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APRIL 4-17, 2019

SPRING IN TAHOE

MARK JUSMARK CREATING MASTERPIECES ON SKIN // JOSÉ GONZÁLEZ SWEDISH-ARGENTINE FOLK CHARMER // THE DISCOVERY LEARNING THROUGH EXPLORATION // PERUVIAN CUISINE IRREVERENT, ALTERNATIVE MAGIC

THE PIXIES’


The Spring Skiing Capital is best enjoyed with friends. Now you and your friends can save big with the Spring Ticket Trio—three lift tickets valid any three days for any three people for just $279. SquawAlpine.com/Trio


April 4 -17, 2019

Volume 38 | Issue 8 TM

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P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 TheTahoeWeekly.com

SUBMISSIONS Events & Entertainment Submit at TheTahoeWeekly.com Click on Events Calendar

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Editorial Inquiries editor@tahoethisweek.com Entertainment Inquiries entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Courtesy Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows

Photography production@tahoethisweek.com

MAKING IT HAPPEN Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102 Account Executive Erik Schultz erik@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110 Art Director Alyssa Ganong production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106

IN THIS ISSUE APRIL 4-17, 2019

Graphic Designer Justeen Ferguson graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101 Entertainment Editor Sean McAlindin entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

FEATURES Spring in Tahoe

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Food Editor Priya Hutner priya@tahoethisweek.com

Sierra Stories

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Family Editor Michelle Allen michelle@tahoethisweek.com Copy Editor Katrina Veit Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle, Cam Schilling

TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/ TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light.

–John Muir

SPRING INTO TAHOE FUN

OUT & ABOUT Lake Tahoe Facts

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Sightseeing

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Events

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What a difference a few weeks make. The snow is still coming, but spring has brought with it bright, sunny, fun-filled days. The conditions are epic, the snowpack is so deep it’s mindboggling, the days are longer, and there’s lots of spring fun ahead. So much so that we put together our picks for the best notto-be missed spring events for the next few weeks. You’ll need some retro gear, your spring skis and a wetsuit. Check out the details in this edition’s “Spring in Tahoe: Fun in the Sun & Snow.” Nearly every ski area in the Tahoe Sierra has extended its season, but the countdown to the end has begun. Get out there and enjoy skiing and riding this month with many of Tahoe’s resorts closing after Easter. After that, the fun continues only at Alpine Meadows, Heavenly, Mt. Rose and Squaw Valley.

Last chance for prizes We’ve given away a more than a dozen prizes to readers this winter, and we only have a few more left to give away. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to take our short Reader Survey. Click on the link for Take the Reader Survey at the top of the page. Psst! The spring 2 for 1 specials have started. Look in this edition for great 2 for 1s and other special deals around Tahoe. 

FAMILY FUN Discovery Museum

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Family Fun Activities

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For the Kids

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ARTS & CULTURE Mark Jusmark

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The Arts

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MUSIC SCENE The Pixies

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Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 14 José González

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FUN & GAMES Horoscope & Puzzles

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LOCAL FLAVOR Peruvian Cuisine

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Tasty Tidbits

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Wine Column

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Chef’s Recipe

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ON THE COVER The annual Gates & Wakes competition on the West Shore is a rite of passage each spring in the Tahoe Sierra. This year’s race returns on April 6. Competitors race on skis at Homewood Mountain Resort, before switching to water skis and racing on Lake Tahoe. Details at TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on Events Calendar. | Courtesy Homewood Mountain Resort, skihomewood.com, @skihomewood

Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & Instagram

@TheTahoeWeekly 3


TheTahoeWeekly.com

Donner Summit

Truckee Donner Lake

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

h Ta

SUGAR BOWL

N

WEST EAST SOUTH

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

Tahoe Vista

ALPINE MEADOWS

Dollar Hill

NV

Lake

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

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Ta h o e R i m

CASINOS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

Tahoe City

SNO-PARKS

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

SQUAW CREEK

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Olympic Valley SQUAW VALLEY

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

MT. ROSE

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

DONNER SKI RANCH

ROYAL GORGE

SKY TAVERN

il

SODA SPRINGS

CLAIR TAPPAAN

BOREAL

Reno & Sparks

TAHOE DONNER

AUBURN SKI TRAINING CENTER

Eagle Rock

NEVADA NORDIC

Glenbrook

Carson City

Volume: 39 trillion gallons There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Homewood o Ta h

HOMEWOOD

e Ri

DID YOU

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

KNOW

CA Cave Rock

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years Watershed Area: 312 square miles

Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F

Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet

Ta h oe

R i m Tr ail

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

Fannette Island

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Fallen Leaf Lake

BIJOU PARK / LAKE TAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

ECHO LAKES

Natural rim: 6,223’ Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Shoreline: 72 miles Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

HOPE VALLEY

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 59.7 in 2017. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

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April 4 -17, 2019

SIGHTSEEING

A spring storm moves across Lake Tahoe toward the East Shore at Cave Rock. | Katherine E. Hill

One of the lake’s famous natural sites, a volcanic plug on the West Shore. TART

Explore Tahoe (530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us

South Lake Tahoe

Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly. South Tahoe

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov

Lake Tahoe’s only island, home to an old tea house.

Heavenly

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com

Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views. South Tahoe

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

West Shore

$10 parking | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Located in Sugar Pine Point State Park. (Open for tours in the summer.) TART

High Camp (800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com

Olympic Valley

Aerial tram rides, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach northtahoebusiness.org

North Shore

Settled in 1863 as a stagecoach stop. TART

Vikingsholm Castle (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com

Emerald Bay

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

(530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org

The oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center (530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov

Truckee

The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party. TART

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org

Soda Springs

Gatekeeper’s Museum Daily | (530) 583-1762 northtahoemuseums.org

(530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe Art League Gallery South Lake Tahoe

Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry and settlers. South Tahoe

visittahoecity.com

North Shore

Historical sites and Commons Beach. TART

FLOW AT FARAD

Tahoe Science Center

381

Incline Village

Tahoe City 100 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 581-6900 Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Rd. (Depot) Measured Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS) (530)in587-8808

TROA.NET

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village

Free | (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org

855 Alder Ave. (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. TART

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe

Truckee Railroad Museum

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City

truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com

Truckee

Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

(530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing. TART

35 College Dr. (530) 543-2600

3080 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Rd. (530) 587-3558

TRANSIT North Tahoe & Truckee (TART) | laketahoetransit.com South Tahoe | tahoetransportation.org

Truckee

Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

Tahoe City

Self-guided tours, exhibits and hands-on activities. TART

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50 (775) 588-4591

Featuring historic photos & memorabilia, and the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum. TART

Interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone & the Jungle Gym. TART

Featuring local artists and workshops. South Tahoe

Tahoe City

MARTIS 867 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org (530) 583-9283

Kings Beach State Rec. Area (Thurs.-Mon., summer)

Incline Village 969 Tahoe Blvd. (800) 468-2463

CAPACITY: 18,300 C

CAPACITY: A 20,400

Kings Beach

Tahoe City

North Tahoe Arts Center

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org

INDEPENDENCE 14,587

VISITORS’ CENTERS

Museum and 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Free | (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com

Games. Tower of Nations. Olympic Flame. Olympic CAPACITY: 9,500 C DONNER 2,980 Museum at high camp. TART 50

Western SkiSport Museum Donner Summit

Donner Summit Historical Society

Home to the North Shore’s largest sandy beach, in the heart of downtown. TART

Tahoe City

Olympic Museum Olympic Valley C 226,500 STAMPEDE 198,734 CAPACITY: (800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com 29,840 9 Winter Olympic PROSSER 6,356 Celebrate the homeCAPACITY: of the 1960

Truckee River |

6,228.59

Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

CAPA PACITY AC CITY:: 40,87 CITY 40,870 70

Tahoe Maritime Museum

Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island. TART

IN 2018:

225

West Shore

Truckee

6,227.91 |

200,000 AF

Eagle Rock

BOCA 5,702 truckeehistory.org | truckee.com

ELEVATION :

RESERVOIR CAPACITY

150,000 AF

The Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April in 1880 when a storm dumped 4’ of snow in 24 hours.

Readings taken on Friday, March 29, 2019

125

Truckee

Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World.” Grounds open year-round. South Tahoe

LAKE LEVEL Lake Tahoe Natural rim 6,223’

100,000 AF

Donner Summit

South Lake Tahoe

75

Drive through the neck of an old volcano.

Tallac Historic Site

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org

50

East Shore

25

Cave Rock

175

ATTRACTIONS

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org

Old Jail Museum (530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org

Truckee

One of a few surviving 19th Century jails. TART

Boots McFarland by Geolyn Carvin | BootsMcFarland.com

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OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

EVENTS CALENDAR

S P R I N G I N TA H O E

Fun in the Sun & Snow

Bradford Washburn | Jim Herrington

APRIL 4-18, 2019

Snowy gates to water wakes The 15th annual Gates & Wakes returns to the West Shore on April 6. Participants must ski racing gates at Homewood Mountain Resort. After three runs, the competition regroups on Lake Tahoe for water skiing from Homewood High & Dry Marina. | skihomewood.com

Spring in Tahoe brings with retro duds, pond skims, worldclass athletes and general shenanigans with some of the season’s best on-mountain events. We’ve rounded up our picks for not-to-be-missed events this spring to watch and to join in the fun. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com and click on Events Calendar for more spring happenings.

Freeride World Tour

Shred the Love B4BC

The Freeride World Tour features the best skiers and snowboarders in the world. Kirkwood hosts the Freeride World Tour Qualifier through April 5 on the legendary Cirque. Boasting some of the most unique terrain these skiers and riders will face, post up for the day in Devil’s Corral and watch all the action in one of the most beautiful venues on the tour. | kirkwood.com

Boarding for Breast Cancer partners with Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort for a weekend of breast cancer awareness, prevention and fundraising during the Shred the Love event from April 5 to 6. The weekend features an all-ages and abilities Park Jam, live music on the Plaza, silent auction and 10 Barrel’s Hella Big Air Contest. Join the Kick Off Party on April 5 at Benko Art Gallery. | sierraattahoe.com

The Liberty Mutual Insurance NASTAR National Championships from April 4 to 7 at Squaw Valley celebrate the sport of alpine racing, as well as a reunion for the top recreational racers in the country. In addition to all of the action during the races, enjoy free concerts, autograph signings by NASTAR Pacesetters, a competitor raffle, awards receptions, a Family Team Race, a Team Race for Friends, a Resort Team competition, a slalom competition and a final Race of Champions to determine overall winners. | squawalpine.com

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Spring Fling Rail Jam Heavenly’s Spring Fling Rail Jam is April 6 at the base of World Cup. Join the action or come out to watch. | skiheavenly.com

Banked Slalom

There’s no better way to kick off spring than with the annual Banked Slalom at Sugar Bowl on April 6. The snake-run style course is built for the event and features flowy, banked turns and creative features. | sugarbowl.com

Heavenly Pond Skim Come celebrate Spring and see if you can make it across the pond or cheer on others as they skim or sink at Heavenly’s Pond Skim on April 13. Enjoy the action and the laughs at the base of World Cup. | skiheavenly.com

SquawFree ‘Doggin Dust off your old skis, dig out your best outfit and come ski with SquawFree ‘Doggin on April 13. There will be a dual open mogul field competition. | squawalpine.com

Pride Ride Courtesy Northstar

NASTRA National Championships

Courtesy Heavenly

Jancsi Hadik, Freeride World Tour

Photographer

Spring it On Spring in Lake Tahoe is filled with sunshine, pond skims, party bands, beer walks and more. Enjoy a weekend celebration at Northstar from April 5 to 7 during Spring it On with retro costumes for Retro Day, upbeat music, Family Fun Night, the annual Pond Skim and a Passholder Beer Walk. | northstarcalifornia.com

This spring, Homewood will host its first Pride Ride on April 13 and 14 with a dance party, Dual Slalom Drag Race and ski parade down Rainbow Ridge. | skihomewood.com

All downhill from here Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Resort celebrates closing day with the annual Downhill Dummy Contest on April 14. Teams build unique dummies and send them sliding down the hill off a massive jump. This year’s theme is Cartoons. | tahoedonner.com 

Jim Herrington Alpenglow Sports will kick off the Spring Tailgate Talks on April 18 with a presentation by professional photographer Jim Herrington, who will speak about his most recent book, a 20-year project entitled, “The Climbers.” Herrington will discuss the process of tracking down these aging legends who were active during the Golden Age of climbing. Herrington will also discuss his 35-year career as a photographer and about how his favorite type of photography, black and white analog film, seemed to be becoming extinct during his project. Doors open at 6:30 and the presentation will begin at 7 p.m. Herrington will host an informal Q&A and book signing after the show. | alpenglowsports.com

Skiing at Heavenly

until May 27

Heavenly Mountain Resort is extending its winter ski and snowboard season again. The resort is adding three additional weekends of spring skiing with a new closing date of May 27. Heavenly joins Alpine Meadows and Mt. Rose extending the season into May, with Squaw Valley open until July 7. Most Tahoe ski resorts have extended their seasons to remain open until April 21 due to the record-breaking snowfall this ski season. For a complete list of resort closures, visit TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on the Out & About menu.

