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MARCH 7-20, 2019

MT. ROSE’S

HIDDEN CHUTES

KITCHEN DWELLERS’ MONTANA GALAXY GRASS // DISCO TUBING // TOURING ON LOVE, MUSIC & POWDER // COWBOY POETRY LIFE ON A SKI RUN CELEBRATING WESTERN LIFESTYLE //

STARR WALTON-HURLEY


ADVANCE RATE TICKETS

THE EARLIER YOU BOOK, THE MORE YOU SAVE

H C R A M OM FR

$89

Save an additional $10 per ticket when you purchase via the Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows App. Promo code: App2019

S Q UAWA L P I N E.CO M/ T I C K ETS


March 7-20, 2019

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 TheTahoeWeekly.com

15

Lisa Eisner

TM

Courtesy Donner Summit Historical Society

Volume 38 | Issue 6

SUBMISSIONS Events & Entertainment Submit at TheTahoeWeekly.com Click on Events Calendar Editorial Inquiries editor@tahoethisweek.com Entertainment Inquiries entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Photography production@tahoethisweek.com

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MAKING IT HAPPEN Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102 Sales sales@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110 Art Director Alyssa Ganong production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106

IN THIS ISSUE MARCH 7-20, 2019

Graphic Designer Justeen Ferguson graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101 Entertainment Editor Sean McAlindin entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

FEATURES Starr Walton-Hurley

Food Editor Priya Hutner priya@tahoethisweek.com Family Editor Michelle Allen michelle@tahoethisweek.com Copy Editor Katrina Veit Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle, Cam Schilling

TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/ TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light. –John Muir

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6

Mt. Rose’s Hidden Chutes 10

TAHOE SURPASSES 500 INCHES FROM THE PUBLISHER

I thought it was an impressive feat a few weeks ago when we started to surpass the 400-inch milestone in the Tahoe Sierra in mid-February (the average annual snowfall is 409 inches). But, then, the storms just kept on rolling across the Sierra Nevada dumping more and more snow. Now, as of press time for this edition, several Tahoe ski resorts have surpassed the 500-inch mark – Homewood, Sugar Bowl and Squaw Valley – and it just keeps coming. Another snowstorm is moving over the Sierra as I write this on March 1, with the forecast pretty much a steady stream of snowstorms for the next few weeks. The impressive amount of snowfall has prompted Vail Resorts to extend the ski seasons for Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar (see details in this edition and at TheTahoeWeekly.com). And, I expect more resorts to follow suit soon. Take our Reader Survey There’s still time to win great prizes from restaurant gift certificates to lift tickets for giving us 5 minutes of time and your 2 cents in our Reader Survey. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on the link for Take the Reader Survey at the top of the page. Be sure to give us your e-mail to enter. 

Sierra Stories

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OUT & ABOUT Lake Tahoe Facts

4

Sightseeing

5

Events

6

FAMILY FUN Disco Tubing

12

For the Kids

13

ARTS & CULTURE Cowboy Poetry

14

The Arts

14

FUN & GAMES Horoscope & Puzzles

17

MUSIC SCENE Touring on Love, Music & Powder

18

Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 18 Kitchen Dwellers

20

LOCAL FLAVOR

ON THE COVER

Tasty Tidbits

23

Tapas at The Loft

23

Wine Column

25

Chef’s Recipe

26

A snowboarder drops into The Chutes at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe with Highway 431 snaking through the background with views of the Virginia Range in the distance. Read Kayla Anderson’s story on exploring “Mt. Rose’s hidden Chutes” in this edition and at TheTahoeWeekly.com. | Courtesy Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe, @mtroseskitahoe

Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & Instagram

@TheTahoeWeekly 3


TheTahoeWeekly.com

Donner Summit

Truckee Donner Lake

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

h Ta

SUGAR BOWL

N

WEST EAST SOUTH

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

Tahoe Vista

ALPINE MEADOWS

Dollar Hill

NV

Lake

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

il

Ta h o e R i m

CASINOS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

Tahoe City

SNO-PARKS

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

SQUAW CREEK

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Olympic Valley SQUAW VALLEY

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

MT. ROSE

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

DONNER SKI RANCH

ROYAL GORGE

SKY TAVERN

il

SODA SPRINGS

CLAIR TAPPAAN

BOREAL

Reno & Sparks

TAHOE DONNER

AUBURN SKI TRAINING CENTER

Eagle Rock

NEVADA NORDIC

Glenbrook

Carson City

Volume: 39 trillion gallons There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Homewood o Ta h

HOMEWOOD

e Ri

DID YOU

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

KNOW

CA Cave Rock

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years Watershed Area: 312 square miles

Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F

Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet

Ta h oe

R i m Tr ail

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

Fannette Island

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Fallen Leaf Lake

BIJOU PARK / LAKE TAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

ECHO LAKES

Natural rim: 6,223’ Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Shoreline: 72 miles Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

HOPE VALLEY

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 59.7 in 2017. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” n

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

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March 7-20, 2019

SIGHTSEEING

Exploring Mt. Rose’s Hidden Chutes on a powder day. | Billy Jesberg, Mt. Rose Ski Area

One of the lake’s famous natural sites, a volcanic plug on the West Shore. TART

Explore Tahoe (530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us

South Lake Tahoe

Settled in 1863 as a stagecoach stop. TART

Vikingsholm Castle

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island. TART

Watson Cabin

Fannette Island

(530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org The oldest building in Tahoe City and on the

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov

Lake Tahoe’s only island, home to an old tea house.

Heavenly

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com

Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views. South Tahoe

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

West Shore

$10 parking | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Located in Sugar Pine Point State Park. (Open for tours in the summer.) TART

High Camp (800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com

Olympic Valley

Aerial tram rides, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

North Shore

northtahoebusiness.org Home to the North Shore’s largest sandy beach, in the heart of downtown. TART

North Tahoe Arts Center

Tahoe City

National Register of Historic Places. TART

Free | (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com

MUSEUMS (530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov

The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party. TART

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum and 20-mile interpretive driving tour

Gatekeeper’s Museum Daily | (530) 583-1762 northtahoemuseums.org

Truckee River |

FLOW AT FARAD

Tahoe Science Center

381

Incline Village

Free | (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology

truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com

Kings Beach State Rec. Area (Thurs.-Mon., summer)

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50 (775) 588-4591 Tahoe City  100 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 581-6900 Truckee  10065 Donner Pass Rd. (Depot) Measured Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS) (530)in587-8808 

TROA.NET

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village 855 Alder Ave. (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe 35 College Dr. (530) 543-2600

Truckee

Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

Western SkiSport Museum Donner Summit (530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing. TART

Kings Beach

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Rd. (530) 587-3558

TRANSIT North Tahoe & Truckee (TART) | laketahoetransit.com South Tahoe | tahoetransportation.org

Featuring historic photos & memorabilia, and the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Truckee

Interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone & the Jungle Gym. TART

Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry and settlers. South Tahoe

Featuring local artists and workshops. South Tahoe

Old Jail Museum

visittahoecity.com

MARTIS 867 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org (530) 583-9283

VISITORS’ CENTERS

Tahoe City

Tahoe Art League Gallery South Lake Tahoe

North Shore

Tahoe City

CAPACITY: A 20,400

Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

along Old 40. TART

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe City

Tahoe Maritime Museum

6,227.84

Incline Village 969 Tahoe Blvd. (800) 468-2463 

CAPACITY: 18,300 C

Truckee Railroad Museum

Donner Memorial Visitor Center Truckee

Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org

INDEPENDENCE 14,587

lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. TART

(530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org Tahoe City

Games. Tower of Nations. Olympic Flame. Olympic CAPACITY: 9,500 C DONNER 2,980 Museum at high camp. TART 50

Self-guided tours, exhibits and hands-on activities. TART

Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly. South Tahoe

Emerald Bay

Olympic Museum Olympic Valley C 226,500 STAMPEDE 198,734 CAPACITY: (800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com 29,840 9 Winter Olympic PROSSER 6,356 Celebrate the homeCAPACITY: of the 1960

IN 2018:

225

West Shore

truckeehistory.org | truckee.com

CAPA PACITY AC CITY:: 40,87 CITY 40,870 70

6,228.05 |

200,000 AF

Eagle Rock

BOCA 5,702

Truckee

ELEVATION :

RESERVOIR CAPACITY

175

The Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April in 1880 when a storm dumped 4’ of snow in 24 hours.

Readings taken on Friday, March 1, 2019

150,000 AF

Truckee

Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World.” Grounds open year-round. South Tahoe

LAKE LEVEL Lake Tahoe Natural rim 6,223’

125

Donner Summit

South Lake Tahoe (530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org

75

Drive through the neck of an old volcano.

Tallac Historic Site

50

East Shore

25

Cave Rock

100,000 AF

ATTRACTIONS

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org

Truckee

One of a few surviving 19th Century jails. TART

Boots McFarland by Geolyn Carvin | BootsMcFarland.com

Historical sites and Commons Beach. TART

23rd

9

9

5


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

Starr Walton-Hurley O LY M P I A N S T E E P E D I N T A H O E S K I C U LT U R E

EVENTS CALENDAR MARCH 7-21, 2019

S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

Bank on

this slalom

S

tarr Walton-Hurley’s ski roots run deep in Tahoe. She was raised on skis and eventually became an Olympian. At age 76, she is still skiing and teaching. For Walton-Hurley, skiing and mountain life is a family affair. Her maternal grandparents built and operated the Soda Springs Hotel and Soda Springs Ski Hill in the 1930s. Her parents Madelyn and Stan built Donner Ski Ranch. “My mom’s family and brothers Oscar and Herstle Jones were involved with the opening of Sugar Bowl and developed Rainbow Tavern and Nyack Lodge,” she says. Her uncle was considered the first ski instructor in California.

Squaw Valley during the 1960 Olympics, when she was unable to participate due to a broken foot. Four years later, she competed in the Olympic games at Innsbruck, Austria. She was the top American finisher in the downhill and finished ninth overall in world rankings. In 2002, she carried the Olympic Torch at Squaw Valley for the Winter Games in Salt Lake City and in 2010, she carried the Olympic Torch at Squaw Valley for the 50 Year Olympic Celebration. In 2012, she was inducted into the McClatchy High School Athletic Hall of Fame. Hurley continues to ski every year with a group of women called the Olympic

“Skiing is a Zen experience. It’s just you and the mountain. It’s absolutely beautiful. When you wake up in the morning and get first tracks, it’s like going to church with your inner self.” –Starr Walton-Hurley “My grandmother did not ski, but my mother did and won the first medal of the family in the late 30s in cross-country,” she says. “For my family and I, it was our social life.” Walton Hurley was on skis at age 3 and won her first race at age 5. Her father was her ski coach until she made the Olympic team. Sugar Bowl Ski Resort was her home mountain and she was its first Olympian. “I was 14 when I won the Silver Belt the first time in 1957 and again in 1960,” she says she was the youngest person to win the event. Walton-Hurley has had a storied carrier full of honors. She carried the torch to 6

Ladies, women she’s been skiing with since the 1950s. “I am the second youngest at 76,” she says. “I love to ski. I have passion for skiing and got it from my mom and dad.” As a long-time ski instructor her advice when you get stuck in your head is to say to yourself: “‘I can do this.’ And when you are really afraid, don’t do it. That’s when you tense up and can get hurt. It’s all about you and the hill.” Walton-Hurley has been skiing for 70plus years. She tells her Olympic Ladies that skiing is like making love to the mountain, start slow, go smooth and go easy. “Good athletes and teachers need to

LEFT TO RIGHT: Five-year-old Starr Walton-Hurley on

Donner Summit, giving pointers to a much older skier. | Courtesy Starr Walton-Hurley; Starr Walton-Hurley skiing at Sugar Bowl in the late 1950s. | Courtesy Donner Summit Historical Society; Starr WaltonHurley overlooking Donner Lake. | Courtesy Starr Walton-Hurley

be able ski with anybody,” she adds. Hurley cracked her pelvis two years ago, but she’s still out skiing, although a bit more cautiously. “Skiing is a Zen experience. It’s just you and the mountain. It’s absolutely beautiful. When you wake up in the morning and get first tracks, it’s like going to church with your inner self. You are only in competition with yourself and the mountain,” she says. She now lives in Sacramento and has a cabin in Soda Springs that was built in the 1920s. She teaches the Women of Winter classes at Squaw Valley when her schedule permits. She is on the board of directors of the Donner Summit Historical Society, sits on the honorary council of New Zealand and represents the U.S. helping New Zealanders living in California and Americans who want to do business in New Zealand. Hurley is also involved with the Sierra Nevada Olympic and Winter Sports Museum, aka SNOW Sports Museum, in Olympic Valley as an advisory board member. “It’s much needed in our region to keep the history and memorabilia we have in the mountains,” says Walton-Hurley, who believes in giving back to her community. Walton-Hurley is clearly passion-ate about skiing and one of the greatest lessons she has learned is to truly keep passion in your heart: “My favorite moun-tain is the one I am skiing.” n

The fifth annual Boreal Banked Slalom on March 9 is a costume race to benefit the High Fives Foundation open to all ages. The ski and snowboard races will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 2:20 p.m. An après ski party will be from 3 to 6 p.m. with live music. An awards ceremony will be at 4:15 p.m. | Register rideboreal.com

Resorts extend

ski season

After record-breaking snowfall in February, Heavenly Mountain Resort, Northstar California and Kirkwood Mountain Resort are extending the 2018-19 season, as first reported at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Heavenly will be open until April 28 and May 3 to 5; Northstar will be open until April 21; Kirkwood will be open until April 14 and April 19 to 21. | skiheavenly.com, northstarcalifornia.com, kirkwood.com

