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SCH Raise Concerns Over Bill 18 “...we just don’t feel like we should be forced to have any activity that is against our faith based principals.”

Over 1,200 people attended a special meeting at the Steinbach Christian High School where the topic of discussion was the province’s newly proposed Bill 18.

By Marianne Curtis Over 1,200 people attended a special meeting at the Steinbach Christian High School where students, community leaders and the public discussed the province’s proposed anti-bullying legislation, otherwise known as Bill 18. On February 24, Steinbach Christian High School hosted the meeting to raise concern and inform the public on the details of the province’s proposed Bill 18, believing that it will cause more problems than solutions. Bill 18 is formally known as the Public Schools Amendment Act (Safe and Inclusive Schools). The bill amends The Public Schools Act in the areas of bullying and respect for human diversity. While the premise of the Bill is to promote inclusion, one portion is upsetting many people within the community of Steinbach.

“The policy must accommodate student activity that promotes the school environment as being inclusive of all pupils, including student activities and organizations that use the name “gay-straight alliance”, reads the Bill. Steinbach Christian High School’s Scott Wiebe said the province needs to revisit that stance to accommodate faithbased schools. “We support the intent of this legislation but think it’s poorly written,” explained Wiebe. “It’s not about one particular group or activity; we just don’t feel like we should be forced to have any activity that is against our faith based principals.” Steinbach MLA Kelvin Goertzen is supportive of his constituents’ concerns.

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Town of Ste. Anne Tax Bylaw Goes to Municipal Board By Marianne Curtis A special service bylaw proposed by the Town of Ste. Anne went before the municipal board in the middle of February. The municipal board hearing was held to address the proposed special service bylaw that if approved could see properties normally exempt from paying services to pay their fair share. According to council, proposed By-law 17-2012 would see properties such as community schools, churches and the Ste. Anne hospital start paying for services provided by the town. These services include police and fire, road repairs, snow removal and drainage. “The exempt properties do not pay taxes under the general municipal at large mill rate,” explained Town of Ste. Anne administrator Nicole Champagne. “The costs exist regardless; more properties will therefore help pay for these services.” By establishing a special service bylaw, the Town of Ste. Anne will be able to share service costs with all properties, including the exempt ones and the only way to do this is by a Special Services By-Law. Town of Ste. Anne mayor, Bernie Vermette, says that the bylaw would take about 4.5 mils from general taxes and put them into a special levy to pay for special services. “This would allow us to reduce general taxes, which are where payment for special services currently comes from,” Vermette explained. “If we can increase the mil rate to 10 mils for everyone then we won’t be taking money we need for special services from the municipal budget and the budget would drop.” Currently exempt properties pay 6 mils towards a portion of these services while all the rest of the properties pay 6 mils plus the remaining balance for services through the general municipal at large rate. The municipal board hearing was called after a number of objections were submitted to the province in opposition of the bylaw. The majority of concerns were that the bylaw did not guarantee that the Town of Ste. Anne would reduce the general mil rate by the amount of the special levy. “Our concern is that this bylaw, as it reads, is really another tax increase for all business and residents and all public institutions,” stated Ben Fry, a Town of Ste. Anne resident who spoke at the hearing. “There are no guarantees written into it.” Now that a municipal board hearing has taken place, the board will consider all sides before making a decision. It is undetermined how long it will take before a decision is made.


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March 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

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February 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Moms Welcomed Home in La Broquerie

Habitat for Humanity Southeast Chairperson Sherri Bueckert hands Veronica Banos and Maria Unrau the keys to their new homes in La Broquerie.

