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Thank you! A heartfelt thank you to everyone who supported us in our 2020 BAR-E-L Bull and Select Female Sale. Each bidder and buyer that expressed interest in the BAR-E-L program and genetics is truly appreciated. We are really excited about the ALCATRAZ calves on the ground. Would love the opportunity to tour them with you!

“Despite the forecast, live like it’s spring.” Lily Pulitzer

L E R BA Angus Dave & Lynne Longshore Family Stettler, AB H. 403.579.2394 C. 403.740.6788 Web: www.bar-e-l.com Email: barelangus@gmail.com


Todays Angus Advantage  1


12th Annual

Ward’s Red Angus Bull Sale

Thank you to all of the bidders and buyers who supported our 2020 sale! 102072754 SK Ltd. 4S Farms Ltd. Bailey Dietrich Benson Thorpe Brian & Denise Mannix Brian Bates Carl Hanson Carlin Fehr Creekview Farms

Daryl Ogilvie Dave Thompson DKA Farms Jack Morris Janzen Plus JAS Red Angus Josh Friesen Kerry Ringrose Kyle Gordon

Leo Maganin Martens Ranch Matador Pasture Co-op Ltd. McFarlane Acres Ltd. Nick Senik Rafter TH Land & Cattle Ltd. Redekop Cattle Co. Ritchie Farms Rocky Schlaht

Silver Sage Land & Cattle Ltd. Simonson Land & Cattle Ltd. Terry James Trevor & Angie Cross Trevor McKenzie W Bar T Farm Ltd. Wade Richmond Wendel & Beryl Campbell Willner Elbow Grazing

2020 Sask Purebred Breeder of the Year

Herd Bulls walking the pastures this year at Ward’s:

Duralta 166D

CAPONE 198F

Red Ter-Ron

CONTRABAND 72G

Clarke & Denise Ward G.S. 707 RR #7 Box 39 Saskatoon, SK S7K 1N2 P: 306.931-3824 C: 306.220.6372

www.wardsredangus.com

Todays Angus Advantag e   2

Red Selte

IRON MAN 827F


Thank you to all who attended, bid and bought at the

HBH Angus Farms Cattleman’s Connection Bull & Female Sale

We are grateful for your support

118G

HBH Almost Famous 118G

sired by Peak Dot International 28D was purchased by Kevin Anderson, Melita, MB

3G

HBH Grand 3G

sired by S A V President 6847 was purchased by Arthur Eddy, Sibley, IA

155G

HBH International 155G

sired by Peak Dot International 28D was purchased by Wayne Chubaty, Ridgeville, MB

11G

HBH President 11G

sired by S A V President 6847 was purchased by Barry Wiens, Pansy, MB

Introducing a New Sale

HBH Angus with Northern Light Simmentals Sale December 22, 2020 - Virden, MB

Selling: 50 Black Angus & 30 Simmental Including: Cow/Heifer Calf Pairs, Bred Heifers, PLUS Elite Show Heifers

e e s o t r e m m u s s i h t y b p o t S ! n o i t c u d o r p females in HBH Angus Farms Inc. Box 94, Oak River, MB R0K 1T0

Like us on facebook HBH Angus Farm and on Instagram @hbhangus

Neil Carson Ph: 204-773-6927 neilcarson1973@gmail.com

Todays Angus Advantage  3

Darcy Heapy Ph: 204-365-7755 dheapy@mymts.net

www.HBHAngusFarms.com


2020 Spring Issue

In This

11

The start of the new decade welcomed us with many kinds of new emotions. As we started the spring bull sale season, sale and attendance was strong and active, but as self-distancing was introduced, and limitations increased, so did the pressure on some programs. It is amazing that through this spring period record events were held in several breeds…continuing to show us forward thinking and the dedication of breeders and commercial cattlemen as we improved our product to the masses domestically and abroad. This cowboy loyalty is profound and echoes the sentiment that we must continue to move forward with a great sense of pride in maintaining our important position in the food chain.

Covid-19 has increased the public’s awareness of the important value of agriculture in the economy of our nation. Our country’s leaders are making important decisions for the people of Canada but continue to leave oil and agriculture on the backburner, while charging carbon tax to save the planet. We as consumers must start thinking Canada and purchasing Canadian made and produced product, just like the high standard of beef, Canadian producers continue to produce year after year.

A special thanks to all the fellow livestock marketers who spent the last few months on the road with Covid-19 and persevered through this bull sale season. Whether you are a sale manager, auctioneer, More and more consumers have increased their ring staff, order buyer, sale barn owner or internet knowledge of food sources throughout the world. In supplier, operating under the distancing rule offered the past couple of months, consumers have received a new challenge each day, usually after driving through a real lesson in food sources and their availability. the night. Bag breakfasts, drive-throughs, empty sale Empty shelves have suddenly opened the eyes of all barns and constant telephone calls, texts and emails generations from the Baby-boomer generation right to combined with winter driving conditions made for an today’s Generation Z. Self-distancing and quarantines interesting type of sale season…for all your efforts, have re-introduced customs from the past...the family you deserve a vote of thanks. To all the farmers and sitting together around the table for meals, Sunday ranchers who added and improved your herd bull roast beef dinners, families making bread…the simple lineup, thanks for your loyalty and trust. things which we assumed while building our great Using the most used line in our Nation’s Capital…. nation.What I found most interesting on a trip to the “moving forward” we will see an unprecedented grocery store was that the beef shelves were empty, demand for beef by consumers around the globe yet the plant-based product was still there with the from the lessons we have learned in the past few hope of an uneducated consumer picking it up. Yeast, months…good luck with breeding and let us hope if you can find it, is more valuable than gold, but there for good grass. is plenty of toilet paper. Stay safe, because you are a very essential service to the world.

issue

The Ward Saga

16

Canadian Junior Angus News

29

CAB - The Porsche of Beef

30

Black Ink - This Too Shall Pass

38

Roundup 2020 Press Release 41

the

WArdgA sA

16

rank O. Ward along with his wife, Carolina and three-year-old son, Carl, immigrated from Sweden to America in 1885. They settled in Amor Township, minnesota which was established on April 5, 1879. For the next twenty-one years they farmed near Amor and had four more sons… Algot, Elof, Edward and Adolph.

F

To supplement their cash flow, Frank and the boys ran two threshing teams along with whoever wanted work.

The Vanscoy area has been home to the Ward family for over 100 years. In 1906, a year after Saskatchewan entered Confederation, Frank O. Ward, his wife Carolina and sons Carl, Algot, Elof, Edward and Adolph migrated north to Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, a village incorporated in 1918, located twenty-nine kilometers southwest of Saskatoon. Frank purchased a tract of land from the Valley land Company and built a house and sod barn. His three eldest sons, Carl, Algot and Elof, also took out homesteads in the surrounding area. They broke the land, cropped the soil and ran cattle, hogs, chickens and everything they could to survive and raise a group of growing boys.

With World War I over, times were tough for a large, fully grown family; so in 1919, Frank and Carolina purchased a tract of land near Durban, manitoba, a hamlet southwest of Swan River. Adolph moved to manitoba with his parents while Edward stayed back and farmed the home place. On Frank’s passing in 1928, the land in manitoba was sold and Carolina and

The Original Homestead In Vanscoy

The Porsche of Beef

Consumers are willing to pay a high price for beef if it’s worth it every time

By Morgan Marley If USDA Choice were a basic Volkswagen, U.S. cattlemen should be producing the Audis and Porsches made by the same company. That’s according to Robbi Pritchard, speaking at the recent Midwest American Society of Animal Scientists’ Harlan Ritchie Symposium in Omaha. He was one of five who presented on evolving cattle production to align with consumer demands.

30 Superior products require superior attention to detail, including shifting demand signals.

“Those consumer preferences seem to be focused on the increased demand we’ve seen for the higher quality products,” Pritchard said. “And the wellbeing of the animals—which gets around to animal husbandry, our environmental impact and how well we manage though the entire supply chain.”

Some consumers want grass-fed cattle and decreased greenhouse gas emissions simultaneously, Pritchard noted. But the longer an animal walks the earth, the larger its carbon footprint. “It just doesn’t fit,” he said, while allowing, “We still have to work on finding sustainable solutions.” Breaking Old Habits

Nothing holds more value than a relationship with a cattle feeder to gauge genetic improvement needs in successive calf crops. “Having that relationship is when you get rewarded for it,” he said.

“If the AI sires have superior genetics and your cleanup bulls don’t, then you no longer have a uniform, superior calf crop,” Pritchard said. All bulls used have to meet at least average specs. The payback for that comes when the calves sell, whether at weaning, after backgrounding or through retained ownership.

Take notes from hog farmers on replacement females, Pritchard suggested.

“In the ’80s, swine producers started to receive letters from packers that their hogs no longer met market specs and they would not buy their hogs anymore,” he said.

The problem? Lack of uniformity and quality in the sow herd. The quickest and most efficient way to make a turnaround was to buy commercial F1 females with a proven record of consistency. “We can do that in the cattle industry if we’re willing to take that step,” he said.

Leading beef producers are there now, but many more would benefit by following their lead.

Maternal function and carcass quality can be delivered in one package with focused selection. But it doesn’t work if half of your steer calves have maternal sires and half have terminal sires.

Humans have a competitive nature that drives toward “best,” whether that’s luxury cars or premium beef production. “If we’re building a Porsche, do we buy the cheapest brakes to put in it?” Pritchard asked. Unintended consequences proliferate when losing sight of the end goal. Cattlemen have built highly efficient cows. Commercial producers should focus on improving the bottom end of the herd for the fastest results.

The Real World

11

A Breeder’s Veterinary Perspective

24

Vet’s Advice

43

Not Taken for Granted

46

Advertising & Subscription Rates

51

Schedule of Events

56

As for the next challenge, Pritchard asked, “How can you build an entire pen of uniform feeder calves?” Start with how you want to market them and plan backward from there.

