Page 34

CONCRETE JERSEY BARRIER

GRANITE BLOCKS

Typical Dimensions: Varies. 8 / 10 / 12 ft. long x 27 in. wide x 32 in. high. Estimated Cost: $721 / 8 ft.; $1,084 / 12 ft.

Typical Dimensions: 36 in. long x 18 in. high, x 1.5 ft. wide. Estimated Cost: Varies — typically sourced from existing city inventory (reused).

Overview: Large, concrete barriers that can be used to create a wall-style barrier.

Demo (1 day - 1 month)

F Pilot (1 month - 1 year)

F Interim (1 - 5 years)

Recommended Applications and Installation ɖBikeways: ɖ Place in continuous line along edge of lane to create barrier. At T-intersection, provide break for bikeway access from intersecting street. ɖPlazas: ɖ May be combined with planters and other barrier elements to define the edge of a plaza. Place barriers end to end along edge of plaza area, in strategic locations as needed. Not recommended as sole/primary barrier element, due to weight, lack of visual permeability, and potential aesthetic concerns. Tips and Considerations »» Highly durable and long-lasting. »» Can be decorated to integrate public art — New York City DOT has used concrete jersey barriers to create protected bicycle lanes, turning the barriers into a canvas for local artists (see page 32 for more info). »» Extremely heavy, requires trained staff and special equipment to transport. »» Can pose challenges for emergency vehicle access, trash collection, and other curbside services. Potential Sources »» Loan from city public works or transportation department. »» Buy or rent from traffic control equipment suppliers or construction companies 34 · MATERIALS PALETTE · Barrier Elements

Overview: Large, granite blocks can be used as a barrier element and have the added benefit of doubling as seating, depending on use / placement.

Demo (1 day - 1 month)

F Pilot (1 month - 1 year)

F Interim (1 - 5 years)

Recommended Applications and Installation ɖPlazas: ɖ Place along edge plaza area to visually define the plaza space. Strong case study example of this is NYCDOT’s use of granite blocks (along with planters) in and around plaza spaces to create a sense of enclosure and to buffer the plaza from motor vehicle traffic (see page 32 for more info). Blocks have also been used in Philadelphia for this purpose.

Tips and Considerations »» Highly durable and long-lasting. »» Use regionally-appropriate, locally sourced blocks whenever possible. »» Extremely heavy, requires trained staff and special equipment to transport. »» Concrete blocks are a good alternative.

Potential Sources »» Borrow from city public works or parks department. »» Purchase from local stone quarry or landscape vendor.

Tactical Urbanist's Guide to Materials and Design v.1.0  

The only materials and design guidance for Tactical Urbanist demonstration, pilot, and interim design projects. Funded by the James L. Knigh...

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