By Marianne Curtis

make this dream come true in owing a home that is decent, affordable and safe for their Family and friends surrounded two single mothers from Steinbach children.” “This is a big day for me when they took ownership of their because it’s a new life and a new new Habitat homes in La house,” stated Banos. The single Broquerie. On March 1 over 40 people came mother of three and her family will be leaving behind a cramped twoout to La Broquerie to celebrate bedroom apartment in Steinbach. with Veronica Banos and Maria “We are very grateful.” Unrau. Both single mothers Unrau’s story is very similar. The officially took possession of a new single mother was living in a home thanks to the efforts of mould-infested house in Habitat for Humanity Southeast. Steinbach before she became a Sheri Bueckert, Chair of the part of this project. “We are very Family Selection Committee for excited because our doctor thinks Habitat for Humanity Southeast, my kids are going to be healthier was thrilled to turn over the keys after we move out,” she added. to both families. The Habitat for Humanity “Both families were emotional project consisted of the and overwhelmed by the support of the community throughout their construction of a duplex in La Broquerie. The project was funded personal journeys with HFH through Manitoba Lotteries, Southeast and the ongoing Manitoba Housing and the Royal compassion that continues with Bank of Canada in Steinbach friends/families and community businesses,” Bueckert said. “It was along with several other a great celebration as both families individuals and businesses. have also worked very hard to

Storm Watchers Wanted for Team The City of Steinbach is already looking towards summer by putting out a call for volunteers interested in participating in the community’s storm watcher program. The city council decided four years ago that they would look for people interested in becoming the eyes and ears of potential emergency storm situations. A call for volunteers was made and sixteen residents located within the 10-kilometre radius of Steinbach stepped forward. City of Steinbach’s Emergency Planning Coordinator, Denis Vassart, is appreciative of the number of volunteers who have stepped forward to offer their time as storm watchers over the past few years. This will be the fifth year that the program has been in operation. “Firstly, all of the volunteers need to receive a big ‘thank-you’ for their willingness to get involved in this important community project,” said Vassart. “It would never work without them.” In preparation for summer, the Storm Ready Team is looking for four volunteers who will act as weather spotters during times of severe weather, such as a tornado. Spotters must be residents of Steinbach or surrounding area. Volunteers will be provided training by Environment Canada as well as guidelines on how to report a sighting. When they are needed, they will be notified and asked to watch the sky for signs of severe weather developing. They then contact the Emergency Operations Team and Environment Canada to report it. They also play a significant role should a tornado touch down by conducting a preliminary evaluation and report it so that a plan of action can be made and the public informed. Anyone interested in volunteering can call the City of Steinbach’s Emergency Planning Coordinator, Denis Vassart at 392-5996 or by e-mail at dvassart@steinbach.ca.

Habitat for Humanity to Build in Richer By Marianne Curtis Two deserving families will see themselves in new homes now that the Southeast Chapter of Habitat for Humanity has purchased land in Richer for their next project. On February 27, an information meeting took place at the Young at Hearts Club for people interested in an upcoming building project. The Southeast Chapter of Habitat for Humanity recently purchased Lots 10 and 11 on Godard Street in Richer with the intent to start construction on two new homes in June. Sheri Bueckert, Chair of the Family Selection Committee for Habitat for Humanity Southeast, said that four families came out to the meeting and filled out applications for a new home. “There were four interested families that attended and following the sessions all families took applications; that is the first step in the selection process,” Bueckert stated. “For a small community we felt the response was very positive from the interactions we encountered.” She added that there were a number of community individuals and other families that attended to show support for the applicants and to find out more about the program.

