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alexander b arizala

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new science building

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hemmingson center

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student experience center

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maritime center

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urban incubator

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vertical park blocks

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market hall lofts

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urban canopy

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bio diversity pavilion


SECTION

ELEVATION MECHANICAL NEUROSCIENCE

SECTION

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY NEW SCIENCE BUILDING

ELEVATION

NEUROSCIENCE

SECTION PERSPECTIVE

NEUROSCIENCE ENNEAD ARCHITECTS |

2013 -2015

SHELLED Led laboratory-related scope for New York University Langone Medical Center’s new 365,000 square foot, $377 million dollar LEED Gold seeking Science Building from the Construction Document through Construction Administration phases. Conducted façade studies utilizing Rhino, exploring louver configurations reminiscent of DNA sequencing patterns, and subsequently produced exterior and interior presentation renderings through VRay and 3DS Max. GENETICS/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY


SECTION PERSPECTIVE

CONCEPT COLLAGE


10 LAB FLOORS

VIVARIUM SHARED

2 PUBLIC FLOORS

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY NEW SCIENCE BUILDING

ENNEAD ARCHITECTS |

2013 -2015

Scope consisted of ten Molecular Biology and Neuroscience Laboratory floors, and two Vivarium floors. Developed the design and fit-out of each laboratory floor in conjuction with the NYU Real Estate Development & Facilities Department through user-group meetings and consulatant coordination. Design development included constructing a laser-cut physical model illustrating a typical laboratory and faรงade bay.


GONZAGA UNIVERSITY HEMMINGSON CENTER

opsis architecture |

2012 -2013

Prepared presentation drawings, renderings, boards and laser-cut physical models of various schemes for the Gonzaga University New Student Center Design-Build Competition’s winning proposal. Subsequently produced Revit building and pricing documents for the 169,000 square foot, LEED Gold seeking project through the 50% Design Development Phase


WEST CROSSING

ATRIUM STREET

GLOBAL COMMONS


OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT EXPERIENCE CENTER

opsis architecture |

2012 -2013

Designed and detailed interior spaces for Oregon State University’s 90,000 square foot, LEED Gold seeking Student Experience Center during the Construction Document Phase. Developed the design of specialty spaces, such as the multi-faith Meditation Room, comprised of site-salvaged and laser-cut wood casework components.


EMBARCADERO MARITIME CENTER

terminal studio | fall-spring 2012

This thesis project focuses on San Francisco’s Embarcadero Waterfront, specifically the Ferry Building site. The Embarcadero is the interface between the city of San Francisco and the Bay; before the Bay Bridge was constructed, the Ferry Building was the gateway to the city and still serves as a prominent focal point at the end of Market Street. Because the Embarcadero is adjacent to the Financial District, it is quite busy during the day yet relatively quiet during the evenings. Transforming the Ferry Building site into a significant cultural node as well an area that would be constantly activated are key goals of the project. A new location for the San Francisco Maritime Museum and a music hall would jointly serve as the catalyst for this transformation.


In addition to being a physical interface to the city, the site and project would be a temporal one. Relevant precedents were gathered and analyzed, and a key attribute of their success were the inclusion of flexible spaces that would be utilized both day and night. During the day the combined Ferry Building site would serve as a market, conference center and maritime museum. During the evenings it would host various social and cultural events at various intervals. On a daily basis there would be performances in a music venue, and on a weekly basis there would be a “Nightlife� event similar to that of other museums around the country as well as the existing Farmers’ Market. These venues and events would ensure that the site is constantly activated and would thereby serve as a catalyst for transforming the Embarcadero into a livelier, more vibrant contributer to San Francisco culture.


In order to avoid redundancy, an appropriate program was needed that would contribute to San Francisco’s cultural scene without duplicating the existing stock of programs. Of all the nodes evaluated, the Aquatic Park District, where the San Francisco Martime Museum is housed, seemed to be the weakest link in the city’s chain of cultural nodes. The existing maritime museum complex consists of a series of small fragmented programatic elements spread throughout the park. In addition, it is the least accessible of all the nodes by public transportation; one would have to take the supplementary MUNI system to access the site. With the exception of Golden Gate Park, most of the city’s cultural nodes are situated near a BART station, the region’s main public transportation system.


Given those conditions, a more unified Maritime Museum complex in an easily accessible location was called for. San Francisco’s Embarcadero waterfront had been in decline after technological advances shifted the region’s shipping activities to Oakland. This was exacerbated by the Embarcadero Freeway, which cut off the city from the waterfront even further. After the demolition of the freeway after the Loma Prieta earthquake, efforts were made to revitalize the area culminating in the recent restoration of the Ferry Building. However, the area still does not significantly contribute to the city; therefore placing the Maritime Museum there would help define the area as a bona fide cultural center.


