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2018 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

SECURITY & ACCESS CONTROL | INDOOR AIR QUALITY | VISUAL ERGONOMICS & COLOUR

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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

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HIS BEING 12TH YEAR OF JUDGING SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT, IT HAS BECOME CLEAR TO ME THAT THE ISSUE OF SUSTAINABILITY IS FINALLY TAKEN SERIOUSLY BY THE MAINSTREAM COMMUNITY. That may seem a bit of a strange statement to make – after all, one would assume that sustainability is now a given, however the reality has always been up until recently, that sustainability equals not aesthetically pleasing. Somehow, it was always a misnomer for terms like ‘earthy’ and ‘basic’ or perhaps for some, even, ‘primitive’. This year the finalists and indeed the winners of the Sustainability Awards have finally put pay to the notion that green is somehow not ‘pretty’. If you don’t believe me then turn to page 22 and have a look at not only the winners for this year’s awards, but also the shortlisted finalists. Stunning is a word I would use for some of the finalists. Aesthetically pleasing is a term that architects would use, but whatever phrase is employed, the fact is that beauty and sustainability are now inexorably linked. So congratulations to all the winners - especially the winner

EDITOR BRANKO MILETIC EDITOR@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU ASSISTANT EDITOR STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC CONTENT PRODUCERS BONNIE VAN DORP GERALDINE CHUA PRUE MILLER

of the Best of the Best category, which was the team at EME Design for their wonderfully-named ‘Passive Butterfly’ entry. To Jean Graham and Humberto Urriola, winners of Emerging Architect of the Year and Achievement of Merit respectively, well-deserved would be a glib understatement. Perhaps ’about time all your hard work was recognised’ would sum it up much better. To all the winners and finalists, I would like to personally say that simply by getting to this stage, you have all achieved something special and have managed to surpass many others in the industry. To our wonderful judging panel, the 12 Apostles as they came to be known, words simply are not enough to express my sense of gratitude for your work and all the help you have given to me and the awards in general.

ON THE COVER: PASSIVE BUTTERFLY IS A PROTOTYPE AND EXEMPLAR IN SUSTAINABLE AND HOLISTIC RETROFITS OF HERITAGE HOMES TO EXPONENTIALLY IMPROVE THEIR LONG TERM EFFICIENCY AND LIFE. IT SHOWCASES WHAT IS POSSIBLE IN TERMS OF A HOLISTIC UPGRADE TO PASSIVE HOUSE STANDARDS.

INDUSTRY

08 Why FRONT was such a success PEOPLE

10 Vale Kerry Hill 12 Amanda Levete and the

importance of public spaces

DETAIL

14 Perth’s Children’s Hospital 20 2018 Sustainability Awards Winners

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And to the all those in the built industry that strive day in, day out to make our buildings, and structures more in line with the world around them - not only visually but also ecologically, you are the real winners and it is you who should be celebrated for your work.

BRANKO MILETIC

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DESIGNERS JULIA GEE TRACEY YEE LOUIS WAYMENT

CLIENT SUCCESS MANAGER STUART GEACH PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2035 STUART.GEACH@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

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DIGITAL CONTENT CO-ORDINATOR YVONNE GRICE PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2029 YVONNE.GRICE@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

38 Indoor Air Quality 44 Building Information Management 48 Security + Access Control 50 Top Trusted Brands 52 Visual Ergonomics + Colour 59 Product Showcases

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Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,071 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION MARCH 2016

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INDUSTRY

WHY FRONT WAS SUCH A SUCCESS

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CCORDING TO INDESIGN CEO AND FOUNDER RAJ NANDAN, “FRONT IS REALLY THE REASSESSMENT AND DEMYSTIFYING OF GOING TO MARKET WITH YOUR BRAND AND YOUR PRODUCT; THE EVENT IS ABOUT CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE YOU CAN TELL YOUR STORY REALLY EASILY.”

“FRONT addresses the ecosystem that architects and designers have to work in, which includes commercial real estate, the people who facilitate and act as a catalyst within the space area, and ultimately the end user, who is now more vocal and has more knowledge than ever before about what they want their environments to achieve,” says Nandan. “We’re seeing a holistic ecosystem of decision-making where there are several levels of input at the same time rather than blind, silo-based channels.” “FRONT is about having active participants from both a knowledge point of view and participant point of view. We’re asking exhibitors to tell their story through the frame of innovation and ideas rather than as “We’re a design brand with a big reputation and that’s why we’re more expensive and you have to buy us.” That’s an old currency that doesn’t stack up anymore. That was the analogue model,” he says. As to why FRONT was such a success, Nandan says, “We translated the event into a really simple, carefully-orchestrated format that is

“WE’RE ASKING EXHIBITORS TO TELL THEIR STORY THROUGH THE FRAME OF INNOVATION AND IDEAS...”

universal in its design and designed to be completely engaging and highly targeted.” FRONT addressed the ecosystem that architects and designers have to work in, which includes commercial real estate, the people who facilitate and act as a catalyst within the space area, and ultimately the end user, who is now more vocal and has more knowledge than ever before about what they want their environments to achieve. “We’re seeing a holistic ecosystem of decisionmaking where there are several levels of input at the same time rather than blind, silo-based channels,” says Nandan. n


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – CARTER HOLT HARVEY

SEEING THE WOOD FOR THE TREES FROM A PLYWOOD WEEKENDER

PHOTOGRAPHER: CAITLIN MILLS FOR THE DESIGN FILES

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HARD-WORKING, YOUNG MELBOURNE COUPLE SOUGHT A WEEKEND GETAWAY ON THE LAND AND ENDED UP BUILDING AN ECLECTIC, HANDMADE CABIN WITH A LIGHTER FOOTPRINT.

On a picturesque 37-acre property, two hours drive from home, the weekender is nestled into the hill, protected from the wind and taking in views of the paddocks, a pine forest and the hills beyond. Owner-builders Nathan and Lucy Hersey designed and built their little slice of the simple life with a mix of recycled and new materials. As Nathan explained, “The cabin itself is supposed to be simple, cosy and functional and is constructed using a mix of recycled materials, including windows and a door collected from hard rubbish.” Other recycled materials included flooring, recycled glass bottle insulation and leftover framing timber from other people’s work sites. “Being low impact is something that we have always lived by,” added Nathan.

With little previous construction experience, Nathan and Lucy learnt on the job and chose materials that would also be easy to work with. Ecoply structural plywood well and truly fit the bill for the interiors. “To be honest it is really easy to work with. We were able to build the whole cabin using battery powered tools and the Ecoply was easy to cut, hold in place and fix in position.” The interior of the cabin is filled with furniture and pieces collected from travels and second hand shops from all over the east coast of Australia. It’s a space filled with love and memories that feels warm and cosy and is lined, almost entirely in Ecoply. “It’s a cool looking product that is good to the environment, easy to work with, saves time and wastage during construction, and gave us the simple, yet rugged and warm feeling we were wanting to achieve. It’s a product that creates a finish that looks great and is low impact,” explained Nathan. Ecoply is manufactured from sustainably grown Australian and New Zealand plantation pine. Environmental Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) is recognised as the preferred cradle-to-grave basis for comparing the environmental impact

of products, including building materials. On a limited LCA basis, building in wood sourced from sustainably-managed plantations represents a net removal of carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere for at least the life of the structure. As such, building in wood sourced from sustainably-managed plantations can therefore make a positive contribution to combating climate change. It’s a fact that is not lost on Nathan, who added, “It’s always appealed to me that from my cabin lined with Ecoply, I can see the pine plantation out the window, growing taller each year. Perhaps some of the trees from next to our property will end up helping to fulfil other people’s dreams in the future and look as great as our getaway does!”

For more info visit: ecoply.com.au


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PEOPLE


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PEOPLE

A LOSS TO THE INDUSTRY – VALE KERRY HILL

“The profession will be deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Kerry Hill. Kerry was one of Australia’s most renowned architects and he will be sorely missed by many,” says Australian Institute of Architects (AIA) acting national president Richard Kirk. “Kerry started his practice in 1979 in Singapore and in the following decades we saw the creation of a body of work that has come to define tropical modernism in the region. The significance of the work is that it responds sensitively to place through melding the local craft traditions, and cultural and climatic sensibilities of the east, with the technical precision of the modernist traditions.” “Kerry received the highest of honours, both professional and civil, throughout his long and active career,” adds Kirk. Hill received the AIA Gold Medal in 2006, with the jury noting that Hill “has distinguished himself as an architect of exceptional sensibility and expertise - encouraging a progressive and regionally sensitive approach to the design and construction of buildings across the Asia-Pacific region”. In 2012, he was appointed an Officer of Order of Australia for “distinguished service to architecture, particularly as an ambassador for Australian design in South East Asia, and as an educator and mentor.” In 2001, Hill also received the prestigious international Aga Khan Award for Architecture for his landmark Datai Resort in Langkawi. This is the only time an Australian has received the award since its establishment in 1977 and demonstrates the ability of Hill’s studio to work meaningfully across a great diversity of places and cultures.

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ENOWNED AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECT KERRY HILL DIED ON SUNDAY 26 AUGUST, 2018, AGED 75 AFTER A SHORT BATTLE WITH CANCER.

“On a personal note, Kerry was a warm and incredibly generous person,” says Kirk. “As I and many other friends who often travelled through Singapore knew, it was never the same unless you included a short visit to their studio in the heart of Singapore’s Chinatown.” “The studio is located in one of the unassuming shophouses with the only marker to the practice a modestly sized ‘Kerry Hill Architects’ bronze plate. I soon learnt this understatement is more to do with a quiet confidence about the work speaking for itself.” n


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PEOPLE

AMANDA LEVETE ON THE IMPORTANCE OF OUR PUBLIC SPACES

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OUNDER AND PRINCIPAL OF UK-BASED DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE STUDIO AL_ A, AMANDA LEVETE CBE, RECENTLY VISITED SYDNEY TO DISCUSS THE IMPORTANCE OF WELL-DESIGNED PUBLIC SPACES.

“People want spaces where they can come together and connect. Our most vibrant cities like London, Sydney and Lisbon need to create opportunities to connect people of different nationalities and from different walks of life, with different ideas and different experiences.”

The visit included a presentation to 120 industry leaders as part of the Committee for Sydney event series, drawing on her experience designing such world-class public spaces as the Victoria & Albert (V&A) Museum in London, and the Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology (MAAT) in Lisbon.

“When you connect people, relationships are formed and thresholds become more about mutual exchange. This is why public spaces need to be at the heart of our cities, our institutions and particularly our museums,” she says.

The Stirling Prize-winning architect also shared her experience with the architecture and design community as Sydney looks to move the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences to Parramatta. Levete also featured on a panel discussion alongside NSW government architect director of design excellence Olivia Hyde and Sydney Living Museums strategy & engagement director Dr Caroline Butler-Bowdon, discussing the opportunities for the design of outdoor spaces in rapidly-changing Sydney. “Public spaces are more important than ever before,” says Levete.

AL_A’s work to reimagine the V&A broke down the separation between street and museum and unlocked the potential to bring new audiences to the museum, and has contributed to a huge increase in visitor numbers. The MAAT is a stunning museum located on the banks of the river Tagus that reconnects the city and waterfront. With more than 500,000 visitors in its first year, the MAAT is now Portugal’s most-visited museum. The incorporation of public outdoor space in the two renowned museum projects has succeeded in increasing access to people of all ages and backgrounds.