Help with computers Kings Beach Library| April 4, 11, 18

Ongoing computer help with differing themes about computers and technology. Call or stop by for our class schedule. 3-4 p.m. Free | (530) 546-2021, placer.ca.gov


April 4 -17, 2019

Entrepreneurs Assembly Startup Roundtable

Burton Demo Day

Lake Tahoe Yoga | Zephyr Cove | April 4

Sierra | Twin Bridges | April 6

Entrepreneurs Assembly is a great professional networking and growth opportunity. The Roundtable workshops are confidential and provide the best practices for navigating the hurdles in creating a successful business. 6-9 p.m. Free | eventbrite.com

OUT & ABOUT

Burton Snowboards will be in the Solstice Plaza dishin’ out demo boards for your riding pleasure. Take a few laps, but don’t be a board hog. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free | (530) 659-7453, sierraattahoe.com

15th Annual Gates and Wakes Spring Loaded Area venues | South Lake Tahoe | April 4-7

A series of events that bring together the best of spring and winter with on-mountain activities at Heavenly Mountain Resort, Kirkwood Mountain and Sierra-at-Tahoe. | (775) 586-7000, springloaded.tahoesouth.com

Homewood Mountain Resort | April 6

Presented by Superior Boat & Repair returns as the ultimate test of skiing skills. Participants put their snow-skiing skills to the test racing gates, then regroups at lake level for the latter water-skiing segment of the competition. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | (530) 525-2992, skihomewood.com

NASTAR National Championships Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | April 4-7

Celebrating the sport of alpine racing and reuniting top recreational racers. Free | (530) 587-1197, (530) 452-7188, squawalpine.com

Freeride World Tour Kirkwood | Kirkwood | April 4, 5

The Cirque boasts some of the most unique terrain these skiers and riders will face. Post up for the day in Devil’s Corral and watch all the action in one of the most beautiful venues on the tour. | kirkwood.com

Boarding For Breast Cancer Shred the Love Sierra | Twin Bridges | April 6

Boarding for Breast Cancer hosts Shred the Love to raise money to stomp out breast cancer, with live music including a performance by Mescalito, a rail jam, silent auction, a raffle, snowboard demos and more. $25 | (530) 6597453, sierraattahoe.com

Spring Fling Rail Jam Heavenly Mountain South Lake Tahoe | April 6

At the Base of World Cup. | (775) 586-7000, tahoesouth.com

Sierra Nevada College Open House Sierra Nevada College | Incline Village | April 5, 6 Check out Sierra Nevada College to learn about academics, housing and community. 9:30 a.m. | (775) 831-1314, facebook.com

Winter Wildlife Survival Snowshoe Trek Mt.Rose | Stateline | April 5

This trek begins at the Mt. Rose Trailhead above Tahoe Meadows. It is a steady ascent, not for beginners. Physical fitness is a must. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free | tahoerimtrail.org

New Moon snowshoe Area venues | South Lake Tahoe | April 5

Enjoy the complete darkness in the forest, best time for seeing stars, constellations, satellites and space junk. 5-7:30 p.m. | tahoesnowshoetours.com

First Friday at Five The Lift | Truckee | April 5

First Friday at Five, a program of Tahoe Silicon Mountain, is a monthly entrepreneur’s meetup. An opportunity to share what you are working on and ask for/offer insights and resource suggestions to solve problems. 5 p.m. | facebook.com

Spring On It Northstar California Resort | Truckee | April 5-7 Friday Fun Night at the Village Ice Rink, annual Pond Skim, Retro Day costume contest, Pass Holder Beer Walk. | (800) 466-6784, northstarcalifornia.com

Make-A-Wish Masquerade Charity Ball Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino Crystal Bay | April 5

A masquerade charity ball benefiting MakeA-Wish. Come dance the night away and enjoy phenomenal desserts and local art from behind a mask. 7-11 p.m. $50 | (775) 831-0660, facebook.com

Heli-inspired VR lounges Squaw Valley Ski Resort | Olympic Valley | April 5-7 This cinematic piece by CMH Heli-Skiing & Summer Adventures entitled, “Lines of Sight: A Guided Virtual Reality Experience,” was created in partnership with Sherpas Cinema and Google’s AR/VR team, using cutting-edge technology. | squawalpine.com

Dual on Dynamite Sierra | Twin Bridges | April 7

A Dual format bump race. Dress up in your craziest outfit; the best retro costumers will receive a prize. Proceeds from the event will be going to the Sierra-at-Tahoe Avalanche Dogs. 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | (530) 659-7453, sierraattahoe.com

National Library Week Alibi Ale Works | Truckee | April 8

Check out the library’s Virtual Reality set and the 3-D printer while enjoying a choice of refreshments. This is not your parent’s library. 4:30-7 p.m. | truckefol.org

Mountain Minds Monday Pizza on the Hill | Truckee | April 8

Members are involved in the tech industry or small business. Topics are technology, startups, local businesses and environment. 6-8 p.m. $5 | chamber.truckee.com

Good Morning Truckee Truckee-Tahoe Airport | Truckee | April 9

Open to the public. It is held the second Tuesday of every month at Truckee Tahoe Airport from 7:00-8:30am. Ticket price for general public is $12; Truckee Chamber members $10 and includes a hot breakfast and raffle ticket. 7-8:30 a.m. $12 | truckee.com

Volunteerpalooza: Open House and Appreciation League to Save Lake Tahoe headquarters | April 10 Want to learn more about Keep Tahoe Blue and how to get involved? All ages are welcome to learn more about the League’s programs. 5:30-8 p.m. Free | (530) 541-5388, donate.keeptahoeblue.org

Mythbusting: Lake Tahoe Edition South Lake Tahoe Library | April 10

Tahoe Institute of Natural Science and the South Lake Tahoe Library uncover the truth behind Lake Tahoe’s popular myths and legends. TINS’ Sarah Hockensmith will debunk some common misconceptions, while also exploring the basin’s unique history, geology, flora and fauna. 6-7:30 p.m. Free | tinsweb.org

CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

Early-bird pass Sale through April 30 Adult (ages 24-64)

$399 Youth (ages 13-23)

$229

Child (ages 7-12) & Senior (ages 65-69)

$159

Super Senior (ages 70-79)

$139

includes: spring access Upcoming Events:

4/5: Diamond Cut Video Awards 4/13: STOKE Mountain Tour 4/20-21: closing weekend events

Purchase lift tickets, passes & rentals online: DiamondPeak.com 7


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

Me xican-American War & St. Patrick’s B a t t a l i o n | P a r t I I I part of a fighting unit that included their countrymen and other Europeans who were legal residents in Mexico to form what they initially called the Foreign Legion. Because this first phase of resistance to the American invasion was heavily dominated by Irishmen, Mexicans called the unit Colorados (Redheads).

The St. Patrick’s Battalion became an artillery force manned by primarily recently immigrated foreigners that fought directly against the

H

istorians often refer to the MexicanAmerican War (1846-1848) as the forgotten war since it was quickly overshadowed by the discovery of gold in California, which occurred just as the peace treaty was signed and the United States took possession of the former Mexican province. But the conflict dramatically changed the relationship between the U.S. and Mexico in ways that still reverberate. Among the many unique ramifications of the American aggression against Mexico is that it was the only time that U.S. troops deserted and formed their own military unit within the enemy’s army. The St. Patrick’s Battalion became an artillery force manned by primarily recently immigrated foreigners that fought directly against the same American soldiers they had mustered in and trained with. Despite a lack of combat experience, U.S. artillery units were considered among the best in the world at the time, known for their proficiency at rapid deployment and firing of their heavy weapons. The crippling tactic was known as flying artillery. The Irish battalion’s cannon and howitzers, however, supplied by Mexico, were inferior to the Americans in both range and explosive power. But the men fighting in the St. Patrick’s Battalion proved themselves skilled, formidable opponents. Irish and German Catholic defectors were inspired to desert because of abuse and discrimination by American Protestant officers who denied the recruits the right to hold religious services, among other abuses and indignities. The bigotry was

1847 Battle at Churubusco. | Courtesy Wikipedia

encouraged by the Nativist movement, a political policy and cultural attitude that was anti-Catholic and anti-immigrant and particularly strong in the U.S. Army at the time. Although there were a variety of nationalities among the men who choose to fight for Mexico, the Irish renegades in particular decided that they could not fight against Mexican soldiers who were also Catholic and defending their homeland, much like the Irish were against the British back home. The leader of St. Patrick’s Battalion was Irish immigrant John Patrick Riley, a strapping, red-headed, Irish-born former sergeant major in the British Army. In September 1845, Riley joined Company K of the 5th U.S. Infantry. His new commander, Capt. Moses Merrill, was impressed with the new recruit. He recognized a kindred soul in Riley, noting that he was, “a master of arms, a well-groomed, genial, well-spoken, restless man of action.” Merrill was correct, Riley was an intelligent and highly capable soldier. However, due to discrimination and mistreatment of Irish enlistees in the American army, he and fellow Irishman Patrick Dalton, another British army vet, deserted Company K in the spring of 1846, just before Congress declared war on Mexico. Many of the early deserters were Irish. Between 30 and 40 abandoned their posts for Mexico prior to the outbreak of hostilities after they decided it was immoral to kill Mexican soldiers trying to defend their country. These men would become

same American soldiers they had mustered in and trained with. Riley named his fighting force the Saint Patrick’s Battalion — in Spanish that translated into San Patricios. Riley also had a distinctive banner created for his unit. Composed of green silk, it had the image of St. Patrick embroidered in silver on one side, with a shamrock and a harp on the other. Later in the war, as the U.S. Army was approaching Mexico City for the ultimate battle for the country’s capital, the San Patricios artillery unit would be joined by a handful of Americans residing there, as well as by other European-born civilians, including Irish, Germans, Poles and even some Englishmen. These disparate individuals joined Riley’s battalion when they felt that their adopted homeland, lifestyle and families were threatened by the “Yankee invasion.” The Americans had superior field artillery and small arms, but were hampered by long, logistically challenged supply lines far from the U.S., a lack of horses and mules to transport food, medicine and ammunition, susceptibility to numerous tropical diseases in the lowlands, as well as issues with desertion and a general lack of loyalty by its volunteer militias. Many volunteers simply abandoned the conflict and returned home as soon as their one-year enlistment was up. The challenges frustrated U.S. military commanders beyond reason, but despite the apparent edge held

HISTORIAN & AUTHOR

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Group presentations · In-home talks

(530) 546-5612 · TheStormKing.com 8

WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION: MONDAYS TAHOE CITY

WEDNESDAYS KINGS BEACH

3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Ctr. 330 Fairway Dr.

3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House 265 Bear St.

TUESDAYS TRUCKEE

THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE

3:30pm to 4pm Sierra Senior Center 10040 Estates Dr.

3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church 341 Village Blvd.