Generic cattle have limited potential in today’s branded and specialized marketplace, where the average load is 75% Choice or higher. That’s also the threshold for reward premiums. Learning from others can save a lot of time, worry and money.

issue

“When feeder cattle go to the feed yard sooner and are harvested sooner, there’s less carbon footprint,” he said.

Consumers have proven they’re willing to pay the “Porsche price,” but if the eating experience doesn’t match, then that brand of beef will get scratched off the buy-again list, he said.

Borrowed Approach

as in every

All of it, starting with those first investments leading up to a breeding season that may include artificial insemination (AI).

If we can break some old habits, he said, a uniform calf crop decreases the need for sorting and mixing into shared pens at the feed yard; if we do less of that, we will use less antibiotics. “When we co-mingle, it’s like daycare,” Pritchard said. No amount of vaccinations and health precautions can prevent disease in every animal. Technology has provided assistance in monitoring animals and streamlining chores, but he said it’s increasingly used as a substitute for choices and husbandry skills. Those require persistent practice. “Husbandry is kind of like marriage,” he said. Everyone has their own opinion on what makes a successful marriage, so “it’s really hard to define the good ones.” Animal welfare is the biggest concern from consumers, and husbandry is a key component. Technology and husbandry intermix during heat detection, Pritchard said. He noted a commonly listed advantage of timed AI is that it eliminates the need to identify which cows are in heat. “But,” he asked, “if we are challenged to find help that can recognize estrus, how capable are we of identifying early signs of illness in feeder cattle? There’s more to raising a good steak than what meets the eye. It has to have superior attention from first plans to the dinner table.

There are different ways to evaluate efficiency. Some compare weaning weights as a percent of cow weights. Others optimize carrying capacity, which keeps downward pressure on frame size. “Both of these select for smaller cows,” Pritchard said. “But in the end, we’re still trying to see how many servings of beef we can produce per cow per year.” That’s why he prefers to compare cows on their progeny’s hot carcass weight, times age at harvest, divided by cow body weight. Efficiency benefits the environment, too. Cattle used to enter the feed yard at 15 to 18 months of age, but today most Northern Plains cattle are harvested by then.

Today’s Angus Advantag e

30

46 Cat Skinner

Shorty’s neighbours were… well different. There were ranchers, hippies and old timers that were born, raised and spent their entire life in the same yard. Some of them were skilled cattlemen, some skilled cowboys and the hippies were skilled farmers albeit their crops only recently became legal.

Frank was none of the above. True enough he had been born and raised in the same house he and his wife inhabited now, but it was his wife that was the skilled one in his operation. Frank could spend the day talking to a hat on a stump, in fact he preferred the stump to his wife most days, but he had a heart as big as a house and he would work his butt off to pull off a good joke. Shorty had grown up on the neighbouring ranch to Frank and even though he didn’t see Frank often, he did stop in when he was passing through. Shorty had stopped in earlier in the day, but there was no one home. Now, as he made his way home from dropping some salt blocks on a remote corner of the summer range, he was happy to see Frank’s truck parked at Deadpine Lake. Frank was out on a new irrigation dam that was being built for the ranchers downstream. Shorty pulled over, got out of his truck and joined his old friend. “Shorty! Good to see you!” Frank extended his dirty hand and Shorty shook it. “Hi Frank. What’s happening?” Shorty nodded towards a D6 Cat parked on top of the new dam. “That Joe’s Cat?” “Yup” Frank was grinning now. “What’s going on Frank?” It was one of those questions that Shorty really wasn’t sure he wanted answered. “Well Shorty… follow me while I tell you.” Frank turned and walked towards his truck. “I’ve known Joe for a long time. In fact he and I went to school together… at least

to Grade 8.” Frank glanced over to see if Shorty had any reaction to his statement. “You two made it to Grade 8?” “Not really… we aged out. But here is the thing… Joe is a pretty good friend, but he has always been an arrogant SOB. He thinks he is pretty cool with his little toy over there.” Frank nodded back at the Cat. “So today I got kinda lucky. Real lucky that you showed up, ‘cause I need a little help to put that cocky little bugger in his place.” “Geez Frank! I am too young to go to jail…” Shorty was only half kidding. Frank’s grin just got bigger. The grin was so big that it caused his hand rolled cigarette to tumble down his shirt. Frank stepped on the butt and nodded into the bush. There, laying lifeless was a young black bear. “What the hell Frank?” “The frickin’ bears have been hanging around here all summer, Shorty. I have had enough of them. I came up here to see how Joe was doin’ on the dam and there he was just standin’ there on the road, so I shot him.” “We are still talking about the bear, right Frank?” “Yeah! Now you are here, I can get even with that little prick.” “Bear or have we switched to Joe?”

Cover Photography Grant Rolston

Frank was getting pretty excited as he realized they might be able to pull this off. He ignored Shorty’s question completely. “Just wait here, Shorty.” Shorty had always had the impression that Frank was kinda allergic to breaking a sweat, but that afternoon and early evening he learned otherwise. By the time the two men

Today’s Angus Advantag e

46

Todays Angus Advantag e   4


To each and every buyer and bidder and everyone who attended our 2-year-old bull sale and yearling bull sale, we appreciate you.

Building relationships that create value at every level of the industry.

Darren Ippolito ¡ KISBEY SASKATCHEWAN Tel 306-577-8970 Email moose.creek@sasktel.net

www.moosecreekredangus.com Todays Angus Advantage  5


Todays Angus Advantage  6


Brent & Dale Stewart Kelsey & Tyler Thompson Box 908, Russell, MB R0J 1W0 Cell: 204-773-6392 stewartcows@wificountry.ca www.stewartcattle.com

T Bar C Cattle Co. Ltd. Warman, SK S0K 4S0 O: 306.933.4200 F: 306.934.0744 info@tbarc.com www.tbarc.com

View the catalogue online www.BuyAgro.com Todays Angus Advantag e   7


Todays Angus Advantage  8


We would like to thank and congratulate our customers on a successful spring bull sale season. We value the friendships and loyalty of everyone we work with and the confidence people showed by placing bids, both online or on the phone. While it has been an interesting sale season, we are proud that so many great operations have the confidence in T Bar C to professionally be their Complete Sale Management Solution!

Now Booking Fall Dates! Call us to discuss your marketing needs!

Chris Poley 306-220-5006

Shane Michelson 403-363-9973

Ben Wright 519-374-3335

Box 2330, Warman, SK S0K 4S0 O: 306-933-4200 F: 306-934-0744 info@tbarc.com www.tbarc.com Todays Angus Advantage  9


Selling yearling and two-year old bulls and replacement heifers by private treaty

Sired by Walking Sires: Red Double C “Brando” Red Double C “Dino” A.I. Sires: Red DKF Razor 55C Red Brylor Red Kodiak 3A

We pride ourselves on being able to offer bulls suitable for cows and heifers from a herd that has an excellent reputation for producing quiet, functional cattle. All of our young cattle are pail fed and very use to human contact.

Check out our 2020 lineup,

Visit kccattleco.com for more information Dr. Colin Palmer DVM, Kim Palmer & Family RR 5 Site 502 Box 39, Saskatoon, SK S7K 3J8 (20 minutes from Saskatoon) Phone: 306.492.2134 Cell: 306.290.8431 Todays Angus Advantage  10


The start of the new decade welcomed us with many kinds of new emotions. As we started the spring bull sale season, sale and attendance was strong and active, but as self-distancing was introduced, and limitations increased, so did the pressure on some programs. It is amazing that through this spring period, record events were held in several breeds…continuing to show us forward thinking and the dedication of breeders and commercial cattlemen as we improved our product to the masses domestically and abroad. This cowboy loyalty is profound and echoes the sentiment that we must continue to move forward with a great sense of pride in maintaining our important position in the food chain.

COVID-19 has increased the public’s awareness of the important value of agriculture in the economy of our nation. Our country’s leaders are making important decisions for the people of Canada but continue to leave oil and agriculture on the backburner, while charging carbon tax to save the planet. We as consumers must start thinking Canada and purchasing Canadian made and produced product, just like the high standard of beef, Canadian producers continue to produce year after year.

A special thanks to all the fellow livestock marketers who spent the last few months on the road with COVID-19 and persevered through this bull sale season. Whether you are a sale manager, auctioneer, More and more consumers have increased their ring staff, order buyer, sale barn owner or internet knowledge of food sources throughout the world. In supplier, operating under the distancing rule offered the past couple of months, consumers have received a new challenge each day, usually after driving through a real lesson in food sources and their availability. the night. Bag breakfasts, drive-throughs, empty sale Empty shelves have suddenly opened the eyes of all barns and constant telephone calls, texts and emails generations from the Baby Boomer generation right to combined with winter driving conditions made for an today’s Generation Z. Self-distancing and quarantines interesting type of sale season…for all your efforts, have re-introduced customs from the past...the family you deserve a vote of thanks. To all the farmers and sitting together around the table for meals, Sunday ranchers who added and improved your herd bull roast beef dinners, families making bread…the simple lineup, thanks for your loyalty and trust. things which we assumed while building our great Using the most used line in our Nation’s Capital… nation.What I found most interesting on a trip to the “moving forward” we will see an unprecedented grocery store was that the beef shelves were empty, demand for beef by consumers around the globe yet the plant-based product was still there with the from the lessons we have learned in the past few hope of an uneducated consumer picking it up. Yeast, months…good luck with breeding and let us hope if you can find it, is more valuable than gold, but there for good grass. is plenty of toilet paper. Stay safe, because you are a very essential service to the world. Todays Angus Advantag e   11


KNOW the

Score your Indicators:

SCORE

1

2

< DON’T BREED

for higher pregnancy rates Don’t just detect cows for heat.

Using Estrotect™ Breeding Indicators, identify when cows are ready to breed when the Breeding Bullseye™ or equivalent area rubs off. Born from university research, the Breeding Bullseye supports a unique patch scoring system to determine estrus intensity. Scores of 3 and 4? Breed cows with up to 3x higher pregnancy rates. Scores of 1 and 2? Hold off on breeding.