Build the

tallest snowman Join the Tahoe Snowman Challenge to build the tallest snowman through March 31, sponsored by Lake Tahoe AleWorx, FNCTN and Tahoe Heartbeat. The first 10 snowman more than 15 feet tall will receive a free Tahoe Heartbeat beanie for the snowman, and up to five free hats for the workers’ efforts. Prizes given for the top three winners, along with Most Creative and Most Realistic. Rules online. | Tahoe Snowman Challenge on Facebook


March 7-20, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

EVENTS

Co-working space in

Tahoe City

Virtual Reality Studio Incline Village Library Incline Village | March 8

Experience the canals of Venice, ride a roller coaster or walk with dinosaurs on the second and fourth Fridays. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Free | (775) 832-4130, libraryaware.com

The Tahoe Mill is opening a second coworking location in Tahoe City in April. The new downtown Tahoe City office space will have private offices and desks, along with a meeting room, kitchen and waiting area. | tahoemill.com

Physics of California

Help with computers

Alpenglow Expeditions AIARE Level 1 Course

Kings Beach Library Kings Beach | March 7, 14, 21

Ongoing computer help. First Thursdays of the month are “Exploring our Digital Resources,” second Thursdays are “Computer Q&A with Carl LeBlanc,” third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone” and fourth Thursdays are differing themes about computers and technology. Call or stop by for our class schedule. 3-4 p.m. Free | (530) 546-2021, placer.ca.gov

Squaw Dogs Chamber of Commerce Mixer North Lake Tahoe Visitor Center Tahoe City | March 7

Come meet the rescue dogs of Squaw Valley at the Tahoe City Visitor center located at the wye as part of Snowfest! Free family event. Get your picture with a hero for $5. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free | (530) 581-8727, facebook.com

Sierra College, Tahoe Truckee | March 8

Maruša Brada, a physics professor at UC Davis, will discus why snowflakes are six-sided, why we can ski, surf and scuba dive and other physics of sports. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for refreshments. 7-8:15 p.m. | sierracollege.ticketleap.com

Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | March 8-10, 18-20

AIARE Level 1 certified students can expect to develop a good foundation on how to prepare for and carry out a backcountry trip, to understand basic decision making while in the field and to learn avalanche rescue techniques. This is a comprehensive entry-level avalanche course designed for those with basic ski and snowboard touring experience. | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

SnowFest! Day 8 Area venues Tahoe City | March 8

SnowFest! Day 8 includes Bridgetender’s 11th annual Rib Fest and Ike & Martin’s 80s dance party at Jakes on the Lake. | tahoesnowfest.org

Quad Crusher Entrepreneurs Assembly Startup Roundtable Lake Tahoe Yoga | Zephyr Cove | March 7

Entrepreneurs Assembly is a great professional networking and growth opportunity. The Roundtable workshops are confidential and provide the best practices for navigating the hurdles in creating a successful business. 6-9 p.m. Free | eventbrite.com

SnowFest! Day 7 Area venues | Tahoe City | March 7

SnowFest! Day 7 includes the Meet the Avalanche Dogs of Squaw Valley at North Tahoe Visitor Center and Za’s Cornhole Tournament. | tahoesnowfest.org

Sexual Harassment Prevention Training North Lake Tahoe Visitor Center Tahoe City | March 8

To assist with local business compliance, the North Lake Tahoe Resort Association/ Chamber will host a Sexual Harassment and Bullying Awareness and Prevention workshop for business owners and managers. This training satisfies California’s AB 1825 requirements, including information on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression. 8:30-10:30 a.m. $15-$25 | (530) 581-8727, facebook.com

Subaru Winter Fest Soda Springs | March 8-10

WinterFest is a one-of-a-kind mountain destination and lifestyle tour, with live music by The Lil’ Smokies, s’mores,daily giveaways and test the latest gear. 9 a.m. | skisodasprings.com

Sugar Bowl Resort Norden | March 9

Sugar Bowl’s marquee uphill race is back for its third year.The increasingly popular Quad Crusher is is the last in the Silver Belt Series. The course covers all four peaks and will test your touring stamina. With three different divisions, there is an uphill class for every enthusiast. Prizes, festivities and cold beverages to follow. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. $75 | sugarbowl.com

Snowfest! Pancake Breakfast North Tahoe Event Center Kings Beach | March 9

Start your SnowFest! celebration day in Kings Beach with delicious pancakes, prepared by North Tahoe Public Utility District staff and volunteers, and served with sausage, fresh strawberries, coffee, milk, and orange juice. 8-10:30 a.m. | tahoesnowfest.org

Guided Snowshoe Tours Clair Tappaan Lodge Norden | March 9, 16

Guided Snowshoe Tours are on Saturdays at 10 a.m. to explore Tahoe National Forest. Bring snowshoes or rent a pair. The tour lasts 2 to 3 hours. Bring snacks and dress comfortably, in layers. Hot chocolate and tea will be available before and after the tour. Space is limited. | RSVP (530) 426-3632 10 a.m. $10-$20 | (530) 426-3632, facebook.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

ADULT TICKETs

$69

starting at WITH A 3-DAY VALUE PASS

KIDS

byop

6 & UNDER SKI FREE

$20 off adult ticket

Bring Your Other Pass Deal

Upcoming Events:

3/9: Interpretive Ski Tour 3/10: Retro Ski Day & Passholder BBQ 3/24: Dummy Downhill 3/30: Luggi Foeger Uphill/Downhill race

Purchase lift tickets & rentals online: DiamondPeak.com 7


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

EVENTS

MARCH 7-21, 2019 spring skiing in style from old wooden skis and woolen outerwear, 1970s stretch pants, or neon onesies from the 1980s. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | (775) 832-1177, facebook.com

is the largest source of pollution. League staff will train volunteers to survey stormwater infrastructure including pipes and storm drains. All ages welcome. 2-4 p.m. Free | (707) 2737017, keeptahoeblue.org

Snow Sculpture Contest River Ranch Lodge | Tahoe City | March 10

The annual SnowFest closing event. Teams of 1 to 4 people mold, shape, carve, color and decorate amound of snow into a masterpiece. Local celebrity judges, patio shenanigans, BBQ lunch and shotskis. 12-3 p.m.| facebook.com

Courtesy Sierra-at-Tahoe

Subaru Winter Fest

Perfect your method Sierra-at-Tahoe and Vans present Methodology on March 16, an all-day event that combines speed and style. This banked slalom concept adds a new element of competition with a double-sided hip before the finish line, allowing riders to shave time off of their run with their best method air. The competition is open to everyone and to all ages. Registration is $10 per rider. All proceeds from this event go to The Revert Foundation, which encourages and inspires youth development by sharing mountain and outdoor experiences. | sierraattahoe.com

Boreal Mountain California | Norden | March 10 Demo the latest equipment from Nordica and LibTech, grab great giveaways and hot chocolate, support Adaptive Sports Chapter, participate in the Subaru scavenger hunt or take a photo in the giant Subaru Adirondack chair. | rideboreal.com

SnowFest! Last day Area venues | Tahoe City | March 10

The last day of SnowFest! includes Family Fun Day at Winter Sports Park in Tahoe City, River Ranch Snow Sculpture Contest and Tahoe Donner Ididarun. | tahoesnowfest.org

Disco Tubing

Boreal Banked Slalom

SnowVentures Activity Zone Olympic Valley | March 9, 16

Boreal Mountain Rsort | Soda Springs | March 9 The fifth annual Boreal Banked Slalom is a costume race that benefits the High Fives Foundation and includes live music and a legendary après party. Ski and snowboard races will be from 10:30 a.m. to 2:20 p.m. Apres ski party is from 3 to 6 p.m. 10:30 a.m. $14-$34 | rideboreal.com

Interpretive Ski Tours Diamond Peak Ski Resort | Incline Village | March 9

Diamond Peak will offer a series of free guided on-mountain tours. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | (775) 832-1203, facebook.com

Kings Beach Snowfest! Parade Downtown | Kings Beach | March 9

Featuring music, floats, costumes, candy and more. The North Tahoe Business Association hosts the fun-filled parade featuring entries from more than 30 local community organizations and businesses. 11:30 am-12:30 p.m. Free | (530) 546-9000, northtahoebusiness.org

Families can spin, slide and speed down the snow tubing lanes to vibrant DJ tunes as the night is illuminated with colorful lights and lasers splashed on the mountainside. Tubing starts on the hour for 55-minute session. 5-7 p.m. | squawalpine.com

Village at Squaw | Olympic Valley | March 9, 16 Enjoy a winter fireworks celebration every Saturday. 5:30 p.m. Free | (800) 403-0206

SnowFest Day 9 Area venues | Tahoe City | March 9

SnowFest! Day 9 includes pancake breakfast with North Tahoe Fire Department, Dress Up Your Dog contest, Kings Beach parade, Alaskan Open Snow Golf Tournament, an ice-cream eating contest, Snow Ball Drop fundraiser, Get S’Mores Saturdays and live music at Hacienda del Lago. | tahoesnowfest.org

McKinney Cup Mt Rose Ski Tahoe | March 9, 10

Family and friends are invited to a winter beach party full of tropical fun, with live music, food specials, a snow sculpture contest, games and more. 12-3 p.m. Free | tahoedonner.com

Get S’more Saturdays

Demo Day

Downtown Kings Beach | March 9

Diamond Peak Ski Resort Incline Village | March 10

Tahoe Donner | Truckee | March 9

Head to participating eateries and shops for something extra and unexpected, then stroll to the outdoor gathering area at Las Panchitas where there will be s’mores, heaters and fire pits, plus multiple chances to win valuable raffle prizes. 3-6 p.m. Free | (530) 546-9000, northtahoebusiness.org

Demo the latest gear. 9 a.m. | (775) 8321177, facebook.com

Feel Good Fridays Boreal | Soda Springs | March 15

Buy a lift ticket at Boreal for $25 which includes $5 donation to High Fives Foundation. Mingle in the upper bar around 4 p.m. for Bingo and raffle prizes. High Fives Foundation, is a nonprofit that raises injury prevention awareness and provides resources and inspiration to those who suffer life-altering injuries. 9 a.m. $25 | facebook.com

Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Resort | Truckee | March 10 Dogs of all shapes and sizes compete in this entertaining, timed dog pull race, which raises money for the Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe. | tahoedonner.com

Pizza on the Hill | Truckee | March 11

Tahoe Silicon Mountain is a monthly networking group for people that live, work or vacation in the Truckee/Tahoe/Reno area. Members are involved in the tech industry or small business. Topics are technology, startups, local businesses and environment. 6-8 p.m. $5 | chamber.truckee.com

Diamond Peak Ski Resort Incline Village | March 15

Join the Community Snowshoe Hike to Diamond Peak’s Snowflake Lodge. 5:30-9:30 p.m. | (775) 832-1177, facebook.com

Historic Snowshoe to Martis Peak Lookout Martis Peak Road Entrance | Kings Beach | March 16

This challenging snowshoe hike with Tahoe Rim Trail Association climbs for the first 4 miles, gaining 1,700 feet in elevation before topping out at the Martis Peak Lookout. The rewards are spectacular views of Truckee and Donner Pass and Sierra Buttes and Lake Tahoe to the south. We will enjoy lunch at the top, so don’t forget to bring one. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $5 | tahoerimtrail.org

Truckee-Tahoe Airport | Truckee | March 12

Snowshoe Cocktail Races

Good Morning Truckee is open to the public – everyone is invited. It is held the second Tuesday of every month at Truckee Tahoe Airport from 7:00-8:30am. Truckee Chamber members $10 and includes a hot breakfast and raffle ticket. Anyone who brings their own traveler coffee mug will receive an additional raffle ticket 7-8:30 a.m. $12 | truckee.com

Camp Richardson | South Lake Tahoe | March 16

55+ Snowshoe Hikes

Sierra Speaker Series

Area Venue | Incline Village | March 12, 19

Donner Memorial State Park | Truckee | March 16

Join a weekly light to moderate level snowshoe hike at various locations throughout the Tahoe area. Following the hikes, relax and socialize with fellow snowshoers. Hikes are subject to weather conditions. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. | (775) 832-1310, yourtahoeplace.com

Mythbusters Incline Village Library | Incline Village | March 13 Come uncover the truth behind Lake Tahoe’s most popular myths and legends. This free event features guest speaker Sarah Hockensmith of Tahoe Institute for Natural Science. She explores the unique history, geology, flora and fauna of Tahoe’s Sierra Nevada and Carson Range. 6:30-8 p.m. Free | (775) 832-4130, tahoerimtrail.org

Think you have what it takes to run with a full cocktail tray in hand through obstacles up and down the beach at The Beacon Bar & Grill while wearing snowshoes? We have great prizes for the fastest (and cleanest) at the obstacle course finish line. Show up between 5 and 7 p.m. on race days to enter. 5-9 p.m. Free | facebook.com

David C. Antonucci explores some of the socalled facts about Lake Tahoe that appear in print and on the Internet. They arise from ignorance, word-of-mouth, myth and over-exuberant exaggeration. Was Kit Carson at Tahoe? Does Tahoe mean big water? Did Mark Twain camp near Glenbrook? Find out the answers to these and other long-held fictions. 5-6:30 p.m. Free | (530) 583-9911, sierrastateparks.org

Full Moon Snowshoe Tour Sugar Pine Point State Park | Tahoma | March 16 State Park interpreters will be leading a Full Moon Snowshoe Tour exploring the natural and cultural history around the HellmanEhrman estate and Lake Tahoe shoreline in Sugar Pine Point State Park. 6:30-9 p.m. $25-$35 | (530) 583-9911, facebook.com

