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SUSTAINABILITY WEEK 2014

Advancing the green economy in South Africa and the region

EVENT REPORT INCORPORATING SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE Sustainability Week is a brand owned by Alive2green and operated in association with various industry stakeholders.

SUSTAINABILITY

WEEK

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION


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Message from the CEO

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Sustainability Week 2014 Introduction Events and Activities Event Greeting Event Attendance

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CONTENTS 6

Governance

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Economic Sustainability

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Environmental Sustainability

Alive2Green Sustainability The Alive2Green Sustainability Story

Organisational Profile Markets, Sectors and Customers Products Product Ranges

Energy Efficiency at Alive2Green Products and Services Customer Health and Safety Marketing and Communications Packaging Responsibility Materials Used Water Waste Emissions

Sustainability Reporting Stakeholder Engagement Employees Local Communities Suppliers Shareholders

HOST SPONSOR

MEDIA PARTNERS

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Certificate 

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AFFILIATED ORGANISATIONS

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Mechanisms for Communication Values, Principles, codes and Proocedures..

SPONSORS


Welcome Messages

SUSTAINABILITY WEEK REPORT Greetings from the City of Tshwane, We are humbled to have successfully hosted the 2014 Sustainability Week in the capital city. The platform gave us the opportunity to articulate the city’s plans of becoming a climate resilient, low carbon and resource-efficient city, aligned to its Tshwane Vision 2055. As part of remaking the spatial form of the capital city, we are guided by the principles of justice, sustainability, resilience, spatial quality and efficiency. We undertake to intensify our focus on sustainable initiatives to contribute to sustainable livelihoods and resource-efficient communities. To this end, we have put together game-changing plans to realise our vision: The Tshwane Green Economy Strategic Framework and the Green Building Development By-law and Policy are just two of the eco-visionary’s masterpieces recently launched to encourage a resource-efficient city that creates jobs, stimulates economic growth and sustainable development while also reducing the environmental footprint of the city. Our commitment in reducing carbon emissions is our little contribution to ensure that future generations enjoy the same quality of life as we do today.

Sincerely Kgosientso Ramokgopa Executive Mayor for City of Tshwane

Dear Sustainability Week stakeholder, Sustainability Week 2014 was a watershed event, and included key partnerships with the City of Tshwane, BASF, and Nedbank, supported by media partnerships with The Star newspaper and SABC3 – a key contributing factor. Running the event in partnership with the capital city, and having key officials participating in the seminars grounded the discussions in practical reality, and gave a real sense of connection between theory and application. We hope that Sustainability Week can continue to play the role of facilitator in bringing about knowledge sharing, and new ideas and perspectives between civil society organisations, government departments, private sector companies and project funders. I wish thank all our sponsors and exhibitors, official suppliers, and service providers. Special thanks go to our speakers and facilitators, and indeed to you for your participation at Sustainability Week 2014. We look forward to welcoming you in 2015 as we once again pick up these critically important themes, and indeed add one or two more. By adding a slightly more international feel, we intend to ensure that Sustainability Week continues to be among the most relevant and influential green economy events on the annual calendar.

Sincerely

Gordon Brown Event Convenor


sustainability week 2014 report Message from the CEO

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live2Green believe that the only way we will succeed in changing the world is by harnessing the power of the market. This can be achieved through intelligent government policies, well informed and thus conscious consumers, bold and innovative companies, and knowledgeable, empowered professionals and media. We are advocates for best practice in relation to sustainability, but not evangelists. Our aim is to stimulate the green economy through the provision of information and the creation of marketing platforms. The company vision is to use our media expertise in electronic and print publishing and events to stimulate change by facilitating a knowledge transfer and creating a market place for green business investment and entrepreneurship. Alive2Green have always produced event reports but this is the first report that has been prepared in accordance with the GRI G3.1 Guidelines (with the assistance of GSA Campbell Consulting). We plan to produce similar reports on an annual basis, in line with the timing of Sustainability Week each year. This report contains information about the sustainability performance of our activities as they relate to Sustainability Week 2014, a project of The Business Zone 1678 CC, trading as Alive2Green. Sustainability Week is our flagship event and represents a convergence of various Alive2Green brands and products. The boundary of this report is limited to the events, activities and products linked to Sustainability Week; however, we have also included certain product and company information that is deemed relevant. In five years from now, our events and publications should be widely regarded as the leading media resources in their sectors, the ‘go to’ reference for anyone seeking green economy information, the trusted and effective way to reach sector decision-makers, specifiers, and buyers. Our goal is to be the employer of choice in our sector, and to be meaningfully involved in our communities. We will constantly measure and monitor our environmental impacts from events to publishing and strive to reduce these by redesigning our systems and reconceptualising our approach to the way we do business. In our publishing business specifically, we target wastage. Due to the nature of consumer publishing, which affects our Green Home title, there is significant wastage resulting from unsold copies. While we already work hard to redistribute these copies, the system is difficult and expensive. We plan, within the short to medium term, to completely redistribute these unsold copies. A key impact of our publishing business is the use of materials in the form of paper, chemicals, and inks and we are in discussions with suppliers to offer us the lowest impact options in relation to these. With regard to the impact of paper stemming from the farming of wood, it is important to note that wood is farmed sustainably in South Africa. The use of wood for paper is not a carbon intensive process as wood is a carbon store which, if used to make paper, is recycled several times and ultimately biodegrades. The carbon is released slowly, unlike in the case of burning for heating or cooking. The forestry industry does have impacts however, in particular on biodiversity where large forested areas become devoid of endemic

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fauna and flora, as very little can grow under foreign tree species such as pine and blue gum. These species also have deep root systems, draw vast amounts of water from the water tables, and pose a fire risk in the dry season. Printing processes have a high impact from energy and water use and from waste streams such waste water. A key impact created at the printer is to render paper products non-recyclable or less recyclable due to the use of coatings and laminates – we will avoid using these on our products. At Alive2Green, we specify uncoated paper and insist on paper products guaranteed to have come from sustainably grown forests. As we go forward, we will seek to utilise international eco-labels such as Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), however if any such labels are not appropriate to South Africa in that they are too onerous and thus expensive, we will prefer to use alternative local labels. In our events business, a business category that is notoriously wasteful as a consequence of the build-up and break-down nature of the activity, we constantly strive to minimise impacts. The use of reusable and recyclable signage and marketing materials, the recycling of waste food products, and the separation of waste on-site are already firmly entrenched practices. Choosing a venue with excellent energy water and waste policies and practices is also a key tenet of our policy, but as we go forward we plan to work with all suppliers – from venue to catering to shell scheme systems and audio visual in order to encourage them to innovate in relation to their impacts. The broader market in which Alive2Green operates is somewhat deflated, however the sustainability niche is showing strong growth, especially within the building and energy sectors. These are international and South African trends and the company is well positioned to grow along with the sector. Targets for the year to March 2015 are fairly aggressive in terms of the number of projects being rolled out and the team will be challenged. At the same time, success will be rewarded in both financial and environmental terms – after all, as an advocacy focussed business, it really is a case of the more successful we are, the greater the positive impact we make. In the next three to five years, our goal is to grow moderately and organically, delivering value to shareholders, delivering tangible value to our customers and stakeholders, and further contributing to the advancement and development of the green economy in South Africa and regionally. The role of the media is to observe, comment and report. But, the media can also lead. As a media company, Alive2Green believes that by actively exposing the work and achievements of leaders within the green economy, it contributes to the effectiveness of that leadership. By using achievements as a benchmark for what can be done, others are inspired to do great things, and competitors are galvanised into action, to innovate further. While the company is not an advocacy organisation but a media company, the effect of its work is to advocate for best practice.

Gordon Brown, CEO


sustainability week 2014 report

Sustainability Week is a multifaceted and integrated event that traverses sectors and emphasises opportunities for investors, policymakers, business people, and consumers to improve environmental and economic performance – be it through achieving efficiencies, introducing alternative approaches, and by unlocking value. Sustainability Week showcases innovation and seeks to inspire and educate attendees. Multiple platforms highlight the actions and interventions of leading thinkers, policymakers, practitioners and producers as they set the benchmark for how to respond to global and national challenges, spurred by demand for more sustainable solutions.

Gordon Brown Event convenor

By becoming a leading ‘green economy’ South Africa can dramatically improve competitiveness. With the appropriate policy framework, responsible investment in responsible businesses and being driven by informed and intelligent procurement and consumer purchasing, South Africa can be a world leader. The rolling out of mega renewable energy, green building, and sustainable transport projects in 2013 are perfect examples of this principle in action.

B SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES SEMINAR

CSIR INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE

JUNE 2015

Alive2Green Alive2Green is a specialist knowledge company focussed on promoting and delivering content on sustainability, believing that once presented with the facts, decision-makers will make the right choices. The company works in partnership with leading research institutions, industry organisations and government departments to develop and produce forums, publications, events and educational courses that communicate the fundamental issues, thereby facilitating, in some small way, the knowledge transfer needed to advance towards a sustainable future. Founded in South Africa in 2006 by directors: Gordon Brown, Lloyd Macfarlane and Andrew Fehrsen Offices in: Cape Town, South Africa (Head Office) Curepipe, Mauritius Representative office in Birmingham, Alabama USA The Business Zone 1678 CC trading as Alive2Green is owned by Cape Media Corporation (50%), Gordon Brown (25%) and Lloyd Macfarlane (25%). The organization is a closed corporation registered in the Republic of South Africa and is the sole owner of the Sustainability Week events and properties.

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sustainability week 2014 report Events and Activities

GREEN BUILDING CONFERENCE

Welcome, opening and keynote address, session 1 Speaker: Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa, executive mayor of Tshwane Topic: Welcome note Speaker: Llewellyn van Wyk, CSIR Built Environment Topic: Introduction and context Speaker: Dr Elizabeth Farrelly, architect Topic: Keynote Summary: Councillor Ramakgopa provided an overview on the City of Tshwane’s (CoT) activities related to the development of green building. He welcomed all delegates and officially opened the conference. Van Wyk provided the context for the conference. Dr Farrelly introduced the concept of ‘Green Seduction’ and explained that arguing in pursuit of developing green buildings, architects had focused more on the buildings than the spaces in-between. Contextual presentations, session 2 Speaker: Llewellyn van Wyk, CSIR Built Environment Topic: Green infrastructure Speaker: Gaétan Siew, Port Louis, Mauritius Topic: Sustainable cities Summary: Van Wyk began his presentation by highlighting a connection between the green economy and green infrastructure. He discussed the impact of development on the environment and the consequence of climate change. Siew argued that the rise of the middle class in developing countries was leading to a reversal of the brain drain that has negatively affected the continent. He said that within the context of high infrastructure costs, a new relationship was being forged between technology and the built environment. This includes the use of the mobile phone by users as a means of connecting to various services. Case studies, session 3 Speaker: Lindiwe Kwele, deputy city manager- City of Tshwane Topic: Case study – Tshwane House Speaker: Heinrich Gerstner, Heinrich Gerstner Harding Architects Topic: Case study – Hotel Verde Summary: Kwele introduced the CoT’s Vision 2055, and then touched on the City’s Inner City Regeneration Programme to