BREED >

AS GOOD AS A BULL™

Make easy yes or no breeding decisions with the Estrotect Breeding Indicator.

3

4

ESTROTECT.com

©2020. ESTROTECT AND AS GOOD AS A BULL ARE TRADEMARKS OF ROCKWAY, INC.

Same address, all new look: www.cdnangus.ca

Coming Soon to a computer

near you!

The Canadian Angus Association is pleased to announce the launch of our newly redesigned website, www. cdnangus.ca. Featuring a brand new look, more information on our programs and a fully responsive layout for all platforms—we hope you’ll find it easier to navigate and find what you’re looking for quickly and efficiently. Our goal with this new website is to provide our members and visitors with a simple way to discover more about Canadian Angus programs, news, events, sales, and all the latest happenings. It’ll be your one-stop-shop for everything Canadian Angus!

Launching Tuesday June 2, 2020

Todays Angus Advantag e   12


Todays Angus Advantageâ&#x20AC;&#x192; 13


Todays Angus Advantageâ&#x20AC;&#x192; 14


His Son Sells By Private Treaty!

Whitney Black Angus announces another powerhouse brood cow from deep in the heart of Schaff Angus Valley in North Dakota! S A V Madame Pride 0075

S A V Abundance 6117

Dam of 4056

Son of 6117 & 4056 Sells!

S A V Madame Pride 4056 • February 20, 2014 S A V HARVESTOR 0338 S A V HESSTON 2217 S A V EMBLYNETTE 3301 S A F 598 BANDO 5175 S A V MADAME PRIDE 0075 S A V MADAME PRIDE 8264

S A V HERITAGE 6295 S A V EMBLYNETTE 7749 S A F 598 BANDO 5175 S A V EMBLYNETTE 7319 BON VIEW BANDO 598 S A F ROYAL LASS 1002 LEACHMAN RIGHT TIME S A R CRUZS PRIDE 8597

• IMP 0456B

2126441

• She has a tremendous February S A V Abundance bull calf available for sale by private treaty • Maternal sister to world record setting $1.51 million dollar S A V America • Maternal sister to $100,000 top selling heifer in the S A V 2013 Production Sale • Maternal sister to the $150,000 Madame Pride 0413 • She is a deep, massive, broody cow with a great udder and quiet disposition • Her maternal matriarch, Madame Pride 0075, has $5.3 million dollars in sales • 0075 has 158 progeny averaging $33,368 in sales to 22 states, Canada and Brazil with 41 daughters retained at S A V

Todays Angus Advantag e   15


The

Wardga Sa

F

To supplement their cash flow, Frank and the boys ran two threshing teams along with whoever wanted work.

The Vanscoy area has been home to the Ward family for over 100 years. In 1906, a year after Saskatchewan entered Confederation, Frank O. Ward, his wife Carolina and sons Carl, Algot, Elof, Edward and Adolph migrated north to Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, a village incorporated in 1918, located twenty-nine kilometers southwest of Saskatoon. Frank purchased a tract of land from the Valley Land Company and built a house and sod barn. His three eldest sons, Carl, Algot and Elof, also took out homesteads in the surrounding area. They broke the land, cropped the soil and ran cattle, hogs, chickens and everything they could to survive and raise a group of growing boys.

With World War I over, times were tough for a large, fully grown family; so in 1919, Frank and Carolina purchased a tract of land near Durban, Manitoba, a hamlet southwest of Swan River. Adolph moved to Manitoba with his parents while Edward stayed back and farmed the home place. On Frank’s passing in 1928, the land in Manitoba was sold and Carolina and

rank O. Ward along with his wife, Carolina and three-year-old son, Carl, immigrated from Sweden to America in 1885. They settled in Amor Township, Minnesota which was established on April 5, 1879. For the next twenty-one years they farmed near Amor and had four more sons… Algot, Elof, Edward and Adolph.

Todays Angus Advantag e   16

The Original Homestead In Vanscoy


name Red Letter Stock Farm. Through the ‘80’s the main selection criteria was frame and growth and the Wards chose a one eighty direction from that trend. Calving ease has got to be an important part of selection because fifty percent of your calf crop is heifers and most heifers get bred and calve with some reasonable assumption of ease. So, with Tom teaching full time at the University of Saskatchewan, the fifteen-year-old teenager, Clarke, got his first experience of marketing in the purebred industry. By the late ‘80’s and early ‘90’s the commercial industry started looking at Red Angus bulls for their heifer pastures.

Adolf & Lillian

family returned to the Vanscoy district. Through settlement of the estate, Adolph received the family farm quarter section. Adolph and wife, Lillian (Clarke) had eight children; Rose, Elof, Mary, Alice, Leila, Adolph (Tom), Sylvia and Dean. Tom, the sixth of the eight children, married in 1968, taught high school in Lloydminster and Saskatoon, before returning to Vanscoy with his family. Clarke was five when they returned to the farm. The first cattle on the Ward Farm were Simmental, Charolais and Hereford commercial Cattle Congress 2001 cattle but after calving them out, it was an easy decision to go another route. Clarke recalls, “The first few females were selected at Gary Conrad’s In the early years they would consign their bulls dispersal back in ’75 or ’76; Dad started bringing to provincial test stations: Saskatoon, Regina and Pathlow at Melfort. Clarke relates, “You send them trailer loads of Red Angus cows home!” in the fall, the gain is tracked all winter and then Starting in 1976, they were one of the earlier have a sale in the spring. If your bulls performed pioneering breeders, originally running under the well, they were eligible for the sale and the nonTom Ward 1959

Todays Angus Advantag e   17


Red Blackbird Of Strathayr 29G

performers went home. We were fortunate; we did not break the bank but did well. Back in those days there were only a handful of Red Angus breeders: Flying K, Moose Creek, Creech, Six Mile and us, just to mention a few; so the test centers were good promotion for herds that had bulls for sale.” In 1980, Tom purchased Red Blackbird “Our longevity Of Strathayr 29G; she was the highest selling Red and fertility Angus female in North factor is a America at $26,500 up to recent times. He embryo great selling transplanted this great feature and a female and established a very profit yielding cow mainstay of our family… “my father was success.” one of the early guys to do embryo work in the province.” They built their best cow families using longevity as a key selection factor. The Freyjas, Blackbirds and Lassies are some of the oldest in the herd. “Good basic mainstay cow families…not the stuff that you are gonna go win Agribition with… but the kind of cattle that are gonna make you a good living and a herd you can be proud of. Our longevity and fertility factor is a great selling feature and a mainstay of our success.”

In 1990, Clarke and Denise were married and started their new farmstead the following spring, establishing Ward’s Red Angus in 1991 and taking over the program. Clarke relates, “Technically we homesteaded our half section because it was bare pasture. You can say we followed in the footsteps of my grandfather; we chopped a hole in the fence, pulled in a house trailer, built a barn (and rebuilt it four months later after it partially burned with the help of family and neighbors), some pens, watering bowls and started running cows ourselves. The farm, along with the family, expanded over the next 30 years; two sons, Josh and Cole, more facilities and more cattle.

Vanscoy 4-H Club 100 Year Anniversary

Raising a young family in the Vanscoy community, getting involved with the Vanscoy Multiple 4-H Club was a tradition. Both Tom and Uncle Dean were members and Clarke joined at the age of eleven and competed until the age of 20. Josh and Cole competed in the Beef Project successfully over the years, winning many ribbons and trophies for their steer and heifer projects, Clarke serving as a Beef Leader and Denise as the General Leader. Cattle shows soon became a family outing and a new way for the Ward operation to promote their cattle. Wards exhibited cattle at Fall Fair in Saskatoon, Agribition and Lloydminster Stockade Round-Up. Over the years they consigned females to Red Roundup, Harvest Classic, Angus Pride and Touch of Class. 4-H is the reason the black cattle have shown up in the Ward program. “Cole, our

Todays Angus Advantag e   18


youngest boy, wanted a black heifer to show, as Josh had a red one. I bought an Erica daughter at the Angus Pride Sale from the Cooks at Blackie, Alberta. We got a little advice from Neil Carruthers as to what to breed her to and her first son was purchased by a breeder for double that of his mother. Her next calf duplicated the feat, so it did not take much time to add a little black into our program, as our customer base was also requiring it. Over the years, we have been using some black red carriers to add new genetics into the herd.”

First Barn Being Built in 1991

Barn Built in 2005

were selling bulls or delivering bulls all year. They tried hosting a silent auction sale at the farm with dismal results. They then had the opportunity to consign bulls to the Complete Bull Sale. Moving to an auction setting was stressful but successful. Clarke relates, “T Bar managed our first sale and every sale since. I will always remember the first pep talk I ever got from Teddy about a tough market…you have twenty skinny bulls to sell, get prepared for a tough day (the conversation has been edited). After the smoke cleared that day, all twenty bulls sold for an average of over $2,600 and change. We learned a lot from Ted and every year we got a pep talk and every year our sales got better.” In 2020, Clarke and Denise moved their In addition to bull sale back home into their new shop and had operating a family breeding operation, Clarke a video sale with outstanding results. “We shoulda was on the board of the Saskatchewan Angus done this ten years ago!” Association for twelve years serving as President for two, on the CRAPS Board for a couple of stints and an Angus Representative for Fall Fair for seven years. The couple will tell you that sitting on boards involves the entire family in a livestock operation because someone has got to be there to calve cows and take care of chores…it is a family commitment. New Shop/Sale Facility 2019

That family commitment is what it has taken to establish their solid repeat customer base. When Clarke and Denise were first married,they marketed their bulls through private treaty off the farm; so selling bulls was a six month job…it felt like they Todays Angus Advantag e   19

Showdown Spruce Meadows


Clarke will always be one of the biggest Angus promoters in the breed! He has marketed cattle across North America and travelled as far as Mongolia to promote the breed. The first stop on the Saskatchewan Angus Tour this past summer was the pastures at Ward’s Red Angus. The most consistent features of this cow herd are the soundness of foot and limb and udder type of the cows. Those foundation females are still hard at work, longevity…Clarke and Denise want a product which will suit and survive their customer’s type of management.

