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S P E C I A L

R E P O R T

TECHLEARNINGUNIVERSITY.COM

Remote Teaching and Learning Playbook for

The

Higher Ed


SPECIAL REPORT: THE REMOTE TEACHING AND LEARNING PLAYBOOK FOR HIGHER ED

CONTENTS

4 CONTINUITY PLANNING THROUGH UNCHARTED TERRITORIES AND AN UNPRECEDENTED CRISIS

Most institutions of higher education have a business continuity plan in place to help ensure there’s as little disruption as possible in the event of unforeseen crisis. The key to creating a suitable business continuity plan is flexibility.

6 SPRING TRAINING

Because the COVID-19 crisis landed near or during spring break, colleges and universities in the U.S. had a narrow window of opportunity to train instructors and students on how to use an online platform.

10 A STEP-BY-STEP MOVE TO A VIRTUAL CAMPUS

Rico D’Amore, Director of Academic Services Technology at Benedictine University, shares his process and diary of moving the university to a virtual campus.

12 THE VIDEO STREAMED CLASSROOM

When colleges and universities needed to move all courses from face-to-face classes to virtual learning environments, nearly overnight, readily available communications platforms enabled a quick transition. More robust video solutions can help take the experience to the next level.

16 ELEARNING RESOURCES

FLIPPED OVERNIGHT According to educationdata.org, there were approximately 18.2 million students in the U.S. enrolled in colleges and universities for the Fall 2019 Semester with more than one million of them being international. Now think about all 18 million students learning remotely. Timing is everything. No one would ever say that the timing of COVID-19 sweeping across the U.S. was good, but for some colleges and universities, spring break provided at least a small window to transition systems and train instructors to teach remotely. The higher education community is made up of particularly compassionate individuals willing to share during the best of times. During interviews for this Remote Teaching and Learning Playbook — the first special edition from the new higher ed resource, Tech & Learning University — many were even more eager to pass along what they are learning day-to-day as the mass transition to remote teaching and learning unfolds. The Tech & Learning University Remote Learning Playbook includes strategies, decisions, implementation methods, and lessons learned from undertaking this huge task of moving courses online in midstream — all from the perspective of the higher ed tech community. Thanks to our team of advisors who were instrumental in sharing their stories. Find their stories — and many more from higher ed institutions from around the country — on TechLearningUniversity.com. You can also sign up for our weekly newsletter covering topics here. During times like these, it’s the greater community that will help see us all through this unprecedented period. Wishing you and yours good health. Christine Weiser, Group Publisher Tech & Learning University and Tech & Learning

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Cindy Davis is a contributing editor to Future plc titles: Tech & Learning University, AV Technology and Systems Contractor News. For more than 20 years, she has developed and delivered content for the industry’s top print and online publications as well as at live events and trade shows. Davis enjoys exploring the ethos of converged technology spaces as well as diving deep into the complex topics that shape the AV/IT industry.

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Planning for the Unexpected

CONTINUITY PLANNING THROUGH UNCHARTED TERRITORIES AND AN UNPRECEDENTED CRISIS By Cindy Davis Most institutions of higher education have a business continuity plan in place to help ensure there’s as little disruption as possible in the event of natural disasters, cyberattacks, epidemic, or other unforeseen crises. While we rarely have advance notice of a disaster, the duration of the disruption can often be quickly accessed and a plan of action implemented.  The first cases of coronavirus were reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, and the first case in the U.S. was reported on January 20, 2020. The World Health Organization declared the virus now known as COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, 2020. Within days of that announcement, colleges and universities began to implement phases of continuity plans.  If there is a faint silver lining to be found in all of this, it’s the fact that many U.S. colleges and universities were about to begin, or were already, on spring break. 