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contextualise the Tshwane House case study. She presented the Tshwane House case study, stating that in the development of this project, the CoT would aim to achieve a six-star green star office SA rating. Gerstner spoke about the Hotel Verde project that is located in close proximity to the Cape Town Airport. He highlighted the sustainability principles that had been applied in the design of this project, in particular the use of three vertical wind turbines for energy generation. He noted that on the advice of the sustainability consultant on the project team, gold and platinum ratings will be pursued on the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for new building construction and existing buildings rating tools, respectively. Case studies, session 4 Speaker: Lloyd Rubidge, VDMMA Architects Topic: Case study – The Silo Project Speaker: Anthony Orelowitz, Paragon Architects Topic: Case study – Alexander Forbes Building Speaker: Dion Chang, Flux Trends Topic: Future trends Summary: Rubidge presented on the Silo Project located at the V&A Waterfront, Cape Town. Similar to the first two case studies, he discussed the sustainability principles applied in the design of the project, highlighting the use of sea water exchangers. He said that the project had achieved the Western Cape’s first six-star green star commercial building rating for Silo 1; while Silo 2 achieved a four-star green star residential building rating. Orelowitz presented a case study on the third commercial building for the day, 115 West, located across from the Sandton Gautrain Station. He focused on the client’s commitment to green building principles and noted that the project was awarded a plaque recording a best practice green star SA rating. The final speaker on day one, Dion Chang, identified numerous trends that had an impact on the building environment. One of the most significant trends was how experience, as opposed to products, were becoming more important to the consumer, i.e. the built environment user. Case studies, session 5 Speaker: Llewellyn van Wyk, CSIR Built Environment Topic: Introduction and context


sustainability week 2014 report

GREEN BUILDING CONFERENCE

Speaker: Arno Pieters, Crafford and Crafford Architects Topic: Case study – Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) Building Speaker: Tim Hall, Light Earth Design, Kigali, Rwanda Topic: Master class on relevant sustainable design in East Africa Summary: Van Wyk opened day two of the Green Building event by giving a brief overview of day one’s presentations. Pieters’s presentation on the TUT’s new architecture wing case study highlighted the commitment of architectural practices to sustainable development. He noted that the building not only applied basic sustainability principles, but aimed to get the users, i.e. the students, involved in its operation as part of an educational experience. Although the designers initially aimed for a green star rating, this proved too expensive and project costs were therefore targeted at the application of as many sustainability principles as possible. Hall’s presentation on relevant sustainable design in East Africa identified the challenge of high infrastructure development costs in Africa. He observed the Rwandan government’s commitment to sustainable development, evidenced in its policies and implementation practices, i.e. involvement of design professionals in the development of numerous key cultural and housing projects. Hall’s presentation also identified the use of local labour and innovative technologies and design in the application of basic sustainability principles. Case studies, session 6 Speaker: Graham Young, University of Pretoria Topic: Landscape Urbanism Speaker: Michelle Sandilands, Michelle Sandilands Architects Topic: Case study – UNISA Cape Town Campus Speaker: Dirk Funhoff, BASF Topic: Next generation materials Summary: Young provided a landscaping perspective amid a myriad of architectural presentations. He highlighted the significance of landscape architecture on the creation of positive urban space within the context of sustainable development. Sandilands presented the second educational building case study, UNISA Parow phase 2 located in Cape Town. She noted that the project did not apply for a green star rating, but that it was designed with sustainability

principles in mind. In particular, the building was designed to respond to the local light industrial context and other existing buildings. She noted that the building was designed for flexibility, adaptability and recyclability. Following numerous presentations on buildings, Funhoff spoke at a micro level on the elements of building components designers regularly specified. His presentation equipped delegates with some understanding of why building components worked the way they did and provided a glimpse of the Phase Change Materials (PCM), which illustrated the direction of BASF research. Panel debate and closing remarks, session 7 Panelists: Heinrich Gerstner, Elizabeth Farelly, Gaétan Siew, Graham Young, Tim Hall Summary: This panel debate was facilitated by Llewellyn van Wyk, who introduced the panellists and stated what they would discuss: ’Why are green buildings essentially modernist?’ Each panellist was requested to make an opening statement, following which delegates were given the opportunity to voice their opinions and pose questions to the panellists. The debate highlighted environmental ratings more as a status symbol rather than a performance measure. Concern regarding the rise of a language (or formula) for green building was discussed. Emphasis on first principles is required, to respond not only to climate change, but to the context within which development occurs. This highlights the necessity for critical thinking to form part of the teaching and learning of the built environment. At the end of the panel debate the panellists offered final summaries. Van Wyk summarised the main issues and officially closed the conference. The rapporteur for the Green Building Conference was Nosizo Sebake. Panellists, transported on electric bicycles, were given a technical tour of BASF house at the CSIR Campus.

Conference Chairman: Llewellyn van Wyk Programme Director: Nosizo Sebake

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sustainability week 2014 report

VISION ZERO WASTE SEMINAR

Design of Products and Materials for Recyclability Speaker: Cllr Petunia Mashaba – City if Tshwane Topic: Welcome note Speaker: Douw Steyn – National Reclycling Forum (NRF) Topic: Introduction Speaker: Ray Finch and Joel Arcus, Biowaste Technologies Topic: Oroduct innovation Speaker: Kiril Dimitrov – Woolworths Topic: Packaging Summary: Councillor Mashaba contextualised the session by emphasising that the City of Tshwane, a sentiment echoed later by the City of Johannesburg, was rapidly running out of landfill space. The Councillor also made the point that it takes up to three years to bring new landfill sites on line, and the City will run out before then. It was also made clear that landfilling was not an inexpensive option or an environmentally or socially appealing one. Steyn of the NRF introduced the morning theme by taking delegates through the Plastics SA Design for recycling guidelines, emphasising key strategies to avoid plastics ending up as not recyclable. This was reinforced by Dimitrov who raised similar design considerations such as: • Materials and components – #1 PET bottle is recyclable, but tray, cup, clamshell are not • Colours (a clear bottle is widely recyclable vs. a brown bottle which is not recycled in SA and thus considered by recyclers to be a contaminant) • Additives – oxygen scavengers, oxo-biodegradable, etc. • Labelling – sleeves, direct print, stickers, labels of incompatible materials • Adhesives – difficult to separate and wash in a process, are contaminants • Accurate labelling – material identification or consumer focused labelling and instruction • Other components – triggers, lidding and barrier layers are contaminants Finch introduced the compostable bags, developed by Joel Arcus, which are used effectively in the recycling of compostable waste streams such as food and garden waste. Users simply place all such waste materials into the bags which are then tossed into the bio composter plant, and come out as nutrient-rich fertiliser. By creating a material that acts like plastic but is compostable, a true zero waste solution is created. Finch also presented on a range of waste-to-energy solutions, effectively opening this discussion at the vision zero waste seminar, a topic which may be picked up on in 2015.

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In summary, and flowing from the panel discussion, it is clear that a great deal will have to be done in terms of the design of products and packaging in order to render more products and materials recyclable. Considerations need to extend beyond the material itself and include recycling realties within the market being serviced, as not all recyclable materials are actually recycled – a complex issue indeed. Minimising pre-consumer waste streams Speaker: Hermann Erdmann – Recycling and Economic Development Initiative of South Africa (REDISA) Topic: Waste tyres in SA Speaker: Joshua Wallace – Western Cape Inductrial Symbiosis Project (WISP) Topic: Industrial symbiosis Speaker: Alex Limille – Wizeimpact (presented in a later session but included here because of relevance) Topic: Circular economy Summary: Two excellent examples of initiatives to reduce waste streams were presented – Hermann Erdmann took delegates through the REDISA initiative, a system of extended producer responsibility in the tyre industry. The system in essence embraces the circular or closed loop approach to materials, and significantly does this in relation to tyres, which are a problematic waste stream. It is funded through a levy paid by tyres sellers, which then pays for the collection, transportation, and storage of used tyres. The system is run by the retailers who reclaim the old tyres when fitting new tyres, and which are then collected by REDISA contract transporters, who drop the tyres at key points. Materials beneficiators are contracted by REDISA to break the tyres down into their component materials: rubber, fabric, steel, and carbon black, all of which can be sold as direct inputs or as primary materials in a variety of beneficiation applications. The REDISA system effectively removes tyres from landfill and illegal dump sites, removing the range of handling and health hazards associated with waste tyres. Wallace presented WISP, which identifies project, company, or industry waste, and seeks out other projects, companies and industries for which these waste streams may represent an opportunity. The initiative has been brought into SA from abroad and holds great value in eliminating certain otherwise hazardous or high impact waste streams. An example of this circular thinking was presented by Alex Limille who spoke about the theory of circular economy, which he defined as follows: “The circular economy refers to an industrial economy that is restorative by intention and design; aims to rely on renewable energy; tracks, and eliminates the use of toxic chemicals; and eradicates waste through careful design.”


sustainability week 2014 report In conclusion, it is very clear that industrial waste streams to landfill are significant, indeed they account for a high percentage of waste to landfill sites, and solutions are available through implementing circular material flows. This section of the vision zero waste seminars must enjoy greater focus in future, and include solutions power, construction, and steel industry waste streams. The REDISA example can, and indeed this is the intention, be applied to many other waste streams beyond automotive tyres, and initiatives such as WISP should be put into operation nationwide as soon as possible. Separation at source Speaker: Reon Pienaar – Aecom Topic: Separation at source Speaker: Gavin Heron – Earth Probiotic Topic: The food waste recycling benefit Speaker: Mthobeli Kolisa – City of Tshwane Topic: Landfill versus material retrieval Speaker: Khosi Baker – City of Johannesburg Topic: Initiatives to drive separation at source Speaker: Simon Mbata – Waste Pickers Association Topic: Zero waste programme and recycling campaign Summary: All voices at the event echoed the view that an increase in separation at source on the part of households and businesses would be the primary driver of recycling. By deduction should separation at source continue in only a small number of households and businesses, growth in the recycling sector would continue to be sluggish. Pienaar shared the findings of a survey conducted in Rustenburg and Helenvale, near Port Elizabeth. Findings indicated that some people were not interested, some already recycled, but many were interested and indicated they would recycle if the council made bags available – in short the survey shows there is large scope for uptake of separation at source within these communities, and this could be extrapolated to the rest of SA.

The municipal representatives reinforced the dire need to move away from the current approach to disposal, driven by the lack of landfill space and the national policy which emphasises strategies that pursue the waste hierarchy. The City of Tshwane presented the new best practice clean material recovery facilities (MRF) launched as a PPP, which will collect separated and unseparated waste, sort the waste and retrieve materials, as well as implement a ‘best of breed’ incinerator (more detail to follow on this aspect). Mbata, chairman of the SA Waste Pickers Association, emphasised that waste pickers have been recycling materials for many years, and but for their work, landfills would have filled up much sooner. Waste pickers should therefore be given due respect as a primary stakeholder in any move towards recycling in SA. There were no dissenting voices to this appeal. In conclusion the group was left with a clear impression that all stakeholders represented were speaking the same language and there was consensus that a steep growth in separating at source and recycling was not only desirable, but absolutely necessary. Review of the vision zero waste seminars The editorial objective of the session was to pose the question as to whether one could begin to piece together a vision of a zero waste system or society, one that places a value on human and environmental health, as well as on finite resources. In conclusion, and after hearing from a diverse range of stakeholders and perspectives, it would seem that while such a discussion is highly complex and multifaceted, it was the only option. To continue to exist sustainably and indeed to grow and solve our many problems, a change from the current disposal-oriented paradigm to a circular, reuse, renew paradigm is absolutely necessary and indeed on the agenda.