Ward’s Stall Agribition 2008

Saskatchewan Angus Breeder of the Year 2020

Ward’s Red Angus, Clarke and Denise, Josh and Kari, Carter and Olivia, Cole and Kathryn, were awarded Saskatchewan Angus Breeder of the Year for 2020. Despite social distancing and everything else, Ward’s Red Angus had a great sale south of Vanscoy. Clarke will tell you that if you can sell bulls to your friends and neighbors, then you are achieving the requirements of the industry, while making more friends. Ward’s Red Angus is a true example of a family operation with determination and a marketing goal. Todays Angus Advantag e   20

Clarke & Denise

Josh, Kari, Carter & Olivia

Cole & Kathryn


Todays Angus Advantageâ&#x20AC;&#x192; 21


The sale is not over until the transfer is done. Don’t forget to complete the deal and transfer your animal(s). Transfers have never been easier. Transfers can be done on AngusNOW, by emailing the transfer information to registry@cdnangus.ca or by completing the back of your registration certificate. Contact the Canadian Angus Association and complete your transfers today.

1-888-571-3580 • registry@cdnangus.ca • www.cdnangus.ca

Todays Angus Advantag e   22


Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 23


Don’t Give Up On EPD’s

Biography: Dr. Colin Palmer is an Associate Professor of Theriogenology (Animal Reproduction) at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Originally from Nova Scotia, Dr. Palmer worked in mixed practices in Ontario and British Columbia and has owned/operated a practice in Saskatchewan. Dr. Palmer along with his wife Kim and children Lauren, Emily and Carter run a herd of purebred Red Angus cattle under the KC Cattle Co. name.

I have been hearing a lot of frustration from fellow producers concerning the reliability and real value of expected progeny differences (EPD’s); some to the point that they are no longer including these data in their sale catalogues, opting instead to focus on the performance data of the animal or to highlight in words just how good that individual or breed line has performed relative to their own herd or in the show ring. On one hand, I am very sympathetic and can appreciate the frustration when a weaning weight EPD declines 20 pounds or more seemingly overnight while a birth weight EPD increases by 2 pounds, yet on the other I am disappointed that a very useful technology that has been around for over 40 years is being tossed aside in favour of much less reliable selection tools. Worse still is that this is happening just when we are getting into genomically enhanced EPD’s that are helping us improve the reliability and the accuracy of those numbers. Like it or not, we owe a lot to EPD’s for getting our cattle herds to where they are today. Loosely quoting Jim Leachman who spoke at a seminar I attended over 20 years ago – “no genetic progress was made in beef cattle between 1880 and 1980”; “It was only with the development of EPD’s that real genetic change was made possible”. On their website the Red Angus Association of America reports that the average weaning weight of Red Angus calves actually declined during the 20 year period before the introduction of EPD’s and has been on a steady increase since. Without EPD’s, it is difficult to determine what proportion Todays Angus Advantag e   24

of an animal’s performance is due to its environment (feeding, management) and what is due to true genetic value; the only part passed on to the next generation. So what is the root of the frustration? My belief is that lack of understanding of what the numbers mean, where the numbers come from and how to actually use EPD’s coupled with large, often unfavourable changes in the EPD values for our most looked at traits is the cause. The current fluctuations in EPD numbers are mostly occurring in the Angus breed with the most disappointment amongst the Red Angus breeders. Expected progeny differences are calculated using production data from the individual animal and from its relatives… half siblings, parents, grand parents and so on. My favourite trait to discuss is weaning weight (WW) – the calculation of the WW EPD utilizes a direct measurement from the individual and it is the most economically relevant trait for the cow-calf producer. Not only is it the individual’s weaning weight, but those of numerous relatives are included in generating the EPD number. Most genetic evaluations of the growth traits utilize multiple-trait analysis which accounts for correlations that occur between them. For example, birth weight, weaning weight and yearling weight are related and each will have an influence on the other in the calculation of EPD’s. Data from ancestors, the animal’s own performance and data gathered from progeny are all weighted appropriately in the analysis model. Full siblings can be vastly different; although in


theory, they share 50% of their DNA; it is only when the performance data from progeny are gathered that we gain a reliable appreciation for which genes were present in the parent. More data translates to more accuracy. If producer, “Go-It Alone,” does not submit any information to the breed association for several generations then EPD’s generated will only be based on pedigree estimates using data gathered from other herds with related animals. ”Go-It Alone” may produce the next great outcross bull with an outstanding phenotype, but those numbers may change dramatically when progeny data is entered from several herds and the true genetic value of that animal is revealed. Heavily used artificial insemination (AI) sires will have the most accurate EPD’s – accuracy is reported as a number between 0 and 1 with those closer to 1 representing a great accuracy. A highly accurate EPD will not vary much more and can be counted on to be a true representation of the genetic value of that trait. A highly accurate EPD does not mean that the calves will perform like clones for a particular trait, it simply means that the EPD number will not change much provided it stays in the same data base. Young, unproven sires usually have reported accuracies for the growth traits in the range of 0.40 to 0.50; however, the accuracy will improve steadily with continued input of data from his calves. Accuracies associated maternal and carcass traits EPD will naturally take much longer to improve. Regardless of the trait, the actual EPD number by itself has little meaning. Touting that your bull has a +60 yearling weight EPD has no relevance unless you know the breed, breed database, and when that number was generated. The numbers are for comparing two animals within the same breed - database. For example, Canadian Angus Association, January 2020; or Red Angus Association of American, Fall 2019; or Canadian Hereford Association, Fall 2019. For your information (FYI) numbers from different databases are not directly comparable! If you take the time, you can easily find bulls in the popular sire catalogues that are evaluated in both databases and not surprisingly the EPD numbers are different. A handy tip is to also look at how the animal stacks up in the percentile

rank or (rank %) – if the rank percentage is 50 or greater it means the bull is below breed-database average for that trait. For the birth weight EPD, the higher the EPD, the greater the birth weight and the greater the rank %. Higher birth weight is not considered to be a good thing! In contrast, a rank % of 10 for WW means the bull is in the top 10% of his breed database for weaning weight which is a very good thing! A straightforward exercise is to compare two bulls from the same bull sale catalogue or simply check that the database is the same. One bull has +50 weaning WW EPD and one has a +35 WW EPD. If each sired 25 calves the average adjusted weaning weight for the +50 sire group should be 15 pounds greater than that of the +35 sire. Will this happen in reality? No, it is not likely that you will see exactly a 15 pound difference in 25 calves because of many factors the simplest of which includes dam variablility, how the calves were managed (twins, pastures, feed resources, castration, implanting) and really just biological variability. However, when calf age at weaning, dam age, sex of the calf and other variables associated with contemporary group are accounted for the +50 WW EPD bull will have heavier calves than the +35 WW EPD bull and as more calves are produced by these bulls, and the accuracy improves, the more likely you are to see that the average difference in weaning weight is 15 pounds. Most of the beef breeds update their EPD’s twice a year. Recently, the Canadian Angus Association moved away from including red cattle in the Red Angus Association of America database to evaluating both black and red cattle together in the Canadian database. This resulted in a change in numbers which is to be expected as the baseline numbers would be different. The real positive is that Canadian Angus Cattle can be compared regardless of coat colour. Yes, the average black EPD’s are greater than the average red EPD’s for the growth and carcass traits, however, the average birth weight EPD is lower for red cattle and the milk EPD’s are similar. As always, genetics from both colours can be sampled to improve cattle and directly comparable EPD’s can facilitate this.

Todays Angus Advantag e   25


Unlock your full sales potential! Contact us to find out how info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 26


◊ Angus Cattle ◊ ◊ Ranch & Performance Horses ◊

performance

RED & BLACK angus

Leon & Melissa Lee Oyen, Alberta Leon Cell ◊ 403-664-0370 Melissa Cell ◊ 403-664-9177 E-Mail ◊ diamondlranching@gmail.com Box 441 ◊ Oyen, Alberta ◊ T0J 2J0

Bob Hahn

bhahn@hahnco.com cell. 780.991.1355 home. 780.464.0296 fax. 780.423.4836 www.hahnangus.com

22525 Twp Rd 514 Sherwood Park, Alberta, T8C 1H5

We Stand Behind Our Bulls and Beside Our Customers

Lee & Laura Brown

Box 217, Erskine, AB T0C 1G0 403-742-4226 Lee cell 403-740-9429

RR 2, Olds, AB T4H 1P3 | 403.994.0552 Brody, Justine, Calynn & Hiller Gardner Gary, Donna & Rob Smith: 403.556.2290 info@diamondtcattle.ca | www.diamondtcattle.ca

llbangus@telus.net www.llbangus.com

Annual Bull and Female Sale second Saturday in March

Are you on the list?