“WHEN YOU CONNECT PEOPLE, RELATIONSHIPS ARE FORMED AND THRESHOLDS BECOME MORE ABOUT MUTUAL EXCHANGE. THIS IS WHY PUBLIC SPACES NEED TO BE AT THE HEART OF OUR CITIES, OUR INSTITUTIONS AND PARTICULARLY OUR MUSEUMS.”

Some of AL_A’s other notable international work includes the prominent Central Embassy mixed-use retail and hotel complex on Bangkok’s primary commercial artery, the 2015 MPavilion in Melbourne, and the current remodelling of the historic Galeries Lafayette department store in central Paris which balances tradition with modernity. n


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THE WHIMSICAL CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL DESIGNED FROM A CHILD’S PERSPECTIVE WORDS: STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN HOLLAND GROUP


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DETAIL

AT PERTH CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, FAMILIES ARE PROVIDED WITH AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE PARENTS ARE WELCOMED AND MADE TO FEEL AT HOME WITH THEIR CHILD.

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fter more than six years in the making, with numerous delays, scandals, safety scares, the addition of tens of millions of taxpayers’ dollars, and the demise of the lead architects themselves, the $1.2 billion Perth Children’s Hospital is finally complete. The hospital welcomed its first patients in May this year. The hospital’s design was a collaboration between JCY, Cox Architecture, Billard Leece Partnership (BLP) and HKS Architects, and John Holland Group as the builder.

A CHILD-LIKE APPROACH Aside from the large amount of money and drama surrounding this project (including the lead architects being put out of business by the project’s skyrocketing costs), what makes this project unique from other hospital projects in Australia is the fact that it’s a children’s hospital that has actually been designed from a child’s perspective. A visit to the hospital can be daunting for anyone, let alone a child. There are strange smells, sounds and people everywhere, not to mention the cold, white-washed interiors. That’s where Perth Children’s Hospital is different. Every element of the design has been considered from a child’s perspective, from the eye-catching, animated green exterior to lowered seats for children that also serve as places for climbing, playing and exploring.

Another noteworthy element is the ceilings – the ceiling design includes intricate elements such shapely and colourful cut-outs to help distract children who are being wheeled through the hospital. This is just one of many features that were included to create a sense of wonder and intrigue in children who might otherwise be pre-occupied with stress or anxiety about their stay in the hospital.

UNIQUELY WESTERN AUSTRALIAN According to the architects, the hospital’s design was largely inspired by the Western Australian environment, particularly the flora and fauna of the nearby Kings Park. This directly influenced the layout of the hospital, which is based on petals and a stem. The entire building is arranged in this structure. The ‘petals’ house the children’s ward, offering natural light and nature views. The ‘stems’ are the corridors, connecting all of the different elements of the hospital. However, unlike most hospital corridors, the ‘stems’ are filled with light and colour. “The form also emerges from an ideal layout for patient observation,” says Mark Mitchell, health planning director at BLP. “Open centres to the building generally afford the perimeter for patients’ and families’ use, and the central area of each of the wings are more open for staff to observe, work and provide support across the unit. So,


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the two concepts came together pretty nicely from a form optimisation perspective.” As with many other elements of the hospital, the building’s colour palette was inspired by Kings Park. The colouring of the flora has been incorporated into the hospital’s palette to deliver vibrancy and freshness and pay homage to the vista surrounding the building. “The interior colourways [also] reference the incredible bursts of colour from the wildflowers that sweep through Western Australia every year,” says Mitchell. “Instead of focusing a colour in a particular area, there are bursts of a lot of colours.” “We talked a lot about the concept of finding the small, beautiful object within the vast landscape. The idea that there’s a gem or jewel inside a huge expanse of something else – that seems to be a uniquely Western Australian thing. The design was conceived as a response to that – a small special space within the vastness of the landscape.” On the exterior, the building includes a doubleskin façade on its east and west faces, where the majority of the clinics, laboratory and teaching spaces are housed. The use of the double-skin façade not only amplifies views to Kings Park, but also helps to control glare and heat. On the whole, the building’s façade is dynamic and animated, changing colours throughout the day. This is due to the use of motorised louvres that open and close throughout the day as they track the light of the sun.

DESIGNING FOR FAMILIES Designing a hospital for children means taking families into account too. At Perth Children’s Hospital, the vast majority of rooms are single patient rooms, which allows children and their families privacy and the option to have more control over their rooms. Each room has been designed with the child’s perspective in mind, including windows with stunning views, many of which are of Kings Park or Swan River. There are also ‘family zones’ under the windows where parents can stay overnight, and siblings can play. These features were all included to help reduce children’s anxiety about being in hospital.


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ABOVE: Each room has been designed with the child’s perspective in mind, including windows with stunning views, many of which are of Kings Park or Swan River.


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“One of the main differences between a children’s hospital compared to an adult hospital is not just the way it looks, but how the family become key participants in the care process,” says Mitchell. “Parents tend to know a lot about their child’s “normal” state, so they become a bit of a gauge of their kid’s progress. That’s why they’re encouraged to stay as long as possible, to participate in the care.”

CREATING A HEALTHY WORKPLACE While the whole point of a hospital is to encourage health, this doesn’t always translate into the design. While most hospitals are cleaned religiously (creating that signature ‘sterile’ smell) and include all kinds of measures to protect staff from sick patients, that doesn’t mean hospitals are a healthy place to work.

At Perth Children’s Hospital, contemporary workplace design features were taken into consideration. Some of these features include amenities for stress reduction, respite areas, natural light and nature views, exercise areas, park access, landscaping and rooftop gardens. “From the earliest stages, we discussed the importance of having staff-only spaces – places where staff can concentrate without the constant need to be looking after parents and kids and their families,” says Mitchell. “The office space is quite collegiate, instead of being heavily divided into specialty units, to encourage greater crossover and collaboration between the different specialists and between the educators, researchers and clinicians. You never know what “Eureka!” moments may spring out of those chance conversations.”

A LEGACY FOR WESTERN AUSTRALIA With over 200 design professionals across four firms and countless other stakeholders, it doesn’t need to be said that this was a colossal project. The hospital was shrouded with controversy during its construction, and has certainly left its mark on Australian architecture, being one of the reasons for the disbandment of JCY Architects. But it must also be recognised that this is a landmark healthcare project for Western Australia, that will hopefully have a long legacy. n

ARCHITECTS COX ARCHITECURE JCY ARCHITECTS AND URBAN PLANNERS, BILLARD LEECE PARTNERSHIP, AND HKS CLIENT WA HEALTH AND JOHN HOLLAND PROJECT STATUS COMPLETED, 2011-2018 CONSULTANTS NORMAN DISNEY & YOUNG, AURECON BUILDER JOHN HOLLAND


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From 200 to 70 and then there were 35, from which we ended up with 15 winners. This year’s Sustainability Awards, the 12th annual such awards, were not just just an exercise in ingenuity, but were well-deserved on many other levels.

“Carefully modelled and tested to ensure yearround comfort, the design uses a passive design approach to ensure vastly improved comfort and super-efficient thermal performance,” says the entry description.

I say that because this year was not just about proving the actual sustainability of the submitted project – it was also about entering the project in the correct category, something that is not always as easy as it seems on face value.

More than anything else, it is great to see adaptive reuse winning – after all, the most sustainable building is the one you are in right now.

But enter they did, and the winners, were once again, spot on the money as they say. The winner - or the Best of the Best - this year went to the aptly-named ‘Passive Butterfly’ house, which has been described as “a prototype and exemplar in sustainable and holistic retrofits of heritage homes to exponentially improve their long term efficiency and life.” It showcases what is possible in terms of a holistic upgrade to Passive house standards.

The Achievement of Merit and Emerging Architect categories went to two people who seemingly are at opposite ends of the spectrum but in reality are both innovative go-getters that have improved the industry. To all the shortlisted fi nalists, we here at Infolink | BPN salute you. And to the winners, congratulations and a job well done from everyone here at the magazine.

Branko Miletic, editor, INFOLINK | BPN

Thank you to our sponsors Event Partner

Interior Architecture

Commercial

Single Dwelling – Alteration or Addition

Education & Research

Public & Urban Design

Emerging Architect of the Year

Green Building

Landscape/Biophillia

Multiple Dwelling

Healthcare

Smart Building

Innovation or Application

Single Dwelling – New

Achievement of Merit

PHOTOGRAPH: KENDAL JAMES


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018

Best Of The Best

The Winner Passive Butterfly EME Design The Passive Butterfly proves that inefficiently performing homes of 19th and 20th centuries can be upgraded holistically to be super-efficient and net-positive in energy, sustainably designed and environmentally conscious. In doing so architects can educate people and provide an opportunity to positively impact the urban environment and achieve better health and environmental outcomes for everyone.

From the judges: “Passive butterfly is an innovative and well-thought-out response to the need for sustainability in a tricky space. It is a unique and beautiful example of what is possible in sustainable home design, and how architects should be designing homes in the 21st century and beyond. Passive Butterfly is a most well-deserving winner of the Best of the Best Award.”


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018

Commercial Architecture

The Winner One Malop Street Aurecon Group Sustainability and occupant wellbeing have been prioritised at One Malop Street, Geelong, WorkSafe Victoria’s new headquarters, consisting of fifteen levels of A-Grade commercial office facilities, and incorporating the historic Dalgety & Co. façade.

From the judges: “A stunning result that saw the team go well beyond business-as-usual energy performance.”

Housing some 800 office workers, the building represents the pinnacle of design for tenant wellness, with the targeted achievement of ambitious sustainable building ratings.

The Shortlist

The Beehive Luigi Rosselli Architects

Barwon Water HQ GHDWoodhead


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018

Education & Research

The Winner

The Shortlist

Macquarie University Incubator – Architectus The Incubator is designed to be 100 percent reusable. Therefore, sustainability was key to the design approach, selection of materials, fabrication of timber cassettes, and installation of the structural system. The Incubator was almost entirely constructed of sustainably sourced engineered timber above ground level. The floor construction adopted a timber cassette system with a timber ceiling diaphragm of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), large span laminated veneer lumber beams and glulam V columns.

Synergy, CSIRO BVN

The vertical envelope is composed of panels of plywood, CNC-cut to optimise material use from standard sheet sizes and arranged to generate a distinctive visual identity for the Incubator. This system would be ideal for achieving efficiencies in structural spanning, innovation in fabrication and installation, and the potential for re-use. From the judges: “It is aspirational to see such a natural and light filled timber structure be home to an incubator of the future ideas and imaginings needed to create a sustainable horizon.With beautiful use of certified timber, natural ventilation, light and native plantings, this is a beautiful building.”

Sustainable House Carter Williamson Architects


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018

Emerging Architect

The Winner

The Shortlist

Jean Graham Director of Winter Architecture Just over two years ago, Jean Graham established Winter Architecture. Jean considers herself secondary to the practice, straying away from the fulfillment of a self-titled practice. Instead, Jean has elected to translate the quiet, introspective, site-specific qualities of Winter – the season – into an architectural dictum. With varied budgets and a range of client backgrounds, Winter Architecture has opened up the possibility of architecture to a number of clients who did not feel architecture was accessible to them, due to low budgets, difficult site restrictions and the desire to build themselves. The Winter Architecture team are from a multi-disciplinary background with many of its staff collaborating from a distance, located all across Australia. This unique arrangement of a design studio evokes a diverse appreciation and approach to design.