Facilitator: Gordon Brown

SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES SEMINAR

Opening the seminar, keynote speaker Cecilia Njenga, of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) South Africa, delivered a global perspective by discussing eight key messages from international experience, namely: • Cities are drivers of change at both local and global levels • Integrated approach to resource efficiency optimises resource use • Taking action is cost effective • Improved infrastructure achieves greater resource efficiency • Innovative finance mechanisms leverage extensive benefits • Indicators are key in assessing a cities environmental performance • Peer-to-peer exchanges facilitate access to appropriate policy choices

• Coordinated coalition of stakeholders enables transformative change By reinforcing each message with an international case study, greater insight could be gleaned as reduction statistics were highlighted, as were examples of green infrastructure investments and operating costs of selected green city projects. Providing a local approach, Cleo Forster, of the WSP Group addressed the issue of how SA cities can approach the sustainable cities concept, asking the question of whether a sustainable city is simply a collection of green buildings. Using Menlyn Maine as a case study, she demonstrated the multiple infrastructural layers requiring individual assessment and re-assessment that make up a green city,

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sustainability week 2014 report Sara Birch from ICLEI presented strategies for climate change resilience and transformation. Examining statistics of energy consumption and consequent greenhouse gases, she outlined steps for sustainable development and community transformation. The Five Cities Network Programme, targeting particularly vulnerable communities and their livelihoods, was highlighted. The programme stresses the uniqueness of each government and the importance

of a strategic, interactive and collaborative integration of global and local development planning. Adding to this notion, Strategic executive director (SED) Amalemo, of the City of Tshwane focused on a shift to sustainable neighbourhoods promoting inclusive and sustainable cities. Facilitator: Lemao Dorah Nteo

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SEMINAR

Can a move to more Sustainable Energy have the combined effect of cutting GHG emissions and driving economic grow th Speaker: Councillor Jacob Masango – City of Tshwane Topic: Welcome note Speaker: Dr Rebecca Maserumule – Department of Enerby (DoE) Topic: The overview of integrated energy planning approach Speaker: Dr Marco Marco Lotz – Nedbank Topic: Meeting the demand for funding sustainable energy projects Speaker: Ntombifuthi Ntuli – Deparment of Trade and Industry (Dti) (Ntuli spoke in the mid-morning session but is included for thematic relevance) Topic: Renewable energy as a driver for economic growth in South Africa Summary: Councillor Masango welcomed the group and provided context from the City of Tshwane’s perspective. He committed the City to a clear path towards energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE), in the belief that such a move would indeed cut emissions, stimulate new industries and create employment. Dr Maserumule of the DoE presented an overview of the departments approach to energy planning, which is comprehensive and seeks to provide secure energy to meet anticipated economic activities while balancing the opportunity provided by having a good supply of coal against the need to protect human and environmental health. Key drivers of change, it seems, will hinge on policies such as the Carbon Tax Policy and the Climate Change Response Policy and in the absence of these the DoE policy stance seems somewhat weak from a sustainable energy perspective. The approach certainly does not place sustainable energy (SE) as a primary goal, rather SE is considered as a question of diversification of supply, the extent to which will be determined by policies outside the department. Lotz concluded: “The sustainability squeeze is on…” with government driving it from the top and investors driving it from the bottom, and business opportunities should not be underestimated. Ntuli presented on the foreign investment triggered through the REIPP process, pointing to the economic value of this investment. In conclusion – the sustainable energy (EE and RE) projects already underway in SA can demonstrate the massive opportunity to the country in terms of both clean energy generation and economic

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growth through private and foreign investment. However, unless government and the DoE in particular, positions sustainable energy as a primary energy strategy and not simply as part of the mix, the true potential for reducing GHG and stimulating economic growth will never be attained. Deep EE among high demand users as a key to sustainable energy Speaker: Hanno Olinger – Exxaro Resources (Olinger kindly spoke in the morning session but is included here for thematic relevance) Topic: Leading edge sustainable energy interventions in the mining sector Speaker: Faith Mkhacwa – National Cleaner Production Centre (NCPC) Topic: Creating a framework through which to drive industrial energy efficiency Speaker: Gareth Gregory – Deloitte Topic: Energy modelling and planning Speaker: Mduduzi Dlamini – National Empowerment Fund (NEF) Topic: The venture capital value proposition for funding the development of green economy projects Summary: Olinger outlined the business of Exxaro Resources, and spoke to their multiple efforts to operate sustainably. He demonstrated the extent to which operations are measured in terms of water and energy intensity, which positions Exxaro to make quantifiable interventions going forward. Having only 20 minutes Olinger stopped short of sharing the actual savings achieved through specific implemented EE interventions to date. Mkhacwa presented an overview of their work with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) in assisting companies to achieve ISO standards, and the resultant saving achieved across various key high-energy consumption operations. The presentation demonstrated the sound business case for EE, quantifying investments and returns, and illustrating the clear opportunity for users and for service and technology suppliers. Gregory of Deloitte set out a model to be adopted by companies considering investments in EE, concluding that companies should take an integrated and strategic approach and not simply a technology approach.


sustainability week 2014 report Dlamini presented an interesting overview of the lending environment for companies, and made the following statement: “Despite a lack of financing constantly being cited as a constraint to the growth and development of SMEs, there are a variety of funding programmes and financing schemes available in the market. Awareness and uptake of these schemes, however, has been low. In exploring the barriers to financial inclusion, it was found that the most significant barriers to financial inclusion were not regulatory or supply-related, but maybe attitudinal or perceptual (FinScope Survey)”. In conclusion, this point reinforces a long held view of this observer that the financial markets have lacked the creativity and sales effort to target green economy investments. The view was expressed ultimately by the full panel, that a widespread uptake of EE interventions would have a significant effect in reducing GHG and driving economic growth. Sustainable Energy at the city scale – formulating a strategy to target peak demand Speaker: Sed Nndwamato Mutshidza, City of Tshwane Topic: Sustainable Energy at a City Scale Speaker: Peter Neilson, Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality Topic: Preparing an interim guideline document for net metering Speaker: Jaco Cronje, director operations, EES Africa Topic: Technological barriers to implementing smart grids and peak tariffs in SA cities, and key solutions Speaker: Viktor Maartens, Energy Services, Eskom Ltd Topic: Status on demand side management Speaker: Denise Lundall, SANEDI Topic: Cool surfaces for South African Buildings Speaker: Dr Sharon Blair, SAASTA Topic: Hydrogen and Fuel Technology as an alternative source of energy for SA Summary: Saving energy, creating energy, utilising landfill as energy sources, hydrogen fuel cell technology and the move towards smart metering and smarter grids to manage energy supply and demand with the overall aim of creating smarter, more resilient cities were topics of discussion during the second part of the Sustainable Energy Seminar.

The overall sense is that the slow move to deregulate and set split tariffs are impeding the implementation of solutions to provide lowcost, secure energy to city residents and businesses. Residential energy use increases during winter and commercial energy use increases in summer. The best way to improve efficiencies in both sectors is to change behaviour, change technology and aim for optimum efficiency in operations and equipment. Innovations like heat resistant paint for use on rooftops and pavements have a positive effect on CO2 emissions and cool areas under treatment by two to four degrees Celsius. Research and development of energy saving solutions are providing valuable opportunities for skills development and the creation of green-collar jobs. Each of SAs 143 municipalities has a role to play and fall within a ‘catch 22’ scenario as electricity supply is a key source of revenue gener¬ation. Deregulating energy supply will bring with it a loss of revenue and degree of control. This, and the slow move to national deregulations and lack of clarity on how energy suppliers can feed into the grid and at what tariff, is preventing faster take up of solutions that do exists but that require testing. Smart metering brings with it a huge influx of data personnel to each household that requires sensitive management but in turn could provide valuable information to create targeted campaigns to drive behaviour change among households with high energy usage. Consumer campaigns to reduce energy usage have been very effective to date. The country was using more energy in 2007 than it is now and 348 MW of electricity has been saved during peak hours – enough to power 3,8 million laptop computers. Hydrogen fuel cell technology and its development is a core strategy of the DTI who aim to develop a knowledge-based economy with skills in the manufacturing and export of these products. Energy entrepreneurs need a more adaptable arena to work in and the scope to enable market forces to drive supply and demand. This means we are a long way off from seeing smart metering play its part in energy management and the creation of smarter cities with resilient energy supply that have new revenue models based on the solutions to hand. Facilitators: Gordon Brown and Melissa Baird

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT AND MOBILITY SEMINAR

Are the current public transport mega projects assisting in making South Africa more sustainable? Speaker: Councillor Rebone Mokgothadi – City of Tshwane Topic: Welcome note Speaker: Angela Andrews – Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport Topic: Keynote

Speaker: Dr Vaughn Mostert – University of Johannesburg (UJ) Topic: Are recent mega investments in the transport sector helping to set SA on a more sustainable development path Summary: Councillor Mokgothadi welcomed delegates to the session and contextualised the discussion by committing the City of Tshwane to a path toward sustainable transport and mobility.

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sustainability week 2014 report Andrews, presented the Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport Draft Green Transport Policy, and welcomed further public comment. In setting out the problem case she began by stating that transport is the largest contributor to GHG emissions in SA, and that Gauteng is the province with the largest contribution. Andrews then set out related legislation in SA and Gauteng Province as well as the broad set of strategies to address the issues, and then outlined a collection of projects that are already contributing to these objectives, such as public transport projects – Gautrain, BRT etc, concluding with policy statements and priorities. Dr Mostert presented a hard hitting critique of current approaches concluding that public transport mega projects such as Gautrain and the BRTs are poor value for money as they are not solving the problem of too many cars, a factor that is undermining the economy. Dr Mostert stressed the need to focus on low priced quality public transport along already identified primary routes which may well transcend municipal boundaries. In conclusion it seems there is a strong difference of opinion about the chosen investment path, but hopefully it is not too late for academics such as Dr Mostert to be heard, and his research and views to be incorporated – after all, at the time of the seminar, public comment and indeed stakeholder engagement was still open on the Draft Green Transport Policy. What further investments and interventions can further advance SA cities towards greater sustainability? Speaker: Pheko Letlonkane – City of Tshwane Topic: Projects and initiatives exemplifying integrated public transport

Speaker: Vincent Truter – Cycology Topic: Sustainable electric mobility SED Letlonkane presented the complex matrix of challenges facing the CoT Transport Department, the first and arguably the most difficult is the scale of the City, with some borders as far as 50 kilometres from the city centre. The presentation demonstrated the comprehensive analysis carried out by city officials, that there was clarity as to policy direction and a definite will to seek out sustainable solutions. The final speaker, Vincent Truter from Cycolgy electric bike and Tours Company and founder of Decongest Sandton, gave an entertaining and thought provoking presentation of his personal journey to becoming a vocal and highly effective advocate of the cycling lifestyle. He shared the problem statement and vision behind Decongest Sandton which promotes non-motorised transport as the key to getting people out of their cars and onto bicycles and their feet in central Sandton. In conclusion, speakers from fairly diverse perspectives used similar language to describe the problems and the solutions, although there was some difference of opinion as to how to achieve the goals of a safer, more sustainable transport system in SA generally and in Gauteng in particular. The objective of this session was to stimulate discussion and foster greater engagement and consultation. One hopes that the key protagonists will engage one another further as policies and acquisitions are bedded down. Facilitator: Gordon Brown

SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCE SEMINAR

Supply Side Speaker: Councillr John Ngonyama, City of Tshwane Topic: Welcome note Speaker: Neil van Wyk, Department of Water and Sanitation Topic: Current water resources status and availability Speaker: Meagan Donnelly, Randwater Topic: City scale water resources Speaker: Dean Muruven, WWF-SA Topic: Economics of water Summary: Councillor Ngonyama gave a brief outline of water and its link to social well-being and culture. He explained that development should be sustainable as they link strongly with society, the environment and the economy. He urged the audience to think about how we can increase water use efficiency. The Councillor concluded by sketching the day’s programme. Van Wyk described a broad view of South Africa’s current water availability and water scarcity. He outlined South Africa’s historic and