Make your sale standout! Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Todays Angus Advantag e   27


Pedersen Livestock

Kurt & Becky Pedersen

(780) 755-3160 (780) 209-9999 Kurt Cell www.pedersenlivestock.com

Sean McGrath

Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 (780)853‐9673 sean@roundrockranching.com www.roundrockranching.com

The Best Beef in a Better World

The

Sean McGrath

Samtia Angus

REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS CATTLE Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 Lee & Layne Gleim & Family (780)853‐9673 Box 4467, Taber,sean@roundrockranching.com AB Home: (403) 223-8442 www.roundrockranching.com Cell: (403) 795-0004 or (403) 634-8226 The Best Beef in a Better World “Our Vision is Based on Quality Not Quantity” layneg@cciwireless.ca

Mick & Debbie Trefiak

14 miles east of Wainright and 11 miles north on range road 4-3

RR 1 Edgerton, Alberta T0B 1K0 P :: 780-755-2224 F :: 780-755-2223 C :: 780-842-8835 mick@mjt.ca www.mjt.ca

The Best Beef in a Better World

The Best Beef in a Better World

Todays Angus Advantag e   28

The

The

The

Sean McGrath

Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 (780)853‐9673 sean@roundrockranching.com www.roundrockranching.com

Sean McGrath

Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 (780)853‐9673 sean@roundrockranching.com www.roundrockranching.com

The

Sean McGrath

Box 3528 Vermilion, AB T9X 2B5 (780)853‐9673 sean@roundrockranching.com www.roundrockranching.com

The Best Beef in a Better World


Box 3771, Regina, SK S4P 3N8 Phone 306-757-6133 • Fax 306-525-5852 Email bwagner@cdnangus.ca

Canadian Junior Angus Showdown 2020 Rescheduled for 2021 May 5, 2020

Canadian Junior Angus (CJA) has made the difficult decision to cancel our National Junior Angus Show, Showdown 2020, scheduled for Brandon, Manitoba this July due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The health and safety of our members and their families are our priority and with the uncertainty of what the summer will bring with the virus, government regulations and travel, cancelling the show was really the only responsible option available to us. We are disappointed that we will not be able to get together with our Junior Angus family this summer, however we look forward to heading to Brandon next July 22–24 for Showdown 2021. Any 2020 entries received will be refunded and sponsors will be contacted regarding refunds and/or deferring their sponsorship to next year’s show. The CJA board are working on details for a Showdown 2020 Online Challenge to engage with members across the country July 20–25, so please watch the CAA website and our social media channels for more information on the Challenge in early June. We encourage your participation! If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out to any CJA board member. Stay safe and healthy. For more information, please contact: Belinda Wagner CJA Coordinator bwagner@cdnangus.ca 306-757-6133

Tyra Fox CJA President tyrafox20@gmail.com 780-871-2563

Todays Angus Advantag e   29


The Porsche of Beef

Consumers are willing to pay a high price for beef if it’s worth it every time

By Morgan Marley If USDA Choice were a basic Volkswagen, U.S. cattlemen should be producing the Audis and Porsches made by the same company. That’s according to Robbi Pritchard, speaking at the recent Midwest American Society of Animal Scientists’ Harlan Ritchie Symposium in Omaha. He was one of five who presented on evolving cattle production to align with consumer demands. Superior products require superior attention to detail, including shifting demand signals. “Those consumer preferences seem to be focused on the increased demand we’ve seen for the higher quality products,” Pritchard said. “And the well being of the animals—which gets around to animal husbandry, our environmental impact and how well we manage though the entire supply chain.”

“When feeder cattle go to the feed yard sooner and are harvested sooner, there’s less carbon footprint,” he said. Some consumers want grass-fed cattle and decreased greenhouse gas emissions simultaneously, Pritchard noted. But the longer an animal walks the earth, the larger its carbon footprint. “It just doesn’t fit,” he said, while allowing, “We still have to work on finding sustainable solutions.” Breaking Old Habits As for the next challenge, Pritchard asked, “How can you build an entire pen of uniform feeder calves?” Start with how you want to market them and plan backward from there. Nothing holds more value than a relationship with a cattle feeder to gauge genetic improvement needs in successive calf crops.

“Consumers have proven they’re willing to pay the ‘Porsche price,’ but if the eating experience doesn’t match, then that brand of beef will get scratched off the buy-again list.” he said.

“Having that relationship is when you get rewarded for it,” he said.

Generic cattle have limited potential in today’s branded and specialized marketplace, where the average load is 75% Choice or higher. That’s also the threshold for reward premiums.

“If the AI sires have superior genetics and your cleanup bulls don’t, then you no longer have a uniform, superior calf crop,” Pritchard said. All bulls used have to meet at least average specs. The payback for that comes when the calves sell, whether at weaning, after backgrounding or through retained ownership.

Borrowed Approach Learning from others can save a lot of time, worry and money. Take notes from hog farmers on replacement females, Pritchard suggested. “In the ’80s, swine producers started to receive letters from packers that their hogs no longer met market specs and they would not buy their hogs anymore,” he said. The problem? Lack of uniformity and quality in the sow herd. The quickest and most efficient way to make a turnaround was to buy commercial F1 females with a proven record of consistency. “We can do that in the cattle industry if we’re willing to take that step,” he said. Leading beef producers are there now, but many more would benefit by following their lead. Maternal function and carcass quality can be delivered in one package with focused selection. But it doesn’t work if half of your steer calves have maternal sires and half have terminal sires. Humans have a competitive nature that drives toward “best,” whether that’s luxury cars or premium beef production. “If we’re building a Porsche, do we buy the cheapest brakes to put in it?” Pritchard asked. Unintended consequences proliferate when losing sight of the end goal. Cattlemen have built highly efficient cows. Commercial producers should focus on improving the bottom end of the herd for the fastest results.

All of it, starting with those first investments leading up to a breeding season that may include artificial insemination (AI).

If we can break some old habits, he said, a uniform calf crop decreases the need for sorting and mixing into shared pens at the feed yard; if we do less of that, we will use less antibiotics. “When we co-mingle, it’s like daycare,” Pritchard said. No amount of vaccinations and health precautions can prevent disease in every animal. Technology has provided assistance in monitoring animals and streamlining chores, but he said it’s increasingly used as a substitute for choices and husbandry skills. Those require persistent practice. “Husbandry is kind of like marriage,” he said. Everyone has their own opinion on what makes a successful marriage, so “it’s really hard to define the good ones.” Animal welfare is the biggest concern from consumers, and husbandry is a key component. Technology and husbandry intermix during heat detection, Pritchard said. He noted a commonly listed advantage of timed AI is that it eliminates the need to identify which cows are in heat. “But,” he asked, “if we are challenged to find help that can recognize estrus, how capable are we of identifying early signs of illness in feeder cattle?” There’s more to raising a good steak than what meets the eye. It has to have superior attention from first plans to the dinner table.

There are different ways to evaluate efficiency. Some compare weaning weights as a percent of cow weights. Others optimize carrying capacity, which keeps downward pressure on frame size. “Both of these select for smaller cows,” Pritchard said. “But in the end, we’re still trying to see how many servings of beef we can produce per cow per year.” That’s why he prefers to compare cows on their progeny’s hot carcass weight, times age at harvest, divided by cow body weight. Efficiency benefits the environment, too. Cattle used to enter the feed yard at 15 to 18 months of age, but today most Northern Plains cattle are harvested by then. Todays Angus Advantag e   30


Mike & Brenda Wheeler 4694 Blackwater Rd. Vanderhoof, BC V0J 3A1 Tel: 250-567-4020

Email: north.40@live.ca

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Don e bl m a g with r you ! sale

stomers Connect with new cut to coast from coas

Book your card ad now! 306-933-4200

Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list on www.BuyAgro.com info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 31


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pasture shots?

Ie aIr Ro

summer is a great time to have pasture shots done. Why? • they are great for website updates • profile pictures of your cows are great supplemental pictures for sale catalogues • they make great content for your social media pages

taking bookings for:

2018

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Prairierose graphic co. Morgan Ilg

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• pasture shoots • fall sales & dispersals • herdsire and donor pictures

306-231-3066 morgan@prairierosegraphicco.com prgco.smugmug.com

Todays Angus Advantage  32


Join the list!

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 33


DK “a quality brand”

Donn & Karen Kraynick & Family Box 1657 Canora, Sask. S0A 0L0 cell (306) 562-7776 email kraynick@xplornet.ca

Red & Black Angus Box 23 Gladmar, SK S0C 1A0 www.dkfredangus.com

Dwayne & Karen Fettes 306-969-4506

dkfredangus@sasktel.net

dkfredangus@gmail.com

Unlock your full sales potential! Contact us to find out how info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200 Are you on the list?

Make your sale standout! Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Todays Angus Advantag e   34

Scott, Tina Brandy & Eric 306-815-7023


Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 35


Unlock your full sales potential! Contact us to find out how info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Glenn & Mel Sisson

(306) 873-4890 Cell: (306) 852-9047 RR 1, Ridgedale, SK S0E 1L0 “The Final Legacy of the Black Pearl” Sale ~ December 16, 2017 Saskatoon, SK

Todays Angus Advantag e   36


SHA D

US NG

REEK A YC

KENT HARRIGAN & CHERYL PERKINS MAPLE CREEK, SK

306-662-7339

PUREBRED BLACK ANGUS

WWW.SHADYCREEKANGUS.COM

Sunderland Ranch Ltd. Registered Black Angus Cattle

Terry & Rachelle Sunderland www.sunderlandranch.net Box 2139 Maple Creek, SK S0N 1N0 terrysunderland@sasktel.net 306-662-3021

Home of SAV Ten Trillion 3112A Son of AAR Ten X 7008 5A X SAV Blackcap May 5530

Tom & Vicki Flanagan Maple Creek, SK P: 306.662.2272 C: 306.662.8120 tomvic@sasktel.net sheidaghananghus.com

Purebred Registered Red Angus

The Kereluiks

Box 278, Sheho, SK S0A 3T0 twin.heritage@sasktel.net www.twinheritage.com Mitch Allan and Ann Michael 306.272.7501 306.849.4638 306.220.1976 “Add a Touch of Heritage to Your Herd

Todays Angus Advantag e   37

Box 176 Dundurn, SK S0K 1K0 306.492.2161 wilbarcattle@gmail.com b r ya n a n d t r a c e y w i l l m s w w w . w i l b a r c at t l e . co m


This Too Shall Pass By Nicole Erceg

Though many have a poor taste in their mouth seeing others profit while staring at a wrecked spring budget sheet, if we refuse to cut corners on our consumer experience, the reward will come in time. Today, producing high-quality beef may not be the thing that makes an extra dollar, but those who faithfully invested in carcass merit will lose less as we cross this valley. Many might compare the last year or so in the cattle business to torment, but what’s a tough couple of years when the Israelites wandered in the desert for four decades? The beef industry today looks vastly different than it did 40 years ago and those who persevered through the challenges of those days saw many good years, too. In troubled times, the comfort of food and good beef in the freezer keeps many content and healthy at home. When we’re all able to get back into our favorite steakhouse, cattlemen who can produce a quality celebratory steak dinner will still be in high demand.

