Page 24

CANADIAN ARCHITECT 06/17

24

ABOVE The interiors include dramatic staircases and common areas overlooking a shared courtyard. Diverse unit layouts accommodate a range of residents. LEFT Oversized portals mark building entrances from a street designed to prioritize pedestrian activity over cars. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP The Phase 3 tower, currently under construction, blends design elements from the first two phases; a raised terrace will include a pool and other amenities; the preliminary design for Phase 4, the final building in the complex, is torqued to fit the geometry of its pentagonal site.

While the floorplate and balcony positions remain consistent, the visual effect of the façade varies significantly between the elevations. Saucier likens this to “changing the appearance of a body with a dress— even if most of the body remains the same. It changes the rapport with the environment completely.” The façades on Phase 2 are wrapped in white aluminum cladding, which forms rectangular extrusions at the corners in a somewhat random pattern—deliberately so, again, for variety. Residents can identify where they live by the pattern of the balconies, a marker that Saucier likes: “In residential buildings, there can be a repetition that is very alienating,” he says. Not so here. The meticulous detailing of the cladding panels allows this game of formal push-and-pull to work even up close. If the exterior design suggests variety, that promise is borne out by the interiors of the suites. The unit layouts in condo developments are

CA Jun 17.indd 24

17-06-02 2:55 PM

Canadian Architect June 2017  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...

Canadian Architect June 2017  

Canadian Architect is a magazine for architects and related professionals practicing in Canada. Canada’s only monthly design publication, Ca...