Page 26

Ask a Creativity Coach

by Romney Nesbitt

Winning Outcomes Not making progress on your creative goals? Are you easily distracted by food, technology or pets? Your procrastination may be a side effect of a work related transition in your life such as retirement, a change in work hours, summer break, etc. Whenever the structure and predictability of what’s been normal for you changes, it’s easy to get off track. Here are six suggestions to help you find a “new normal” that will work for you. Positively State What You Want, Not What You Don’t Want “I intend to produce one painting a month” is more effective than “I’m tired of not producing any new pieces.” Be Specific “I want to paint more” becomes “I want to work on my creative project for one hour five or six times each week.” Take Charge of Your Time To maximize your productivity view a typical day in three segments: morning, afternoon and evening. Segments add up: a five day work week equals 15 segments of time, seven days a week equals 21 segments of time. Decide how many “times” you want to work on your creative work each week. Work with Your Body’s Energies Choose the time segment for your creative work when you feel energetic--this is how to work with your body instead of against it. The body has energy highs and lows during the day called circadian rhythms. If you’re a morning person, use that high-energy time to do your high-value creative activities. If your energy sags in the afternoon, fill the time with low-value activities such as errands, internet surfing or chores. Do the right thing at the right time and you’ll increase your productivity and personal satisfaction. Go to Work If spouses, kids, pets and chores are too distracting for you to work at home, then look for a new place to work. Here are a few alternatives: rent, barter, share or enroll. Your local art supply store may have

26

business of art

information about studio spaces for rent. Church classrooms are empty during weekday business hours. Ask the office manager about renting space or offer to barter original art for your space (murals, backdrops for plays, bulletin cover art). Share an office space (I know a massage therapist who shares office space with a counselor—one uses the office in the day, the other in the evenings and on weekends). Enroll in an art class and get a temporary studio space once a week. A “real” work space will encourage you to be more regular in your work habits (and your rental costs are a tax-deduction!). Accountability Counts Form a group of five to seven individuals who are serious about reaching their goals. Select group members with differences: different ages, business backgrounds, skill sets and goals. Your group could have members interested in art making, writing, weight loss, financial independence and home organization. Members must have a commitment to their goals and be willing to participate in the group process. Keep the meetings under an hour. In the first half-hour each member gives a five minute report on their activity such as hours spent on the project, pounds lost, number of closets cleaned etc. If a person has had an off week with nothing to report, he or she states “no report” and the group moves on to the next person without any judgment. Group meeting time is reserved for reporting action—never excuses. If time permits, members may pose questions to the group, solicit expertise, network, etc. Friendships may develop within the group but the purpose of the group is the business of goal-reaching through accountability. n Romney Nesbitt is a Creativity Coach, artist and writer living in Tulsa. She is the author of Secrets from a Creativity Coach, available on Amazon.com. Romney welcomes your ideas or questions for future columns. Contact her at Romneyn@att.net or at www.romneynesbitt.com.

Profile for Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition

Art Focus Oklahoma, March/April 2010  

2010 March/April Art Focus Oklahoma is a bimonthly publication of the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition dedicated to stimulating insight into a...

Art Focus Oklahoma, March/April 2010  

2010 March/April Art Focus Oklahoma is a bimonthly publication of the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition dedicated to stimulating insight into a...

Profile for ovac