FLIPPING 48,500 STUDENTS TO ONLINE The key to creating a suitable business continuity plan (BCP) is flexibility. “While we may plan for certain natural disasters, no one could have expected the impact COVID-19 would have on our universities and society in general,” says Joe Way, PhD, CTS, Director, Learning Environments at the University of Southern California (USC). Adapting to an ever-changing dynamic means having the ability to react quickly to shifting circumstances and alter plans as each new piece of information arises. And those decisions aren’t taken lightly when it comes to serving the 48,500 students and the 28,873 faculty and staff who are at USC for the 2019–2020 academic year. Way recommends being honest with yourself and your team about the overriding objectives. “It’s not easy going through your entire org structure and categorizing each individual as ‘essential’ or ‘non-essential,’” he says. Projects that were deemed high priority before the crisis, including some that teams had been working on over a year, all of a sudden need to be shelved.   Way says that a solid BCP should be updated at least monthly in nonemergency times—and daily when in action—with four core areas:  1. Every individual’s daily activities should be marked as high, medium, or low priority in terms of the continuity of the core mission of teaching and learning.

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2. Key back-up personnel for each individual’s essential activities should be identified. 3. The core skills and assets of each team member—both technical ability and character qualities—should be listed, in case those proficiencies should be required in other areas of the organization. 4. All physical assets necessary for continuing the institution’s mission should be identified, with notes as to how they could be redeployed in various disaster situations. Communication is key—it’s important to ask the team continually “what would we do if . . .” and be honest about the potential consequences. “In reality, many of the things we focus on day after day are not that important when faced with the single goal of providing a safe learning experience for the student body, whether virtually or in the physical classroom,” says Way. “That can be a tough pill to swallow for many tech managers whose regular role is boots-on-the-ground support.”

A STORM OF COMMUNICATIONS The University of Washington (UW) was one of the first universities in the U.S. to react to the threat of COVID-19, which would impact its nearly 50,000 students. When the decision to move to remote teaching and learning was made, UW was already in the last week of its winter term. “In this context, we’re prepared for snowstorms or other events that happen that we already knew how to adapt to,” says Yanko Michea, Director of Information and Learning Technologies at the College of Education at UW. “Most of the lecturing and work was already done, and instructors decided how they would close out the term.” Like many universities at that point in early March, UW thought that students would return to campus at the start of the spring term. Spring break gave Michea and other support staff at UW a brief window to play out the “what if ” plans for rest of the academic year and to figure out how best to communicate changes, as the situation developed, to faculty and students.   During the first week, Michea says, “some days there were ten emails a day being sent to the same people in response to COVID-19, and what we were going to be doing.” The various departments quickly convened to get everybody on the same page in answer to the core question: “What

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From top: Linda Jerrett, Director of Learning and Event Technology Services at Boston University; Joe Way, PhD, CTS, Director, Learning Environments at the University of Southern California; Yanko Michea, Director of Information and Learning Technologies at the College of Education at the University of Washington

is it that’s going to happen, and how are we going to support faculty and students,” he says. The teams surveyed instructors to assess various needs, such as what resources they’d need to work from home and what types of courses were being taught. “We asked if there were any major things that we needed to fix before we got to that point [of everyone working from home]?” says Michea. “There were things that we could fix and others that we didn’t have a fix for right away.” Some infrastructure issues, such as internet bandwidth for faculty and students in remote locations, are not easily fixed. “We asked if we had populations at risk and could identify them,” he says. “You need to be cognizant and sensitive to the fact that not everybody is in the same situation, and you need to create solutions that work for the everyone.” As is the case at most colleges and universities, there are faculty at UW who have never used a learning management system (LMS). “We needed to figure out if there was anyone we should be more proactive in reaching out to,” Michea says.  With an eye towards the future, he says, “you’re still thinking about developing your vaccine, but today’s task is to be able to deliver online and to provide continuity of service.”

