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2015-16

ACADEMIC REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow ....................................................................................... 4 2015-16 Enrolments............................................................................................................. 6 Growth & Salaries ................................................................................................................. 8 Indigenous Enrolment 2015-16......................................................................................... 9 2015-16 Delivery Locations.............................................................................................. 10 Student Profile 2015-16 .................................................................................................... 11 International Student Enrolment 2015-16......................................................................12 Campuses and Centres ...................................................................................................... 15


YESTERDAY, TODAY & TOMORROW Assiniboine Community College (ACC) first opened its doors in February 1961 as the Brandon Vocational Training Centre. Shops and classrooms were located in several buildings throughout the city. The centre was soon renamed the Manitoba Vocational Training Centre and in 1966 students moved into a new building at 1430 Victoria Avenue East. In December 1969, the centre became Assiniboine Community College when Manitoba’s three technical vocational schools were made community colleges. When the vocational centre opened in 1961, it had a staff of four and offered two courses to 24 students. By 1966, it had grown to a staff of 24 and offered 11 programs to 300 students. Today, the college offers more than 40 unique programs with various credentials, and apprenticeship programs to a full-time enrolment of over 3,200. The college has over 500 full- and part-time employees and an annual operating budget of around $42 million. ACC has three campuses in Brandon as well as campuses in Dauphin and Winnipeg. The college is in the middle of an exciting relocation and expansion to a beautiful site on Brandon’s north hill. The first piece of this relocation was completed in 2007, opening the doors of the Manitoba Institute of Culinary Arts (MICA). This Manitoba heritage building is a mix of old and new. In September 2010, the Len Evans Centre for Trades and Technology was opened at our North Hill Campus. This 130,000 square foot facility features innovative machine shops and equipment as well as modern classrooms in a historically rich setting. The college’s Sustainable Greenhouse opened in early 2013 and is a central location for training and applied research and home to our Horticultural Production and Sustainable Food Systems programs. 4

I.n 2015-16 we continued to remain on track with our commitment to double our graduates by 2025. In June of this year, ACC had the single largest graduation in the college’s history. A total of *948 students graduated from 45 different certificate and diploma programs in addition to 159 individuals achieving Red Seal certification from seven trades apprenticeship programs. * Data as of June 2016 ceremony


ACC’S ANNUAL PROVINCIAL IMPACT TOTALS $613 MILLION A recent study on ACC’s economic impact shows a contribution of more than $613 million every year to Manitoba’s economy.y. “We know that investments in education produce economic and social returns far greater than their costs,” said ACC president Mark Frison. “Continued investment in ACC and post-secondary education is tied directly to the growth and prosperity of our provincial economy. A more skilled workforce makes Manitoba stronger and more competitive.”

Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) conducted the analysis. They are a leading provider of economic impact studies and labour market data to educational institutions in North America.

Other notable results from the study are as follows:

A survey completed by Probe Research Inc. earlier this year shows that a large majority of recent ACC graduates secure employment shortly after receiving their diplomas and certificates.

The average internal rate of return for students is 21.2 per cent on their investment in education at ACC. This rate of return continues over their working lives.

At 96 per cent, the overwhelming majority of recent graduates who were seeking work and were not returning to school secured employment. Nearly 80 per cent of these jobs are permanent.

For every dollar of public money invested in ACC, there is a cumulative return of $1.90 to the government over the students’ working lives in the form of higher tax receipts and public sector savings.

The average annual gross salary of recent graduates is $44,050. And it’s good news for Manitoba as 94 per cent of recent ACC graduates have chosen to stay in the province.

Taxpayers see an internal a rate of return of 10.1 per cent on their investment in the college.

