are soups, sandwiches, salads and killer desserts. 10809 Executive Center Dr., Searcy Building. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-223-2257. BL Mon.-Sat. OYSTER BAR Gumbo, red beans and rice, peel-and-eat shrimp, oysters on the half shell, addictive poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; boys. 3003 W. Markham St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-7100. LD Mon.-Sat. OZARK COUNTRY RESTAURANT Specializes in big country breakfasts and pancakes plus sandwiches and several meat-and-two options for lunch and dinner. 202 Keightley Drive. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-663-7319. B daily, L Mon.-Fri., D Thu.-Sat. PURPLE COW DINER 1950s fare â&#x20AC;&#x201D; cheeseburgers, chili dogs, thick milk shakes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50s setting at todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prices. 8026 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-221-3555. LD daily, BR Sat.-Sun. 11602 Chenal Pkwy. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-4433. LD daily, BR Sat.-Sun. 1419 Higden Ferry Road. Hot Springs. Beer, All CC. $$. 501-625-7999. LD daily, B Sun. THE RELAY This grill offers a short menu, which includes chicken strips, French fries, hamburgers, jalapeno poppers and cheese sticks. 12225 Stagecoach Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-455-9919. LD daily. THE ROOT CAFE Homey, local foods-focused cafe. With tasty burgers, homemade bratwurst, banh mi and a number of vegan and veggie options. 1500 S. Main St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. BL Tue.-Sat., BR Sun. SALUT BISTRO This bistro/late-night hangout does upscale Italian for dinner and pub grub until the wee hours. 1501 N. University. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-660-4200. L Mon.-Fri., D Tue.-Sat. SANDYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOMEPLACE CAFE Specializing in home style buffet, with two meats and seven vegetables to choose from. 1710 E 15th St. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-375-3216. L Mon.-Fri. SCALLIONS Reliably good food, great desserts, pleasant atmosphere, able servers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a solid lunch spot. 5110 Kavanaugh Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-6468. L Mon.-Sat. SHORTY SMALLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Land of big, juicy burgers, massive cheese logs, smoky barbecue platters and the signature onion loaf. 1100 N. Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-2243344. LD daily. SONNY WILLIAMSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; STEAK ROOM Steaks, chicken and seafood in a wonderful setting. 500 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-324-2999. D Mon.-Sat. STAGECOACH GROCERY AND DELI Fine poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; boys and muffalettas â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and cheap. 6024 Stagecoach Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-455-4157. BLD Mon.-Fri., BL Sat.-Sun. TERRI-LYNNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR-B-Q AND DELI Highquality meats served on large sandwiches and good tamales. 10102 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-6371. BL Tue.-Fri., BLD Sat. (close at 5pm). CONTINUED ON PAGE 52

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MARCH 7, 2013

51


CROSSWORD

DINING CAPSULES, CONT.

EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

ACROSS

28

Toon/live action film of 1996 9 Typewriter’s spot 13 Tool for the scatterbrained 15 Thereafter 16 Tragedystricken 17 “Three Sisters” playwright Chekhov 18 Torpedo detector 19 Trademarked Intel chip 21 “This Little Girl of Mine” country singer ___ Young 23 Take 24 Telegraph suffix 25 Told to come 26 Tripp’s rank on “CSI: Miami”: Abbr.

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1

ANSWER B O F F

A P A R

N E V A

R E A M E R

A N G O R A

D T R A I N

A N I N

I R A N C O N A B U T C A R R E M B A

31 32 34 35 36

True: Ger. Tear up Tetley products Twit Tiger’s bagful Taoism, e.g.: Abbr. Technical work requirement Total Tense, maybe TV channel with “Style Report” and “Beauty Report” Tsars and others Tide’s ebb, e.g. Threaded across and down Texas hold’em action Text you might R.S.V.P. to Thing that’s highly explosive

Trig functions Treating all fairly Toboggan Taxed

56 57 58 59

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DOWN

Tosses, as seeds 37 2 Theorem work 38 3 Titan booster 42 4 The Café Carlyle and others 5 Times to start new 44 calendarios 6 “The ___ is 45 up!” 48 7 Type of dye 8 Target audience of Maxim 49 9 Ten-spots and such 51 10 Taken 11 Traveled by 52 Vespa 12 Ted and others TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 14 Third way, maybe N A S P E A C O A T E R A A D S O R B S 15 “The House of the Seven C O N P I T S T O P Gables” locale K S I N A T R A T E T E H A N S E L 20 Towering tree I Y O U Y O W Z A 22 Tadpole’s later E E N A P S A I D form, perhaps E X T R A T I N Y 23 This puzzle’s L I E W A R N E D theme S S T D B A S S I 26 Turn a blind U T R E A R eye, say I S S A N S E N T R A 27 Turkey or T A L A P A I R O F chicken dish E R A D E S C A N T served cold S S Y A R T E M I S 29 Taste authority