THE TIDAL WAVE FROM 3,000 MILES AWAY Key teams at Boston University (BU), who support 35,000 students and 4,000 faculty, started planning for the possibility that COVID-19 could completely upend how classes would be taught soon after the first case in the U.S., more than 3,000 miles away in Seattle, was announced. “We started planning when we were watching it rolling through other global areas,” says Linda Jerrett, Director of Learning and Event Technology Services at BU. “Before we really knew what we were dealing with, we spent weeks in a room thinking about what this could look like and what we were handling.” Jerrett is part of BU’s Client Services and Support team, which is responsible for business relationship management with the academic and administrative groups that are supported by Information Services and Technology (IS&T). “We take everything from the client service perspective, so it was time to take a hard look at our continuity planning,” she says. A detailed and robust continuity plan needs to assess and take into account what support staff can handle under various circumstances. “We know what our thresholds are for switching from one phase to another,” Jerrett says. “If 75 percent of our staff is well, we can function ‘this way,’ but if we drop to 50 percent of our staff, then on campus we need to adjust to another level of service.” The COVID-19 response quickly escalated to the plan that is currently in place. The campus is closed to faculty and staff as well as students, and remote support is needed. 

CONTINUITY PLANNING AND THE FUTURE The COVID-19 pandemic is being likened to World War III. Ten years ago, colleges and universities could not have transitioned nearly as seamlessly from face-to-face to remote teaching and learning and maintained continuity. Nobody can accurately predict when we’ll go back to normal, or even what the new normal will look like. The one thing that’s certain is that catapulting every instructor into the 21st century of remote learning will have a dramatic impact on the future of developing curriculum for online teaching and learning.

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How to Hit a Curveball

SPRING TRAINING COVID-19 threw a curveball at the world the likes of which has never been seen. Because it landed near or during spring break, colleges and universities in the U.S. had a narrow window of opportunity to train instructors and students on how to use an online platform. By Cindy Davis

Today’s university and college undergraduate students are the first true digital natives—Generation Z. “Their elementary-age Disney Club Penguin virtual dance parties, high school FaceTime skills, e-gaming talents, and ability to seek information instantaneously through YouTube and other online media confirmed that the modern college-aged student knows how to live and thrive in a digital world,” says Joe Way, PhD, CTS, Director, Learning Environments at the University of Southern California (USC). “What we as an institution needed to do was focus those skills into our chosen delivery platform. Snapchat became Slack-chat; FaceTime became Zoom-time.” Two months prior to its COVID-19 response, USC became an enterprise Zoom customer. During the first week of the response, USC account signups skyrocketed from a few thousand to over thirty thousand. “Today, over 90 percent of the institution is connecting lectures, group study sessions, labs, and even social gatherings over the platform,” says Way. It’s no surprise that the USC digital natives took to learning the new platform significantly faster than their instructors.

DECIDEDLY NOT GEN ZERS

ADOBESTOCK, MANIPULATED

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A common thread among most colleges and universities is that many of its traditional instructors have never taught an online course and are not familiar with the campus learning management system (LMS), even at a basic level. Flipping the virtual switch from traditional to remote teaching presented more of a challenge for these non-digital natives. “The key to helping the faculty is partnering with both the solution providers and our institution’s teaching-and-learning department,” says Way. “At USC, we found that Zoom had already done the heavy lifting for us, a since they already had’quick-and-easy tutorials on account setup and best practices.” Rather than sending people searching, USC created two websites, keepteaching.usc.edu and keepworking.usc.edu, as one-stop-shops for providing the necessary resources. “In addition to pre-recorded material provided on the website, in partnership with our Center for Excellence in Teaching (CET), we hosted over 50 one-hour live virtual training sessions in order to ensure a convenient time was always available for the faculty to join,” says Way. “These were supplemented with one-on-one online or phone training sessions as requested.”

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How to Hit a Curveball USC’s ITS service desk enlisted help from other internal IT departments to provide individualized guidance on other necessary instructional tools like Blackboard and Respondus. “Even in my Learning Environments department, we recognized that the same people who work as frontline in-classroom support also possess the same customer service skills necessary to run virtual CX and end user training, and could be redeployed to supplement those needs,” says Way.

