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Lake Huron’s Eastern Shore  Middle Bass Island

Huron

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Ontario

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Michigan

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Erie

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Superior

Grand Banks 53 Aleutian RP

20Tips

THAT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE

Hunt  Larson  Starcraft  Tiara  Vanquish

lakelandboating.com May 2011

Display Until May 31, 2011

in this issue

Features 22

Grand Banks 53 Aleutian RP

26

Tiara 3100 Coronet

34

Sound Advice

38

Bluewater Country

48

Middle Bass Island

A stylish home away from home

A roomy dayboat that breaks the mold Twenty common-sense tips for safer boating Explore Bayfield, Goderich and Kincardine, Ontario A low-key destination with mass appeal

Search 1,000s of new and used boats for sale lakelandboating.com/boat_search.cfm

34

PHOTO BY FRANK LANIER

48

PHOTO BY MARGE BEAVER

2 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

38

PHOTO BY ONTARIO TOURISM

Departments

4 6 8 12 16 17 18 20 30 52 72 76

From the Helm Mail Call Scuttlebutt

78 82 88

Lakeshore Life Classifieds Above the Waterline

Mariner’s Bookshelf Gear Guru Corke Board

On the Cover

Electronics The Chandlery Boat Spotlights Marina Watch Dining on Deck Ask an Expert

Timeless nautical spirit and long-range cruising capability come standard on the all new 53 Aleutian RP from Grand Banks.

from the helm May 2011 Volume LXV, No. 5 Publisher Walter “Bing” O’Meara

Celebrate May

“Safety First” is the best philosophy.

business staff Associate publisher: David Leli Eastern advertising representative: Mark Conway Regional and classified sales manager: Kirsten Moxley Marketing director: Linda O’Meara Circulation director: Sharon P. O’Meara editorial & advertising offiCe 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone: 312-276-0610 | fax: 312-276-0619 email: staff@lakelandboating.com website: lakelandboating.com

This year it’s May 21-27, and each year we dedicate a large portion of our May issue to safe boating. The information and tips we offer on our pages, as well as the new equipment we review, can save lives. Much of the knowledge we can gain to stay safe happens on shore, before we start the engines. Consider taking a U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary course or a Safety at Sea class. At the very least, have the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary do a complimentary inspection of your boat. And finally...congratulations to the St. Ignace girls basketball team, who won the Class C state championship March 19. Way to go, girls! Remember: Let us hear from you; we value your input. Be safe.

A wArning for subscribers Lakeland Boating will not contact you by phone to renew your subscription. Renew by calling 800-827-0289 or visit our website, lakelandboating.com, and click on the “Subscribe” tab.

4 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A y 2 011

Creative staff Art director/production manager: Brook Poplawski Creative consultant: Christy Tuttle Bauhs Contributors Elizabeth Altick, AJ Bosch, Chris Caswell, Mark Corke, Mike Harris, Andrew Hind, Forest Johnson, Marty Kovarik, Matt Kowalski, Capt. Frank Lanier, Roger McAfee, Zuzana Prochazka, Jerry Richardson, Marty Richardson, Roman Sapecki, Colleen H. Troupis, Dave Wallace

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hat was old is new again, as personified by the reincarnation of the Tiara Coronet 3100 Dayboat by Leon Slikkers, founder of Tiara Yachts and Pursuit Boats in Holland, Michigan. Leon took on the Coronet project, utilizing contemporary design and elements from the past to create a beautiful dayboat and weekend yacht that anyone would be proud to own. See page 26 for our test and review. The Grand Banks 53 Aleutian, which is featured on our cover and review on page 22, is not to be missed. For a Great Lakes cruising yacht, 53 feet is the perfect size. This trawler is beefy as well, allowing you to handle most anything you’ll face on the Great Lakes. At the dock, one would be hard pressed to find a more comfortable boat to live on. Paul Reed of Reed Yachts Sales was recently honored with a lifetime achievement award from Hatteras Yachts (see story on page 8). Paul and his son, Brent, who also is his business partner, are longtime friends of Lakeland Boating. We wish them continued success. If you plan to cruise Lake Huron this summer, be sure to visit Bayfield, Goderich and Kincardine. Marty Richardson’s piece, entitled “Bluewater Country” on page 28, briefs you on all you’ll need to know to enjoy your stay in these three quaint towns perched on the Ontario shore of Lake Huron. If you like islands, Lake Erie’s Middle Bass Island off Port Clinton, Ohio, might be the place for you. Check out Heather Steinberger’s story on page 48. Each May, the National Safe Boating Council promotes one week as National Safe Boating Week.

editorial staff Editor: Lindsey Johnson Senior editor: Dave Mull Editors-at-large: Heather Steinberger & Roland Schultz Field editor: Tom Thompson

Classified advertising 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone 800-331-0132, ext. 21 | fax 312-276-0619 subsCriPtions P.O. Box 15396 | North Hollywood | CA 91615-5396 Customer Service: 800-827-0289 O’Meara-Brown Publications Inc. Walter B. O’Meara, president Timothy Murtaugh, secretary Tracy Houren, controller Lakeland Boating (ISSN 0744-9194), copyright 2011, is published eleven times per year (except November) by O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc. Editorial and advertising offices are located at 727 S. Dearborn St., Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605; 312-2760610. Annual subscription rates: United States, $24.95 per year; International and Canadian, $36.95 per year (11 issues), includes 7% G.S.T. tax (G.S.T. registration number 894095074-RT0001) and $12 postage included. Single copies are $4.99 for U.S. and Canada. Only U.S. funds are accepted. Subscription correspondence should be addressed to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396 (U.S.), or call 800-827-0289. Known office of publication: 727 South Dearborn Street, Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, please send all address changes to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396. Lakeland Boating is a registered trademark of O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc., Chicago, Illinois. Published as Lakeland Yachting 1946-1955. Unsolicited work may be submitted at the author’s, photographer’s or artist’s own risk. Lakeland Boating assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited material. All submissions must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope with sufficient return postage.

Printed in the U.S.A

mail call

Calling all Canines (& Felines, too!) WIN THIS four-legged life jacket

BOATERS POINT 2541 NE Catawba Road Port Clinton, OH 43452 Phone: (419) 734-3796 Fax: (419) 734-1560 www.boaterspoint.com

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t the Lakeland Boating offices in Chicago, everyone’s an animal lover. I mean serious, hard-core dog and cat people (some of us even have goats and chickens and ducks, too!) We enjoy sharing fun stories about our pets with one another, and we expect you do as well. We’d like to hear more about your four-legged friends. That’s why this month, we’re asking our readers to write in and tell us about their canine and feline crewmembers. In 300 words or less, we want to know what’s most interesting and unique about your dock dog or cat. The write-up (and accompanying photo) deemed most worthy by Lakeland Boating editorial staff will receive a four-legged Paws Aboard life jacket. We’ll special order the vest to fit your particular canine or feline. Please submit written entries, along with a high-resolution photo of your pet (at least 300 dpi,

or 1 MB), via e-mail to staff@lakelandboating.com, or send a “snail mail” message to: Canine & Feline Crewmember Contest, c/o Lakeland Boating, 727 S. Dearborn St., Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. The deadline to submit entries is June 1, 2011. A winner will be announced in the July issue of Lakeland Boating, and the winning write-up and photo will be published in the magazine’s “Mail Call” department. First runner-up will receive a secondary prize (see description below) and likewise have their write-up and photo published. In your submission, please include your full name, mailing address and e-mail address.

Got something to say? We love hearing from you! E-mail us at staff@lakelandboating.com, or drop us a line at Lakeland Boating, 727 South Dearborn St., Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. The opinions expressed in Mail Call are not necessarily those of Lakeland Boating. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

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But wait...there’s more than one winner! First runner-up will receive the Total Pet Health™ First Aid Kit. The kit comes with 19 first aid essentials to treat most minor four-legged crewmember emergencies, neatly contained in a zippered nylon bag. Items include tweezers, latex gloves, gauze pads, wrap bandage, styptic powder, alcohol prep pads, antiseptic swabs, iodine prep pads, Mylar emergency blanket, and more. DOG PHOTO COURTESY OF PAWS ABOARD MEDICAL KIT PHOTOS BY DAVE MULL

scuttlebutt

A Cut Above

Paul Reed recognized with lifetime achievement award.

Reed (pictured right) receives his award from Hatteras vice president of sales Karl Kemppainen.

Long-time Hatteras Yachts sales representative Paul Reed, of Reed Yacht Sales in Grand Haven, Traverse City and LaSalle, Michigan, was recognized for his years of dedication and sales excellence with the prestigious Hatteras Yachts Lifetime Achievement Award. He received the honor at the 2011 Miami Yacht and Brokerage Show, held in Miami Beach, Florida, back in February. For more than 40 years, Reed has flourished as a valuable member of the Hatteras family. He began his lengthy sales career with the New Bern, North Carolina-based company in 1971, and worked his way up to principal of his own company, Reed Yacht Sales, which has three locations in Michigan: Grand Haven and Traverse City on Lake Michigan, and LaSalle on Lake Erie. “I am very honored, grateful and proud to receive this prestigious award from Hatteras Yachts,” says Reed. “It has been a tremendous relationship for the past 40 years.” Reed credits much of his success to his customers, former employers and his family and friends who’ve supported him throughout his career. In addition to the Hatteras line, Reed Yachts Sales also carries the Cabo and Cutwater brands and enjoys a thriving brokerage business. For more information, visit reedyachtsales.com

24/7 Boat Show

NauticExpo provides a year-round boat show experience. If you’ve got the urge to shop for boats and related gear at 2 a.m. in your pajamas, look no further than nauticexpo.com, a website that provides users with a “virtual” boat show 24 hours a day, seven days a week—with no entry fee or ticket costs. The newly redesigned site features more than 38,000 boats and marine equipment products, 7,500 catalogs and technical spec sheets, 2,400 press releases and 2,700 product and corporate videos. To learn more, visit nauticexpo.com.

WALSTROM MARINE Harbor Springs 105 W. Bay Street Harbor Springs, MI 49740 Phone: 231-526-2141 Fax: 231-526-7527

Cheboygan 113 East State Street Cheboygan, MI 49721 Phone: 877-245-9702 Fax: 231-627-8091

Bay Harbor 801 Front Street Bay Harbor, MI 49770 Phone: 231-439-2741 Fax: 231-439-2740

www.walstrom.com

scuttlebutt

Operation Summaries

From the 9th District U.S. Coast Guard.

Fireman Mario Agudelo and Seaman Dana Parsons, assigned to USCG Station Buffalo, prepare an ice rescue sled during ice rescue training on Buffalo Harbor.

03/06 Vessel Traffic Service Turns 115 Sault St. Marie, MI USCG Vessel Traffic Service St. Marys River, nicknamed “Soo Traffic� in Sault St. Marie, turned 115 years old March 6. Soo Traffic exists to prevent groundings, rammings and collisions in the St. Marys River and mitigate their environmental impact by sharing information and implementing appropriate traffic management measures. During 2010, Soo Traffic assisted a total of 61,532 vessels including ferries, tour boats, tankers and freighters as they transited through the St. Marys River. case closed 03/16 Exercise Caution on Weakened Ice Green Bay, WI A vehicle broke through the ice in lower Green Bay, Wisconsin, prompting USCG personnel at Sector Lake Michigan to remind the public of the dangers of traveling by car, ATV or snowmobile onto weakened ice. The driver of the truck escaped uninjured and walked to shore to notify local authorities. Recent fluctuating temperatures have made ice weak and unstable. Those who choose to recreate on the ice are encouraged to adhere to USCG safety recommendations and take proper precautions. case closed 03/17 Man Medevaced Off Cruise Ship Caribbean A USCG helo crew from A/S Traverse City, Michigan, temporarily assigned to the Coast Guard Cutter Spencer patrolling Caribbean waters, medevaced a man from a cruise ship about 115 miles south of Haiti. Staff from the cruise ship Emerald Princess called USCG Seventh District Command Center to request a medevac for the 64-year-old man after he reportedly began experiencing breathing problems and was placed on a ventilator. A/S Traverse City crew hoisted the man onto the MH-65C Dolphin rescue helo and brought him to Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where they were met by Trinity Air Ambulance for further transport to awaiting emergency medical technicians in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. case closed 03/17 Six Rescued From Ice Floes Linwood, MI A USCG airboat crew from Station Saginaw River, Michigan, rescued five people who became stranded on an ice floe in Saginaw Bay, near Linwood, Michigan. The local fire department rescued another man who was stranded on a different ice floe in the same area. The high number of rescues demonstrates that the rapidly changing air temperature is making ice in Saginaw Bay and the remainder of the region unstable and extremely dangerous for recreational users. An HH-65 Dolphin rescue helo crew from USCG A/S Detroit was nearby on a different mission, but flew over the area to verify no one else was stranded. They found a piece of ice about 11 miles long rapidly drifting away from shore, but they reported there did not appear to be anyone on it. USCG advises all ice-sport enthusiasts to check the weather prior to going out on the ice and to recognize that warming temperatures can make for extremely unsafe conditions. case closed 10 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M a y 2 011

PhOTO By PO3 BArrETT BrAUCh

Calendar of Events

scuttlebutt may 3 – 5 Sandusky Area Maritime Association Annual Meeting & Dinner Sandusky, OH | sanduskymaritime.org may 7 Shipyard Tours Sturgeon Bay, WI | doorcounty.com may 7 – 14 Tulip Time Festival Holland, MI | tuliptime.com may 20 – 22 Zoo-de-Mackinac Harbor Springs & Mackinaw City, MI mackinawcity.com may 21 Nautical Mile Open House & Fun Day St. Clair Shores, MI | nauticalmile.org

may 7-14 | Tulip Time | Holland, michigan

pHOTO By AJ BOSCH

Ports of Call Gala (Door County Maritime Museum) Sturgeon Bay, WI doorcounty.com

may 21 – 27 National Safe Boating Week safeboatingcouncil.org may 22 – 23 May Days / Nautical Flea Market Sandusky, OH | sanduskymaritime.org may 28 Mackinaw City Memorial Bridge Race Mackinaw City, MI | mackinawcity.com may 28 – 29 Maifest Jacksonport, WI | jacksonport.net may 28 – 30 Fort Michilimackinac Pageant Mackinaw City, MI | fmpcfestival.org Ghost Tours of Door County Door County, WI | doorcounty.com may 29 St. Clair Shores Memorial Day Parade St. Clair Shores, MI | nauticalmile.org

11 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a y 2 011

mariner’s bookshelf

To Serve and Protect

New book reveals USCG’s important role in WWII. BY AN DR EW H I N D

B

“US Coast Guard in WWII” by Alejandro De Quesada Osprey Publishing, 2010 $18.95

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ooks devoted to World War II typically focus on the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. But generally overlooked is the contribution of the U.S. Coast Guard, which effectively became America’s fifth armed service. Beyond its traditional roles, the Coast Guard took on a number of invaluable wartime duties, including escorting convoys in the Battle of the Atlantic, and operating landing craft at the Normandy invasion and in many amphibious assaults across the Pacific. This little-known story is told in concise format in Osprey Publishing’s new book, “US Coast Guard in World War II.” Recreational boaters are familiar with the U.S. Coast Guard in its peacetime role of saving lives, inspecting vessels for safety, maintaining lighthouses and aids to navigation, and responding to maritime disasters. These are duties the Coast Guard has been perfecting since its founding in 1790 as the Revenue Cutter Service. From a mere ten cutters, the Coast Guard had grown to a force of several hundred vessels. After Pearl Harbor, the Coast Guard experienced another dramatic increase: By war’s end, it operated 800 cutters, 351 naval vessels, 288 ships for the Army, and thousands of smaller craft including amphibious landing craft. Most of the men who served aboard these vessels had peace-time boating experience, either as commercial fishermen or in a recreational capacity. In pure numbers, their service was impressive. The Coast Guard rescued more than 1,500 survivors of torpedo attacks in the Atlantic; sank 11 enemy submarines; and received more than 2,000 personal decorations. But the role of the U.S. Coast Guard in World War

II is little remembered. Even more obscure is that of Coast Guard Auxiliaries. Members were volunteers who served only in specific geographic areas, usually near his or her home or work, and though unpaid were sworn members of the armed forces. The vast majority were men, although some were women, with recreational boating background or familiarity with a maritime way of life. These volunteers served in a number of important roles, freeing up Coast Guard personnel for more hazardous duty elsewhere. Since the Navy and Coast Guard were short of small craft for offshore duty, recreational boaters were encouraged to enlist and bring their boats with them to form a coastal picket fleet. This so-called “Corsair Fleet,” consisting of more than 5,000 men and 2,300 civilian sailing vessels and motor yachts, cooperated closely with naval vessels and aircraft to watch for German U-boats and was particularly valuable in the early war years. The Volunteer Port Security Force was another important role played by the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Its task was to protect from sabotage the countless warehouses, piers and other facilities that kept the American shipping industry afloat. Some 20,000 men served in this capacity. A Beach Patrol Program saw Coast Guard Auxiliaries monitor shorelines and alert the Army to any perceived threat. To fulfill this task, a series of watch towers, as well as dog and horse patrols, were established along the seaboards to watch for saboteurs, enemy submarines, fires and sailors of stricken vessels in need of rescue. Finally, some 2,000 women enrolled to attend to the paperwork, freeing men to move from behind desks for sea duty. The entirety of the U.S. Coast Guard’s wartime service—regular service and auxiliary—is told in detail within “US Coast Guard in World War II,” and brought to life with numerous photographs and color drawings. Though the book is of interest to military history aficionados, it will undoubtedly be of particular interest to readers of Lakeland Boating. After all, the men and women whose service it chronicles were predominantly recreational boaters, little different from those who enjoy this magazine. 

scuttlebutt

Helping Hand

boatu.S. launches free smart phone app.

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hen your boat breaks down on the water, calling for a tow is simple. The hard part is telling the towboat precisely where to find you. Thanks to BoatU.S., calling for help just got simpler. BoatU.S. now offers a free smart phone app (for members and non-members) that helps you call for a tow in a hurry. “The new BoatU.S. app can greatly improve towboat response times due to the accuracy of the GPS latitude and longitude technology built into these high-tech phones,” Jerry Cardarelli, vice president of Towing Services for BoatU.S., said in a statement. “The moment you hit the app’s ‘Call Now for a Tow’ button, it automatically provides us with critical information.” Available for iPhones and Android phones, the app operates similarly to GM’s On-Star system. When you need a tow, the 24-hour dispatch center receives data, including your boat’s latitude and longitude, its make, length, and details such as whether you have a working

PHOTO by dave mull

VHF radio aboard and your phone number. Then, you talk to an operator to arrange a tow. BoatU.S. members with Trailer Assist service can take this app on the road to summon help for a disabled vehicle or boat trailer, too. The “Share Your Location” feature lets you text message or e-mail your latitude and longitude with a Google map link. Additionally, any time the app is activated it automatically displays latitude and longitude at the top of the phone’s display, regardless of cell coverage. This feature turns a smart phone into a backup GPS. The BoatU.S. Towing App also works well with your float plan. Text or e-mail loved ones ashore so they can track your trip on BoatU.S.’s online Member Service Locator map. For more information, visit boatus.com/app. r

13 laKelaNdbOaTING.COm m a Y 2 011

scuttlebutt

Zip It!

Life jacket complaints are a thing of the past. by e lizabeth altick

T

he reasons for not wearing a life jacket are as numerous as the ways people drown. Common complaints include: “They’re hot and uncomfortable!,” “They limit my movement!,” and “They’re ugly!” But thanks to recent life jacket innovations, particularly of the inflatable variety, none of these excuses hold water. Smart, stylish boaters wear life jackets as though their lives depended on it. Why? Because nearly 90 percent of those who drown weren’t wearing one. And, contrary to popular belief, most drownings don’t occur far at sea; loss of life is most common on inland waterways within swimming distance of land or the boat itself. “Most people drown when the boat is drifting, at

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anchor or when the boat is at idle speed,” according to Chris Edmonston, BoatU.S. boating safety director. U.S. Coast Guard regulations are simple and clear: All recreational boats must carry one wearable Coast Guard-approved life jacket for each person aboard. Additionally, boats 16 feet and longer must carry one throwable flotation device. Children must wear a life jacket while underway, unless they are in an enclosed cabin or below decks. Inflatable life jackets are becoming increasingly popular, being lighter, more comfortable and less cumbersome than other traditional life jackets. Many are compact and weigh less than two pounds. The primary method of inflation is through use of a replaceable CO2 cartridge, but the wearer also can inflate the jacket by blowing into a tube.

phOTO COurTEsy Of DEfENDEr

scuttlebutt Inflatable life jackets offer almost twice the flotation of a traditional life jacket, but there are drawbacks. For starters, they are not approved for use by persons under 16. They also require maintenance. Inflatables should be inspected prior to each use. Some automatic life jackets, particularly older models, carry a risk of accidental inflation if water intrudes or if you’re boating in wet/humid conditions. They are not approved for sports such as jetskiing or waterskiing, where wearers will likely get soaked or find themselves in and out of the water, and they provide no protection against hypothermia. Of note to Great Lakes boaters, cold weather adversely affects the operation of inflatables because CO2 will not expand to the same volume as it would in warmer weather, thus reducing the life jacket’s buoyancy. If this happens, simply top off the jacket using the installed inflation tube. Proper fit is of critical importance when choosing a life jacket, not only for its life-saving effectiveness, but also for comfort—so you’ll be more likely to wear it. For adults, chest size (not weight) determines size. To try on a life jacket, loosen all the straps, zip it up, then tighten the straps starting at the waist. Have someone

pull up on the life jacket shoulders; if it moves past your nose, it’s too large. Children’s sizes depend on weight. To assure a snug fit, pick the child up by the shoulders of the life jacket. The child’s chin and ears should not slip through. Padded head support also is important. 