My favorite book in the Bible is Exodus. The first time I read it, I remember getting so frustrated with the Israelites. How could they be so close to the Promised Land and mess everything up?! It’s mind boggling to look at a historical map and realize they crisscrossed a patch of land the size of a few large ranches for 40 years before finally reaching their destination. As I’ve reread it many times, I’ve come to see myself in their struggles — complaining about the manna when God provided food, creating false idols when they only needed to be still and wait. Oh, how I am guilty of the same sins. Those passages in the beginning of the Good Book are a reminder that we can’t have the mountaintop views without first crossing the valleys — sometimes more than once. There are no words I can write that will take away the devastating slap of a market drop, the pain of a postponed bull sale or the exhausting frustration that things feel out of control and it’s cattlemen who get the short end of the stick. But this is not a burden cattlemen carry alone. Our partners down the supply chain who normally serve our steaks with pride are going without paychecks they expected. For too many, the restaurant bustling with business just weeks ago will now be shuttered forever.

The page will eventually turn. Those who ride out the storm and build better herds that target premium quality will see their persistence pay. As we walk through the unknown ahead, the one sure thing is the world will still need great beef and those who raise it. Next time in Black Ink®, Miranda Reiman will talk about flexibility. Questions? E-mail nerceg@certfiedangusbeef.com.

The Israelites survived generations of slavery. They overcame the plagues. They persisted through enormous struggles only to be left to wander a stone’s throw away from glory, fated to suffer more before reaching their destination. Cattlemen, too, know hard times. We endured when the rain shut off in 2012, bounced back after a cow stole Christmas, survived the ’80s Farm Crisis and have the blood running through our veins of those who made it through the Great Depression. This too shall pass. We don’t know when, we don’t know how. The only thing we can do is continue on course — producing exceptional beef that flies off the grocery shelves in both good times and bad.

Todays Angus Advantag e   38


Don’t make your sale hard to nd... With your next big sale on the horizon, the one thing that remains the same is...

the buyers need to know! Stay visible with an ad in Todays Angus Advantage!

Put your sale where buyers see it! Summer Early Sales & Prospects Issue

Booking Deadline: Friday, July 10 Todays Angus Advantage  39

Bryan Kostiuk P: 306-933-4200 F: 306-934-0744 info@todaysangus.com www.todaysangus.com


Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca MATTHEW & LEANNE GLASMAN

Angus & Simmental 204.773.3209 H 204.773.6055 C

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

Put your operation Bruce,on Ione &their Breanna Austen & Katie radar... Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 www.andersoncattle.ca 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

Book your card ad today! 306-933-4200

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

Bruce, Ione & Breanna

www.andersoncattle.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

www.andersoncattle.ca

204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca (204)483-3234 John (Cell) (204) 483-0764 Gloria (Cell) (204)-741-0648

Bruce, Ione & Breanna Austen & Katie Comp2 RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 204 734 2073 andersoncattle@inethome.ca

/GlasmanFarms www.glasmanfarms.com

Quality Purebred Red & Black Angus Genetics Annual Bull Sale - 3rd Saturday In March

John & Gloria Turner BoxAusten 234,&Souris, Katie MB R0KComp2 2C0RR2 Swan River, Mb R0L 1Z0 Email giturner@xplornet.ca

mlg@glasmanfarms.com Box 1390, Russell, MB R0J 1W0

www.andersoncattle.ca

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 40

Albert, Glen, Larissa, Ian Dr. David & Shelly Hamilton Hamilton (204) 872-2358 (204) 822-3054 (204) 526-0705 (204) 325-3635 larissa_hamilton@hotmail.com â&#x20AC;˘ www.hamcocattleco.com


stomers Connect with new cut to coast from coas

Book your card ad now! 306-933-4200

The 2020 Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup and Canadian Junior Shorthorn Weekend to be held July 31, August 1 and 2, 2020 in Neepawa, Manitoba is cancelled Press Release May 4, 2020

Due to the current coronavirus situation and the uncertain guidelines on how many people can gather at one event, along with the concern of safety for everyone involved, the Roundup Committee has made the difficult decision to cancel the 2020 Roundup. The Committee always looks forward to working with the All Breeds Junior Youth and hosting a first-class event, so we are doing our best to still offer opportunities for youth in 2020. This year, since we will not be able to meet in one location, the committee is currently working on some fun, educational activities along with online workshops for any Junior members that are interested in participating. We are currently working out the details but stay tuned to the Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup Facebook page and our website at www.mbyouthbeefroundup.weebly.com. The Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup Scholarship entry forms will be online in early May, and entry deadline is July 1, 2020. Senior members please complete the applications as these funds can be a way to help you fund your future education. For this year, the Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup - Canadian Western Agribition Judging Team, will be selected through an online application process. Deadline is September 1, 2020. If you are a Senior member please consider this opportunity to participate in livestock judging, meet new Juniors and be part of the Roundup Team. However the show will go on in 2021. Mark July 30, July 31 and August 1, 2021 for the Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup and the Canadian Junior National Shorthorn Weekend, Neepawa, Manitoba. Have a safe summer! Roundup 2020 Committee.

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 41


Convention/AGM Notice

Notice of Canadian Angus Association Virtual AGM 2020 The Canadian Angus Association will be hosting an online AGM on Thursday, June 11, 2020 at 7pm MDT. Please follow Canadian Angus social media channels and check back on our website at www.cdnangus.ca for registration information.

Key highlights include: • • • •

Presentation of 2019 Financial Statements 2019 Highlights and 2020 new initiatives Presentation of CAA board and new executive Update on Junior and Foundation programs

SAVE THE DATE National Convention 2021 National Convention 2021 will be cohosted by the Saskatchewan Angus Association in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Mark June 10-12, 2021 on your calendars and stay tuned for session and event details as they develop.

PLAN AHEAD National Convention 2022 National Convention 2022 will be cohosted by the Maritime Angus Association in Moncton, New Brunswick. Circle June 9-12, 2022 on your calendars and follow Canadian Angus on social media for event announcements.

1-888-571-3580 • www.cdnangus.ca • cdnangus@cdnangus.ca Todays Angus Advantage  42


Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 43


18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Unlock your full sales potential!

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Contact us to find out how Office #: (905) 898-4463 info@buyagro.com Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca 306-933-4200

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Manager

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Manager

18010 Bathurst St. Newmarket, ON L3Y 4V9

Gerald Kellington Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Ian & Joy Rudkin

Manager

Office #: (905) 898-4463 Gerald's #: (905) 252-6315 Email: galten.farms@sympatico.ca

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 44

3320 bradburn Road blackstock, on, L0b 1b0 905.718.5331 maplelinefarm@hotmail.ca


’t Don e l b m ga h wit r you ! sale

(a partnership)

4023 Meadowbrook Drive, Unit 108, London, Ontario N6L 1E6 www.weavercroft.com Kevin Brooks 519-878-1183 kb@weavercroft.com

Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list on www.BuyAgro.com info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200

Put your operation on their radar... Book your card ad today! 306-933-4200

Todays Angus Advantag e   45

John Weaver 519-318-6302 john@weavercroft.com

Jim Weaver 519-868-0328 jw@weavercroft.com


Cat Skinner Shorty’s neighbours were… well different. There were ranchers, hippies and old timers that were born, raised and spent their entire life in the same yard. Some of them were skilled cattlemen, some skilled cowboys and the hippies were skilled farmers albeit their crops only recently became legal. Frank was none of the above. True enough he had been born and raised in the same house he and his wife inhabited now, but it was his wife that was the skilled one in his operation. Frank could spend the day talking to a hat on a stump, in fact he preferred the stump to his wife most days, but he had a heart as big as a house and he would work his butt off to pull off a good joke. Shorty had grown up on the neighbouring ranch to Frank and even though he didn’t see Frank often, he did stop in when he was passing through. Shorty had stopped in earlier in the day, but there was no one home. Now, as he made his way home from dropping some salt blocks on a remote corner of the summer range, he was happy to see Frank’s truck parked at Deadpine Lake. Frank was out on a new irrigation dam that was being built for the ranchers downstream. Shorty pulled over, got out of his truck and joined his old friend. “Shorty! Good to see you!” Frank extended his dirty hand and Shorty shook it. “Hi Frank. What’s happening?” Shorty nodded towards a D6 Cat parked on top of the new dam. “That Joe’s Cat?” “Yup” Frank was grinning now. “What’s going on Frank?” It was one of those questions that Shorty really wasn’t sure he wanted answered. “Well Shorty… follow me while I tell you.” Frank turned and walked towards his truck. “I’ve known Joe for a long time. In fact he and I went to school together… at least

to Grade 8.” Frank glanced over to see if Shorty had any reaction to his statement. “You two made it to Grade 8?” “Not really… we aged out. But here is the thing… Joe is a pretty good friend, but he has always been an arrogant SOB. He thinks he is pretty cool with his little toy over there.” Frank nodded back at the Cat. “So today I got kinda lucky. Real lucky that you showed up, ‘cause I need a little help to put that cocky little bugger in his place.” “Geez Frank! I am too young to go to jail…” Shorty was only half kidding. Frank’s grin just got bigger. The grin was so big that it caused his hand rolled cigarette to tumble down his shirt. Frank stepped on the butt and nodded into the bush. There, laying lifeless was a young black bear. “What the hell Frank?” “The frickin’ bears have been hanging around here all summer, Shorty. I have had enough of them. I came up here to see how Joe was doin’ on the dam and there he was just standin’ there on the road, so I shot him.” “We are still talking about the bear, right Frank?” “Yeah! Now you are here, I can get even with that little prick.” “Bear or have we switched to Joe?” Frank was getting pretty excited as he realized they might be able to pull this off. He ignored Shorty’s question completely. “Just wait here, Shorty.” Shorty had always had the impression that Frank was kinda allergic to breaking a sweat, but that afternoon and early evening he learned otherwise. By the time the two men