At this point, Habitat for Humanity Southeast is waiting for a response from the RM of Ste. Anne on whether the project will be a duplex or two separate houses. “We are hoping to have two families that qualify. So either it will be a duplex on one lot or one single dwelling home on each lot. However, if there only ends up being one family that qualifies then it will obviously be a single home on one lot,” Bueckert explained. To become a Habitat for Humanity home owner, the family has to demonstrate a need, have an ability to pay based on income and be willing to work alongside Habitat on the project. For example, single families need to put in 350 hours of sweat equity while a couple would have to put in 500 hours. To ensure these projects proceed, Habitat for Humanity relies on donations and public support. A fundraising dinner and dance is taking place in Niverville on April 5. Habitat for Humanity Manitoba (SE Chapter) offers families living in difficult situations the opportunity to break the cycle of poverty. Habitat homes are sold at market value with selected families offered a hand up through no down payment and interest-free mortgages.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Faith-based Freedom Questioned continued... Continued from page 1 “People are concerned that this bill will remove the discretion of faith based independent schools and public schools to assure that their faith based values and community based values are still respected,” stated Goertzen. “There are different kinds of student groups that could have faith perspectives that are different than the individual school; independent schools have the right to ensure that they can determine the kinds of activities forming in their schools.” “All children deserve to feel safe in school. Unfortunately, Bill 18, because it is poorly drafted and designed, will not reduce bullying,” Goertzen continued. “Many have raised the concern that it infringes upon the constitutionally protected right of freedom of religion by removing discretion on school activities for faith based independent schools and that it does not allow for local input for public schools.” The Hanover School Division superintendent, Randy Hildebrand, says that his division will not get involved in a theological debate on what is going on in the community and this was just one side of the issue. “A lot of people are talking about the Gay-Straight Alliance issue; that is one particular group in our schools. They are not the only one and we will be consistent in giving equality to all groups, no matter if they are a minority in all our schools,” stated Hildebrand. “We will continue to provide a safe environment for all students; all students need to know that they are safe in Hanover schools.” He added that Hanover School Division has met with the Minister of Education and received assurances that should a public meeting be held in the community where all sides can speak, she will be in attendance. Meanwhile, the RM of Hanover has taken a rare public position on the matter by approving a resolution that supports the concerns of the Steinbach Christian High School. “It is not common (to oppose a provincial bill) but we got many calls from ratepayers and I think they have to be heard,” stated Reeve Stan Toews. In the resolution, the municipality requests that the province address the concerns raised about Bill 18 by amending it to ensure that it effectively deals with bullying while “safeguarding the freedom of conscience and religion for students and staff in all schools.” Bill 18 would apply to both public and funded independent schools, like Steinbach Christian High School. Funded independent schools receive 50 percent of their funding from the government, the rest through tuition and donations. There are 14,000 students in Manitoba that attend funded independent schools, most of which are faithbased.

More Than Just News!

March 2013

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Local Authors Lend Support to Book Sale Book lovers planning to attend this year’s Bethesda Hospital Health Care Auxiliary book sale are in for a special treat this year. Not only will readers have an opportunity to purchase used books and support a worthy fundraiser but they will also have an opportunity to meet a couple of local authors. Bethesda Health Care Auxiliary president, Phyllis Toews, is excited about this year’s addition, which will see three different local authors selling and signing their books alongside the annual used book sale. “We are always looking for new ways to fundraise or improve our event and this is a great complement,” stated Toews. “For the first time this year we are inviting a couple of local authors to participate in the sale; customers can pick from thousands of used books and meet some of our local talent.” This will be the first time the Auxiliary has allowed anyone to sell books alongside their sale but Toews is not worried about setting a precedent. “We’ve had book vendors ask to set up but we’ve always said no because they are businesses and we are non-profit,” Toews continued. “In this case the authors are sharing a portion of their sales with our organization while giving them exposure and access to readers.” Three authors from throughout the area will be available in the afternoons including Marianne Curtis, author of Finding Gloria, who will be launching a special version of her bestselling memoir on March 21 at the event. “Over the past 25 years, I’ve probably made over 100 visits to Bethesda Hospital as a patient or with my children; I even worked there briefly as a health care aide and a medic,” explained Curtis. “I no longer work in the medical field, and writing a big check to support something like this is not always possible; this is my way of giving back and saying thank you for a job well done.” All three authors will be selling their books onsite with a portion of their sales going in support of the Bethesda Health Care Auxiliary’s current fundraiser. The names of the other 2 local authors who will be appearing on March 20 and 23 will be announced in the weeks before the event. The Bethesda Health Care Auxiliary annual book sale will take place at the Clearspring Centre from March 20 to 23. Funds raised at the event are slated for the purchase of suction machines that will be installed in each room in the Bethesda Hospital Rehabilitation Ward. Donations for the sale are still being accepted and can be dropped off at the Clearspring Centre on Tuesdays between 9:30 am to 4:30 pm. There is also a drop-off location outside of Sobey’s.