9

19 21

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ASIAN

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1

24 26

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31

38

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35

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36 39

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PUZZLE BY MIKE BUCKLEY

31

Toned quality

33

Tunnel effect

34

Trumpet blares

39

Treated for preservation, maybe

40

Touchdowns : football :: ___ : rugby

41

“That’s terrible!”

47

Tenor standard “___ Mio”

43

Tec group in old France

50

Took (out)

53

Test figs.

46

Terri with the 1980 country hit “Somebody’s Knockin’”

54

Tough ___

55

Theater head: Abbr.

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

THIS MODERN WORLD

WEST END SMOKEHOUSE AND TAVERN Its primary focus is a sports bar, but the dinner entrees are plentiful and the bar food is upper quality. 215 N. Shackleford. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-7665. L Fri.-Sun., D daily. WINGSTOP Features 10 flavors of chicken flappers for almost any palate, including mild, hot, Cajun and atomic, as well as specialty flavors like lemon pepper, teriyaki, Garlic parmesan and Hawaiian. 11321 West Markham St. Beer, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-9464. LD daily.

A.W. LIN’S ASIAN CUISINE Excellent pan-Asian with wonderful service. 17717 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-5398. LD daily. CURRY IN A HURRY Home-style Indian food with a focus on fresh ingredients and spices. 11121 North Rodney Parham. Beer, Wine, No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-4567. LD Mon., Wed.-Sun. LEMONGRASS ASIA BISTRO Fairly solid Thai bistro. Try the Tom Kha Kai and white wine alligator. 4629 E. McCain Blvd. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. 501-945-4638. LD Mon.-Sun. PHO THANH MY It says “Vietnamese noodle soup” on the sign out front, and that’s what you should order. Traditional pork dishes, spring rolls and bubble tea also available. 302 N. Shackleford Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-312-7498. LD Mon, Wed.-Sun. TOKYO HOUSE Defying stereotypes, this Japanese buffet serves up a broad range of fresh, slightly exotic fare as well as more standard shrimp and steak options. 11 Shackleford Dr. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-219-4286. LD daily.

BARBECUE

CHIP’S BARBECUE Tasty barbecue piled high on sandwiches generously doused with the original tangy sauce or one of five other sauces. 9801 W. Markham St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-225-4346. LD Mon.-Sat. PIT STOP BAR AND GRILL A working-man’s bar and grill, with barbecue, burgers, breakfast and bologna sandwiches. 5506 Baseline Road. Full bar, No CC. $$. 501-562-9635. BLD daily.

EUROPEAN / ETHNIC

ISTANBUL MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE This Turkish eatery offers decent kebabs and great starters. 11525 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-223-9332. LD daily. LEO’S GREEK CASTLE Wonderful Mediterranean food plus dependable hamburgers, ham sandwiches, steak platters and BLTs. 2925 Kavanaugh Blvd. No alcohol, CC. $-$$. 501-666-7414. BLD Mon.-Sat., BL Sun. (close at 4 p.m.). TAZIKI’S GREEK FARE Fast casual chain that offers gyros, grilled meats and veggies, hummus and pimento cheese. 12800 Chenal Parkway. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-225-1829. LD daily.

ITALIAN

CIAO ITALIAN RESTAURANT Fine pasta and seafood dishes, ambiance and overall charm combine to make it a relaxing, enjoyable, affordable choice. 405 W. Seventh St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-372-0238. L Mon.-Fri., D Thu.-Sat. IRIANA’S PIZZA Unbelievably generous hand-tossed New York style pizza with unmatched zest. Good salads, too; grinders are great, particularly the Italian sausage. 201 E. Markham St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-374-3656. LD Mon.-Sat. U.S. PIZZA Crispy thin-crust pizzas, frosty beers and heaping salads drowned in creamy dressing. 2710 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-2198. LD daily. 5524 Kavanaugh Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-664-7071. LD daily. 9300 North Rodney Parham Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-224-6300. LD daily. 3307 Fair Park Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-565-6580. LD daily. 650 Edgewood Drive. Maumelle. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-851-0880. LD daily. 3324 Pike Avenue. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-758-5997. LD daily. 4001 McCain Park Drive. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-753-2900. LD daily. 5524 John F Kennedy Blvd. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-975-5524. LD daily.