Todays Angus Advantag e   46


had accomplished the plan that Frank had hatched, both of them were sweaty and somewhat blood stained… but both were pretty proud of themselves. They loaded the bear carcass onto a tarp that Frank pulled out from under the seat of his truck and were able to drag the bear over to the Cat. Then with the help of some old lariats that Shorty had, a block and tackle that Frank produced from his truck box and some ranch rocket horsepower the two men were able to lift the bear onto the operator’s platform of Joe’s old D6. They pried and pulled, they grunted and swore and they ended up getting the carcass in a seated position on the D6. Frank picked up his long discarded shirt and draped it over the bear’s shoulders as if he were wearing it, pulled an old Case ball cap out of the cab of his truck and put it on the bear’s head and then wired the bear’s neck to the bush guard behind the Cat’s seat. By this time the carcass was getting a little stiff, but Frank was able to pull the front paws over and wedge them onto the control arms on either side of the seat. As a final touch, Frank sacrificed a hand made cigarette and left it in the bear’s mouth. By the time they stepped back to admire their handiwork they realized they were only able to see it by headlights. Frank was sweat soaked and swatting mosquitoes from his bare back and arms. Shorty was covered in sweat and a little bear blood, but he was a little proud of what the two had accomplished. Shorty looked over at his old friend. Frank was lighting another cigarette and staring at the D6. “Shorty, you got the time?” “Geez Frank it is after 9… I gotta get going, Cathy is going to have a fit.” “You better stop at my place and clean up a bit, if she is worried and you show up looking like that…” Shorty and Frank showed up at Frank’s house later that night. Frank’s wife was out baling hay, so Shorty did a quick clean up, phoned Cathy and told her he had been helping Frank kill some chickens and then headed home. Frank was hiding in the brush at 6 AM the next morning when Joe arrived to go to work. Joe rolled up and parked his truck in the same place he had been parking all week. He got out of the cab, pulled on a yellow hard hat and a long sleeved

shirt and headed across the dam towards his Cat. He was carrying a grease gun and staring out across the lake. He was only a few steps away from the machine when he shifted his attention from the lake to the task at hand. He always fired the Cat up while he greased the machine and for some reason on this day he hadn’t even looked at the Cat until he started to climb onto the operator’s platform. Frank watched Joe drop the grease gun and stumble backward. Then he regained his balance and took a quick couple steps towards his truck. By that time Joe’s Grade 7 education kicked in and he realized that he had been set up. He looked around to make sure no one had seen him. He listened carefully to see if anyone was laughing at him and if the damned bear was breathing. He heard neither, so he picked up the grease gun and climbed onto the Cat. Joe was staring at a glassy eyed black bear with a hand rolled cigarette in his mouth. The bear looks as though he was wearing a shirt and the biggest insult of all, he was wearing a Case hat. The bear was starting to stink and the flies were a pain in the butt. Joe had two questions, who did this and how the hell was he going to get the bear out of his seat. The answer to both questions walked out of the bush a few minutes later. Frank’s eyes were red from lack of sleep and laughing. “Morning Joe. You hire a new guy?” Frank was straight faced as he lit yet another cigarette. “Figured it was you, you bastard. You are lucky this is a grease gun. Just in time to help me get this out of my way. And just so you know, I start the clock when I get out of the truck, so you better get up here and get going.” Shorty figured it must have cost the ranchers about $500 that morning, while the two old friends cleaned up the Cat so that Joe could go to work. There was a lot of swearing, a lot of sweating, but most of all the two men laughed like they were kids again. If you ever go to Deadpine Lake you will see an earth dam on the south end of the lake. On the west end of the dam there is an unusual bump on the top side of the dam, beneath which lies a bear carcass wearing a red and black checked shirt and a Case ball cap.

Grant Rolston was born and raised in ranching country near Penticton, British Columbia. After graduating school, he worked on a purebred Hereford ranch, then assumed a position at Western Breeders Artificial Insemination Unit. In 1980, he left the livestock scene and joined the Edmonton Police Department, where he received his formal training in photography, working for the IDENT unit (crime scene investigation). After a decade, he returned to the industry, purchasing a herd of purebred Angus cattle but both Grant and his wife, Lauralee, worked off the ranch to make a living. He chose livestock photography and is now Canada’s premier livestock photographer of beef cattle. Grant and Lauralee travel throughout nine provinces in Canada for on farm photography, in addition to all major livestock shows, including the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, the Canadian Western Agribition and all major National Junior shows in the summer months. Grant and Lauralee Rolston reside in Vulcan, Alberta. With four decades of experience, Grant shares things that are “Not Taken for Granted.” Todays Angus Advantag e   47


Breeders 117 th

Productie on Sal

Advancing Reproductive Solutions

February 8, 2020

SAV Resource 1441

Bow Valley Genetics

Kelly & Martie Jo Schaff 6110 Co. Road 81 St. Anthony, ND 58566 (701) 445-7465 www.schaffangusvalley.com kelly@schaffangusvalley.com

Services

www.bowvalleygenetics.com p 1.587.887.1934 | f 1.587.317.7392 box 1239, brooks, ab, t1r 1c1

EMBRYO TRANSFER SERVICES | IVF | DOMESTIC AND EXPORT QUALIFIED SEMEN COLLECTION CERTIFIED FOR EMBRYO EXPORT PRODUCTION | OWNER’S USE SEMEN EMBRYO & SEMEN STORAGE & DISTRIBUTION

Bova-Tech Ltd. Embryo Transplants

DESIGN DESIGN

Tyler Dietrich

Graphic Artist ~ Owner Pictures, Advertisments, Logos C: 780.385.0030 Email: ty.dietrich.21@gmail.com

We provide owners use semen collection at our facility and we can produce domestic and export qualified semen in our new industry leading centre. Bow Valley Genetics offers complete embryo collection and transfer services on farm or at our donar centre.

SERVICES

www.bova-tech.com

In-Clinic & On Farm Services Embryo Collection, Freezing & Transplants Donor Care Facility Recipient Programs

P.O. Box 80142 Airdrie, Alberta T4B 2V8 Canada Tel: (403) 332-1567 E-mail: info@bova-tech.com

Export Certified International Marketing

Alberta - Saskatchewan - Manitoba

Todays Angus Advantag e   48


LOOKING FOR

WOOD! SLAB BOARDS, SPLIT RAIL, ROUGH SAWN (ANY SIZE)

RANDY TOOTH HOME: 403-533-3985 • RANDY CELL: 403-809-1795 SHELAGH CELL: 587-888-4111 TWO LOCATIONS ROCKYFORD OR SUNDRE

Craig Flewelling Consulting • Ring Service • Order Buying Craig Flewelling Box 428 Bowden, AB T0M 0K0 Phone (403) 556-0515 cell Email: flewcc@xplornet.com www.flewellingcattleco.com

Lone Trailer Sales and Repair Cabri, SK

306-741-5983 or 306-741-5980 Refurbishing Stock Trailers, Sandblasting, Painting and Lights Find us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/lonetrailers

stomers Connect with new cut to coast from coas

Book your card ad now! 306-933-4200

Todays Angus Advantag e   49


Marcel DeCorby Spy Hill, Sask.

Cell: 306-745-7755 mhdecorby@gmail.com

Specializing in farm & ranch property

  Auctioneer Box 2330 Warman, SK S0K 4S0

Cell (306) 220-5006 chris@tbarc.com

MARK STOCK Box 89, Hazelet, SK S0N 1E0

306-678-4811 Cell: 403-357-8104

RING SERVICE & LIVESTOCK SERVICE

Worried about your next sale? Get the turnout you’re looking for by putting your sale on www.BuyAgro.com

Contact us to be added to the upcoming events list! info@buyagro.com 306-933-4200 Todays Angus Advantag e   50


Advertising and Subscription Deadlines and Editorial Calendar Canadian Angus Association Bull Buyers Guide Special Issue - Herd Sire Issue

For More Information Contact:

Bryan Kostiuk Editor 306.933.4200 C: 306.292.7763

Shane Michelson Marketing C: 403.363.9973

Booking Deadline Material Deadline January 2 January 6

Chris Poley

Camera Ready January 13

Spring - Distaff/Female Issue

Marketing 306.933.4200 C: 306.220.5006

April 17

Ben Wright

July 10

April 22

April 26

Summer - Early Sales and Prospects

Marketing C: 519.374.3335

July 15

July 22

Early Fall Issue - Late Sales and Shows August 15

SU B SCRIBE

August 22

August 26

Late Fall Issue - Late Sales and Shows

We appreciate your interest in Today’s Angus Advantage and hope you have enjoyed this issue. To receive further issues, please fill out the following subscription form and return it along with your payment (prices listed below) to:

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Todays Angus Advantage  51

$250.00


A.S. Galten Farms

44

Clegg Angus

26

Aberlynn Farms

26

Clevelands Farm

34

Ag+ Plus Design

48

CMT Farms

34

Alameda Agencies Ltd.

48

CNI Ranching

34

Alta Genetics

48

Combest Red Angus

26

Anderson Cattle Co.

40

Country Lane Angus

27

Arda Farms

26

Crescent Creek Angus

34

Arway Angus

44

Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd.

49

Atlasta Angus

26

DeCorby, Marcel

50

Baintree Angus

26

Deer Range Red Angus

34

Bar DK

34

Deer River Ranching

27

IFC

Delorme Livestock

34

34

Diamond L Ranch

27

Diamond T Cattle Company

27

Bar-E-L Angus Black Ridge Angus Farm Blairs. Ag Cattle Company

OBC

BMB Brewin Angus

26

DJ Cattle Co.

40

Border Butte Angus

26

DKF Angus

34

Bova-Tech Ltd.