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future plans for mitigating this scarcity while also describing some of the risks associated with the country’s water scarcity. Donnelly described a very broad view of global water concepts and the concepts pertaining to a South African water perspective. She then shared some of the work that Randwater are doing in an effort to raise awareness among South Africans of the plight of our country’s water resources. She mentioned that Randwater work with the nursery industry in particular. Muruven constructed a picture of our water source areas, or water factories that essentially take up 8% of our landmass but provide more than 50% of our river flow. He also gave the audience an insight into WWF-SA’s Journey of Water programme that has as its basic tenet, ‘water does not come from a tap’. The session ended with a short Q&A session from the audience. Water Risk Speaker: Dr Ernst Baard, CapeNature Topic: Managing and restoring the Western Cape’s water factories


sustainability week 2014 report Speaker: Prof. Sabelo Mhlanga, University of Johannesburg Topic: Nanotechnology application in the water sector Speaker: Mokena Makeka, Mokeka Designs Topic: Water Cathedral Summary: Sadly, the speaker from Coca Cola did not attend. However, Dr Baard followed splendidly on the heels of Muruven, when he spoke of the importance of protecting ecological infrastructure. He also addressed the issue of proper fire management and presented an expanded public works programme that Cape Nature is working with. This programme is essentially the ‘working for water’ one. According to Dr Baard, Invasive Alien Plants (IAPs) cover 10 000 000 ha and use 3,3 billion cubic metres of water per year. Prof. Mhlanga gave an interesting presentation on nanotechnology and he did this by using a case study approach. Essentially he suggested that nanotechology can help two rural communities access safe, reliable, clean drinking water. Makeka provided a fresh approach to raising water awareness by presenting his latest architectural masterpiece, the water cathedral. The water cathedral will be a cultural icon in the middle of the mother city that will evoke dialogue about water conservation, use, demand and scarcity. The session concluded with a panel discussion that essentially focussed on water as a human right; the political will of decision-makers to enable municipalities to better manage water, and the further enabling of municipalities and partners with the right budgets (and expenditures against that budget) to spend. Compliance and enforcement Speaker: Richard Holden, Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA) Topic: Reacting to incidents – Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) in the Witwatersrand basin Speaker: Dr Thomas Gyedu-Ababio, Inkomati Catchment Managment Agency Topic: Water security in the Inkomati, Water Management Area (WMA) Speaker: Nndwamato Mutshidza, City of Tshwane Topic: Case study on compliance/ enforcement Summary: Holden’s topic seemed to suggest he would speak on AMD in the Witwatersrand, but he ended up challenging the paradigm of the present by suggesting that AMD is merely one of the current sources of water pollution in this country. He challenged the audience with thoughts about how we, as private, individual water users, could play a role in valuing and conserving water better. He also presented facts and figures on the costs of new augmentation schemes versus the cost of infrastructure maintenance and refurbishment. The take-away message of the presentation was that of self-regulation. Dr Gyedu-Ababio presented a holistic picture of water resource management in the Inkomati (now Inkomati/Usuthu) catchment. The picture he presented was bleak: the aforementioned catchment is in deficit. But he also addressed some of the fantastic interventions that the CMA is engaging in to try and turn the deficit into a neutral or positive water balance. He mentioned water reallocation through compulsory licensing, water conservation measures and the use of alternative water sources. Mutshidza spoke at length about the City of Tshwane’s good quality water but then honed in on the determination of the City to provide good quality, potable water for all by 2055 (this, apparently, is encapsulated in their Vision 2055 for the City). Part of this vision would be achieved by better management of their waste water treatment plants (WWTP), which he described.

Assisting to prevent a water crisis Speaker: Dr Olufemi Fasemore, Hitachi Topic: Operational and maintenance system and asset management tool for water and waste water facility Speaker: Annelie Swanepoel, Randwater Topic: Algae and what it means in the water Speaker: Jeremy Taylor, Water Rhapsody Topic: Water sustainability – our responsibility Summary: Dr Fasemore presented Hitachi’s maintenance system and asset management tool for one of their waste water facilities. Essentially it outlined how an electronic, on-line system can “bring the waste water facility closer to the supervisor”. Swanepoel described an interesting view of algae and cyanobacteria and how these form the basis of aquatic foodwebs in the presence of sunlight. She also presented how Randwater respond to, and treat, algae and cyanobacteria levels in water storage facilities. Taylor outlined some of the environmental and water risks we face as a society. He then described some of the potential mitigation measures we may be able to engage with to help lower the risk. Some of those were water-use efficiency in agriculture, augmentation, transfers or simple conservation measures like those catalysed by the products sold by Water Rhapsody. That allowed him a springboard into sharing how Water Rhapsody has helped people save millions of litres of water over 20 years. This session closed with an audience discussion, which included potential panellists as the facilitator decided that the topic was one that everyone should engage in and not just a select few from the presenter line-up. The facilitator changed the topic of discussion to read: ‘how can society – every one of us – proactively assist to prevent a water crisis?’ The discussion ensued for approximately 20 minutes. Concluding remarks Most, if not all, speakers recognised that we live in a water scarce country; that our water resources are severely constrained and that we need to mobilise all of our resources and knowledge to engage in interventions that make sense. An underlying implication by speakers and audience members alike was that augmentation, as one of these interventions, can only take us so far; that we need to do a better job of exercising water conservation and water demand management measures. These measures include better efficiencies in agriculture, the practical application of policy within both commercial and urban developments, private lifestyles and manner of doing business and certainly the manipulation of pricing as an interventionist strategy. In fact, it seems that more discussions about price versus cost versus value are required. With regard to policy, it seemed that people were saying two things: • There is no clear policy about practical water demand management measures, and; • How is the private sector and local government enabled to apply policy to their businesses and to the constituency? In addition to the topics raised above, the issue of cross-sectoral collaboration and engagement was discussed, particularly in light of agriculture. An opinion was voiced that agriculture needs to be included in a lot of these dialogues and conferences. And lastly, the issue of accountable leadership was brought to the table. It was made known that strong political leadership is required for good decision-making to influence the forward progression of robust integrated water resources management in South Africa. Facilitator: Garth Barnes

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sustainability week 2014 report

B

GREEN BUSINESS SEMINAR

Speaker: Douglas Kativu, Global Reporting Initiative Topic: GRI g4 and associated developments Speaker: Pieter Conradie, University of Pretoria: Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership Topic: A critical analysis of integrated reporting Speaker: Kerri Savin, Nedbank Topic: Nedbanks integrated reporting journey Speaker: Nicola Robins, Incite Sustainability Topic: Shared value Summary: The more efficient we become the more resources we use, according to English economist William Stanley Jevons. He proposed that as technology progresses, the increase in efficiency with which a resource is used tends to increase (rather than decrease) the rate of consumption of that resource. Jevon’s theory is unfortunately and quite inconveniently relevant in the context of corporate reporting said Pieter Conradie who urged delegates to consider the fact that the real solutions to corporate sustainability cannot simply be based in optimum resource efficiency and increased environmental performance over time, but rather in significant disruptive (and probably painful) interventions that are required to create meaningful change. The Green Business Seminar focused on two important themes in corporate sustainability: reporting and carbon. The morning sessions were dedicated to the corporate reporting environment and in particular to the issues, principles and guidelines around integrated reporting. Savin spoke about the bank’s integrated reporting journey and Robins gave some insights into the creation of shared value through an authentic materiality process. Kativu spoke about new developments and linkage documents from GRI and specifically about the G4 Guidelines in relation to the integrated reporting process. Conradie presented a critical analysis of integrated reporting as a mechanism for addressing crucial environmental and social issues. The speakers then participated in a panel discussion and fielded questions from the audience that related to their presentations, but which also focused strongly on issues of sustainability in the supply chain. Panelists: Alex Hetherington (Carbon Calculated), Franz Rental (Climate Neutral Group) and Ndivhuho Raphulu (NCPC) Summary: Through the introduction of carbon tax the South African government plans to bring about a transformation to a low carbon

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economy by reducing (relative) carbon emissions and by establishing a revenue stream, which can contribute towards climate change mitigation and adaptation. As laudable as these objectives are, there are some major concerns about the viability of such a tax in the current context of poor economic growth and high inflation rates. The first of the two afternoon panel discussion sessions saw Alex Hetherington, Franz Rental and Ndivhuho Raphulu discussing the context of the proposed new legislation around carbon tax and carbon offsets. Companies are already showing a commitment to measuring, managing and reducing carbon emissions and these initiatives are not necessarily driven by imminent legislation but by the business case that underpins a low carbon strategy. Hetherington cited examples of how companies that are reducing relative carbon emissions within an authentic reporting process are realising savings and increasing reputation among key stakeholder groups. Rental explained the financial and strategic benefits of carbon offsets in a sustainability strategy and as an alternative to carbon tax within the legislation framework. Raphulu provided a detailed background to the economic issues that are driving a low resource manufacturing movement and the corresponding business case for interventions that produce meaningful savings and even tax incentives under the Energy Efficiency Savings Tax Incentive Scheme. Panelists: Mohammed Tilly (Green Fund SA) and Elize Hattingh (Green Talent) The final panel session of the afternoon saw Mohammed Tilly and Elize Hattingh discussing a number of issues relating to green jobs, green skills and green project funding in South Africa. Tilly gave a brief presentation on the Green Fund and explained the application and approval processes involved and also touched on some of the successes achieved. The topic of skills development seemed very relevant to the audience and was discussed in some detail. Hattingh made the point that the increasingly widening skills gap in certain key areas of the green economy may yet present a problem for those trying to grow this valuable sector. Audience participation at the seminar was good and in some cases the discussions could have continued beyond the time allowed. The topics seemed to be relevant in the current context of corporate sustainability. Facilitator: Lloyd Macfarlane


sustainability week 2014 report RESPONSIBLE AND SUSTAINABLE TOURISM SEMINAR

Speaker: Niki Glen and Caroline Ungersbock, Sustainable Tourism Parnership Topic: Welcome and introduction Speaker: Dr Anthony Turton, Environmental Risk Analyst Topic: Mining, industry and tourism sustainability Speaker: Heidi van der Watt, International Sustainable Tourism Advisor Topic: Sustainable tourism and the next 20 years Speaker: Rehann Calitz: Topic: Farm my city Speaker: Dr Merinda Roets, Scientific Roets (Pty) Ltd Topic: Some realities/lessons of tourism for rural development Speaker: Johan Oliver Topic: Magaliesburg development initiative Speaker: Alan Roxton Wiggill Topic: Marketing for the community Speaker: Les Carlisle, group conservation manager at &Beyond Topic: Case study and beyond

Summary: Niki Glen opened the day welcoming all participants and thanking all speakers. Glen, one of the co-founders of the Sustainable Tourism Partnership programme, briefly introduced each speaker, and pointed out that the common requirement to make the day successful is that all the speakers are big thinkers, understand the need to work across complex systems and structures and have developed solutions to local economic development, environmental sustainability, capacity building and community empowerment through moving beyond the current mainstream thinking and acting. All speakers have developed or co-developed innovative solutions to common underlying challenges. Each speaker was asked to illustrate how we can be comprehensive and bold and how we can open doors for mass scale collaboration among various stakeholders, to enable sustainable development in tourism to leapfrog into the future. Facilitator: Niki Glen

FOOD SECURITY SEMINAR

Speaker: Councillor Eulenda Mabusela, City of Tshwane Topic: Welcome note Speaker: Inge Kotze, World Wide Fund (WWF) Topic: Best practice/innovations in industry that are helping address food security issues Speaker: Dawie Maree Topic: Private sector perspectives Speaker: Dr Moraka Makhura, head of economic research, Land Bank Topic: Land Bank Speaker: Ronnie Mkhombe, Swaziland Water and Agricultural Development Enterprise (SWADE) Topic: Case studies from Swaziland Speaker: Arthur Lenk, Topic: Learning from the Isreali agricultural experience Speaker: Graeme Wilkinson Topic: Food security and agricultural livelihoods funding programme Speaker: Quinton Naidoo, manager FEED Africa, Food and Trees for Africa

Topic: Developing small-scale farmers Speaker: Jane McPherson, Grain SA Topic: Developing small-scale grain farmers Speaker: Dr Ntsiki Maine, Food Security, City of Tshwane Topic: Food security initiatives in the City of Tshwane Speaker: Arianna Baldo, executive director Fair Trade Label, South Africa Topic: Protecting the rights of small-scale farmers as a key to food security Summary: Food security is part of the trifold nexus that includes water and energy security. Speakers at the Zero Waste seminar reflected on how much energy is wasted as a result of landfill, and food waste is a massive component of landfill. In a country where more than 25% of people live on social grants and with a constantly rising petrol price the implications for food security are profound. Simply put, it is going to get more and more expensive to deliver cheap, fresh produce to the average South African. Without access to healthy, nutritious food; education and health are adversely