Five USCG-approved Life Jackets:

 Type I Offshore Life Jackets are best to keep you afloat in rough, open water in areas where rescue may be slow.

 Type II Near-Shore Buoyant Vests are for calm, inland waters where fast rescue is likely.

 Type III Flotation Aids are suitable for watersports and good in calm water where quick rescue is assumed.

 Type IV Throwable Devices include cushions and ring buoys, which provide backup to a life jacket.

 Type V Special-Use Devices are intended for activities such as kayaking, waterskiing and windsurfing.

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gear guru

Safety at Sea

Take care this summer with the following products. BY Z UZANA PROCHAZ KA <

LAKE LITE Solar Powered Illuminating Buoy

Boating at night can be precarious, especially around swim areas, marked dangers and where maneuverability is tight. Nighttime navigation aids are helpful but often difficult to pick out, especially against a backdrop of land-based lights. That’s why Lake Lite developed a solar-powered buoy, the entirety of which lights up at night. Made from roto-molded polyethylene, Lake Lite buoys are durable and won’t crack or disintegrate in the sun. They come in two shapes: Pencil (straight) for deeper water; and the T-model for shallow areas. Each has a 4-watt solar panel and a bright internal LED light that illuminates the entire white buoy for up to 30 hours on a full charge. Each buoy comes with a variety of reflective labels, bands and symbols. Labels include Swim Area, Keep Out, Danger Rocks, Slow No Wake, and Hazard Area, among others. Lake Lite is working to secure U.S. Coast Guard approval, but for now the buoys are not intended for use as navigation beacons on commercial waterways. They can, however, be used by waterfront property owners. You can buy the buoys direct from the manufacturer for $399.95. LAKELITE.COM

FIRST RESPONDER CLAM Medication Tray

>

The CLAM medication tray was originally designed for use in dental office emergencies, but it’s a great addition to your shipboard medical kit. It includes seven must-have emergency meds in pre-measured, easy-to-administer devices, taking the guesswork out of dosing. The CLAM contains: Epinephrine autoinjectors (often referred to by the brand name EpiPen) in adult and child versions for allergic reactions like bee stings or nut and seafood ingestion; two pre-filled Diphenhydramine (basically Benadryl) syringes; one Albuterol inhaler for breathing emergencies; Nitroglycerin sublingual tabs for cardiac emergencies; one tube of Insta-Glucose for diabetes-related problems; three packs of aspirin, which can be used to treat minor pain or thin the blood in cases of heart issues; and five ammonia inhalants to treat lightheadedness, dizziness or loss of consciousness. Everything in the kit is labeled, and a booklet is included to explain the use of each drug. Since many are prescription medications, you’ll need to be a physician or nurse to order them, or you’ll need to have a USCG license. The CLAM retails for $439. FRES-CPR.COM

MUSTANG SURVIVAL MIT Inflatable Life Jacket

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Mustang Membrane Inflatable Technology (MIT) is new and exclusive to Mustang’s next generation of inflatable life jackets. The MIT inflatable is lighter, more flexible and designed not to ride on the neck, thereby reducing chafing and fatigue. It’s suitable for anyone 16 years or older and is easy to inspect because it has only one fold. It uses stretch materials derived from the medical industry and is a one-piece vest. The shell doubles as the inflatable membrane, and there is no internal bladder. The MIT inflatable life jacket is approved by the U.S. Coast Guard and provides 50 percent more buoyancy than a traditional foam vest with a lot less bulk. The MIT model comes with manual and auto inflation options and an oral inflation tube as backup. The manual version retails for $89.99; the auto inflation version sells for $99.99. MUSTANGSURVIVAL.COM 16 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

ZUZANA PROCHAZKA is a U.S. Coast Guard 100 Ton Master with 20 years boating experience. Her work has appeared in numerous national boating magazines, and she authors a popular gear and boat review blog, TalkOfTheDock.com.

corke board

I Heart Charts

Paper still holds water, despite the electronic revolution. BY MAR K COR KE

I

n this day and age, you might think boat owners have little use for paper nautical charts. But a chart is very useful and contains a wealth of information that may not be available on a chart plotter or computer display. Typically, all charts will contain depth, sometimes called soundings, in either feet, meters or fathoms (one fathom equals six feet). Charts also show navigational markers, obstructions and other points of interest or hazards to mariners.

near London, England. For instance, the position of the 59th Street Harbor Marina in Chicago, Illinois, is at 41. 47' 30" North and 87. 34'51" West. Always knowing your lat and lon is a good idea, as it unequivocally establishes your position, which can then be passed onto the U.S. Coast Guard if you get into trouble and need assistance. This is much simpler and less ambiguous than just saying you’re current location is “about 10 miles from the big white lighthouse.”

Scale

When all else fails

Charts come in different scales; which one you use will depend on several factors, such as personal preference and the area being navigated. A chart will have a scale showing latitude and longitude—horizontal along the top and bottom for longitude, and vertical along the left- and right-hand sides for latitude. Positions marked on a chart are always given as a series of numbers, degrees, minutes and seconds. One minute of arc (not to be confused with one minute of time) is equal to one nautical mile, with 60 seconds making up one degree. You often can find a scale elsewhere on the chart showing nautical miles, and by opening up a compass to a desired distance measured on the scale, it’s possible to walk the compass’ dividers across the chart to find the distance between two points. Assuming we were cruising at 5 knots and knew our location, we could set the dividers to five nautical miles and mark our estimated position in one hour’s time—as long as our course did not alter. Or, we could find our distance from shore or some other point by measuring with the dividers and referring back to the miles scale.

Paper charts are an important back up should your electronics fail. Knowing where you are at all times is less stressful and means you’re less likely to get into trouble or make mistakes, especially when you are tired. One good practice is to update your position on the chart every 30 to 60 minutes. If you’re on a longer passage, note not only your position but also the time in soft pencil on the chart, which can later be erased when you’ve completed your voyage. In fact, you can mark favorite fishing or gunkholing spots on the chart, too, so that you can find your way back at another time.

Latitude and longitude Latitude and longitude are measured north or south from the equator and east and west from the Greenwich meridian

Mark Corke is an accomplished journalist, author and sailor and creator of the popular blog onboardwithmarkcorke.com, focusing on various DIY boating projects.

O TT O DA I TRJKOC E OSRHKMEO E / P H O T O C R E D I T PHO O CBRYEM MARY SMITH / PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE

Planning on paper

Resources:

ained Nautical charts can be obt te, bsi we AA through the NO

Another way charts are helpful: Passagemaking. I / like to lay the chart out and study my intended route, nauticalcharts.noaa.gov noting any obstructions or places I need to avoid. Sure, you can do this with a chart plotter; but by the time you’ve zoomed out to show your starting and finishing points, all detail is lost—and this is especially troublesome on smaller chart plotters. Once I’ve done basic planning on the paper chart, I can enter waypoints into the electronics with confidence. If you don’t keep charts on board, then I strongly urge you to reconsider. And even if you do have some aboard, it may be time to pull them out, dust them off and brush up on your chart work. You might be glad you did. 

17 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

electronics

Safety Savvy

GOST, Navionics introduce new products at 2011 Miami show. by rog e r mcafe e GOST | Immobilizer More than 5,000 boats are reported stolen each year, a majority of which are never recovered. And those are just the ones we know about! Many more boats, outboards and personal watercraft are nicked annually, but they’re never reported to authorities. Unfortunately, industry insiders believe non-reported thefts vastly outnumber the reported ones.

The new “Community Layer” from Navionics lets boaters generate content to add to their electronic charts and then share this information with other boaters through the Navionics server (top). With its Immobilizer, GOST raises marine anti-theft devices to a whole new level (bottom).

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In an attempt to reduce these costly casualties, GOST (Global Ocean Security Technologies, formerly Paradox Marine), an industry leader in yacht security, introduced a revolutionary new antitheft device: The Immobilizer. When armed by a coded, wireless key fob, the Immobilizer makes it virtually impossible to start an outboard— but allows enough power flow to other low-draw electronic devices so that computerized equipment maintains memory settings and will resume normal operation. When the unit is armed, it blocks high current draw from reaching the motor. If a thief tries to start her up, the motor won’t kick over and a siren starts wailing. The alarm continues sounding for a predetermined amount of time set by the boat owner. GOST can even protect twin outboards; simply install

one Immobilizer for each engine using a common, single-code key fob program. The Immobilizer also can be used to protect snowmobiles and ATVs. The units, introduced at the 2011 Miami International Boat Show in February, cost $384 each, including the key fob. Owner installation is a cinch. GOSTGLOBAL.COM

Navionics | Community Layer Navionics, a world leader in electronic chart production, introduced yet another award-winning chart application at the 2011 Miami International Boat Show. The application is dedicated to mobile devices—the iPhone and iPad. In fact, it took home a National Marine Manufacturers Association Innovation Award in the Consumer Safety Equipment category, presented at the Miami show. The application creates what Navionics calls a “Community Layer,” which allows chart users to generate content that will show up on their own chart, as well as an overlay on a regular Navionics electronic chart. A boater can note rocks, wrecks, marine construction, buoys, beacons and lights that are either not marked on the regular charts or have been moved. He or she also can note the location of restaurants, fuel docks and other local knowledge and services a boater might need. Additions are uploaded to the Navionics server and are almost simultaneously downloaded to other boaters who have the application installed on their mobile devices. Information added by boaters shows up on the chart as a green circle containing a “+” sign, letting other boaters know the feature has been added by a boater and is not part of the basic chart. If a boater deletes an item from the layer, the deletion shows up beside a red circle with a “-” in the center. If boaters start messing around with the Community Layer, the Navionics server can track them down and delete any fraudulent posts. Those individuals also will be barred from further postings. If changes posted to the Community Layer are later verified by Navionics, they will be posted to the main Navionics charts. The Community Layer can be turned off by any user of the application. All Navionics marine and lakes chart applications for both the U.S. and Canada can be purchased through iTunes. The cost is $14.99 for an iPhone and $34 for an iPad. NAVIONICS.COM r PHOTOS COurTESy Of NAvIONICS (TOP) / GOST (BOTTOM)

name game CAnine CrewMeMber

Laur-annah-K This photo was taken by our friends at Port Washington Marina in Port Washington, Wisconsin, a couple of days after the Fish Day Festival (it’s billed as the largest single-day fish fry in the world). The name Laur-Annah-K is pronounced Lor-On-Ah-K and stands for Lauren, Annah and Kathy; my two girls and my lovely bride. I just get the bills.

It seems Skipper gets all the attention. Since the age of six months, he’s been on the boat with us and loves it. He’s even better known around the lakes than we are! Being a Golden Retriever, his personality and demeanor are perfect for children wandering by the boat or on the dock. Before he knows it, we’re putting on his “doggles” and everybody is smiling, pulling out cameras or cell phones to grab a candid shot of the 90-pound gentle giant. Once underway, Skipper finds his special spot and sleeps until we arrive at the next port. After we’ve throttled down and have approached our destination, Skipper wakes and walks the catwalk to the bow to see where we are. He loves swimming and going for dinghy rides. Skipper is eight years old now and can’t wait till we launch the boat this spring to start another season of boating. He’s definitely a “boat dog!” Capt. Todd Hurley | Escanaba, MI

Dan Marchetto

StiLL no PooL You can tell who won the vote on the pool versus the boat. That would be dad! Great magazine. Peter Dumart West Montrose, ONT

the ChumP Our 2470 Pursuit is named after our son, Nich, who left us way too early in life. He was affectionately given the nickname “The Chump” by his brother, Matt, when he was younger. We miss him every day! Doug & Rita Hoff Maumee, OH 19 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

the chandlery

Safe Passage

Stock up on the latest and greatest safety gear this season.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE COLEMAN COMPANY INC.

the chandlery

> SLICK SUCCESS

>

BAIL OUT

Proper safety procedures start at the dock,

When cruising, a dependable, high-volume bilge

and what better way to stay safe than to

pump is key. Edson’s Gallon-A-Stroke Emergency

prevent problems before they start? That’s

Manual Pump Kit removes standing water on

the philosophy behind Oil Gone Easy’s Marine

board and stops a leak dead in its tracks, turning

S-200, an eco-friendly, biodegradeable bilge

a potentially life-threatening situation into a

cleaner that, when poured into your boat’s

trustworthy fix until you arrive safely at the dock.

bilge, eliminates oil and keeps the bilge clean

The kit includes a handy Forespar TruPlug to

for up to two months—with just one application.

squelch active leaks and a bright orange

A one-quart bottle is $19.95. OILGONEEASY.COM

storage bag for easy access. Retail price is

< HARD WIRED

$1,059. EDSONMARINE.COM

>

TRIPLE PLAY

European manufacturer Ocean Signal recently released a trio of new safety products into the U.S. market: The SeaSafe E100/E100G EPIRB; SeaSafe S100 Search and Rescue Transopnder (SART); and the SeaSafe V100 hand-held VHF radio. Each device features improved battery life and has earned FCC approval. The E100 EPIRB retails for $519 (the E100G version is $799) and the SART is $799. OCEANSIGNAL.COM

Turn your Smartphone into a bona fied lifesaver with the SPOT Connect. When reception is sketchy, the Connect keeps you in contact with friends, family and emergency personnel. Pair your Smartphone with the device and link to a global satellite network that lets you send messages and GPS coordinates from virtually anywhere. Send e-mail, text messages, update your Facebook and Twitter accounts, and in case of emergency send an SOS requesting assistance with the click of a button. Retail price is $169.99. DEFENDER.COM

> CLOSE QUARTERS Keep close tabs on your entire crew with Raymarine’s LifeTag Wireless Man Overboard system. LifeTag can monitor up to 16 crewmembers at a time, and should the unthinkable happen—someone falls overboard—the system alerts you with a loud siren. When integrated with other Raymarine SeaTalk devices, LifeTag can automatically mark the position on your chart display and trigger critical recovery information on screen. The LifeTag system retails for $685; individual LifeTag pendants are $115 each. RAYMARINE.COM

boat test

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boat test

GRAND BANKS 53 ALEUTIAN RP A stylish home away from home. BY TOM THOM PSON

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GRAND BANKS

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boat test

A

good day for testing boats isn’t necessarily what you think of as a good day on the water. It’s nice if the seas are a little rough. The day I tested the new Grand Banks 53 Aleutian RP was one of those days. The Atlantic Ocean off Fort Lauderdale was running four to six feet with a stiff east wind—but the sun was shining brightly. My host for the day was David Hensel, Grand Banks’ director of brand and marketing. As we put this classic long-range cruiser through her paces, he pointed out the confident, solid ride. At one point, we got up to 22 knots through the sloppy waters. For most of the time we soldiered on at about 12 knots, and I must say it was not an uncomfortable ride. The 53 Aleutian RP is equipped with V-drives, and the widest beam is at the stern. This, coupled with more weight aft, gives the boat excellent stability in following seas. She took four- to six-footers with equal aplomb. Whether in turns or tracking straight, you always felt in control at the helm. The Caterpillar C-12 diesels on our test boat were the optional power package and rated at 715 horsepower each. They can deliver a top speed of 25 knots at 75 to 80 percent load. The modified deep-V hull provided a very smooth ride and came on plane effortlessly. A double chine—one above and one below the waterline—keeps things dry as well. The 53 is ready handle whatever Mother Nature throws her way.

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boat test

UnderstAted elegAnce Interior accommodations aboard the 53 Aleutian RP are what you’d expect from Grand Banks; an air of understated elegance is evident in her appointments, accented in rich wood tones and fabrics. The salon entrance is through double doors from the cockpit. Sofa seating lines both port and starboard sides. A generous expanse of glass ushers in plenty of natural light. Two steps up and you’re on the upper main deck, which holds a centerline helm station, a dining area to port and a full galley amidships. A starboard-side doorway takes you out to one of the fully protected side decks that lead forward to a Portuguese bridge. Beyond the bridge is a foredeck seating area. The center of the flybridge has an L-shaped settée to port that surrounds a teak table; another settée runs along the starboard side. The aft area allows for an optional davit and tender or an electric grill, among other things. A centerline helm station provides good sightlines, and an optional hardtop is available. The lower deck on the 53 Aleutian RP features three staterooms, one of which can be configured as an office. There are two full heads, each with separate shower stalls. One is ensuite to the full-beam master stateroom; the other is accessed from the companionway. The master stateroom has a walk-around king berth and cozy seating area. Because the boat has V-drives, the engine compartment takes less space, thus allowing for a utility room. Grand Banks lets you configure this additional space to best suit your own particular needs. Options include using the area for extra storage, or installing a second refrigerator/freezer. The Grand Banks 53 Aleutian RP is the kind of boat you can call home, be it for an extended cruise that might stretch over weeks or months at a time, or just a weekend getaway. It has everything you want and need, all in grand style. r PHOTOS COURTESY OF GRAND BANKS

Grand Banks 53 Aleutian RP Standard Equipment Sleipner Sidepower SE170/250TC bow thruster; T-Cummins QSC8.3 600-hp w/ ZF Gear V-Drive; SEAGULL IV water purification system; AGM batteries; Onan generator w/ sound shield—21.5 kW e-QD series for 60 Hz, and 17.5 kW e-QD series for 50 Hz; shore power inlet, 50 amp aft; Glendinning Cablemaster w/ 75-ft. cable; fresh water washdown; Stidd Admiral low back helmseat at pilothouse and flybridge; granite countertops in galley/heads.

Specifications LOA: 53'10" Beam: 17'9" Draft: 4'9" Weight: 73,000 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 1,000 gals. Base Power: T-Cummins QSC8.3 (600-hp) Base Price: Contact dealer grandbanks.com

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boat test

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boat test

TIARA 3100 Coronet A roomy dayboat that breaks the mold. BY CH R I S CASWE LL

PHOTO BY FOREST JOHNSON

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B

efore you go check out the new Tiara 3100 Coronet, throw away any preconceived notions you harbor about the Holland, Michigan-based boatbuilder. No, wait; keep the ones about how well Tiaras are built, about how well designed they are, and about how Tiara really understands the boating family. OK, now open your eyes. If you’re like me, the first time you see the 3100 Coronet, your heart is going to go pitty-pat. Without using technical terms, this is one really cool boat. The real name for this new Tiara is the 3100 Coronet Dayboat, but that barely scratches the surface. The cockpit is immense but, even more important, Tiara has made it easy to get around. There’s a transom door from the extra-wide (40-inch) swim platform so you can board easily from a floating dock without having to clamber gracelessly over the coaming. And when you want to go up to the foredeck, there are dedicated steps so you don’t have to step on the cushions, which is something many builders overlook. Our test boat had the teak option that includes teak toerails, steps and a teak inlay on the swim platform. Each corner of the transom has an L-shaped settée with hidden drink holders, and there are two aft-facing double-wide bench seats. The port seating group can have an optional removable table for munchies or dinner, and this converts the area to a sunpad with a filler cushion. Just forward to port is another L-shaped settée on a raised platform that serves as both a companion seat for the skipper and an alfresco dining area with removable table. Very slick. Behind the helm seat is an entertainment center with an electric grill, sink and drawer-style UltraFrigo fridge. There’s a television jack, too, so you can bring the flatscreen TV from the cabin for a night under the stars. The skipper gets a helm that’s fit for a Star Wars commander, with a wood-rimmed wheel, separate throttles and shifters, and a row of neatly labeled rocker switches. Our test boat had the Garmin electronics package with a 12-inch multifunction touchscreen display. Included are radar and GPS, digital sounder, VHF and autopilot. Tiara calls this a “dayboat,” but, hey: I’ve stayed in Motel 6s that had less space. How they created both a huge cockpit and a very civilized cabin in just 31 feet remains a mystery. The starboard side has an L-shaped galley with Corian counter, hot and cold pressure water, and an under-counter microwave. Our test boat had the optional Isotherm fridge, and there are drawers and lockers for cutlery, utensils and supplies. There is no cooktop, but why would you want one when you have a full galley in the cockpit, and you’ll probably hang a barbecue on the transom, too? On the other side is the head compartment and, if you’re prepared for the usual cramped head that seems an

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boat test

The 3100 Coronet’s helm is nothing short of impressive, with its elegant wood trim and Star Wars-esque layout (top left). While officially classified as a dayboat, the 3100 is perfect for overnight getaways, too (bottom left). among her coolest features, the 3100 Coronet comes with a built-in electric grill—ideal for entertaining (right).

afterthought on too many boats, well, you’re in for a surprise. Molded in one piece for easy cleaning, it has a Vacuflush toilet standard, a stainless vanity sink and, best of all, a shower sized for real people. Several more items are worthy of note. First, the windshield is unique to Tiara because, instead of the usual aluminum framing that corrodes into an ugly rash, the 3100 has a resin-infused composite frame that not only looks great, but will always look great. Even better, it has a built-in track for the optional canvas top that stretches from the radar arch to shade the command bridge area. You have two options for the top: A soft top, which has isinglass side curtains; or the fiberglass hardtop (about $17,000), which includes a sunroof but still requires side curtains. If you plan to stretch your season into the cooler, wetter months, then the hardtop is an easy choice. A word about construction: Superb. Solid fiberglass underwater, balsa-cored topsides and, get this, a completely gel-coated bilge that shines like the outside of the hull. Stringers are fully encapsulated, and Tiara offers a five-year transferable warranty on hull, deck and fiberglass fuel tanks. Standard (and only) power are a pair of healthy 375-hp catalyzed 6.0L MPI gas Crusaders that are easily accessible because the entire after section of the cockpit sole lifts electrically. Underway, we topped out at nearly 35 knots (40 mph) with the hammers down, but we were still eating up the miles at a comfy 4200 rpm and 27 knots (31 mph). With Teleflex hydraulic steering, the 3100 handled like a much smaller boat and, with a 14-degree deadrise at the transom, she runs through chop with poise. I enjoyed every second aboard the Tiara 3100 Coronet, and I think you will, too. She’s perfect for the way people enjoy their boats, with family and friends aboard for day adventures, and she isn’t shy on the amenities. But don’t let that “Dayboat” label cloud your judgment: She’s perfect for that getaway overnighter on the water, too. r PHOTOS BY FOREST JOHNSON

Tiara 3100 Coronet As Equipped T-Crusader 6.0L MPI gas (catalyzed) 375-hp engines; salon air conditioning; exterior teak accent package; Garmin electronics package; ACR remote spotlight; teak and holly cabin sole; stereo upgrade; galley fridge; LCD TV; Imron paint; Platinum helm console; anti-fouling bottom paint; pillow package; cockpit TV; bow thruster; four stainless steel opening port lights; Auto rope/chain anchor windlass system; radar arch; custom composite windshield frame w/ tempered safety glass; windshield wiper system w/ 2 washers/ wipers; entertainment center w/ TV jack/electric grill/sink/drawer fridge; 40" swim platform; Clarion AM/FM/CD stereo w/ cockpit remote; Vacuflush toilet; 33-gal. fresh water tank; Corian countertop w/ stainless steel sink; pedestal berth w/ storage; full fiberglass head; 10" stainless steel cleats forward/ midship; two 10" pop-up cleats aft.