(775) 298-4161

|

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by Mexican forces, the spirited Americans were victorious in every meaningful engagement, although often with significant losses on both sides. Over the course of the war, the two countries fought a series of intense skirmishes as U.S. forces pushed their way toward Mexico City. American naval squadrons established blockades on Mexico’s Pacific and Gulf of Mexico coasts to control ports and offload military materiel, including men, draft animals and weaponry. The Mexican infantry — the country had no navy — had the advantages of home terrain, choice of where to fortify resistance points, numerical superiority in the field and the mobility of highly trained, horse-mounted regiments that proved lethal with guns and lances in close combat. The last major and by far bloodiest battle of the war occurred on Aug. 20, 1847, at a well-fortified Franciscan monastery just a few miles outside Mexico City. The compound was called the Convent of Santa Maria de Los Angeles at Churubusco, an Aztec word meaning “the place of the war god.” Although the artillery skills of the San Patricios had been a serious thorn in the side of the Americans in previous altercations, it was during the fight for Churubusco where the unit displayed exceptional bravery and lethality against their former comradesin-arms. Their actions that day elevated the St. Patrick’s Battalion into national hero status in Mexico, where they are still honored today with monuments and celebrations. The battle would be the most hard-fought of the war, an epic clash dubbed Bloody Friday. E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Read Parts I & II. Click on History under the Explore Tahoe menu.

The Mexican army had barricaded the bridge over the Churubusco River with breastworks behind which they positioned cannons, mortars and riflemen. In the monastery itself, members of the San Patricios watched from the narrow windows embedded in the adobe structure’s 12-foot high walls. Directly in front of the Churubusco Monastery, John Riley’s men had constructed a fieldwork that protected their four 8-pound cannons. As Riley and the Mexican troops readied their positions, they watched thousands of fellow soldiers fleeing up the road past them. They had a pretty good idea what was chasing them. Stay tuned for more in the next edition or at TheTahoeWeekly.com.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on History under the Explore Tahoe tab.


April 4 -17, 2019

EVENTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7

Inaugural Sierra-at-Tahoe Competition Teams unGala

Feel Good Fridays

MontBleu Resort | Stateline | April 13

Boreal | Soda Springs | April 12

Buy a lift ticket at Boreal for $25, which includes $5 donation to High Fives Foundation. Mingle in the upper bar around 4 p.m. for Bingo and raffle prizes. High Fives Foundation, is a nonprofit that raises injury prevention awareness and provides resources and inspiration to those who suffer life-altering injuries. 9 a.m. $25 | facebook.com

Virtual Reality Studio Incline Village Library | April 12

Experience the canals of Venice, ride a roller coaster or walk with dinosaurs on the second and fourth Fridays. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Free | (775) 832-4130, libraryaware.com

Sierra College, Tahoe | Truckee | April 12

How does music impact, elevate, inspire your life? How does music take us to other times and other places and other feelings? Discuss these topics with Donna Axton, Sierra Nevada College Music Program Chair and Psychology Professor. 7-8:15 p.m. | sierracollege.ticketleap.com

SquawFree Doggin Fundraiser Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | April 13

Dust off your old skis, dig out your best outfit and come ski with SquawFree. There will be a dual open mogul field competition with prizes. The course is guaranteed to be hero bumps, without any set lines or man-made jumps. There will be different dual brackets based on age and/or ability. After party includes beer and food, poker. 9 a.m. Free | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

The event will be hosted in Squaw Valley’s Silverado area, with competition based around both uphill and downhill skill and speed. The competition is composed of two parts: ski touring or splitboarding up and then the descent on the same equipment. | (800) 4030206, redbull.com

Contestants attempt to ski or board across a pond of water on the mountain top.See if you can make it across the pond or cheer on others as they skim or sink at the base of World Cup. | (775) 586-7000, skiheavenly.com

Homewood Mountain Resort | April 13, 14

Includes a live DJ and dance party at the Big Blue View Bar, Dual Slalom Drag Race, ski parade down Rainbow Ridge, and apres drink specials all-day at 89 Bar & Grill in the North Lodge. | (530) 525-2992, skihomewood.com

Can you tell the difference between a Jeffrey and sugar pine? White and red fir? Learn to identify trees in the Sierra on this special skate ski and lunch combo on about 20km of trail with some elevation gain and short stops to talk about trees with Tim Hauserman. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $25 | tahoexc.org

Closing Day and Downhill Dummy Contest Downhill Ski Resort | Truckee | April 14

Enjoy food and beverage specials, a bounce house, live music and the traditional Downhill Dummy event. This year’s theme is Cartoons. | tahoedonner.com

Emerald Bay’s Underwater Trail Tahoe Maritime Museum Tahoe City | April 16

There’s a mystique to what lies beneath Lake Tahoe’s surface. Denise Jaffke, archaeologist for California State Parks, and Walt Holm from OpenROV, will give a virtual tour of select shipwreck sites. Light refreshments. 5-6 p.m. Free | facebook.com

Azzara’s Italian Restaurant Incline Village | April 16

Enjoy an intimate seated dinner with an Alps-inspired menu with dishes like potato cheese soup, spinach spaetzle, and apple strudel. The Chalet is one-quarter mile uphill. 5:30 p.m. | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

Granite Chief’s 6th annual Shrieddit Community Arts Center | Truckee | April 13

The 6th Annual Shreddie Awards returns with fun for the whole family with raffle prizes and awesome ski videos from across the country and beyond. 6-9 p.m. | facebook.com

Ski & Winter Clothing & Accessories

Tahoe Cross Country | Tahoe City | April 14

TRYP Networking Mixer

Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | April 13

30-60% off

Ski to the Trees

Diamond Peak Ski Resort Incline Village | April 13

Snowshoe Chalet Dinner

Located at The Resort at Squaw Creek

Heavenly Mountain South Lake Tahoe | April 13

Interpretive Ski Tours

Diamond Peak will offer a series of free guided on-mountain tours. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | (775) 832-1203, facebook.com

in Progress

Pond Skimming

Red Bull Raid Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows | Olympic Valley | April 13

WINTER SALE

The public is invited to the inaugural unGALA to support winter athletes in their drive to their personal best. Dress how you want and rock with them to the sounds of Coast Tribe while drinking beer from Drakes. 7-10 p.m. | (775) 588-3515, eventbrite.com

Pride Ride The Power of Music

OUT & ABOUT

WIN AMAZING PRIZES!!!

Tahoe Regional Young Professionals’ April North Shore Mixer will take place at Azzara’s Italian Restaurant. All attendees will receive one free drink and appetizers. TRYP members enter free; non-members are $10. 5:30-8 p.m. | (530) 536-6526, facebook.com

65th Annual North Lake Tahoe Community Awards Granlibakken Tahoe | Tahoe City | April 18

An exciting and memorable evening of celebrations to recognize our region’s local luminaries. 6-9 p.m. $90 | (530) 581-8778, gotahoenorth.com

Spring Tailgate Talk: Jim Herrington Alpenglow Sports | Tahoe City | April 18

Alpenglow Sports will start the Spring Tailgate Talks with a presentation by professional photographer Jim Herrington, who will speak about his most recent book and 20-year project, “The Climbers.” Doors open at 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m. | alpenglowsports.com

VISIT TheTahoeWeekly.com TO ENTER TO WIN Take our Reader Survey to enter. Click on the banner at the top of the page. facebook.com/thetahoeweekly

@TheTahoeWeekly

thetahoeweekly.com

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events. 9


FAMILY FUN

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Family FUN

The Discovery

L E A R N I N G T H R O U G H E X P L O R AT I O N S T O R Y B Y M I C H E L L E T. A L L E N | P H O T O S B Y K AT H E R I N E E . H I L L

T

he Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, known as The Discovery, is a science center that fosters exploration of scientific principles through hands-on learning. Featuring a variety of exhibits focused on science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM), The Discovery provides an informal environment for learning how these principles apply to our lives and to the world. My family has been to The Discovery many times and loves to go. One day after school, my sister, Katherine Hill, and I surprise my son, Anikin, and take him to visit The Discovery in Reno, Nev. Anikin is thrilled and has a hard time containing his excitement as we make the short drive to the museum. We arrive and Anikin bounces and fidgets with anticipation as we buy our tickets and takes off running into the museum. Our first stop is the Inside Out: An Anatomy Experience exhibition. Intended to help us better understand the human body, Inside Out, presents this knowledge with fun, interactive activities. We have fun testing our color blindness, placing puzzle pieces of the digestive system in a model of the human body and watch the variations in our heartbeat with a heart rate monitor. We only scratch the surface of this exhibition before Anikin takes off to the next one. As we continue to navigate the museum, we find ourselves in Da Vinci’s Corner. This space is filled with experiments and tasks in honor of the Father of Invention, Leonardo da Vinci. Da Vinci was knowledgeable in many subjects, including anatomy, music, science, engineering and cartography. He spent most of his life inventing and investigating the world and this exhibition is a tribute to his work. In Da Vinci’s Corner, Anikin spends most of the time playing with the motion picture simulator, which creates an illusion

of motion by rotating pictures around a spinning cylinder. He also enjoys the exhibit that demonstrates the concepts of loft and flight and practices knocking down blocks with a catapult. After Da Vinci’s Corner, we enter the featured exhibition, Mindbender Mansion. This unique experience features variously themed puzzles and brainteasers to exercise the mind. Each of the exhibits encourages participants to solve the problem at hand to reveal hidden clues and to decipher secret passwords. There are 40 individual and four group activities in the mansion offering a mental challenge for every age. In the Mindbender Mansion, we find some of the puzzles easy to solve and others much harder. We come across one puzzle that we attempt to solve but we are not successful. We each try several times thinking with each round we can get to

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Anikin Allen tubes in the Truckee River that is part of the Truckee Connects exhibit; Anikin Allen in Da Vinci’s Corner; Anikin and Michelle Allen explore the inventions in Da Vinci’s Corner.

the bottom of the puzzle. Eventually, we must admit defeat. As we walk away, I can’t help but continue to contemplate the answer. We collect enough clues to use them to reveal a secret password to unlock one of the vaults in the mansion. We have fun exploring several more activities before Anikin is off again. Next are Anikin’s favorite exhibits — Cloud Climber and Truckee Connects. Truckee Connects is a model of the Truckee River watershed, following the origin of its water from Lake Tahoe to its final destination in Pyramid Lake. Anikin

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enjoys getting wet as he manipulates the flow of the water by moving parts within the model. He doesn’t realize it but he is learning how water can provide electricity, irrigation, recreation and wildlife habitat. Cloud Climber is a multi-leveled climbing structure protected by netting that stretches from the floor of the lower level to the roof of the museum. A challenge for the young and the young at heart. There are many other permanent exhibits including the Spark! Lab Smithsonian, Science Underground, Little Discoveries, for explorers that are age 5 and younger; and many more. Each exhibit is an opportunity to learn more and to broaden the brain’s cognitive ability. Even after spending several hours navigating the museum, we realize that there is not enough time to check out everything so we decide we will come back soon. Kat, Anikin and I leave the museum shortly before closing and walk next door to Holey Schmidt! Donuts. As we walk in, we are greeted by a large selection of decedent flavors. Anikin picks a doughnut with white frosting and sprinkles, Kat chooses a Red Velvet and I finally decide on a Bavarian crème with chocolate frosting. Indulgent, but extremely delicious. We head back to the car as we talk about how much fun we had and how exciting it will be to come back again. Kat and I talk about coming back to attend one of the Science Distilled lectures or perhaps the Chemistry of the Cocktail (includes cocktails and food) held every year in November. Other events include Teen Science Nights, Family Science Nights and the popular Social Science series. With an amazing array of exhibits and events for every age, there are many reasons for us to come back to The Discovery soon. | nvdm.org 

Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center VOTED BEST POOL ROOM ON THE NORTH SHORE! Automatic Scoring “Bumper Bowling,” Video Arcade, Billiards, Video Poker, Cocktails, ATM, Full Swing Golf Simulator 920 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village (775) 831-1900 email: bowlink@aol.com

We accept Visa or Mastercard. Reservations required. Morning flights only for best weather conditions. The earlier, the better. All flights are weather permitting. 48 hour cancellation policy. Flights are from Carson City Airport.

10

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April 4 -17, 2019

Family Fun

FAMILY FUN

FOR THE KIDS

ICE SKATING

Courtesy IVGID

ADVERTISEMENT NORTH LAKE TAHOE

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

INCLINE VILLAGE

Indoor facility open year-round. South Tahoe

Snow Play Area on Fairway Blvd., next to the Chateau, on the driving range. Bring equipment.