Pipe Keepers Intro Training Retro Ski Day & Passholder BBQ Diamond Peak Ski Resort Incline Village | March 10

Break out your retro gear to celebrate

8

Lake Tahoe Visitors Authority along with its destination partners present a series of events that bring together the best of spring and winter with on-mountain activities at Heavenly Mountain Resort, Kirkwood Mountain and Sierra-at-Tahoe; loud outfits; lodging specials; restaurant deals; happy hour. | (775) 586-7000, springloaded.tahoesouth.com

Good Morning Truckee Winter Fireworks

This annual Masters event pits some the fastest skiers in the sport against each other in Giant Slalom. The McKinney Cup is sponsored by Tamara McKinney in memory of members of her family, Steve, McLane and Frances McKinney. | (775) 849-0704, visitrenotahoe.com

Winter Beach Party

Area venues | South Lake Tahoe | March 14-21

Moonlight Snowshoe Hikes I-Did-A-Run

Mountain Minds Monday CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

Spring Loaded

Ski Run Marina | South Lake Tahoe | March 14 A citizen science program to address the threat of stormwater pollution entering Lake Tahoe. Runoff from rain storms and snowmelt

NOLS Wilderness First Aid TRTA Office | Stateline | March 16, March 17 The Tahoe Rim Trail Association is hosting a two-day Wilderness First Aid (WFA) course


taught by NOLS Wilderness Medicine (NOLS WM). This course provides individuals with a foundation in important first aid concepts critical to responding effectively to emergencies in a remote backcountry environment. $235-$265 | tahoerimtrail.org

Full Moon Snowshoe Tour Tahoe Adventure Company | Tahoe Vista | March 20

OUT & ABOUT

Courtesy Sugar Bowl

March 7-20, 2019

Join a Full Moon Snowshoe Tours through the brisk mountain air of Tahoe’s pristine forests. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $70 | (530) 913-9212, tahoeadventurecompany.com

Beer & Gear Homewood Mountain Resort Homewood | March 16, March 17

Third Annual Beer & Gear at Homewood’s returns with a new twist. Participating ski and snowboard brands will be matched with a brewery to create a ski and sip pairing. Equipment demos will be offered free, lift tickets and beer will be available for purchase. | (530) 525-2992, skihomewood.com

Platinum First Tracks Northstar California Resort | Truckee | March 17 Enjoy First Tracks, along with Platinum lift line privileges the entire day and a gourmet breakfast at Zephyr Lodge. 7-10 a.m. | (800) 466-6784, facebook.com

Tahoe Donner Family Challenge Tahoe Donner | Truckee | March 17

The Family Challenge is a matched-time competition raced by family teams at Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Resort. It is a Giant Slalom race, but the time that counts is the difference between first and second runs. 12 p.m. Free | tahoedonner.com

St. Patrick’s Annual Community Celebration The Chateau | Incline Village | March 17

This family-friendly party will feature an authentic Irish dinner, dancers and singalongs. Meet St. Patrick (and a tricky leprechaun). There will also be kids’ crafts, games, and facepainting. Everyone is welcome. 4:30-7:30 p.m. | eventbrite.com

Full Moon Snowshoe Adventure Lake Tahoe Snowshoe Tours Incline Village | March 20

In this Moonlit Snowshoe Experience enjoy the pristine Tahoe wilderness, in avalanche-safe high alpine terrain. Perfect for first-timers and athletic children age 15 and older. a 2.5-hour guided tour of 1 to 3 miles with moonlit views of Lake Tahoe. Includes snowshoes in the ticket price. | travelnevada.com

Mountain Town Marketing Strategies Truckee-Tahoe Airport | Truckee | March 21

Knowledge Bites presents Mountain Town Marketing Strategies.Small local businesses face a unique marketing challenge being in a tourism-driven mountain town. The majority of their best customers do not live here. Join David LaPlante, chief marketing officer at PropertyRadar, for a presentation. 9-11:30 a.m. $20-$30 | chamber.truckee.com

Family Dinner & Reading Night Boys & Girls Club NLT | Kings Beach | March 21

Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe and Kings Beach Elementary present this second annual event for a free dinner and a variety of reading rooms with a featured book and guest reader. Enter a raffle for prizes. Each family gets a new book to take home. 5-7 p.m. Free | bgnlt.org

Sugar Bowl’s signature, Silver Belt Series, wraps up with the Quad Crusher on March 9. This annual event is an endurance race staged across its four iconic peaks: Mount Judah, Mount Lincoln, Mount Disney and Crow’s Nest Peak. Three divisions, including elite, team and citizen, and distinct courses make this fun for both seasoned athletes and passionate uphillers. The event will conclude with an awards celebration, food, drinks and raffle with proceeds benefiting Sierra Avalanche Center. Tickets are $75. | Register sugarbowl.com

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events.

Good Times Snow

at Granlibakken

Area venues | South Lake Tahoe | March 19

Enjoy amazing illumination in the forest, occasionally challenging to see stars, constellations, satellites and space junk 5.-7:30 p.m. | tahoesnowshoetours.com

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FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

MT. ROSE’S

The secret features that people tend to find most often are Venom, 209’er and Jerry’s Tree, named because it resembles Jerry Garcia and has photos of him taped to it TOP

Two skiers take on the challenging terrain of The Chutes. | Courtesy Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe RIGHT

Looking out at a stunning view of the Mt. Rose hidden Chutes. | Courtesy Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe Skier enjoys fresh powder during the opening day of The Chutes. | Courtesy Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe Skiing a challenging line in The Chutes at Mt. Rose during a competition. | Courtesy Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe

10

A

t 10 a.m. on a crisp February morning, Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe is blanketed in a few inches of fresh white snow. Most of the mountain is open, including the lower Chutes, a section of 200-plus acres of advanced and expert steeps loca-ted smack in the middle of Slide Mountain and Mount Rose. This challenging terrain faces State Route 431 on the eastern side of the mountain, out of the sun’s reach most of the day, which keeps the snow light and fluffy. There are 15 named chutes on the 2018-19 trail map, all at 40- to 55-degree vertical pitches, accessible through nine gates. The steepness of these trails means that avalanches are prone to happen — and often do — especially after snowstorms. Therefore, Mt. Rose Ski Patrol has several avalanche mitigation processes in place to try to trigger slides and leave zero chance for the public to get caught in one. Having worked at the mountain between 2009 and 2013, I took practically every chance possible to run a few Chutes when ski patrol deemed them safe to enter. In one of those seasons, I even rode all 16 officially named Chutes in one day. It was then when I discovered other chutes, ones with official-looking yellow signs on them that weren’t on the trail map. There was Playground, up on the western side of the Chutes somewhere off the Cutthroat gate, where you used to be able to see the sign from the Northwest Magnum 6 chairlift. And then there’s 209’er tucked into the trees, named after longtime ski patroller Carl Williams’ radio number. On this particular winter day, an hour after the lower Chutes opened, Mt. Rose Ski patroller and friend Kevin Devine guided me to some of these hidden pockets in the Chutes and pointed out a few more secret spots. There are a couple of reasons why these features aren’t on the trail map. First, it’s already jam-packed with names with little room for any more. But the more important reason is that these areas give ski patrollers a more accurate knowledge of the terrain should an incident occur so they can respond faster when someone is in trouble. And they can determine where to accurately throw a detonator. As a Chutes

skier or rider, it’s fun to stumble on these somewhat hidden spots. Devine has been working at Mt. Rose since 1996 and knows the mountain like the back of his hand. We took a few runs together through the chutes. Riding up the Chuter chair, Devine pointed out the Bermuda Triangle with ski tracks leading to it near Tower 7. The heavily wooded area leads to an area between the road up to Winters Creek Lodge and the Chuter chair. It has some great snow, but it’s easy to get lost. If you go too far down, you’ll have to hike back out. Devine also points out Benson’s, a spot on the ridge between Miller Time and Nightmare where a man with the last name of Benson got caught in a slide. There’s another area on the other side of the Chutes next to Cardiac Ridge also named where an incident occurred, unofficially called Coddington’s. The secret features that people tend to find most often are Venom, 209’er and Jerry’s Tree, named because it resembles Jerry Garcia and has photos of him taped to it. But the only way to come across them is to stay high on the ridges and keep your eyes open. If you head straight down the throat of any chute, you’ll ski or ride past them. In looking for the old-growth bristlecone Jerry’s Tree, I accidentally stumbled on Venom. We crossed over to a spot near the Beehive chute. Devine said they are thinking about putting up a sign in the trees called Oh, Beehiiive as a nod to Austin Powers. If you are an advanced or expert skier or rider who likes treasure hunts and challenging terrain, take a day to find Mt. Rose’s hidden chutes for yourself. And give a big thank you to Mt. Rose Ski Patrol team for keeping the runs safe for us all to enjoy. | skirose.com nt E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Read Kayla’s adventure riding all 16 named chutes in one day


March 7-20, 2019

FEATURE

HIDDEN CHUTES S T O R Y B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

11


FAMILY FUN

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Family FUN

B O O G I E D O W N AT

Disco Tubing S T O R Y B Y M I C H E L L E T. A L L E N

T

he word disco makes us think of bell bottoms, platform shoes, colorful lights and catchy dance music. We don’t usually associate it with snow tubing, but Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows has put them together to create a funky, yet thrilling, experience. The concept is simple: sliding on an inflatable tube down a groomed mountain slope decorated with bright lights while listening to disco music. The disco music is played by a DJ and complemented by

You don’t need bell bottoms or platform shoes to enjoy the scene at Disco Tubing. a laser light show projected on the mountainside. Sounds like a groovy idea to me. Fans of just about any snow activity, Disco Tubing sparked my family’s interest. On one recent Sunday, me, my husband, Luke, and my son, Anikin, took a drive to beautiful Squaw Valley to check it out. Steady snowfall and brisk temperatures greet us as we arrive. We head into the SnoVentures Activity Zone located next to the Far East chairlift on the east side of the parking lot. We pick up our tickets from the registration desk and step out the door to the tubing hill. A short walk brings us to a large, groomed hill draped in LED lights. The sounds of iconic disco music fill the air. We meet the supervisor, Michael, and Luke asks if Anikin can ride with one of us and Michael says no; only one person allowed per tube. Anikin is fine with it and grabs a

LEFT: The tubing hill. | Courtesy Squaw Alpine; LEFT: Anikin Allen enjoys the tubing at Squaw Valley.

| Michelle Allen

small inflatable tube from the stack as Luke and I grab larger ones. To get to the top, we load a covered conveyor lift called a magic carpet. Il-

We accept Visa or Mastercard. Reservations required. Morning flights only for best weather conditions. The earlier, the better. All flights are weather permitting. 48 hour cancellation policy. Flights are from Carson City Airport.

12

luminated on the inside by color changing lights. the tunnel over the magic carpet provides a nice reprieve from the stormy weather. At the top, we choose one of the three lanes and wait for our turn. I find myself dancing to the beats of the music as we wait. Soon it’s Luke’s turn. He sits down in his tube and the operator grabs the strap and slings him down the hill. His tube is low on air, which keeps him from making it all the way to the bottom. He quickly hops up and moves out the way. Next, it’s Anikin’s turn. He plops down on his tube and the operator asks if he wants to go straight, get a little spin or a big spin. He chooses straight and the operator whips him down the hill.

He accelerates pretty fast and makes it further than Luke did. Smiling, he jumps up and runs to the side to wait for me. Then it’s my turn. I tell the operator I want to go straight and before I know it, I am speeding down the hill. Spinning a little as I drop, I enjoy the feeling of having no control. Protected by large snow banks on either side of the tubing lane, this is a low-risk activity suitable for almost anyone 40 inches or taller. I meet Luke and Anikin at the elevated fire pit at the bottom of the hill, Luke grabs a more inflated tube and we head back up to take another run. We keep taking laps, making the most of the hour time limit. Luke is much happier with the more inflated tube, making it much farther down the hill. We test out each of the lanes and ultimately decide the middle lane is the fastest. On one of our laps, I take a look out over the valley and notice the storm clouds are starting to break apart. Small glimpses of the crystal-clear night sky peek through, giving me pause and appreciation for the moment. At the end of each lap, we stop at the fire pit, lingering longer each time. By the end of the hour, we start to get cold and hungry. We say goodbye to Michael and his staff and thank them. As we walk back to our truck, the moon is starting to show through the diminishing clouds. I take a final look back at the tubing hill and I marvel at the juxtaposition between the spectacular laser lights shining on the trees and the the light of the moon. You don’t need bell bottoms or platform shoes to enjoy the scene at Disco Tubing. But you will need warm clothes and a strong desire to go fast and boogie down. Can you dig it? | squawalpine.com Michelle may be reached at michelle@tahoethisweek.com


March 7-20, 2019

FAMILY FUN

For the Kids Make and Take

Tahoe Donner Family Challenge

Incline Village Library | March 13

Tahoe Donner | Truckee | March 17

Children in Kindergarten to fifth grade are invited to make a DIY craft and take it home. The library will provide all the materials and directions. 4-4:45 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

The Family Challenge is a matched-time competition raced by family teams at Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Resort. It is a Giant Slalom race, but the time that counts is the difference between first and second runs. 12 p.m. Free | tahoedonner.com

RUFF, Read Up for Fun

Courtesy Tahoe PhotoDonner Credit |Downhill Photographer?