Specifications LOA: 30'6" Beam: 12'6" Draft: 2'8" Weight: 13,550 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 210 gals. Base Power: Crusader 6.0L MPI 375-hp Base Price: $261,500 Price as Tested: $323,245 tiarayachts.com

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boat spotlight

Hunt Harrier 25

Stunning addition to a legendary lineup. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

F

Specifications LOA: 25' Beam: 9' Draft (Up): 1'16" Draft (Down): 3' Displacement (Fully Loaded): 7,000 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 100 gals. Water Capacity: 15 gals. Standard Power: Volvo Penta EVC 8.1Gi I/O 375-hp huntyachts.com

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or those unfamiliar with Hunt Yachts in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, this is the powerboat company that evolved from the C. Raymond Hunt Associates yacht design firm, founded by the late Ray Hunt. Now a veritable legend, this skilled sailing yachtsman was one of the 20th century’s most innovative designers, bringing to life the Concordia yawl, the Olympic Gold Medal-winning 5.5 Meter Minotaur and the junior and club sailboat-racing 110s and 210s. On the power side, Hunt created the Boston Whaler and the offshore powerboats known as “Moppies.” Their big-water, record-breaking performances blazed the way for all high-performance powerboats to come, launching the success of Bertram in the process. In the late 1990s, Hunt designers sought to develop a simple, low-maintenance, single-engine powerboat with the legendary deep-V hull that has always been the heart of a Hunt design. Such a boat would deliver good speeds, fuel-efficient performance and a smooth, dry ride while also providing accommodations for owners who might choose to spend nights aboard. And so the Hunt 33, and the modern-day Hunt Yachts, was born. The company’s new Hunt Harrier 25 fits neatly into the Hunt family. “The hull is an original Hunt deep-V from the 1960s with loads of deadrise forward and aft,” explained Lynne DeBeer, marketing director. “The deck was developed a year ago as a redesign of the classic Hunt Moppie-style

Bertram. She’s been continually tweaked—this is the Porsche 365 that evolved to the 911.” This fast-touring sportboat boasts a sleek profile, and she offers both runabout and dayboat characteristics. Topside, she has a fiberglass helm console with teak trim and custom mahogany steering wheel, an adjustable sport helm seat with storage beneath, adjustable sport companion seat with insulated cooler beneath, engine-box seat cushion with seat back, nicely appointed wet bar with Corian countertop, cold-water sink, refrigerator and waste bin, self-bailing cockpit, transom shower, teak swim platform with ladder, transom locker and Bimini top. Belowdecks, she features a V-berth with storage beneath, manual head, storage locker and attractive faux teak-andholly sole. Commissioning packages are available that incorporate safety gear, additional boat gear, anchor, name and hailport, and even bottom paint. Hunt Yachts provides a variety of opportunities to customize each Harrier 25. Owners can choose gelcoat and bootstripe colors, conventional and L-shaped settée arrangements, removable stern seats, and more. Aboard the 25, the 375-horsepower sterndrive Volvo Penta Electronic Vessel Control (EVC) 8.1Gi gas engine is jack-shafted to the outdrive. This keeps the cockpit open while balancing the boat for top performance. She retails for $142,500 with the standard engine; optional power includes a 300-horsepower Volvo diesel I/O, a 315-horsepower Yanmar diesel jet drive and a 350-horsepower Yamaha outboard. r

boat spotlight

Larson Cabrio 857

More than just a touch of elegance. by dave m u ll

W

hen you’re looking at the category of boats innocuously dubbed “pocket cruisers,” you’re probably doing so because you want versatility, performance, good looks and a trusted name in boatbuilding. Larson’s new Cabrio 857 achieves all those and more. With a centerline length just over 28 feet, it’s tough to attach the term “pocket” to this boat. Its 8-foot, 10-inch beam means you can trailer it rather easily, although you might need a permit (it’s four inches wider than the 8-foot, 6-inch beam that usually doesn’t require a permit). And of course all boaters with trucks big enough to tow a 3-ton boat that’s not quite nine feet wide follow that rule (wink, wink). This boat is something of a “recreational vehicle” on water, with a forward cabin and v-berth (sleeps two) that converts to the dining area and an aft berth with a double bed. Two couples or a small family could enjoy this boat for long weekends and even longer. It’s a nice size for port-hopping around the Great Lakes; big enough to smooth out crummy weather, yet small enough to trailer to favorite ports. To perform family swimming and skiing duties, the Cabrio 857 has a telescoping boarding ladder and a ski tow hook, plus an integrated transom shower and swim platform extension. The bow rope locker keeps an anchor ready for remote rafting and gunkholing. Overnight stays in the wilder parts of the Great Lakes will be more enjoyable, thanks to a screened deck hatch that lets fresh

air in while keeping mosquitoes out. Stainless steel rails around the bow and foredeck make this area easier to use at anchor; stainless steel cupholders throughout the cockpit keep beverages at hand. A cockpit fridge and wet bar featuring a stone countertop means handy refills. Crewmembers can relax in the cockpit on a port-side sunlounger and built-in stern jump seat, or on a massive starboard-side wraparound sofa. U-shaped stern seating with filler cushion and table is optional. A nice standard is a color-matched Bimini package, which is fully enclosed. A camper canvas set is optional. The 857’s galley comes standard with a 12V/110 electric fridge, microwave, sink and stove. It’s even got dedicated wine storage, and the whole area avoids feeling cramped thanks to ample lighting and port and starboard bow windows. Power options are wide and varied, ranging from single gas and diesel installations to duals, with a choice of engines and drives from MerCruiser and Volvo Penta. Base price for the standard version is $91,022. As the company literature states: “There’s a feeling that sweeps over you in your Cabrio 857. The feeling of success. As our newest mid-sized cruiser, this magnificent watercraft symbolizes excellence from the idyllic rear deck to the luxurious quarters waiting at the bow. And when you’re at the helm? Exhilaration, coming or going.” In other words: We bet you enjoy sea-trialing it! r

Specifications LOA: 28'1" Beam: 8'10" Draft (Down): 36" Weight (Approx.): 6,650 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 84 gals. Power: MerCruiser or Volvo Penta larsonboats.com

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boat spotlight

Starcraft 22 SCX

I/O or outboard, this boat is “SCX-y.” by dave m u ll

T

Specifications LOA: 21'10" Beam: 102" Weight: 3,500 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 50 gals. Power: MerCruiser 5.0 MPI Alpha 260-hp or Mercury Verado OB 250-hp starcraftmarine.com

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he new Starcraft 22 SCX is something of a design paradox: It looks thoroughly modern, yet its hull configuration smacks of a throwback to the 1960s. Combining this big bowrider’s unusual, yet highly appealing style with its thorough friendliness, we arrive at one conclusion: This boat is cool. The Starcraft 22 SCX features a forwardsponson hull that calls to mind some of the old “tri-hull” boats that dominated the fiberglass boat scene some 40 years ago. See those old boats today, and they look, well, kind of 1960s-era clunky. Not so with the 22 SCX, which has clean lines around lots of freeboard. Was the “throwback look” part of the plan? “That was kind-of the idea behind it,” says Steve Huber, with Starcraft’s marketing department. “We wanted the ‘pickle-fork’ design so we could get a lot of space in the bow area. The great thing is, because we have the tri-hull design, we have a tremendous amount of depth in that bow. It feels like you’re sitting back in the cockpit.” That depth also allows a whole lot of cargo under the bow seats, which, incidentally, convert from four individual seats to two sunpads by simply sliding in a couple of cushioned inserts. With more folks in the cockpit, the boat can easily seat 12 people. Some of these boaters can sit on the rear bench seat, which actually folds down from the outside of the transom, over the swim platform, allowing, say, parents to sit and watch the kids swimming.

Starcraft puts this boat in its “Crossover” category (also where you’ll find it on the company website), as it has the layout of a deck boat or pontoon with a much more impressive hull. In fact, the “dihedral vee” hull, says Huber, forms a cushion of air between the three sponsons, providing a super-smooth, catamaran-type ride. The significant vee in the middle gives it more maneuverability than a cat, too. With the side sponsons, it’s incredibly stable at rest, allowing lots of weight on either side, without a lot of tilting. Of the many cool things about this boat, we especially like how the front swim platform mimics the rear with its own boarding ladder, making the boat perfect landing craft for the picnic beach and all-around swimming fun. Huber adds the boat has already been a hit with the company’s dealer network. “It’s got a lot of crazy-cook features, like the sink that comes with the upgrade package,” Huber says. The luxury package includes lighted cup holders, snap-in carpet and stereo controls on the swim platform. Tests on the I/O version with the standard 260-hp MerCruiser 5.0 MPI Alpha have shown it to achieve better than 45 mph. The OB version, with a factory-rigged Mercury Verado 250, was clocked at better than 50 mph. Base price on the MerCrusier 5.0 MPI version is $38,125. Simply put, this is a heck of a boat for doing all kinds of fun stuff on big water—or smaller lakes, for that matter. It’s got a great ride, terrific performance and provides a wonderful platform for on-water relaxation. r

boat spotlight

Vanquish 26C

A modern-day twist on a classic design. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

W

hen Capt. Morgan Huntley acquired Vanquish Boats in 2010 and relocated the company to Newport, Rhode Island, he had a very specific mission in mind: To hand-craft contemporary day yachts that boast a classic look, yet incorporate state-of-the-art technology. Looking at the new center-console version of the Vanquish 26, it’s clear that Huntley’s team has a winning formula. “The original idea was to get back to classic-style inboard propulsion,” Huntley said. “We take our inspiration from a long time ago to build something high-end with a classic look, but we use modern stuff!” A graduate of the Landing School in Arundale, Maine, and the Newport-based International Yacht Restoration School, Huntley has more than 15 years of boatbuilding experience. Prior to his acquisition of Vanquish , he held positions with such renowned companies as Hinckley Yachts and Outerlimits Offshore Powerboats. He also holds a 50-ton U.S. Coast Guard Master’s license. Quite simply, he knows boats. And he’s truly enthusiastic about the new Vanquish 26C, which came from the drafting board of acclaimed yacht designer—and Lake Erie native—Doug Zurn. “We knew we had a proven hull, which performs in a great, unusual manner,” he enthused. “With the weight in the middle, it’s low and stable. “Underneath the curves and the chrome, there’s a little sports car in there!”

Like all Vanquish Boats, the 26 is built by hand, one at a time. “Here in Newport, we pull from an incredible pool of craftsmen, which guarantees an exceptional level of construction,” Huntley said. “And because we are a Northeast yachting hub, there’s an amazing exchange of ideas.” The 26C can seat up to 10 adults, courtesy of her U-shaped, dodger-sheltered forward seating. Her storage areas include a bow settée compartment, convenient ski locker and an additional compartment stashed neatly beneath the captain’s seat. Owners who plan to spend long days on the water can add a DC cooler for beverages and snacks, while anglers can add rod holders and an easily accessible bait well. The 26C has a no-wood, non-rot laminate design. Her key features include a self-bailing cockpit, Plexiglas windshield, Edson steering wheel with hydraulic steering, electric engine-hatch lifts, choice of either rugged marinegrade vinyl or Sunbrella colors and patterns for the interior, and even an American flag with teak staff. Plus, for the 2011 model year, all 26Cs will have head facilities as well. With a 330-horsepower Crusader 5.7L gas engine and standard equipment, the Vanquish Boats 26C retails for $125,000. She’s also available with a Crusader 6.0L gas engine or a Yanmar diesel. “The price is reasonable, and people are incredibly excited when they go out for a ride,” Huntley commented. “She’s beautiful, and she’s a lot of fun to drive.” r

Specifications LOA: 25'8" Beam: 8' Draft: 19" Weight: 4,200 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 66 gals. Standard Power: Crusader 5.7 HO MPI 330-hp vanquishboats.com

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Sound

Advice Twenty common-sense tips for safer boating. BY CAPT . FRAN K LAN I E R

A successful day on the water is the result of planning and preparation. From checking the weather to wearing a life jacket, paying attention to even seemingly minor details will help ensure everyone on board has a good time and arrives safely back at the dock. 1. Practice safety drills Nothing can better prepare you and your crew for an emergency than regular safety drills. Draft up basic instructions for events such as fire,

4.

1. man overboard (MOB), sinking, etc., and discuss safety equipment location and procedures with everyone on board. Assign roles and responsibilities to crewmembers where appropriate and make sure everyone knows what’s expected of them in an emergency. Mix it up a bit to make drills more interesting and to better prepare for those “out of the box” situations (the captain as the MOB, for example). Don’t forget to include younger crewmembers as well—teaching your 10-year-old how to make a distress call instills confidence and just may save your life. 2. File a float plan From a safety standpoint, letting a responsible person on shore know where you’ll be boating and when you 34 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

plan on returning is a no-brainer. A float plan not only ensures that search and rescue agencies are notified in a timely manner in the event of an emergency, but also speeds up response times by narrowing down the search field. Free float plan forms are available for download at Float Plan Central (floatplancentral.org). When filing a float plan, make sure the information provided is both detailed and accurate. Avoid last minute, on-the-water changes in boating destinations, launch ramps, etc.— unless you can contact and update the person who’s maintaining your float plan ashore. 3. Check the weather Always check weather forecasts and warnings before leaving the dock and remain vigilant while on the water. Check weather warnings and forecasts by listening to weather radio broadcasts on your VHF radio, online (nws.noaa. gov/nwr), or by visiting any of the various weather websites available, such as Weather Underground (wunderground. com) and Weather Bug (weatherbug.com). It’s also a good idea to have a bailout plan in the event of severe weather. Check area charts for possible safe harbors should you be unable to make it back to your departure point. 4. Buy a PLB or EPIRB With PLB units available for less than $200, even the most tight-fisted boater can afford to add a PLB to their arsenal of on-board safety equipment. Always register your PLB or EPIRB unit with NOAA (beaconregistration. noaa.gov/), and don’t forget to update any changes (contact phone numbers, sold units, etc.). If going on an extended cruise, use the “Additional Data Field” to provide information such as number of passengers, special considerations (medical issues), etc.

8. 5.

5. Keep good flashlights on board You never know when a day trip can turn into an overnight affair due to engine troubles, running aground, etc. While flares work well in an emergency and are required equipment, they don’t last very long—and nothing says “I need help” quite like a frantically waving flashlight. Keeping a small, waterproof light in your life jacket pocket (secured with a lanyard) is always a good safety feature. 6. Buy life jackets you’ll actually wear Most boats carry the obligatory, “four for $25” orange square life jackets to meet the minimal requirements of one jacket per every person on board. These remain stuck in some out-of-the-way locker and rarely see the light of day. Why not pick up your safety game a notch by upgrading to life jackets that you and your crew will actually wear? Newer life jacket designs such as inflatable vests or “fanny pack” types are both comfortable and affordable. Wearing a life jacket should be second nature to boaters, akin to automatically donning a seat belt when getting in the car.

7.

7. Mouse anchor rode shackles Ensure all screw-pin shackles are moused (secured) with stainless steel wire to prevent unscrewing (plastic wire ties will work in a pinch). Along these preventative lines, make sure the bitter end of your anchor rode (it’s called that because it’s a bitter sight to see it slipping over the side) is attached to the boat. This attachment point isn’t meant to bear the load of anchoring, but rather to

prevent accidental loss of the rode. The bitter end of an all-chain rode can be secured with multiple turns of tarred nylon lashing, which can easily be cut if you need to slip anchor or add more rode. 8. Carry paper charts Yes, electronic navigation is here to stay, and it’s mighty convenient to boot, but if that’s all you rely on, you’ll always be one diode away from trouble. Paper charts (and knowing how to use them) are an excellent navigational safety net. It’s also easier to get a “big picture” view of your location, routes, etc. on paper charts versus the smaller screen of a chart plotter. 9. Hold the alcohol Boating and fun go hand in hand, and while there’s nothing wrong with enjoying a cold beer or bottle of wine with your friends, make sure it’s done while snugly anchored for the night, or once back at the docks. Bottom line: Boats are like any other vehicle, and should only be operated while sober. 10. Conduct a safety brief A pre-departure safety brief is always a good idea, especially with new folks on board. Cover the basics, such as location of safety equipment (fire extinguishers, life jackets, first aid kit, etc.), but don’t be afraid to include additional topics—including use of the VHF radio. Post a diagram of the vessel that shows where everything is, from seacocks to fire extinguishers.

PRODUCT PHOTOS COURTESY OF DEFENDER / SNAPSHOTS BY FRANK LANIER

6.

35 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

11.

13.

11. Conduct an LPG or CNG leak down test A leak down test is used to detect leaks in Liquid Propane Gas (LPG) or Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) systems. If your boat uses either for cooking or heating, not only should you know how to conduct a leak down test, you also should perform one at least weekly. With the appliance valves off, open the cylinder supply valve and remote solenoid (if so equipped). Next, close the cylinder supply valve and note the pressure gauge reading. The pressure indicated should remain constant for at least three minutes. If not, there’s a leak in the system, and it shouldn’t be used until inspected and repaired by a competent service technician.

15. Make a pre-departure check list Aviators use them and boaters should, too. What better reminder to open that engine raw water intake seacock, or unplug the shore power cord prior to getting underway? Create your own checklist and use it each time you prep for heading out on the water. 16. Learn how to swim Wearing a life jacket is well and good, but knowing how to swim will increase your boating pleasure and confidence on the water. Sign the kids up, too. 17. Install smoke and CO detectors Marine-grade smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) detectors are recommended on all boats over 26 feet in length that have a galley and enclosed sleeping quarters. All

12. Operate at safe speeds Excessive speed and operator inattention are common factors in many boating accidents. All operators (particularly those with less experience) should know their limitations, as well as those of their boats. Note extenuating circumstances such as limited visibility, traffic density, and proximity to navigational hazards, and take positive action by keeping a sharp lookout and reducing speed. 13. Go beyond “minimum” requirements The minimal U.S. Coast Guard requirements for items such as flares and portable fire extinguishers are just that—the bare minimum. Most boaters don’t realize the average discharge time for the B/C Type I dry chemical extinguishers found on most boats is only 8 to 15 seconds (some owners have told me they thought they last 5 minutes or more), or that the typical burn time of a red day/night handheld flare is 40 seconds or less. These minimum requirements should be viewed more as a starting point than the final word. 14. Take continuing education courses Boating education programs on navigational rules, emergency procedures and the effects of wind, water and weather are offered (often for free) by agencies such as the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, U.S. Power Squadron and BoatU.S. This knowledge can save lives. For additional information on courses in your area, visit boatus. com, cgaux.org, or americasboatingcourse.com.

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internal combustion engines and open-flame equipment (stoves, heaters, etc.) emit CO, an odorless, colorless gas that can kill in minutes. CO may also be drawn into the cabin from other vessels through ventilation systems. An even better option for boats with generators that power air conditioners and other appliances would be a CO alarm system designed to shut off the generator once CO is detected. 18. Install a high water bilge alarm When it comes to dealing with flooding, quick detection is key. The early warning provided by a bilge alarm can add valuable minutes—extra time to find the leak (while it’s still above pooling water), don life jackets, fire up additional pumps and send out that last-ditch distress

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signal. An alarm will hopefully give marina personnel enough warning to keep your boat from sinking at the dock, too. Make sure the alarm is loud enough to be heard over engine noise and by passersbys at the dock. 19. Carry a basic tool kit When it comes to an engine break down underway, you’re pretty much relegated to the repair abilities of a Neanderthal unless you have a basic tool kit on board and at least a few spare parts. Nothing extravagant—a socket set, screwdrivers, an assortment of pliers and any tools specific to your engine (sparkplug wrench, etc.). Common spare parts to stash on board include spark plugs, belts, hoses, fuel filters, and the like. 20. Conduct an annual safety inspection The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers free Vessel Safety Checks. They’ll check your boat’s equipment and provide information about its use, safety procedures and applicable regulations. Unlike an official boarding by the Coast Guard, however, you don’t have to worry about receiving a citation during this inspection; Coast Guard officials simply let you know how to correct any deficiencies or problems uncovered. 