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

MOUNT ROSE

Ice skating & rentals. Club House. CLOSED. TART

Near the Mount Rose summit, enjoy sledding in Tahoe Meadows off Highway 431. Bring equipment.

TRUCKEE

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

At Truckee River Regional Park. Skate rentals, broomball leagues, ice dancing & hockey lessons. Skate rentals & season passes available. CLOSED. TART

End of National Avenue off Hwy 28. Rentals available. TART

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

SWIMMING

Sledding & cross-country trails. Rentals available. Club House. TART

(530) 542-6262 | cityofslt.com

(530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

(530) 546-0605 | northtahoeparks.com

INCLINE VILLAGE

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com

(530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

OLYMPIC VALLEY

25-yard, 8-lane indoor pool at Incline Recreation Center, swim lessons, aqua fitness, 1-meter spring diving board, inflatable slide (weekends).

SQUAW VALLEY

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SQUAW VALLEY PARK

Swimming Lagoon & Spa at High Camp at Squaw Valley, free form lagoon with 50-meter lap lanes, two islands with waterfalls and native boulders. Call for schedule. TART

Free snowplay area. Free parking to access cleared walking paths in Olympic Valley to Tahoe City. TART

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com

(530) 452-4511 | squawalpine.com

Who knew the

Easter Bunny could swim? On April 13, the Easter Bunny will be hiding eggs in the Incline Village Recreation Center pool. Some eggs will float, and some will sink. Infants to age 11 can participate in a series of hunts in the pool from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Kids can fine-tune their egghunting skills before the big Eggstravaganza Community Egg Hunt in Incline Village on April 20. The price is $2 per child for recreation members and $4 per child for nonmembers. | yourtahoeplace.com

Tubing & mini snowmobiles. TART

placer.ca.gov

Astro-Poetry Contest

Teen Tuesdays

Tahoe Star Tours | Truckee | April 4-14

Incline Village Library | April 9, 16

Code Crew

Craft Day

Incline Village Library | April 4, 11, 18

Incline Village Library | April 10

Free | facebook.com

4-5 p.m. Free | (775) 832-4130, libraryaware.com

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

ECHO LAKE

(530) 542-6056 | cityofslt.com 25-yard indoor/outdoor year-round pool. Lessons. South Tahoe

(530) 644-2324 Highway 50 at Echo Lake Road. Bring equipment.*

TRUCKEE

4 p.m. Free | libraryaware.com

4 p.m. | events.washoecountylibrary.us

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

SAWMILL POND

Indoor pools with competition pool and warm water pool, diving board, swim training, hydraulic lift and lessons. TART

On Lake Tahoe Blvd. Bring equipment. South Tahoe

Mother Goose on the Loose

Make and Take

TAYLOR CREEK

South Lake Tahoe Library | April 4, 11, 18

Incline Village Library | April 10

Highway 89, north of Camp Richardson Road. Bring equipment.* South Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe Science Expo

ROCK CLIMBING WALLS TRUCKEE

(530) 543-2600

Community Recreation Center offers 29’ climbing wall & 12’ bouldering wall. All ages & levels. Lessons available. TART

SLEDDING & TUBING

RUFF, Read Up for Fun

Toddler Story Time

Wednesday Morning Club

Incline Village Library | April 4, 11, 18

Kahle Community Center | Stateline | April 10

South side of I-80, Castle Peak exit beyond Boreal Inn frontage road. Bring equipment.*

Early Literacy Storytime

Paws2Read

South Lake Tahoe Library | April 5, 12

Incline Village Library | April 11

TAHOE DONNER

10:30 a.m. Free | (530) 575-3185, engagedpatrons.org

Family Roller Skate Night

Kids Arts Saturdays

Kahle Community Center | Stateline | April 5

North Tahoe Arts | Tahoe City | April 13

KAHLE PARK

(775) 586-7271 | douglascountynv.gov Off Highway 207. Bring equipment. South Tahoe

TRUCKEE & BEYOND

DONNER SUMMIT

OPEN AS CONDITIONS PERMIT.

(530) 587-3558

EAST SHORE

SPOONER LAKE (775) 831-0494

State park open for general snow play. Bring equipment. Parking fee.

HOPE VALLEY AREA

(530) 587-9437 | tahoedonner.com At Trout Creek Recreation Center. No personal sleds. Family events all season.

YUBA PASS

CARSON PASS

(530) 994-3401

(209) 295-4251

Highway 49 at Yuba Pass. Bring equipment.*

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

WEST SHORE

HOPE VALLEY (775) 882-2766

Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Bring equipment.*

BLACKWOOD CANYON (530) 543-2600

4:30-6:30 p.m. Free

11:15-11:45 a.m. | (775) 832-4130

6-8 p.m. $2-$5

Northstar California Resort | Truckee | April 5

5 p.m. | (800) 466-6784, northstarcalifornia.com

Kids Night Out

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

GRANLIBAKKEN

Northwoods Clubhouse | Truckee | April 5

Machine-groomed snow play area; no tubes or toboggans allowed. All ages.

Teen Scene

TAHOE CITY

Kahle Community Center | Stateline | April 5, 12

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 110, to be listed in Family Fun.

Gentle slope on Highway 89 South, one-eighth mile south of the wye. Bring equipment. TART

5-9 p.m. | tahoedonner.com

ALL ACTIVITIES ARE WEATHER DEPENDENT.

7-10 a.m.

4-5 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

1-3 p.m. $5-$10 | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Spring Egg Hunt & Crafts KidZone Museum | Truckee | April 13

Spring Break Camps Kahle Community Center | Stateline | April 15-18 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. $26

6:30-9 p.m. $5 | (775) 586-7271

Preschool Story Time * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

4-5 p.m. Free | (530) 582-7846, truckeefol.org

10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | facebook.com

MEISS MEADOW

(530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com

Truckee Library | April 10, 17

Friday Fun Nights

Snowplay area off Hwy. 89, 3 miles south of Tahoe City. Bring equipment.*

(209) 295-4251

4-4:45 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

Lake Tahoe Community College South Lake Tahoe | April 4

STATELINE

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

10:30 a.m. | (530) 573-3185, engagedpatrons.org

Weird Science Wednesdays Incline Village Library | April 17

4 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

Kings Beach Library | Kings Beach | April 9, 16

10:30-11 a.m. Free | (530) 546-2021, placer.ca.gov

BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

North Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com (TART) | South Tahoe: tahoetransportation.org

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events. 11


THE ARTS

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Arts

& CULTURE

CREATIVE AWARENESS

Sisu

launch party

Mark Jusmark

C R E AT I N G M A S T E R P I E C E S O N S K I N S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

M

Courtesy Coalition Snow

ark Jusmark, owner of Truth Tattoo, has been creating beautiful art on people’s bodies for more than 18 years. His wife Anna, now a hairstylist at Coupe Sixty-One Hair Salon in Truckee, and her friend talked him into getting his first tattoo and becoming a tattoo apprentice back in Maui, Hawaii, where he was living at the time. Jusmark has been a Tahoe resident for 13 years, creating masterpieces on skin at his studio in downtown Truckee.

Coalition Snow is celebrating Issue Two of Sisu magazine with a launch party at Alibi Ale Works in Truckee on April 4. The event is free. Guests can enjoy the showing of “Evolution of Dreams,” Jackie Paaso’s and Eva Walkner’s new, mountain-skiing film.

“Tattooing is magic. It’s transformative. It’s a meditative

Guests can also see and purchase Issue Two of Sisu Magazine, a magazine for people who share a love of adventure and the outdoors. Sisu is a Finnish word that embodies the spirit of perseverance, grit and guts. It’s the art of inner strength. The magazine offers thought-provoking articles, inspirational features, art and photography, infused with Coalition Snow’s passion, camaraderie and grit. | Sisu

practice. Tattoos shape you. Tattooing has become my church, my spiritual practice.” –Mark Jusmark

Magazine on Facebook

Jusmark designs custom tattoos. Unlike many tattoo venues, there is no art on the walls to choose from in his studio. Instead, beautiful canvas paintings grace the walls. Jusmark has been an artist and painter since he was a young boy. Hanging on the back wall of his studio is a large piece of artwork, which at first glance appears to depict flowing clouds on a bright blue background. A closer look reveals a person meditating made from those swirling clouds. He is a long-time meditation practitioner and it is meditation that helps him drop into the zone while working with his clients. It helps him understand what they want on their body. He says he makes it his business to know who’s who in the tattoo world from Reno to Sacramento: “I don’t specialize in portraits. It’s best to know who that person is or who the best watercolor or black work guy is.” According to Jusmark, his talent lies in “making people’s dreams come alive.” Part of the process is to figure out what the client wants, what is in his or her mind and what is his or her expectation. When a client decides on the color purple, Jusmark needs to figure out what shade. “There are a lot of shades of purple. Do you want heavy lines? I need to get from their mind to my mind, from my hand to their body,” he explains. Jusmark uses a practice he learned in Hawaii called Huna dreaming. He asks clients to pick a time of day and imagine a setting with the same smells and surroundings. He has them sit at the same time and spot for a series of days and look 12

Compass Clay TOP: Mark Jusmark seated in front of one of

his canvas prints; LEFT: Mark Jusmark shows his personal wrist tattoos.

at magazines, marking with a sticky note each photo that speaks to them or catches their eye. “Then I tell them to put the magazines away for two days,” he says. “It’s about dreaming.” Eventually, he instructs the client to narrow the images down to the three that resonate. This begins the process. He has clients do the dream process for a month sometimes. “It helps to break it down. Speaking the

same language, listening to the interpretation. I don’t want anything in my head as to what I think they want. I show up to be a tool for you,” he says. Tattooing clients is like meditation, he says. He is focused and detailed. He becomes one with his client. During a session, he walks people through their pain. The breath is a key to help alleviate the pain. “I have them take three breaths — ten seconds in, hold the breath for five and breathe out ten seconds. Tattooing is an absolute world,” he says. “I don’t want to make a mistake on skin.” Jusmark creates tattoos of any size, full body or small designs. He has created many works of art on Tahoe bodies and his paintings can be found hanging in numerous establishments around Tahoe including the Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema, where a painting of Chewbacca watches as you purchase your popcorn. “Tattooing is magic. It’s transformative. It’s a meditative practice. Tattoos shape you. Tattooing has become my church, my spiritual practice,” says Jusmark. I was so inspired by him, I made an appointment to have him help me design a new tattoo. | truthtattootruckee.com 

opens

Compass Clay Studio, a learning ceramic studio and gallery, has opened in South Lake Tahoe. Owners and instructors Colleen Sidey and Bryan Yerian are ceramic artists with more than 20 years of experience, Lake Tahoe Community College art faculty members and local elementary school art enrichment teachers. Products and services range from fine art sculptures and colorful, functional ceramic wares to small classes, workshops, kiln firing services and private lessons. The studio is located at 976 Edgewood Circle. | Compass Clay Studio on Facebook

Wild & Scenic

Art Walk

Mountain Area Preservation is hosting a free Wild & Scenic Art Walk in Historic Downtown Truckee on April 18 from 5 to 8 p.m. as part of the Wild & Scenic Film Festival. The event will highlight local artists, studios and shops. Each location will have beer or wine and feature art with environmental themes. | mountainareapreservation.org


April 4 -17, 2019

Arts

THE

National Library Week Alibi Ale Works | Truckee | April 8

Check out the library’s Virtual Reality set and the 3-D printer while enjoying a choice of refreshments. This is not your parent’s library. 4:30-7 p.m. | truckefol.org

CHINESE WOODCUTTERS’ EXHIBIT In their heydays in the boom-and-bust mining culture of the late 1800s, the mining camps of Aurora, Nev., and nearby Bodie had a combined population of nearly 20,000. Keeping the thriving camps supplied was an ongoing challenge. A little-known piece of history of the two boomtowns — the role of the Chinese woodcutters who supplied firewood and charcoal to the camps — is the subject of a major new exhibit at the Nevada State Museum in Carson City, Nev. “Fueling the Boom: Chinese Woodcutters in the Great Basin” is open in the museum’s South Gallery until December. The exhibit highlights the significance of the woodcutting residents of Chinese Camp near Aurora, who felled pinyon pines to supply Bodie and Aurora with firewood and charcoal from about 1875 to 1915. | nvculture.org