LATINO

CANON GRILL The varied main-course menu rarely disappoints, though it’s not as spicy as competitors’. 2811 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-664-2068. LD daily. COTIJA’S A branch off the famed La Hacienda family tree downtown, with a massive menu of tasty lunch and dinner specials, the familiar white cheese dip and sweet red and fiery-hot green salsas. 406 S. Louisiana St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-244-0733. L Mon.-Fri. LA REGIONAL The small grill tucked away in the back corner that should excite lovers of adventurous cuisine. 7414 Baseline Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-565-4440. BLD daily. LOS TORITOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT Mexican fare in East End. 1022 Angel Court. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-261-7823. BLD daily. PEPE’S Better than average Tex-Mex. Try the chicken chimichanga. 5900 W 12th St. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-296-9494. LD Mon.-Sat.

52

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES


EVERYBODY’S CRAZY ABOUT A

MARCH 7, 2013

Sharp-

dressed

man

BY JANIE GINOCCHIO PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

F

Customers model finished Bespoke handmade suits from THE INDEPENDENT.

ellas, I hate to tell you, but there’s no excuse for dressing like a slob in Little Rock. Whether your preferred style is an old-school three-piece suit and tie or a more fashionforward vibe, there’s a men’s store in Central Arkansas that can clothe you beautifully. A couple of our personal favorites are The Independent and Mr. Wicks Gentleman’s Shop. The Independent, located in Hillcrest on Kavanaugh near SO Restaurant, opened back in September. The store focuses on the young-minded consumer, whether he’s age 18 or 60, who may have an established sense of style or is just beginning to develop that style. The Independent specializes in custom-fit, handmade clothing, a service that’s seeing a resurgence in popularity. Continued on page 54

TOMS for Spring! 2616 Kavanaugh Blvd. • Little Rock 501.661.1167 www.shopboxturtle.com

MR. WICKS has a large selection of colorful Southern Tide polos, chinos and shorts, just in time for spring. ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

MARCH 7, 2013

53


AFTER DARK, CONT. “Treasure Isle.” World premiere of a new musical version of the classic Robert Louis Stevenson tale. Arkansas Repertory Theatre, through March 31: Wed., Thu., Sun., 7 p.m.; Fri., Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. 601 Main St. 501-378-0405. www.therep.org.

GALLERIES, MUSEUMS

NEW EXHIBITIONS, EVENTS

More art listings can be found in the calendar at www.arktimes.com ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, MacArthur Park: “Time of Fear,” film about local reaction to Japanese internment in southeast Arkansas during World War II, 6 p.m. March 12, in conjunction with exhibition “Wendy Maruyama: Tag Project/Executive Order 9066,” work inspired by the internment, through April 21; “Edward Weston: Leaves of Grass,” 53 gelatin-silver prints, through April 21; “Delta Exhibition,” through March 10; “Museum School Faculty Exhibition: Past and Present,” through March 10. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 372-4000. BUTLER CENTER GALLERIES, Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: “No I’m Not, He Is: A Flying Snake and Oyyo Comic Retrospective,” cartoons by Michael Jukes, reception 5-8 p.m. March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night, with music by violinist Oksana Pavilionis; “1st Annual Membership Exhibition” by the Arkansas Society of Printmakers, through April 27. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 320-5700. CANTRELL GALLERY, 8206 Cantrell Road: “Structures II,” paintings by Daniel Coston, March 8-April 27, opening night reception 6-8 p.m. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 224-1335. CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 509 Scott St.: “Mid-Southern Watercolorists Spring 2013