Most safety products pictured in this story are available for purchase through Defender via the company’s website, defender.com.

PRODUCT PHOTOS COURTESY OF DEFENDER / SNAPSHOTS BY FRANK LANIER (TOP LEFT) AND MARK CORKE (RIGHT)

37 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

Bluewater

Country

Explore the quaint, historic towns of Bayfield, Goderich and Kincardine, situated along the eastern shore of Lake Huron.

L

BY MARTY R ICHAR DSON

Lake Huron’s Canadian shore is one of spectacular sunsets and beautiful rivers flowing down into protected ports. Cruising north along the shore, there are few anchorages, but mariners have their pick of lively resorts or quaintly quiet harbors interspersed with sand bluffs and pristine beaches. Here are three Ontario harbors to add to your cruising plans.

Bayfield: Heritage village on the Great Lakes Some 52 miles northeast of the Blue Water Bridge connecting Port Huron, Michigan to Sarnia, Ontario, lays the charming port of Bayfield, Ontario. Founded in 1832 and named after nautical surveyor Henry Wolsey Bayfield, the town developed as a center for the surrounding agricultural community and included grist and saw mills, blacksmith shops, a distillery, tanneries and a brickyard. The harbor was constructed in the 1870s, inside the mouth of the Bayfield River, where the entrance is well marked at the breakwaters. This is one of the best-equipped yacht harbors on the lake. As is Canadian custom, dock masters monitor VHF channel 68. Bayfield’s downtown is accessible via the Mara Street Walkway, a footpath through a wildflower sanctuary. The small, historic village streets are shaded by majestic trees and offer delightful boutiques, shops and galleries, many housed in restored 19th century buildings. Mariners can take a break from the rigors of sailing to explore some of the unique shops. Cammie’s of Bayfield is a must-stop for fabulous European clothing for every captain and his or her crewmembers. Enjoy tempting gourmet chocolates or fresh pastry, and quaint restaurants provide a wide variety of offerings, from fine dining to pub fare. On Bayfield’s Main Street is one of Ontario’s finest inns, the Little Inn, my favorite spot for elegant dining. One of the province’s longest continuously running inns (in operation since 1830), it was originally built as a stagecoach stop. Today, the Little Inn has achieved the Canadian Automobile Association’s coveted “Four Diamond” rating for both rooms and dining. All rooms have modern amenities with authentic and unique antique touches. The Inn’s French trained chef, Joseph Petrinac, prides himself on using mostly local ingredients to create his award-winning dishes. The Inn also is a favorite for romantic weddings.

PHOTO CO RE UD R ITTE JSO Y EOSFHOMNOTEA R/I O PTHOOUTROI SCMR E D I T MARY SMITH / PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE

39 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

If your itinerary calls for some pampering, try Sapphire Spa’s healing environment. This day spa provides a truly magical experience of wellness arts, Pilates and yoga offered by the professional staff. They offer a fabulous couples spa package that will leave you completely relaxed and ready to move on to Pioneer Park at the north end of Main Street, the perfect spot to watch a beautiful Lake Huron sunset. Special festivals are featured all year long, including June’s Sail and Canvas event, which launches the summer season with an exhibit of fine artisan work and nautical treasures. Throughout July, enjoy periodic concerts in Pioneer Park, or catch the Vettefest Corvette show. During July and August, join a guided Heritage Walking Tour every Saturday at 10 a.m., hosted by the Bayfield Archives. Should you find yourself not wanting to leave this memorable port, you might consider contacting Judi Milligan at Royal LePage Heartland Realty to explore available real estate.

Goderich: Prettiest town in Canada

Catering to visitors for more than 140 years, Bayfield’s Albion Hotel is a rustic home away from home, complete with cozy bed and breakfast rooms and an on-site restaurant specializing in traditional pub fare.

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For pub fare, try the Albion Hotel, with its wooden tables and benches reminiscent of Canada’s old English ties. Friendly and classic, it offers a full range of appetizers and traditional pub grub. The hotel has four inviting and comfortable bed and breakfast rooms. The Albion has been a country-styled favorite of vacationers for more than 140 years. And be sure to check out the giant fisherman carved from wood in front of Harry’s Restaurant on Main Street, where you can catch nightly entertainment in season. Docking Joe’s Pub & Eatery offers traditional pub-style food in a nautical setting, and the Red Pump Restaurant is a boater’s favorite.

Just 12 miles north of Bayfield, Goderich is the oldest settlement on the Canadian shore of Lake Huron. Dr. William “Tiger” Dunlop, a larger-than-life soldier, journalist, woodsman and politician known for his exploits as a British Army surgeon in India, founded the town in 1827. Salt mining anchors the port of Goderich. About 50 percent of all rock salt mined in Canada comes from this mine, which is a veritable underground city of roadways and chambers extending more than two miles under Lake Huron, 1,700-plus feet below the surface. Cruisers easily spot the harbor, as the salt mine tower and port grain elevator is visible from miles offshore. But the steadfast beacon guiding commercial and recreational vessels alike is the Goderich Lighthouse, one of the town’s most identifiable symbols. Situated atop a 130-foot cliff, this plain, squat structure promised refuge to mariners for more than 160 years and was the first permanent lighthouse—as well as the highest—on the Canadian shore of Lake Huron. Located in Lighthouse Park at the end of Lighthouse Street, this spot is a popular vantage point to catch a beautiful sunset. Goderich has the largest deepwater port on Lake Huron; each season, about 100 freighters visit, transporting salt, grain and calcium chloride. Your first glimpse of the harbor may give an industrial impression, when in fact, Goderich bills itself as the “prettiest town in Canada.” You’ll see why at The Square, PHOTO COURTESY OF ONTARIO TOURISM

Marina Info BAYFIELD

Harbour Lights Marina 519-565-5150 | www.harbourlightsmarina.on.ca Harbour Lights Marina can accommodate up to 250 boats and has room for 40 transients, with a maximum length of 60 feet and draft of seven feet. Electricity and water are available at each slip, and gas and diesel also are available. Marina guests enjoy a swimming pool, tennis courts, showers, washrooms and laundry facilities and a ship’s store.

Bluewater Marina is located on the south side of the Bayfield River. The marina features 60 seasonal wells, 20 guest berths, pump-out service, 20-, 30- and 50-amp electric service, wireless internet, washrooms and showers. Beach access and a public launch ramp are nearby.

South Shore Marina 519-565-2715 | www.southshoremarina.ca South Shore Marina is another facility near the highway bridge, with limited depths at five feet. Five transient slips are available for boats up to 32 feet. Some slips have water and power.

MICH IGAN

Bluewater Marina 519-565-2233 | www.town.bluewater.on.ca

LAKE HURON

ONTARIO

GODERICH

Maitland Inlet Marina 519-524-4409 Goderich has two harbors with separate entrances. The south harbor’s wharfage is 4,600 feet and can accommodate vessels up to 730 feet in length. The harbor is 26 feet deep, making it the only industrial seawaydepth harbor on the eastern shore of Lake Huron. It remains open 10 months of the year, depending on winter ice conditions.

Snug Harbor 519-524-8813 Also in the south harbor, the municipal marina offers boaters berths at Snug Harbor. Situated on the north dock, amenities include pump-out service, electrical hook-ups and washroom and shower facilities.

Maitland Valley Marina 519-524-4409 | www.maitlandmarina.on.ca This marina offers 250 slips that can accommodate boats up to 100 feet in length. It also features a 25-ton boatlift, clubhouse facilities, pool, playground, golf and tennis, and complimentary transportation into town.

KINCARDINE

Kincardine Municipal Marina 519-396-4336 | www.kyc.ca Inside the buoyed and dredged channel protected by two breakwalls, Kincardine Municipal Marina is managed by the Kincardine Yacht Club. The harbor features 20 transient berths for boats up to 65 feet, with depths of nine feet. The marina has gas, diesel, showers and washrooms, pump-out, 15-, 30- and 50-amp service, free wireless internet, propane grills, picnic tables and a launch ramp. PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE / PHOTO CREDIT MARY SMITH / PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE

Cruising Through CUSTOMS Shuttling between the U.S. and Canada doesn’t have to be difficult—if you follow these important steps. Since 9/11, boaters traveling between the U.S. and Canada have experienced tighter customs reporting requirements. But don’t let that deter you from visiting your friendly international neighbor. Come prepared, and you should have a smooth transit. The easiest border crossing into either country is via a NEXUS card for each person aboard. This card, obtained in advance of your trip from a designated U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) office, is valid for five years. Another easy method for entry into the U.S. is for all passengers to carry a Canadian Border Boat Landing (I-68) permit. With either a Nexus card or I-68 permit, you are simply required to report in by telephone. A final, slightly less convenient means for entry to the U.S. is physical check-in at one of the Outlying Area Reporting System (OARS) locations. These facilities use videophones at select marinas, which link you directly to a CBP officer. Customs officers may be on duty at the marinas. Remember: You are traveling across an international border. Be polite and respectful of customs officers on both sides, have a complete list of your ship’s stores, and be aware of import limitations on alcohol, cigarettes and select produce and meats. For more information about U.S. and Canadian customs, visit cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel or call 877-CBP-5511. — Jerry Richardson

41 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

The eastern shore of Lake Huron teems with quaint shops and storefronts reminiscent of yesteryear, like this cafè in Bayfield. Enjoy scrumptious eateries, flea markets, antique shops and beautiful sunsets during your stay.

42 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE / PHOTO CREDIT MARY SMITH / PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE

Goderich’s octagonal, three-acre central park. Here, the streets are aglow with premier shopping, dining, exploring and sightseeing. Goderich boasts that you can see the sun set twice in one evening: First from the beach; and if you scamper up the walkway, you can view it a second time from the bluff. Speaking of beaches, those with a love of the great outdoors will enjoy Goderich’s three pristine public beaches, connected by the boardwalk that hugs the waterfront. Take your picnic to one of these perfect beaches, and spend the day swimming or simply gazing out over beautiful Lake Huron. Or, take your bicycles along the Menesetung Bridge across the old railway trestle to enjoy spectacular views of the harbor, Maitland River and Lake Huron and beyond. Nearby Marine Heritage Walkway features plaques that describe points of historical interest on the town’s waterfront along beach paths, the harbor and bluff. Goderich has several museums, all worth visiting. The Huron County Museum contains a 19th century streetscape that lets visitors walk through yesteryear’s town, past storefronts, a blacksmith shop, dentist office and fire hall. The Marine Museum displays the dramatic history of Goderich harbor shipping in the wheelhouse of the SS Shelter Bay, open July and August. The Huron Historic Gaol (pronounced “jail”) was constructed in the mid 1800s with stones quarried from the Maitland River. Its octagonal shape featured central cellblocks surrounded by exercise yards. This was considered a model of humanitarian prison design for its time, despite

this being the site of the last public hanging in the entire country of Canada. Today, it is a meticulously restored National Historic Site. Here, “Behind the Bars” tours are available Tuesday and Thursday evenings during July and August. Soar to new heights at Huron County Museum’s latest gallery, located at the Goderich Airport. This “Sky Harbour” exhibit traces the history of the airport from its founding in 1938 to the present day. During World War II, it played an important role as a pilot training school. Today, visitors enjoy its unique collection of artifacts on display, all contributed by Royal Canadian Air Force veterans. The arts community in Goderich bring visitors back year after year. Goderich Little Theatre is celebrating 65 years of top-notch entertainment, making it one of the oldest community theater groups in Canada. Nearby Huron Country Playhouse presents the finest in musicals, comedies and dramas. April through September, enjoy the Blyth Festival, a community-based professional theater that features themes from the region and all of Canada. Artists have long been a key part of the Goderich experience. Reuben Sallows, praised as “Canada’s Photographic Genius,” is featured at the gallery by the same name. A native of Goderich, his work exemplifies Canada during the early part of the 20th century. Or, visit the Goderich Co-op Art Gallery, where all members participate in its operation, and artists staff the gallery. After dark, there’s even more to do. Enjoy a

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ONTARIO TOURISM / FISHING BOAT PHOTOS COURTESY OF BAYFIELD HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Bayfield is home to the Helen MacLeod II, the oldest surviving Great Lakes commercial fishing vessel. Today, she sits in storage, awaiting a major renovation by the Bayfield Historical Society (middle photo, above) that is expected to restore her to her former glory. She was originally constructed between 1923 and 1926 (lower photo), following the lines of the Great Lakes schooners. 43 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

Can’t-miss stops on any Goderich traveler’s itinerary are the Saturday morning Farmer’s Market and Sunday Flea Market, both held in The Square (left). The eight-sided tower of the Kincardine Lighthouse has guided mariners to safe harbor since the early 1880s (right). Today the lighthouse is a museum, open to the public July through Labor Day, Wednesdays through Saturdays.

Kincardine: You’re never a stranger

night of dancing, drinks and conversation at Joey Friday’s nightclub, complete with dance floor, stand-up bar and music, located below the Hotel Bedford. Or, enjoy a frosty beverage and a game of darts or pool at the Candelight, featuring regular live entertainment. But don’t stay out too late, or you’ll miss the Saturday morning Farmers’ Market and Sunday Flea Market, both held in The Square. Wednesday evenings usher in Cruize Nights, where folks show off their fancy cars from June through September. On July first, Canada Day fireworks and parade also are favorites. Scottish history is prominent along this coast, with Goderich featuring “Piping Down the Sun” on Friday nights during July and August, and a Celtic Roots Festival in early August. 44 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

Kincardine, just 37 miles north of Goderich, is often referred to as the “Explorer’s Port of Choice.” The town got its start as a lumber, salt, fishing, furniture and agricultural hub in 1856. Today, the town’s vibrancy comes from its beautiful Lake Huron shoreline, marina, beaches, four golf courses, fishing derbies and hiking trails. The harbor’s most identifiable structure is the Kincardine Lighthouse, the eight-sided tower that served as mariners’ guide to safe harbor since the early 1880s. The shutters of its first light rotated by weighted chains to produce the flash, visible some 30 kilometers offshore. Today, the light is automated, and the lighthouse is a marine museum open July through Labor Day, Wednesdays through Saturdays. Visitors can ascend to the top to enjoy the spectacular view. Legend has it that a ship in danger was guided into the harbor on a moonless night, after a worried passenger, playing a lament on his bagpipes, was answered by the sound of bagpipes ashore. This legend continues at dusk, when the “phantom bagpiper” plays haunting melodies atop the lighthouse to mark the summer sunsets—but apparently the ghost takes off on Saturdays. Nearby rests the huge anchor from the schooner Ann Maria, which foundered offshore in 1902 and serves as a testament to the dangers of a lee shore. Kincardine has beautiful city parks, including Dunsmoor Park, which features Sunday evening sing-a-longs and “Music in the Park” concerts for the public Wednesday evenings, each at 7:30 p.m. during the summer season. Station Beach Boardwalk provides a nice sunset-watching promenade punctuated by historical interpretive plaques. Geddes Environmental Park is located beside the bridge on Queen Street, and features a butterfly garden, Peace Labyrinth and walking trails connected to the River Walk and the harbor. The quaint, historic town has splendid examples of Victorian heritage architecture, including the oldest building, the Walker House, just across from the lighthouse. Built in 1850 as an inn and tavern, it has been fully restored with permanent and rotating local history exhibits and features periodic heritage speaker presentations and gift items. This is just one of the stops

along the Heritage Kincardine self-guided walking tour, which gives boaters some welcomed shore-side exercise. Kincardine has many galleries to peruse during your stay. Start with the SeeView Gallery, featuring a stained glass gallery, where you can order a custom piece and see original Canadian artwork, clay tiles, pottery and rustic furniture. Nearby is Victoria Park Gallery, a co-op featuring local artisans’ works of jewelry, furniture and art. The Scougall Gallery features turn-of-the-century area photographs reproduced from original glass slides. Nightlife can be found at the Harp and Whistle, which serves your favorite lagers, ales and traditional Irish pub fare. Draught beers (including local Ontario micro-brews) and good food greet visitors at the Hawgs Breath Saloon. Crabby Joe’s or New Seasons Tavern are great for a casual night out with family or friends. Or, visit the Bruce Bar and Grill for a variety of international PhOTOs COURTEsY OF ONTARIO TOURIsM

offerings, including spectacular Mediterranean tapas. Kincardine celebrates all season long with festivals and events, including the Saturday evening downtown march of the 103-year-old Scottish Pipe Band at 8 p.m. during July and August. Saturdays from late May through early October, pick up some fresh produce at the Kincardine Agricultural Society Farmers Market at Connaught Park Pavilion. Try your luck at the Annual Fish Kincardine Derby in late May or the Chantry Chinook Classic Salmon Derby in late July and early August. Celebrate the area’s Scottish heritage with the Kincardine Chapter of the Companions of the Quaich Malt Tasting and Dinners, taking place in mid June and late August. As is customary with many communities along the lakeshore, Canada Day brings fabulous fireworks displays, and early July also ushers in the annual Kincardine Scottish Festival and Highland Games. r 45 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M a Y 2 011

special advertising section A turn-of-the-century inn with casual country dining and a relaxing pub. Bed and Breakfast accommodations start at $115.

PO Box 114 1 Main Street Bayfield, Ontario N0M 1G0 519-565-2641

www.thealbionhotel.com

Bayfield Discover

Ontario

More than beaches, beautiful sunsets and a great vacation spot...

•Village Shops •Fine Dining •Full Service Marina & More

www.villageofbayfield.com

Welcome to the Municipality of

KINCARDINE MARINA

Eat Drink Sleep 43o 33’54.97” N / 81o 42’05.88” W

A Real Country Inn.. In A Heritage Village.. On A Great Lake

26 Main St. N, Box 100 • Bayfield, Ontario Canada N0M 1G0

www.littleinn.com • 1-800-565-1832 • 519-565-2611

Cammie’s Clothing Sail to beautiful Bayfiled, Then wend your way through lush scenery and quaint streetscapes to Cammie’s, a store exclusive to discerning ladies and gentlemen. We have clothing for you the sailor.

Ladies-collections from Europe:  Gelco  Lebeck  Lucia  Simon Chang For the gentlemen-collections from Italy:  Green Coast  Sail Explorer Plus much more for all you Captains and Mates.

46 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

www.kincardinemarina@bmts.com & www.kyc.ca (web cams)

Offshore Marine was founded in 1985 and devotes itself to

REPAIRING & RESTORING MARINE VESSELS of all types, with meticulous care and pride.

Offshore Specializes In: • Structural repairs and restoration • Transom, stringer, collision, and all other boat repairs

Indoor Shop Capacity of 44 Feet! 864 Alma St. Amherstburg, ON Canada

All from Cammie’s of Bayfield Always a Pleasure, Sheila

519-396-4336

• Free Wireless • BBQ’s & Gazebo’s • 15-30-50 amp service • Showers

519-565-2075

Ph: 519-730-1104 • www.offshoregroup.net

★ Harbor Highlights Labeled on Photos

★ Waypoints for Every Harbor

★ Cruising Tips

★ Getting Through Customs

★ Golf Courses

★ Boat Ramps

VOL. 4

VOL. 4

Other Oth Great Lakes cruising guides are available!

SO

LD

OU

T!

Available June 2011

Marine City p.22 Fair Haven p.34 Port Lambton p.25 rfield Township p.37 Algonac p.26 New Baltimore/Cheste p.41 Wallaceburg p.70 Mt. Clemens/Clinton River Metro Beach p.45 Harsens Island p.30

To pre-order or order other guides, call LaSalle p.76

800-589-9491 Oak Harbor/Cooley Creek

Mitchell’s Bay p.67

Port Wheatley p.255 Leamington p.258

Port Stanley p.245

Erieau p.252

Catawba Island p.116

Port Burwell p.239

p.250

Nanticoke p.223

Turkey Point p.228 St. Williams p.231 Port Rowan p.233

Port Dover p.225

Long Point p.236

Fort Erie p.212

Erie/Presque Isle p.190

Buffalo p.201

Niagara River p.205

Irving p.199

p.219

Barcelona p.194

Dunkirk p.196

Port Maitland/Dunnville

Port Colborne p.215

Nobody knows the Great Lakes like Lakeland Boating.

and the Connecting Rivers Section 1: Lake St.Clair n Shore of Lake Erie Section 2: Southwester Shore of Lake Erie Section 3: Southeastern of Lake Erie Section 4: Northern Shore

Conneaut p.187

Ashtabula p.184

Geneva State Park p.181

Fairport Harbor p.178 Mentor p.176 Chagrin River p.173

Port Glasgow/Rodney

Middle Bass Island p.133 p.128 South Bass Island/Put-in-Bay Kelleys Island p.136 West Harbor p.119 Cleveland p.166 p.123 East Harbor/Marblehead Rocky River p.164 Lorain p.161 Port Clinton p.110 Beaver Creek p.158 Sandusky p.141 Vermilion p.154 Huron p.147

Pelee Island p.256

Cedar Creek p.264

Kingsville p.262

North Maumee Bay p.98

Ottawa River p.98 Toledo p.101 p.105

Bolles Harbor p.90 Luna Pier p.96

Monroe p.88 Toledo Beach p.93

Port Bruce p.242

Port aerial photos Marina listings Where to eat Things to do Cruising tips

Thames River p.64

Belle River/ Puce River/ Pike Creek p.61

Amherstburg p.79

Colchester Harbour p.266

Gibraltar p.79

Wyandotte p.73

Monroe County p.84

★ What to do

Windsor p.59

★ Where to Eat

    

Grosse Pointe p.53 Detroit p.55

★ Aerial Photos of Each Port

St. Clair Ports o‘ Call

LECG_CoverIFC.indd

Ports o‘ Call & Lake Lakeland Boating’s Lake Erie

★ Up-to-Date Marina Listings

St. Clair Shores p.47

★ Every Port on the Lakes

aLakkeeStE.Crlaieir L &

Sarnia p.14

YOUR COMPLETE CRUISI NG RESOU RCE!