Matthew Hinds Architect/Director of Taylor & Hinds Architects

From the judges: “I really like Jean Graham’s understated approach to architecture and her inclusion of undergraduate students, recent grads and young registered architects making their way in the world in her practice. In particular, I think it is exemplary of her approach to include the forgotten people of a vast and untapped client base.”

The practice has adopted an online mode of working, in order to engage and collaborate with each other remotely. This approach enables the practice to directly engage with a range of localities and to not be bound by the fixed nature of a traditional studio.

Sarah Lebner Lead Architect at Light House Architecture & Science


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018

The Winner Green Building

The Prince’s Terrace Adelaide Defence Housing Australia From the outset, the project strived to create sustainable housing that would support human health and wellbeing. Throughout the material specification and procurement process, the project team ensured that all internal materials selected met the Green Building Council of Australia’s (GBCA) Green Star standards for low toxicity.

timber products were compliant with Green Star formaldehyde emission limits. As such, more than 20,000 red shale recycled bricks, carefully salvaged from heritage demolition sites around Adelaide, were used in The Prince’s Terrace façade, adding character and diversity to the edgy industrial architecture of the precinct while also upcycling 100 percent of brick materials from other demolitions

At project completion, 100 percent of all adhesives, sealants, paints and carpets were compliant with Green Star volatile organic compound (VOC) emission limits and 100 percent of all

From the judges: “The philosophy behind the design was to blend rich, local heritage with contemporary living according to the architects. Mission accomplished I would think.”

The Shortlist

The Beehive Luigi Rosselli Architects

The Burcham Stable Innovations Rosebery Pty Ltd


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2018

The Winner Healthcare

Wallan Veterinary Hospital Crosshatch Wallan Veterinary Hospital in regional Victoria is an efficient and elegant building that successfully refreshes the traditional vet hospital typology. The client’s brief called for a state-of-the-art facility that comfortably accommodates a range of programmatic requirements as well as addresses the site’s unique constraints. The design solution was to raise the single-level building on a recessive masonry base and set it back from the street. In doing so, flooding issues were mitigated on a challenging site that slopes down towards a creek at the rear of the property.

Three box-like volumes rationalise the plan and reflect the building’s multiple uses. The public zone is located at the front with animal wards to the side. Each volume breathes with ample cross ventilation allowed by louvred windows and intersecting corridors that punctuate the double façade. The result is a calming, airy interior with a sense of flow and connection between zones. Uniformly spaced timber battens wrap the building on the north, east and west elevations and provide effective sun-shading.

The Shortlist From the judges: “This design is worthy of a hotel or restaurant. The fact that it is a veterinary clinic shows that beauty and sustainability are now linked. ”

Melrose Health Bent Architecture


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Innovation & Application

The Winner e-Board Winya This patented process recycles melamine board to produce new board to make new furniture, which stops tens of thousands of tonnes of office furniture going to landfill. Old desks are transformed into new desks.

barcoding system record the product life and keep mapping this each time these desks are returned and the melamine is made into new desks, allowing users to log on and see where their desk started its journey 30 years ago.

The innovation continues into the completely closed loop supply model that supports the product now and way into the future.

From the judges: “e-Board closes the loop on a terrifyingly wasteful process by capturing the furniture that is regularly discarded as offices are renovated and using it to create board for new furniture. Sustainable manufacturing processes further supports the beauty of the products.”

e-Board’s life and chain of custody is recorded and mapped. The new desks become part of the next generation. The furniture data and

Highly commended

The Footprint Calculator The Footprint Company

The GreenBook The Footprint Company


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The Winner Interior Architecture

The Burcham Stable Innovations The Burcham’s new design embraces the site’s unique history, re-using the former 1918 Wrigley’s Gum Factory building as residential apartments, then adding two new four and five storey apartment buildings, comprising 99 apartments in total across the three buildings. The interiors, also designed by Allen Jack+Cottier, blend the industrial heritage of the building with the late 20s early 30s character of its architecture, while making the most of the original features. The spaces inside the existing building are kept ‘raw’ with polished concrete floors, exposed high concrete ceilings, unusual and elegant ‘mushroom’ capital columns and abundant light.

The Shortlist

Italianate House Renato D’Ettorre Architects

From the judges: “Stunning, innovative and a wonder of light and space. This is what sustainable design should be all about.”


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Landscape & Biophilia

The Winner Phoenix Rooftop Bent Architecture Phoenix Rooftop is a green refuge in the unlikeliest of places – 30 storeys high, on an exposed, yet spectacular site in the centre of Melbourne.

From the judges: “What a beautiful addition to a city building. This is what every building in every Australian city should have.”

The project provides the same functional requirements one would find in an average suburban garden, demonstrating similar spaces can be incorporated into dense urban environments. The site is broken into three distinct, yet connected zones: standing zone, sitting zone and eating zone. Raised garden beds filled with fragrant and flowering plants act as a wind break, a balustrade, and help to delineate and enclose each of these zones.

The Shortlist

An arbour straddles the garden, shading, shielding and protecting the occupants. The arbour is designed to respond to each zone’s relative need for privacy, sunlight, and protection from the wind and rain, using a combination of creepers and timber battens. This project embodies the philosophy that green roofs should be designed to be enjoyed and experienced by people – to be outdoor rooms, not just a sustainability initiative, but a versatile and an enjoyable space in its own right. Bendigo Garden for the Future Taylor Cullity Lethlean

The Burcham Stable Innovations Rosebery Pty Ltd


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Multiple Dweling

The Winner The Prince’s Terrace Adelaide Defence Housing Australia

Highly Commended

Located in the revitalised urban precinct of Bowden in South Australia, The Prince’s Terrace Adelaide has gained national recognition for receiving a 6 Star Green Star communities rating and for mandating that all new developments obtain a minimum 5 Star Green Star rating.

From the judges: “This residential project impressed the judges with its innovative design, sound sustainability strategy, and range of quantified benefits including reduced energy use, lower water use, a great location with local transport and amenities, and a vastly reduced carbon footprint. Not only does this project blend rich, local heritage with contemporary living, but it has achieved independent certification of its sustainability attributes.”

The Prince’s Terrace Adelaide project was designed to be extremely climate responsive and ensure maximum comfort for residents. It integrates passive design principles to minimise energy usage for heating, cooling and lighting, and to increase the comfort and wellbeing of its occupants.

Clyde Mews Six Degrees Architects

The Shortlist

Starting with sustainable design basics, each dwelling has been orientated to maximise natural daylight and to passively heat and cool throughout the year. Shading devices and balconies have also been optimised to allow the sun in the winter and block it in the summer. All dwellings have also been designed to promote natural cross ventilation for cooling in the summer as well as ensuring healthy airflow with ‘breeze paths’ incorporated throughout all living areas. The General C. Kairouz Architects


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The Winner Public & Urban design

krakani lumi Taylor & Hinds Architects Steeped in the sensibilities of a 40,000-year-old culture, this project maintains a deep sense of environmental awareness and custodianship. The siting considers both the mild climate of the North East of Tasmania, but also positions the project in the lee of existing vegetation, which reduces the impacts of localised changes in diurnal temperature from sea breezes. Artificial heating and cooling demand is reduced by encouraging guests to be weather-aware and dress accordingly.

Traditional pelted Wallaby shawls are provided for additional warmth. The Standing Camp is entirely off-grid – powered by a 5.3 kW roof mounted solar array. Water is harvested on site. The materiality is limited to robust timber and metal finishes. All timbers have been locally sourced from sustainably managed Tasmanian supplies. There is no glazing at krakani lumi. Not a single tree was removed in the process of constructing this project.

The Shortlist From the judges: “krakani lumi: What a fantastic place this is! I definitely want to visit this beautiful sensuous form seemingly dropped from the heavens to rest in the Bay of Fires. Yes it cost a bomb to build but it was worth every cent, pack your bags and get your walking shoes on. Your spirit will sing in this camp site.”

Foreshore Amenities Zen Architects


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From the judges: “Passive Butterfly is an impressive solution to the problem of designing a highly sustainable addition to a heritage home. It is sensitive to the existing home while also managing to be high-tech and contemporary in its design.”

The Winner Single Dwelling Alt or Addition

Passive Butterfly EME Design With a flexible and efficient plan, a home office and productive veggie garden, the ‘Passive Butterfly’ is an archetype for sustainable, healthy and happy living. The asymmetrical ‘butterfly’ roof design was not only developed to be a beautiful architectural form, but also a functional way of getting sun into a light-starved extension by optimising solar access both internally and externally.

The folds in the roof form allow for hi-light windows to be inserted into the living room, and the roof’s apex and valley positions work to thread light into spaces and onto internal thermal mass. The Passive Butterfly’s temperature, humidity, indoor air quality and electricity consumption are monitored constantly, providing exemplary results throughout the year.

The Shortlist

L-House Alexander Symes Architect

Vasey House Light House Architecture & Science


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Single Dwelling New

The Winner Drumkerin Mahalath Halperin Architects

The Shortlist

Jenny’s House Light House Architecture & Science

This project is the architect’s own new residence as a response to downsizing but also the chance to showcase an example of best practice in passive solar, energy efficient and sustainable house design. It is very much about the holistic approach to the integration of the building systems rather than just individual ‘sustainable’ items and components.

From the judges: “Drumkerin is a charming, quirky home that implements sustainable features in clever ways. Particularly impressive is the way the architect managed to maximise passive design principles in order to minimise costs. A job well done!”

But it’s not just about the house – it’s also about the occupants, and people’s decision to take responsibility for their actions in choosing how we live and what impact we personally have on the planet. The Shed Anderson Architecture


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The Winner

Smart Building

8 Chifley Square Lippmann Partnership / Roger Stirk Harbour & Partners 8 Chifley Square is a premium grade commercial office tower in the financial centre of Sydney’s central business district. The site is 1600sqm in area and is situated on the corner of Phillip, Hunter and Elizabeth Street facing north over Chifley Square.

public domain while being energy efficient and environmentally sustainable.

The design concept was generated by the desire to create a highly stimulating 21st century workplace in a building which contributes to the

The so-called “reverse podium” at street level offers shade in summer and sun in winter, and is a valuable extension of the city’s public realm.

70 percent of the site’s ground plane is publicly accessible with the first office floor plate elevated 20m above the ground.

From the judges: “Design is everything and this is clear for 8 Chifley Square. It is a bold addition to the Sydney CBD skyline and together with its many high-tech attributes, a portal into smart building design of the future.”

The Shortlist

Smart Home Green Sheep Collective


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The Winner Humberto Urriola Founder of Atlantis Corporation

From the judges: “Humberto Urriola has shown what it means to utilise the power of imagination and turn that into a reality that helps mankind. What the world needs right now is many more visionaries like Humberto Urriola.

In the early 1970’s Urriola, a trained landscape architect, developed a vision of transforming modern cities with beautiful landscaped parks and gardens. Buildings would be covered with hanging gardens and rooftops with luxuriant gardens for people to enjoy.