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sustainability week 2014 report affected. This is why the small-scale farmer has such a pivotal role to play. There are many success stories of private sector partnerships with NGOs who are championing the development of small-scale farmers with sound economic mentoring in order for them to create agri-businesses that will continue to flourish into the future. National government needs to investigate the optimum use of land in order to not compromise agricultural development in favour of land development because climate change and water threats will require the re-evaluation of intensive mono-culture farming against small scale, diverse solutions that can be serviced by the development of a new generation of farmers and the use of green technology to provide crops that can withstand extremes in weather. Case studies show that sound mentoring and education of willing participants lead to a generation of resilient small-scale famers who can provide fresh, organic produce to local communities and

restaurants ensuring a supply and demand value chain that benefits the farmers directly and cuts costs and CO2 emissions in distribution. The tough challenges faced in developing these new farmers are lack of education, language barriers and overinflated expectations about working-to-earn and lack of financial skills. This means the development of a project takes a number of years rather than a few months and mentoring is a vital aspect to the success of a new farm. Farming needs to be championed by leaders and influencers in order to create a new nation of resilient food providers. South Africa could be a leader in Africa if the decision-makers do not lose sight of how access to arable land needs to be made a priority and do not ignore skills development in the agricultural sector. Ethical labelling initiatives are proving the social value of re-investing profits into the upliftment of farm workers. Facilitators: Melissa Baird and Tony Sanderson

YOUTH AND THE GREEN ECONOMY

Speaker: Councillor Eulenda Mabusela, City of Tshwane Topic: Welcome note Speaker: Inge Kotze, World Wide Fund (WWF) Topic: Best practice/innovations in industry that are helping address food security issues Speaker: Dawie Maree Topic: Private sector perspectives Speaker: Dr Moraka Makhura, head of economic research, Land Bank Topic: Land Bank Speaker: Ronnie Mkhombe, Swaziland Water and Agricultural Development Enterprise (SWADE) Topic: Case studies from Swaziland Speaker: Arthur Lenk, Topic: Learning from the Isreali agricultural experience Speaker: Graeme Wilkinson Topic: Food security and agricultural livelihoods funding programme Speaker: Quinton Naidoo, manager FEED Africa, Food and Trees for Africa Topic: Developing small-scale farmers Speaker: Jane McPherson, Grain SA Topic: Developing small-scale grain farmers Speaker: Dr Ntsiki Maine, Food Security, City of Tshwane Topic: Food security initiatives in the City of Tshwane Speaker: Arianna Baldo, executive director Fair Trade Label, SA Topic: Protecting the rights of small-scale farmers as a key to food security Summary: Food security is part of the trifold nexus that includes water and energy security. Speakers at the Zero Waste seminar reflected on how much energy is wasted as a result of landfill, and food waste is a massive component of landfill. In a country where more than 25% of people live on social grants and with a constantly

16

rising petrol price the implications for food security are profound. Simply put, it is going to get more and more expensive to deliver cheap, fresh produce to the average South African. Without access to healthy, nutritious food; education and health are adversely affected. This is why the small-scale farmer has such a pivotal role to play. There are many success stories of private sector partnerships with NGOs who are championing the development of small-scale farmers with sound economic mentoring in order for them to create agri-businesses that will continue to flourish into the future. National government needs to investigate the optimum use of land in order to not compromise agricultural development in favour of land development because climate change and water threats will require the re-evaluation of intensive mono-culture farming against small scale, diverse solutions that can be serviced by the development of a new generation of farmers and the use of green technology to provide crops that can withstand extremes in weather. Case studies show that sound mentoring and education of willing participants lead to a generation of resilient small-scale famers who can provide fresh, organic produce to local communities and restaurants ensuring a supply and demand value chain that benefits the farmers directly and cuts costs and CO2 emissions in distribution. The tough challenges faced in developing these new farmers are lack of education, language barriers and overinflated expectations about working-to-earn and lack of financial skills. This means the development of a project takes a number of years rather than a few months and mentoring is a vital aspect to the success of a new farm. Farming needs to be championed by leaders and influencers in order to create a new nation of resilient food providers. South Africa could be a leader in Africa if the decision-makers do not lose sight of how access to arable land needs to be made a priority and do not ignore skills development in the agricultural sector. Ethical labelling initiatives are proving the social value of re-investing profits into the upliftment of farm workers.


sustainability week 2014 report

EVENT GREENING Event Attendance Event Management The organisers of Sustainability Week are committed to ensuring that the events and activities taking place before, during and after Conference/Group Date the week are as green as reasonably possible in terms of their impact on the environment. 17 June 2014 Of ficial Opening and Event greening activities include correspondence and engageLaunch of the Green ment with certain key suppliers such as venue, caterers, exhibitors [Geef tekst op]Outreach Programme and sponsors regarding ways in which they can reduce the impact of their involvement, and how they can assist to report on sustainabilThe Green Building 17 - 18 June 2014 ity. Various other interventions that relate to specific environmental Conference issues, such as energy, water and procurement have been discussed and actioned with key stakeholders. Vision Zero Waste 17 June 2014 Seminar Carbon footprint Events have the effect of increasing carbon emissions as they genCleantech Incubation 17 June 2014 erate increased levels of activity and energy consumption. We travel Seminar to and from events and we make use of accommodation and other products and services when attending events. We can measure the Sustainable Cities & 17 June 2014 impact of our event activities by calculating a carbon footprint. Communities Seminar  Alive2Green selected Carbon Calculated to conduct the carbon  footprint for the Sustainability Week events and activities. Energy Seminar 18 June 2014

Certificate  

Registered 100

286

110

50

62

96

Carbon offsets Food Securit y 64  19 June 2014  In order to host a carbon neutral event Alive2Green implemented  measures to reduce the carbon footprint of the event as much Sustainable Transpor t 19 June 2014 79 as possible and offset all remaining emissions, except emissions and Mobilit y  generated by the delegates travelling to the event. Offsetting was ar ranged by the carbon management company Climate Neutral Group. Sustainable Water 19 June 2014 86  A carbon offset is an equivalent amount of carbon that is either Resource Seminar  absorbed, or avoided being emitted, elsewhere. This can be achieved  by financing renewable energy or energy efficiency projects to Green Business Seminar 19 June 2014 109  replace the need for fossil fuels, or by conserving or planting forests,  to absorb carbon from the atmosphere. Under the advice of Climate 19 June 2014 85 Responsible &  Neutral Group, Alive2Green selected the Basa Magogo Alternative Sustainable Tourism   Ignition Technique project, a pioneering Gold Standard project in Seminar  South Africa’s townships which is saving lives, reducing emissions  and enhancing the quality of life for vulnerable communities. By  Youth & Green Economy 20 June 2014 517  offsetting with this project Alive2Green ensured that 100 households  benefit for years to come which collectively saves these households Exhibitors 17 - 20 Jun-14 208  more than R60,000 per year in coal purchase costs, more than  R360,000 in medical bills due to a cleaner cooking environment  Media 17 - 20 Jun-14 47 and more than 30,000 kg of coal is not burned thereby reducing air   pollution across Gauteng. Complete Expo Staf f 17  17 - 20 Jun-14 

Venue greening The CSIR ICC has a number of initiatives in place to reduce negative environmental impact. Gauteng Green Events Guidelines is used by the venue to ensure greening is at the forefront of all activities and the Event Greening Guidelines from GSA Campbell were used by Alive2Green to liaise with venue stakeholders.

Other Ser vice providers

17 - 20 Jun-14

97

17 - 20 Jun-14    

20

Staf f and Volunteers TOTAL:

2 033

17


sustainability week 2014 report Marketing Print

Publication

Value

Summary

01- Jun-14

My Office

R 21 398.47

Green is good for business

06 - Jun-14

Record Moot

R 4 776.90

Humanity works together for a brighter future; Sustainability Week

16 - Jun-14

New Age Western Cape

R 13 585.14

Mayor sees future in zero carbon emissions car

25 - Jun-14

Daily Sun Wheels

R 15 866.47

Beating SA’s transport problems with e -bicyles

01-Aug-14

SABI Magazine

R 10 970.01

Celebrate women’s month level fields

01-Aug-14

SABI Magazine

R 16 359.40

Wise waste water processes SABI a Sustainability partner

01-Aug-14

SABI Magazine

R 16 359.40

“Green is the new Gold” green success

Broadcast

Station

Value

Summary

23 - Jan-14

Lotus FM

R 18 788.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Gordon Brown

05 - Jun-14

Lotus FM

R 8 568.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Gordon Brown

05 - Jun-14

SA FM

R 4 293.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Mr Blessing Manale - City of Tshwane

12- Jun-14

SA FM

R 6 570.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Reon Pienaar - AECOM

15 - Jun-14

SABC News

R 13 200.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Mr Blessing Manale - City of Tshwane

17- Jun-14

SABC 2

R 27 600.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Dorah Nteo City of Tshwane

18 - Jun-14

SABC 2

R 21 800.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Elize Hattingh on the youth event

19 - Jun-14

Lotus FM

R 14 48 4.00

Sustainability Week - Food Security Seminar; Interview with Nazeem Hoosen

20 - Jun-14

SABC 3

R 168 850.00

Sustainability Week; Interview with Melissa Baird and Teresa Kok

Websites

Website

Value

Summary

21- Jan-14

Publicityupdate.co.za

R 63 270.00

Sustainability Week 2014 set to take place in Pretoria this June

21- Jan-14

Link2media.co.za

R 35 792.00

Advancing the green economy in South Africa

22- Jan-14

Health24.com

R 51 427.00

SA becoming a leading green economy Sustainability Week

22- Jan-14

Infrastructurene.ws

R 12 694.00

Gearing up for Sustainability Week

24 - Jan-14

Greenbusinessguide.co.za

R 31 037.00

SA becoming a leading green economy Sustainability Week

21- May-14

Shop -sa.co.za

R 277.00

Advancing the green economy in South Africa

18


sustainability week 2014 report

21- May-14

Link2media.co.za

R 4 4 4.00

Striving for a green economy

21- Jan-14

Link2media.co.za

R 35 792.00

Advancing the green economy in South Africa

22- Jan-14

Health24.com

R 51 427.00

SA becoming a leading green economy Sustainability Week

22- Jan-14

Infrastructurene.ws

R 12 694.00

Gearing up for Sustainability Week

24 - Jan-14

Greenbusinessguide.co.za

R 31 037.00

SA becoming a leading green economy Sustainability Week

21- May-14

Shop -sa.co.za

R 277.00

Advancing the green economy in South Africa

21- May-14

Link2media.co.za

R 4 4 4.00

Striving for a green economy

22- May-14

Publicityupdate.co.za

R 349.00

Stellar line -up of conferences, seminars confirmed for Sustainability Week 2014

26 - May-14

Bizcommunity.com

R 7 577.00

Sustainability Week strives to create awareness of environment

28 - May-14

Itweb.co.za

R 2 575.00

Sustainability Week to be held in Tshwane

29 - May-14

Rekordmoot.co.za

R 392.00

Working together for a brighter future

02- Jun-14

Pretoria-news.co.za

R 19 242.00

Sustainability Week to be held in Tshwane

05 - Jun-14

Publicityupdate.co.za

R 34 4.00

W WF-SA’s Inge Kotze confirmed to speak at Food Security Seminar this June

05 - Jun-14

Infrastructurene.ws

R 405.00

Sustainability Week - Inge Kotze

06 - Jun-14

Nmbbusinesschamber.co.za

R 498.00

Sustainability Week - Advancing the Green Economy in South Africa

06 - Jun-14

Tshwane.gov.za

R 8 45.00

Sustainability Week - Striving for a Green Economy

10 - Jun-14

Bizcommunity.com

R 7 761.00

W WF-SA expert to address Food Security Seminar

12- Jun-14

Abrbuzz.co.za

R 58 4.00

Electric vehicle handover ahead at Sustainability Week

16 - Jun-14

Thenewage.co.za

R 1 345.00

Mayor sees future in zero carbon emissions car

16 - Jun-14

Mypressoffice.co.za

R 397.00

Builders focuses on Sustainability

18 - Jun-14

Polity.org.za

R 906.00

Integrated Energy Plan to be published by March 2015

18 - Jun-14

Engineeringnews.co.za

R 1 480.00

Integrated Energy Plan to be published by March 2015

18 - Jun-14

Engineeringnews.co.za

R 1 536.00

Project developers should consider venture capital for funding - NEF

18 - Jun-14

Engineeringnews.co.za

R 1 470.00

SA could move towards long-term adoption of smart electricity grids

18 - Jun-14

Polity.org.za

R 938.00

Project developers should consider venture capital for funding - NEF

19


sustainability week 2014 report 18 - Jun-14

Tshwane.gov.za

R 798.00

A green week for Tshwane

19 - Jun-14

Polity.org.za

R 901.00

SA could move towards long-term adoption of smart electricity grids

19 -Jun-14

Engineeringnews.co.za

R 1 363.00

BASF a key par tner of Sustainabilit y Week 2014

20 -Jun-14

It web.co.za

R 2 603.00

UAE challenges calls for energy innovators

22-Jun-14

Thegreentimes.co.za

R 374.00

Energy adversaries and compatriots moving closer?