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More Than Just News!

On the Question of Municipal Amalgamation The Provincial Government has laid down a challenge to municipalities, amalgamation where necessary or else. There will be fallout on this until the cows come home. In some minds, it probably would have been preferable if a honeyed approach had been the order of the day. Grown up attitudes in municipal circles are in a perennially acute short supply. Municipalities are the “invention”, so to speak, of our Provincial Government, so take the bull by the horns (or in some cases a donkey would be a more accurate description) and pin the tail already. According to Provincial law, a minimum of 1,000 population is required to form a municipal entity. Of 196 Municipalities 92 do not meet this threshold. Of these, many spend 20 percent of their budget on administration costs. Many have difficulty applying for Provincial and Federal Programs. Therefore, $14 million of Federal dollars are in limbo for lack of proper requests. Where I would differ from the Manitoba government is on lowering administrative costs that could be a goal of all municipalities. The question is how do you sooth egos? Honey works, but hard nose decisive leadership is quicker and satisfies more people. Over the last 20 years, there have been many improvements in municipal cooperation such as fire fighting services, water management and conservation areas, plus a few development corporations. Much more could be done but progress is painfully slow. The major impediment to cooperation is the oversized ego of councilors, reeves and mayors. For instance, I’ve heard cultural integrity in a ward is a good thing, but out of the same mouths, I’ve heard immigration is a good thing. Another invalid point of view: too many voters in a ward and any individual voter lose his or her influence. Nonsense! Put the same 1,000 population people in one, two or three wards and the opposition always loses some influence. It is called the spice of democracy. There is less chance of a 1,000 people being negatively impacted by nepotism if the voter count is substantially greater than family size in any given area. That is not as rare as you may think. In a past life, I have been a member of council and there were times when a lack of critical thinking, petty and irrelevant differences and bullying tendencies of groups on council were of the stuff history should not be made of. But, alas, it was. True, I did learn a lot and was subjected to numerous experiences, not all positive by a long shot. Self-serving decisions were considerably more frequent than manners and common sense, or common good. Democracy is, unfortunately, not only derived from a positive attitude but also from a negative attitude, which is, more frequent at the municipal level because of, among other things, very little appreciation and media interest. Greater numbers could obviously lower the costs associated with any endeavor taken on by municipal governments. We could also do with smaller councils and greater administrative cooperation with neighbouring municipalities. Jurisdictions sharing industrial areas, personal care homes along with tax sharing arrangements could be a start, but not an end. Then again, I think Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Northwest Ontario should be one province. How many administrative dollars could be saved? Just kidding. We wouldn’t get past giving this new area a name. Then again, Assiniboia is not taken, is it?

Serving the communities along the historic Dawson Trail and beyond.

The Dawson Trail Dispatch is a monthly newspaper distributed free of charge to 50 Southeastern Manitoba communities. Published by: One One Consultants Inc. Box 308, Richer, MB R0E 1S0 Phone: (204) 422-8548 Fax: (204) 422-9768 Dan Guetre, Managing Editor One One Consultants Inc., Publisher News Writers: Marianne Curtis and Dan Guetre Columnists: Lee Guetre, Peter Friesen, Anni Markmann, Peter Martens, Raylene Snow, Eileen Lewis, Travis Olifirowich Production/Design: Dan Guetre, Myriam Dyck, Monica Guetre and Wilma Priebe Advertising: Karen Jorgenson and Dan Guetre

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Thankful Families Continue their Search for Missing Family Pets and Answers Dear Editor: Thank you Marianne. I have read the feature “Dogs Disappearing” and am very pleased with it. The article is very informative and in no way fear mongering. We can only hope that this awareness is brought out to all who read the paper and maybe we can catch these criminals. And hopefully reunite our lost pets to the grieving families. Awesome job Marianne. Thanks again, Leah Stuttkowski, on behalf of my Keesha who, as well, thanks you.