Acheivement of Merit

This vision of green cities would be part of a new urban cycle for modern living that improved water quality, reduced contaminated run-off, improved urban air quality, reduced the heat island effect and above all improved the mental wellbeing of the people living in the cities. As a landscape architect, Urriola found many challenges to realising his vision. For example, in designing roof gardens, the weight of the necessary soil and the traditional layer of aggregate for drainage was too heavy for most structurally engineered rooftops at the time. Urriola came up in with a solution which was both capable of bearing structural loads and was lightweight while allowing water to drain – the first plastic drainage cell, made from recycled polypropylene. Today these drainage cells Urriola invented and first produced in 1986 are industry standards,

used successfully in many different applications and copied by many manufacturers around the world. For example, Urriola’s drainage cells played a major part in the recent project to prevent flooding in Venice. Arguably, these drainage cells are the first major evolution of traditional pipes in thousands of years. Then in 2012 he came up with his next great idea – the first modern vertical garden system, Gro-Wall, capable of rapidly transforming any bare concrete wall into a beautiful verdant space for people to appreciate and enjoy as they go about their lives. Made from environmentally-friendly recycled plastic, the Gro-Wall vertical garden products are of sturdy construction and solve the twin problems of irrigation and drainage. Urriola’s vision and sense of purpose has given the planet some of its most important tools to combat the current and emerging environmental problems it faces. Urriola could be called the ‘Tesla of Water,’ such is his passion for pure water and ideas for saving the environment.


ADVERTISING FEATURE – ELTON GROUP

A CHANGE IN THE CULTURE OF SPECIFYING TIMBER VENEERS IN AUSTRALIA

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S THE COUNTRY’S CONSTRUCTION SECTOR REMAINS BUOYANT, ARCHITECTS AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS ARE SEEKING NEW WAYS TO MINIMISE WASTE GENERATED FROM NEW BUILDS. IN THIS, MATERIAL MANUFACTURERS HAVE PROVEN TO BE PARTICULARLY ADEPT AT SATISFYING THIS INCREASED DEMAND WITHOUT COMPROMISING ON EITHER QUALITY OR SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS. Bridging the divide between design flexibility and sustainable outcomes (that are, by virtue of this industry’s mushrooming growth, still scalable), the use of timber veneers continues to be widely embraced by our AECO sectors. Providing additional health and wellbeing benefits for end users, the specification of timber veneers sits squarely within critical success factors for wellbeing-focused certifications – such as those awarded by the WELL Building Institute. Evidently offering a significant value add for clients in terms of meeting health and sustainability criteria, designers are increasingly turning to timber veneers in recognition of the degree of design freedom and flexibility such material offers. New Layers Of Veneer: New Technology In Timber Veneer Improves The Industry – a new whitepaper – equips builders, designers and architects alike with the ability to make informed decisions about timber veneer in a competitive market. Outlining how

timber veneer achieves sustainability, design flexibility, health and wellness while also meeting the pressure of an ever-strengthening market, the whitepaper demystifies questions surrounding the specification of timber veneer in this dynamic and changing industry. Due to a number of internationally recognised standards, timber veneers present designers with the chance to specify materials that have been sourced both transparently and sustainably. As a result, many of our industry’s leading practitioners select timber veneer in anticipation of legislature currently being expected to pass in the coming year, and which explicitly enforces more sustainable building processes that are both wellbeing - and environmentally-aware for end users, designers, builders and investors. In fact, brands such as Elton Group – one of Australia’s largest suppliers of timber veneer – understand the aggregative

value potential timber veneers now offer designers ahead of this mass industry change. Shrewdly backing up its exhaustive portfolio with a suite of international standards (including the Forest Stewardship Council Certification (FSC), Elton Group has continued to lead the Australian timber veneer market with high quality architectural products for more than seven decades. With the brand’s proprietary WoodWall veneer, Elton Group bring a highly flexible veneer solution to the market. As a high-quality, real timber veneer wallpaper suitable for a wide range of direct applications including MDF, plaster, plasterboard, steel and acrylic, WoodWall promotes rapid and simple installation that will completely transform spaces with minimal delay or downtime, and at less than half the cost of conventional timber panelling.

To Download visit: goo.gl/DvbnKx


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THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF GOOD AIR WORDS: PRUE MILLER

THE CENTRAL TENET OF THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH OF ‘DO NO HARM’ SHOULD BE AS MUCH APPLIED TO DOCTORS AS IT IS FOR THE DESIGNERS OF HEALTHCARE FACILITIES. MEETING AIR QUALITY STANDARDS IN A ZONE THAT EXPECTS, INDEED ENCOURAGES PATHOGENS OF ALL SORTS IS A TEST FOR CREATIVE THINKING AND THE VERY BEST IN ALTRUISTIC ENGINEERING.


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he engineering involved in creating a safe and pleasant air atmosphere is actually a very delicate balancing act.

Hospitals and day surgeries, even GPs have to cater to patient and staff comfort while creating an environment hostile to whatever manages to walk in through the filter-less front door, and into the workspace. Surprisingly HVAC systems, even those with HEPA filters, are seen as a potential threat to positive indoor air quality (IAQ) success, as the ducts themselves can become ideal sites for colonisation of moulds and fungi, which can then be aspirated effectively throughout the system.

MAKING A HOME FOR THE PATHOGENS TO THRIVE Legionnaires’ Disease is perhaps the most widely known illness that is spread in several ways but most spectacularly through contaminated cooling tower water being disseminated through commercial buildings via the HVAC system. In the outside world, most people’s immunosuppressant systems can brush off a light dusting of germs. However, many of the people in the healthcare facilities are patients, with compromised immune systems ripe for infection.

Airepure Australia has published several papers on this subject. It has a range of filtration systems, including those for operating theatres and laboratories, and was a supplier to the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre. Airpure says that HEPA filters can be augmented by additional hardware, such as UV light that can be utilised within the ducted system. UV light is known as an effective germicidal system that can lighten the pathogen load within large systems. But of course, the architecture plays a vital role. A building or practice with less than ideal humidity or damp control will set itself up for ongoing microbial issues. Effective but harsh cleaning practices such as chemical washing may satisfy surface cleaning but can exude offensive and troublesome gases and fumes that will exacerbate patient discomfort. For this purpose, Rockcote has a range of paints designed for healthcare – designed to not only be robust as far as scrapes and abrasion is concerned, but also to be able to withstand ‘project cleaning’ of rooms. Their acrylic paint is less porous than other paints, which makes it less prone to surface growths. And when there is damage that needs urgent repair, the low VOC paint has low odour and quick drying properties that allows rooms to be turned around quickly.

PROVIDING NEW AIR The evacuation of ‘old’ air, or exchanging of air, is a constant event in healthcare. The rate and ratio are dependent on the situation i.e. operating theatres have 20 complete exchanges of air each hour, an isolation room (where patients with highly infectious diseases such as measles may be situated) has different rates and also faces more frequent attendance of staff that breach the formal containment lines. Negative air pressure rooms have a constant intake and exhaust of air, with the filtered exhaust/air flowing away from the hospital’s general population space. Room pressurisation, while once only seen in very few rooms in major hospitals, is now far more widespread and effectively and invisibly handles the task. However, with greater use comes greater expense through both purchasing, installation, monitoring and rigorous maintenance and repair. And this is perhaps where the difference in hospital design over the last 50 years is most striking, with the almost entirely lost concept of ‘wards’ or shared rooms. The ‘Nightingale wards’, as they were called, were designed as a long narrow room with beds along each long side, and shared toilet facilities at one end.


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We then progressed to rooms that held fewer patients, but six beds were not uncommon, then down to four, two and yes, single rooms are the expected standard now, even in public hospitals, and each room is expected to have its own ensuite. There is more to this move toward ‘private’ accommodation than resembles hotel or resort design. The advantages of this are a much-reduced transfer of pathogens as patients no longer pass each other on the way to the toilet, and staff that also no longer pass every patient in order to attend just the one. Of course, while rooms now have fewer people, they have more equipment, and the need for well-designed vent placement then becomes even more critical.

THE WINDOW TO THE PATHOGEN’S SOUL However, one old habit has seen a comeback – opening windows. The new Royal Adelaide Hospital, designed by Conrad Gargett has managed the almost impossible - allowing fresh air into a facility, and even more remarkable is that the patient rooms have windows that sit above a bench seat that converts to a bed for overnight visitors. Richard Does is a director of the architectural firm responsible for the design of the 800-bed hospital that includes 40 operating theatres and a rather breathtaking landscape. “We look to nature for our design inspiration, and elegantly efficient outcomes,” says Does.

Clearly a stance he has taken here is creating the chance for patients to remain connected to the natural environment, despite being somewhat institutionalised in what is the largest health and research precinct in the southern hemisphere. The quietly-spoken architect is proud of the green credentials of the design, more so as it is the first hospital of its kind to achieve a top rating from the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). “Everything is low VOC,” Does tells A&D. “What drove all our choices was to use the more natural resources. If we couldn’t use a timber, we would use a veneer.” Even the artwork within the rooms is calculated to be beneficial. “With the choice for the artwork we used photographs printed on laminated board, solid board, that could be wiped down and easily cleaned. Key drivers are the health and wellbeing of the patients.” But in considering air flow, it is impossible not to return to the gardens and landscapes featured in hospitals around the country, and around the world. Therapeutic gardens, another most welcome time traveller, have taken on a pivotal role in contemporary healthcare design. While aged care facilities have been proponents of gardens as a vital part of residents’ positive lifestyle, acute care settings frowned upon mingling the atmospheres of institutional restriction, and uncontrollable nature.

Katherina Niebler-Walker is not only one of the most famous therapeutic garden designers in Australia, but is now in demand globally. Her work on the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital 11 garden terraces is breathtaking not only in its design, but also in its ongoing success several years after installation. She is passionate about creating peopleoriented places that interweave natural and built environments. She is also a believer in the power of healing gardens. To see how effective the gardens were, the hospital placed “Bench Diaries” in situ and encouraged users of the space to enter their feelings about the surroundings. The results were quite wonderful – including a hand-written entry from a very young patient. “I am a cancer patient here at LCCH. I have been here for a week because a sudden fever came over me. Now I am in a wheelchair. Fresh air is my healer at the moment. Love this garden.” Nowadays, this growing field of healthcare design sees the development of greater intertwining of technology and holistic design practices. n

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CASE STUDY VRV HEAT RECOVERY

ABBEY HOUSE, MITTAGONG THOMPSON HEALTH CARE, IS AN ESTABLISHED PROVIDER OF LUXURY RESIDENTIAL AGED CARE FACILITIES. For their new Abbey House facility in the NSW Southern Highlands town of Mittagong, they sought a mechanical air conditioning package that gave each of the 143 residents complete control over the temperature in their rooms. Daikin worked closely with the builder and installing contractor, Tempco Energy Solutions during the two-stage project to exceed the brief requirements and provide thermal comfort throughout the facility. The project required simultaneous heating/cooling operations, or the ability for a tenant in one room to cool their room while their neighbour heated theirs. Simple operation by the facility’s aged residents was imperative, as was easy access to units for maintenance and repairs. Additional requirements included adequate ventilation and exhaust systems in addition to the cooling of a chapel and ‘cool room’ (mortuary).


In terms of construction, Stage 1 of the project – which took place over approximately 12 months – required Daikin and Tempco to retrofit their heating and cooling units, since the first floor had by this stage already been constructed and the roof above this completed.