Truckee Library | March 13, March 20

Banana Split Extravaganza Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Resort needs help devouring a 200-foot Banana Split at the annual Banana Split Extravaganza on March 16 at 1:30 p.m. Be sure to pack extra spoons with your ski gear so you can help gobble up some of this tasty monster. It’s free, it’s fun and it will restore your energy after a morning of skiing. | tahoedonner.com

Incline Village Library | March 20

Paws2Read

The 14th annual Science Expo family night has the theme of Physical Sciences. Topics include: forces and motion, properties of matter and energy, with activities focusing on light mixing, refraction, sublimation, chemical reactions, electricity, density, sound and much, much more. 4-6 p.m. Free | (775) 831-1314, tahoe.ucdavis.edu

Incline Village Library | March 14

Children can practice reading to friendly therapy dogs and receive a free book. All ages welcome. 4-5 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

Young Readers Society: Teen Chapter

Kids Night Out

Kings Beach Library Kings Beach | March 12, 19

Northwoods Clubhouse | Truckee | March 16

With stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 18 months to 3 years. 11:15-11:45 a.m. | (775) 832-4130

Astro-Poetry Contest

Teen Tuesdays

Tahoe Star Tours | Truckee | March 7-21

Incline Village Library Incline Village | March 12, 19

Incline Village Library | March 7, 14, 21

Tahoe Star Tours announces the call for poems for the 2019 Astro-Poetry Contest. Poems can be submitted anytime until April 14 from students in elementary to high school. Poems must have an astronomy theme and be 20 lines or less. Free | facebook.com

Sierra Nevada College Incline Village | March 20

Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe and Kings Beach Elementary present this second annual event for a free dinner and a variety of reading rooms with a featured book and guest reader. Enter a raffle for prizes. Each family gets a new book to take home. 5-7 p.m. Free | bgnlt.org

Preschool Story Time

Toddler Story Time

North Tahoe Science Expo

Family Dinner & Reading Night

The Teen Chapter of the Young Readers Society Book Club is held the third Friday of each month. Recommended ages 13 to 17. 5:30-6:30 p.m. | wordafterwordbooks.com

South Lake Tahoe Library | March 7, 14, 21

The Kings Beach Library hosts a Preschool Storytime every Tuesday from 10:30-11am. Each week has a different theme. In a lively, silly and casual environment kids work on multi-sensory pre-literacy skills. Stop by for loads of fun, and read books, sing songs, learn nursery rhymes, and do fun and easy crafts. 10:30-11 a.m. Free | (530) 546-2021, placer. ca.gov

Come join the fun and experiment with weird wacky science. 4 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

Word After Word Books Truckee | March 15

Mother Goose on the Loose Jump start your child’s brain development with this award-winning program that combines music, movement and literature. 10:30 a.m. | (530) 573-3185, engagedpatrons.org

Weird Science Wednesdays

The Truckee Library has joined forces with the Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe to bring the RUFF (Read Up For Fun) Program to children in the library. Children can practice their reading skills by reading aloud to trained therapy animals. 4-5 p.m. Free | (530) 582-7846, truckeefol.org

Kids ages 4-9 are invited to an evening of fun at Northwoods Clubhouse while parents enjoy a night on the town. 5-9 p.m. | tahoedonner.com

Boys & Girls Club NLT Kings Beach | March 21

Offers kids a fun way to explore different ways to learn about technology. A new activity each week. 4-5 p.m. Free | (775) 832-4130, libraryaware.com

Wednesday Morning Club Early Literacy Storytime South Lake Tahoe Library | March 8, 15

Build a child’s pre-reading skills with this engaging and interactive program designed to support a child’s early literacy development for a lifelong love of reading and learning. Suitable for children ages 3 to 5 with parents and caregivers. 10:30 a.m. Free | (530) 5753185, engagedpatrons.org

Teen Scene Kahle Community Center Stateline | March 8, 15

Kids in grades 6-12 can shoot hoops, play volleyball, climb the rock wall and play arcade or video games. 6:30-9 p.m. $5 | (775) 586-7271

Friday Fun Nights Northstar California Resort Truckee | March 8, 15

Join the fun in the heart of the Village as the disco lights surround the ice skating rink every Friday night with drink specials, complimentary face painting and live music. | (800) 466-6784, northstarcalifornia.com

Kahle Community Center | Stateline | March 13

A supervised fun and safe program for kids on these school calendar late start days. Children need to be dropped off at Kahle Community Center and DCSD busses will transport students to ZCES. 7-10 a.m.

Babysitting Training for Teens Truckee Community Pool Truckee | March 13, 20

If you would like to become a babysitter, take this class to learn about keeping kids safe, the business of babysitting, creative ideas for entertaining children and tactics for dealing with misbehaving kids. Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate from the American Red Cross for Babysitting Training. Grades 6 and older. 1-3:15 p.m. | tdrpd.org

Craft Day Incline Village Library | March 13

The library invites children in kindergarten to fifth grade to make aown DIY craft and take it home. The library will provide all the materials. 4 p.m. | events.washoecountylibrary.us

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events. 13


THE ARTS

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Arts

& CULTURE

CREATIVE AWARENESS

Cowboy Poetry

Knit one, sip too

C E L E B R AT I N G W E S T E R N L I F E S T Y L E S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

C

owboy culture isn’t something that necessarily comes to mind when you think about the Tahoe Sierra, but it is alive and well in the Sierra Valley. On March 15 and 16 the Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival will offer a glimpse into the life of the cowboy. Most of us can only imagine waking up at dawn to the sound of the pounding hooves of cattle being driven across the range, making lassos, bucking broncos and sitting around a campfire under the full moon with a tin of beans and a guitar. The festival in its 34th year is held in Vinton at Sierra Valley Grange Hall. It illuminates the Western and pioneer lifestyle in an area rich in history.

Atelier and Alibi Ale Works Truckee Public House hosts Knit and Sip on March 10 from 5 to 7 p.m. Knitters, crocheters and yarn artists have a place to congregate and relax. Bring your projects or start one. Consider this a spark to ignite a fire and get all knitters, crocheters and yarn artists together for a night out. Held the second Sunday of the month. | ateliertruckee.com

After Audubon: Art, Observations and Natural Science Nevada Museum of Art Reno | March 7-April 21

“My granny knew every cowboy song.

TOP: Richard Elloyan and Steve Wade performing. LEFT: Cowboy poet Chris Isaacs on his horse Double.

I grew up listing to that stuff. They didn’t call

Ol’ Double

it cowboy poetry back

By Chris Isaacs

then.” –Chris Isaacs Rich Moore and his wife, Pam, have been organizing the festival for the last eight years. “We offer a unique show in an intimate setting,” says Rich of the 200-seat show. The festival offers three shows that present Western music, poetry and dinner. I ask him if there was a difference between Western music and country music. “Western music is not country music. Western music is focused around cowboy life. It’s all about the experience of cowboys and the frontier people on the range.

COWBOY POETRY & MUSIC F E S T I VA L MARCH 15-16

Sierra Valley Grange | Vinton

It’s a part of history that is slowly being lost. The festival is a way to keep it alive,” he says. Chris Isaacs has been writing cowboy poetry for more than 25 years. His mother’s family were ranchers; Isaacs spent a lot of time at his grandparent’s ranch growing up. “My granny knew every cowboy song. I grew up listing to that stuff. They didn’t 14

It’s funny how memories can ambush you some, Just come at you from out of the blue. For no reason at all they just seem to appear, And why? I just don’t have a clue. call it cowboy poetry back then,” says Isaacs, who started writing poetry in high school. “I didn’t want anyone to know I was a poet. ” The 74-year-old poet and storyteller received encouragement from other cowboy poets to start performing. “People seem to like what I do, and I’ve been writing the last 25 years,” says Isaacs, who gets inspiration from his life experiences. “I try to see the funny side of things when I can. Gotta laugh or you’ll crazy.” Isaacs says that he best expresses himself through his art form. He mentions much of his stuff is pretty “punchy,” meaning it refers to a cowpuncher (a cowboy). Isaacs is a fan of masterful storytelling and notes two people he admires: Curt Brummett and Waddie Mitchell. His alltime favorite storyteller, however, is Mark Twain. “Mark Twain understood and had such a grasp of human nature,” says Isaacs. Cowboy entertainer Dave Stamey is performing at this year’s festival along with local Western musicians Richard Elloyan and Steve Wade from Dayton, Nev. There’s a show at 7:30 p.m. on March 15 and 16 and a matinee on March 16 at 2 p.m. The festival is a benefit for Sierra Valley Grange #466. | sierravalleygrange.org

But sometimes it happens and today it sure did, And for some reason this memory decided to stay Of a little paint horse that I wish I still had, And I’m missing ol’ Double today. I’ve had two or three that was better than him, So it wasn’t because he was the best. He wasn’t too pretty if that was your thing And with size he sure wasn’t blessed. He had a split ear and one cloudy eye And he’d buck when the mornings were cold. But he’d try anything that I asked him to try, ‘Cause he had a heart of pure gold. No, he wasn’t the best by any stretch of the mind But I’d take a whole herd like him any day. ‘Cause I don’t need a world beater, just a good honest horse, And I’m missing ol’ Double today. n

Contemporary artists such as Penelope Gottlieb, Kara Maria and Donald Farnsworth pick up from where John James Audubon left off in new, celebratory and sometimes critical ways. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Ann Johnston: Quilts of the Sierra Nevada Nevada Museum of Art Reno | March 7-May 19

This exhibition features more than 30 of Ann Johnston’s large-scale quilts inspired by the Sierra Nevada. Johnston’s quilts make creative use of patterns and textures to create literal, abstract, and sometimes completely imaginative representations of the area. Using both machine and hand-stitching, the artist creates dimensional surfaces. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

College Art Exhibit North Tahoe Arts Tahoe City | March 7-25

College art exhibit. Artists’ reception on March 9 from 5 to 7 .m. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Colors of Lake Tahoe Sierra Nevada College Incline Village | March 7-15

Artist Deborah Lawrence Shafer’s “Colors of Lake Tahoe” is on exhibit in the Prim Library featuring artworks from a collaboration between scientists at UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center and the artist. Schafer created the artworks using spectral measurements of Lake Tahoe taken by TERC scientists. | (775) 831-1314, sierranevada.edu


March 7-20, 2019

Arts

THE

Rose Are RAD Film Festival Cargo at Whitney Peak Hotel Reno | March 8

The second annual Roses are RAD Winter Film Festival, sponsored by Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe and the Sierra Avalanche Center is at Cargo. The event was designed as an opportunity for amateur ski and snowboard filmmakers to have his or her work screened by the viewing public and win prizes. Films selected for screening will be judged by an audience vote. | (775) 3985400, thetahoeweekly.com

MEETING FOR THE

FIRST TIME

Knit & Sip Alibi Ale Works - Truckee Public House Truckee | March 10

Atelier and Alibi Ale Works Truckee present Knit and Sip every second Sunday. Bring a friend and your yarn project. 5-7 p.m. | alibialeworks.com

“In Conversation: Alma Allen and J.B. Blunk” stages a conversation between two artists who never met but whose work share a deep affinity for nature. The exhibit

Empty Bowls/Open Studio

will be in Nevada Museum of Art until

Ogres-Holm Pottery Carson City | March 12-April 2

June 23. “In Conversation” is comprised of

Create an empty bowl to donate to charity. Instruction will be offered to create and paint a bowl or create something on our own during open studio session. Open studio time is free of charge and open to the public. 6-8:30 p.m. | visitcarsoncity.com

nearly 80 works, ranging from monumental furniture and sculpture in wood, stone and bronze to delicate ceramic plates. The diversity of creations illustrates how both artists, inspired by nature’s visceral power and beauty, create evocative work from

Adult Coloring

materials found on the land.

Truckee Library Truckee | March 13-Feb. 3

Truckee Library sets aside some space for adults to indulge their creativity by coloring pages with crayons, pencils and more. All materials provided. 11 a.m.12 p.m. | (530) 582-7846, madelynhelling.evanced.info

Both Alma Allen and J.B. Blunk were self-taught and each began making work on a small hand-made scale: Blunk in ceramic and Allen in wood and stone. Working alone in rather remote locations gave them the space and freedom to expand

A.D. Hopkins Reading and Signing: The Boys Who Woke Up Early

the scale and range of their practices to Lisa Eisner

encompass not only housewares, furniture and sculpture but also the design and building of their own homes and studios. The exhibition also features photographs by Lisa Eisner and Leslie Williamson that show how each shaped his own environment, creating a parallel dialogue between these two contemporary photographers. The exhibition features new work in bronze and stone made by Allen especially for the occasion, as well as a number of his early pieces in wood, marble and stone, and J.B. Blunk’s art borrowed from his house, designed and built by him, considered his masterwork. | nevadaart.org

“Home Means Nevada” Nevada Legislature Senate Carson City | March 7-July 25

The Nevada Arts Council is unveiling a new traveling photo exhibition. “Home Means Nevada” will start its journey in the hallways of the Nevada Legislature during the 2019 session. The exhibition features the works of 15 contemporary photographers. The exhibit highlights treasures found on federally managed lands across the state. | travelnevada.com

THE ARTS

Mariah’s Chair, carved in 1978 J.B. Blunk | Nevada Museum of Art

Sundance Books and Music Reno | March 14

Join a reading and signing with A.D. Hopkins, author of “The Boys Who Woke Up Early.” 6:30-7:30 p.m. | (775) 786-1188, sundancebookstore.com

“In Conversation: Alma Allen and J.B. Blunk”

Paul Valadez: Selections from the Great Mexican-American Songbook

Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival

Nevada Museum of Art Reno | March 7-June 23

Nevada Museum of Art Reno | March 7-April 21

Sierra Valley Grange Hall Loyalton | March 15-16

“Tahoe Art League Presents”

Gathering of Artists

Lake Tahoe Community College South Lake Tahoe | March 7-23

North Tahoe Arts Tahoe City | March 20-April 15

“In Conversation: Alma Allen and J.B. Blunk” stages a conversation between two artists who never met but whose work shares a deep affinity. The exhibit will be in Nevada Museum of Art until June 23, 2019. “In Conversation” is comprised of nearly 80 works, ranging from monumental furniture and sculpture in wood, stone and bronze to ceramic plates. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

The Lost World of Dragons Wilbur D. May Museum at Rancho San Rafael Regional Park Reno | March 7-May 12

Discover the stories and mythology of dragons throughout history and around the world. Get a thrill from larger-than-life animatronic dragons, try out a virtual reality experience that lets you ride a flying dragon, sit on a throne and sneak through a dragon’s lair, and more. 10 a.m. | (775) 785-5961, facebook.com

Using vintage sheet music of the “Great American Song Book” as his backdrop, Paul Valadez re-envisions the idea of the songbook, integrating nostalgic images with Spanglish text, resulting in a dichotomy of oblique visual ideas that are equal parts humor and social commentary. 10 a.m. | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

The annual “Tahoe Art League Presents” art show is running concurrently with a show in the Foyer Gallery by Catherine Lockner and a show of artist printmakers in the Halden Gallery. | talart.org

Dr. Kim O’Reilly Reading and Signing Sundance Books and Music Reno | March 8

Join former UNR professor Dr. Kim O’Reilly as she shares her new book, “We Love You, But You’re Going to Hell.” 6:307:30 p.m. | (775) 786-1188, sundancebookstore.com

Sierra Valley Grange is the home of the longest running and best Cowboy Poetry event in California. It started in 1986 and is second only to Elko, Nev. Over the years we have had the best poets and singers from the around the country perform in a beautiful hall built in 1934. 7:30 p.m. | sierravalleygrange.org

This free program offers artists the opportunity to meet other artists and work together in a shared studio space. Artists are invited to bring their latest projects to work on in shared studio space. On first and third Wednesdays. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events.