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Say No to the Vote-tax Just when you thought, it was safe to go back into your wallet it is votetax 2, the sequel. Like most sequels, this one is worse than the original. Unhappy with the first cut the NDP hired a new director to ensure this horror film is edited to look just the way they wanted it to. In vote-tax, the original, the NDP wanted to give itself and all other parties a subsidy for every vote received in a general election. If the director’s cues are taken, the new vote-tax will cost Manitobans $600,000 every year. Based on current standing, the NDP share of that would be over $1 million between elections. On principle, the PC party will not be taking the vote-tax. Political parties in Manitoba already have a portion of election expenses covered by the public, just like it is done everywhere else in Canada. Enough is enough. The NDP is a tired government that no longer has the gumption to go out and raise its own money. In a province that places great emphasis on volunteer fundraising this is sending the wrong message. There are community groups out there selling chocolate bars and itching friends and neighbours on the virtues of their organizations in order to raise money. Why does the NDP think this is below its party? Why does the NDP think it’s better than these groups? The vote-tax is wrong and the NDP knows it. That is why it did not take the money the last time and we call on the NDP to find its moral compass again. It is time to stop this anti-democratic practice and kill the vote-tax. I welcome all comments and concerns you may have. If you would like to contact me, please feel free to call my office by phone at 204-424-5606, by fax at 204-424-5458 or by writing to Box 889 La Broquerie Manitoba ROA 2WO. You can also email me at dennis.smook@leg.gov.mb.ca.

in the Dugald and Oakbank area for Keesha. I am not doing any tracking in the southeast area right now as this is now in the hands of the RCMP. If someone is taking these dogs, we do not know what they are capable of and I do not want to put my dog or myself in any danger. I don’t want to see anyone taking the law into their own hands. Do not approach any strange vehicles, just get plate numbers and if possible a picture and contact the RCMP. I am a dog lover and I want to see all these lost dogs reunited with their owners. Thanks again for the great story on these missing dogs, keep up the great work. Thanks, Rene Belliveau Area Coordinator, Winnipeg Lost Dog Alert Dear Editor: Words cannot express our deep-felt appreciation for all of your efforts please, continue to help those who cannot speak or help themselves! Lynn Slater

Dear Editor: Thanks for all your hard work and dedication in putting this article together Marianne. Hopefully all this awareness will get people talking even more and hopefully shed some light on all these disappearances. For all the owners and Dear Editor: the rest of us dog lovers, thank you so I just read your story on the missing much for doing right by the dogs. dogs and would like to thank you for Diana Pacak keeping the exposure of them out there. Southeast Lost Dogs I am an Area Coordinator with Winnipeg Lost Dog Alert and also the Dear Editor: handler of the WLDA tracking dog. I I would like to thank you on behalf of have been up in the Ste. Anne area all dog owners and all dogs. I have just several times tracking Bobby, the read the articles in your February edition. missing Boxer and have even tracked As I sit on my couch with your paper in

my hand, I had to let you know how much this means to all the dog owners. Tomorrow I will take a copy and show some rescues in Winnipeg, who may not see it otherwise. Also, as founder of Niverville Dog Adoption Fair, thank you for your support. Dawson Trail Dispatch and their staff are an example of community spirit and the ability to care about all in their community. Barry Piasta, Niverville, MB Dear Editor: I am writing to THANK YOU for putting the article in your February 2013 paper about the missing dogs. Everyone in the area needs to be aware of the sick, sick people who are taking them. Marianne, your article made me cry just thinking of all those families that have lost their dogs, some people with two dogs in the same household. That is just heart breaking. I’ve been hearing about this for some time and am scared to death that someone will take my yellow lab. I would die if she went missing. I hope they catch the sick, demented, twisted people who are stealing and doing who knows what to these poor innocent animals. I am SO HAPPY you wrote this article to make people aware. Awareness is key! I hope this is stopped and doesn’t continue to happen. It breaks my heart. I hope all these dogs are found alive and well and that the people that took them are locked up in a mental institute. THANK YOU so much to the Dispatch for printing this article! Well done Marianne Curtis! Sincerely, Melissa L