It was very straightforward .... Working together with the Daikin team, who was always on call, worked very well.”

To meet the unique requirements of the project, Daikin worked with Tempco Energy Solutions to provide VRV III and VRV IV Heat PETER BRADLEY TEMPCO ENERGY SOLUTIONS Recovery systems across both stages of the project. A total of 545 kW of heating and cooling power – or 104 units – was delivered in stage 1 of the project, with an additional 536 kW – or 96 units – added in stage 2. A mechanical ventilation and exhaust system was installed in the kitchens, with similar systems employed in toilets and utility rooms. The use of Daikin products ensures reliable, smooth operation for all residents. “Daikin can provide heat/cool simultaneous operation as we have a true 3-pipe VRV HR system,” explains Daikin Commercial Account Manager Dean Pepper, “This means that one tenant’s room can cool whilst another heats.” Peter Bradley of Tempco Energy Solutions was similarly pleased with the finished project. “It was very straightforward,” he says, “Working together with the Daikin team, who was always on call, worked very well.”

To learn more about Daikin’s commercial HVAC products and services, visit commercial.daikin.com.au


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BIG BIM BENEFITS FOR HEALTHCARE DESIGN WORDS: GERALDINE CHUA


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A WORLD WITHOUT BIM, OR BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING, MAY FEEL LIKE ANCIENT HISTORY TO SOME IN THE INDUSTRY. BUT IN THE RICH LEGACY OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN, THE TECHNOLOGYDRIVEN TOOL IS A RELATIVE NEWCOMER.

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raditionally, teams would create 2D computer-aided designs, which they translated into 3D models to show how different building elements would come together. These models provided spatial information and nothing more.

“At the beginning of a project, BIM ensures people and teams collaborate much earlier. Shared responsibility means teams will know and understand processes, and the ambiguity of projects decreases as a clear picture of what to expect appears.”

However, researchers and computer scientists soon found ways to tag data to these 3D objects—data that could be arranged in a systematic manner that was useful to project planning.

At the same time, operating in a healthcare environment is a time sensitive task, he adds. “By using intelligent, data-rich models of existing buildings, access to information is easier and more organised, helping get information to people who need it in a timely fashion.”

By the early 2000s, software that placed information at its core started emerging. With these programs, data powers the modelling, which is supported by real-world architectural context. For example, a wall “knows” where in a structure it stands, “understands” that it could host windows and doors, and is capable of being scheduled. It’s easy to understand how this merging of information management and building modelling (to create BIM) offers several benefits for the AEC industry. But perhaps no other group feels the impact of the tech more than healthcare project teams. The pressures of cost, schedule and safety is amplified by the scale and complexity of designing a hospital, where multiple building elements may compete for the same space, and the efficiency of systems can literally mean life or death. “In healthcare, BIM is an increasingly important tool enabling greater efficiencies and collaboration during the design and construction phase,” Andy Cunningham, regional director at Autodesk, explains.

SUNSHINE COAST UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL The $1.8 billion SCUH by Architectus and HDR boasts many firsts. It’s the first non-replacement greenfield hospital in Australia in over 20 years; the first PPP healthcare project in Queensland; and the first dRofus and Graphisoft openBIM project within Australia. SCUH services an ever-growing Sunshine Coast population, delivering a wide range of tertiary level healthcare facilities, including an emergency department and comprehensive cancer centre. At the heart of the 160,000sqm site is a heavily landscaped courtyard accessible by the hospital’s most important spaces. In this outdoor room, staff and patients alike can take advantage of the local climate, natural air and light, and the community’s coastal lifestyle. According to Aurecon, a member of the project’s PPP consortium, BIM was integral to the design and build process. Following a clear directive to maximise off-site

prefabrication and modular construction, it helped overcome buildability, logistics, material availability and time constraints. “Using BIM, specifically Autodesk’s Revit, the project team was able to model components and systems in their proposed locations, and plan spatial allowances and fixings,” Susie Pearn, client director, Education at Aurecon, and building projects director Adrian Jenkins, note in a white paper. “Proof of concept testing was conducted using 3D printed rapid prototyping. In doing this, it was recognised that not all areas would be suitable for prefabrication because of their inherent uniqueness and complicated services needs.” However, the use of BIM was not without its challenges. Because different stakeholders employed different software, there was a fear that project management would end up being too complicated. This mandated the creation of an openBIM environment, where all users could work on the project simultaneously despite the use of multiple programs, including dRofus and Archicad. “Interoperability of project files is fundamental for the adoption of digital processes and extracting the value in the construction industry,” Scott Beazley, digital technologies manager at Mitchell Brandtman, says in an interview with dRofus. “Not just in design only, but taking it through to construction & fabrication. “The more we can use common formats like IFC, the more reliability and confidence we can have in the process.”


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PREVIOUS: Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre. Image courtesy of Silver Thomas Hanley DesignInc + McBride Charles Ryan. LEFT: Contractors and trades can view a list of project issues on Apple or Android tablets and phones, add details, and move through approval steps

VICTORIAN COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTRE The VCCC, designed by Silver Thomas Hanley, DesignInc and McBride Charles Ryan, is a $1 billion cancer centre in the heart of Melbourne’s research and biomedical precinct.

Due to the complexity of the project, BIM was crucial in ensuring that all designers were able to collaborate on a regular basis, with models being shared across various locations.

QUICK TIPS FROM ANDY CUNNINGHAM, REGIONAL DIRECTOR AT AUTODESK

WHAT’S NEXT FOR BIM IN HEALTHCARE?

Every situation differs, but my advice for anyone embarking on BIM is to remember the following:

Taking up 130,000sqm, the dynamic building combines several activities into one building—from being home to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, to hosting research and clinical facilities for Melbourne Health, and research and education spaces for the University of Melbourne.

According to Autodesk, the answer is simple: advanced technology.

This includes: 160 overnight inpatient beds, 110 same-day beds, a 42-bed capacity intensive care unit, eight operating theatres, nine radiation therapy bunkers and several square feet dedicated to research clinical trials and training.

“Computers and machines will do more to support the design process. Instead of manually drawing walls, doors, and columns for what we think is a good design, we’ll leverage sophisticated algorithms that will automatically feed designers with the optimal building footprint, structural load capacity, and thermal performance, for example.”

Up against this project, the team developed an ambitious vision for BIM—to model every design detail that was larger than 10mm. According to PCL Construction, part of the design-build joint venture with Grocon, this allowed the team to work from not one, but 237 separate models. This, in turn, provided the opportunity to “break down the building into small components, and to plan construction sequencing and activities around them”.

“BIM has already radically transformed the way we design healthcare spaces, and as the technology continues to evolve, this will only become more sophisticated.

“This will radically speed up the time it takes to design and test ideas.” Nowadays, this growing field of healthcare design sees the development of greater intertwining of technology and holistic design practices. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: AUTODESK

“Applying BIM…provided the opportunity to prefabricate large / complex sections of the project to tolerance within 10mm,” Cunningham explains.

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“It also allowed for clash detection prior to any works proceeding on site and for the accurate set out of the site installation.”

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Get everyone on board early, but bring in BIM late. One of BIM’s biggest factors for successful adoption is a team’s willingness to collaborate outside of traditional silos. After making initial introductions with firm leadership, be sure to bring everyone else into the conversation as soon as possible. Once the team is assembled and ready for BIM, it’s best to start implementing the process on projects that have already begun. Show, don’t tell. When managers face entrenched resistance to adopting BIM, all the slide decks and promises in the world might not erode it. Instead, try demonstrating its advantages by letting new BIM adopters struggle a bit. Listen and reassure. People need to be reassured that BIM is most effective for saving money by cutting out time inefficiencies, not labour expenses. BIM savings are reflected on-site, in making construction more efficient and better coordinated. In terms of training, it’s important to identify the best staff to take lead roles in managing their firm’s use of BIM. Top-level managers might not have the time or technical abilities to take on operational roles with the new system, so lower-level employees might make better BIM managers.


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HEALTHCARE: SECURITY AND SAFETY WORDS: PRUE MILLER

SECURITY IS IMPORTANT IN EVERY BUILDING, BUT PERHAPS MORE SO IN THE AREA OF HEALTHCARE WHERE NOT ONLY IS VULNERABLE PATIENT SAFETY A CONCERN, BUT ALSO THE PRESENCE OF EXPENSIVE EQUIPMENT, PHARMACEUTICALS AND DEADLY TOXINS, ALL OF WHICH RAISE THE NEED FOR INCREASED SECURITY.


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here is a lot to be said of making security an obvious element of design, an easy tool to dissuade those considering breaching the perimeter for whatever reason, from actually making a move. Grilles on windows, stickers with stern warnings, motion detectors and even a security firm presence have an impact. But there is a downside; what patients don’t want when approaching the dentist chair is any sort of emotional disruption. Windows and doors are clear access points which offer not only egress but also views, fresh air and a link with the peace of the outside world. Grilles on any of these points will serve one master but not the other. Crimsafe ha a range of virtually invisible screens and a range of meshes that allow the fresh air and views to enter, while maintaining a secure perimeter day and night – and that includes protection from mosquitoes as much as marauders. The Crimsafe window screens also offer a keyless emergency exit system and the varying strength of the meshes allows for the protection of those more vulnerable patients in secure facilities from falling, or jumping from windows at height. Doors have different parameters to consider; they are both gatekeepers of a comfortable inside climate and are also instrumental in providing personal safety and security for the staff, visitors and patients inside a healthcare facility, even a GP practice where break-ins for drugs are an all-too-frequent occurrence. The Crimsafe iQ door is purported to be the toughest model in the country, and comes with touch pad entry that includes day/night programming to ensure secure locking each night, and ease of entry by staff the next day. For buildings with a high traffic flow, such as hospitals and other treatment centres, Boon Edam has a range of traffic moderating doors that are both stylish and fit for purpose. One is a new take on a revolving door; the Duotour offers a door that can convert from turning, to a more fixed opening that can take on people moving options such as ambulance trolleys, as explained by Boon Edam Australia managing director Michael Fisher.

“When an entry requires sophistication to channel the flow of visitors in high numbers at peak times, or those accompanied by carts, trollies or hospital beds, the Duotour two-wing automatic revolving door is the optimal solution. Unlike a three or four wing revolving door, the Duotour can channel a high capacity of foot traffic while having a fairly small footprint.” At peak times, or in order to allow passage to trollies or beds, the function of the Duotour can be switched from the automatic revolving door setting to automatic sliding or swinging doors, ensuring maximum capacity and ease of movement.

Over the next four decades the number of dementia sufferers in Australia is projected to climb from 413,000 to 1.1 million, says the UoW paper. Many of these people, very many in fact will spend time in a secure facility. For family members, the decision to move a loved one into a home is hard enough, let alone dealing with the guilt of putting their loved one in a ‘jail’. The UoW paper reported the most common reaction to institutional fencing was that it was a ‘necessary evil’.

It is also possible, in a security incident, to immediately lock the doors’ movement.

The focus has to shift to making these safety precautions more palatable as the population behind the barriers rapidly increases.

Security and safety once inside these buildings also presents some unique issues. In the case of fire, for instance, many of the inhabitants are non-ambulatory, or compromised in some other way.

Enter new materials that must still maintain their integrity against considerable force, be designed so that they remain ‘unclimbable’ while all the time adding to the positive benefits of being outdoors.