Juried Exhibition,” March 8-April 30, reception 5-8 p.m. March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night. CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER, 1200 President Clinton Ave.: “Jazz: Through the Eyes of Herman Leonard,” more than 40 original black and white images by photographer Herman Leonard, who documented the evolution of jazz form from the 1940s through post-Hurricane Katrina, with photographs of Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie and Ella Fitzgerald, through July 21; “Making Politics Personal: Arkansas Travelers,” exhibit about supporters who traveled the country to campaign for Clinton; permanent exhibits on policies and White House life during the Clinton administration. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $7 adults; $5 college students, seniors, retired military; $3 ages 6-17. 370-8000. COURTYARD AT THE MARRIOTT, 521 Clinton Ave.: Work by members of the ArtGroup Maumelle, 5-8 p.m. March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night. 975-9800. COX CREATIVE CENTER, 120 River Market Ave.: “Bridging the Burden: In Their Shoes,” boots of Arkansas soldiers killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, through April 27, 2nd Friday Art Night reception 5-8 p.m. March 8. 918-3086. GALLERY 221, 2nd and Center Sts.: “Highlights of Spring,” Sean LeCrone, featured artist, open 5-8 p.m March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night. 8010211. HEARNE FINE ART, 1001 Wright Ave.: “The Struggle Continues ... History Unfolds,” paintings and mixed media by Frank Frazier, through April 8, receptions 1:30-3 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night, artist talk 11 a.m. March 9. 372-6822. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, 200 E. Third St.: “Hidden Arkansas,” photographs by 11

members of the Blue Eyed Knocker Photo Club, opening reception 5-8 p.m. March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night, with live music by Peg Roach Loyd, show through May 5; “Treasures of Arkansas Freemasons, 1838-2013,” study gallery, through July 12; “Phenomena of Change: Lee Cowan, Mary Ann Stafford and Maria Botti Villegas,” through May 5; “Perfect Balance,” paintings by Marty Smith; “A Collective Vision,” recent acquisitions, through March. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351. OLD STATE HOUSE MUSEUM, 300 W. Markham: “Fourte,” Youth String Quartet of the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, 5-8 p.m. March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night; “Battle Colors of Arkansas,” 18 Civil War flags; “Things You Need to Hear: Memories of Growing up in Arkansas from 1890 to 1980,” oral histories about community, family, work, school and leisure. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9685. STUDIOMAIN, 1423 S. Main St.: “The Pettaway Neighborhood Plan,” 5-8 p.m. March 8, 2nd Friday Art Night, with refreshments. studiomainar.tumblr.com. THEA CENTER, 401 Main, NLR: “Homie Sapiens,” pop-up art show by Haynes Riley and Layet Johnson, 5-9 p.m. March 8; “Visual Arts Winners Show,” through March 24. 9 a.m.noon, 1-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 1-5 p.m. Sat. 379-9512. BENTONVILLE CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, One Museum Way: “American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell,” 50 paintings and 323 Saturday Evening Post covers from the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass., March 9-May 28, $12 non-members ages 19 and up; “A Conversation with Lorie Norton Moffatt, director of the Rockwell Museum, 5-5:45 p.m. March 9, $10 non-members; “Abstractions

on Paper: From Abstract Expressionism to Post Minimalism,” through April 29, works from the collection of the Arkansas Arts Center by Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, Ellsworth Kelly and others; permanent collection of American masterworks spanning four centuries. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Thu., Sat.-Sun.; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed.Fri. 479-418-5700. FAYETTEVILLE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS, Fine Arts Center: “Submerged: A Solo Exhibition of Photographic Works by Kendra North,” through March 29; closing reception and lecture by the artist 6 p.m. March 28; lecture by David Brooks, 6:30 p.m. March 12, room 213. 479-575-7987. HOT SPRINGS TAYLOR’S CONTEMPORARY SALON OF FINE ART, 204 Exchange St.: “The Warren Criswell Show,” paintings by the Arkansas artist. 501624-0516 YELLVILLE P.A.L. FINE ART GALLERY, 300 Hwy. 62W: Open house and artists demonstrations by Frank Nixon, Jack Ryan, Ann Worster, Dana Johnson, Dan Cohee, Dorothy Anders, Jane Ryan and Barbara Chappell, 4-7 p.m. March 8. 870-656-2057.

CALL FOR ENTRIES

The Thea Foundation, 401 Main St., North Little Rock, is taking submissions for its 11th annual scholarship competitions for high school seniors. Submission for filmmaking scholarship due April 5. For more information, go to the theafoundation.org/scholarships or call 3799512.