UP TO BAT Flexibility is the key. “As information came out, plans were made and then changed and then changed again,” says Robb Mann, CTS-I, Manager, Integrated Educational Technologies, ITS at the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW). All of UNCW’s classes have shells in Canvas and the majority have been migrated to online. “There was a lot of pedagogical heavy lifting going on for folks,” says Mann. Multiple live sessions on a variety of online topics, including how to use Zoom and Echo360, were streamed, recorded, and posted for instructors. “The LMS team provided extra support Robb Mann, CTS-I, University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) to assist people who had never used any kind of portal before,” says Mann.  UNCW provided webcams, headsets, and laptops to professors and students who did not have anything they could use remotely. “We also pillaged some doc cams for the math faculty to take home so they could easily replicate their normal teaching environment,” Mann says.  Separate pages were created on UNCW’s site for faculty and students with links to video demos, FAQs, and more, so they could find everything they need in one location. “It has content from our Distance Education group, Center for Teaching Excellence, Office of eLearning, IT, etc. That has helped streamline things for people so they can self-help before calling our help desk,” says Mann. The Distance Education group monitors ticket queues from 7:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m. every weekday as well as on Sunday afternoons so they can reply quickly to questions from faculty or students about the remote learning platforms they’re using.   “Fortunately, my team was able to step up to bat whenever needed, even if it was outside of their normal area of expertise,” says Mann. What advice would he give to others going through this transition? “Trust your team, and delegate,” he says.  

AH, THE LIFE OF AN AV DESIGNER “My job just got easier,” says Justin Rexing, MS, CTS-D, ISF-C, DMC-E-4K, Audiovisual Design Engineer at Western Kentucky University. Like most people, Rexing is working from home. “I’m still designing AV systems, still meeting with clients, and creating estimates for our team to review,” he says. Interestingly, this shift has created multiple efficiencies in Rexing’s workflow. “I brought multiple large displays home, my Biamp Devio Justin Rexing, MS, CTS-D, system, downloaded my softphone for ISF-C, DMC-E-4K, Western Kentucky University my office number, and I’m rocking,” he says. “The only thing I’m not doing regularly right now is commissioning and full punch out of systems on site.” He hopes that this will change once a safe protocol is established.  At the University of Missouri–Kansas City, as at most other schools, there has been a large-scale cooperative response from Information Services groups to move almost the entire university to remote and online. “There are a lot of services that we provide that are usually taken for granted,” Jamie Rinehart, University of Missouri–Kansas City says UMKC’s A/V Designer, Classroom Technology Services, Jamie Rinehart. “These are things like activating softphone clients to get instructors their regular office phone numbers, checking out USB cameras, headsets, microphones, laptops, etc. for those who don’t have them, and offering crash courses in remote software support.” Keeping back-end services, the network, and server systems running must still happen. Everything is being done as quickly and efficiently as possible to give the instructors the tools they need to support their students’ learning.  “Personally, my duties as an A/V designer haven’t had too much of an impact on the day-to-day activities of the remote faculty, and we’re not permitted on premises.” Currently the shift to remote is not slowing upcoming projects. “I’m already being asked, ‘Is our new system ready for online only?’ Most of the time, that answer is, ‘yes,’” says Rinehart.

Even in my Learning Environments department, we recognized that the same people who work as frontline in-classroom support also possess the same customer service skills necessary to run virtual CX and end user training, and could be redeployed to supplement those needs, —Joe Way, Director,Learning Environments at the University of Southern California

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How to Hit a Curveball A STEP-BY-STEP MOVE TO A VIRTUAL CAMPUS Rico D’Amore, Director of Academic Services Technology at Benedictine University, shares his process and diary of moving the university to a virtual campus.  Before heading into our spring break, the decision was made to move all on-campus services at Benedictine to a completely virtual campus. Benedictine has a large percentage of non-traditional students already, so they were already attending school “virtually” and their courses were designed for online learning.   

organization find answers—especially the instructors. During times of crisis it’s tough to remember even a few hours later, much less days later, things that happened or discussions that took place. 7. This last one is a personal thing for me. Every day I try to remember that instructors face all of the same stresses and problems in life outside of work that I do, and that some maybe have even more issues to deal with. Administrators, instructors, and students all have to flexible and show compassion to each other because shifting the mode of classroom instruction can be difficult for all, especially in this short period.