Aged care facilities, perhaps the most rapidly growing of the many splinter groups involved in healthcare, are particularly susceptible to fire events, given that many of the residents are forgetful and by no fault of their own, instigators of most accidents.

Companies such as Locker Group, which produces a vast range of perforated metal and wire mesh products, says that it can transform a barrier into a work of art, by either masking an existing fence, or in some cases creating the barrier on its own.

Clinton Greene of Greene Fire in Sydney says this is an ideal area to consider the implementation of fire and smoke curtains. These ceiling recessed units can be deployed and reset with minimal effort, and are effective in the vital role of containment of a fire event.

Being able to apply vibrant colours and interesting perforations with varying textures, the fence can become a welcome distraction, rather than a negative influence.

With modern facilities incorporating large open plan areas, and vast atria, old fashioned fire doors cannot be relied upon to control outbreaks. With no need for support posts the curtains can be placed anywhere, creating safe cells, protecting fire escape stairwells as well as working as a funnel system to move the smoke away from populated zones. The fastest growing demographic in Australia is that of the ageing population, and with that comes new and more complex security issues for aged care facilities, and general healthcare units.

With imagination, architects can take full advantage of this style of material to allow residents safer ‘adventures’ in their homes, adding low maintenance, protected walkways, bridges, tunnels and sculptures in the facility grounds that enrich walks for residents, families and staff. It would seem that much of this is obvious, yet in many new facilities this human dimension, the understanding of how patients and staff actually perform the art of healing, is lost amid the inhumanity of designing to a budget. n

The most contentious is that of boundaries; of keeping patients with dementia safely enclosed. SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS LOCKER GROUP

Recently, the University of Wollongong (UoW) published a paper that examined the confronting subject of high fences and gates, a contentious aspect of security that causes the most angst in healthcare.

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/LOCKER-GROUP GREENE FIRE ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ GREENE-FIRE BOON EDAM ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/ SUPPLIERS/BOON-EDAM CRIMSAFE ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN. COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/CRIMSAFE-SECURITY-SYSTEMS


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BEHIND EVERY LEADING BRAND IS TRUST

S

INCE 2012, ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN HAS COUNTED MORE THAN 30,000 VOTES CAST IN ITS BIENNIAL INDUSTRY BENCHMARK SURVEY KNOWN AS THE TOP TRUSTED BRANDS. Public voting is now open and the 5th instalment of this highly-respected industry survey will reveal the public perception of brands that are held in the highest regard by architecture, building, construction and design professionals. When choosing a supplier or partner to work with, trust is a powerful differentiator. “The Top Trusted Brands reveals those 100 brands that are most recognised by industry to uphold a relationship beyond the sale, time and time again,” says Branko Miletic, editor of Infolink | BPN and Architecture & Design. “That’s why the public vote is so important.”

Your vote is important. This year we’re questioning what defines trust and how brands demonstrate the three pillars of trust: Quality, Candour and Consciousness. Quality is integrated into every facet of a brand’s business, from product and service development, through to its delivery, demonstrating a commitment to effectiveness, durability or innovation. Consciousness is changing the way brands do business. Brands that focus on how to add value to their offering and address customer safety, social and environmental concerns, will be rewarded.

2016 TOP 10 1. WEATHERTEX AUSTRALIA 2. DULUX AUSTRALIA 3. BLUESCOPE LYSAGHT 4. CAROMA 5. ALUCOBOND ARCHITECTURAL 6. CSR GYPROCK 7. THE LAMINEX GROUP

Candour at its core is honesty. Trusted brands communicate with transparency whether that be social media responses or financial reporting to shareholders.

8. JAMES HARDIE WALL & FLOOR PRODUCTS

Cast your vote now at: trustedbrands.architectureanddesign.com.au

10. AUSTRAL BRICKS

9. HAFELE AUSTRALIA


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COLOUR BY DESIGN WITH A VIEW TO LIGHTNESS WORDS: PRUE MILLER

THE HEALTHCARE DESIGN SECTOR IS ENTIRELY COUNTER-INTUITIVE; THE BEST-LOOKING PLACES ARE NOT FOR THE GLAMOROUS AND CAREFREE, BUT FOR THE BROKEN AND BURDENED. THERE IS A NO MORE CHALLENGING BRIEF THAN TO MAKE A TERRIFYING PLACE WELCOMING, TO MAKE A COMPLEX AND PAINFUL EXPERIENCE LESS SO OR TO TAKE A CLINICAL, TECHNOLOGY DRIVEN SPACE AND MAKE IT HOLISTIC.

W

elcome to the magic show that is healthcare design. And the ticket cost is eye watering. The recently completed Royal Adelaide Hospital is reported as the most expensive building in the country, coming in at $2.4 billion.

just this market, from behind the scenes needs such as operating theatres to waiting rooms.

That’s more than Canberra’s Parliament House, but then again, expectations of productivity are far higher with a hospital.

A trail blazer in healthcare design has been the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital in Brisbane.

The driving force behind the visual domain of healthcare is entirely psychology driven. From colours, textures, and way finding to light sources and access to fresh air the needs of the customer (which includes staff, patients and family) are complex and demanding. Not surprisingly colours in healthcare have an important role in scene setting and mood altering. Dulux paints has created a comprehensive range of colour palettes for

Using the right colours is hardly a new concept. What has changed in more recent design is the combination of colour, texture and materials.

The specialist paediatric teaching hospital was completed by architect Conrad Gargett in 2015 and is recognisable across the city by its bright green, cheerful façade. It is here the ‘hospital as a tree house’ concept begins; once inside the massive central void is criss-crossed by ‘branches’ that radiate from the atria ‘trunks’. Enormous, vibrant bird sculptures perch in the voids and at not one but at twelve levels marvellous outdoor spaces and gardens are found.

Designed by Katherina Niebler-Walker, the terraces allow light and living colour to interplay with the hard architecture. It is all designed to free the mind, and often the bodies, of institutional albeit medical, detention. A sense of space, of freedom is frequently a casualty in the healthcare industry – yet there has to be order and clarity in spaces that deal in healthcare, whether it be a dental office or a six-level hospital. For retaining the sense of space, while still defining functionality, glass is the go-to medium. A space-age example can be found in The Netherlands, where Studio Prototype designed a complete building for an orthodontic practice. Ortho Wijchen broke down a number of design mainstays by using simple half panels of glass between suites, and allowing the entire common wall of the building, which faced the five procedure areas, a view of a green field.


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PREVIOUS: Enormous, vibrant bird sculptures perch in the voids and at not one but at twelve levels marvellous outdoor spaces and gardens are found. FAR LEFT: The Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital in Brisbane was completed by architects Conrad Gargett in 2015 and is recognisable across the city by its bright green, cheerful façade. LEFT: The Cabrini paediatric wing of the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital is a wonder for more than its medicine.

More than a view, the walls actually opened a whole new take on designing for medical practice, which resulted in Studio Prototype being nominated in 2017 for an Architizer A+ award in Healthcare and Wellness. Kristen Altamura is with Exposure, a company that designs and creates architectural glass panels. “We sandblast directly onto the glass,” says Altamura, which is a point of difference in a market where coloured films and decals are often simply adhered to glass panels. The longevity and durability of glass artwork is advantageous in a healthcare setting where equipment is often an abrasive, and of course the material is easily cleaned. Exposure says it can print panels up to 3.6m x 2.4m, the largest sandblasting unit in Australia and can create images using colour, in much the same way as those that created early etchings. For those with concerns about glass panels and safety, Altamura points out that the glass can be strengthened using standard laminating techniques resulting in a toughened sheet. But really, the product is about beauty, and unlimited graphic potential.

“It is beautiful, it looks almost 3D. And even if it is 75 percent etched out, the light still transmits through.” The company is currently working on a large project for a Geelong aged care facility that will illuminate the lobby, featuring an Aboriginal design. Another design option that clearly appeals in the healthcare genre is that supplied by Aglo Systems. Its organoid surfaces bring the outside inside, using recognisable organic elements which have been harvested from hillsides of the Austrian Tyrol and binding them with an ecologically sound binding agent. The result is a decorative coating that could be of petals, leaves or grasses, all of which promote the sense of wellness. For waiting areas (or even cafes within the precinct) such decorative coatings offer not just beauty but a chance for total distraction as the random patterns give the eye much to canvas during long wait times. A welcome newcomer to the walls and hearts of healthcare clients is interactive digital display.

And while some form of digital facility has been available in recent builds, for instance the self-serve way-finding kiosks in the Royal Adelaide Hospital, it is still new in many of our hospital wards. The Cabrini paediatric wing of the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital is a wonder for more than its medicine. The wall display produced and installed by Ennus transforms a wall into a wonderland, where trees appear and caterpillars crawl at the behest of young hands on what is a timber wall. “It’s actually a 0.5mm veneer,” says Nimrod Weis from Ennus. “And the display penetrates the wood.” Ennus, a multimedia design company based in Melbourne, describes their work as a mix of art technology and fun, and it’s an apt description. Using interactive real time motion tracking, the art form becomes responsive, reactive and most importantly, distracting for kids in a foreign, stressful environment. “It helps parents too,” adds Weis. “And at night the scene changes to a cityscape, and a cat walks along [the digital fence line]. It makes the kids feel as though they are having a special treat, that others who just visit in the daytime don’t get.”


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FAR LEFT: Using the right colours is hardly new as a concept, what has changed in more recent design is the combination of colour, texture and materials. LEFT: Control of light is critically important in good mental health, including premium rest cycles.

The team at Ennus are now looking at projects in aged care and dementia units where diversion is a problem for staff and patrons.

‘ICU Syndrome,’ where the 24/7 bright lights of the ICU area have been a contributing factor to the disturbing psychosis.

“It’s a way to create a space where they can find something to do, something that helps pass the time.”

Control of light is critically important in good mental health, including premium rest cycles.

And time is an issue on many levels for those dwelling in the healthcare sector for any length of time. Primordially humans have judged time by the change in the ambient light. Airlines have twigged to the value in time shifting using coloured cabin LED lights that subconsciously help passengers time shift and avoid the rigours of time zone jet lag. Human Centric Lighting is designed to maintain a human circadian rhythm when natural triggers are absent. Does it matter what time you think it is? Yes, it does. Our bodies are designed to secrete hormones, from cortisol to melatonin at certain times of the day, triggered by light cues. In fact, the lack of time of day recognition by critically ill patients has led to what is called

More than a matter of turning off the lights and pretending it’s suddenly night, the cues are sent to our brains via a range colour temperature.

In the aged care sector, specifically in the dementia units, there is a concept described as ‘sundowning’ where patients become agitated and distressed at the end of the day, which often leads to disturbed or absent natural sleep patterns, and a resulting increase in drug therapy. It has been proven that adaptive light can manipulate the colour and content of light to encourage beneficial hormone production.

Gerard Lighting is a proponent of the financial and holistic value of HCL systems in industry, including the healthcare sector.

Also used across healthcare design in greater frequency is the positive impact of biophilic design.

Driven by an astronomical time clock, the systems which range from small rooms to building-wide installations, can be set to mimic any time frame required.

Ideal for areas where fresh air excursions are an unlikely option, the positive impact on staff and patients in every corner of healthcare is proven to enhance the complex and ever-changing healing environment. n

The Rapix system from Gerard Lighting, which handles large installations, can be programmed to handle individual zones as well as sector-wide needs.