5


2015 2016 ACADEMIC REPORT PROGRAM TABLE Program Aboriginal Community Development Accounting and Finance Agribusiness Automotive Technician Business Administration Carpentry and Woodworking Civil Technician Communications Engineering Technology Comprehensive Health Care Aide Computer Systems Technology Construction Electrician Culinary Arts Early Childhood Education Early Childhood Program Management Education Assistant Electronic Technician 1 Environmental Technologies General Business GIS Environmental Technology Heavy Duty Equipment Technician 2 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician 2 Horticultural Production Hotel and Restaurant Management 2 Hotel and Restaurant Management 2 Industrial Metals Fabrication Interactive Media Arts Network Administration Technology Office Administration 2 Office Administration 2 Piping Trades Police Studies Power Engineering Practical Nursing Practical Nursing Refresher Social Service Worker Sustainable Food Systems Apprenticeship Contract Training Cost Recovery Mature Student High School

College Total

6

Academic Credential Diploma Advanced Diploma Diploma Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Diploma Certificate Diploma Diploma Advanced Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Advanced Diploma Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Diploma Diploma Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Diploma Advanced Diploma

Secondary Diploma

3

1

Electronic Technician is the exit certificate of the Communications Engineering Technology Diploma Program

2

Survey Results are grouped, diploma and certificate programs are not collected separately.

3

Due to program exclusions, college totals are different from published statistics.

--Survey samples less than 5 are reported as null.

New Students

Returning Students

0 12 49 15 134 24 19 12 85 0 15 26 39 0 14 1 27 19 0 11 24 6 3 11 12 28 18 11 32 17 19 15 194 0 25 2 786 1844 2970 417

1 30 36 2 78 0 9 16 8 17 0 19 28 0 0 0 18 9 0 1 13 5 0 6 1 22 0 1 15 0 0 0 193 0 0 2 12 190 262 38

6936

1032


Distance Education Enrolment

166

110

196 168 61

11

37

5

754

Total Enrolment

Attrition Rate

Number of Graduates

1 42 85 17 378 24 28 28 203 17 15 45 263 168 75 1 45 28 11 12 37 11 3 17 13 50 18 12 84 17 19 15 387 5 25 4 798 2034 3232 455

0% 5% 9% 18% 15% 13% 14% 18% 26% 6% 13% 33% 28% 20% 19% 0% 11% 11% 0% 0% 8% 0% 0% 6% 23% 20% 6% 0% 15% 24% 26% 13% 11% 0% 24% 25%

1 8 31 14 53 18 9 10 78 9 13 13 19 28 18 1 13 12 1 12 6 7 3 4 8 17 0 10 7 12 14 13 121 1 0 1 165 284 65 81

8722

Percentage of Graduates Satisfied with their program

Percentage of Graduates Employed

Average Wage Earned

-89% 84% -93% 83% --95% -88% 91% 90% 86% 100%

--100% -100% 100% 89% -93% 100% --100% 100% 100%

--$40,467 -$31,646 $29,219 $46,568 -$37,821 $43,688 --$32,861 $46,846 $31,301

38% ---

----

----

75% --

100% --

$30,420 --

-----

--90% --

--$29,622 --

89% -86% 100% 84% ----

100% 83% 86% 75% 98% ----

$42,545 $38,988 $38,057 $61,854 $54,286 ----

1180

7


GROWTH & SALARIES GROWTH DISTRIBUTION 2014 - 2015

2015 - 2016

% Change

Apprenticeship

761

798

5%

Contract Training

1526

2034

33%

Cost Recovery

3069

3232

5%

Mature Student High School

366

455

24%

Regular Program

2550

2594

2%

Grand Total

8272

9113

10%

TOP 10 AVERAGE SALARIES* FOR OUR 2015-16 GRADS Program

Salary

Power Engineering

$61,854

Practical Nursing

$54,286

Early Childhood Program Management

$46,846

Civil Technician

$46,568

Computer Systems Technology

$43,688

Office Administration

$42,545

Agribusiness

$40,467

Piping Trades

$38,988

Police Studies

$38,057

Comprehensive Health Care Aide

$37,821

*Salaries as reported in our grad survey results for programs that had a sample size greater than 5.