St. Clair p.19

La ke 24 Inc Er - x lud ie 3 es Pla 6- a nn inch ing Ch ar t

Port Huron p.14

special advertising section

www.maitlandmarina.on.ca • Email: maitmar@hurontel.on.ca

Updated! $49.95

2/18/11 3:07 PM

The sunsets over the lake are magnificent

Both of them.

Set atop a bluff overlooking Lake Huron, Goderich boasts two sunsets, one at lake level, and if you hurry up to the lighthouse, a second view from the top of the cliff. It is just one of many unique reasons to visit us soon.

1

For information please contact: Tourism Goderich 1-800-280-7637 Visit our website at goderich.ca or ontarioswestcoast.ca

Goderich is a great part of “Shakespeare to the Shoreline” driving tours shakespearetotheshoreline.ca

47 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

waypoint

Middle Bass Island A low-key destination for those looking to enjoy good company and beautiful scenery. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

F

airly or unfairly, Ohio’s Lake Erie Islands have become synonymous with Put-in-Bay for the vast majority of Great Lakes boaters. Although this vacation and cruising playground comprises Lake Erie’s largest archipelago, we still think of one place—The Bay, with its gift shops, golf carts, watering holes, bustling docks and legendary round-the-clock revelry. Perhaps that’s understandable; South Bass Island draws approximately two million visitors each year. If you’re hoping to find a more laid-back experience and a real transition to island time, however, the archipelago does offer less-traveled cruising destinations. And 805-acre, Big Dipper-shaped Middle Bass Island, home to less than 100 year-round residents, is at the top of that must-visit list.

48 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a y 2 011

As are all destinations within the Lake Erie Shores and Islands region, Middle Bass is very accessible. It’s a short day trip from the mainland and from popular offshore destinations such as Put-in-Bay and Kelleys Island; if the weather is uncooperative, you also can hop aboard the Miller Ferry at Catawba on the mainland or the Sonny-S Ferry at The Bay. If you choose to take your own boat to the island, you’ll tie up at the Middle Bass Island State Park marina. Opened in 2010, the 190-slip facility features 70 seasonal, 110 transient and 10 personal watercraft slips; dockside electric hookups; and limited showers and flush toilets. Day dockage is on a first-come, first-served basis, as are reservations for overnight stays. If you’re interested in camping, the state park has 21 PHOTO By ROMAN SAPECKI

waypoint

nonelectric sites with fire rings, picnic tables and access to a vault latrine. There is no drinking water or electricity. Then, from your dock or campsite, you can set out with a golf cart, a bicycle or a kayak to explore the island. Or go on foot; it’s only a mile and a half long. Named Isle des Fleures by French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, and his crew in 1679, Middle Bass Island once was famous for more than flowers. In the 1850s, island owner José de Rivera Saint Jurgo cultivated the land for grape production and winemaking; in 1866, new owner Andrew Wehrle established Golden Eagle Wine Cellars, which became one of the country’s largest wineries. Island resident Peter Lonz established his own winery in 1884, and in 1926, he and his son, George, merged their family business with Golden Eagle. Placed on the

National Register of Historic Places in 1986, the Lonz Winery hosted countless merrymaking tourists until July 2000, when a crowded terrace collapsed, killing one person and injuring dozens. The State of Ohio bought the property. Now, Lonz Winery’s iconic Gothic-style castle is part of 124-acre Middle Bass Island State Park. In addition to the winery and the marina, Ohio’s 74th state park incorporates nearly a mile of Lake Erie shoreline and acres of undeveloped woodlands, wetlands and glacial grooves. Then there’s the Middle Bass Kuehnle Wildlife Refuge, with even more opportunities for world-class bird-watching, particularly since the island lies on one of North America’s primary migratory paths—as it turns out, for Monarch butterflies as well as for birds. 49 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a y 2 011

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Since the late 1800s, Lonz Winery has remained one of the most iconic establishments on Middle Bass Island. Today, the Gothic-style castle is part of 124-acre Middle Bass Island State Park (right). Visitors can hop aboard the Miller Ferry at Catawba on the mainland to enjoy a day on the island (below).

Middle Bass Island also is home to an historic district, a variety of rental cottages and bed-and-breakfasts, St. Hazards Waterfront Resort and JF Walleyes, a microbrewery and restaurant that lies within easy reach of the marina. Chris Zeitler, who co-owns JF Walleyes with partner Marika Gross, is an avid Lake Erie boater. “I’ve been boating in these islands for 30 years, since I was 18,” he enthused. “On Saturdays, I used to take the ferry to Middle Bass to hang out at Lonz Winery and hear the bands.” In 1998, Zeitler purchased a “future build” condo on the island. When it was finally completed in 2005, he started spending long weekends here. “I fell in love with the island,” he recalled. “Then the opportunity to purchase JF Walleyes fell into my lap. I had 50 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

no experience, but decided to take a stab at it!” Zeitler and Gross started their new venture in 2006. “We remodeled it inside and out, we made subtle menu changes, and we opened the Blue Lagoon,” Zeitler said. “We knew the marina was coming. The state broke ground in 2007, and we opened The Blue Lagoon on the Fourth of July weekend in 2008.” The Blue Lagoon features an 18-inch-deep wading pool with a grotto, waterfalls, plenty of chaise lounges and comfortable bistro-style outdoor dining. It remains family-friendly until 9 p.m., and there’s live entertainment on weekends. “On Fridays and Saturdays this season, we’re going to host our own ‘Minute to Win It,’” Zeitler said. “And we have serious prizes, including Bahamas cruises.” Other highlights on the 2011 calendar include a 5K race, pig roast, clambake, Lonz grape stomp, chili cook-off and a Halloween party. And the season has already started. “Public transportation starts March 25, and the marina opens April 15,” he said. “We do weekends until May 1, then we’re open daily, with entertainment from Memorial Day weekend to mid-October.” Even with a summertime population that surges to 1,500, Zeitler said Middle Bass Island remains a low-key destination for those who seek an alternative to the more frenetic pace of, say, Put-in-Bay. “This is a nice, clean, safe place to dock your boat and have a quiet night,” he commented. “It’s a very tranquil island.” For more information about the marina, visit www. dnr.state.oh.us/parks/middlebass/tabid/766/Default.aspx. To learn more about JF Walleyes, call 419-285-2739 or visit jfwalleyes.com. To learn more about Middle Bass Island and the Lake Erie Shores and Islands region, visit middlebass.org and shoresandislands.com. r

WINERY PHOTO BY ROMAN SAPECKI / FERRY PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE ERIE SHORES & ISLANDS®

marina watch

Algonac Harbour Club

This family-friendly marina has something for everyone. by colle e n h . trou pi s

Algonac Harbour Club 1999 pointe Tremble Rd. Algonac, MI 48001 810-794-4448 algonacharbourclub.com

Amenities Transient slips: y Pump-out: y Gas: y Diesel: y Lifts: y Launch ramp: Nearby (next door) Engine repair: y Hull repair: y Marine store: Nearby Restaurant: y Showers: y Laundromat: y

52 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M a y 2 011

S

et on some 21 acres along the deep waters of the St. Clair River, Algonac Harbour Club is home to what is considered the birthplace of powerboating, with links to Chris-Craft and Gar Wood. From approximately 1920 to 1970, the original Chris-Craft plant sat on the site. “We still have two of the buildings,” says president and owner Pete Beauregard Sr., who opened the marina in 1985. One of those buildings houses some of the marina’s 140,000 square feet of indoor heated storage. That means that in addition to the friendly staff and plenty of amenities, the 363-slip marina has deep roots in the area’s history—and in powerboating, which is what it’s still known for today. “Within walking distance is the Algonac-Clay Historical Museum,” Beauregard adds. “It has a lot of memorabilia that shows the beginning of boating in the 1920s.” It’s no wonder boating became so popular here. The marina is uniquely positioned on the St. Clair River, which connects Lake Huron and Lake St. Clair. Lake Erie is just an hour away. “Being that it’s in the deep water close to all the fishing grounds of Lake St. Clair, on the deep water of the St. Clair River and an hour away from Lake Huron, it’s a

great transient marina for people cruising through the area,” Beauregard says. With 75 transient slips, the certified Michigan Clean Marina is ready to accommodate, though reservations are recommended—particularly during the busiest times. The facility can accept boats up to 65 feet in length. Water depth is about six feet. “It’s an inland-type marina, so it’s very well-protected,” says Beauregard. “We have no exposure to rough water.” The marina offers the full range of repairs, including haul-out, prop repair, electronics and fiberglass. “We are a seven-day, full-service marina,” he says. Upon arriving at the marina, guests are sure to be treated with courtesy while enjoying the free Wi-Fi, two pools (one just for adults and one for the kids), tennis, basketball, and volleyball courts, horseshoes, several dog runs, the on-site restaurant, Harbour Grille, and more. Plenty is always going on here. The marina hosts some 20 events throughout the season, beginning with the May 28 seasonal kickoff and “docktail” party, all the way through Spectacular Halloween in early October. “We are constantly adding events for the whole family,” Beauregard says. r phOTO By MATT KOwALsKI

marine marketplace 53 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a y 2 011

The Award-winning Back Cove 30: now on order

experienced boats at great prices 24'9" 24'9" 25' 29'0" 29'0" 31'6" 31'6" 31'6" 31'6" 32'0" 32'7"

1995 Pursuit 2460 Denali ..................................................................$25,000 2000 Pursuit 2460 Denali ..................................................................$32,900 1991 Tiara 250 Sportboat ...................................................................$22,500 1991 Tiara 290 Sportboat ...................................................................$36,500 2002 Sea Ray 290 Amberjack .......................................................$78,900 1997 Tiara 3100 Open ...........................................................................$87,000 2002 Tiara 3100 Open....................................................................... $139,900 2003 Tiara 3100 Open LE .............................................................. $149,000 2004 Tiara 3100 Open LE ...............................................................$156,000 1996 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique....................................................$39,000 2004 Grady White 300 Marlin ....................................................... $115,000

call us today 920.854.4521

32’7” 33’9” 34’0” 34’6” 37’8” 42’6” NEW! 21’10” 23’11” 23’11” 27’6”

2007 Tiara 3200 Open ...................................................................... $239,000 1985 Sea Ray 340 Express ...............................................................$19,000 2001 Formula 34 PC ...............................................................................$99,000 2007 Sabre 34 Hardtop Express ..............................................$369,000 2001 Cruisers 3750 MY .................................................................... $164,000 2003 Cruisers 4050 Express MY............................................. $249,000 2011 Cobalt 230 .............................................................. Contact Cal-Marine 2011 Cobalt 242............................................................... Contact Cal-Marine 2011 Cobalt 242WSS .................................................. Contact Cal-Marine 2011 Cobalt 276 ............................................................... Contact Cal-Marine

/ www.cal-marine.com / 10884 N. Bay shore drive, sister bay, WI 54234

Reed Yacht Sales is the new Midwest dealer!

C U T W AT E R 2 6

Cutwater Boats produces two models—a 26-foot and 28-foot single-inboard diesel—each a contemporary interpretation of the classic downeast style. Cutwater Boats is a division of Fluid Motion LLC, manufacturer of Ranger Tugs. • Long list of standard features • Revolutionary new hull design • Exceptional interior volume

C U T W AT E R 2 8

• Superior ride comfort, speed, economy, range and handling • Trailerable (8' 6" beam)

SEE US AT THESE 2011 SHOWS The Catawba Island Boat Show April 29th – May 1st Grosse Pointe Yacht Club Boat Show May 20th – 22nd Bay Harbor Boat Show June 17th – 19th

GRAND HAVEN, MI Brent Reed 616-402-0180 LASALLE, MI Paul Reed 419-304-4962  Tim Manton 419-509-6948 TRAVERSE CITY, MI Brad Thompson 231-668-9868

www.reedyachtsales.com

Extensive Marketing Plan List your Trawler with us!

Trawler Charters & Trawler Schools NOW AVAILABLE on the Great Lakes

Largest number of trawler listings anywhere!

Come to Manitowoc, Wisconsin We Sell the Dreams, You Build the Memories!

IDEAL GREAT LOOP & FRESH WATER TRAWLERS NEW TRAWLERS

American Tugs 525, 435, 395, 365

41 Camano 2011 $50,000 off new order

31 Camano 2006 $189,000

29 Ranger Tug 2010 $239,500

27 Ranger Tug 2011 $182,800

25 Ranger Tug 2008 $129,900

• Yearning to do the Great Loop? • Looking for a fuel-efficient trawler? • Matching your budget... priceless! We are the listing broker and selling broker so we work for the SELLER and the BUYER NEW TRAWLERS

BROKERAGE TRAWLERS NEW LISTING

21 Ranger Tug 2010 $58,500

65.5 Skipperliner 1992 $239,000

65 Custom Trawler 1998 $585,000

45 CHB Sedan 1981 $110,000

43 Saberline 1996 $359,900

42 Nordic Tug 2008 $649,500

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

42 Nordic Tug 1999 $339,000

42 Grand Banks 1993 $289,000

42 Grand Banks 1987 $219,000

41 Lindmark 1987 $105,000

37 Custom Steel 1986 $110,000

37 Great Harbour 1996 $269,000

36 Heisier Lobsterboat 2000 $139,000

36 Grand Banks 1984 $129,000 SALE PENDING

36 Grand Banks 1973 $59,500

32 Grand Banks 1990 $125,000

32 Cheoy Lee 1983 $64,000

32 Island Gypsy 1983 $59,900

31 Camano 2001 $139,000

31 Blue Seas 1988 $89,000

26 Nordic Tug 1981 with trailer $75,000

21 Ranger Tug 2007 with trailer $47,000

41 PDQ Power Cat 2006 39 Ocean Alexander 1991 $425,000 SALE PENDING $149,900

*Please note the location of the brokerage trawler in the website listing: at Manitowoc or at the owner’s location

www.trawlersmidwest.com • 920-894-2632 • 866-375-1633

A Complete Line of New and Pre-owned Yachts.

Committed to Honest Reliable Service

LoCated in CHiCago

56’ 1999 Sea Ray 560 Sedan Bridge T-3406 Caterpillar $449,000

46’ 1979 Hatteras Sport Fisherman T-8V71T1 Detroit Diesel, 425HP $137,500

58’ 2000 Sea Ray 580 Super Sun Sport T-3406 Caterpillar, 800HP $489,900

63’ 1991 Skipperliner 630 Motor Yacht Charter boat, T-Merc diesels, call for price

53’ 1994 Ocean 53 Super Sport T-8V92 Detroit Diesel, 760HP $350,000

50’ 2001 Cruisers 5000 Sport Sedan T-74P TAMD Volvo, 480HP $379,000

46’ 1999 Sea Ray 460 Sundancer T-Diamond Series Cummins, 450HP $180,000

46’ 1985 Viking 46 Convertible T-892 Detroit Diesel, 675HP $119,000

46’ 2004 Carver 466 Motor Yacht, T-TAMD 75P EDC Volvo, 370HP $299,000

45’ 2007 Formula 45 Yacht T-Volvo Penta, 575HP $469,900

41’ 2001 Sea Ray 410 Sundancer T-8.1 S Merc Horizon, 370HP $154,900

40’ 2008 Rinker 400 Express Cruiser T-Merc I/O’s, call for price

39’ 1987 Sea Ray 390 Express Cruiser T-454 Merc, 340HP $39,900

37’ 2004 Larson Cabrio 370 Midcabin T-8.1 S Merc Horizon, 370HP $129,000

40’ 2000 Carver 406 Aft Cabin T-Cummins, 330HP $129,900

Sistership

Sistership

37’ 1995 Sea Ray 370 Sundancer T-Mercs, 340HP $84,900

36’ 1992 Four Winns 365 Express T-Ford, 460HP $59,900

36’ 2001 Trojan 360 Express Cruiser, T-Merc MX 6.2 MPI Hrzn., 320HP $95,000

35’ 1997 Carver 350 Mariner T-350 Crusader, 320HP $74,900

33’ 1996 Sea Ray 330 Sundancer T-454 Merc, 310HP $57,900

32’ 1998 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique T-Merc, 260HP $49,900

31’ 2002 Sea Ray 310 Sundancer T-350MAG Merc, 300HP $72,000

29’ 2003 Four Winns 298 Vista Cruiser T-5.0 GXi/DP Volvo, 270HP $69,900

For more information or to set up an appointment, contact Elite Yachts or Barbara Walsh www.yachtworld.com/eliteyachtbrokerage | 630.887.1478 | Cell 630.235.0227 | yachts98@sbcglobal.net

Windy City Yacht Brokerage, llC

1997 70’ nePtunus my 1110HP 12v92 detroits, 2 jet sKis tender, tHrusters, staBilizers $799,000

1988 55’ oCean suPer sPort 735HP detroit 8v92s, Heavy renovations. looKs great $235,000

1971 54’ striKer sPort fisHerman 550HP detroit 1271s, many new uPgrades, 18’ Beam, al Hull $225,000

1986 52’ Jefferson montiCeLLo 375HP Cat 3208s, $200K rennovation, Corian, new eleCtroniCs $299,000

1991 44’ Lee WiLbur Custom 375HP Cat 3208s, Hull Blue awlgriP, suPer struCture wHite awlgriP, fanatiCally maintained $249,000

1998 40’ sea ray sundanCer 350HP Cat 3116ts. vdrives, 965Hrs, inside Heated, metiCulous maintenanCe, many Custom, fresHwater $139,500

1992 36’ bayLiner 3688 200HP Hino dsls, straigHt drives, very Clean, new uPgrades fresHwater $90,000

1986 36’ Carver 3607 aft CBn 350HP Crusaders, gen 2 srs, 2 Heads, 2 Helms great PriCe fresHwater $37,900

2003 32’ sea ray 320 sundanCer merC 300HP mag v drives 410 Hours, generator, radar, fresHwater $84,900

2003 32’ regaL 3260 Commodore volvo 320HP 5.7l v drives only 240 Hours, generator, fresHwater $84,900

2002 31’ sea ray sundanCer t-6.2l merCs w/Bravo iii 250 Hrs, radar, one owner, fresHwater $69,900

1990 30’ Carver 30 santego twin merC 260HP 5.7l alPHa one 550 Hrs, exCePtionally Clean, fresHwater $24,900

1998 28’ sea ray ss single 385HP merC w/205 Hrs. vaCuflusH Head 9’6” Beam fresHwater $34,900

2010 31’ sea ray 310 sundanCer axeus drives, generator, almost new $189,000

SiSter Ship

SiSter Ship

www.WindyCityYachts.com •

Jeff Pierce, CPYB

SiSter Ship

2006 27’ sea ray 270 seLeCt eX HigH end Bow rider, single 350mag w250Hrs, BlaCK Hull, arCH, Head fresHwater $55,000

• 312-440-9500 Email: jeff@windycityyachts.com

marine marketplace

Celebrating our Fiftieth Year! DEMO BOAT OF THE MONTH

BROKERED BOATS

PRE-OWNED BOATS

94 85 94 05 85 00 92 00 87 87 94 90 90 08 89 88 03 07 09

20’ 25’ 27’ 27’ 28’ 28’ 29’ 29’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 38’ 42’ 43’

Cantius 48

2009 Cruisers 520 Coupe $Call

Princess 42 Flybridge Sea Ray 200BR w/5.0 Merc, Trl..................................................................................9,900 Sea Ray 250 Sundancer w/260, Merc ......................................................................11,400 Wellcraft 2700 Martinque w/7.4L Merc ...................................................................19,900 Sea Ray 270 Amberjack w/350 MAG MPI BRIII .......................................................49,900 Bayliner Contessa w/260 HP Volvo.............................................................................9,900 Sea Sport 2744 WA w/5.7L BRIII Merc, Trl................................................................29,900 Sea Ray 290 Sundancer w/7.4 Bravo II 310HP Merc ....................................................24,900 Chaparral Signature w/T-4.3L Volvos .......................................................................49,900 Chris Craft Amerosport T-350 Crusaders ..................................................................24,900 Carver Mariner w/T-270HP Crusaders ......................................................................39,500 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique w/5.7L Merc ..................................................................39,900 Trojan 10 Meter Express w/T-454 Crusaders ...........................................................34,900 Donzi Center Console w/T-250 Johnsons .................................................................19,900 Carver Mariner w/T-5.7 MPI Crusaders ..................................................................229,000 Regal 360 Commodore w/T-7.4L Mercs ...................................................................44,900 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-340 HP Crusaders .....................................................................49,900 Silverton 38 Convertible w/T-8.1 MPI Crusaders ...................................................169,000 Rinker 420 Express w/T-496 HO Mercruiser BRIII ..................................................199,000 Carver 43 Super Sport w/T-IPS 500 Volvos ............................................................499,000

07 05 97 01 06 95 00 04 88 90 99 02 07 85 88 99 02 03 04 94

Ph: 815-357-8666 2007 RAYBURN 92 SKYLOUNGE

30’ 31’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 38’