24 -Jun-14

Greenbusinessguide.co.za

R 439.00

UAE challenges calls for energy innovators

24 -Jun-14

Nmbbusinesschamber.co.za

R 466.00

Final Integrated Energy Plan to be released by March

27-Jun-14

Publicit yupdate.co.za

R 34 4.00

A more sustainable future awaits South Africans

27-Jun-14

Link2media.co.za

R 4 42.00

A more sustainable future awaits South Africans

30 -Jun-14

Bizcommunit y.com

R 7 539.00

Cit y of Tshwane launches Green Outreach Programme

01-Jul-14

Iolproper t y.co.za

R 2 008.00

Tshwane plans green development for Zithobeni

06 -Jul-14

Thegreentimes.co.za

R 369.00

Sustainabilit y Week brings lively debate to green issues

Amount estimated from the credibilit y gained from the exposure received

R 2 578 799.16

PR Print

Publication

Value

Description

-14

Architecture Specificator

R19 942.00

Get ready to put ideas in motion

-14

Green Business Journal

R35 900.00

Get ready to put ideas in motion

-14

Green Home Magazine

R35 900.00

Get ready to put ideas in motion

-14

Start newspaper

R180 000.00

Get ready to put ideas in motion

-14

Green Building Handbook

R17 950.00

Get ready to put ideas in motion

Broadcast

Station

Value

Summary

Jun-14

SABC 3

R400 000.00

Get ready to put ideas in motion

Websites

Website

Value

Summary

21- May-14

Shop -sa.co.za

R277.00

Advancing the green economy in South Africa

21- May-14

Link2media.co.za

R 4 4 4.00

Striving for a green economy

22- May-14

Publicityupdate.co.za

R 349.00

Stellar line -up of conferences, seminars confirmed for Sustainability Week 2014

20


sustainability week 2014 report 26 - May-14

Bizcommunity.com

R 7 577.00

Sustainability Week strives to create awareness of environment

28 - May-14

Itweb.co.za

R 2 575.00

Sustainability Week to be held in Tshwane

29 - May-14

Rekordmoot.co.za

R 392.00

Working together for a brighter future

Electronic

e - Journal

Value

Description

jan- Jun-14

alive2green

R75 000.00

Sustainability Week 2014

TOTAL:

R775 862.00

GRAND TOTAL:

R 3 354 661.16

Event Attendance Conference/Group

Date

Registered

Official Opening and Launch of the Green Outreach Programme

17 June 2014

100

The Green Building Conference

17 - 18 June 2014

286

Vision Zero Waste Seminar

17 June 2014

110

Cleantech Incubation Seminar

17 June 2014

50

Sustainable Cities & Communities Seminar

17 June 2014

62

Energy Seminar

18 June 2014

96

Food Security

19 June 2014

64

Sustainable Transport and Mobility

19 June 2014

79

Sustainable Water Resource Seminar

19 June 2014

86

Green Business Seminar

19 June 2014

109

Responsible & Sustainable Tourism Seminar

19 June 2014

85

Youth & Green Economy

20 June 2014

517

Exhibitors

17 - 20 Jun-14

208

Media

17 - 20 Jun-14

47

Complete Expo Staff

17 - 20 Jun-14

17

Other Service providers

17 - 20 Jun-14

97

Staff and Volunteers

17 - 20 Jun-14

20

TOTAL:

2 033

21


sustainability week 2014 report

ORGANISATIONAL PROFILE exhibition budgets as a primary source of income. The company operates across the following sectors:

Alive2Green is a media company focused on advocating sustainability and believes that once presented with the relevant information, decision makers will make the right choices – the company tackles issues surrounding sustainability and the environment. Alive2Green owns and organises conferences, exhibitions, handbooks, eJournals, websites and magazines, which connect leading industry stakeholders with government, civil society and each other. In doing so, Alive2Green helps to communicate the fundamental issues, promote leading best practice, and facilitate the action needed for a more sustainable future. Sustainability Week, the five day event relevant to this report, is a project of Alive2Green, which operates in South Africa and is based in Cape Town. Furthermore, Alive2Green is a 50% subsidiary of Cape Media (Pty) Ltd. Shareholders of Alive2Green are also executive directors of the company and participate at management and committee level in day-to-day operations.

• • • • • • •

Property and construction Transport Energy Water Waste Tourism Business/commercial

The company started out by launching green building focussed media: the www.greenbuilding.co.za website and eJournals, the Green Building Conferences, and the Green Building Handbook. Later, Alive2Green expanded its media offerings to other sectors such as energy, water, waste and transport.

Markets, sectors and customers As a media company Alive2Green competes in the event, print media, and electronic media markets – relying on advertising and

B

DIVISIONS AND PRODUCTS ALIVE2GREEN SUSTAINABILITY STORY Alive2Green is a company focused on sustainability in terms of content. As a fundamental strategy to gaining editorial content, the company does not present itself as experts, but rather seeks to create platforms for experts to share knowledge. Whether it is through electronic or print publishing, or through its events, the company puts forward the independent views and expertise of third party experts. In so doing, Alive2Green enables their views to be shared, thereby stimulating responses, and triggering action.

Events Division organises events for alive2green such as Sustainability Week, the Green Business Seminar Series, Youth & the Green Economy Series, but also organises events on behalf of strategically aligned organisations such as the South Africa Institute of Architects.

PROGRAMME 2013

IT STARTS

HERE

Advancing the Green Economy

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION

SPONSORED BY

Responsible Tourism

Green Business

22

Sustainable Energy

Transport & Mobility

Water Resource

Green Building

Vision Zero Waste

26 July 2013

22


sustainability week 2014 report Online division publishes multiple sector websites and social media platforms. While this division provides online services to other divisions, its primary function is online publishing, and to this end publishes a fortnightly eJournal providing the latest stories in circulation under the heading of sustainability with a focus on green building, sustainable tourism and youth issues.

Handbooks division publishes peer-reviewed handbooks on multiple sectors, working closely with industry experts and researches, and industry representative bodies. The handbook series forms an invaluable resource of thought leadership and case study content for multiple industry sectors. The

The

Handbook

OU EN T RISMERGY Southern & East Africa Volume2 The Essential Guide

ISBN 978-0-620-55987-4

9

780620 559874

Sustainability and Integrated REPORTING HANDBOOK

Sustainable Energy

Tourism

02

ISBN 0-620450-683

9

780620 450683

www.alive2green.com/renewableenergy

Water Resource Handbook

South Africa Volume 4

RT REP IO NG ISBN 978062061001-8

9

OFC 4.3 3.indd 1

Sustainable

The Essential Guide

TING

05

www.sustainabletourism.co.za

The

South Africa 2014

Resource Handbook South Africa Volume 5 The Essential Guide

R150.00 incl. VAT ISBN 9780620452403

0 714001 005

79 8 0772223 6 2 0 6 1540014 0018

2014

The Responsible and Sustainable

www.alive2green.com/water

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alive2green.com

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780620 452403

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Magazine Division publishes Green Business Journal and Green Home Magazine in alternate months, aimed at green business stakeholders, and households respectively, providing readers with the latest thinking, examples of action and leadership among business and domestic consumers and suppliers.

ISSUE 9 2013

MAR/ApR 2014 • ISSUE 11

Jan/Feb 2014

07

SAVING MILLIONS IN THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR

9 772225 597009 <ir> framework

targeting differentiation for competitive advantage

WORLD RHINO DAY 21ST CENTURY COAL WASTE RECYCLING IN SOUTH AFRICA

R29, - (VAT INCL) ISSN 0123-456X ISSN 2225-5974

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WATER USE IN AGRICULTURE

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MERVYN KING

USHERING IN THE NEW INTERNATIONAL <IR> FRAMEWORK R29, - (VAT INCL) ISSN 2225-5974

02010

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WISE WATER USE IN AGRICULTURE PART II

COLLABORATION

THE KEY TO SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY

MANUFACTURING THE REBIRTH OF SOUTH AFRICA’S TEXTILE INDUSTRY

greenhome greenhome I living informed today I

magazine

I living informed today I

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and the green economy

SuStainaBle cSi initiativeS aS a Building Block to reputation

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GREEN ECONOMY FRAMEWORK

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Travel

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Adventure Sports

Renewable energy jobs, cleaner power

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Energy Wise

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TSHWANE

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MIND THE GAP

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23


sustainability week 2014 report

SUSTAINABILITY REPORTING The event committee used externally developed sustainability guidelines from GSA Campbell Consulting. These guidelines were directed at key stakeholders of the event and were designed to facilitate engagement and responsiveness. The guidelines were presented to stakeholder groups in an online form which requested their participation (including feedback) under each guideline. The process for defining report content was led by the event committee and consisted of committee meetings and certain engagements with stakeholders. The process was informed by: • The usefulness of the report for stakeholders (and included stakeholder interests and expectations). • The purpose, experience and nature of the activities at Alive2Green. • The material environmental, social and economic impacts of the organisation. • The intention to report data for as many indicators as was reasonably and practically possible. • The availability of data for the reporting period. The committee identified and discussed stakeholder groups which, in the opinion of the committee, possess the ability to materially

impact or influence the performance of the company and are themselves potentially impacted by the organisation and its activities. The committee was also responsible for determining materiality where a process was used to identify issues that were then ranked in terms of importance. Materiality was used as a guide for prioritising topics in the report and the report has been written with all key stakeholders in mind. Materiality is also discussed in the CEOs message and in the Energy and Emissions sections of this report. Alive2Green hopes that all stakeholders will be able to access, read and understand the report and that they will offer feedback. Having said this, the event committee is of the opinion that the report will be read more by the following stakeholder groups: • • • • • • • •

Delegates Government departments Sponsors and exhibitors Alive2Green employees and associates Event suppliers and service providers The local community Industry associations The media

Stakeholder Engagement STAKEHOLDER GROUP

MECHANISMS FOR ENGAGEMENT

FEEDBACK AND RESPONSE

Delegates

The event used email and media platforms to communicate with delegates and potential delegates. Relevant delegates were targeted, based on their industry and personal profile.

Delegates were able to communicate with the event management team via the sustainability week website and via email. Through these and other platforms delegates were able to submit questions/issues and the event team was able to respond to questions/ issues raised.

Sponsors and exhibitors

The event sales team communicated with sponsors and exhibitors using the phone, email and meetings. The event marketing team communicated with exhibitors and sponsors using email and advertising. See more detail in the media schedule section of this report.

Sponsors and exhibitors were engaged in the same ways that delegates were (above)

Employees and associates

Employees and associates were communicated with using email and in a number of daily, weekly and monthly meetings.

mployees and associates were able to raise issues in meetings that were then followed up and reported back on in subsequent meetings.

Suppliers and service providers

The event emailed the suppliers and service providers as required. We have a loyal and long-term relationship with most of the suppliers and service providers.

Suppliers and service providers were able to communicate with the event management team via scheduled meetings and phone calls in which responses to their queries and issues were provided. In future we will attempt to engage with sup pliers earlier in the cycle. We will also be incorporating more about supplier sustainability in this process.

24


sustainability week 2014 report The local and re gional community

The event communicated with the local and regional community through local business community databases, chambers and industry associations.

The media

See the Media Schedule section of this report.

Industry associations, affiliates and institutions and government departments

The event management team attended industry forums and events to meet key role players from industry associations, affiliates and institutions and government departments. The event management team also communicated with the industry associations, affiliates and institutions and government departments in meetings and through emails and phone conversations. The event management team negotiated agreements with certain industry associations in order to market to their members.

Local and regional communities were able to communicate with the event management team via the Sustainability Week website and via email. Through these and other platforms, community members were able to submit questions/issues and the event team was able to respond to questions/issues raised.