The museum’s form and structure is derived from the site and program’s maritime history. The roof form is reminiscent of a ship in motion; this serves as a reminder that the ships in the museum are not merely static objects on display, but are instead dynamic vessels that moved through the seas during their lifetime. Brushed aluminum is used as the primary exterior cladding material, which reflects and diffuses the color and mood of the water and sky at any given moment.


ABRICULTURE BUILDING

UPPER VIEWING PROMENADE

open to below

library above

entry hall

main exhibition hall

ramp down

small craft hall

MAIN LEVEL PLAN 1/16” = 1’

FERRY BUILDING

In terms of the experiencing the space, the way one traditionally views ships in a maritime museum has been reimagined. Currently most museums have only one large boat hall for interior exhibits and a dock for exterior exhibits. As one enters, everything is revealed right away, leaving no surprises. A more dynamic viewing experience would be accomplished by only revealing certain portions of ships at a time. There are two entrances: one from the street level and one one the plinth level oriented toward the promenade. If one enters from the street one starts off by seeing the ship hulls, but if one enters from the main entrance above, one starts off by seeing the ships’ sails and into the ship hulls..


ABRICULTURE BUILDING museum storage

open to above administration

lower viewing promenade lower lobby

COVERED WALKWAY/ STALLS

lower exhibition hall

visitors center

restaurant

small craft hall ramp up

ferry terminal

ENTRY PLAZA (FARMERS MARKET)

GROUND LEVEL PLAN 1/16� = 1’

PROMENADE

FERRY BUILDING

Visitors are then guided through three main exhibition spaces; The entry hall connects both levels and can accommodate taller vessels with masts and sails, the main boat hall can accommodate medium sized vessels, and the small craft hall houses long and narrow vessels. The small craft hall utilizes a ramp as a transition from the main upper level to the water level, and serves as the culmination of the experience from land to water as one descends the ramp toward the Bay. The ferry terminal and restaurant are anchor points at the end of the peninsula created by the structure, and activate the lower promenade and urban room.


operable skylights for daylight and heating control

rain screen wall assembly (int. to ext.) wood siding sheathing i-beam steel stud sheathing building membrane xps insulation air gap z-girt metal panel

operable glazing panels for fresh air intake

air distribution in raised floor system

water tight welded steel wall and floor assembly in ballast level

Instead of being placed on piles, the whole structure floats, and the main structural system is a series of ship-like ribs that define each of the the three main exhibition volumes. Each of those exibition spaces features a distinctly shaped structural system with long spans to provide as much open versitile space as possible. Those long spans are achieved by the use of steel, but are clad with wood to add warmth to the interior spaces. In conjunction with the ribs, the opaque and curtain wall enclosure system frame specific views of the bay as well as reveal and conceal ship exhibits.


The enclosure system is also a dynamic element that features operable systems that allow certain elements to enter and escape the structure depending on the Bay’s capricious weather conditions. Fresh air is drawn in from operable floor panels below and cross-ventilation as well as the stack effect allow stale air to be exhausted through skylights above. When conditions do not allow for those natural effects to be used, a mechanical HVAC system is used to distribute air under a raised flooring system. Drains within the exterior raised floor as well as on the roof allow rainwater to be collected and stored in a tank used as infill under the urban foyer.


URBAN INCUBATOR

arch 584 | fall 11

This mixed-use project aims to be the catalyst for the redevelopment of Portland’s Union Station District. It features various conference, communal, and live/work spaces to be used by local and startup businesses. This proposed urban plan calls for a stronger emphasis of the area as an important threshold into and out of the city via rail, and accomplishes this through the transformation of 6th avenue into a more


significant pedestrian boulevard. The building itself utilizes cubism as a source of inspiration for mediating the discrepancy of scales within the neighborhood. This has resulted in a series of roofs that cascade down and through the structure. The curtain wall system plays an important role in emphasizing the roofs while also acting as a transition to the main masonry-clad structure.


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Permeability through the site is imperative given that the site is the ‘pivot point’ between the improved 6th Avenue boulevard and the proposed extension of the park blocks. Therefore, the conference and communal spaces have been perched on the second and third levels, resulting in a more permeable retail ground level.

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The theater serves as a transition between the second and third levels, and the conference center acts as a bridge between the north and south wings of the building. The live/work units above have been arranged around a skip/stop elevator system with double-exposure units. This configuration allows for cross-ventilation as well as double-height spaces.