48

Dorran, Steve

49

Bow Valley Genetics

48

Double Bar D Farms

34

Broken T Ranch

34

Double C Red Angus

35

Brooklyn Cattle Co.

26

Double F Cattle Co.

35

BuyAgro.com 33

Dragonview Angus

31

Cadillac Stock Farms

44

Drumhaggart Ltd.

40

Canadian Farm Insurance Corp.

48

Dwajo Angus

27

Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society

49

Early Sunset Ranch

1

CD Land & Cattle

26

Eastondale Angus

35

Chapman Cattle Company

26

EKW Red Angus

35

Circle 7 Angus

34

Emmatt Creek Ranch

35

Clair Lane Stock Farm

44

Estrotect 12

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 52


Eton Six Cattle

40

Hamilton Farms

27

Everblack Angus

27

Harprey Angus Farms

44

F Bar & Associates

40

Hartford Bros.

44

Fair Haven Farms Ltd.

40

Harvest Angus

31

Flewelling, Craig

49

Hawkeye Creek Ranch

35

Fraser Farms

40

Hazel Bluff Angus

27

GBS Angus Farm

35

HBH Angus Farms Inc.

GBT Angus

35

High Tree Cattle

35

Gerlei Angus

35

Hollinger Land and Cattle

35

Gilchrist Farms

44

Honeybrook Farms

35

Gillett Angus

27

Ivanhoe Angus

35

Glasman Farms

40

J Bar Dee Farms

35

Glen Gabel Angus

35

J&S Cattle

35

Glen Islay Angus

44

JAS Red Angus

41

Goad Family Angus

27

JD Pastures

27

Grant Rolston Photography Ltd.

49

Jim Nugent Livestock

50

GTA Ranch Inc.

27

Johnston/Fertile Valley

53

H.S. Knill Co. Ltd.

22

JPD Farms

44

Hahn Cattle Co.

27

Justamere Farms Ltd.

36

Hamco Cattle Co.

40

KC Cattle Co.

3

10, 36

Dennis Johnston ~ David Johnston 306.227.2344 ~ 306.867.7959 PH/Fax: 306.856.4726 Conquest, Saskatchewan ranchers@sasktel.net www.johnstonfertilevalley.com

 Todays Angus Advantag e   53


Kembar Farms

41

Neilcairn Angus

45

Kenray Ranch

36

Nordal Limousin & Angus

36

Key Ranch

36

Norfolk Cattle

45

Kueber Farms

27

North 40 Red Angus

31

Lazy S Ranch Inc.

27

Northern View Angus

36

LCI Doenz Ranches

27

Northway Cattle Co.

28

Leela Farms

44

Nu-Horizon Angus

36

Lewis Farms

27

Ockerman Angus

28

LLB Angus

27

Ole Farms

28

Lone Stone Farms

27

Ossaw Angus

41

Lone Trailer Sales and Repair

49

Peak Dot Ranch Ltd.

36

LT Log & Tin Forest Products Ltd.

49

Pedersen Livestock

28

Lucky 7 Cattle Co.

27

Poley, Chris

50

M&J Farms

41

Poplar Meadows Angus

31

Macks Red Angus

44

Prairierose Graphic Co.

32

Macnab Angus

36

Premier Livestock

Maple Line Farm

44

Pro Rich Seeds

15

Mar Mac Farms

41

Pugh Farms

28

McGowan Farms

28

Red Rock Red Angus

28

McMillen Ranching Ltd.

36

Red Rose Angus

37

Meadow Ridge Ent. Ltd.

36

Redekop Cattle Company

36

Merit Insurance Brokers

50

Redrich Farms

28

Miller-Wilson Angus

28

Rehorst Farms Ltd.

45

Minburn Angus

28

Reid Angus

28

MJT Cattle Co. Ltd.

28

Remitall Farms

Moose Creek Red Angus

5, 36

8

IBC

Right Cross Ranch

36

Movin On Farms

28

Rivercrest Angus Ranch

28

Myjoco Angus

44

RJ Livestock

28

Todays Angus Advantag e â&#x20AC;&#x192; 54


RNR Flicek Black Angus

36

T Bar C Cattle Co. Ltd.

Rob Roy Angus

45

Tambri Farm

45

Round Rock Ranching

28

Tannas Ranches

29

Royal Angus

36

Ter-Ron Farms

29

RSL Red Angus

36

Today’s Publishing

21

Samtia Angus

28

Tri A Angus

29

Sandy Bar Ranch

37

Triple L Angus

37

Schaff Angus Valley

48

Tullamore Farms

45

Schulz Angus

28

Twin Heritage Farms

37

Shady Creek Angus

37

Valley Blossom Ranch

37

Sheidaghan Anghus

37

Vikse Family Farm

29

Shiloh Cattle Company

28

Vos Vegas Farms

45

Shortgrass Cattle Company Ltd.

28

Walkerbrae Farms

45

Southern Angus Farms

28

Wards Red Angus

2

Spring Creek Simmentals

37

Waveny Angus Farm Ltd.

22, 29

Springside Red Angus

37

Weavercroft International

45

Spruce Ridge Stock Farms

41

Whitney Black Angus

Spruce View Angus Ranch

29

Whitton-Brook Farms Ltd.

45

Standard Hill Livestock

37

Wilbar Cattle Co.

37

Steen Agencies Inc.

50

Wild West Angus

41

7

Willowside Farm

45

Stewart Cattle Co. Ltd.

6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14

15, 45

Still Meadow Farm

31

Willowview Angus Farm

37

Stock, Mark

50

Windy Willows Farms

37

Storebo Farm Simmental & Angus

37

WRAZ Red Angus

37

Stromsmoe Hereford & Angus

29

Y Coulee Land & Cattle Co.

37

Sunderland Ranch Ltd.

37

Yarrow Creek Farm & Ranch

29

Sunny Grove Angus

37

Z Bar Angus

37

Symens Land & Cattle Co.

29 Todays Angus Advantag e   55


23 Brooking Angus Ranch Open Book Invitational Chapter 8 AngusLive.com 26 Bench Angus Long Yearling Bull And Purebred Bred Heifer Production Sale Shaunavon, SK 30-5 Canadian Western Agribition Regina, SK

December

June 5

Johnson Livestock Online Summer Bull Sale Peebles, SK

July 23-25

21st Annual Canadian Junior Angus Show Brandon, MB

September 5

Autumn Angus Classic Sale Hanover, ON

October 3 10 19 28-31

Eastern Extravaganza Angus Sale Lindsay, ON Gilchrist Farms & Guests “In It To Win It” Sale Lucknow, ON Justamere Sale Of The Year Lloydminster, AB Manitoba AgEx Brandon, MB

1 Six Mile Genetic Focus Female Sale CCI.Live 3 National Angus Gold Show Regina, SK 9 Double Bar D “Sharing The Herd” Production Sale Grenfell, SK 9 Spring Creek “Golden Opportunity VII” Female Sale Moosomin, SK Johnson Livestock Angus Female Sale / D&N 15 Livestock Commercial Angus Bred Heifer Sale Peebles, SK 16 The Female Focus Production Sale Neudorf, SK Strongbow Farms Purebred Female Production Sale 17 Hartney, MB 20 Stewart Cattle Co. Complete Dispersal Virden, MB Blairs.Ag Cattle Co. Opportunity Knocks Sale 21 Saskatoon, SK 22 HBH Angus & Northern Light Simmentals Production Sale Virden, Mb 30 Premier & Guests Falls View Production Sale Niagra Falls, ON

November 4-7 5-6 5-7 7 11-15 18 21

Lloydminster Stockade Roundup Lloydminster, AB Saskatchewan Angus Gold & Junior Show Lloydminster, AB Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Toronto, ON Royal Elite All Breeds Sale Toronto, ON Farmfair International Edmonton, AB Maple Lake Stock Farms Production Sale Hartney, MB Manitoba Angus Keystone Klassic Brandon, MB

Published by:

Today’s Angus Advantage

Published 5 times/year- Winter, Spring, Summer, Autumn and Fall

Box 2330 Warman, Saskatchewan S0K 4S0 Phone: (306) 933-4200 Fax: (306) 934-0744 info@todaysangus.com www.todaysangus.com

Careful consideration has been placed on production of this magazine and we are responsible for the value of the advertisement; however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions.

Our Staff

Publications Mail Agreement: 40021107

Bryan Kostiuk - Editor Chris Poley - Marketing Treena Ballantyne - Controller Carla Horatchka - Accounting Debbie Thiessen - Circulation Tanya Buziak - Circulation Janessa McKay - Design Breanne Anderson - Design Stephanie Lange - Design Katie Serhienko - Design Morgan Ilg - Office Support

Todays Angus Advantage  56

Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Today’s Angus Advantage Circulation Dept. Box 2330 Warman, Saskatchewan S0K 4S0


Remitall F

Connection 82G High Selling Bull Remitall Spring Bull and Female Sale at $15,000 for Half Interest/ Half Possession to HBH Angus, MB S: S A V Cutting Edge 4857 D: Remitall F Jet 74Y (HF Tiger 5T) BW: 83 lbs. BW

WW

2.5

78

YW 140

Peak Dot

WW: 836 lbs.

YW: 1335 lbs.

Milk SC

Carcass WT

22

REA

+0.87 +0.030

+53

Marb +0.59

Colossal 828G

Feature and High Selling Colossal son to sell at 2020 Peak Dot Ranch Spring Bull Sale S: Musgrave 316 Colossal 137 D: Peak Dot Barbara 148C (S A V Eliminator 9105) BW: 80 lbs.

WW: 1016 lbs.

YW: 1478 lbs.

BW WW YW Milk SC REA Carcass WT Marb 1.3 56 104 25 +50 +0.38 + 38 +0.60

Thank you to all Buyers and Bidders for making our 2020 Remitall Farms Spring Bull and Female Sale a Huge Success


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Today's Angus Advantage Spring 2020  

Today's Angus Advantage Spring 2020  

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