GRADUATION LARGEST IN COLLEGE’S HISTORY 1180 students graduate from Assiniboine Community College, making it the single largest graduation in the college’s history. In June 2016, A total of 1015 students graduated from 45 different certificate and diploma programs in addition to 165 individuals achieved Red Seal certification from seven trade apprenticeship programs. Overall, 297 students graduated with distinction, meaning they achieved at least a 4.0 cumulative weighted grade point average during their studies.

8


INDIGENOUS ENROLMENT 2015-16 ACC believes strongly in strengthening its partnerships with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples through continued collaboration. In December 2015, 18% of our student enrolment identified as being First Nations, Metis or Inuit. 2011 - 2015 INDIGENOUS ENROLMENTS Funding Source

2011 - 2012

2012 - 2013

2013 - 2014

2014 - 2015

2015 - 2016

Apprenticeship

16

18

27

34

26

Contract Training

324

268

275

275

331

Cost Recovery

185

166

208

192

209

Mature Student High School

271

213

232

193

227

Regular Program

360

352

357

387

381

Total

1156

1017

1099

1081

1174

2011 - 2012

2012 - 2013

2013 - 2014

2014 - 2015

2015 - 2016

Apprenticeship

6

2

3

4

7

Contract Training

56

69

22

84

100

Cost Recovery

31

4

0

6

9

Mature Student High School

36

54

35

52

37

Regular Program

75

89

83

88

81

204

218

143

234

234

2011 - 2015 INDIGENOUS GRADUATES Funding Source

Total

ACC SIGNS INDIGENOUS EDUCATION PROTOCOL Joined by Community Elders, in August 2015, Assiniboine Community College (ACC) signed Colleges and Institutes Canada’s (CICan) Indigenous Education Protocol. The signing reaffirms the college’s commitment to Indigenous education, recognizing the distinct and diverse cultures, languages, histories and perspectives of First Nations, Métis and Inuit people. This protocol is founded on seven key principles, including a commitment to making Indigenous education a priority and supporting students and employees to increase understanding and reciprocity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

9


2015-16 DELIVERY LOCATIONS 2015-16 Assiniboine Comunity College Permanent and Temporary Sites

1. Birtle 2. Brandon 20

3. Canupawakpa 4. Crystal City 5. Dauphin 7

6. Ebb & Flow 7. God’s Lake 8. Killarney 9. Minnedosa 10. Neepawa 11. Peguis 12. Pine Falls 13. Portage la Prarie

19

14. Rolling River 15. Russell 16. Sandy Bay 5

15 1

3

6

11

21 16 14 9 10 2 17 8

4

Eastern Region 12

13 18

Central Region Western Region

22

17. Souris 18. Southport 19. Swan River 20. Thompson 21. Waywayseecappo

Northwest Region

22. Winnipeg

Northeast Region

23. Swift Current Sk (not shown)

ACC plays an important role in economic development by producing highly regarded graduates for an increasingly diversified mix of urban, rural and remote communities. Key contributors to this ongoing success are the multiple campuses and training sites throughout Manitoba. 10


STUDENT PROFILE 2015-16 ACC AGRIBUSINESS STUDENTS CELEBRATED AFTER ANNUAL COMPETITION

GENDER DISTRIBUTION

41% 59%

MALE FEMALE

Second year Agribusiness students at Assiniboine Community College (ACC) culminated months of teamwork at the annual Agribusiness Plan Competition.

2015-16 GENDER AND AGE DISTRIBUTION FEMALE

GENDER

60 above

60 above 50-59

50-59

40-49

40-49

30-39

30-39

20-29

20-29

0-19

0-19

2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000

500

0 Count

500

1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500

Age

Age

MALE

In addition to bragging rights, the winning team that developed a plan for a fictional company named Agricultural Training Farm of Manitoba received $1,200. All second year Agribusiness students formed teams to prepare business plans for fictional agriculture businesses. Students kicked off their projects in year one and were encouraged to begin collecting information during their co-op work experience over the summer. 11


INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ENROLMENT 2015-16 In the 2015-16 academic year, international enrolment significantly increased. Students were enrolled in a variety of regular programs as well as cohorts which are programs that are offered exclusively to international students.