CUE

Continued from page 53 On the other end of the spectrum is Mr. Wicks, which opened in 1960. A family-owned, traditional men’s store, they offer the finest dress clothing and quality sportswear brands like Southern Tide. Mr. Wicks has had a partnership with Southern Tide since 2006, and the selection available has grown with the brand each season, including the famous Skipjack Polo with its exclusive True-Vent Micro Pique fabric in a variety of colors to get you ready for spring. Pair them with Southern Tide’s Vintage Chinos or Channel Marker Shorts, and you will be the ready for sports and relaxation this season.

hearsay

The professionals at THE INDEPENDENT measure a customer for a handmade suit. They work with their clients’ specific measurements, fit needs, styling desires and needs to determine the finished product, whether it may be suit, shirt, sportcoat, pant or shoe.

➥ Head up to Northwest Arkansas on March 24 to listen to great local acoustic acts and contribute to a worthy cause. THE CANDLELIGHT CONCERT FOR EPILEPSY AWARENESS will be from 2-6 p.m. March 24 at Powerhouse Seafood and Grill in Fayetteville. Local musicians Wes and Ed, Bert and Heather, Mike and Grady, and Russ Hutchison are scheduled to perform at this free, all-ages concert. Donations will be accepted, and all funds raised will 54

MARCH 7, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

go to the Epilepsy Clinic at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. There will also be a mix of a few silent auctions and raffle tickets, including a chance to win a ride to school in a fire truck for a lucky boy or girl and a set of four tickets to a Naturals game. ➥ EGGSHELLS KITCHEN COMPANY will host Tandra Watkins of the Capital Hotel, who will teach a class on breads and spreads. The class is from 6-8 p.m. March 13 at Eggshells, and the cost is $50 per person.

THE INDEPENDENT is the place to go for handmade, six-fold ties from Biagio Santo and handmade shoes from Gravati and Scarpe Di Bianco.

➥ Monday is kids eat free night at select restaurants in THE PROMENADE AT CHENAL. Participating restaurants are A.W. Lin’s Asian Cuisine, Big Orange, Bravo! Cucina Italiana, Local Lime, The Tavern Sports Grill and YaYa’s Euro Bistro. Check with the participating restaurants for details on the promotion. ➥ Purveyor of comfy, yet stylish shoes CLARKS USA is now open on the second level of Park Plaza Mall, next to Talbots.


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ARKANSAS TIMES CLASSIFIEDS Roommates ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.Roommates.com.

Employment DISCOVER THE “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 800-470-7545 Paid In Advanced! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately!  www.mailing-station.com Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-2921120 www.howtowork-fromhome.com

Employment HARICON CORP., In Baton Rouge, LA is hiring 10 temporary Farm Workers from 4/01/2013 to 12/30/2013: 40 hrs/week. Workers will, plant, spray, weed, fertilize and water plants, shrubs, and trees, using hand tools and gardening tools. Harvest plants and transplant or pot and label them. Inspect plants for pests and disease, digs, cuts, and transplants seedlings. Operates a tractor and other equipment to fertilize, cultivate, harvest, and spray fields. Must have three months experience operating a tractor. $9.50/hr (prevailing wage). Guarantee of 3/4 of the workdays. All work tools, supplies, and equipment furnished without cost to the worker. Free housing is provided to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the workday. Transportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be provided or paid by the employer, with payment to be made no later than completion of 50% of the work contract. Send resume or contact Arkansas Department of Workforce Services Foreign Labor Certification Program #2 Capitol Mall, Room 434, Little Rock, AR 72201, phone (501) 683-2372 or the nearest State Workforce Agency and reference job order #442426 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com

LIVE LIKE a popstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Shawn 800-7160048 (AAN CAN)

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Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families is accepting resumes for a part-time Administrative Assistant. Requires general office skills, excellent communications skills, ability to handle multi-line phone system, proficiency in Microsoft Office programs and database programs. 5+ years experience preferred. Salary commensurate with experience. Send cover letter, resume, and references to nleonhardt@aradvocates.org or 1400 West Markham St., Ste. 306, Little Rock, AR 72201. AACF is an equal opportunity employer.

cindy@movingtomac.com • 501-681-5855

www.arktimes.com March 7, 2013 55


WOODLAND H E IG H TS

invites you to join

Dr. David Lipschitz

as he presents a monthly series of talks on lifelong health beginning Monday, March 25 Noon Dr. Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest goal is to educate the public about aging. Most importantly, he aims to empower people with the tools to live longer, happier and healthier lives.

8700 Riley Drive Little Rock

501-224-4242 w o o d l a n d h e i g h t s l l c . c o m


Arkansas Times