15


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

Me xican-American War | P a r t I President James Polk, circa 1846. | Courtesy Library of Congress

H

istorians often refer to the Mexican American War (1846-1848) as the forgotten war since it was quickly overshadowed by the discovery of gold in California, which occurred just as the peace treaty was signed and the United States took possession of the former Mexican province. The conflict was then further eclipsed by the cataclysmic American Civil War 13 years later. But it was war with Mexico that exacerbated deep sectional divisions in the United States triggered by slavery and the potential expansion of America’s “Peculiar Institution” to new Western territories that led directly to that Civil War. In 1844, James K. Polk, a slave-owning Democrat from Tennessee was narrowly elected president of the United States over his opponent, noted statesman and legendary orator Henry Clay. Polk campaigned on a platform of land acquisition in the West including the controversial annexation of Texas, a goal that led to the hotwire topic of adding more slave territory to the nation. Clay was a slave owner, too; however, as a politician who had earned the appellation the Great Compromiser for his ability to defuse sectional crises, he felt expansion of slavery would upset the delicate political balance of the country.

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Clay’s position did not fit the surging narrative of Manifest Des-tiny, which cost him a close election. Although he would not live to see the Civil War, Clay was correct about the issue of slavery expansion leading to national instability and greater divisional conflict in the United States. True to his word, in December 1845 President Polk approved the annexation of the 10-year-old Republic of Texas, a slave-holding territory. He brought Texas into the fold, but kept his eyes focused on the West. Polk, along with members of his cabinet, rightfully feared rival Great Britain had its own designs on California and the Pacific Coast. An 1818 treaty had created joint control between the U.S. and England for the Oregon Country, a vast territory west of the Rocky Mountains and north of the 49th parallel. President Polk was a staunch supporter of the growing movement of Manifest Destiny in the 1840s, where native-born, white Americans “possessed the divine right” to expand west to the Pacific Ocean. In Polk’s mind, and in reality, Great Britain’s presence in the Pacific Northwest and Mexico, with its control of California, complicated the American push west. The president secretly sent diplomats to England to wrest control of the Oregon Country from the world’s greatest military power at the time. In a brazen move that was half bluff, Polk threatened war to gain the territory. It was a bold maneuver and Polk was genuinely surprised when Britain blinked and signed a treaty relinquishing the future states of Oregon, Washington, Idaho and western Montana to the U.S. It was a brilliantly played acquisition. Buoyed by the results of this successful strategy, Polk decided to try the same ploy with Mexico, this time offering money instead

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of impending war. At first it looked promising; Mexico’s President Joaquin de Herrera indicated openness to the deal, but he was overthrown in January 1846 by a cabal of conservative Army generals unwilling to negotiate with the United States. While all this geo-political intrigue was in motion, the long-sought California Trail over Donner Pass was established. In April 1846, members of what would become the Donner Party joined about 1,500 other pioneers with covered wagons heading west to Mexico’s Alta California, to settle there and establish American communities and institutions. They were predominantly agrarian families looking to put down new roots. The same month those emigrant wagons rolled west from the Missouri River, hostilities broke out between Mexican and American military forces over a festering border dispute along the Rio Grande River.

The Mexican-American War was supported by most Americans during the first year of impressive U.S. battlefield victories, but it later proved highly divisive and harshly judged as it wore on. The Mexican government never officially recognized the Republic of Texas or its southern border and stated (correctly) that the legal border was the Nueces River about 100 miles northeast of the Rio Grande. On April 25, Mexican troops crossed the Rio Grande to attack U.S. forces that Polk had provocatively positioned on the north side of the river. Predictably, in response to Mexico drawing first blood, Polk declared that Mexico’s defense of its sovereign territory an invasion of American soil and on May 13 Congress declared war. The conflict had no direct impact on the California Trail in 1846, but later during the winter of 1846-47, when it came time to rescue the ill-fated Donner Party trapped by deep snow in the Sierra, relief efforts were stymied because many recently arrived American settlers HISTORIAN & AUTHOR

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were away fighting in Mexico. Perhaps no war should be forgotten because there are important lessons to be learned from military conflict, as well as soul searching to determine if the war served the people’s and nation’s best interest. The war was vigorously supported by most Americans during the first year of impressive U.S. battlefield victories against overwhelming odds, but it later proved highly divisive and harshly judged as it wore on. In his memoirs, Ulysses S. Grant, a U.S. president and commanding Union general in the Civil War, called the armed conflict “a wicked war.” The West Point graduate admitted that he had held that opinion even as he bravely led troops in battle against Mexico, but “I had not moral courage enough to resign.” Grant wrote that the American-instigated conflict was “one of the most unjust wars ever waged by a stronger against a weaker nation, an instance of a republic following the bad examples of European monarchies.” He declared that “the American Civil War was punishment for that transgression.” Many disagreed with Grant’s assessment, but this war — the first ever fought by American troops on foreign soil — produced cautionary military metrics that still resonate. U.S. forces were plagued by more than 11,000 desertions, the highest rate of troop desertion of any American war at more than 8 percent. The conflict also caused the highest death rate of any war, including the horrific Civil War. According the U.S. Dept. of Defense, 13,200 of the 79,000 men who served in the Mexican war died, a mortality rate of nearly 17 percent, compared to 6.5 percent in the Civil War. Most American soldiers perished from disease, but more than 1,000 men were reported missing, likely due to irregular Mexican forces who picked off American troops one-by-one in guerrilla attacks during the subsequent occupation. Mexican casualties among soldiers and civilians have been estimated at about 25,000. Stay tuned for Part II in the next edition and at TheTahoeWeekly.com. n Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on History under the Explore Tahoe tab.


March 7-20, 2019

Horoscopes

FIRE

EARTH

AIR

WATER

FUN & GAMES

Puzzles

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20)

The Pisces influence will likely work very well for you. Your focus is strong, yet you may feel like you are surfing a wave more than burning rubber. If you can accept this, you can make great strides over the coming few weeks and possibly even realize a dream or two. The hidden message within the wave metaphor is that you have to concentrate and work it.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)

It may seem that things you once considered to be certain are dissolving like a mirage. Everything is up for debate again. The only certainty is the flow of change. This occurs on many fronts simultaneously. So, the challenge is to keep an open mind and be willing to see things differently. This may require letting go of the subconscious urge for control of the outcome.

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

One way or another, you feel the need to retreat. This could manifest as an escape. Yet, Mars and Uranus in Taurus may be having the effect of keeping you grounded, literally. Spending quality time with friends is a possibility, yet you are not in the mood for a party. Travel would be ideal but a venture into a good book might suffice.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

There are some yellow flags raised regarding your overall state of health. Or, it may be your current lifestyle that requires that you make some key adjustments. There are indications that you are under a lot of stress these days. Sometimes the stress is obvious and other times it is hidden. Either way, step back and take a fresh look.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

A revolutionary momentum has been building and is now coming to a peak. You are determined to make your presence known, to be seen and heard. However, you may be experiencing a temporary disconnect right now. This should shift a little as the week progresses and by next week you will feel connected again, even if under challenging circumstances.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21)

A creative cycle is underway. Some of the impetus is coming from external sources destined to agitate you out of your comfort zone. If they do their work, you will be pushed into your lap, den or think tank. It is important that you think and go big now, somehow. If necessary, feel the fear and use it as fuel for action.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

Finding your place in the sun may seem extra challenging right now. Getting the attention you may want and need may not be forthcoming right now. Therefore, the best solution is to simply wait this one out. Accept it as a feature of your destiny that this is not the time to advance your position. Rather, ride this one out quietly.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21)

Balancing the urge to lay low in your den versus venture a new highway, or two, is now underway. At worst, you could be dealing with deep feelings of sadness or disillusionment. Positively, you recognize the opportunity to go within and recharge. This can be best achieved by giving yourself a break for a while, like a few weeks.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

Sometimes we feel a little less certain than others, like now perhaps. The Pisces influence for you signifies a philosophical and spiritual search, but not one that is likely be fulfilled too soon. Yet, if you set your intentions and patiently play along, you may receive sublime insights and realizations, even if they take until April to come to consciousness.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19)

Well, if anyone is able to make the most of this Mercury Retrograde in Pisces storm, it is you. However, you have arrived at a place in your life where you may be undergoing the preliminary stages of something of an identity crisis. It may simply amount to the desire to explore new horizons. Either way, the answers you seek are about your place in the world.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23)

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19)

Circumstances are pushing you to dig deep again. While you feel expansive on certain fronts, it may feel like you are spinning your wheels and not getting the traction you desire. This will not last but could linger for a few weeks. Curb your expectations directed at yourself and others and trust that you will be busy again and with full traction soon.

Hocus Focus differences: 1. Woman has headband, 2. Sunglasses are different, 3. Boy’s shirt has buttons, 4. Tree is wider, 5. Showman’s “arms” are different, 6. Boy is taller.

A deep dive into unfamiliar waters continues to keep you busy. Positively, you have entered a creative and inventive cycle. New dreams and designs are the rewards of your diligence. By next week, you will feel inspired to take these to the next level. This could prove to be a special time offering opportunities for public recognition, soon.

Why does the server at our diner always get ill? I believe it must be something in the waiter.

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17


MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

Pam and Dan Rosenthal TOURING ON LOVE, MUSIC & POWDER STORY BY SEAN McALINDIN

March 9 | 4 p.m. | Alpine Bar | Alpine Meadows & March 14 | 6:30 p.m. | Cottonwood Restaurant | Truckee

A

fter growing up in different parts of the country, skiers and folk musicians Pam and Dan Rosenthal met in Breckenridge, Colo., when Dan offered Pam her first ski instructor job. “He hired me in 86 and we were married by 89,” says the feisty, silver-haired singer with her wiry, hardworking husband by her side. “We decided to test the marriage to see if we could make it to 30 [years],” says Pam. “If we can live in a van together for six months, I think we pass the test. I’m not sure of the exact number, but the percentage of people who are musicians and ski instructors that stay married is a low one.” For the past 15 years, the Rosenthals have lived in Carbondale, Colo., where they teach at Aspen Snowmass. When they got the report from headquarters that Aspen Skiing Company was joining forces with Ikon Pass ski resorts, Dan got a wild idea. “He said, ‘I want to do this,’ ” says Pam. “And I laughed. At that point there were 28 resort.” But with their two daughters both out of the house, the couple realized their crazy notion to ski every North American Ikon Pass ski resort in one season might not be that outrageous after all.