Knitting Group Atelier | Truckee | April 9-Dec. 31

The group is open to all knitters, crocheters, loom artists every Tuesday. Bring a project or start a new one. 4-6 p.m. | (530) 386-2700, ateliertruckee.com

Adult Coloring Truckee Library | Truckee | April 10-Feb. 3

Truckee Library sets aside some space for adults to indulge their creativity by coloring pages with crayons, pencils and more. All materials provided. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | (530) 582-7846, madelynhelling.evanced.info

Bodie, 1908 J. Holman Buck, courtesy Nevada Historical Society | Nevada State Museum High School Art Exhibit

“Spring Thaw” exhibit

North Tahoe Arts | Tahoe City | April 4-14

Northwest Reno Library Reno | April 4-27

High School Art Exhibit. Artists’ reception on April 4, 4 to 6 p.m. | (530) 581-2787

History of Transportation: A Mural Study Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | April 4-21

During the Great Depression, Lundeberg proposed her concept for a public mural celebrating the contributions of workers to society. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

“Home Means Nevada” Nevada Legislature Senate Carson City | April 4-July 25

After Audubon: Art, Observations and Natural Science Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | April 4-21

Contemporary artists such as Penelope Gottlieb, Kara Maria and Donald Farnsworth pick up from where John James Audubon left off. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Andrea Zittel Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | April 4-July 31 Wallsprawl #4 is based on an aerial photograph of the southern Nevada military installation known as Nellis Air Force Base. Zittel sourced the image online from an aerial image database. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Ann Johnston: Quilts of the Sierra Nevada Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | April 4-May 19

See more than 30 large-scale quilts inspired by the Sierra Nevada. Using both machine and hand-stitching, the artist creates dimensional surfaces. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Art of the Greater West Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | April 4-21

Making connections between artistic practices and diverse cultures of the Greater West super-region — a geographic area that spans from Alaska to Patagonia, from Australia to the American West. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Banff Mountain Film Festival Reno Ballroom | Reno | April 4-April 4

A celebration of mountain cultures, this showing of short films from around the world plays to a sold out crowd every year. 7-9:30 p.m. | (775) 851-5180

Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Memorial Poles Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | April 4-June 23 Presenting 94 works by contemporary Aboriginal artists from Arnhem Land. 10 a.m. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

THE ARTS

The exhibition features the works of 15 contemporary photographers. The exhibit highlights treasures found on federally managed lands across the state. | travelnevada.com

Sierra Watercolor Society’s newest exhibit of original watercolor paintings by local artists. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | (775) 224-5289, sierrawatercolorsociety.com

To Have and To Hold: Nevada’s Art Collection John and Geraldine Lilley Museum of Art, University Arts Building, University of Nevada, Reno | April 4-July 31 For the first time in the Department of Art’s history, its impressive collection of more than 5,500 works of art has a permanent exhibition home in The John and Geraldine Lilley, University of Nevada, Reno’s new museum of art. | (775) 784-6682, unr.edu

Trevor Paglan: Orbital Reflector “In Conversation: Alma Allen and J.B. Blunk” Nevada Museum of Art Reno | April 4-June 23

Nevada Museum of Art Reno | April 4-June 30

Comprised of nearly 80 works, ranging from monumental furniture and sculpture in wood, stone and bronze to ceramic plates. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

A sculpture constructed of a lightweight polyethylene, housed in a small box-like infrastructure known as a CubeSat that was launched into space. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

The Lost World of Dragons

Under One Sky

Wilbur D. May Museum at Rancho San Rafael Regional Park Reno | April 4-May 12

Nevada State Museum Carson City | April 4-Oct. 22

Discover the stories and mythology of dragons throughout history and around the world. 10 a.m. | (775) 785-5961, facebook.com

Maya Lin: Pin River-Tahoe Watershed Nevada Museum of Art Reno | April 4-Dec. 7

A large-scale wall installation made from thousands of straight pins showing the perimeter of Lake Tahoe and its tributaries. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Find out when humans first occupied the Nevada portion of the Great Basin, the natural foods they collected and the skills they used for survival. See a reconstruction of a Great Basin cave containing evidence of past cultures and climate.

Nevada State Museum Carson City | April 4-Oct. 22

Learn about state symbols, minerals, original American Indian art, artifacts of historic value and more. | nvculture.org

Incline Village Library | April 5-Aug. 7

A memoir-writing program for seniors. 2-4 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoelibrary.us

Sierra Nevada College Incline Village | April 5-6

Author of “Queen Sugar,” adapted into a dramatic series for OWN, Oprah’s television network. The workshop on April 6 is free to SNC students, $50 for the public. 7-9 p.m. | (775) 831-1314, sierranevada.edu

Paul Valadez: Selections from the Great Mexican-American Songbook

Thomas Lloyd Qualls talk

Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | April 4-21

Sundance Books and Music | Reno | April 6

Valadez re-envisions the idea of the songbook, integrating nostalgic images with Spanglish text. 10 a.m. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

North Tahoe Arts | Tahoe City | April 11-Oct. 3

Join local basketweaver Karey Dodge as she shares her passion for Pine Needle Basketry. Participants will learn simple stitches and techniques used in this ancient art form. 12-4 p.m. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Inaugural Alliance Awards South Lake Tahoe High School | April 13

The inaugural Alliance Awards will be attended by prominent members of the South Lake arts community, including presenters, nominees, celebrities, luminaries and supporters and partners of the arts. 5-9 p.m. | facebook.com

TMCC Writers’ Conference Truckee Meadows Community College Reno | April 13

Hobnob with successful authors and agents seeking new talent. Enjoy a day filled with tips that will give you the advantage in getting published and gain guidance for producing a story that resounds with readers. | (775) 829-9010, tmcc.edu

Members Exhibit North Tahoe Arts Tahoe City | April 16-May 13

Artists’ reception is on April 27 from 5 to 7 p.m. There is no entry fee for this exhibit. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

French Film Festival Truckee Meadows Community College Reno | April 17-May 6

Movie screening with introduction, discussion and free French-themed refreshments. 2-5 p.m. | (775) 673-7269, tmcc.edu

Lifescapes

Natalie Baszile reading & workshop Our Nevada Stories: Objects Found in Time

Pine Needle Basket Weaving Workshop

Author Thomas Lloyd Qualls introduces his new novel, “Painted Oxen.” 2-3 p.m. | (775) 786-1188, sundancebookstore.com

Gathering of Artists North Tahoe Arts | Tahoe City | April 17

This free program offers artists the opportunity to meet other artists and work together in a shared studio space. Bring your latest projects to work on in shared studio space. On first and third Wednesdays. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Wild & Scenic Art Walk Historic Downtown Truckee | April 18

Mountain Area Preservation is hosting this event in conjunction with its 4th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival to highlight local artists, studios and shops. 5-8 p.m. | (530) 582-6751, facebook.com

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events.

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MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

The Pixies’

I R R E V E R E N T, A LT E R N AT I V E M A G I C STORY BY SEAN McALINDIN

April 11 | 7 p.m. | Grand Sierra Resort | Reno, Nev.

J

oey Santiago grew up on 1960s surf rock with bands such as The Ventures and The Shadows commanding him to pursue an emotive, uninhibited style of lead guitar. “The song titles were apropos,” he says. “If the song was called ‘Chicken Running,’ it sounded like a running chicken. I was entrapped by the guitar, but some of words came through by osmosis.” When he met Black Francis (born Charles Thompson IV) in a University of Massachusetts dormitory in 1986, the spark of the Pixies was born. “He had my vague, not-necessarily-onpoint sense of humor and he was writing songs that were original and that’s what I always wanted to do,” says Santiago. Both artists dropped out of college and moved to Boston where they put an ad in a local music magazine, The Phoenix, looking for a female bass player who liked both Peter, Paul and Mary and Hüsker Dü. The only person who responded was a 25-year-old named Kim Deal, who showed up to the audition without a bass because she had never played one before. “It was all organic,” says Santiago. “At that point we were just trying to put together enough material for a 30-minute show.” Once they started gigging the Boston area, the Pixies quickly caught the attention of a young, enthusiastic college music scene with their obscure lyrics, inane guitars and minimalistic arrangements. “It was all about keeping it sweet and simple,” says Santiago. “Then I’d try to do something weird, laying off the blues scale, creating jagged-sounding parts while staying true to the chord progression, not getting in the way and getting in the way at the same time. I worked with what I had.” Back in those early days, Pixies’ rehearsals were actually quite disciplined. “We all had jobs and we would meet after work and we knew we only had two or three hours tops to do something constructive,” says Santiago. “We were working together almost every day. We all really enjoyed it, but we weren’t ever precious with it. We didn’t need to coddle it. It was more like my kids: you can run, you walk, you can eat, now get the f*** out of here.” On releasing iconic LPs “Surfer Rosa” in 1988 and “Doolittle” in 1989, the Pixies flew to the top of the college radio charts. Although their records sales were relatively modest, their influence reverberated throughout the early 1990s alternative revolution with artists such as David Bowie, U2, Nirvana, Radiohead, Weezer and Pavement extolling the uncanny lyrics, off-beat timing and exaggerated dynamics that came to define a musical generation. 14

ALTERNATIVE ROCK

Once they started gigging the Boston area, the Pixies quickly caught the attention of a young, enthusiastic college music scene with their obscure lyrics, inane guitars and minimalistic arrangements. After releasing two more albums and touring the world, Pixies broke up in 1993. “We were a bunch of pricks who couldn’t see what we had,” says Santiago. “We lost track of it somehow and stopped having fun.” Meanwhile, Santiago started a family, dipped his toe into composing and spent two years thinking about himself and staying in bed. “After a while, my wife said, ‘I think you have mental issues,’ ” he says. “I’ve always been very sensitive, but right now I’m actually good and it feels weird that I can’t really complain about anything.” Almost every year, there was a buzz that Pixies would get back together. “At some point [in 2003], Charles joked on record that we jam all the time,” says Santiago. “The rumor blew up and offers started streaming in. We got together all agreeing that if we sucked and didn’t sound good, we’d shake hands and go our separate ways; but we had fun.”

Pixies will release their seventh album this September. “It’s a mish mosh of songs that came together, but it still sounds like Pixies to me,” says Santiago. According to Santiago, onstage, the Pixies pretty much wing it: “It’s random. That’s the way we do it. If we have a setlist, we tend to get more lost.” If they even ever really had any hits to begin with, they wouldn’t promise to play them for you anyway. “If you ask us to play a song, our answer’s going to be, ‘F*** you. Thanks for your opinion, but that’s not correct. You’re input really didn’t matter. We just wanted you to feel special,’ ” he says, laughing. “We’ve always just been trying to be wiseasses who’ll have other bands listen to our stuff and be like, ‘Why didn’t we think about that?’ and also, ‘Why are you thinking about this so much?’ We’ve already got the style. We can turn anything into a Pixies song.’ ” | grandsierraresort.com 

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

CALENDAR

APRIL 4-18, 2019

APRIL 4 | THURSDAY Reno Philharmonic Orchestra Nevada Historical Society, Reno, 10 a.m. Platinum Recording Artist Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 12 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Dirty Birdie Bingo/DJ The Polo Lounge, Reno, 7 p.m. DJ Trivia MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 7-9 p.m. “Mamma Mia!” North Tahoe High School, Tahoe City, 7 p.m. Todd Clouser The Divided Sky, Meyers, 7 p.m. Banff Mountain Film Festival Reno Ballroom, Reno, 7-9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Jeff Richards Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Stampede Country Music & Dance Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. Bohemia Night Talent Show Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 8-10 p.m. “The Empire Strips Back” Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m. New Wave Crave Silver Peak on The River, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 5 | FRIDAY Reno Philharmonic Orchestra Nevada Historical Society, Reno, 10 a.m. Tim Bluhm & the Preacher’s Pickers Sierra, Twin Bridges, 1-4 p.m. Live music Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 2-5 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Serina Hays Sunnyside Restaurant & Lodge, Tahoe City, 4-9 p.m. Garden Brothers Circus Reno Events Center, Reno, 4:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Kabir Singh Reno Tahoe Comedy, Reno, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Evening of Improv Comedy Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 7-9 p.m. Nation Beat Community Arts Center, Truckee, 7-9 p.m. “Mamma Mia!” North Tahoe High School, Tahoe City, 7 p.m. Make-A-Wish Masquerade Charity Ball Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 7-11 p.m.