Dawson Trail Dispatch

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Supporting Hard-Working Canadians With tax season just around the corner, let me remind you about some of our Conservative Government’s tax benefits and credits you may want to consider when filing your 2012 taxes. Our efforts have helped a typical family save on average $3,100 per year. In 2009, we introduced the Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) to help you achieve your financial goals. A TFSA is a flexible, registered savings account, available to all Canadians 18 years of age or older. Investment income, including capital gains, earned within the account is not taxed, and withdrawals are tax-free. Starting this year, you can contribute up to $5,500 each year in a TFSA. One thing to remember is that any unused space under the annual cap can be carried forward to subsequent years, without any upward limit. Another benefit our Government introduced is the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) for families with young children. Since 2006, families have been receiving $100 per month for each child under six. Families are able to choose how to invest this benefit depending on their needs. I’ve heard from families who have invested the UCCB into registered education savings plans, while others have told me they are happy to have the support to supplement their childcare expenses. To help parents with the cost of giving their children access to team sports and other healthy lifestyle activities, our Conservative Government introduced the Child Fitness Tax Credit. Parents can claim a tax credit of up to $500 per child under 16, for fees in sports programs such as ballet, hockey, and soccer. The Children’s Arts Tax Credit also provides up to $500 against fees for children’s artistic and cultural activities, such as art or music lessons. Some of you are not only caring for children, but also aging family members. If at any time during 2012 you maintained a residence where you and the person you care for lived, you may be able to claim a maximum Caregiver Amount of $4,402. New this year is our Conservative Government’s Family Caregiver Tax Credit, which allows caregivers to benefit by claiming an enhanced amount under other eligible credits, such as the Child Tax Credit or the Caregiver Amount. It is a 15 percent credit on $2,000. I encourage you to take advantage of all of the tax benefits available to you for the 2012 tax year. If you would like a copy of our Tax Guide for Tax Savings for You and Your Family, please contact my office at 1-866-333-1933 or by email at toews.v@parl.gc.ca.

No Blank Cheques Re: Open Letter to Our MP Honourable Vic Toews: Please Have a Conversation with Your Colleagues in Ottawa on Haiti Dear Mr. Rocque, I would first like to thank you for your interest in the subject of reconstruction of Haiti. As you are aware, our government has been absolutely clear; we are deeply concerned with the plight of the Haitian people. Since 2006, the Government of Canada has provided over $1-billion in assistance in Haiti. After the devastating earthquake of January 2010 that killed hundreds of thousands, including two RCMP officers, and displaced many more; our government moved quickly to provide immediate disaster relief in Haiti and long-term rebuilding efforts. More recently, our government responded quickly and decisively with humanitarian assistance when Hurricane Sandy struck Haiti. But, we should not take gratification in the simple transaction of international aid. Due to the generosity of Canadian taxpayers, more than 1.9 million children and youth received vaccinations against polio, measles and rubella. In addition, more than three million Haitian women, newborns and children have access to free health services in 63 health institutions nationwide through Canada’s assistance. These are only two examples of the tangible results that Canadians can take pride in. While the results of specific projects have largely met expectations, progress toward a self-sustaining Haitian society has been limited. Our government has a responsibility to maximize the value of Canadian taxpayer dollars. That is why Canada is reviewing its long-term engagement strategy with Haiti, as we do with all of our programs. We continue to make progress on areas of long-term development that we have previously committed to, and we stand ready to offer our support for the people of Haiti should future humanitarian crises arise. However, we remain concerned with the slow progress of development in Haiti, in large part due to weaknesses in their governing institutions. We want to improve the results achieved and better address the needs and priorities of the Haitian people. Doing so requires greater leadership, accountability and transparency from the Government of Haiti so that they can take a greater role in the development of their country. Our government’s international development goal is to help countries, their governments, and their people help themselves. Canada’s assistance will not be a blank cheque. We expect accountability, we expect transparency, and we expect tangible results for those most in need. Mr. Rocque I trust that this information has been helpful and I thank you again for sharing your thoughts regarding Haiti’s reconstruction. Sincerely, Vic Toews MP for Provencher