COLORADO MOUNTAIN MUSIC

The Rosenthals began their six-month tour at Eldora Mountain outside of Nederland, Colo., where they played their homegrown brand of folk and Americana at Timbers Tap Room. From there, a cross-country visit to see family in West Virginia offered a chance for some picking and skiing at Snowshoe Mountain. They headed up the East Coast in December to Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine and

“ It’s not as hard as people think if you are willing to put in some extra planning, lose a few comforts and just go for it.” “We love to ski and play music and we’re still young enough to do this stuff,” says Pam. “We’re in this fortunate place where we can enjoy life.” The Rosenthals play dreamy, emotive brand of folk based around Pam’s steady upright bass and harmonies and Dan’s cowboy guitar swagger, covering Bob Dylan, John Prine and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. They recorded an ethereal, yet homey 2014 compilation album called “Arrows of Love” with artists including songstress Jamie Birdsey and daughter, Carly. This year, the couple will celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary and Dan’s 60th birthday this year. The tour of mountain, old friends and music is also a celebration of his late father, George, who taught Dan how to ski in Killington, Vt. So with visions of endless snow and family sing-alongs in their minds, the couple made a deal that Dan would paint houses while Pam booked gigs. “When I started getting some success with the booking, it was around then we got our trusty Olive (a 2006 Dodge Sprinter van),” she says. “But Ikon kept adding resorts, so we just kept rerouting and rerouting.” 18

–Pam Rosenthal Quebec experiencing variable, yet decent, early winter weather. “We knew we were taking a risk doing the East Coast first, but we found unseasonably good conditions,” says Dan. “You can’t do anything about Mother Nature, so you get what you get.” While winding their way north, the Rosenthals skied everything from ice to fresh powder to what can only be described as a mountain of soft, slushy snow cones after it rained and snowed intermittently throughout the day. On their night off, the couple played lively gigs at a variety of venues ranging from the quaint pub in Sunday River, Maine, to a grand hotel at the foot of New Hampshire’s 6288-foot apex. By the time Christmas rolled around, Ikon Pass’s bounty had grown to 38 resorts stretching across the United States and Canada. So, on their way back to Carbondale for the holidays, the Rosenthals rerouted again, this time through Michigan to ski the newly added Boyne and Boyne Highlands in a day. After teaching skiing through the New Year, the couple set out on the road again for the Rocky Mountain portion of their

journey. They skied epic conditions in Utah, as well as in Jackson Hole, Wyo., and Big Sky, Mont., where they played a free gig at Wild Joe’s Coffee Shop. “The Rockies were all powder,” says Dan. “We’d have to move our van for the snow plows in the resort parking lots, but one night in Deer Valley there was so much snow we couldn’t move. In Jackson, it snowed 19 inches in one morning and we had four powder days in a row. Now we’re paying for that time with really cold weather.” By mid-February, the Rosenthals were in Alberta at Canada’s Big 3 — Lake Louise, Banff Sunshine and Mt. Norquay — in Banff National Park. By this point, they had made it to 21 resorts. “One thing we didn’t really expect was that at night in Canada it’s been 35 degrees below zero. They call it a three-dog night when you need three dogs to stay warm,” says Dan alluding to one of his classic rock musical inspirations. “The best we could do was a two heater night on a diesel engine.” Their trip continued to Revelstoke and Cypress Bowl in British Columbia, Crystal Mountain and the Summit at Snoqualmie in Washington, before arriving this week in Tahoe. After skiing Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows, they plan to resume their expedition south to Mammoth and Big Bear before crossing the desert to Taos, N.M. They will complete the full Ikon tour back in Colorado at Copper Mountain, Winter Park, Steamboat Springs and Aspen. The Rosenthal’s homecoming show will be on April 14 at River’s Restaurant in Glenwood Springs where they’ve hosted an open mic for the past 10 years. “We come across people all the time who say, ‘I wish I could do that.’ I always say, ‘I bet you could if you adjusted your life a little bit and just worked it out.’ It’s not as hard as people think if you are willing to put in some extra planning, lose a few comforts and just go for it,” says Pam. | squawalpine.com,

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

CALENDAR

MARCH 7-21, 2019

MARCH 7 | THURSDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Moe. MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 7 p.m. Dat Phan Pioneer Underground, Reno, 7 p.m. Dirty Birdie Bingo/DJ The Polo Lounge, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Raj Sharma Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Stampede Country Music & Dance Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Chris English Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.

MARCH 8 | FRIDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Live music Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 2-5 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Chi McClean FiftyFifty Brewing Co., Tahoe City, 6 p.m. Ike and Martin Jake’s On The Lake, Tahoe City, 6 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Dat Phan Pioneer Underground, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 7:30 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Raj Sharma Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. University Percussion Ensemble ft. Michael Spiro & Gray Barrier Nightingale Concert Hall, Reno, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Chippendales Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Live Music Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats, Truckee, 8-11:55 p.m. Tim Bluhm Benefit Concert Alibi Ale Works, Truckee, 8 p.m. Larry the Cable Guy Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, 8-11 p.m. Dancing with the Stars: Live! Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m.


March 7-20, 2019

MUSIC SCENE

C A L E N D A R | MARCH 7-21, 2019 Dancing with the Stars: Live! Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m. Matt Raney Bar of America, Truckee, 9-10 p.m. Andre Nickatina Whiskey Dicks, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. The Flesh Hammers, Metalbilly Trucker, Principles Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 9 p.m. Smoke & Mirrors Caberet Hard Rock- Vinyl, Stateline, 9 p.m. Local Anthology Hacienda del Lago, Tahoe City, 9 p.m. Raj Sharma Laugh Factory, Reno, 9:30 p.m. Dat Phan Pioneer Underground, Reno, 9:30 p.m. Soul -Funk -Disco Party The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.-12 a.m. DJ Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m. Rose Are RAD Film Festival Cargo at Whitney Peak Hotel, Reno

MARCH 9 | SATURDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m Live DJ Homewood Mountain Resort, Homewood, 12-3 p.m. Winter Beach Party Tahoe Donner, Truckee, 12-3 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 2 p.m. Chi McClean Village at Squaw, Olympic Valley, 2 p.m. “Stewart Little” Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 2-5 p.m. Live DJ Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 3-6 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Live Music Sugar Bowl Ski Resort, Norden, 3-6 p.m. Annual St. Patrick’s Day Dinner & Show Circus Circus, Mandalay Ballroom, Reno, 4-8 p.m. Pam and Dan Rosenthal Alpine Meadows, Tahoe City, 4 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Dat Phan Pioneer Underground, Reno, 6:30 p.m. Melodrama One-Act Plays Truckee Community Arts Center, Truckee, 7 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Come in from the Cold Bartley Ranch Regional Park, Reno, 7 p.m. Sebastian Maniscalco Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 7-8:30 p.m. “Stewart Little” Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 7-10 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Classix Series: Trail Blazers Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 7:30 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Raj Sharma Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Chippendales Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Ben Morrison Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 8 p.m.

Matt Raney Bar of America, Truckee, 9-10 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Smoke & Mirrors Caberet Hard Rock- Vinyl, Stateline, 9 p.m. SoDown The BlueBird Nightclub, Reno, 9 p.m.-3 a.m. Twiddle w/Iya Terra Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 9 p.m. Raj Sharma Laugh Factory, Reno, 9:30 p.m. Mojo Green Hacienda del Lago, Tahoe City, 9:30-11:30 p.m. Dat Phan Pioneer Underground, Reno, 9:30 p.m. DJ Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. Ignite Burlesque Variety Show Harvey’s Cabaret, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.

MARCH 10 | SUNDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 2-5 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 2 p.m. Live DJ Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 3-6 p.m. Apres Ski Live Music Hard Rock-Center Bar, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Classix Series: Trail Blazers Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 4-6 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Joel Ward The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Liquid Stranger The BlueBird Nightclub, Reno, 7 p.m.-12:01 a.m. Raj Sharma Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. YG Reno Events Center, Reno, 8 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Deep House Lounge The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.-12 a.m. Chris English Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.

MARCH 11 | MONDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. West Coast Swing Dance Carson Lanes Family Fun Center, Carson City, 5:30-10 p.m. Karaoke Polo Lounge, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Open Mic Night Alibi Ale Works - Truckee Public House, Truckee, 7-10 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Motown on Monday The Loving Cup, Reno, 9 p.m.-3 a.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.

MARCH 12 | TUESDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Bingo Tuesday’s with T~n~Keys MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Joel Ward The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. J. Chris Newberg The Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Tuesday Night Blues Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

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MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Kitchen Dwellers’ M O N TA N A G A L A X Y G R A S S STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

March 15 | 10 p.m. | Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev.

GALAXY GRASS

M

ax Davies is eating his lunch at Fonda Mexicana restaurant in Kansas City, Mo., on the back end of a cross-country, co-bill with Colorado’s Magic Beans, as he recounts the start of Kitchen Dwellers. Kitchen Dwellers first evolved in 2009 at Montana State University in Bozeman as a loose collective of friends who jammed together in the traditional gathering spot of mountain homes. “We started playing in the kitchen and slowly moved to some of the bars in town, making fools of ourselves,” says Davies. What started at open mics in tiny dives such as Haufbrau House has grown into a national touring act that packs Bozeman’s classic, live-music venue, The Filling Station. As undergrads, the boys used to see topnotch string bands such as The Infamous Stringdusters and Trampled by Turtles perform for energetic, intimate crowds. “It’s a legendary spot,” says Davies. “A huge hanger with tin walls and license plates everywhere. It’s been around forever, a mile or so outside of town. It’s got a vibe of anything goes.” There is a history of quality, acoustic music originating from Big Sky Country from Mission Mountain Wood Band and Rob Quist in the 1970s to modern groups such as Kitchen Dwellers and The Lil’ Smokies out of Missoula. “It’s a place that draws you in,” says Davies of his home state. “Everyone takes their freedoms to heart and you can pretty much do whatever you want. That comes out in the music I think. We’re given that free space. It’s something that helps us when we’re off the road back in Montana, staying up with friends living in the mountains with no cell or Internet service. There’s running water, but it’s pretty far removed from anything in town. It’s easy to write and play all day. People go home back to that environment and it promotes their own creativity.” This space and freedom has led to the creation of a genre that Kitchen Dwellers’ fans call Galaxy Grass. “Sometimes we totally leave the form on the songs and start making weird noises,” says Davies. “After the show, people don’t realize that strange sound was coming out of a banjo.” Early in their trajectory, Kitchen Dwellers made several instrumental, weekend trips to Colorado where they connected with other up-and-coming jam bands that soon became close, musical companions.

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They recorded their 2017 debut album, “Ghost in the Bottle,” at Mountain Star Studio somewhere between Nederland and Blackhawk in the lost heart of the front range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, working with artists such as Leftover Salmon’s Andy Thorn, Little Feat’s keyboardist Bill Payne and Greensky Bluegrass dobro player Anders Beck. In 2018, the quartet delivered an EP of material by The Band. “We did it because there are so many thing we love about The Band,” says Davies of the iconic group. “Their songwriting,

“We started playing in the kitchen and slowly moved to some of the bars in town, making fools of ourselves.” –Max Davies their Americana sound. They incorporated so many things into the music and it was always their own sound. Everybody was a multi-instrumentalist, they shared a lot of the songwriting duties and there wasn’t necessarily a leader or frontman.” Sound like another band you may know? Early this year Kitchen Dwellers were in Denver recording their anticipated follow-up LP under the guidance of guru Chris Pandolfi. “He brings a lot of stoke and excitement,” says Davies of The Infamous Stringdusters’ dynamic banjoist. “He’s keeping us on track. He’s very, very positive and focused. It’s something that we’ve started to call the Panda Effect. Seriously, I hang out with Chris for a day and I’m playing my instrument better than I ever have before. He has this weird thing with the way he is with music that makes you that much better.” As they polish up the record and hit the road hard for another big year ahead, Kitchen Dwellers are working at writing new material and upping the production quality of their shows. “We want to put our best foot forward, have fun and try to give the best we can,” says Davies. “Not everyone is given these chances, so we’re not taking it for granted.” | crystalbaycasino.com n

C A L E N D A R | MARCH 7-21, 2019 MARCH 12 | TUESDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.

MARCH 13 | WEDNESDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Wild Winter Wednesdays River Ranch Lodge, Tahoe City, 3-11:30 p.m Ike and Martin Sugar Bowl, Norden, 3-6 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. The World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra Casino Fandango, Carson City, 7-10 p.m. Willy Tea Taylor Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 7 p.m. Wednesday Night Showcase Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 7:30 p.m. J. Chris Newberg The Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Tyler Carter Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Open Mic Anything Goes Jimmy Bs, Reno, 9-11:30 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. An Evening At the Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m.

MARCH 14 | THURSDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Pam and Dan Rosenthal Cottonwood Restaurant & Bar, Truckee, 6:30 p.m. Graves Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 7 p.m. Night Beats The Loving Cup, Reno, 7-10 p.m. Dirty Birdie Bingo/DJ The Polo Lounge, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 7:30 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30 p.m. “Harbor” Lake Tahoe Community College- Duke Theater, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30-9:30 p.m. J. Chris Newberg The Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Tracy Smith Pioneer Underground, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Glorious Guitar Nightingale Concert Hall, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Stampede Country Music & Dance Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. An Evening At the Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.

MARCH 15 | FRIDAY

Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Live music Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 2-5 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Moonlight Snowshoe Hikes Diamond Peak Ski Resort, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Drum Circle and Open Mic Night Art Truckee, Truckee, 6-9:30 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Tracy Smith Lex Nightclub, Reno, 6:30 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Jazz with Bayberry Jake’s On The Lake, Tahoe City, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Lake Tahoe Dance Collective North Tahoe High School, Tahoe City, 7 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 7:30 p.m. “End Days” Restless Artists Theatre Company, Sparks, 7:30 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. “Harbor” Lake Tahoe Community College- Duke Theater, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30-9:30 p.m. J. Chris Newberg The Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Wolves Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival Sierra Valley Grange Hall, Loyalton, 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Live Music Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats, Truckee, 8-11:55 p.m. The Wizard of Oz, The Musical Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 8 p.m. Tracy Smith Pioneer Underground, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Magic After Dark starring Robert Hall The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Monkey Pastime Club, Truckee, 9 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Smoke & Mirrors Caberet Hard Rock- Vinyl, Stateline, 9 p.m. An Evening At the Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. Lil Debbie & Smoov-E Whiskey Dicks, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Uncle Funkle Bar of America, Truckee, 9:30-10:30 p.m. J. Chris Newberg The Laugh Factory, Reno, 9:30 p.m. Soul -Funk -Disco Party The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.-12 a.m. DJ Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. Kitchen Dwellers Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m. Gem Faire Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, Reno

MARCH 16 | SATURDAY Gem Faire Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, Reno, 10 a.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Live DJ Homewood Mountain Resort, Homewood, 12-3 p.m.