STEPS TAKEN TO HELP INSTRUCTORS TEACH REMOTELY

Following are some random thoughts from my notes and experiences over these last two stressful weeks: Rico D’Amore, Benedictine University 1. Identified what tools needed to be updated or added to the LMS—in our case, D2L (Design to Learn)—to help teachers to be successful. It was decided we needed to add Examity (online test proctoring ORGANIZATIONAL EFFORTS TO HELP service), upgrade the version of the Virtual Classroom for D2L, and have INSTRUCTORS TEACH REMOTELY Webex ready as soon as possible for all instructors.  1. Identify the problem and set the goal. What is the instructor’s current   level of skill with presenting emotely? Can we identify users who need the 2. Updated screencast tutorials and created step-by-step instructions and most help? Where can I get information? other support documents so they were accessible to instructors.   2. Define the people within the organization and the roles they will play to 3. Monitored help-desk tickets closely and developed new support help solve the problem. As mentioned above, the Chief Operations Officer documents for other users who may have similar problems. at Benedictine created a Technology Task Force that includes representatives   from the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence, Academic Services 4. Something we didn’t plan on—instructors at our university also started Technology, and Information Technology departments. creating support documents and shared them with colleagues.   3. The Technology Task Force then created a Virtual Campus Training 5. I created a Virtual Campus Training survey, which the newly created survey that was distributed to all university instructors to identify what the Technology Task Force distributed. The task force was created by the products or online topics were where they needed training. Chief Operations Officer and includes representatives from the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence, Academic Services Technology, and 4. Different departments identified people who will provide virtual Information Technology departments. individual, small group, and email support to instructors in need. 6. Over the past two weeks, I’ve been keeping a journal of my daily activities in which I’m also tracking my help-desk tickets by topic. The time spent doing this is worthwhile, since it helps everyone in the

COACHING FROM THE SIDELINES The University of Washington uses Canvas for its LMS, Panopto for asynchronous recording of lectures, and Zoom for “face-to-face” remote teaching and learning.  Zoom, or any other video communications platform, might be easy with a small group—but asking an instructor to manage a class of 100 students is altogether different. It’s a challenge to teach a class while also paying attention to a set of questions, reading comments in the chat box, and noticing raised hands on such a platform. Adding more in-depth features, such as the breakout rooms that Zoom offers, makes it even more complicated for one instructor to handle. “We’re looking to set up a service

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5. From the onset, the university administration communicated directly with all instructors, maintained a positive open line of communications, and set reasonable expectations.

for faculty where we would provide moderators,” says Yanko Michea, Director of Information and Learning Technologies at the College of Education at UW. The university will look to train existing and support staff. “These are going to be the people manning these operations in terms of new or enhanced services that we are going to be offering.”  

PINCH HITTING

The higher education community is like no other in terms of its willingness to share trials and successes to help create a better teaching and learning experience for the greater good. Check out the Resources section for links to a broad range of helpful tools and case studies.

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Video Tips for Remote Teaching