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: GERARD LIGHTING ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/GERARD-LIGHTING

Alternately the system can allow individual and personal preference overrides in their local work zone.

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ADVERTISING FEATURE – PGH BRICKS & PAVERS

PGH BRICKS RELEASES HIGH QUALITY BIM CONTENT LIBRARIES FOR REVIT AND ARCHICAD

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GH BRICKS HAS PARTNERED WITH AUSTRALIA’S LEADING BIM CONTENT CREATION PROVIDER UNIFI LABS TO DEVELOP AUSTRALIA’S MOST EXTENSIVE AND ADVANCED BIM LIBRARY FOR BRICKS. THE PGH BRICKS LIBRARY HAS BEEN CREATED NATIVELY IN BOTH REVIT AND ARCHICAD FORMATS. IMPORTANTLY, BOTH LIBRARIES HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED USING ‘BEST OF BREED’ CONTENT CREATION METHODS UNIQUE TO EACH DESIGN AUTHORING SOFTWARE, MEANING USER EXPERIENCE AND BIM PROJECT DOCUMENTATION OUTPUTS ARE OPTIMISED FOR BOTH REVIT AND ARCHICAD USERS.

help them not only with their project design and documentation processes but with their efforts to evolve their BIM and broader design technology initiatives. The feedback we’ve had to date from designers has been extremely positive and reinforces our commitment to continually evolving our BIM content library as the industry makes progress in this area”.

Recognising recent advancements in design technology and the increased adoption of BIM workflows by building designers, PGH Bricks have created this library with the objective of making specifying and documenting Bricks more efficient for designers and ensuring visualisation outputs created during the design process are of optimal quality.

General Manager for UNIFI Labs AUS/NZ, Luke Johnston says, “to their credit, the PGH team have been uncompromising throughout the development process in their intent to maximise end user experience. This is clearly evident in the quality of the end result. We truly believe this library sets an industry benchmark, not only for Bricks, but for all materials-based products as they relate to BIM content in both Revit and ARCHICAD.”

Prior to developing the library, PGH and UNIFI Labs conducted research into how designers create and manage BIM content materials libraries and how these materials are incorporated into project models. From a visualisation aspect, this research reinforced the need for the underlying image assets to be high quality, tileable and capable of producing seamless, blemish-free outputs, whilst not being large in file size and a burden on model performance. On the documentation side, it was important that the content incorporated sufficient, consistently structured product data to assist with the creation of project schedules.

Another major factor in setting the library creation scope was understanding how designers would review, integrate and manage materials libraries, especially those sourced from product manufacturers. With this in mind, PGH worked with UNIFI to create highly detailed ‘Content Overview and User Guides’ that provide users with step-by-step best practices for library integration and optimal project documentation outputs. Also included as part of the BIM content library assets are project files that assist with QA processes undertaken by library managers, demonstration of common project documentation outputs and as ‘Virtual Showrooms’ for designers to browse. General Manager – Marketing for PGH Bricks, Jai Sanderson says, “the frequency with which designers have been requesting BIM content from us has increased significantly in recent times so we are thrilled to be able to make this BIM content library available to our project design partners. We are confident it will

The PGH Bricks BIM Content library is available for download from the PGH Bricks website.

To Download visit: goo.gl/8KB253


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GET THE INFORMATION YOU NEED AUSTRALIA’S LEADING SOURCE OF NEW & EXCITING BUILDING AND ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS

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SPECIFY MASONRY A FEATURE IN A THOROUGHBRED CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE Baines Masonry was chosen to supply the masonry content to FDC Constructions $110M project for William Inglis & Son to build a multipurpose, state-of-the-art, global centre of excellence for the display and sale of Australia’s outstanding thoroughbred horses that incorporates the latest technology in international real-time auction sales and the highest level of comfort and hospitality for its global clientele at Warwick Farm. Known as ‘Riverside Stables’, the facility is established as a key venue in Western Sydney catering to a multitude of events and functions. The feature of the Warwick Farm precinct is a new 5 star luxury hotel, named The William nglis, part of the M allery collection by Sofitel. Baines Masonry products were chosen because of their excellent qualities of finish, strength, tolerances and their high fire and acoustic capabilities. Although Baines supplied the masonry component the centre is built on much of it is covered by a number of facades, The feature masonry chosen was a smooth face, AppinStone colour, to highlight the stables and a retaining wall near the luxury hotel, the blocks had to have the strength and colour to blend in with the complex. The feature masonry has a silicone additive injected into the mix during production which helps supress ef orescence and provides a higher barrier to water penetration than masonry can achieve. o see the colours and finishes Baines Masonry can supply go to www.bainesmasonry.com.au, select Design Professionals and scroll down to R UR W MAS R S RS WAR R , if fire and acoustics are required try our new Fire and Acoustic calculator under Technical Manuals. Contact Baines Masonry Blocks 02 4631 1383 bainesmasonry.com.au

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ACOUSTIGARD NON-COMBUSTIBLE ACOUSTIC & THERMAL INSULATION Beyond structural performance, fire, acoustics and thermal – are perhaps the key elements of wall system performance and specification. Whether on a boundary or in a facade of high-rise apartments, external walls require non-combustible insulation to reduce fire risk, while delivering peaceful acoustics and thermal performance for occupant comfort. Similarly, many internal walls in commercial and multi-residential buildings require enhanced acoustic and fire separation, while some also require a thermal rating. Bradford Acoustigard™ presents the ideal non-combustible insulation solution for external and internal walls, delivering enhanced fire, acoustics and thermal performance. Acoustigard™ is a non-combustible, glasswool fibre insulation specifically engineered to reduce mid to high range acoustic transmission in walls (and ceilings). Manufactured in varying densities the acoustic and thermal performance can be tuned to suit project requirements. Acoustigard™ can be supplied in varying thicknesses up to 90mm and densities up to 32 kg/m3, delivering up to R2.7 added insulation to the total wall thermal performance. Unlike some other products, Acoustigard™ retains its form and won’t slump in the cavity, ensuring the risk of voids in walls are eliminated and maintaining the acoustic and thermal performance well beyond building handover to owners and tenants. Contact CSR Bradford 1800 354 044 bradfordinsulation.com.au

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SPECIFY NEW FINISHES AND COLOURS FOR STORMTECH GRATES Inspired by worldwide trends Stormtech has launched some exciting new colours and finishes – Matt Black, Satin Black, Brass, Copper and Bronze – to offer more creative options to designers, specifiers and consumers. The colour finishes are available across the whole range of Stormtech’s designer grates and drains, from their standard 100, 65 or 38 Range through to fully customised options. These metallic finishes will add sparkle and give a sleek and luminous finish to any contemporary design, offering a luxurious and glamorous feel whether it be timeless brass or trendy copper. Stormtech has been providing inspiring architectural drainage solutions for home and commercial building projects for over a quarter of a century. Used in bathrooms, showers, thresholds, paved areas, driveways, pools and pool surrounds, Stormtech grates and drains are known for sleek design, innovation and practicality. All Stormtech products are Australian Made and WaterMarked certified. With a proud commitment to ecofriendly design, Stormtech offers the only linear drainage product in the world with Global GreenTag certification. Contact Stormtech 1300 120 729 stormtech.com.au

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POSISTRUT CASSETTES ARE FLOORING BUILDERS & DEVELOPERS MiTek PosiStrut Flooring Cassettes take what is currently done on site and prefabricate it in a factory. he oor is built to the current specifications for de ections, reactions and acoustics. lumbing locations, voids stacks, wastes and duct chases and recessed wet areas are resolved at the design stage to ensure ease of installation on site. MiTek PosiStrut Flooring assettes can also utilise top chord support, so they can be craned into position on-site and fixed in minutes. Two people can do in a day what it takes three or four to do in seven days – with more square metres of ooring laid by less labour in a lot less time. There is no storage issue on-site and this is an advantage. he truck arrives and within minutes the first cassette can be craned into position. nce installed and fitted (and relevant safety scaffolding erected) the cassettes can be walked on, so the next part of the construction process can get underway. ollowing trades can move in and start work. lumbing, electrical, heating air conditioning/ducting can be readily accommodated by PosiStrut’s easy-access. Contact MiTek Ph: 03 8795 8888 mitek.com.au

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SPECIFY

DISCOVER THE INFINITE ELEGANCE OF ASCOT.VOGUE The new ascot.Vogue range delivers a modern twist on classic dado wall styles, featuring a well-defined profile with a fresh aesthetic that’s particularly suited to formal dining rooms, master suites, hallways or entry foyers. his innovative product range provides three unique designs, offering varying aesthetics and lengths to allow the freedom to create striking features and engaging atmospheres. o compliment the elegance of ascot. ogue we have available our asy ado rails which are designed to sit on top of the paneled wall as a seamless finish.

DYSON AIRBLADE™ WASH+DRY HAND DRYER NOW UP TO 39% QUIETER Dyson Airblade™ Wash+Dry hand dryer, combines in a single touchless unit, a tap and a hand dryer. This helps save space in the washroom and reduces water dripping from hands onto the oor. Up to 39% quieter than its predecessor due to a re-tuned motor and optimised slot blade geometry. t is certified by uiet Mark, tested and approved by The Noise Abatement Society. ry your hands in 1 seconds with -filtered air, yson’s filters capture 99.95% of particles from the washroom air, (0. 3 microns).

Why not discover how the distinct profile style of the ascot. ogue range is the perfect solution for your next project

Dyson Airblade™ hand dryers produce up to 79% less CO2 than paper towels and some other hand dryers. They use 52% less water than predecessor due to reduced ow.

Contact EasyCraft 07 3906 7200 easycraft.com.au

Contact Dyson 1800 426 337 dyson.com.au/forbusiness

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HAVWOODS PERFECT PAR-KY TIMBER FLOORING FOR ANY BUDGET Made in urope, avwoods’ ar-ky engineered timber ooring planks and herringbone blocks are crafted for exceptional value, making a genuine hardwood oor an option on even the tightest of budgets. ricecompetitive, stress-resistant, click joint profile for fast, easy installation, ar-ky is available in an array of gorgeous colours and finishes. primegrade uropean ak top layer, bonded to an ultra-strong core and sealed with 8 layers of U -cured lacquer makes ar-ky ideal for high-traffic spaces such as residential, commercial and retail fitouts and it can be fitted as ooring, cladding or bespoke joinery. vailable with 15-year or 20-year residential warranty, ar-ky is perfect for your timber ooring needs. Contact avwoods 1300 28 966 havwoods.com.au

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CONCEALED HINGE CEILING HATCH: 1 HOUR – 90 MINUTE – 2 HOUR The Fyreguard 1 Hour, 90 Minute & 2 Hour CH-FYREHATCHES are designed to provide a ush set or anged fire rated access hatch for ceiling applications where access is required, while still maintaining at least a 1 our, 90 Minute 2 our fire rating. The C - R TC S sit ush with the ceiling lining and have concealed hinges to limit visual impact. The panel is secured by a rim lock with a key provided or can be individually keyed for maximum security. The C - R TC S are used in fire rated ceilings where access is required to ceiling cavity for service installations or maintenance. Contact yreguard 07 5593 4955 fyreguard.com

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SPECIFY BENCHES & SHELVES AUSTRALIA’S HIGHEST QUALITY MODULAR AND COMMERCIAL BENCHING SYSTEMS

AWS VENTIENT™

Britex is one of Australia’s premier fabricators of custom made stainless steel benching products. Consistently specified and contracted to fit out Hospitals, Laboratories, Commercial Kitchens and Processing Plants with custom stainless products.