Page 18 -21 Industry associations, affiliates and institutions and government departments were able to communicate with event management via phone and scheduled meetings. These groups were able to raise issues in meetings that were then followed up and reported back on in subsequent meetings.

GOVERNANCE Board of directors Alive2Green has a chief executive officer (CEO) who is of the highest authority and is an executive director of the Board. Directors report to the CEO. Shareholders use the board meeting platform to provide their input and to influence resolutions. The directors have functional portfolios and are responsible for the development and execution of company strategy. The planning and strategy committee is tasked with the execution of the strategy and the day-to-day management of the company is run through divisional committees. Economic and environmental targets are the responsibility of the sustainability committee. The event committee is a divisional committee consisting of the directors and executive management and is responsible for the development of environmental targets and event greening. Alive2Green directors are reviewed annually on performance and are actively developing industry knowledge and are presenting and authoring papers in industry publications. Mechanisms for communication Alive2Green has certain mechanisms which allow employees and stakeholders to provide recommendations or direction to directors.

These consist mainly of regular meetings and/or emails. In the context of the event, directors representing stakeholder groups of Alive2Green were able to bring recommendations and directives to the event committee, which met regularly with members and directors in the months leading up to the event. Some of the topics raised in these meetings related to the desired scope and outcomes of the event, budgets, event sustainability (including sustainability initiatives and targets under waste minimisation), energy efficiency (EE) and EE awareness, community involvement and legacy. Values, principles, codes and procedures Alive2Green has developed and implemented value statements and codes of conduct internally which are used as guidelines for management, and which relate to economic, environmental and social performance. These are communicated with employees who have forums and systems at their disposal to address the values, codes of conduct or standards with regard to non-compliance in any work related situation or incident.

ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY Alive2Green is subject to general business risk associated with climate change. The financial impact of increased tariffs, carbon taxes and emissions regulations will reduce the organisations potential to operate as effectively without corresponding increases in funding. However, given that the activities of Alive2Green and the event are

directed specifically at climate change mitigation and adaptation, an opportunity exists for Alive2Green to show results and to demonstrate leadership in this space, which may even serve to position the organisation as an essential solution to climate change mitigation, potentially increasing access to funding.

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sustainability week 2014 report

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Energy and emissions at Sustainability Week Large events such as Sustainability Week can be major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The use of electricity, heating, air conditioning, transportation and paper contributes to climate change in some way. Electricity and fuel consumption were regarded to be the most material impacts for Sustainability Week and it was important to measure and mitigate consumption wherever possible. This included creating awareness among key stakeholders. Roughly 90% of electricity generated in South Africa comes from coal fired power stations which emit tons of carbon into the earth’s atmosphere. Events are also usually associated with the use of planes, cars, busses and trains which use carbon emitting fuels in various degrees. A ‘carbon footprint’ is an effective measure of the total emissions associated with the event. A carbon footprint can generally be defined as the total sets of greenhouse gas emissions caused by an organisation, event, product or person . Alive2Green undertook a greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and offsetting initiative in an attempt to make the event ‘carbon neutral’. Part of the responsibility to reduce the carbon footprint for Sustainability Week rests with exhibitors and participants, and so all attendees were encouraged to select low-carbon options. The

initiative to offset the carbon footprint for Sustainability Week 2014 consisted of establishing the event’s overall carbon footprint (which was prepared by Carbon Calculated), implementing event greening measures and then offsetting the Scope 1(direct) and Scope 2 (electricity) emissions with the Basa Magogo gold standard project facilitated by the Climate Neutral Group in South Africa.

OVERVIEW OF SUSTAINABILIT Y WEEK’S 2014 CARBON DIOXIDE EQUIVALENT (CO2e) EMISSIONS REPORTING PERIOD: Sustainability Week 2014 – 4 day conference CARBON FOOTPRINT CALCULATION CONDUCTED ON: CSIR International Convention Centre, Pretoria METHODOLOGY: Greenhouse Gas Protocol – Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard Total Sustainability Week delegates & exhibitors over 4 days: Total Sustainability Week crew and guest speakers over 4 days: Total square metreage of space used:

1 899 162 5 000 Kilograms of CO2e

Purchased electricity

24 378.50

Travel by Alive2Green staff

33 334.12

Travel by speakers

55 764.94

Travel by delegates, exhibitors, media & staff Emissions from recycled waste Emissions from paper consumption Contingency (5% of total emissions) TOTAL SUSTAINABILITY WEEK 2013 EMISSIONS CO2e (kilograms)

26

165 181.25 55.86 773.28 13 974.40 293 462.35

Emissions per daily attendee (kgCO2e/attendee)

142.38

Emissions per square metre of total space utilised (kgCO2e/m2)

58.69


sustainability week 2014 report Total Emissions by activity at Sustainabilty Week in 2014

Total emissions by activity at Sustainability Week in 2014 5% 0%

8%

Electricity: 24 379 12%

A2G travel: 33 334 Speaker travel: 55 765 Delegate and other travel: 165 181

19%

56%

Recycled waste: 56 Paper: 773 Contingency: 13 974

Comparison between 2013 and 2014 Sustainability Weeks Description

2013

2014

No. attendees

2 560

2 061

m2 of space utilised

3 426

5 000

Comparison between 2013 and 2014 Sustainability Weeks

Description No. attendees Electricity emissions (kgCO2e) m2 of space utilised

1 242.6 4

Electricity emissions (kgCO2e)

Travel by Alive2Green staff emissions (kgCO2e)staff emissions (kgCO2e) Travel by Alive2Green

Emissions from food waste (kgCO2e)

3.74

Emissions from recycled waste emis-

-

sions (kgCO2e) Emissions/attendee (kgCO2e/attendee) Emissions/m2 of space

|

2014 2 061 24 378.50 5 000

1 242.64 -

Travel by speakers emissions (kgCO2e) by speakers emissions (kgCO2e) Travel by crewTravel and speakers (kgCO 2e) Travel by delegates, exhibitors, media & staff emissions (kgCO2e) Travel by crew and speakers (kgCO2e) 20 190.28 Emissions from food waste (kgCO2e) Emissions fromTravel recycled waste emissions (kgCO2e) by delegates, exhibitors, media 122 279.92 Emissions from& paper consumption emissions (kgCO2e) staff emissions (kgCO2e) Contingency - 5% of total emissions (kgCO2e)

Total emissions (kgCO2e)

2013 2 560 3 426

20 190.28 122 279.92 3.74 799.25 7 165.56 151 741.61

24 378.50 33 334.12

33 334.12 55 764.94 55 76 4.94 165 181.25 55.86 165 181.25 773.28 13 974.40 -

293 462.35 55.86

59.27 44.29

142.38 58.69

Emissions from paper consumption emissions (kgCO2e)

799.25

773.28

Contingency - 5% of total emissions (kgCO2e)

7 165.56

13 974.40

Total emissions (kgCO2e)

151 741.61

293 462.35

Emissions/attendee (kgCO2e/attendee)

59.27

142.38

Emissions/m2 of space

4 4.29

58.69

SUSTAINABILITY WEEK 2014 CARBON FOOTPRINT REPORT | FINAL

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sustainability week 2014 report

BASA MAGOGO GOLD STANDARD PROJECT Background to the Basa Magogo gold standard project In South Africa approximately one million people use coal to heat their homes and to cook their meals. As a result, 26% of all hospital admissions for respiratory problems and disease are caused by the inhalation of these deadly fumes. Additionally, burning coal in South Africa alone releases an estimated 4.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, increasing the pressure on climate change. The Basa Magogo Alternative Ignition Technique project is the first registered gold standard project of its kind that changes household coal ignition behaviour. This is done through a locally integrated programme whereby township locals demonstrate the Basa Magogo way to light a coal fire to other local residents. The result is a more fuel efficient and cleaner burning fire, thereby reducing carbon emissions and negative health impacts. The Project Basa Magogo means ‘Light it up Grandmother!’ in Zulu. This technique was named after a community member of eMbalenhle near Secunda called Granny Nebelungu Mashinini. She perfected the method when the Nova Institute introduced and tested the technique in the communities back in 2004. Basa Magogo demonstration Conventionally, in the townships, a fire is started by first lighting firewood and other ignition material at the bottom of the stove or brazier and then adding coal on top. The Basa Magogo alternative teaches the opposite, whereby coal is placed at the bottom and firewood and other material is added on top and then lit. The technique results in a more effective top down, rather than bottom up ignition. Previous smoky method In order to teach this new technique and to go against the widespread conventional method, a comprehensive programme of small group demonstrations, surveys, monitoring and maintenance has been mastered, which takes place throughout the year. These costs are covered thanks to the revenue received from the sale of carbon credits. The carbon credits of this project are developed under the WWF endorsed gold standard. Environmental impacts • 50% less coal is needed to produce the same amount of heat • 300,7 kg less coal is used by households per year • 1,3 tons of CO2 reduced per family per year Health impacts • 90% reduction in indoor smoke • 80% reduction in ambient air pollution • Improved visibility and reduced health risks Social impacts • Cooking temperature using Basa Magogo is reached in 10 minutes compared to 60 minutes using the conventional heating method

28


sustainability week 2014 report

• Households have more time for other productive activities • More time for childcare or other family-oriented activities Economic impacts • Households save on average R450 per year due to less coal purchases • Additional time is available for other economic activities • Savings in health costs are more difficult to quantify but based on several well-documented surveys it is estimated to be at least 10 times more than the coal savings Sustainability Week 2014 Carbon Offsetting Certificate

[Geef tekst op]

Certificate 

    

   

grown forests and aims to redistribute as many unsold copies as possible. The company made use of reusable and recyclable signage and marketing materials for the event, and waste products from the event were separated and recycled. The event committee chose a venue with excellent energy water and waste policies and practices. Alive2Green products play a role in spreading the message about sustainability by stimulating the green economy and by facilitating a knowledge transfer and providing a source of information for green business and entrepreneurship information. Customer health and safety The event met all Joint Operations Committee (JOC) requirements for customer health and safety. The JOC was established to ensure that all events held in Johannesburg are safe and that event organisers comply with all the by-laws and regulations of the City. The venue, used for many large events and exhibitions, was chosen as it already had multiple health and safety amenities in place. Packaging responsibly Packaging materials were avoided and recycled where possible and the following materials were reclaimed for re-use: • Delegate badges (after the event) • Delegate bags not wanted

       

           

    

Energy efficiency guidelines were also adopted for the event and communicated with key stakeholders. However, due to the event having no previous point of reference, energy reductions could not be recorded or measured against a previous baseline. Products and services To the extent that it was regarded to be important to communicate the sustainability aspects of the event to attendees and participants, the GSA Campbell event greening guidelines were used to do this leading up to and following the event. This event sustainability report forms part of this stakeholder communication process. Alive2Green specifies uncoated paper and insists on paper products for its publications guaranteed to have come from sustainably

Materials used As a publisher and events company, Alive2Green produces a large quantity of printed materials, and takes the following into account when procuring such materials: • Source of paper products – the company ensures that these emanate from sustainably farmed forests. • Printing approach – the company chooses uncoated paper to ensure maximum recyclability. • The event programme was printed on Hi-Q paper – 64 page, A4 size, print run of 1 500 totalling 300kg of paper. • Re-usability – the company prints generic signs where possible to ensure reusability and offers bins for used lanyards and plastic sleeves. • Recycling – the company ensures that materials used for publications are recycled or redistributed and that waste separation processes are put in place during the event. Water Total water consumption during the event could not be measured; however, various water conservation awareness messages (including guidelines) were communicated to key stakeholders prior to, and during the event. Waste Attendees were informed in advance about the waste guidelines for event greening. These include information about: • How waste should be dealt with at the event – waste was separated at source, weighed and reported. • Which waste containers should be used for which waste – waste separation bins were distributed throughout the venue.