March 7-20, 2019

MUSIC SCENE

PAMELA

PARKER

March 16 | 2 p.m. Sun Deck | Alpine Meadows

PAMELA PARKER and The Fantastic Machine manufacture fresh rock ‘n’ roll in the classic spirit with loud guitars, untethered drums and powerful vocals. Don’t miss this show at the greatest natural amphitheater in Tahoe. They say they can hear it from Waterfall to Scott Chair and beyond. | squawalpine.com

ONE GRASS, TWO GRASS

WinterWonderGrass late-night lineup The fifth annual WinterWonderGrass Tahoe festival has announced its late-night series, Grass After Dark, featuring such favorites as Fruition, Travelin’ McCourys and One Grass, Two Grass. Grass After Dark features performances at local venues including Olympic Village Lodge and Plaza Bar in Olympic Valley, Alibi Ale House in Truckee and Moe’s BBQ in Tahoe City.

LAKE TAHOE

DANCE

COLLECTIVE

These shows are only for those age 21 and older; doors open at 9:30 p.m. Tickets for these shows are limited in capacity and expected to sell out quickly. winterwondergrass.com/squaw

Olympic Village Lodge March 29 | Fruition + Upstate March 30 | Leftover Salmon + Jeff Austin Band March 31 | Billy Strings + WWG All-Stars Plaza Bar March 29 | An Evening with Pickin’ on the Dead March 30 | An Evening with ALO Alibi Ale House Truckee March 29 | Pixie and the Partygrass Boys March 30 | An Evening with the Travelin’ McCourys Moe’s BBQ March 30 | Pickin’ on the Dead, One Grass, Two Grass

Gem Faire Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, Reno

MARCH 16 | SATURDAY Gem Faire Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, Reno, 10 a.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Live DJ Homewood Mountain Resort, Homewood, 12-3 p.m. St. Patrick’s Day Parade C Street, Virginia City, 12-1 p.m. The Wizard of Oz, The Musical Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 2 p.m. Pamela Parker Alpine Meadows, Tahoe City, 2 p.m. Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival Sierra Valley Grange Hall, Loyalton, 2 p.m. Squaw Alpine Spring Music Series Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 2:30-6 p.m. Live DJ Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 3-6 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Live Music Sugar Bowl Ski Resort, Norden, 3-6 p.m. Dinner & Dance Sierra Valley Grange Hall, Loyalton, 5:30-10:30 p.m.

Danielle Hankinson

GRASS AFTER DARK

ROCK N’ ROLL

Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Tracy Smith Pioneer Underground, Reno, 6:30 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Come in from the Cold Bartley Ranch Regional Park, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Lake Tahoe Dance Collective North Tahoe High School, Tahoe City, 7 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 7:30 p.m. “End Days” Restless Artists Theatre Company, Sparks, 7:30 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live comedy Carson Nugget, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. “Harbor” Lake Tahoe Community College- Duke Theater, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30-9:30 p.m. J. Chris Newberg The Laugh Factory, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Wolves Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Cowboy Poetry & Music Festival Sierra Valley Grange Hall, Loyalton, 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Atmosphere, Dem Atlas, the Lioness, DJ Keezy Cargo at Whitney Peak Hotel, Reno, 8 p.m. An Evening At the Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Marie & The Osmonds Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 8-10:30 p.m. Baker St. MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 8-11 p.m.

Orgone Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 9 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Smoke & Mirrors Caberet Hard Rock- Vinyl, Stateline, 9 p.m. Phutureprimitive The Stone House, Nevada City, 9:30 p.m.-1:55 a.m. Indigo Grey Fat Cat Bar & Grill, Tahoe City, 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. J. Chris Newberg The Laugh Factory, Reno, 9:30 p.m. DJ Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. Ignite Burlesque Variety Show Harvey’s Cabaret, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m. Celtic Music Series Brewery Arts Center, Carson City

DANCE

March 15-16 | 7 p.m. North Tahoe High School | Tahoe City KNOWN FOR presenting the highest caliber and widest variety of works ranging from elegant, energetic classical works to contemporary dance, Lake Tahoe Dance Collective presents the 11th annual Winter Season featuring works choreographed to Bach, Ravel and Debussy. | laketahoedancecollective.org

“WIZARD OF OZ”

MARCH 17 | SUNDAY Gem Faire Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, Reno, 10 a.m Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. The Wizard of Oz, The Musical Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts, Reno, 1-8 p.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 2 p.m. “End Days” Restless Artists Theatre Company, Sparks, 2 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 2-5 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 2 p.m. Mic Smith, DJ Clayon Ambassadors, DJ Roger That McP’s Tahouse Grill, South Lake Tahoe, 2 p.m. Live DJ Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 3-6 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

MUSICAL

March 15 | 8 p.m. March 16 | 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. March 17 | 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Pioneer Center | Reno, Nev. THERE TRULY is no place like home as the greatest family musical of all time, the wonderful “Wizard of Oz” lands in the heart of Reno. Travel over the rainbow and down the Yellow Brick Road with Dorothy, Toto, the Cowardly Lion, Tin Man and Scarecrow in a lavish production, featuring breathtaking special effects, dazzling choreography and classic songs. | pioneercenter.com

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MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

LOST WHISKEY ENGINE

BEN

MORRISON March 9 | 8 p.m. Virginia Street Brewhouse | Reno, Nev.

BEN MORRISON’S tones are smoky, soulful and timeless, embodying the old spirit of country and the rock ‘n’ rock soul of Northern California. | renobrewhouse.com

LIL DEBBIE

CELTIC

& SMOOV-E

March 17 | 7 p.m. Alibi Ale Works | Truckee

FOLK

MARCH 17 | SUNDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

Indigo Grey Fat Cat Bar & Grill, Tahoe City, 9:30 p.m. Deep House Lounge The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.-12 a.m. Black Uhuru, DJ Dubfyah MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m. Reno Wind Symphony Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Reno

MARCH 18 | MONDAY

HIP HOP

March 15 | 9 p.m. Whiskey Dick’s Saloon | South Lake Tahoe PLEASE STOP asking Lil Debbie if she wants to be the next Cardi B, her answer is no. “I like going to 7-11 and being able to buy hot chips with nobody hounding me,” says the Californian rapper. “I like where I am.” She performs with Sebastopol’s own producer and rapper Smoov-E. | Whiskey Dick’s on Facebook

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. West Coast Swing Dance Carson Lanes Family Fun Center, Carson City, 5:30-10 p.m. Karaoke Polo Lounge, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Joel Ward The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Motown on Monday The Loving Cup, Reno, 9 p.m.-3 a.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.

MARCH 19 | TUESDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Magic Fusion Starring Joel Ward The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Swing Dance night Alibi Ale Works - Truckee Public House, Truckee, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Adam Hunter Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Tuesday Night Blues Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Stephen Marley Acoustic Band Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.

MARCH 20 | WEDNESDAY

Evolution of Organic Enjoy Tahoe Food Hub-sourced specials at Tahoe Tap Haus with Director Q&A

March 7

Captain Marvel March 8-28

LUNAFest March 28

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

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Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. Wild Winter Wednesdays River Ranch Lodge, Tahoe City, 3-11:30 p.m. Ike and Martin Sugar Bowl, Norden, 3-6 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Robert Hall The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Black Mountain Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 7 p.m. Actors and Creux Lies The Holland Project, Reno, 7-10 p.m.

Wednesday Night Showcase Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Open Mic w/Greg Lynn Red Dog Saloon, Virginia City, 7-10 p.m. Adam Hunter Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Wolves Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Open Mic Anything Goes Jimmy Bs, Reno, 9-11:30 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. An Evening At the Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m.

LOCAL PICKERS Lost Whiskey Engine return to Alibi for their 5th annual Saint Patrick’s Day show. Come to dance, sing and partake in the Irish tradition with kinfolk near and far for a night you might soon forget. | alibialeworks.com

FREE PEOPLES

MARCH 21 | THURSDAY Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 11 a.m. “Ahknaton” Bruka Theatre, Reno, 2 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Dirty Birdie Bingo/DJ The Polo Lounge, Reno, 7 p.m. “End Days” Restless Artists Theatre Company, Sparks, 7:30 p.m. “Violet Sharp” Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Adam Hunter Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. “Harbor” Lake Tahoe Community College- Duke Theater, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30-9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Is Back Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Corteo University of Nevada Reno, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Wolves Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, Reno, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Stampede Country Music & Dance Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. Kevin Farley Pioneer Underground, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Magic Fusion Starring Robert Hall The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. Live Music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. An Evening At the Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. The Expendables, Kash’D Out MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 9 p.m. Spafford w/ Coburn Station Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 9 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m.

GYPSY SOUL

March 15-16 | 8:30 p.m. Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats | Truckee PORCH ROCK professionals Free Peoples display sophisticated songwriting with unexpected turns that take their laid-back music from the toe-tapping to the cerebral. | moodysbistro.com

Tim McGraw, Steve Miller Band in Tahoe The 2019 Summer Concert Series at Harvey’s Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena has added more big-name, exciting performers. The mostplayed country artist, legendary Tim McGraw is coming to Tahoe on June 14. Pentatonix: The World Tour with special guest Rachel Platten joins the concert series on July 7. Classic rock meets classic country on Aug. 24 as the Steve Miller Band performs with Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives. Country music great Luke Bryan is scheduled for Aug. 25 with singer/songwriter Jon Langston as the opening act. The Grammy-Award-winning Dave Matthews Band will return as part of its 2019 North American tour on Sept. 6. Tickets are now on sale. | caesars.com/ harveys-tahoe


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American Tapas

COMES TO THE LOFT S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

T

Crawl

for the luck

of the Irish Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on March 17 with the Heavenly Village Leprechaun Crawl. There will be green beer and live music throughout the village, as participants crawl from pub to pub. For a $15 donation receive drink and food specials from 3 to 7 p.m. Costumes are encouraged. | theshopsatheavenly.com

he Loft located in Heavenly Village introduces its new venture, Taste at The Loft, American Tapas Lake Tahoe, a dining experience unlike any in South Lake Tahoe, featuring tapas and small bites created by Frank Trotta. “Frank is our VP of operations, head chef and sommelier. He has an extensive culinary background. We have a little bit of everything that reflects that on our menu,” says Chelsea Miller, marketing manager.

“ The inspiration for our new menu concept came from our space. The Loft is a really unique, modern and interesting venue and we wanted to come up with a food concept that was innovative and interesting just like The Loft itself.”

“Evolution of Organic” Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema | Tahoe City | March 7 The story of organic agriculture, told by those who built the movement. Director Mark Kitchell is available for Q&A. 7:30 p.m. | tahoearthauscinema.com

Snowfest! Pancake Breakfast North Tahoe Event Center Kings Beach | March 9

Start your SnowFest! celebration day in Kings Beach with delicious pancakes, prepared by North Tahoe Public Utility District staff and volunteers, and served with sausage, fresh strawberries, coffee, milk, and orange juice. 8-10:30 a.m.

Wine Walk at the Carson Mall Carson Mall | Carson City | March 9

Come sip and shop at the Carson Mall on the second Saturday of the month. 2-6 p.m. | Carson Mall on Facebook

Get S’more Saturdays Downtown Kings Beach | March 9

Head to participating eateries and shops for something extra and unexpected, then stroll to the outdoor gathering area at Las Panchitas where there will be s’mores, heaters and fire pits. 3-6 p.m. Free | (530) 546-9000, northtahoebusiness.org

Snowshoe Chalet Dinner Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | March 9

An intimate seated dinner with an Alpsinspired menu. 5:30 p.m. | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

–Frank Trotta

“The inspiration for our new menu concept came from our space. The Loft is a really unique, modern and interesting venue and we wanted to come up with a food concept that was innovative and interesting just like The Loft itself,” says Trotta. “The menu for Taste is influenced by a variety of factors. As the food and beverage director of the Stanley Hotel, I learned a lot about wild game. Working as an executive chef and food and beverage director in the Caribbean, Bahamas and Key West gave me a passion for Floribbean cuisine. And my Italian upbringing in the NYC area taught me how to utilize classic Italian ingredients.” Trotta, who is originally from New Jersey, is co-owner of The Loft with Paul Reder. Featured items include the roasted beet and burrata salad with basil and balsamic, yellow fin tuna and avocado ceviche and mini lamb chops with a mint, pomegranate balsamic glaze. The menu has something for everyone including vegan and vegetarian fare. Starts include unique soups and salads, assorted charcuterie plates and antipasto, wild game tastes such as bison carpaccio with white truffle oil, capers, red onions and shaved Parmesan, and honey bourbon-glazed pork belly skewers. “The presentation and sauces are well thought out by Frank and top notch,”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Tastes’ charcuterie plate. | Courtesy The Loft; Selection of craft cocktails. | Courtesy The Loft; Chef Frank Trotta. | Courtesy The Loft

says Miller. In addition to tapas and small plates, the restaurant boasts a number of desserts on the menu. “In the kitchen and in the hospitality business in general, I am inspired by making people happy and trying to give them an overall wonderful experience. I love entertaining and hosting dinner parties and that’s what running a restaurant is like: having a group of people to your home to have a great time. In addition to being a CIA-trained chef, I am also a certified sommelier and craft cocktail enthusiast. That’s what we are striving for at The Loft, combining great food with the perfect glass of wine or craft cocktail,” says Trotta. Taste offers a full bar, craft cocktails and has large wine selection. The bar offers magician-themed cocktails to fit in with the nightly magic shows, such as Sleight of Hand made with Benhams Gin, lav-

ender-infused Lillet, tart cherry juice and dried lavender or The Illusionist, prepared with High West American Prairie bourbon, basil-infused Amaro, English breakfast syrup, lemon juice and angostura bitters. In addition, The Loft hosts a happy hour from 4 to 6 p.m. daily, Whiskey & Wine Wednesdays and if you show up to Lipstick Lounge Thursdays come wearing lipstick, you’ll receive a complimentary Cosmopolitan, glass of house wine or champagne. | thelofttahoe.com n Priya Hutner is a writer, health and wellness consultant,and natural foods chef. Her business, The Seasoned Sage, focuses on wellness, conscious eating and healthy living. She offers healthy organic meals for her clients. She may be reached at priya@ tahoethisweek.com or visit theseasonedsage.com.