April 4 -17, 2019

C A L E N D A R | APRIL 4-18, 2019 Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Jeff Richards Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Garden Brothers Circus Reno Events Center, Reno, 7:30 p.m. New Vintage Baroque Nightingale Concert Hall, Reno, 7:30-10 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. José González Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 8 p.m. Todd Clouser Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats, Truckee, 8 p.m. Floreyyyy, Bangus, Jekbooty, Maselli The Holland Project, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 9 p.m. Bias & Dunn Bar of America, Truckee, 9 p.m. Jeff Richards Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 9:30 p.m. Karaoke/DJ Hustler Jimmy B’s Bar & Grill, Reno, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. DJ Show Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. Slumberjack 1up, Reno, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 6 | SATURDAY Reno Philharmonic Orchestra Nevada Historical Society, Reno, 10 a.m. Boot Juice Sierra, Twin Bridges, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Live DJ Homewood Mountain Resort, Homewood, 12 p.m. “Mamma Mia!” North Tahoe High School, Tahoe City, 1 p.m. Live Music Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 2-4 p.m. Live Music KT Deck, Olympic Valley, 2:30 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Dinner Murder Mystery SureStay Plus Hotel by Best Western Reno Airport, Reno, 5:30-9 p.m. Comedy Murder Mystery Dinner Theater Gold Dust West Casino Hotel, Carson City, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Seckond Chaynce w/ Southern Cut Virginia St. Brewhouse, Reno, 6-11 p.m. Nick Eng The Potentialist Workshop, Reno, 6-11 p.m. Perennial Punx Spring Showcase Reno Bike Project Auxiliary Location, Reno, 6:30-11 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Todd Snider, Paul Thorn & James McMurtry MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 7 p.m. Rosebud’s Dance Band 2019 Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 7-9 p.m. “Mamma Mia!” North Tahoe High School, Tahoe City, 7 p.m. Tres Noctambule Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 7-10 p.m.

11th Annual Harp Plus Nightingale Concert Hall, Reno, 7 p.m. Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. KRS-One Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Brew, Brats & Ballet Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Jeff Richards Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Craig Ferguson Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. The Alan Parsons Live Project Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m. Air Supply Sparks, 8-11 p.m. Ekin Cheng Reno Events Center, Reno, 8 p.m. Country “Ladies Night” The Saint, Reno, 8 p.m. Jason King MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Todd Clouser Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats, Truckee, 8:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 9 p.m. Bias & Dunn Bar of America, Truckee, 9 p.m. Jeff Richards Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 9:30 p.m. Ignite Burlesque Variety Show Harvey’s Cabaret, Stateline, 10 p.m. DJ Show Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. The Golden Cadillacs Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 7 | SUNDAY Live Music Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Preacher’s Pickers w/Brian Rashap Sierra, Twin Bridges, 1-4 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 2-5 p.m. MerryGold Buckhorn Bar, Sierra City, 2:30 p.m. Corky Bennett Music & Comedy Mountain Music Parlor, Reno, 6-8 p.m. Brew, Brats & Ballet Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Jeff Richards Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Will Durst The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. KRS-One Whiskey Dicks, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m. Deep House Lounge The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.-12 a.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 8 | MONDAY Karaoke Polo Lounge, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Karaoke Auld Dubliner, Olympic Valley, 8 p.m. Motown on Monday The Loving Cup, Reno, 9 p.m.-3 a.m.

APRIL 9 | TUESDAY Bingo Tuesday’s with T~n~Keys MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Ike and Martin Alibi Ale Works - Truckee Public House, Truckee, 7-10 p.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Tuesday Night Blues Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 10 | WEDNESDAY Ike and Martin Sugar Bowl, Norden, 3-6 p.m. Tsurunokai Verdi Community Library & Nature Center, Verdi, 4-5 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. JP Harris Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 7 p.m. Wednesday Night Showcase Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Open Mic Anything Goes Jimmy Bs, Reno, 9-11:30 p.m. Chicken Bingo w/ DJ Finger Lickin The Loving Cup, Reno, 9-11:30 p.m. Country Line Dancing/Karaoke Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 9 p.m.

APRIL 11 | THURSDAY Bristlecone’s Biggest Little Blues Club Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Dirty Birdie Bingo/DJ The Polo Lounge, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Mark Kalin & Jinger The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Spite, Fallujah Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Pixies Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Stampede Country Music & Dance Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. Black Magic Flower Power Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 8 p.m. Altar De Fey, Basha The Holland Project, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Michal Menert w/Mr Rooney & Rambo The BlueBird Nightclub, Reno, 8 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Mark Kalin & Jinger The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 12 | FRIDAY Live music Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 2-5 p.m. Live Music KT Deck, Olympic Valley, 2:30 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

MUSIC SCENE

THE BEER

GARDENERS

ROCK ‘N’ ROLL

April 6 | 2 p.m. Village at Squaw | Olympic Valley FOUNDED IN 1991, The Beer Gardeners are Lake Tahoe’s strictly casual, good-time, beer-and-peanut-party band specializing in loud, high-energy rock and blues, twisted covers, mystery B-sides and original compositions better left unsolved. | squawalpine.com

HOZIER

INDIE ROCK

April 12 | 8 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort | Reno, Nev. A PLATINUM-CERTIFIED Irish songwriter and balladeer born in County Wicklow, Hozier released his sophomore record “Wasteland, Baby!” at the top of the Billboard charts in March. He’ll take you to church in the acoustically ornate Grand Theatre. | grandsierraresort.com

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

Dumbo March. 29-April 18 The Unruly Mystic: John Muir Benefits the Sierra Club April 25 Avengers: Endgame April 25-May 16 Aladdin May TBD Rocketman May TBD Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

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MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

STEVEN WRIGHT

April 13 | 8 p.m. Silver Legacy Resort Casino | Reno, Nev. STEVEN WRIGHT’S bio reads: “I was born. I started telling jokes. I started going on television and doing films. That’s still what I am doing. The end.” In his typically sardonic humor, he fails to mention an Oscar and two Emmys along the long and winding road of outrageous, thoughtprovoking farce. | silverlegacyreno.com

TODD CLOUSER

COMEDY

APRIL 12 | FRIDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

AVANT-ROCK

April 4 | 7 p.m. The Divided Sky | Meyers April 5 & 6 | 8 p.m. Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats | Truckee TODD CLOUSER IS a composing guitarist based out of Mexico City who combines elements of rock, jazz, blues and the spoken word. He has toured the world with his group, A Love Electric, collaborating with musicians from Keb’ Mo to Flea and now presents three intimate nights in Tahoe with the “You Are Brave” trio featuring Sam Ravenna and Pat Corte. | thedividedsky.com, moodysbistro.com

THE

GOLDEN CADILLACS

ALT-COUNTRY

April 6 | 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. THE GOLDEN CADILLACS began their musical journey in high school in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. After exploring various roads of their own, all paths have led back to a harmony that can only be found in lifelong friendship. | crystalbaycasino.com

16

Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Jeff Jones Sunnyside Restaurant & Lodge, Tahoe City, 4-9 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Jackyl w/ Blackwater Ryzn Virginia St. Brewhouse, Reno, 6-11 p.m. Live music Sierra, Twin Bridges, 6 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Mark Kalin & Jinger The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. “Spring Breaks 5” Cargo at Whitney Peak Hotel, Reno, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Hozier Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m. Jimmie Vaughan w/Coco Montoya MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 8 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 9 p.m. Public Eye Bar of America, Truckee, 9 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 9:30 p.m. Zeke Beats The BlueBird Nightclub, Reno, 9:45 p.m.-3 a.m. DJ Show Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. micah J & DJJD Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 13 | SATURDAY Record Store Day 2019 Sundance Books and Music, Reno, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Live Music Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 2-4 p.m. Live Music KT Deck, Olympic Valley, 2:30 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Kay - Dance The Generator, Sparks, 4-6 p.m. Toccata “St. Matthew Passion” Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd, Reno, 4-6 p.m. Brews, Brats, and Ballet Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 4-5:30 p.m. Skull Crack The Potentialist Workshop, Reno, 5-10 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Thunder From Down Under Baldini’s Casino, Sparks, 6 p.m. We Predict a Riot, Preacher Cargo at Whitney Peak Hotel, Reno, 6-11:30 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Mark Kalin & Jinger The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Inaugural Sierra-at-Tahoe Competition Teams unGala MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 7-10 p.m. Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Home Free Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 7:30 p.m. TCT Improv Comedy Night Art Truckee, Truckee, 7:30 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. One Button Suit Mountain Music Parlor, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m.

Steven Wright Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 8-10:30 p.m. Country “Ladies Night” The Saint, Reno, 8 p.m. “Alice in Wonderland” Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 8-10 p.m. Saved By The 90s Virginia St. Brewhouse, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Thunder From Down Under Baldini’s Casino, Sparks, 8:30-10 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Magic Fusion Starring Mark Kalin & Jinger The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 9 p.m. The Crystal Method The BlueBird Nightclub, Reno, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Public Eye Bar of America, Truckee, 9 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 9:30 p.m.

Harvey’s adds Blake Shelton, Lionel Richie The 2019 Summer Concert Series at Harvey’s Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena has added more big-name, exciting performers – Blake Shelton and Lionel Richie. Five-time Male Vocalist of the Year winner and Grammy nominee Blake Shelton will perform on July 12, while Lionel Ritchie, classic crooner and popular music superstar, will perform on Aug. 12. The lineup features Tim McGraw, Pentatonix, Miranda Lambert, Jackson Browne, Steve Miller Band, Luke Bryan and the Dave Matthews Band. Details available at TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on Music Scene. Tickets are on sale. | caesars.com/ harveys-tahoe


April 4 -17, 2019

José González

C A L E N D A R | APRIL 4-18, 2019

APRIL 14 | SUNDAY Live Music Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Patrick Walsh Sierra, Twin Bridges, 1-4 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 2-5 p.m. “Alice in Wonderland” Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 2-10 p.m. Toccata “St. Matthew Passion” Trinity Lutheran Church, Gardnerville, 4-6 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Mark Kalin & Jinger The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Caravana Del Amor Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 7 p.m. Smiley Joe Wiley Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Deep House Lounge The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.-12 a.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 15 | MONDAY Bijou Bell University of Nevada Reno, Reno, 5 p.m. Karaoke Polo Lounge, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Karaoke Auld Dubliner, Olympic Valley, 8 p.m. Motown on Monday The Loving Cup, Reno, 9 p.m.-3 a.m. Bison Bluegrass Band The Divided Sky, Meyers, 9 p.m.

APRIL 16 | TUESDAY Bingo Tuesday’s with T~n~Keys MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 6:30-9:30 p.m. AJJ w/ Antarctigo Vespucci, Pllush The Holland Project, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Toccata “St. Matthew Passion” First United Methodist Church, Reno, 7-9 p.m. Jon Stringer Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. 20th Century Kaleidoscope w/Stephanie Sant’Ambrogio, & James Winn University of Nevada Reno, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Swing Dancing Night Alibi Ale Works - Truckee Public House, Truckee, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Tuesday Night Blues Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Thomas Gabriel Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 8 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

APRIL 17 | WEDNESDAY Ike and Martin Sugar Bowl, Norden, 3-6 p.m. Galileo, Stars in His Eyes Incline Village Library, Incline Village, 4 p.m.

Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Classical Open Mic Goose & Chey’s, Tahoe City, 6-8 p.m. Wednesday Night Showcase Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Open Mic w/Greg Lynn Red Dog Saloon, Virginia City, 7-10 p.m. The Illusionists Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 7-8:30 p.m. Swing Dance Za’s Lakefront, Tahoe City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Jon Stringer Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Murs, Locksmith, Cojo Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 8:30 p.m.

SWEDISH-ARGENTINE FOLK CHARMER STORY BY SEAN McALINDIN

April 5 | 8 p.m. | Pioneer Center | Reno, Nev. Johan Bergmark

Ignite Burlesque Variety Show Harvey’s Cabaret, Stateline, 10 p.m. DJ Show Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

MUSIC SCENE

“In general, I’ve been influenced by Sweden’s humanist values. From my second album on, I’m not just writing about my own personal demons, but looking at our collective struggles and topics that deal with humanity now.” –José González Chicken Bingo w/ DJ Finger Lickin The Loving Cup, Reno, 9-11:30 p.m. Country Line Dancing/Karaoke Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 9 p.m.