29


sustainability week 2014 report

Total Waste Values Date

Product

R/ton

Mass

Value

VAT

2014/06/02

K4

700,00

320

224,00

31,36

2014/06/02

Plastic - PET CLEAR

600,00

300

180,00

25,20

2014/06/02

Plastic - PET MIXED

600,00

100

60,00

8,40

2014/06/02

Glass - Mix

200,00

200

40,00

5,60

2014/06/11

Cans - Mixed

200,00

100

20,00

2,80

2014/06/11

Cans - Beverage

200,00

200

40,00

5,60

2014/06/11

Upgrade”MW”

1 200,00

400

480,00

67,20

2014/06/11

Latex Books

1 200,00

220

26 4,00

36,96

2014/06/11

Plastic - PET MIXED

600,00

100

60,00

8,40

2014/06/11

News Print

150,00

100

15,00

2,10

2014/06/24

K4

700,00

200

140,00

19,60

2014/06/24

Plastic - LDPE MIXED

500,00

20

10,00

1,40

2014/06/24

Plastic - PET CLEAR

600,00

100

60,00

8,40

2014/06/24

Glass - Mix

200,00

100

20,00

2,80

2014/06/24

SBM

1 200,00

200

240,00

33,60

1 853,00

259,42

2 660,00 Total (including VAT )

R 2112,42

Remittance summary Mass

2 660,00

Total value (excluding)

1 853,00

Total VAT

259,42

Total value (including)

2 112,42

30


sustainability week 2014 report

SOCIAL SUSTAINABILITY Employment value system Alive2Green subscribes to the principles of broad-based black economic empowerment and provides on-the-job training. Staff at Alive2Green is expected to uphold the company ethos in their dealings with customers and suppliers. Open, honest and respectful communication and freedom of expression is encouraged and the company ensures a safe and healthy work environment for all employees. Employment and remuneration As a small company, Alive2Green offers the best possible packages it can afford to administrative staff and offers competitive basic-plus-commission packages to sales staff. The company also boasts high levels of staff retention and long service.

was directly responsible for a meaningful economic contribution to the local region of Ekurhuleni. The publicity surrounding the event resulted in increased awareness of event activities and objectives in the Gauteng region and in South Africa. In addition, international speakers and guests of the event were also informed about the commercial profile of the region. This exposure was valuable for the region and for the event facility. Future tourism and trade opportunities are expected to flow as a result of the awareness and networking activities surrounding the event. Alive2Green has policies relating to local procurement and local hiring.

Workforce Table Training and education Education and training are treated as very important at Alive2Green and this is particularly relevant in the context of Sustainability Week, which required staff to possess the requisite skills and experience in order to manage so many moving parts. Volunteers who worked at Sustainability Week were trained beforehand and a large number of these volunteers have worked at two or more Alive2Green events. Volunteer retention is excellent. Volunteers were mostly students in the architectural, engineering, technical or science faculties of tertiary institutions in the local community. Volunteers were paid a stipend which covered food and transport for the time that they were at the event. Community development Alive2Green established a new platform that focuses on youth and the role they can play in the green economy. There is a large demand for specialised industries in sustainability and the company intends to encourage students to consider and pursue these careers. There are various platforms where South African youth can learn more about the opportunities available to them within the green economy.

Gordon Brown Lloyd Macfarlane Suraya Manuel Marcus Matsi Nicole Kenny Shannon Manuel Nicole Julius Nazeem Hoosen Rashaad Manuel Trinit y Maholela Brian Mkhabela

Youth and the Green Economy

7287 likes Alive2Green elected to support the local Basa Magogo project by purchasing carbon credits that were aligned with the development of this project through the Carbon Neutral Group (see information in the energy and emissions section above). It was important for the company to work with this local community-based project for the second year in a row. Alive2Green also seeks to source only local products and services which in turn contribute to the growth of the local economy. Alive2Green staff participates in group company community engagements such as running food tables, donating food, and clothing. Beyond this, the company donates space to non-government organisations such as Green Peace, WESSA, and several others. The event

Aaron Sibande Mesutu Nyalambisa Zanele Sifundza Yakira Bahadur Nomfundo Makhanya Jabu Mthombeni Elizabeth Labuschagne Olipa Phiri Ronnie Maloka

31


sustainability week 2014 report

GRI INDEX INDICATOR

RESPONSE

COMPLIANT

1.1

Page 4

P/C

2.1

Page 5 + front covers

Y

2.2

Page 6 -16, 22, 23

Y

2.3

Page 25

Y

2.4

Contents page, 5

Y

2.5

Page 5

Y

2.6

Page 5

Y

2.7

Page 5

Y

2.8

Page 5, 22, 23, 31

Y

2.9

There have been no significant changes during the repor ting period regarding size, structure, or ownership including: - The location of, or changes in operations, including facilit y openings, closings, and expansions; and - Changes in the share capital structure and other capital formation, maintenance, and alteration operations

Y

2.10

No awards have been received in this repor ting period.

Y

3.1

Contents page, 35

Y

3.3

Contents page, 35

Y

3.4

Page 35

Y

3.5

Page 24

Y

3.6

Contents page, 35

Y

3.10

There have been no restatements of information in this inaugural repor t.

Y

3.11

There have been no significant changes from previous repor ting periods in the scope, boundar y, or measurement methods applied in this inaugural repor t.

Y

3.12

Page 32-35

Y

3.13

Page 35

Y

4.1

Page 25

Y

4.2

The chair of the highest governing body is also an executive director

Y

4.3

No Non-Executive Members

Y

32


sustainability week 2014 report

4.4

Page 25

Y

4.5

No linkage

Y

4.7

Page 25

Y

4.8

Page 25

Y

4.12

Page 35

Y

4.13

Alive2Green is a member of the Green Building Council of South African and the Cape Chamber of Commerce.

P/C

4.14

Page 24, 25

Y

4.15

Page 24

Y

4.16

Page 24, 25

Y

EN1

Page 26

P/C

EN2

No recycled input materials have been used

Y

EN3

The company does not make use of any direct energy in its operations

Y

EN7

Page 17

Y

EN9

No water sources have been significantly af fected by the withdrawal of water

Y

EN10

No water is being reused or recycled at present

Y

EN11

No land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversit y value outside protected areas.

Y

EN12

There have been no significant impacts of activities, products, and ser vices on biodiversit y in protected areas and areas of high biodiversit y value outside protected areas.

Y

EN13

No habitats have been protected or restored

Y

EN14

There are currently no strategies, current actions, and or future plans for managing impacts on biodiversit y. Event operations do not have a material impact on biodiversit y.

Y

EN15

No IUCN Red List species and national conser vation list species with habitats in areas af fected by Event operations

Y

EN18

Page 17, 26, 27

Y

EN22

26, 27, 30

P/C

EN23

There have been no significant spills

Y

EN24

No treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII has been transpor ted, impor ted, expor ted and no transpor ted waste has been shipped internationally.

Y

EN25

No water bodies and related habitats have been significantly af fected by discharges of water and runof f.

Y

33


sustainability week 2014 report

EN27

No products or packaging has been reclaimed

EN28

No fines and/or non-monetar y sanctions for noncompliance with environmental laws and regulations have been incurred in the period

Y

EN29

No significant environmental impacts of transpor ting products and other goods and materials used for the organisationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operations have occurred in the period.

Y

HR1

There are no significant investments agreements that include human rights clauses or that have undergone human rights screening.

Y

HR2

There are no significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions taken

Y

HR3

No specific training related to human rights policies and procedures in operations takes place at this time. Employees do, however, undergo an induction training process that is informed by the policies and principles of the Labour Relations Act and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, both of which refer to human rights issues that are relevant for Alive2Green and Sustainabilit y Week.

Y

HR4

No incidents of discrimination have been recorded.

Y

HR5

No operations or activities have been identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk.

Y

HR6

No operations or activities have been identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labour. Internal (and ex ternal BCEA) policy is strictly applied in terms of legal employment age requirements.

Y

HR7

No operations or activities have been identified as having significant risk for incidents if forced or compulsor y labour.

Y

HR8

There are no securit y personnel working in or for the organisation but securit y personnel were employed by the venue for the Event.

Y

HR9

There have been no incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions taken.

Y

L A1

Page 31

P/C

L A3

There are no benefits provided for full-time employees that are not provided for temporar y or par t-time employees

Y

L A4

No employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements

Y

L A5

Minimum notice period(s) for employees regarding operational changes are governed by the Basic Conditions of Employment Act of 1996 (the Act). This applies to collective agreements for workers whose contracts are deemed to be governed by the Act.

Y

L A8

No serious illness education, training, counselling or risk control programs are of fered.

Y

L A9

No employees are represented by trade unions

Y

SO1

There are currently no existing programmes and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities.

Y

SO2

All business units and depar tments are regularly analysed for risks related to corruption.

Y

34


sustainability week 2014 report

SO3

The company does not have any clear-cut anticorruption policies and procedures.

Y

SO4

There have been no incidents of corruption

Y

SO6

No financial and/or in-kind contributions to political par ties, politicians, and related institutions were recorded in the period.

Y

SO7

No legal actions for anticompetitive behaviour, anti-trust, and monopoly practices have been recorded in the period.

Y

PR2

There have been no incidents of noncompliance with regulations and voluntar y codes concerning health and safet y impacts of products and ser vices during the life cycle.

Y

PR3

No products or ser vices require procedural information

Y

PR6

Alive2Greenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marketing and adver tising communications are governed by the South African Adver tising Standards Authorit y as well as cer tain terms contained in the Consumer Protection Act.

PR7

There have been no incidents of noncompliance with regulations and voluntar y codes concerning marketing communications, including adver tising, promotion, and sponsorship.

Y

PR8

There have been no complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data.

Y

PR9

There have been no fines for noncompliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and ser vices.

Y

EC2

Page 25

Y

EC4

Alive2Green has not received any financial assistance from Government.

Y

EC6

Page 31

P/C

EC7

Page 31

P/C

Legend: Y= Compliant P/C= Partially Compliant

This report is based on the GRI Framework and has been prepared according to the GRI G3.1 Guidelines, at Application Level C with the assistance of GSA Campbell Consulting GSA Campbell Consulting 0861 777 669 | info@gsacampbell.com

Contact information: Alive2Green Gordon Brown, Chief Executive 021 447 4733 Gordon.brown@alive2green.com This report is for the period April 2014 through July 2014 and incorporates the events and activities of Sustainability Week taking place in South Africa. Alive2Green plans to report annually on sustainability performance at Sustainability Week. The company does not believe that a report assurance process is necessary at this time.

35


CSIR INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE

23-25 JUNE 2015

SUSTAINABILITY WEEK, advancing the Green Economy in South Africa and the region! Calling all investors, policy makers, business people, and consumers to seek ways to improve social, environmental and indeed economic performance in the region – be it through achieving efficiencies, introducing alternative approaches, or simply by unlocking value through awareness and behaviour change.

Sustainability Week 2015 will connect the dots! This multifaceted, integrated event, that traverses sectors emphasising opportunities within the green economy will now do just that – connect delegates from different sectors in a single combined morning plenary session that speaks to the holistic nature of the challenge, seeking to spawn new connections, and trigger new perspectives, and ultimately to stimulate more business.

Becoming a leading ‘green economy’ should be the primary goal for South and southern African countries, as by doing so we begin to weave the golden thread of real economic growth, expansion of desirable jobs, low carbon industries, food and health security, talent retention, and high value tourism.

At Sustainability Week 2015 we go further than ever before to explore how Africans can work together to ensure a sustainable developmental path. If we make the wrong developmental investments today we could lock our economies into high cost low growth trajectories for decades to come. Courageous leadership is called for right now, and Sustainability Week is among the most important gathering of thought leaders in the region. If you can influence policy, offer solutions, or affect mind sets, then you should be in attendance!

Showcasing innovation like never before – educating and inspiring attendees through multiple platforms and highlighting the actions and interventions of leading thinkers, policy makers, practitioners and producers as they set the benchmark for how to respond to global and national challenges, spurred by demand for more sustainable solutions.

B SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES SEMINAR

CSIR INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE

JUNE 2015

By becoming a leading ‘green economy’ South Africa can dramatically improve competitiveness! CONTACT US

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

021 447 4733

sales@alive2green.com

Sustainability Week 2014 Event Report  
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