Without need for electric power, sensors or human intervention, the AWS Ventient™ passively controls ventilation determined by ambient temperature. Optimising ventilation without compromising acoustics, makes AWS Ventient™ the ideal solution for a healthcare project. and properties where windows and doors otherwise remain closed. *AWS Ventient™ unit shown without cover.

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REYNODUAL NON-COMBUSTIBLE CLADDING Reynodual ® is a pre-painted double sheet aluminium panel for facades with high technical, visual and environmentally friendly requirements. It offers the possibility of creating complex shapes for an attractive and creative appearance.

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ARCPANEL AQUATEK PANEL: OUTSTANDING CORROSION RESISTANCE FOR AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS The complete sustainable, highly durable roofing and wall cladding solution that’s quick and easy to install. ARCPANEL Aquatek Panel combines aesthetic, innovative design, with high strength, durability and excellent thermal insulation.

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GLOBAL DIGITAL ART ACCESS

PROMAT PENETRATION SEALS

Niio is a world-leading management, distribution and display platform for premium digital artworks. Established with the vision of enabling the market and spreading the experience of digital format art, Niio offers seamless accessibility to discover and experience the world’s finest moving image artworks.

All Promat Australia penetration seal products have been tested to AS1530.4 and AS4072.1 in line with the requirements of BCA Clause C3.15 and will achieve fire resistance levels (FRL) of up to -/240/240. Promat Australia has systems to protect metal pipes of various type and size, cables of various kinds.

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MOLY-POLY PIVOTS BY ANGLE SHOE PRODUCTSA Angle-Shoe makes Moly-Poly pivots in Canberra’s only door hardware workshop. They are specifically for light 35mm doors to 35kg. The pivots are made from a special blend of engineered Nylon with molybdenum to enhance UV resistance, durability and lubrication.

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SUPPORT ARMS AROUND THE TOILET GIVE ASSISTANCE TO SIT AND STAND Danish design and manufacture at its very best, Pressalit delivers a support arm to enable users to have a good posture and body balance. The Folding Support Arm range from Pressalit, is a dedicated collection of supportive equipment that has been developed principally for people with limited mobility.

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SPECIFY FACADE SERIES COMMERCIAL SHUTTERS

INTEGRATED SYSTEM SOLUTIONS FROM SOLAMAGIC

For a long lasting façade solution that improves commercial buildings energy efficiency, Shutterflex offer the façade series commercial shutters. The façades are custom-made to fit any opening and available in a range of complementary colours to suit building architecture.

Solamagic is the perfect advertisement media for your products and sponsors. Customising your Solamagic unit allows you to keep your customers aware of your brand and business whilst warmly comforted by Solamagic heating units.

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INTRIM 800 SERIES SHADOWLINE SYSTEM The unique Intrim Shadowline system allows you to create a seamless Shadowline skirting & door jamb the easy way. It is fast, neat and eliminates the inconvenience of a metal or PVC 10mm Shadowline bead. Using Intrim’s system will help you reduce your buildings costs and save 30% installation time. Available in pre-primed MDF and finger-joined pine.

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KOMBI STAIRS & PLATFORMS BY SAYFA GROUP Kombi modular stair and platform systems provide the ultimate in flexibility and customisation. Kombi is easily installed and can be adjusted to suit the required stair angle whilst allowing each individual tread to be levelled and spaced accordingly, minimising the need for precise on site measurement and fabrication.

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FOLDING GRILLES AND FOLDING CLOSURES

TURBO-TUFF™ HAND DRYER

Cost effective, attractive, lightweight, and easy to use, the FC1 Permashield Folding Closure is a proven security option. The system uses a series of continuous extruded aluminium hinged panels, making it a low friction system with fewer moving parts.

Turbo-Tuff™ Recess Mounted Sensor Hand Dryer operates automatically using the IR sensor that activates the dryer when hands are placed in the sensor zone. Owner-adjustable air speed & temperature with on/off heating options

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KORLOK CLICK VINYL FLOORING Korlok is a rigid core flooring product, and as such, is an ideal alternative to laminate and engineered hardwood click floors. Offering quick and easy installation and hiding subfloor imperfections, it also has the durable and waterproof qualities of luxury vinyl.

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MONIER INLINESOLAR™ - THE POWER OF A GREAT LOOKING ROOF InlineSOLAR™ is compatible with any Monier roof tile product, and is recess-mounted within your roof line. It offers all the benefits of solar while still maximising the street appeal of your home. Available in standard black framed panels, InlineSOLAR™ can be upgraded to the elite panel option.

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SPECIFY SLIMLINE WATER TANKS A Slimline water tank is a great choice for tight spaces, allowing you to maximise the water storage capacity of the area available. Tailor the length, width, and height to perfectly fit the space you have. Capacities range from 600 litres up to 8,700 litres.

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SUPERIOR STEEL ALUMINIUM AND COLORBOND STEEL FENCING AND GATES

EPLY ® : PANGUAPUREGLUE™ A PLYWOOD REVOLUTION Cleaner and greener from forest to finished product, lighter and more stable, EPly ® - PanguaPureGlue™ is a plywood revolution. It’s innovative, non-toxic soy bonding system is the key. It is the safer, smarter solution for a wide variety of applications.

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EVERGREEN MOSS PANELS

Superior Screens provide innovative and versatile COLORBOND® stainless steel and aluminium gates as well as stainless steel and aluminium fencing for privacy, sun control and security in a range of applications.

Our Evergreen Moss panels are made from a natural, slow-growing reindeer moss called Cladonia Stellaris and is hand-picked from the forests of Scandinavia. The moss is originally a neutral white colour and we dye it 3 shades of green to use as a decorative product.

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BINSAFE: OFFERS A RANGE OF BIN ENCLOSURES FOR SMALL TO LARGE SCALE PROJECTS

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

EURO JAMB FLUSH DOOR JAMB SYSTEMS BY ALTRO BUILDING SYSTEMS

BinSafe’s Bin Enclosures offer High Quality Australian-Made units to add a contemporary and discreet look to any area where a clean environment is desired.

Eurojamb provides the perfect hassle-free door jamb in a choice of Architrave, Square set or Shadowline finish. Eurojamb features a two-part wooden and aluminium construction that takes all the pain out of getting a consistently professional door detail finish.

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ESCEA OUTDOOR KITCHEN The EK Series wood fire comes equipped with everything you need to achieve a smoky meat lover’s feast - an Ember Generator, 13-point adjustable cooking plates, grills and meat hooks. Best of all, once the flame cooking is done, it all hides underneath a stainless steel draw. Leaving you with a roaring outdoor fire to relax in front of into the small hours.

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VORTEX HIGHPERFORMANCE FRAMING SYSTEM Skyscrapers are prone to make ‘groaning’ noises, which often raises concerns for residents and guests. The groundbreaking new product, Vortex, from Studco is a genuine solution with validated results.

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SPECIFY DECKER DESIGN SOLID COMPOSITE DECKING DECKER DESIGN range of solid composite decking provides a low maintenance environmental alternative to timber for building decks or patios. Our solid product is 25mm thick, thicker than other products providing integrity at 450mm joist spacing. Our boards come 140mm wide, with edge channels for hidden fixing using our “Invisi-Clip” system.

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KRONOTEX DISTRIBUTED BY AFS: PREMIUM GERMANMADE LAMINATES Beautiful, durable and affordable. Kronotex combines the ingenuity of German engineering with the beauty of timber to deliver stunning, hardwearing laminates that mirror the splendour of solid wood floors.

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PALETTONE: HIGH PERFORMANCE VINYL FLOORING

GRO-WALL® FACADE ARCHITECTURAL SCREENING The Gro-Wall® Façade system is an ideal product for creating beautiful architectural design elements for creative facade applications. The Gro-Wall® Façade has many applications that include privacy screening, as a trellis for climbing plants or for creating shaded areas.

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HI-MACS ACRYLIC SOLID SURFACES FROM GUNNERSEN Available for a range of applications including both residential and commercial, the Hi-Macs Acrylic Solid Surfaces are a non-porous, versatile decorative surface material.

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CONCRETE TACTILE PAVING EXPERTS

As with all Homogeneous PUR ranges, Palettone PUR features a high quality, cross-linked polyurethane reinforcement, UV-cured to provide a low-cost polish free maintenance regime for the lifetime of the flooring.

Strong and durable concrete Chelmstone’s concrete TGSI pavers ensure compliant solutions for all projects. Cautional and directional pavers are available in a range of colours with luminance values stated to accommodate project requirements.

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CEMINTEL ® TERRITORY™ RANGE

HEAVY COMMERCIAL VEHICLE LIFTS

Stemming from Japanese values of simplicity, nature, and quality, the Cemintel® Territory™ range is a natural cladding range created for you. The pre-finished cladding seeks to emulate material such as stone, timber, concrete, metal, tiles, and smooth render.

Lifting trucks is not child’s play. 30 tonne vehicles leave no margin for error and reliability and performance must be designed in from the beginning. Safetech know because we have built more heavy capacity vehicle lifts than any other company in Australia.

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TICKS ALL THE BOXES FOR GOOD HAND HYGIENE

Did you know ... good hand hygiene is essential to help reduce the risk of health-care staff being conduits for the spread of infections. Aquablend™ eSQX is the result of a transformation in design thinking and has been proven to remarkably minimise known risks in healthcare facilities. Aquablend™ eSQX can improve hygiene* and provide better infection control by enabling safer, easier and more effective hand washing.

;

Continuous flow to ensure correct hand washing can be completed

;

Intelligent after flow to cleanse basin bowl and waste

;

Range of spouts to match selected sink avoiding splashing and direct discharge into waste

;

Laminar flow spouts to insure no aerosols released into atmosphere

; Smooth, flush to wall finish for easy surface cleaning ;

Point of use thermostatic control with thermal flush (use kit ATM698) function to minimise waterborne bacteria and legionella

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Optional automatic 12 hour flush cycle to cleanse pipework and basin bowl

;

Capability to be linked to Enware Smart Flow™ Water Management System for data collection and monitoring

*Enware is currently involved in a Collaborative Research project with Monash Health to explore ‘how can we improve hand hygiene in hospitals through enhanced products, systems and processes that reduce bacterial transmission?’ Find out more on our website. Whitepaper “Minimising Legionella Risk in Healthcare at www.enware.com.au/white-papers

www.enware.com.au | 1300 369 273 | info@enware.com.au


ACCESS INFLUENTIAL BUYERS AT AUSTRALIA’S LEADING INDUSTRY EVENT

14–16 MAY 2019 INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE SYDNEY

From architects and designers to building contractors and developers; DesignBUILD is the platform used by the industry to learn about current trends whilst discovering products to specify in their projects.

ARCHITECTURE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DESIGN

Contact the team to be a part of DesignBUILD 2019 02 9275 9206 designbuild@divcom.net.au designbuildexpo.com.au

Profile for Indesign Media Asia Pacific

INFOLINK | BPN September_October 2018  

INFOLINK | BPN September_October 2018