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coast range

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columbia plateau

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oregon ecoregions

willamette valley

blue mountains

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klamath mountains

director park

abstracted geography

portland park blocks

VERTICAL PARK BLOCKS

arch 584 | spring 11

This new addition to Portland’s skyline is a vertical extension of the city’s park block system. Each of the main parks in the system provides a unique experience, ranging from the hardscaped Director Park to the quiet and naturalistic Tanner Springs Park. In order to further diversify the park block experience, each of the eight parks within the skyscraper derives its character from one of Oregon’s ecoregions.

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eastern cascades

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northern basin


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city grid shift

These ecoregions, ranging from the Coast Range to the Blue Mountains, inform various design attributes. For example, the volume of each park is abstracted from the respective region’s geography (i.e. concave valleys and convex mountain ranges). Each park features plants specific to its assigned ecoregion and would feature retail vendors from the region as well, such as a wine bar in the Willamette Valley park block.


The structure consists of a concrete core, which houses the circulation and mechanical systems. In order to accomodate the large park voids, the floors are hung from the core by a series of steel supports. Fixed louvers provide shade as well as help define each office and residential block.


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The skyscraper stands at 700 feet tall, with 28 office floors and 20 residential floors. A series of local, express, fire, and service elevators are arranged to provide optimal vertical circulation. The floor plan represents the shift in the city’s grid system between the north and south park blocks. The size of each floor plate decreases as the structure reaches toward the sky, emphasizing the three point perspective.


MARKET HALL LOFTS

arch 584 | winter 11

Situated in Portland’s Old Town/Chinatown Historic District, this mixed-use project aims to revitalize the area by including a public market hall in the program, as well as lofts, a restaurant, and a lounge. The Simon facade, the remains of a Richardsonian Romanesque structure, is treated as an urban artifact; the project aims to respect it, as well as the historic neighborhood, by implementing appropriate massing.


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The rythm and proportions of the Simon facade’s elements are used to inform various design decisions throughout the new structure. The roof form is based on an abstracted dragon, a Chinese symbol of power, strength, and good luck. It’s ‘tail’ begins at the top of the structure, descends and weaves through the building, and finally culminates at its cantilevered ‘head.’


The CCB Building across the street works in conjunction with the building’s north facade to help demarcate Davis Street as a Festival Street. The Festival Street aims to blur the boundary between pedestrians and automobiles by removing sidewalks and traffic devices, therefore implying a seamless multi-purpose urban space.


Inside the building, the main programmatic volumes are set back by an atrium in order to emphasize the Simon facade as a monolithic urban relic. The atrium roof’s series of masonry beams and skylight voids further stress the facade as a plane and a historic artifact being reinforced by the new addition.


URBAN CANOPY

arch 683 | fall 10

Based on a revised urban framework developed for the Salem Sustainable Cities Initiative, this project takes the idea of green space that weaves throughout the urban fabric and turns it on its side as a means of enveloping the program. These programmatic elements are further transformed according to each element’s specific needs, the desire for a built-up intersection at Commercial and Bush Streets, and the transition from indoor to outdoor spaces.

green fingers


enveloped program

hierarchy of space

terraces / built-up corner

solar orientation

sheltered outdoor spaces


SITE PLAN 1” = 20’ 3RD FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

grocery store

4TH FLOOR

5TH FLOOR

6TH FLOOR

7TH FLOOR

BALLROOM

TERRACE

TERRACE

GYM

BALLROOM

RESTAURANT SPA

TERRACE

hotel lobby

SPRING PERMEABILITY

SUMMER PERMEABILITY

The building features a living roof system that changes with the seasons. This results in various levels of transparency throughout the year; the roof is opaque during the summer when shading the building is imperative, while the roof is more transparent during the winter when more natural light is desired. Interior living wall systems continue the idea of green spaces wrapping throughout the project while also contributing to indoor air quality.

FALL PERMEABILITY

WINTER PERMEABILITY


SECTION B 1� = 20’

The program consists of a boutique hotel, supermarket, and retail spaces. A breezeway through the building, terraces, and generous overhangs all allow activities to spill outdoors while simultaneously protecting occupants from the elements.


‘blossoming’ of the structure

BIODIVERSITY PAVILION

arch 101 | fall 07

Derived from the movement of a California Harbor Seal through the water and the blossoming of a Pitkin Marsh Lily, the Biodiversity Pavilion would exhibit the endangered species of the region in an attempt to garner attention and support from the general public.


‘swimming’ movement in plan

seal tank

flower exhibition area

dry tank

the seal’s backbone as a datum point

the opening and expansion of the flower


Alexander B. Arizala | Architectural Portfolio