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TA S T Y T I D B I T S CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

Art of Mixology The Ritz-Carlton | Truckee | March 10, 17

Courtesy Homewood Mountain Resort

This entertaining, educational experience will feature freshly cut herbs, classic ingredients such as bitters and infused liquors to create three unique cocktails paired with appetizers. 4-5 p.m. $60 | ritzcarlton.com

Weekend of Beer & Gear Homewood Mountain Resort hosts the annual Beer & Gear on March 16 and 17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a new twist. This year, the best local and regional ski/snowboard brands will be matched with 10 favorite local brewers to create the first ski-andsip pairings while enjoying music from The Sextones. Participants will have the chance to test new gear and review it alongside a set of preselected ski journalists, beer connoisseurs and professional reviewers. Reviewers will be asked to look at three different categories: the performance of the ski/snowboard, the taste of the beer and how well it pairs with the ski equipment. In addition, the second annual Homewood King of the Hill Race will take place on The Face. The race is free to enter and runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on March 16. Contestants will try to make it down an un-groomed course with a full mug of beer going for fastest time with the most remaining liquid at the bottom. | skihomewood.com

Soup! (There it is) Kitchen Collab | Truckee | March 14

The entry fee for this benefit includes a handcrafted ceramic bowl, a variety of soups, bread, light refreshments, desert and live music. 5:30-8 p.m. $30-$35 | (417) 619-0713, kitchencollab.com

South Tahoe Beer Trail Area Breweries South Lake Tahoe | March 14-21

Celebrate the unique craft beer culture. Follow the South Tahoe Beer Trail throughout Spring Loaded and to get a free South Tahoe Beer Trail pint glass. | tahoechamber.org

Reno Wine Walk Riverwalk District | Reno | March 16

Stroll along the Truckee River in the Riverwalk District for a wine tasting. Strollers and pets are not advised because of large crowds. 2-5 p.m. $20 | renoriver.org

Rocky Mountain Oyster Fry Virginia City | March 16

Line up to sample tasty Rocky Mountain Oysters (beef and sheep testicles) prepared by chef’s competing for bragging rights. Dress up in your most outlandish St. Patty’s Day garb.| visitrenotahoe.com

Mountain Family Dinner Series Northstar California Resort Truckee | March 16

Load the Big Springs Gondola to MidMountain, enjoy a family-style interactive dinner, stop for a family photo and then cozy up by the fire with s’mores. 5-9 p.m. | (800) 466-6784, eventbrite.com

Snowshoe Cocktail Races Camp Richardson South Lake Tahoe | March 16

Think you have what it takes to run with a full cocktail tray in hand through obstacles up and down the beach at The Beacon Bar & Grill while wearing snowshoes? Show up between 5 and 7 p.m. on race days to enter. 5-9 p.m. Free | facebook.com

Dinner & Dance Sierra Valley Grange Hall | Loyalton | March 16 Dinner - Country Style Pork BBQ, Dance Lessons are free with paid admission. 9931182 or annygrny@att.net for info. 5:30-10:30 p.m. $5-$1,182 | sierracountychamber.com

Reno Leprechaun Crawl Downtown | Reno | March 16

One of the largest bar crawls in the nation with more than 50 beer and drink specials. No covers. Commemorative crawl cup and map. Specially-themed live entertainment and DJs. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. | crawlreno.com

Beer & Gear Homewood Mountain Resort | March 16, 17

Participating ski and snowboard brands will be matched with a brewery to create a ski and sip pairing. Equipment demos will be offered free, lift tickets and beer will be available for purchase. | (530) 525-2992, skihomewood.com

Tequila Social Grand Sierra Resort | Reno | March 16

Features six unique tequilas from Don Julio, five food and sweets stations from Cantina prepared by Chef James Mendoza and entertainment by Flamenco guitarist, Milton. RSVP. $90 | (775) 789-1630, grandsierraresort.com

Leprechaun Crawl Heavenly Village | South Lake Tahoe | March 17 The Leprechaun Crawl will feature, live music, green beer and food specials at Heavenly Village restaurants and bars. Costumes are encouraged. Register outside Base Camp Pizza. 4-7 p.m. $15 | crawlreno.com

St. Patrick’s Annual Community Celebration The Chateau | Incline Village | March 17

This family-friendly party will feature an authentic Irish dinner, dancers and singalongs. There will also be kids’ crafts, games, and face-painting. Everyone is welcome. 4:30-7:30 p.m. | eventbrite.com

Spring Loaded Brew Bus Tour Area breweries | South Lake Tahoe | March 20, 21 A personalized and exclusive guided bus tour to local breweries on the South Shore. Includes guided transportation to breweries and at each brewery will be beer tastings, a small bite to eat and bottled water. 12-3 p.m. $30 | (775) 588-5900 ext. 308., tahoesouth.com

Third Thursday Tasting The Pour House | Truckee | March 21

Enjoy a wine tasting each month. 5-7 p.m. | thepourhousetruckee.com

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March 7-20, 2019

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VOLCANIC WINES STORY & PHOTOS BY LOU PHILLIPS

of Th e S ou th of France

P

rovence is clearly known in the wine world for light, ethereal Rosé and in the world of luxury travel for sunny villages and some of the world’s most lovely and sexy beaches. But like people, places have shadow sides and in Provence that is defined by big, dark and brooding Mont Ventoux, which is geologically part of the Alps. While located in Provence, this mountain also looks down on the southern Rhone to the west and just like the Rosés from Provence the bold reds we will be looking at mainly utilize Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre, Carignan, Cinsault and the like. They also carry the signature garrigue or Herbes de Provence, characteristics that to a great degree come from the molecules of those very herbs that are carried on the powerful mistral winds that grace both regions.

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Wednesdays 2- Course min. required.

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Spindleshankstahoe.com | 400 Brassie Ave, Suite B · Kings Beach | (530) 546.2191

Après Ski Specials & Discount Lift Tickets Join us Sunday March 10 from 12-4 for the 31st annual Snow Sculpture Contest!

Domaine de Trévallon will age for decades. This is a seriously excellent roastbeast or marinated and roasted vegetable match. The X factor in this formula is our old friend Cabernet Sauvignon that is rarely seen in the Rhone but has a substantial presence in Provence and in its red blends. Much of even the better fruit was sold to co-ops and made into bulk wines, but that past decade or so has seen a proliferation of individual producers on the market. Here are a few recommendations that are sure-fire hits. Don’t be surprised if you find older vintages because this is one of the rare regions that releases wine when it feels they are ready to perform at their best. E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Read Lou’s columns on other volcanic wine regions: > Napa Valley wines > Italian wines

Toward the top end is Domaine de Trévallon, which as a Robert Parker discovery decades back was at one time quite pricey. Fortunately, this Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah gem has fallen off the radar with many and can be had for the relative song of about $45. As a bonus it will age for decades, which also means that for a pre-teen bottle you should decant vigorously. This is a seriously excellent roast-beast or marinated and roasted vegetable match. You’re welcome. Other tasty choices that are in the $15 to $25 range are Château Pesquié, Domaine de Fondrèche and Domaine Vindemio.

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2285 River Road Alpine Meadows, CA. 96146 | 530-583-4264 | www.RiverRanchLodge.com

Domaine de Trévallon | Courtesy Domaine de Trévallon

There are also some gems in white wine made with typical grapes of the southern Rhone, but these are even rarer than the reds. These robust wines carry the Côtes du Ventoux appellation, but they often more prominently feature their village name and will have Ventoux somewhere on the front or back label. This, along with the rarity of these wines in most markets, makes them difficult to find on one’s own. If you have an adventurous local wine shop guru, he or she may carry a selection or two, but your chances are probably better at one of the larger wine stores. On the other hand, if these wines are your jam, they are well worth the effort. n Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier in Tahoe and his consulting business wineprowest. com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 5443435 or wineguru123@gmail.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns. Click on Wine Column under the Local Flavor tab.

Helping Collectors Sell, Buy and Manage Their Collections Assisting Businesses Build Effective Wine Programs Making Your Wine Events Really Special Expertise and Ethics Public and Private Wine Classes

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544-3435

(530) 587-3557 10186 Donner Pass Rd - Truckee

Eclectic old world Ambiance Home made Pastas Wide-ranging Wine list DINNER AND BAR NIGHTLY FROM 5-9 PM Reservations Recommended

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Sun-Thurs | 5-6 pm

Downtown Truckee | (530) 587-4694

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CORNED BEEF HASH B Y C H E F D AV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

Kings Beach Lunch Specials Daily Early Bird Special 4-6pm

Dinner Special 4-10pm

$3.50 Margaritas $3.50 Dos Equis $2.50 Draft Bud

25% Off Mexican Combo Dinners

Full

Bar

Open 11:30am-10:00pm (530) 546-4539 8345 North Lake Blvd. - Across from the State Beach in Kings Beach

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Fine Italian Food & Spirits

Our mission is to reduce the incidence of hunger and its detrimental effects upon individuals, families, the community and the region.

WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION:

Locals Love Lanza’s! (530) 546-2434 BAR - 4:30 p.m. DINNER - 5 p.m.

7739 N Lake Blvd - Kings Beach

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MONDAYS TAHOE CITY

WEDNESDAYS KINGS BEACH

3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Ctr. 330 Fairway Dr.

3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House 265 Bear St.

TUESDAYS TRUCKEE

THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE

3:30pm to 4pm Sierra Senior Center 10040 Estates Dr.

3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church 341 Village Blvd.

(775) 298-4161

|

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INVENTIVE AMERICAN CUISINE IN A COZY, ROMANTIC LOG CABIN Sustainable Fresh Fish | Organic Chicken | Local Seasonal Produce

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NIGHTLY, HOMESTYLE CLASSIC 4 COURSE MEAL $27 Dinner nightly at 6pm | Reservations 530.546.7529 9983 Cove St. Kings Beach | www.souledomain.com

Charlie Soule Chef | Owner

very once in a while, I have to write about the most important meal of the day. Breakfast is the meal that gets you and your metabolism going in the morning and can be a deciding factor on how much energy you have to carry you through until lunch. It is also, probably the most neglected meal of the day. Even people who will talk about the importance of a good breakfast will admit they skip it too often. You know how it is: you sleep in, you’re running late and maybe grab a granola bar on the way out the door — that is, if you don’t decide to blow off breakfast completely and try to make it until lunch. For breakfast, we will settle for donuts or cinnamon rolls, something fast that we can grab and go. For lunch, we will stand in line and wait for a fresh sandwich or baked entree. I have to admit, I fall into this category. I love breakfast, but I’m rather lazy when it comes to fixing something early in the morning. If I do have breakfast, it is usually a Carnation Instant Breakfast. Even a bowl of cereal is too much bother most of the time. As a matter of fact, the cereal I keep in my kitchen almost always is my dinner when I don’t feel like making anything. As for eggs, I love them. There is nothing like a real bacon and egg breakfast, but again, I will only make it when someone is staying over at my house or I decide to binge on my days off. Usually, I eat bacon and eggs, pancakes or waffle in a restaurant. I associate a good breakfast more with vacation than an everyday occurrence. We do have a lot of friends who come to visit in the winter and stay with us to be near the slopes and they are not looking

for a leisurely breakfast. They are looking to get to the mountain as soon as possible so they can stand in line until the lifts open with hopes of getting that rare untracked powder run. Corned beef hash is a rare breakfast treat that can be prepared to take care of all

Corned beef hash is a rare breakfast for anyone to fix on their own but can be prepared to take care of all three meals. three meals. Cook off the corned beef for dinner and then with the leftovers you can make hash for breakfast and great sandwiches for lunch. Other than cooking off the corned beef, hash is easy to make and you can even cut that time down by boiling a few extra potatoes while making dinner the night before. As for the vegetarian, make the hash the same way and substitute veggies such as broccoli, carrots and anything else he or she wants for the beef. This is one breakfast that will give you the energy to make it until lunch. n Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Chef’s Recipe under the Local Flavor tab.

CORNED BEEF HASH

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith 3 C corned beef, cut into chunks 2 large red potatoes, boiled with salt & cut into medium cubes ½ onion, cut lengthwise into strips ½ red pepper, cut into strips ½ green pepper, cut into strips 2 T butter

FEATURING: Slow-Roasted Prime Rib | Baby Back Ribs Steaks | Full Bar | Seafood Pasta | Gourmet Hamburgers 12 ft. Long Salad Bar | Kid’s Menu

JasonsBeachSideGrille.com

(530) 546-3315

8338 NORTH LAKE BLVD., KINGS BEACH, CA

26

Rub the corned beef with the salt, pepper and garlic, and slow cook in a roasting pan, no more than half covered with water and the pan tightly sealed with foil for 8 hours at 250 degrees or until a knife easily penetrates it. For the hash, the key is to cook the ingredients one at a time, instead of all together to maximize the flavors. Start with the onions and half the butter in a heavy skillet and once the onions are starting to brown toss in the peppers. Let them start to soften and toss in the potatoes and the rest of the butter. Let the butter start to brown as the potatoes also turn golden and then toss in the corned beef and pop into a 350-degree oven for 10 to 15 minutes until the meat is hot.


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Every Sunday through Tuesday from 5 - 7pm during the month of March receive a complimentary beer or glass of house wine with the purchase of an appetizer.

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March 7 to 20, 2019  

A snowboarder drops into The Chutes at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe with Highway 431 snaking through the background with views of the Virginia Range i...

March 7 to 20, 2019  

A snowboarder drops into The Chutes at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe with Highway 431 snaking through the background with views of the Virginia Range i...