THE VIDEO STREAMED CLASSROOM When colleges and universities needed to move all courses from face-to-face classes to virtual learning environments, nearly overnight, readily available communications platforms enabled a quick transition. More robust video solutions can help take the experience to the next level. COURTESY MEDIASITE While all video platforms for education are designed to enhance and support the educational process, a platform that also supports livestreaming will greatly enhance the connection between learners and instructors. Video platforms such as Echo360, Kaltura, Mediasite, Panopto, and YuJa all offer livestreaming. Even if you’re just setting out but know that you eventually want to livestream lectures, it’s important to take the time to investigate the robust solutions specifically designed for higher education that can integrate with your learning management system (LMS). These video platforms are designed to enable comprehensive video workflows including lecture capture, video management, livestreaming, flipped classrooms, blended learning with video, video analytics, and much more. “We recommended that faculty host their class times synchronously,” says Ernie Perez, Director of Educational Technology, Digital Learning, and Innovation at Boston University. They asked that instructors not change the day or time from the original course schedule. “If the class was Monday, they hold it at the same time, synchronously, via Zoom,” says Perez. They also recommend recording the class. “After they record, they post into Blackboard in Kaltura, which we call My Media,” he says. This maintains rights management, so only the students in that class have access to the recordings, and no one has access to download the materials. “We can also do accessibility [captioning] through Kaltura,” Perez says. “We can do machine capturing for all the videos, and for accommodation requests we can do ‘person captioning,’ which has 99 percent accuracy.”   

BEWARE ZOOMBOMBING

As if the many ramifications of COVID-19 weren’t bad enough, internet trolls have been invading unsecured online Zoom classes and streaming

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violent and pornographic videos using Zoom’s screensharing feature. “When you move fast, you’ll skip essential steps and not think everything out,” says Joe Way, PhD, CTS, Director, Learning Environments at the University of Southern California. “Due to a Zoombombing incident, we had to institute a university-wide ‘waiting room’ policy, auto-muting of participants and auto-recording of sessions, and we turned off the ability to screenshare without permission from the host.”

HOW TO AVOID BEING ZOOM-BOMBED • Don’t post links on social media to a Zoom class, because anyone with a link can join. • Require passwords to join a meeting.  • Institute a waiting room for anyone not using a university log-in.  • Use the lock meeting feature to prevent new participants from joining. • The instructor should control who can share screen. • Disable file transfer, annotation, and private chat for participants.  Check out these resources from Zoom and USC for more detailed recommendations on how to prevent Zoombombing.

VIDEO CONTINUITY TIPS AND A WORKSHEET Among others, Echo360 and Mediasite, two well-established companies that serve higher education online video needs, are helping institutions make the overnight transition from face-to-face instruction to remote teaching and learning. Following are their top tips for facilitating this transition.

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Video Tips for Remote Teaching TIPS FROM ECHO360

TIPS FROM MEDIASITE

Echo360 supports several online learning methods, including remote video learning with active engagement and video embedded into the LMS/VLE for online courses.

Mediasite video capture, management, and streaming solutions support online and remote teaching and learning. Below are excerpts from a worksheet created by Mediasite for video continuity planning.

1. Re-use recordings from previous courses. Many instructors teach similar courses across multiple academic terms and have saved recordings from previous courses. Since these videos are likely still available in your LMS library, all you need to do is publish them to your current course and you and your students can engage in active discussion linked to each video.

1. Take Inventory: What video do you already have?

2. Create discrete video learning objects. While repurposing previous class videos can get you started, the best practice for remote delivery is to break instruction down into shorter videos that cover a single topic or related set of topics.

2. Prioritize: Find a video initiative that gives you the biggest bang and gain for your video buck. 3. What video will be most valuable? Who needs to capture knowledge or create video? How frequently? What’s the most effective and engaging way to share the content? From where will video content originate? 4. Video streaming and management: From what screens or devices will users watch video?

3. Livestream your classes. When classes are livestreamed, students can participate fully during classes and even ask questions and answer polls. In the event of a full campus closure, keep in mind that livestreaming alone might not be your best option as students return home to many different time zones and may not all have stable internet access. In such cases, providing both livestreaming and on-demand playback options may be more beneficial for your students.

5. Infrastructure: What resources do you have?

4. Use engagement analytics to identify struggling students. An engagement score is a key indicator of student success, and monitoring engagement for remote learners is critical. Instructor dashboards will identify students who are most at risk, and you can sort your entire student list by least-engaged to most-engaged on the student tab for a more holistic view.

8. For administrators: A complete platform for capture and video management will be most useful for administrators.

6. For content creators: It’s important to be able to create content anywhere, on any device. 7. For viewers: Viewers need to be able to watch content anywhere, on any device.