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NDP Losing Money on “Oil” Late last month, on the same day, two things happened that could not have been more at odds with each other. The first was a statement by NDP Premier, Greg Selinger. Before jetting off to Washington for meetings, Mr. Selinger stated that Hydro is Manitoba’s oil. A nice thing to hope for to be sure but then, only a few hours later, Manitoba Hydro itself came out with its own statement saying that it had lost $38 million over the past nine months. If Hydro really is Manitoba’s oil as Greg Selinger says, then it would seem that only the NDP government can lose money on oil. As if the losses were not bad enough, within the same week as Mr. Selinger’s statement Manitoba Hydro was back before the Public Utilities Board (PUB) asking for another increase in Manitoba Hydro rates for Manitobans. Already the utility has raised rates to Manitobans by 4.5 percent in the past year and now they are asking for an additional 3.5 percent increase. That would make for an 8 percent increase in just one year. And if Hydro is Manitoba’s oil then why is it losing millions of dollars and why are Manitobans being hit with significant increases to their hydro rates? There are a few reasons. The first is that for many years now the NDP have been raiding Manitoba Hydro of money. Every time the NDP needed more money to make up for its overspending (and that is quite often) it simply took it from Hydro. Another reason is that the NDP have been dictating to Manitoba Hydro how to do business for many years. That has resulted in decisions not done on a business case but because of political interference. The decision to run a new Bi-Pole transmission line along the longest and most expensive route imaginable is just one decision the NDP forced on Hydro that will cost it hundreds of millions of dollars. Yet another concern is that Manitoba is selling its hydro at a lower cost to our American customers than Manitobans pay for their own electricity. In fact, the export market for hydro accounts for the majority of the money Hydro is losing because prices have been down for a long time as a result of both the U.S. economy and the availability of cheap natural gas. And yet despite these economic realities, Mr. Selinger refuses to subject the construction of two new generating dams to economic scrutiny. The reality is that Manitoba Hydro is losing a lot of money and Manitobans are paying more and more to try to keep it in the black. If Manitoba Hydro is our oil, it seems only the NDP could find a way to lose money with it. I appreciate your comments and concerns. If you have any comments on these or other issues, you can contact me by writing, #3 – 227 Main Street, Steinbach, MB R5G 1Y7, by phone at (204) 326-5763, by fax at (204) 346-9913, by e-mail at kelvin.goertzen@leg.gov.mb.ca or by visiting my website at kelvingoertzen.com. I look forward to hearing from you.


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March 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch


More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Hanover School Division Proposes Tax Increase My Son, the Master Angler Recently my 7-year-old son received a copy of the Manitoba Fishing & Hunting 2013 Guide. In it are listed all the fine folk who caught a fish that met or exceeded the Master Angler length. My son received this guide because last summer he caught a Goldeye that qualified and earned him a bronze badge. Sadly, I did not catch any Masters… sigh… sad but true. Allow me to tell you about the day that he caught it. It was a nice, warm, sunny day last summer when we loaded up the van and headed off to the Red River. Getting there was only half the fun, the other half was the hauling of all of our stuff down to the riverbank. There’s the lawn chairs, the tackle box (es), the bait and the small cooler for our snacks. Thankfully, the kids are getting bigger and are able to carry some of their own items and take some of the weight off Daddy’s shoulders. We finally made it to the riverbank and were quite happy to see that it wasn’t even muddy… always a bonus! After setting everything down and arranging it so that a passing breeze wouldn’t cause it to tumble down into the river, I set about helping everybody get the gear ready to go. First, I helped my son put on his pickerel rig and then turned to help my wife and daughter with theirs. While I was untangling the rigs and trying not to bait the hook with my fingers, my son put his own bait on the hooks and tossed it out into the river. He makes me proud with the great casts that he has, both for distance and for placement. I had barely managed to untangle a rig for my wife and daughter and was getting ready to bait their hooks (they both still refuse to touch the bait) when my son calls out that, he has caught one. Dropping what I was doing, I grabbed the net and helped him land the little fighter. Measuring it at 15.75" nicely placed my son in the record books. While it is true that I didn’t catch a Master last year, I am glad that my son did. Of course, being my son, he has now set his sights high and is determined to catch four more Masters, each of a different species, thereby earning himself a silver badge. While I do wish him luck, I think that I’d better step up my fishing otherwise this little guy of mine is going to leave me in the dust. Don’t get me wrong, I love my son and I like the competition… it’s just the teasing that he gives me about not catching one last year that seems to have me fired up a bit more than usual. Not to worry, I know of at least one fish that was close to being a Master last year (missed it by a quarter inch). This year it should be well over the limit. Now if he catches it before I do… Until next time, take care and keep your world spinning.