APRIL 18 | THURSDAY B Street Theatre Loyalton Elementary School, Loyalton, 8:30 a.m.-1:45 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Dirty Birdie Bingo/DJ The Polo Lounge, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Mark Kalin & Jinger The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Emily Dunning University of Nevada Reno, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Madchild, Stevie Stone, 1 Ton, Phil Maruro Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Jon Stringer Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Spring Big Band concert Nightingale Concert Hall, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Stampede Country Music & Dance Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. Foliage w/ Cathedral Bells The Holland Project, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe

FOLK

J

osé González is at home in Gothenburg, Sweden, on a long-awaited sunny day. “Spring is coming slowly,” says the mesmeric, 40-year-old, folk musician. In 1976, his parents fled Argentina for Sweden after an ultra-right coup d’état disrupted their university studies. “My father was in a left-center political group,” says González. “The junta incarcerated many of their friends.” After spending half a year in Rio de Janeiro going from embassy to embassy in search of asylum, the young family ultimately found refuge in Sweden. José was born two years later into a bilingual household of five. He listened to Latin American records at home, including works by Silvio Rodríguez and other Tropicália artists from Brazil, as well as West African blues, American folk and British rock ‘n’ roll. “I’ve been trying to figure out which part led to what with me, culturally speaking,” he says. “We spoke Swedish and Spanish at home, and I think those are both part of me musically. I’m interested in how what we value strongly [in each language] can change with time.” “In general, I’ve been influenced by Sweden’s humanist values,” he says. “From my second album on, I’m not just writing about my own personal demons, but looking at our collective struggles and topics that deal with humanity now and in the past or future. Although I’m inspired by the skeptic and rational movements that might not have respect for ideas, I’m thinking about the well-being of people. I’m OK with criticizing ideas; I can separate ideas from people.” According to González, he began writing music as a youth in Sweden: “We were all into English music, so I sort of did what the other guys were doing. We had, of course, the music from Argentina and other places and I was playing and singing in Spanish and Portuguese, but it started to feel natural writing in English.” That is, up until the point when González’ 2006 debut album “Veneer” went platinum. He was booked on a world tour, which continues to this day. “I was singing in English, which is my

third language,” he says. “I felt very selfconscious, but Swedish still felt too direct. With English, I could hide behind my lyrics. Once in while I try to write in Spanish, but it doesn’t really come naturally.” His hit cover of fellow Swedes The Knife’s “Heartbeats” became a favorite of listeners looking to dream on catchy emo-folk musings over intricate alt-tuning, finger-styled guitar. “When I was younger, I wrote songs about relationships, but they were far less intimate,” says the artist. “Singing some other person’s words was definitely easier. I’d pick songs that people already knew and do a stripped-down version that was more direct and heartfelt.” González is inspired by musicians who seem to possess the uncanny ability to draw their audience into the music. Think of Simon & Garfunkel playing Central Park in NYC or Silvio Rodríguez in Cuba. The trick is to turn up your acoustic volume as loud as possible so you can play and sing really softly. “Of course, it’s a matter of taste,” he says. “But for me, the more sparse, the better I feel.” At the Pioneer Center in Reno, Nev., González will be performing with a 21-piece orchestra, The String Theory, allowing the dynamics to swell to even grander proportions. “Some songs are in the background with beautiful, classic harmonics and others are more dramatic, bombastic and experimental,” he says of the collaboration. After releasing the expressive “In Our Nature” in 2007 and the expansive “Vestiges & Claws” in 2015, González is presently working on writing material for his highly anticipated fourth album. “I’m going back to simplicity,” he says. “What I do best is simple songs.” In Reno, expect a personal, emotional experience of a show with a worldly, yet somehow otherworldly artist. “There is a switch when the lights dim and I play the first chords on my guitar and, if it sounds good, I get into a meditative mode,” he says. “Listeners are what this tour is all about.” | pioneercenter.com  17


FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Horoscopes

FIRE

EARTH

AIR

WATER

Puzzles

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20) So, spring is off to a hop more than a march. Like a rabbit enjoying the Sun and gently moving from one fresh shoot to another, the time is right to take it slow. You can still get things done, yet if all you do is start a few projects and don’t finish any, you will be in alignment with the Tao. Home is not just where your heart is these days; it is where you want to be body, mind, and soul, too.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21) You are in an industrious mood. You feel determined to manifest plans and visions that have been brewing for some time. All being well, these represent creative goals. It may be that you want to finish what was started earlier or bring certain projects to their next level of development and excellence. Sweet dreams are sweeter when you make them real.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21) You are ready to explore new possibilities. This includes new friendships and/or creative expressions you have not made before. This pioneering exploration is both a feature of a deep process of change that has been underway for the past couple of years and more immediate influences that will synchronize with entering new territory.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22) More than others, you may be contending with a fair amount of weighted realities. These are probably stemming from others or outer circumstances that are undergoing a good deal of change, transformation, perhaps hardship and even death. It can feel like a large weight that you must somehow counter. Take it slow and try not to take it personally.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22) This Aries new Moon is activating your relationships. If you have been waiting for new and true love, this could signal the window of opportunity, so you are wise to be clear with your intentions and desires. You may be feeling the urge to go on an adventure and the opportunity to do so is there astrologically, as well. If you can’t travel far, aim for exhilarating.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21) Things are shaking for you on a variety of fronts. These include your lifestyle rhythms in general and your personal and professional relationships. You yearn to take risks to realize your dreams and you have quite a few brewing. Yet, to succeed, you are challenged to get clear on what and who is worthy of your commitment and time.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21) After what has probably proven to be a challenging period, despite various perks in the mix, you are ready for a new round of activity and interactions. You don’t just want to; you may need to make some moves to feel happier. You are wise to include an emphasis on your health, at whatever level doing so makes sense right now.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19) The spring air is likely inspiring a burst of energy for you. It could be directed towards work, but there are indications that you would like to use it to get away for a while, to take a break. Sometimes, simply breaking free of the routine can be just the break you need. Imagine taking a week off and not going anywhere or having anything to do? Could be nice…

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23)

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22) Aries times constitutes and deep dive for you. This time it is particularly into the waters of your subconscious mind. The goal is not simply to clear the old; it includes laying claim to hidden gifts and talents. Like buried treasure these wait to be claimed, by you. Ironically, to truly realize success with them, you are destined to direct them for the benefit of others.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19) This Aries New Moon stands to manifest as a change in your perspectives to a rather noticeable degree this month. Among other things, you could enjoy a playful mood that you have not for some time. Like your Capricorn friends, you are ready for a change of scenery, rhythm, and approach. Meanwhile, big shifts are brewing close to home.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20) Activation of your ambitions is likely with the Aries impulse. You will feel inspired to get to the bottom of things. This can include a deep cleaning of the corners and closets. Yet, it can also manifest as taking a stronger hold of your talents and skills and especially those that are directed at financial returns.

CryptoQuip

The Sun in Aries is likely serving to lift your spirits. Still, the season is probably not off to a fast start. Positively, you are busy doing inner work of some kind. This could be psychological, or physical as with cleanses, spring cleaning or renovations. Either way, you want to a breakthrough. Whatever your focus, be as gentle and forgiving with yourself and others as you can.

If you see reddish fumes emanating from something, could you call them rose-colored gases?

Hocus Focus differences: 1. Towel is missing, 2. Mom’s hair is longer, 3. Puddle is bigger, 4. Water in tub is not visible, 5. Snorkel is longer, 6. Soap dish is higher.

18


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

April 4 -17, 2019

LOCAL FLAVOR

flavor

F A M I LY AT T H E H E A R T O F

Peruvian cuisine S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

P

eru is the land of the ancient Incans, shamans, Machu Pichu — one of the Seven Wonders of the World — and exceptional food. The country boasts coastal and craggy mountainous regions, cities, deserts and thick humid jungles. The cuisine of Peru is as varied and unique as its environments and the cultures of the people who inhabit them. The Pisco Sour is Peru’s official drink made with brandy, sugar, water, lemons, egg whites and ice. My latest food exploit explores some traditional Peruvian dishes with Nubbia Gamez, bar manager and cocktail mixologist at The Grille at Sawtooth Ridge at Northstar California. I met Nubbia mixing cocktails for the Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe’s Art of Mixology Class a few months ago. Nubbia invited me to her home that she shares with husband Ron and 5-year-old

AJI DE GALLINA From the kitchen of Nubbia Gamez 2 lbs. chicken breast, boil & reserve stock ½ loaf of French bread 2 C whole milk 1 C chicken stock 3 T vegetable oil 1 red onion, diced 6 cloves of garlic, chopped or 3 T crushed garlic ¼ C walnuts 1 t salt 1 t pepper 3 T Aji Amarillo Molida* 1 t Pajillo spice (Peruvian Turmeric spice)

“ Cooking is becoming

Pinch of nutmeg

a lost art and I want my

2 T parmesan

daughter to learn about the

2 eggs, hard boiled

richness of my culture.” –Nubbia Gamez daughter Isabella to learn how to make some of her favorite Peruvian meals. The aroma in the kitchen is rich with the sharp scent of chopped onions, chicken cooking on the stove and the sweet fragrance of fresh baked butter cookies. Nubbia’s best friend Natalia Duda is crying as she chops red onions. The women banter about food and cooking techniques as the sound of the knife thumps on the wooden cutting board. Natalia hails from Poland. She learned the art of Polish cooking from her mother; she loves eating Nubbia’s Peruvian cuisine. Nubbia’s mother is Cuban and her father is from Qatar; she was born and raised in Peru. “I am not genetically Peruvian, but I am culturally Peruvian. There are three main regions in Peru the coast, mountain and jungle and 25 regions similar to our states. I am from the coast and the two dishes we are making today are from the coast,” she explains. She is expecting 50 people for her husband’s birthday party. The menu she is preparing includes Aji de Gallina, a creamy poultry dish prepared with a Peruvian yellow chili paste, and Carapulcra, a shredded pork dish prepared with a Peruvian red chili paste, peanut butter and a Hershey chocolate bar and served with diced potatoes. Neither dish is spicy per se but will be seasoned with Peruvian spices. Nubbia starts with the Aji de Gallina.

“It is a traditional Peruvian dish typically made with hen,” she says, explaining that she substitutes the hen with chicken since it is not easily found in Tahoe. “Hens are not as fat as chicken and are more gamier in flavor.” The creamy dish is served on boiled potatoes and a side of rice. There are 3,000 different varieties of potatoes in Peru. She is calm and confident in her kitchen in the face of 50 people showing up in a matter of hours as she begins ripping up a loaf of French bread and tossing it into a large bowl. She adds milk and chicken stock and soaks the bread that will serve as a base for the dish. Natalia shreds the chicken while Nubbia begins the sofrito, a key ingredient to both dishes. She sautés the onions in vegetable oil until they are transparent and then adds garlic, salt and pepper. While the sofrito sautés, Nubbia blends the bread mixture that has been soaking with walnuts and sets it aside. She adds Aji Amarillo Molida, a yellow chili paste, to the sofrito and cooks it for about 5 minutes until it thickens and then adds the bread sauce to the pot and cooks for another 10 minutes. She pours

TOP: Nubbia Gamez with a plate of Aji de Gallina.

3 T Fresh parsley for garnish

A plate of Aji de Gallina; LEFT: A plate of the Peruvian pork dish Carapulcra.