Cruisers Cxi W/T-4.3 Volvos, Gen .............................................................................84,500 Formula PC w/T-6.2L MPI 320HP Mercs.................................................................119,000 Carver 325 Aft Cabin w/T-350XL Crusaders .............................................................54,900 Carver 325 Aft Cabin w/T-Mercs 350 Mag I/B.........................................................69,900 Cruisers 320 Express w/T-6.2 MPI Mercs ...................................................................99,500 Sea Ray 330 Sundancer w/T-7.4L Mercs .................................................................59,000 Wellcraft 3300 Martinique w/T-7.4L Mercs .............................................................79,900 Chaparral 330 Signature w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII .................................................119,000 Mainship Convertible w/T-454 Crusaders ................................................................49,500 Sea Ray 350 Express w/T-7.4L Mercs ......................................................................39,900 Carver 356 Aft Cabin w/T-7.4L Mercs ....................................................................119,000 Carver 350 Mariner w/T-6.2 MPI 320 Mercs............................................................89,000 Rinker 350 Express w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII Mercs ..............................................134,500 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-454 CID Crusaders ....................................................................35,900 Carver Mariner w/T-454 CID Crusaders.......................................................................54,900 Carver 36 Mariner w/T-350 Mag Mercs......................................................................74,900 Carver Mariner w/T-6.2L MPI 320HP Mercs ...............................................................86,500 Carver 360 Sport Sedan w/T-8.1GI Volvos ................................................................172,500 Carver 360 Mariner w/T-6.0L MPI Crusaders .........................................................159,000 Carver 380 Santego w/T-7.4 Mercs ..........................................................................63,000

www.springbrookmarina.com

02 04 05 05 01 03 07 08 08 85 07 89 05 95 93 01 03 07 01 00 04 86

38’ 39’ 39’ 39’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 46’ 48’

Carver 380 Santego w/T-6.2L Mercs ........................................................................99,000 Silverton MY w/T-3126 CATS .................................................................................279,900 Carver 396 Aft Cabin w/T-8.1 GI Volvos .................................................................219,000 Carver 396 Motor Yacht w/T-8.1 GI Volvos ............................................................289,000 Sea Ray Sedan w/T-3126 Cats ...............................................................................255,000 Cruisers 405 Express Bridge w/T-370 HP Volvo Dsls .............................................215,000 Cruisers 415 Express MY w/T-8.1GXI Volvos .........................................................399,000 Marquis Sport Coupe w/T-D6 Series IPS 370HP ....................................................569,000 Carver CMY w/T-8.1 Volvo GI FWC ........................................................................299,000 Grand Banks 42 Classics w/T-3208 CATS ..............................................................139,500 Carver 42 SS w/T-IPS 370 HP Volvo Dsls ...............................................................349,000 Sea Ray 440 Aft Cabin w/T-330 Mercs ....................................................................89,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-D6 Volvo Dsls .......................................................................274,900 Carver 440 Aft Cabin w/T-420 HP Cummins...........................................................229,900 Carver 440 MY w/T-3116TA CATS .........................................................................169,900 Carver 444 CMY w/T-370 Cummins........................................................................209,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-63P Volvo Dsls .....................................................................249,900 Cruisers 447 Sport Sedan w/T-480 HP Yanmars ....................................................499,000 Silverton 453 MY w/T-450 HP Cummins ................................................................299,000 Sea Ray 460 Sundancer w/T-450 Cummins ................................................................209,000 Carver 466MY w/T-480 HP Volvos..........................................................................369,000 Chris Craft 480 Catalina w/T-350 HP Crusaders ......................................................99,000

Fax: 815-357-8678

2008 TIARA 3000 OPEN

Grand Haven, MI Brent Reed 616-402-0180

Lasalle, MI Paul Reed 419-304-4962 Tim Manton 419-509-6948 1994, 2000, & 2005 HATTERAS 50' CONVERTIBLE

28’ 28’ 29’ 30’ 31’ 31’ 32’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 37’ 37’ 38’ 38’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 43’

1996 2001 2006 2008 1995 1997 2007 1986 1986 1988 1989 1995 1996 1988 2003 1967 1987 2005 2006 1975

2007 CABO 32 EXPRESS

Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Yamaha 225 VX, 225 hp ............................$ 44,900 Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Mercury Optimax, 225 hp ........................Sale Pending Tiara 2900 Classic T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp ......................................Sale Pending Tiara 3000 Open T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp ..........................................$ 184,500 Tiara 3100 Open - Hardtop T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp.........................$ 89,900 Tiara 3100 Open T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp...........................................$ 79,900 CABO 32 Express T-Caterpillar C-7, 461 hp............................................$ 309,900 Trojan F-36 Convertible T-Crusader 350’s, 270 hp ..................................$ 49,500 Hatteras 36 Sedan T-Crusader 7.4 ltr., 350 hp ........................................$ 79,900 Mainship 36 Double Cabin T-Crusader 350 5.7L, 270 hp .......................$ 57,900 Tiara 3600 Convertible T-Crusader 350 hp ..............................................Sale Pending Tiara 3700 Open T-Caterpillar, 3208, 435 hp ............................................$ 139,900 Tiara 3700 Open T-Caterpillar, 3208, 435 hp ............................................Sale Pending Hatteras 38 Convertible T-Detroit Diesels, 6V-71TI ...............................$ 164,000 Powerquest 380 Avenger T-Mercruiser 496 MAG HO, 475 hp ............$ 115,000 Hatteras 41’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 6V53N 216 hp ....................$ 79,900 Chris Craft 42’ Commander T-Detroit Diesel 6V71TI’s ...........................$ 119,900 Tiara 4200 Open - Plan A T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ...........................Sale Pending Tiara 4200 Open - Plan C T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ...........................Sale Pending Hatteras 43 Flybridge MY T-Cummins VT903, 320 hp ............................$ 99,900

62 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

43’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 47’ 48’ 48’ 48’ 49’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 52’ 58’ 58’ 60’ 85’ 92’

Traverse City, MI Brad Thompson 231-668-9868

1995 1984 2006 2000 1985 2009 1988 1994 2004 2007 1988 1994 2000 2005 1999 1978 1985 2000 2006 2007

Tiara 4300 Open T-Detroit Diesels 6V92’s, 550 hp ..................................$ 199,900 Viking 44’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesels 671, 450 hp ............................$ 169,900 Tiara 4400 Sovran T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp ..........................................$ 499,900 Silverton 453 Motor Yacht T-Cummins QSM 11, 535 hp ........................$ 229,900 Ocean 46 Sunliner T-Detroit Diesel, 6-71’s .............................................$ 109,900 Sunseeker 47 Portofino T-Volvo IPS 600, 435 hp....................................$ 819,000 Ocean 48 Super Sport T-Detroit Diesel 6-71’s, 485 hp ..........................$ 169,900 Hatteras 48’ Cockpit MY T-Detroit Diesel 6V92, 535 hp ........................$ 249,900 Silverton 48’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-12, 700 hp ..............................$ 449,000 Grand Banks 49 Eastbay SX T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp ........................$ 749,900 Bertram 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 8V-92 735 hp.........................$ 449,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 12V-71TA DDEC, 900 hp .....$ 399,900 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ..........................$ 565,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-18, 1000 bhp ..........................$ 899,900 Hatteras 52’ Cockpit MY T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ..........................Sale Pending Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 550 hp ...............$ 299,900 Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 650 hp ...............Sale Pending Hatteras 60’ Convertible T-Caterpillar, 3412, 1350 hp ............................$ 874,500 Pacific Mariner 85’ Pacific Mariner T-MTU 10V2000, 1500 hp ............$ 4,795,000 Rayburn 92 Skylounge T-Caterpillar C30, 1550 hp .................................$ 5,500,000

www.reedyachtsales.com

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YOUR GRAND BANKS DEALER FOR THE GREAT LAKES

EAST BAY 55 SX

WALSTROM.COM

HARBOR SPRINGS, MI 231-526-2141 | CHEBOYGAN, MI 231-627-7105 | BAY HARBOR, MI 231-439-2741

63 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

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“Let us earn your business”

Services & Amenities Offered: • Seasonal & Transient Slips up to 120’ • Seasonal & Transient Moorings • Laundry, Shower & Dockside Parking • Indoor Heated & Outdoor Storage • Fuel Dock with Gas, Diesel & Pump-Out • WiFi Internet Access • Near-By Yacht Club • On-Site & Mobile Yacht Repair Services • Complete Mechanical Services • Certified Technicians • 70 Ton Travel Lift • On Site Yacht Sales & Brokerage Services • Launch & Retrieve Program for All Sizes • Member: Boat U.S. & Tow Boat U.S.

Slip & Storage Specials Available: • Multi-Year & Group Discounts • Free Pickup & Delivery Anywhere on Lake Michigan with long term contract • Free Slip for up to 4 weeks in the Spring or Fall with Winter Storage

155 EAST REDWOOD ST., STURGEON BAY, WISCONSIN, 54235

POWER

SAIL Alerion Express • J-Boat • Precision • Laser Performance LIFESTYLE Patagonia • O’Brien • Puma • Gill • Rip Curl • Slam

NEW BOATS IN-STOCK & ON SALE

2011 Hunt Harrier 25

2010 Sea Ray 205 Sport

Brokerage Boats, for complete specs & additional photos visit IrishBoatShop.com 36’ Monk 36 Trawler ‘01 ...................... $ 229,000 25’ Rosborough RF-246 Sdn Cruiser ‘05$ 79,500 36’ Sea Ray 360 Sundancer ‘04 ......... $ 167,500 25’ Chris-Craft Sportsman ‘48 ............. $120,000 36’ Tiara 3600 Open ‘87 .......................... $54,900 20’ Bayliner Capri 2050 LS ‘99 ................. $9,900 34’ Sea Ray 340 Sedan Bridge ‘85....... $ 36,000 19’ Sea Ray 190 Sundeck ‘01 ............... $15,900 30’ Regal 3060 ‘06.................................. $ 79,900 18’ Boston Whaler 18 Outrage ‘81 ...... $14,900 29’ Tiara 2900 Coronet ‘07................... $129,500 18’ Herreshoff Pilot 18 ‘74....................... $ 9,500 28’ Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘97 ............Pending 17’ Sea Ray 176 Bow Rider ‘03 ............. $10,500 28’ Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘00 ............Pending 17’ Boston Whaler Striper 17 ‘89.......... $22,400 26’ Glacier Bay 2670 Isle Runner ‘07 .. $94,000 17’ ‘08 Assembled 17’ Beach Cruiser70’s$ 6,900 26’ Cobalt 263 Cuddy Cabin ‘01 ............. $39,500 11’ Zodiac YL 340 Rib w/Console ‘08...... $5,000

13000 Stover Rd. Charlevoix MI 49720

231-547-9967

cvx@irishboatshop.com

400 Bay Street Harbor Springs MI 49740

231-526-6225

hs@irishboatshop.com

www.IrishBoatShop.com 64 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

68’ 58’ 56’ 56’ 52’ 46’ 44’ 43’ 42’ 41’ 40’ 40’ 39’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 32’ 32’ 29’ 29’ 26’ 25’ 24’ 20’ 19’

2002 2010 1985 2007 2005 2010 2005 2000 2008 1988 2000 1990 1984 1999 1989 2000 1985 1983 1998 1996 1991 1997 1996 2002 2001 1998 1990 2007 1987 1989 1996

Sunseeker Predator Ocean Alexander 58 MY Hatteras 56 Motor Yacht Cruisers Yachts 560 Express Ocean Alexander 52 Sedan Cruisers Yachts 460 Express Cruisers Yachts 440 Express Ocean Alexander 430 MKI PH Cruisers Yachts 420 Express Sea Ray 415 Aft Cabin Carver 404 Cockpit MY TollyCraft 40 Sport Sedan Sea Ray 390 Express Carver 380 Santego Carver 380 Santego Cruisers Yachts 3870 Exp. Dsls Chris-Craft 382 United Ocean Trawler Cruisers Yachts 3870 Exp. Dsls Cruisers 3650 Aft Cabin Cruisers 3675 Esprit Cruisers Yachts 3575 Express Carver 325 Aft Cabin Cruisers Yachts 320 Express Shamrock 29 WA Cobalt 293 Cuddy Cruisers Yachts 2660 Vee Sport Chris-Craft 25 Corsair Sea Ray S24 Sorrento Wellcraft Center Console Four Winns U-19 Unlimited

• 920-743-6526 • BAYMARINE.NET

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70 65 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a y 2 011

CELEBRATING 25

St. Ignace City Marina

YEARS!

Slips Available for 2011 We are a full service marina located on scenic White Lake in Whitehall, Michigan. We offer floating docks, bath and laundry facilities and a helpful, knowledgeable staff.

Dave Kunze

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Welcome To The

Overlooking Mackinac Island, 136-slip St. Ignace City Marina has been welcoming boaters since July 2003.

This beautiful state-of-the-art facility offers several attractions July 1—Labor Day: • Gas/Diesel/Valvtech Fuel • FREE WIFI • 80 ton lift-out • 200 amp for large slips • Marine services for gas • Wells up to 140 feet or diesel engines. • Navigational Lighthouse

Crosswinds is Your Service Solution for all major and minor repairs from top to bottom and stem to stern.

 Factory Certified Service  Transient Slips  Gas & Diesel  Pump Out  Monitor Channel 9  50 Ton Travelift  Heated Indoor Storage

www.crosswindsmarineservice.com 302 S. Lake Street  Whitehall, MI 49461  ph: 231-894-4549

HERE ARE SOME FREE ACTIVITIES: • Entertainment at marina on Wed. & Thurs. evenings • Fireworks every Saturday night • Outdoor movies every Sunday night • Shuttles to local casino • Grocery delivery to marina SPECIAL EVENTS AT THE MARINA: June 25 & 26: St. Ignace Auto Show (marina fills for this event)

July 23: 3rd Annual St. Ignace Fish Feast (marina fills for this event)

August 6: Bayside Music Festival

Harbor Reservation System: 1-800-447-2757 VHF Channel 16 - 9 - 7 Marina Office: 906-643-8131 Marina Fax: 906-643-8362

City Office Fax: 906-643-9393 (L45o51’58”, Lo84o43’06”W) For Area Information, Call 800-970-8717 or visit

www.saintignace.org 66 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

Scan the tag to the right to go directly to our website from your smart phone. Download the free Mobil app at: http://gettag.mobi

What artificial smell do you associate with fresh, clean air? Could it be that ever distinct pine forest? Maybe it’s a vast meadow of wildflowers, a gentle ocean breeze or even crisp mountain air? What if those smells actually were not clean air at all but instead could be causing more harm than good? Hard to imagine isn’t it….The fragrances and odors left behind when we use cleaning products or “air fresheners”, intended to give us that “feeling” of fresh air, are actually chemical off- gases. In fact, many studies have been performed on the negative effects they can pose to your health. Now that I have your attention, what if I told you a product exists that can rid the air of impurities like mold, bacteria, fungi and even some viruses and leave behind a true clean, fresh smell of simply, nothing? That product is Kanberra Gel. Many customers around the globe and right here in the Great Lakes are familiar with Kanberra Gel. Already a staple in the Mega-yacht industry, Kanberra Gel has been making waves in many marine-related areas, as well as RV and automotive storage, pet stores, hardware stores and pharmacies.

BOAT FINANCING

BOAT FINANCING

BOAT FINANCING

THINKING OF BUYING A BOAT? Call us to see what options we have for you.

As readers learned in the April 2011 issue, Kanberra Gel is formulated with Australian Tea Tree Oil, known around the world as a natural, mostly topical antiseptic. Only now those same antiseptic and antifungal properties are realized though an airborne release. There are no synthetic perfumes or chlorine bleach, just a clean, natural scent the way Nature intended. This all-natural product effectively eliminates mechanical and upholstery damaging mold and odors while blanketing the cabin with a protective vapor enhancing overall air quality and comfort. Kanberra Gel is a superior alternative to chemical-based products on the market due to its long-lasting performance, ease of use and allnatural properties. Placed either within a yacht’s air handling system or simply out in the open, Kanberra Gel continually works as an anti-microbial and anti-fungal agent, controlling infecting organisms in the air. In testing, Kanberra Gel was shown to remain effective for up to 45 days or more making it ideal for monthly maintenance programs. Because Kanberra Gel offers superior protection against mold, its health benefits are obvious. Kanberra Gel comes in 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32-oz packages. If you have a question on maintaining the air quality on your vessel, or would like to add a comment on your Kanberra Gel experience, please e-mail me at DavidL@KanberraGel.com. I will respond to all inquiries and post as many as possible in the coming issues. Enjoy the spring!

www.kanberragel.com

RATES HAVE JUST REACHED A NEW 3 YEAR LOW! (2 6 2 8)

1-616-494-BOAT NEW  USED  REFINANCE LIMITED CHARTER BOATS HIGH PERFORMANCE BOATS LOW DOWN PAYMENT PROGRAMS ARE AVAILABLE We offer Personal Service! Terms up to 20 YRS

Regional Office: Holland, MI Financing satisfied customers for over 24 years *Rates are subject to change at any time

www.coastalfinancialcorp.com 67 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

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A Clean Smell is Not Always Clean Air...

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Contact John Danno: 616.836.2780 slips@towermarine.com Two Locations: Saugatuck & Douglas, Michigan

Full Service Marinas Seasonal & Transient Slips Special New Customer Slip Discounts Full Complement of Amenities Aerial photos by Photograpy Plus 231-798-2395

Yacht Center

@ Marina Del Isle

Lake Erie Boating Destination! Located in scenic East Harbor on the Marblehead Peninsula and close to area attractions. Luxury marina resort community complete with restaurant, sports bar, private club & yacht center. • Full time service & parts department • Dockage & rack storage • Heated swimming pool • Restaurant & bar • Electric, water, cable, WiFi • Boater’s lounge • Fitness room • Dog walk • 30’ - 60’ slips

Featuring Cleats— “Home of the World’s Best Wings!” For more information, visit SkipperBuds.com or call (419) 732-2587 68 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

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NORTH SHORE MARINA Year Round Full Service Marina 821 W. Savidge, Spring Lake, MI 49456

Ph: 616-604-0234 Marina 616-842-1488 •

www.northshoremarina.com

Newest Great Lakes Edgewater Dealer Yellowfin Yachts

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Authorized Sales & Service

Yellowfin 36 CC Available Now!

Select Pre-Owned / BrOkerage / rePOSSeSSIOnS / call FOr cOMPlete lISt

48’ ‘87 Ocean SS Convt. T-Detroit 6-71’s, HT enclosed, full elect. Freshwater .. $169,900 46’ ’06 Cruisers 460 Exp. Loaded, HT, air/heat, Gen, low hrs, T-430 Volvo Dsl .. $369,900 45’ ‘90 Viking Convt. air, gen, full elect, T-Detroit Dsls, only 900 hrs, clean......... $249,900 44’ ‘03 Carver MY, Air/Heat, Gen, Full Electronics, Only 213 Hrs, Diesel ........... $234,900 41’ ‘99 Maxum 4100SCA, T-Cummins Dsl, 240 hrs, loaded, air, gen, clean .........$179,900 40’ ‘03 Cruisers 405 MY, T-8.1L air/heat, gen, full elect, washer/dryer, nice ..... $234,900 38’ ‘00 Cruisers 3870, Full Elect., Air/Heat, Gen, New Canvas, Low Hrs, T-385 ..$139,900 38’ ’99 Carver Santego, Air/Heat, Gen, Radar, Low Hrs, Very Nice, T-7.4L....... $97,500 37’ ‘05 Cruisers 370 Exp, T-310HP volvo dsls, super clean, loaded, full elect... $194,900 34’ ‘05 Cruisers 340 Exp. air/heat, gen, loaded, radar, super clean, T-6.2L ....... $129,900 32’ ‘89 Carver Aft Cabin, new canvas & carpet, T-260 Merc I/B, radar GPS.......$27,500 30’ ‘99 Pursuit Exp., New Listing, Rebuilt T-5.7L, Full Elect, HT, Air/Heat .......... $84,900

rePO’S 29’ ‘06 Sea Ray Sundancer 30’ ‘99 Bayliner Express 33’ ‘00 Pro-Line 34’ ‘03 Rinker342 FiestaVee 39’ ‘07 Cruisers 395 MY 40’ ‘01 Baja Outlaw 41’ ‘95 Silverton MY 42’ ‘07 Carver Super Sport MORE ARRiVing wEEkLY! 69 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

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Check out our Brokerage ad on page 65

BOAT LOANS Lake Effect Financial Services, LLC William Otto, III 2907 S. Horseshoe Dr. Grandville, MI 49418

Ph: 616-538-5777 Fax: 866-530-6058 Cell: 216-577-1460

55’ 50’ 47’ 45’ 42’ 41’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 38’ 37’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 34’ 32’ 31’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 26’ 27’ 25’ 24’

’90 ‘03 ‘70 ‘79 ‘87 ‘97 ‘09 ‘08 ‘96 ‘00 ‘00 ‘87 ‘73 ‘85 ‘01 ‘98 ‘89 ‘93 ‘89 ‘81 ‘90 ‘02 ‘04 ‘94

38’ 37’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 35’ 34’ 32’ 31’ 30’ 30’ 28’ 18’ 15’