Download Mediasite’s complete Top Things to Consider When Developing a Campus Continuity Plan

Check out the full Echo360 Guide to Academic Continuity During Campus Disruptions.

DIY STREAMING DOC CAM Yanko Michea, Director of Information and Learning Technologies at the College of Education at the University of Washington, is being resourceful when it comes to helping instructors who are used to teaching with traditional methods to be successful teaching remotely. “I’ve been preparing some tutorials for people on how to set up an external webcam as a document camera,” says Michea. “All you need is a webcam that has a threaded tripod mount on the bottom and a cheap gooseneck with a clamp on the end (see photo).”

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Remote Teaching and Learning Resources AVIXA

MICROSOFT

As COVID-19 continues to impact our daily lives, much of our AV community is looking at extended home office time. As part of AVIXA’s commitment to the industry, they are opening online training to all AV professionals, regardless of membership level through June 12.

Microsoft Teams’ “freemium” version offers unlimited chat, built-in group and one-on-one audio or video calling, 10 GB of team file storage, and 2 GB of personal file storage per user. Teams also includes real-time collaboration with the Office apps for the web, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote.

CISCO Webex is offering users unlimited usage on their collaboration platform.

CONSORTIUM OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY MEDIA CENTERS (CCUMC) The CCUMC provides leadership and a forum for information exchange to the providers of media content, academic technology, and support for quality teaching and learning at institutions of higher education.

EDUCAUSE CORPORATE RESOURCES FOR HIGHER ED GOING ONLINE DURING COVID-19 Compiled by EDUCAUSE, this is an extensive list of corporations and service providers who are offering special discounts on technology, open educational resources, or support for higher education institutions transitioning to remote work and online learning during the COVID-19 outbreak.

EDUCAUSE COVID-19 RESOURCE PAGE This resource page was created to help higher education institutions plan for possible campus disruption by COVID-19. Examples of Teaching and Learning in Response to COVID-19 from Colleges and Universities •  Appalachian State University • B oston University • Johns Hopkins University •  Harvard University • Stanford University • University of Central Florida • University of Southern California

ZOOM Zoom has various offerings and resources for educators in response to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic. Zoom Partnerships Offering Deals • Poly is offering 20 percent off its headset and speakerphone products. Visit the Poly website and apply the promo code Zoom20 when placing your order. • Logitech is offering complimentary headsets and webcams to teachers in the U.S who are in need of help with distance teaching. Logitech has also provided great tips and resources to help remote workers drive productivity and stay in touch with their teams. • Neat is offering free worldwide shipping on its all-in-one Neat Bar. Visit neat.no for details. • AVer is reducing prices for its USB camera product line by 10 percent. Get more details from AVer. • DTEN is offering its Stay Connected program to customers. The program provides a free 30-day trial of DTEN’s all-in-one video conferencing system, which helps educational institutions, healthcare organizations, and businesses connect and collaborate no matter where they are.

ZOOMBOMBING •  How to Prevent a Zoombombing •  USC’s Resources on Zoombombing

For a more extensive list visit EDUCAUSE Working Remotely

GALE, A CENGAGE COMPANY Gale, a Cengage Company, partners with librarians and educators to create positive change and outcomes for researchers and learners. In response to COVID-19, we are offering open access to digital resources, training support, and reference materials. We created a resource center to help our educator and librarian partners, as well as our communities, find reliable information and materials to go virtual, optimize existing resources, enhance instruction, provide accurate health information, and more.

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| SP E C IA L R E P OR T : THE J UST I N TI ME PLAYBO O K FO R REMO T E LEA RN I N G

| TECHLEARNINGUNIVERSITY.COM


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Profile for Future PLC

Tech & Learning.com - Higher Education Remote Learning 2020  

Tech & Learning.com - Higher Education Remote Learning 2020

Tech & Learning.com - Higher Education Remote Learning 2020  

Tech & Learning.com - Higher Education Remote Learning 2020

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