Salt & pepper to taste

in the shredded chicken, spices and tops with some Parmesan cheese. I dip my spoon in during each step of the way, tasting as we go. The thick stewlike mixture takes on a yellowish hue. It is very tasty; comfort food for sure. Nubbia garnishes the dish with chopped, hardboiled egg and fresh parsley. Next, she begins to prepare the Carapulcra. She adds diced tomatoes to the sofrito, adds Aji Panca Molido, a red chili paste and stirs until it thickens. She spoons in peanut butter breaks up a Hershey chocolate bar, pours in some cream and then adds the cubed pork and diced potatoes and cooks it into the sauce. In Peru, they don’t have peanut butter. They use chopped peanuts blended with oil. She also adds a bottle of red wine. This dish takes an hour to simmer and cook. While that is cooking, she finishes the dessert called Alfajores, a butter cookie sandwich filled with dulce la leche and topped with powdered sugar. It is a delicious treat; the combination of caramel between the flaky buttery cookies melted in my mouth. “In Peru, food is how we express our love for each other. Peruvian food takes a long time to cook. Everything is made from scratch. It’s very earthy. I learned to cook from my grandmother and our maid, Nancy, who was from the mountains. Her style of cooking was very different than my family’s,” says Nubbia. “Cooking is becoming a lost art and I want my daughter to learn about the richness of my culture.” 

Place 4 cups of water and chicken breast in a stock pot and bring to a boil until chicken is cooked. Remove chicken and let cool. Reserve stock. Shred chicken into a bowl and set aside. Tear French bread into 1½- to 2-inch pieces and place in large bowl. Add milk and chicken stock. Mix well and let bread soak. Add mixture into a blender with walnuts and blend well. Set aside. In large pot heat oil, add diced onions and sauté until translucent. Add garlic and salt and cook for 5 minutes. Add Aji Amarillo Molida paste* and stir until sofrito thickens for about another 5 minutes. Add bread sauce mixture and cook for 10 minutes. Add shredded chicken and spices and Parmesan cheese. Add more milk and stock until you get the desired consistency and salt to taste. Serve over boiled potatoes or rice and garnish with chopped egg and parsley. * A substitute for the Aji Amarillo Molida is a blend of 1 yellow bell pepper, 1 orange bell pepper and 1 habanero orange chili with a little bit of canola oil.

19


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Courtesy Beercat

TA S T Y T I D B I T S

FiftyFifty to open in Reno

FiftyFifty Brewing has announced plans to open a 9,000-square-foot brewery as part of the Reno Public Market. The new location will include a taproom, brewery and roof deck, with plans to hold events at the location.

Suds

Courtesy Granlibakken

on the slopes What happens when you add beer to a snowcat? The Beercat, of course, presented by 10 Barrel Brewing Co. Imagine a minipub custom built on a 1987 Spryte snowcat. The Beercat brings the beer to skiers, allowing them to enjoy beer slope-side. The Beercat was designed and created with professional snowboarder and tiny-house builder, Mike Basich. They have taken it on tour, which is coming to Tahoe. The Beercat will be at Alpine Meadows Ski Resort on April 12, Heavenly Mountain Resort on April 13 and at Sugar Bowl Ski Resort on April 14. | 10barrel.com

North Lake Tahoe Express Daily airport shuttle 6:00am–midnight

New pub

for Northstar

Mina Group has partnered with Vail Resorts to unveil Bourbon Pub in the Village at Northstar California. Bourbon Pub replace Tavern 6330’ in late spring 2019.

Chef of the Year Granlibakken Tahoe’s executive chef, Ron Eber, has received recognition for his culinary innovativeness and expertise, and has been named American Culinary Federation, High Sierra Chapter’s Chef of the Year.

AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE

Plans for Reno Public Market, originally known as Shopper’s Square, will include a public market food hall, retail spaces and a specialty organic grocer. | fiftyfiftybrewing.com

He has been working as the executive chef of Granlibakken Tahoe since 1978. He takes great pride in his work and strives to create new dishes and to remain involved in the local culinary community in Northern California. He has received numerous accolades and awards for his work, both regionally and statewide. | granlibakken.com

Bourbon Pub will offer reinvented pub fare at the base of the Big Springs Gondola for lunch and dinner. Bourbon Pub’s menu will include Truffle Tater Tots with parmesan and herbs; The Nachos with a fried egg, beef chili, cotija cheese and avocado; Three Little Pigs, a cheddar bratwurst wrapped in puff pastry with jalapeno-yellow mustard; The Veggie Philly with Portobello mushrooms, griddle onions, red bell peppers and American cheese whiz and more. | northstarcalifornia.com

South Tahoe Beer Trail Area Breweries South Lake Tahoe | April 4-7

Celebrate the unique craft beer culture in the South Shore of Lake Tahoe by drinking more beer. Follow the South Tahoe Beer Trail throughout Spring Loaded and to get a free South Tahoe Beer Trail pint glass. | tahoechamber.org

Riverside Farmers Market McKinley Arts & Culture Center Reno | April 6, 13

Every Day Low Fares $49 One way per person $98 Round-trip per person Large group discounts

Get locally-grown goods from Reno’s only winter farmers market. Each week, find organic veggies, fruits, eggs, meats, honey and flowers from the region’s sustainable growers. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | facebook.com

NorthLakeTahoeExpress.com (866)216-5222

YOUR TAXES DESERVE PERSONAL ATTENTION

TAX DAY IS MONDAY APRIL 15TH L et the ex p erien ced accou n tin g team at L u d mila CP A alleviate you r tax f ears an d an x iety. W e w ill p rovid e the most f avorab le 2 018 retu rn p rep aration p ossib le.

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775.636.6601 | ludmilacpa.com O f f ices in I n clin e V illag e & R en o

Carson City Wine Walk Downtown | Carson City | April 6

On the first Saturday of every month, participants can stroll to 35 locations for wine, entertainment and special deals for wine walkers. | downtowncarson.org

Art of Mixology The Ritz-Carlton | Truckee | April 7, 14

This entertaining, educational experience will feature freshly cut herbs, classic ingredients such as bitters and infused liquors to create three unique cocktails paired with appetizers. 4-5 p.m. $60 | ritzcarlton.com

Wine Walk Carson Mall | Carson City | April 13

Come sip and shop at the Carson Mall on the second Saturday of the month. 2-6 p.m. | Carson Mall on Facebook

Brews, Brats, and Ballet Brewery Arts Center Carson City | April 13

Sierra Nevada Ballet presents Brew, Brats and Ballet - A Celebration of New Choreography beer tastings and brats. 4-5:30 p.m. | (775) 883-1976, facebook.com

Snowshoe Chalet Dinner Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | April 13

Enjoy an intimate seated dinner with an Alps-inspired menu with dishes like potato cheese soup, spinach spaetzle, and apple strudel. The Chalet is one-quarter mile uphill. 5:30 p.m. | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

Salsa Showdown Sierra-at-Tahoe Twin Bridges | April 14

Close out the season with a Salsa Showdown. Make your own salsa and you could win a 2019-20 value season pass. Competition is capped at the first 20 salsa entries. This all-day event is at Golden Bear Terrace. 8-10 a.m. $5 | (530) 659-7453, sierraattahoe.com

Third Thursday Tasting The Pour House | Truckee | April 18

Enjoy a wine tasting each month. 5-7 p.m. | thepourhousetruckee.com

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events.


April 4 -17, 2019

LOCAL FLAVOR

BOB CABRAL STORY BY LOU PHILLIPS

W ines Fr om the H eart

I

f ever there was someone destined to be a winemaker, it is Bob Cabral. He grew up an agricultural family and culture in California’s central valley and was responsibly tending to grapes and other crops from the time he could walk. Clearly there is terroir in this guy’s DNA. Fast forward a decade or four to when he spent 16 years at one of the icons of Sonoma, as winemaker at Williams Selyem. This brought him great fame and provided a good life for his family. Then one day he found himself standing alone at sunset in a remote vineyard on the Sonoma Coast

FULL BAR

The wines are crafted from select vineyard blocks of grapes and detailed farming techniques, just-right harvest times and winemaking decisions all driven by a vision of excellence. Cabral goes as far as to select each tree for his barrels.

Bob Cabral wines are crafted from select vineyard blocks of grapes and detailed farming techniques, just-right harvest times and winemaking decisions all driven by a

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vision of excellence. Here are my tasting notes:

Bob in his element. | Courtesy bobcabralwines.com

where he realized it was time to leave the never-ending work weeks of a celebrity winemaker to focus on his family. Eventually Cabral did take on lessconsuming winemaking roles, which provided the balance he was seeking, but still he felt there were a few things missing. First, realized how grateful he was for all the good fortune in his career and knew he needed to give back to the communities that had supported him. To that end, the profits of his newest project would go back into those communities. Second, he felt

Troubadour Pinot Noir is as close to Grand Cru as I have experienced from California —ethereal, earthy, lithe, powerful with rose petal, mushroom and spiced cranberries, sophisticated and sultry. American Girl Rosé is full of barely ripe raspberry, dry strawberry, spice and a beautiful feral quality. You could do an entire meal with this as your wine pairing. Anne Rose Chardonnay is at once crisp, almost crunchy, yet somehow rich on the palate, with a multilayered finish; this represents the best that Russian River offers from this varietal.

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Level 3 (Advanced) Sommelier Bob Cabral Wines | Lou Phillips

The Zallah Ranch Riesling is full of kinetic energy and super-fresh fruit. It is about as good as it gets for American Riesling. From a collector’s standpoint, I see this as the next Sine Qua Non, so with microscopic production levels, you may want to get on their list now. For availability, call Heather Cabral at (707) 3215148 and be sure to tell her I sent you. | bobcabralwines.com  Made for Valette by Bob Cabral | Lou Phillips

he had completely authentic wines inside him that had not been made — zero compromise wines made with abandon. With this mission and his family’s support, Bob Cabral Wines was born. These are the dream wines he has always wanted to make; these are his wines from the heart.

Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier in Tahoe and his consulting business wineprowest. com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 5443435 or wineguru123@gmail.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns. Click on Wine Column under the Local Flavor tab.

Louis Phillips

(530) 587-3557

WineGuru123@gmail.com

(775) 544-3435

10186 Donner Pass Rd - Truckee

Eclectic old world Ambiance Home made Pastas Wide-ranging Wine list DINNER AND BAR NIGHTLY FROM 5-9 PM Reservations Recommended

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’ve heard skiing has been awesome the last few days with the incredible snow base and the sunny days. I thought about the recent cold, blowing snowstorms and how after skiing it’s good to have a nice, hearty meal — a nice, chunky pasta sauce specifically.

After skiing it’s good to have a nice, hearty meal. Pasta sauce is so easy to make and is much better than the stuff you buy in a jar. I make a good-sized batch and keep it in food-saver containers. It can also be frozen into smaller batches so if you want, use the bigger cans and double the meat and veg-

gies. At any rate, while you are recovering from a perfect day of skiing, make a batch of chunky pasta sauce and enjoy some spaghetti to recoup some of the energy you lost on the slopes.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Chef’s Recipe under the Local Flavor tab.

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FEATURING: Slow-Roasted Prime Rib | Baby Back Ribs Steaks | Full Bar | Seafood Pasta | Gourmet Hamburgers 12 ft. Long Salad Bar | Kid’s Menu

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8338 NORTH LAKE BLVD., KINGS BEACH, CA

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PASTA SAUCE

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith 1 small can whole tomatoes, rough chopped 1 small can tomato sauce 1 small can tomato paste ¾ lb. ground beef ½ lb. mushrooms, sliced 1 large onion, diced ½ C red wine 3 T garlic, finely chopped 3 T olive oil 5 bay leaves 2 T oregano 2 T basil 1 T sugar 1 t chili paste Salt & pepper to taste

Heat the olive oil and garlic on medium high just until hot. Don’t brown the garlic; you just want to release the flavors. Add the tomato products, wine, herbs and half the sugar. In another pan, sauté the onions just until they start to soften and add the mushrooms. As soon as cooked, add to the sauce and in the same pan brown the beef. Strain off the fat and add to the sauce. Add the chili paste and let the sauce simmer on low for 20 minutes with the occasional stir before adding the salt and pepper and the rest of the sugar if needed. Remove the bay leaves before serving. Feel free to add roasted or sautéed bell peppers or any other veggies you might like and drizzle a few drops of extra virgin olive oil over the top once plated.


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April 4 to 17, 2019  

The annual Gates & Wakes competition on the West Shore is a rite of passage each spring in the Tahoe Sierra. This year’s race returns on Apr...

April 4 to 17, 2019  

The annual Gates & Wakes competition on the West Shore is a rite of passage each spring in the Tahoe Sierra. This year’s race returns on Apr...