’83 ‘67 ‘00 ‘99 ‘77 ‘76 ’77 ’05 ’85 ’73 ‘80 ‘76 ‘92 ‘08

Fleming ........................................................................$495,000 Sea Ray .......................................................................$449,000 Chris-Craft ......................................................... Sale pending C&L ..............................................................................$117,000 Jefferson.....................................................................$129,900 Maxum ..........................................................................$99,900 Fathom pilothouse .....................................................$425,000 Fathom flybridge ........................................................$449,000 Sea Ray .........................................................................$99,900 Sea Ray .......................................................................$129,900 Nordic Tugs ................................................................$315,000 Grand Banks...............................................................$154,900 Trojan .............................................................................$19,900 Viking .............................................................................$84,900 Powerquest ..................................................................$91,000 Nordic Tug ..................................................................$175,000 Tiara ...............................................................................$59,900 Sea Ray .........................................................................$29,900 Sea Ray .........................................................................$33,000 Carver ............................................................................$16,000 Wellcraft .......................................................................$17,000 Sea Ray .........................................................................$49,000 Aylward 25 ....................................................................$39,900 Maxum ..........................................................................$14,900 SAIL Morgan 384...................................................................$59,900 Chris Craft .....................................................................$19,900 Catalina .........................................................................$99,900 Catalina .......................................................................$110,000 Hallberg-Rassy ............................................................$39,900 Hallberg-Rassy ............................................................$42,000 Tartan.............................................................................$26,000 Beneteau ......................................................................$79,900 Island Packet ...............................................................$49,000 Pearson ...........................................................................$9,900 Catalina .........................................................................$22,000 Sabre .............................................................................$19,900 Tri-Star.............................................................................$3,000 Hunter..............................................................................$6,300

billotto3@gmail.com

Originating agent for: info@harborviewyachtsales.com • Traverse City, MI 49684 Call Bill Allgaier office: 231-933-5414 • cell: 231-218-1227

70 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

Dinghy Lifts Inc., “The Original Dinghy Lift Since 1988”

This all new concept was designed when in the up position you can bring the platform up and over the existing platform and retract in up to 28 inches. This brings the weight forward for better performance while underway. It also brings the tender higher to eliminate backwash. This patented system with a push of a button will hydraulically telescope out to bring your platform out and away from your yacht. Then gently lower your platform down in the water for easy removal of your tender. This is the answer for yacht owners who are carrying larger tenders. The weight capacity is 3,000 lbs. This system is backed by the high standards of Dinghy Lifts Inc. “The Original Dinghy Lift Since 1988”

US PATENTS #78866275 AND #6047659 The only patented Lift System Mfg. in the USA

Dinghy Lifts Inc. • www.dinghylifts.com

Ft. Lauderdale: Ph. 954.563.5035 • Michigan: 989-343-9900 • Fax. 989.343.0829 Email: dinghylifts@yahoo.com

The Best Deals on Pre-owned Boats

1991 NE Catawba Road | Port Clinton, OH 43452 | 419-797-4492

15 ‘99 Edgewater15 Center Console Yamaha 90hp .........$9,995 37 ‘07 Cruisers 370 Exp. T-420 Volvo Penta 8.1HO ...... $219,900 26 ‘06 Sea Ray 260DA Merc 5.7L 350 Mag .................... $67,900 38 ‘03 Sea Ray 380 DA Merc 8.1L 370hp ....................... $156,000 26 ‘04 Albemarle 268 Express Volvo 300hp Dsl ............. $82,900 39 ‘90 Sea Ray 390EC T-Cat 3208 375hp .......................... $86,900 27 ’05 Boston Whaler 270 Outrage T-225 Verados....... $77,900 40 ‘03 Cruisers 4050 MY T-370HP Yanmar Dsl ............. $229,900 27 ‘07 Sea Ray 270 Amberjack Merc 6.2L 320hp .......... $57,745 41 ‘05 Meridian 411 Meridian Merc. 8.1 hzn ................ $230,995 28 ‘01 Sea Ray 280 DA T-4.3’s ........................................... $64,900 41 ’99 Tiara 4100 Open T-435 Cat 3208........................... $234,900 29 ‘98 Sea Ray 290 DA Mercruiser 7.4L 300hp.............. $39,900 41 ‘06 Meridian 411 Sedan Cum. 380 QSB 380hp ....... $299,000 29 ‘01 Sea Ray 290 DA T-Merc 5.7EFI 260hp ................. $69,900

30 ‘07 Grady White 305 Exp. T-Yamaha F250 ............... $154,900 31 ‘02 Fountain 31 Center Console T-225 Mercury........ $59,995 32 ‘94 Fountain 32 Fever T-502 Mag ................................ $39,900 33 ‘93 Sea Ray 330 DA Merc 7.4L 310hp ....................... $44,900 33 ‘08 Sea Ray 330 DA T-370hp 8.1DTS ........................ $185,000 33 ‘05 Larson 33 Cabrio T-5.0 Volvo Gxi ........................ $113,900 34 ‘99 Sea Ray 340 DA T-310 7.4L MPI............................ $82,900

42 ’90 Sea Ray 420 DA Caterpillar 3208 375hp ............... $84,900 42 ‘05 Sea Ray 420 Sedan Cummins 480 CE ................. $329,900 43 ‘09 Sea Ray 43 DA ZEUS T-480 ................................. $674,900 44 ‘93 Sea Ray 440 DA T-300 Cummins ......................... $129,900 45 ‘95 Sea Ray 450 DA T-Cummins 420hp..................... $169,900 45 ‘96 Cherubini 45 Trawler T-250hp Cummins ............ $439,900 46 ‘02 Sea Ray 460 DA T-417 Cummins 6CTA ............... $269,900

34 ’07 Sea Ray 340 DA T-Merc 8.1lL 370hp................... $159,900 48 ‘02 Sea Ray 480 MY Cummins QSM-11 616hp ........ $313,900 34 ‘99 Sea Ray 340 DA T-7.4L 370hp ................................ $89,000 54 ‘98 Sea Ray 540 DA T-735HP Detroit DDEC ............. $399,900 34 ‘99 Sunseeker Superhawk T-Merc 502 MPI .......... $124,900 55 ‘05 Sea Ray 550 Sedan MAN CRM 900hp ............... $699,900 34 ‘08 Sea Ray 340 DA T-Merc 8.1L 370hp ................... $199,900 56 ‘01 Sea Ray 560 Sedan Caterpillar 3406E 800hp .... $499,900 35 ‘00 Carver 350 Mariner T-Merc 7.4L MPI 340hp ...... $124,900 56 ‘01 Sea Ray 560 Sedan Caterpillar 3406E 800hp .... $419,900 37 ‘95 Carver 370 Voyager Crusader 454 XL .................. $79,500 56 ‘03 Sea Ray 560 Sedan MAN T-1005hp ................... $525,000

Always open at WWW.MARINEMAX.COM 71 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

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The All New RETRACTABLE Hydraulic Platform System

dining on deck

Salmon Bianco

The secret’s in the ’shrooms. BY MARTY KOVAR I K

W

hile I dined at iconic Italian restaurant Victoria’s in Green Bay, Wisconsin, the waitress walked by with a plate of salmon and mushrooms. She was kind enough to explain the dish and its ingredients. I gave it a shot at home, and voilà; the sauce turned out rich, with a strong mushroom flavor. Fresh and dried mushrooms pair with cream to make this dish a true mushroom lover’s delight! Next time I’m in Green Bay, I’ll hit up Victoria’s to see how close I came to my initial inspiration. Meanwhile, this preparation tastes pretty darn good.

DIRECTIONS Rinse the shiitake mushrooms and soak them in a bowl of warm water for half an hour. Remove stems, slice caps thin and place them back in the water for another 30 minutes. Clean and cut button mushrooms into thick slices and sauté in olive oil over medium-high heat until lightly browned. Drain shiitakes and add with minced garlic to the buttons. Stir fry together for another two minutes. Carefully add brandy; it has a tendency to flare up in the pan. Reduce brandy over heat. Once it’s almost absorbed, add cream and reduce heat to a low simmer. Season the salmon with salt and pepper, then rub with olive oil. Grill until almost done. If sauce is not thick enough, turn up the heat and reduce further. Serve sauce mixture over angel hair pasta and top with pieces of grilled salmon. The richness of the mushrooms allows this dish to pair well with a nice red wine.

SALMON BIANCO OVER ANGEL HAIR PASTA 6 to 8 dried shiitake mushrooms 8 ounces white button mushrooms 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced ¼ cup brandy 2 cups heavy cream salt and pepper to taste 1½ pounds skinless salmon filets 1 pound angle hair pasta olive oil cracked black pepper sea salt

PHOTO BY MARTY KOVARIK

NEW - USED REFINANCE TERMS TO 20 YEARS Call now to discuss your loan and pre-approval options. More than 25 years experience providing boat loans to satisfied customers nationwide. Financing available from $35,000 to $5 million+. For qualified applicants, rates subject to change without notice.

GREAT LAKES NATIONAL Toll Free 888-408-5577  MI 586-773-5533  IL 847-303-6600

www.greatlakesnational.com

73 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

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BOAT LOANS

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Power Boats

34’ ‘01 Sea Ray 340 ........................105,500 42’ ‘82 Bertram FBMY ...................135,900

26’ ‘99 Sea Ray Sundancer ............. 37,500 34’ ‘87 Sea Ray Express..................31,900 43’ ‘95 Wellcraft 4350 Portofino ..145,000

27’ ‘98 Four Winns 278 ....................42,500 35’ ‘94 36’ ‘82 29’ ‘87 Cruisers Sea Devil...............25,500 37’ ‘88 29’ ‘04 Four Winns 298 ....................72,900 37’ ‘78 29’ ‘94 Sea Ray 290 ..........................28,900 37’ ‘95 30’ ‘97 Maxum 3000 SCR.................42,900 38’ ‘88 31’ ‘92 Silverton 31C ........................40,900 38’ ‘98

Carver 350 Aft ......................82,900 46’ ‘77 Bertam FBMY.....................118,900 Carver 3607 Aft ....................36,500 52’ ‘ 63 Chris Craft Connie ..............49,500 Chris Craft Amerosport ......49,500

Sail Boats

Vinette Steel Trawler ..........49,900 25’ ‘85 Catalina .................................... 6,900 Cruisers 3775........................89,900 27’ ‘73 Catalina ...................................8,750 C.C. 381..................................79,500 27’ ‘77 O’Day .......................................6,900

Carver 380 Santego.............89,500 30’ ‘84 O’Day .....................................24,900 31’ ‘97 Carver 310 EX .......................44,900 40’ ‘94 Mainship Sedan ................119,900 32’ ‘78 Endeavor 32 Sloop ..............26,500 32’ Wellcraft St. Tropez 4 starting@ ..18,900 41’ ‘79 Lindmark Trawler ................94,900 32’ ‘94 Sea Ward 32 Eagle..............43,900 32’ ‘98 Pro Line 3250 .......................$49,900 42’ ‘87 Carver Aft .............................99,500 34’ ‘96 Gemini 105M ....................... 84,950

5309 E. Wilder Rd. Bay City, MI 48706

Details on over 150 listings at

Ph: 989-684-5010 • info@bayharborbaycity.com

www.kellymarinesales.com

Custom Marine Inc. Innovative Solutions for Your Boat

✵ Custom-Built Boats ✵ Yacht Interior Refits ✵ First Class Antique & Classic Wooden Boat Restoration ✵ Paint Jobs & Bright Work ✵ Expert Fiberglass Repair

OILGONEEASY.COM

Remanufacturerd transmissions in stock. Older transmissions our speciality.

Distributors of the Drivesaver flexible couplings and mounts, oil coolers and dampers.

Dealer Inquiries Invited 2706 Portage St., Kalamazoo, MI 49001 • 269-345-0629

Propeller Optimization & Repair Bring your propellers to Peak performance

• Increase speed • Reduce fuel consumption • Eliminate propeller induced vibration • Enable sync of multiple engines 2401 Sawmill Parkway Suite1 Huron, OH 44839

419-433-9550

www.NorthCoastPropTech.com 74 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

Sandusky, OH

Custom built 28 foot Deluxe Sportsman

www.custommarine.biz 419.621.1188

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THE PIER CUSHION

Protect Your Boat From Pier Damage PORTABLE OR PERMANENT

Dealers e Welcom

• Vinyl strap w/velcro sewn in - fits up to 9” square or round post.

PORTABLE ONLY

• Adjustable nylon strap w/Buckle - fits up to 14” square or round post • Strap can be replaced and are interchangeable • Inflatable 23” long all P.V.C. Material • Your choice Vinyl Strap or Nylon with Buckle $41.95 Price includes shipping and handling (IL residents add 7% sales tax)

Patton Enterprises P.O. Box 366, Round Lake, IL 60073 Phone Orders: 847-740-2110

www.thepiercushion.com

Check Your Local Marina

MasterCard and Visa Welcome

WaterWatch

Does the barbecue on your boat need a Cleaner Cook?

IT’S YOUR

RESPONSIBILITY

Call or visit our website for specials!

Don’t Litter on the water

(425) 530-6376 www.cleanercook.com

A Cooperative Program of

NEW Muskrat/Snake

Exhaust Guards

NORTHPORT BAY BOAT YARD Complete Marine Service HEATED & COLD STORAGE

Haul-Out Capacity to 77 Tons On Grand Traverse Bay in Northport, MI

231-386-5151 • www.npbby.com 75 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

ask an expert

Got Life Jackets?

Gabe Doring, product development specialist for Absolute Outdoor, explains how and why you should encourage life jacket use on board.

LB: According to the U.S. Coast Guard, 85 to 90 percent of drowning victims were not wearing a life jacket, and seven out of 10 involved boats 21 feet and less. Why doesn't everyone wear a life jacket? Doring: Because people think they’re hot, bulky and uncomfortable. Inflatable life jackets are a great improvement, with new designs and materials. High-tech materials such as neoprene, 3-D poly-knits and athletic meshes allow freedom of movement. Stylish jackets are designed for particular activities.

CONTACT Gabe Doring

LB: If inflatables diminish the drawbacks of traditional life jackets, how do you encourage your family and guests to wear them? Doring: Wearers should choose the jacket that suits them. Boaters must understand and be comfortable with how a jacket works. They should always be tried out in the water in a controlled environment.

degrees. Inflatable life jackets are not appropriate for water skiing, tubing or whitewater paddling. LB: How do you properly care for a life jacket? Doring: The Absolute Outdoor “Think Safe” booklet and owner’s manual will have valuable information. It’s best to hang your life jacket in a cool, dry, dark area. Check that the fabric is free from rips and tears and the webbing, buckles, zippers, stitching and ladder locks are in good condition. Brittle or shrunken foam may indicate loss of buoyancy. Inflatable life jackets require additional attention. Inspect the fabric of the chamber. Perform air retention tests regularly, using the oral inflation tube. Make sure the CO2 cylinder is in good condition and is armed correctly. It’s important not to store an automatic inflatable in a locker where there is water or condensation, as this can affect the water-sensing bobbin. LB: How many life jackets do you need on board? Doring: The Coast Guard requires USCG-approved life jackets on all recreational boats. The number and type depends on the number of passengers, the size and type of boat, and the water activity.

Absolute Outdoor Inc. 330 Hwy. 10 South, Suite 4 St. Cloud, MN 56304 320-252-2056 absolute@absoluteoutdoorinc.com absoluteoutdoorinc.com

LB: How do inflatables work? Doring: Inflatable life jackets contain a primary CO2 inflation cylinder and mechanism with a jerk-to-inflate handle, as well as a back-up oral inflation tube that also serves as a deflation tube.

LB: What are the regulations regarding children? Doring: Federal regulations require all children 13 years old and younger to wear a life jacket, unless they are inside an enclosed cabin. State laws vary, so check your state’s requirements.

LB: What are the advantages of using inflatables? Doring: When inflated, they provide at least 45 percent more buoyancy than a traditional Type III jacket. In most cases, they more effectively turn a victim face-up and provide more distance from the water surface to your mouth.

LB: Many dogs love the water and are excellent swimmers. Why should they wear life jackets? Doring: Although many dogs have plenty of natural buoyancy, they can get tired, especially in cold water. Flotation gives your dog extra lift and some hypothermia protection. It also can help prevent big gulps of water.

LB: Are there disadvantages? Doring: Because of the required knowledge and maintenance issues, the U.S. Coast Guard only approves them for people 16 years of age and older. A person should be able to swim, so there is less chance of panic. They also are not recommended for cold weather, since the CO2 cylinder is affected by ambient temperature below 40 76 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

LB: Where can someone find more information about life jackets? Doring: Visit our website, absoluteoutdoorinc.com, under the “FAQs” section. We also have a number of videos on YouTube under the search heading “Onyx life jackets.”  PHOTO COURTESY OF ABSOLUTE OUTDOOR

lakeshore life

Montague, Michigan

The perfect summer escape on White Lake. by colle e n h . trou pi s

Address 7752 Old Channel Trail Montague, MI 49437

Specs Bedrooms: 6 Baths: 4.5 Square Footage: 6,700 Shoreline: 230 Acreage: 1.6 Price: $1,090,000

Contact Sandi L. Gentry RE/MAX Lakeshore 616-638-3900 sandigentry.com

78 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

S

et on more than 1.5 acres, this Montague, Michigan, home takes full advantage of its 200-plus feet of gorgeous White Lake shoreline. “There are views of the lake from every room,” says owner Jeff Anonick. “We built the home toward the lake.” The original structure dates back to 1928, but when the Anonicks bought it in 2000, a small-scale rehab project turned into a more in-depth remodel and expansion. “We took it down to the studs, rebuilt it and expanded it,” Anonick says. That included adding on a walk-out lower level that boasts 10-foot ceilings; a rec room complete with a bar, TV and shuffleboard; an exercise room that includes a sauna; a game room; and a fire pit outside. Much of the home features hickory hardwood floors and tongue-and-groove aspen wood ceilings and walls. “We have a total of four-and-a-half linear miles of aspen wood, and all the trim also is aspen wood,” Anonick says. The main level includes a master suite with a large shower and three showerheads, walk-in closet and laundry—not to mention a hot tub on a deck that

overlooks the lake. Also on the main level is a guest bedroom and bath, an upgraded kitchen with a walk-in pantry, and a formal dining room with French doors that open to the formal living room. “All of the media comes into the built-in cabinets in the living room,” Anonick says. “I call it the brains of the house.” Upstairs are four additional bedrooms, an entertainment room and a deck. Outside, the Nantucket-style home is virtually maintenance free, from the Hardie board siding that only needs to be painted every couple of decades, to the Trex decking and pavers. Lush landscaping, including gorgeous white pines, help create a feeling of privacy on the grounds. An elegant gazebo, original to the home, is on the grounds—the perfect spot to enjoy those lake views. And at the base of the hill is a large lawn and a dock where the Anonicks keep their 30-foot boat. It’s the perfect spot for getting to other places; Lake Michigan is a mere five miles across the lake. “It’s an extraordinary property that has incredible views,” adds listing agent Sandi Gentry. r PHOTOS COurTESy Of SANDI GENTry

lakeshore life

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The Quarry presents a rare opportunity to build your custom waterfront home in a private, gated marina community surrounded by wildlife. Less than one hour from almost anywhere in Chicagoland, the Quarry in southwest suburban Channahon, IL, offers some of the finest recreational boating and fishing imaginable. All lots offer boat dock access and are located next to a full-service marina.

815.693.5316 www.thequarrylife.com YOUR GATEWAY TO THE WATERWAYS OF THE WORLD

81 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

lakeshore life

In your style of waterfront living.

classifieds: boats for sale

1971 SLICKCRAFT SS-235 stand up hardtop rigged for Salmon. INTERLUX 2000e barriercoat and antifouling paint. Newer Chevy 350 OMC stringer drive. FF, GPS, Vector rod holders, plus MANY extras. Email for more pictures and details. $5,900 OBO. Dirk 847-833-6995 847-231-6389 AUG11

2003 SEAMASTER 28WA HARDTOP with Tri-Axle Trailer. Tournament Fishing Boat: RayMarine C80 Radar,Gps,FishFinder. Contact: Dominic 708-906-6889 dspigolo@amfam.com JUL11

89 ALBIN 32’ SPORT FISHERMAN COMMAND BRIDGE. Very economical average 6-7 gph. Cruise @ 18-19 mph. Single 300 hp Cummins turbo/ac. with approx. 400 hrs. since MOH. Bow thruster, trim tabs, FD Windless, Auto pilot, Northern Lights Genset w/ approx. 200hrs. Much new equipment including fuel tanks. Ready to cruise or fish. $75,000. 440-487-2580 or jer4dodi@yahoo.com. MAY11

1997 CHAPARRAL 29’9 Twin 350 EFI Remote Spotlight, Sunpad, Radar, Dingy, Windlass, Halon. Pictures Available. Clean. Trailer Optional. 906-370-9411 JUL11 Ready for Great Lakes Salmon. TURNKEY 1984 AQUASPORT OSPREY CC. 2000 Johnson 225hp (400 freshwater hours) and 2006 Mercury 15hp 4cycle trolling motor(5 hours). Includes two 5’ electric downriggers, planner boards, new electronics, all new fishing gear. Invested over $25,000. Must sell price (medical issues) $11,500. ($10,000 without trolling motor). 607-351-5999. AUG11

32’ GRAND BANKS, 1985, Lehman diesel only 985 hrs. Radar, Plotter, VHF, Refrig. Freezer, Microwave, Stoveoven, Shower. Sleeps 5, $98,000. 847-328-5188. AUG11

2007 305 GRADY WHITE. Twin Yamaha 250’s w/215 hours. Original owner, hardtop, bottom paint, twin E80 Raymarine Displays. $154,900. Tom @ 419-797-4492, tom.jagucki@marinemax.com. MAY11 1988 25’ SEARAY 7.4 MERCRUISER recent O/H/ bow & mid cabins, ref, stove, head, on 1994 EZLOADER. $12,900. 715-459-9723 or hweber@solarus.net. AUG11 1996 MAXUM 3200SCR in excellent shape Owner retiring from boating. Pictures available. Has a/c and heat, radar,ice maker excellent buy. $45,500. 708-473-4941 AUG11

1977 25’ CHRIS CRAFT CATALINA. Single 230hp gas engine, trim tabs. New upholstery in cockpit. Full canvas, fresh water, teak interior, good condition $4000. 773-272-2418. bilgepump54@netzero.net. MAY11

1984 27’ ALBIN FAMILY CRUISER Super clean, freshwater only.Own this popular diesel cruiser. Approx 1/2 GPH $29,900. 563-349-9161. JUL11

2007 SEA RAY 270 AMBERJACK $57,900 MerCruiser 6.2L 320HP Motor, Very clean, fresh water boat ready to fish or cruise! MarineMax 419-797-4492. MAY11 82 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

1995 & 1997 TIARA 3100 OPEN’S 100% freshwater, Crusader 7.4 ltr. gas engines, Full Electronics and Fishing Gear. The 1995 has a Hardtop and the 1997 has a new Bimini Top. Asking $89,900 and $79,900 respectively. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS

31’ FOUR WINNS VISTA, 1988, excellent condition, T-5.7, sleeps 6, heat/air, windlass, newer full canvas, headliner, carpet. $18,900. 616-399-7382. JUL11

2000 NORDIC TUG 32’ 570 Hours, Cummins Diesel, Bow/ Stern Thrusters, Dish TV, Clean, Great Lakes Only, Heated Storage, $190,000, 616-588-4127. JUN11

ed! Reduc

2005 TIARA 32 OPEN. 8.1 Crusaders, E120 w/ digital sounder, autopilot, open array, pristine, $199,000. Jeff 517-202-2123. NO BROKERS! JUN11

2006 SEA RAY 320 SUNDANCER, T6.2 Horizon IO’s, 150 hrs, purchased new in 2007, fully equipped. For info, email edkathys@tds.net, or call 608-576-6906 JUN11

2003 SILVERTON 35C. One Owner, freshwater. T-Crusaders, 240 hours. Loaded-usual + bow & stern thrusters; remote controller; davits. Cincinnati. 218-349-8381 JUN11

1990 BAYLINER 3888 MOTOR YACHT. 175hp diesels. Some upgrades. Low hours fresh water boat. Peoria/ Illinois River. $69,000. 309/696-5672 or josephcin@comcast.net JUN11

2008 SEA RAY 330 SUNDANCER. $184,900. Freshwater, Twin 8.1L Mercruiser I/B, 60 hours, generator, E80 color chart plotter, passport warranties until January 2015. Craig 419-341-0740, craig.graham@marinemax.com. MAY11

1987 36’ TIARA CONVERT. Clean/pro-serviced. T-350hp/ 905 hrs. All electronics, photos. Arcadia, MI. $95,900. Call 616-340-7300 MAY11

1990 SEARAY 390 EC 454’S 890 hrs. Full electronics, new head, new fridge, excellent condition. $85,000 OBO. 734-379-4920. AUG11

Reduc ed!