WHY INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION? • Contributes to ACC growth

• Can assist in program innovation and faculty development

• Contributes to population, immigration and labour market development strategies of Manitoba and Canada

• C . ontributes cultural diversity and international perspectives to student experience

• Contributes to enrolment and sustainability of programs at ACC

• Contributes opportunity to develop cross cultural competencies and instruction.

DISTRIBUTION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS REGISTRATION IN 2015-16 China India Ukraine Unknown Nigeria Jamaica Mexico Spain Russia Dominican Republic Belize Vietnam Philippines Pakistan Mauritius Malaysia Gabon Brazil

12

44% 27% 9% 7% 3% 2% 1% 0.9% 0.9% 0.9% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4% 0.4%


INTERNATIONAL ENROLMENTS 250 200 150 100 50 0

2011 - 2012

2012 - 2013

2013 - 2014

2014 - 2015

2015 - 2016

ACC WELCOMED MORE STUDENTS FROM INDIA Assiniboine Community College increased the number of new students from India, now that the college has been accepted into the Student Partnership Program (SPP). “The SPP is a partnership between Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s visa offices in India and Colleges and Institutions Canada that helps students in India streamline and speed up their study visa applications,” said Diane Shamray, VicePresident of Enterprise Development at ACC. “Receiving the SPP designation shows that we meet the high standards of the Student Partners Program.” 13


SKY’S THE LIMIT AS ACC STUDENTS SOAR WITH NEW TECH It’s not a bird, and it’s not a plane, but it is able to leap tall buildings … under the careful control of an operator on the ground. New technology is lifting off at Assiniboine Community College, with instructors excited about the opportunities that remoteoperated aircraft can bring to their students. Known popularly as drones, but more accurately as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, the flying machines are starting to shake up industries from real estate to tourism to agriculture, and ACC students are going to be among the first in the country trained on them.

“If our students get this kind of hands-on experience during their studies, it gives them a real nice tool in their tool belt.” says Steven Hills, a GIS instructor at ACC.

ACC STUDENTS WIN BIG AT ANNUAL SKILLS COMPETITION Thirteen Assiniboine Community College (ACC) students won medals at the 19th Annual Skills Manitoba Competition. Thirty ACC students from a variety of skilled trades and technology programs competed, bringing home four gold, six silver and three bronze medals. Skills Manitoba is an annual event that brings together more than 500 secondary and post-secondary and apprenticeship students from across the province to showcase their talent in over 40 different time-limited, hands-on contests. 14


CAMPUSES & CENTRES VICTORIA AVENUE EAST CAMPUS PARKLAND CAMPUS WINNIPEG TRAINING CENTRE NORTH HILL CAMPUS ACC ADULT COLLEGIATE RUSSELL TRAINING CENTRE

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

SENIOR LEADERSHIP TEAM

Michael Cox, Chair Heather Dodds, Vice-Chair Randy Brown Laura Kempthorne Scott Andrew Jim Murray Terry Parlow Lillian Houle Thomas MacNeill Jamie Robinson Tamara Studer

Mark Frison President Deanna Rexe Vice-President, Academic Karen MacDonald Vice-President, People & Planning Diane Shamray Vice-President, International

as of June 30, 2016

Michael Cameron Dean, Students, Indigenous & Community Development Karen Hargreaves Dean, School of Health & Human Services George MacLean Dean, School of Trades & Technology

Derrick Turner Dean, School of Business, Agriculture & Environment Shannon Brichon Chief Financial Officer Gabriel Toichoa Chief Information Officer Steve Horne Director, External Relations Danielle Adriaansen Director, Public Affairs 15


VISION

Exceptional learning experiences

MISSION

Transforming lives and strengthening Manitoba through applied education and research

1 4 3 0 V I C T O R I A AV E N U E E A S T B R A N D O N , M B 800.862.6307 | INFO@ASSINIBOINE.NET

ASSINIBOINE.NET

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