1996 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 1996 330 SEA RAY SUNDANCER. 5.7 litre inboards. All electronics and genny. Trick Davit. Many upgrades. Nice condition. $59,000. Jim 906-458-9835. AUG11

1980 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp Turbo Diesel, 40 gal water, 200 gal fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, well maintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. MAY11

1994 CARVER 350. AC, Twin Crusaders, Gen, GPS, Radar, Plotter, Auto Pilot, New Canvas ’09, Excellent Condition. $79,9K OBO, 248-644-2850 or stundo@aol.com MAY11

2004 TIARA 3600 SOVRAN. Twin 450hp Cummins, heated storage, excellent, pictures available, $239,000. robert_cummings@ml.com or 920-737-7304 JUL11

1998 37’ SEA RAY EXPRESS CRUISER, Wide beam. Excellent condition, fresh water only, all options, heated storage, Twin 380hp 7.4 mercs. $125,000. Chip@pfisales.com, 313-510-8555. JUL11

38’ HATTERAS FBDC MOTORYACHT 1974. Immaculate, great live-aboard,extensive upgrades,two owner,T-300,low hours, $75,000, complete specs/photos. 231-223-8823, halljr@aol.com. AUG11

2004 SEA RAY 390 MOTOR YACHT. Twin 480CE Cummins 290 hrs. Bristol condition. Loaded with options. Freshwater only. Heated storage. $199,000. 317-523-8506 MAY11

1995 SEA RAY 40 FT EXPRESS, Loaded with every option Sea Ray had to offer, plus a full complement of electronics. A 2008 Zodiac RIB w/15hp Honda, this boat has been stored in an inside-heated facility. Beautifully maintained, in excellent condition and ready for her next owner. Priced over twenty thousand below recent survey. Survey available upon request. $99,500. Contact Jim, 616-293-4359. JUL11

40’ 1967 CHRIS CRAFT CORINTHIAN. Rare awesome award winner. Needs nothing. Nov ‘08 survey. Please, serious inquiries only. 586-791-3744 eve., 248-588-4410 day. MAR11

83 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

classifieds: boats for sale

2003 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 320, 32’, 350 hrs. Twin 300hp inboards. Raymarine electronics w/radar, cabin amenities, $115,000. 574-210-4640, alanwrightcpa@comcast.net. JUN11

2000 SEA RAY 380 SUNDANCER T7.4 Merc. HorizonsGarmin. 2010 GPS, low hours (280). Excellent. Like new. Asking $154,900 OBO. 315-469-1712 days, 315-476-3901 eve and weekends. JUL11

classifieds: boats for sale

l!

Diese

1998 Sea ray 40 Sb Freshwater, loaded and immaculate! Cat diesels, generator, new canvas and carpet, upgraded electronics & satellite TV. $179,900

1990 BAJA 420 ES. One owner boat!! Properly maintained and ready for immediate delivery.Triple 454 Mags. $69,900. CALL!!! 269.251.5530. JUL11

586-772-4200 • emeraldcityharbor.com

1985 OCEAN 46 SUNLINER 100% Freshwater, Two Very Large Staterooms, Excellent Condition, Full Electronics, Very Nice EZ2CY Enclosure on the Aft Deck & Flybridge. MUST SEE! Asking $119,900. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS

MAY11

1999 TIARA 41 OPEN 3208 Cats w/400 hours. Original owner, hardtop, detailed & ready for new owner. $229,900. Tom @ 419-797-4492, tom.jagucki@marinemax.com MAY11

2000 CRUISERS YACHTS 4270 EXPRESS Low Hr. 430 Volvos New Radar+ Plotter Dinghy MTR Lift Underwater Lights $189,900. 219-741-0212. JUL11

2001 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 2001 460 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 450hp CAT diesels; bow stern thrusters, hydraulic swim platform, new canvas and carpet. Fresh water only, inside storage, $235,000. 847-287-4317. arrobobh@comcast.net JUL11

2009 SEA RAY 43 SUNDANCER Freshwater, low hours, Cummins Zeus 480hp, Lift, Sat TV. Call Josh at 419-7974492 or email josh.northrop@marinemax.com. MAY11

2006 411 MERIDIAN SEDAN BRIDGE. Freshwater, Cummins Diesels 175 hours, 4kw radar/plotter, sirius weather, sat TV, bow/stern thruster, trades considered. $299,000. Craig@419-797-4492, craig.graham@marinemax.com MAY11

Fresh ! Water

47’ CHRIS CRAFT COMMANDER 1972, Highly Customized! FRESH WATER, repowered w/Cummins 370’s, 530hrs., Mathers, NEW fuel, water & holding tanks, canvas, cushions, interior, 3 staterooms, queen master, dinghy w/crane, same family 25yrs, 3 boat owner, Must Sell! $158,000 OBO ROB, 612-743-4192. JUL11

ed! Reduc

1997 445 CARVER AFT CABIN. All new canvas & glass. Asking $189,500. ALL OFFERS & TRADES CONSIDERED. Call 920 231-0148 or bacssdb@yahoo.com JUN11

2004 CARVER 466 MOTORYACHT 2005 MERIDIAN YACHTS 411 SEDAN BRIDGE Freshwater, 300 hours, sat TV, Lift, lower helm, thrusters, updated electronics. $230,994. MarineMax at 419-797-4492. MAY11

1996 FORMULA 41' PC, Twin 420hp Cummings Diamond Series approx 690 hours, Kohler generator, air/heat, bow thruster, pilot, plotter GPS, radar, Vacu-flush, depth sounder, central vac, windlass, much more. A pristine fresh water boat, recent survey. $129,900. 630-243-0454 JUL11 84 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

125hrs Twin TAMD75P Volvos, 370HP. Full Raytheon Elec Pkg, hardtop, Satellite TV, granite countertops, wood flooring, thruster, backup camera, generator, A/C, washer/dryer, wetbar w/ice, fresh water, impeccable condition, “one owner” $300,000

630.887.1478  EliteYachtBrokerage.com MAY11

2000 SEA RAY 480, Cats, 600 hrs, thruster, custom interior, one owner. $240K or trade down to 36-40. 231-313-2191. MAY11

48’ 1986 CALIFORNIAN MOTOR YACHT. 3208 Cat Diesels Three staterooms three heads Decorator interior MI $159,000. 313-402 9579 MAY11

CAPT. LARRY LOWE WILL MOVE YOUR BOAT, either power or sail, for you in the Great Lakes, East Coast, Mississippi, or Gulf. Free quotes. Resumé on request. 614-885-3601. llowe7298@wowway.com JUL11 MOVE YOUR BOAT WORRY FREE on our air ride hydraulic trailer. Free Quotes! Dave’s Marine Transport. Toll 1990 JEFFERSON MARQUESSA 53' MOTORYACHT. Detroit 6V92s, 3 staterooms, 3 heads. Extensive 2001 upgrades. Custom Pilothouse. Zodiac. BEAUTIFUL. 612-850-2000. JUL11

Reduc ed!

1991 VIKING 66/CMY 1991 VIKING 66 Custom Cockpit Motoryacht, One Owner, Excellent Condition Freshwater Boat, Many Upgrades, Meticulously Maintained, Teak Interior, $550K Repower Twin 1200hp MAN (300hrs) 21/22kt Cruise. Trade Considered-Motivated Seller $475,000. 800-213-3323 madaboutboating.com AUG11

Free: (866) 814-DAVE (3283) www.davesmarinetransport.com

RUC

CAPT. BILL YOUNKIN awaiting orders. At your service in the Great Lakes, Florida, and all points in between. 100 Ton USCG License, references. Williamyounkin@comast.net, 561-353-6827. JUN11

Charters BAREBOAT CANADA’S FABULOUS NORTH CHANNEL, LAKE HURON. 25 power and sailboats, 27’-50’, cruise and learn, skippered. Canadian Yacht Charters, Gore Bay, Ontario. 800-565-0022. email: info@cycnorth.com, www.cycnorth.com RUC

2005 OCEAN ALEXANDER. 54 LOA (2)500HP Yanmars300 hrs, dual stations, full Raymarine electronics,12KW gen, Air, Zodiac H/B, deluxe bridge. $585,000. 920-739-7668. MAY11

Powerboat 2005 21FT. ARIMA SEA RANGER, soft-top,radar arch, 150 Honda, 9.9, Lowrance, many accessories, very nice, $34,000. 507-247-5160. JUL11

40’, 60’, 88’ DOCKOMINIUMS FOR SALE at beautiful Duncan Bay Boat Club. Clubhouse, pool, floating docks, wifi & more. Straits of Mackinaw. 866-993-3625, sales@duncanbay.com FEB12 1997 55 SEA RAY SEDAN Bridge CAT3196-660HP w/250 hours. Array of Electronics, Mint+ Condition. $259k 248-912-4789. JUN11

Transport Your Boat Air-Ride Equipment Vessels up to 50’

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2001 SEA RAY 560 SEDAN BRIDGE Always freshwater, immaculate, 100K+ in custom upgrades. Mahogany floors, New electronics and bridge enclosure. Josh at 419-797-4492, josh.northrop@marinemax.com. MAY11

Port of Call Yacht Transport Inc. Atlanta, GA & Chicago, IL

800-922-8332 OCT11

SELL THAT BOAT! Place your classified ad at lakelandboating.com!

1997 SEA RAY 330 SUNDANCER, T7.4 MPI (340 hp) Vdrives, Raymarine electronics, one owner, meticulously maintained, fresh water, heated storage, 10’ Zodiac, $69,900. 616-842-4816. AUG11 1981 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp T urbo Diesel, 40 gal. water, 200 gal. fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, wellmaintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. JUN11 REDUCED! 2008 SEA RAY 330/350 SUNDANCER, twin 370 V-drive inboards, 30 hours, all upgrades, never slept on, like new. Freshwater, heated storage only, $189K. 847-848-5199. JUN11 TIARA 35 OPEN, 8.1 Crusaders, Hardtop, Full electronics, New Canvas, 500hrs, Glendenning. Oil Changer. Mint 185K. 734-847-8031. JUN11 2004 SILVERTON 35 MOTOR YACHT, 8.1 gas, 50 hours, fully equipped, pristine, covered slip, pro. Maintained. Reasonable offer. 563-332-7222. MAY11 2004 SEA RAY 42’ SUNDANCER. Cummins 6CTA, 165 hours, hardtop, full Raymarine electronics, full galley, heads(2), A/C(2), TV/VCR(3), DVD, Pristine. 920-773-2194 MAY11 2000 SEA RAY 450 EXPRESS BRIDGE. Very low hours. Always fresh water. Twin 430 hp Cummins. Loaded. Immaculate. $249,500. Health Reasons. No brokers. Didit9@hotmail.com. AUG11 REDUCED AGAIN! ‘95 500 DA SEA RAY. Heated storage, T-550 Detroits. 502 hrs. Clean and equipped. Fresh water only. $235,000. ph: 216-469-7000 MAY11

Slips 40’ SLIP Ellenwood Landing, White Lake, Montague rent for 2011 season $2695. Buy for $12,000. 269-986-9081 MAY11 85 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

classifieds: boats for sale

Yacht Delivery

classifieds: boats for sale

The Best Way to D L O S Sell Your Boat Fast! 4-Month Special

20 Words With 1 Photo: $250 Without Photo: $150 Additional words are $1.50 each.

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20 Words With 1 Photo: $90 Without Photo: $40 Additional words are $1.50 each.

Additional Photos (New!)

Each additional magazine photo: Add $55 per month Add $150 for 4-month special

Order online at www.lakelandboating.com or mail this form. All online orders will receive a free online listing! ORDER FORM Place my classified ad in the following issues: ❏ ❏

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20 words to include length, year, make, model, features, price, phone, and email address.

Not available online. Must call 800-331-0132 x.21 to order.

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Order online or mail this form to:

Lakeland Boating Classifieds 727 South Dearborn, Suite 812 Chicago, IL 60605 Free online listing only applies to ads placed online. Sorry but no refunds once the ad is placed. Photos will be returned only if you enclose an SASE. Lakeland Boating reserves the right to edit copy for spelling, length, format, etc.

Payment: We can accept Visa and MasterCard and checks ONLY for mail-in orders Name Address City

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Ads received after deadline are automatically placed in the next issue.

86 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

above the waterline

Drone Alone

Drone-enhanced cruising may be the next big thing for boaters. BY DAVE WALLACE

T

he most powerful ships on the ocean today are giant aircraft carriers. They are virtual floating cities, with populations of more than 5,000 seamen—along with every conceivable support system to keep men and machinery in fighting trim. They also have the ability to extend influence far beyond their own range, through the use of air power. It’s true that many lesser vessels are capable of carrying helicopters for personal errands beyond the range of the mother ship, so the idea of using air power to extend the range of sea power is far from new. A new twist, however, would be the use of technology to introduce this power and convenience to a vast new market of recreational boaters. Consider these two seemingly unrelated facts of life. Fact Number One: Virtually all cruising boats that explore our Great Lakes are pretty slow compared to other forms of transportation. This lack of speed is slowed even further by the challenging nature of water and weather, including headwinds, breaking waves and reduced visibility. Fact Number Two: The past few years have seen incredible breakthroughs in the miniaturization and sophistication of aerial drones. They are being developed in a wide variety of sizes and a with a wide range of capabilities, from the folding, hand-launched miniaturization of the Pack Bot for terrain observation, to the bomb- and rocket-carrying Predators and Reapers. So…how do these seemingly unrelated facts work together to create new options for boaters? From my perspective (that of a frustrated cruiser who’s never exceeded 10 knots), I see the opportunity and the challenge of turning every cruising boat into a personal aircraft carrier through the development of marine-friendly drones. We can begin with the relatively simple desire for extended vision. Even the most powerful binoculars cannot see beyond the horizon, but a small video drone could be sent ahead to scan a distant shore, check the

88 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A Y 2 011

wave heights beyond a point of land ahead, or observe marina activity at your next port of call. Sophisticated, upgraded versions could actually be programmed to serve many cruising needs that are currently out of range. A shuttle drone could be programmed to run simple errands. It would be sophisticated enough to allow remote landings and takeoffs. It would be sturdy enough to transport a modest amount of cargo; say, a six-pack of beer. You are a mile offshore and out of refreshments. You launch your medium-range cargo drone, codename “Boomerang,” and use the forward-mounted high def TV camera to locate the nearest 7-Eleven onshore. You land it in the parking lot, where it immediately attracts a small crowd of curiosity seekers. You use your TV scanner to identify the most trustworthy-looking person there, then use your digital voice transmission link to ask for their help in completing the mission. The process might go something like this: “Attention blonde lady with the straw cowboy hat and pink blouse…would you please remove the $20 bill inserted in the forward cash cockpit of this aircraft…use it to purchase a cold six-pack of Bud Lite…place that in the rear cargo compartment, and keep the change. Thank you very much.” A more sophisticated model, codename “Placeholder,” could be sent ahead to those desirable but regimented marinas with slip assignment rules that require you to actually arrive within eyesight before a slip can be assigned. Placeholder would be a float plane that, once launched from your boat, could circle the harbor masters’ office while you made a verbal credit card commitment or an electronic cash transfer before landing and taking physical and legal possession of the slip to hold it for your late arrival. These two examples are simply the first off the top of my head, but I stand by my conviction that drone enhanced-cruising will be the next big thing for lakeland boaters.  DAVE WALLACE has been boating in the

Great Lakes for more than 35 years. He’s written for Lakeland Boating since 1993 and helped develop the first edition of Lakeland Boating’s Ports o’ Call cruising guides. ILLUSTRATION BY MIKE HARRIS

★ Harbor Highlights Labeled on Photos

★ Waypoints for Every Harbor

★ Cruising Tips

★ Getting Through Customs

★ Golf Courses

LECG_CoverIFC.indd

 Aerial photos of each port on the lake  Up-to-date marina listings  Where to eat  Things to do  Cruising tips

★ Boat Ramps

To pre-order or order other guides, call

VOL. 4

D SOL

O UT

!

Port Wheatley p.255 Leamington p.258

VOL. 4

1

Other Great Lakes cruising guides are available! Nobody knows the Great Lakes like Lakeland Boating.

Erieau p.252

Niagara River p.205

Rivers ir and the Connecting Section 1: Lake St.Cla rn Shore of Lake Erie Section 2: Southweste n Shore of Lake Erie Section 3: Southeaster of Lake Erie Section 4: Northern Shore

Conneaut p.187

Ashtabula p.184

Geneva State Park p.181

Dunkirk p.196

Barcelona p.194

Buffalo p.201

Irving p.199

p.219

Fort Erie p.212

Port Maitland/Dunnville

Erie/Presque Isle p.190

St. Williams p.231 Port Rowan p.233

Turkey Point p.228

Port Dover p.225

Long Point p.236

Fairport Harbor p.178 Mentor p.176

p.250

Port Burwell p.239 Port Glasgow/Rodney

Port Stanley p.245

Port Bruce p.242

Nanticoke p.223

Port Colborne p.215

Lakeland Boating magazine, your guide to the Great Lakes, has compiled the definitive cruising resource for Great Lakes boaters. With full-color aerial photography and harbor charts for every port on the lake, these guides are an indispensible source of information. You’ll be privvy to the latest word on marinas, restaurants, attractions, activities and important boater amenities in each port, all presented in an attractive, well-organized design. You’ll also get a feel for the personality of each harbor, making it easier to plan your next destination.

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Chagrin River p.173 Middle Bass Island p.133 y p.128 South Bass Island/Put-in-Ba p.105 Kelleys Island p.136 Oak Harbor/Cooley Creek p.119 p.116 Island Harbor a West Catawb Cleveland p.166 p.123 East Harbor/ Marblehead Rocky River p.164 Lorain p.161 Port Clinton p.110 Beaver Creek p.158 Sandusky p.141 Vermilion p.154 Huron p.147

Pelee Island p.256

Cedar Creek p.264

Kingsville p.262

Amherstburg p.79

Colchester Harbour p.266 Monroe County p.84 Monroe p.88 Bolles Harbor p.90 Toledo Beach p.93 Luna Pier p.96 North Maumee Bay p.98 Ottawa River p.98 Toledo p.101

Thames River p.64

Belle River/ Puce River/ Pike Creek p.61

Windsor p.59

Marine City p.22 Fair Haven p.34 Port Lambton p.25 Township p.37 Algonac p.26 New Baltimore/Chesterfield p.41 River n Wallaceburg p.70 Mt. Clemens/Clinto Metro Beach p.45 Harsens Island p.30 Mitchell’s Bay p.67 St. Clair Shores p.47

Available June 2011 Gibraltar p.79

★ Aerial Photos of Each Port

LaSalle p.76

★ What to do

Wyandotte p.73

★ Where to Eat

Call e & Lake St. Clair Ports o‘ Lakeland Boating’s Lake Eri

★ Up-to-Date Marina Listings

Ports o‘ Call

Grosse Pointe p.53 Detroit p.55

★ Every Port on the Lakes

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St. Clair p.19

YOUR COMPLETE CRU ISING RESOU RCE!

Port Huron p.14

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Lakeland Boating May 2011