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At a recent public budget meeting, the Hanover School Division Board of Trustees proposed a 2.43 percent tax increase for the coming school year. Hanover School Division Financial chairperson, Marilyn Plett, told those in attendance that the funding increase is minimal. “This increase will work out to be under $35 per house that is assessed at $200, 000,” explained Plett. “But it is still an increase.” At this time, Hanover School Division is projecting ending the school year with up to a $240,000 deficit. “We did not adjust our reserve for next year,” Plett continued. “We are not budgeting to make up those dollars, we are absorbing that loss.” One of the biggest things to affect this year’s budget was the purchase of five additional buses. “Over the past few years we have budgeted for four new buses per year but that isn’t enough,” Plett stated. “This year that number has increased to nine.” The division’s proposed budget also accommodates the hiring of at least four additional teachers from Kindergarten to grade three in order to meet the province’s new plan to reduce class sizes for that age group. The challenge will then become how to manage classroom space once classes are reduced. “The challenge will be determined based on what schools they will be in,” Plett stated. Approximately 71 percent of the Hanover School Division’s budget comes from provincial funding and the rest is collected through local property taxes. Now that the Hanover School Division has met with the public, the next step will be to take the feedback back to the table and make a final decision. That decision is expected to be made by the middle of March.


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More Than Just News!

March 2013

Area History Preserved in East Braintree Museum By Marianne Curtis A group of volunteers is working hard to preserve the unique history of the area by promoting and improving the Midwinter Heritage site in East Braintree. The group hopes to raise over $10,000 to buy a former piece of community history and return it to its rightful location. Margaret Feilberg, President of the Midwinter Heritage Association, said the group is trying to raise money to buy a small cottage that was once used as a teacherage on the site. “It is now being sold at a

reasonable cost and funds are needed to buy it and have it moved from its present site in Hadashville to be placed back on its original foundation,” explained Feilberg. “It would be lost forever if Midwinter Heritage did not act now to raise funds to buy back the former teacher’s cottage.” It is important to the community that Midwinter School Heritage Museum buys it back and uses it for the Museum’s collection of Homesteading and Pioneer antiques. The antiques are currently housed in the old one-room schoolhouse and it is getting

With Spring Runoff Prevent Foundation Damage and Flooding Wet, stormy weather can cause problems for almost any building. Therefore, it is advisable for property owners to occasionally inspect the entire perimeter of their home’s exterior, especially before the arrival of heavy rain or snow. Check that your gutters and troughs are intact, fixed securely to your house, and positioned under the roof overhang to catch and direct your winter or spring runoff to downspouts and away from the base of buildings. Next, make sure the ground and walkways slope away from your house, so water or melting snow won’t accumulate and saturate the soil near the building foundation. If there are any areas you are uncertain about, check them during the next significant rain, and be prepared to prop a temporary tarp or thick poly sheet against the house to prevent pooling. If you don’t want to wait for the next rain use, a garden hose to see which direction the water runs, away or toward your home. Make sure sump pumps are functioning and if hydro goes out, and then you either have a battery backup for the pump or a generator handy. Note that with a battery backup it takes care of any problem when you are not there to start a generator. If you remember to keep, water away from your home there is less chance of any problems with cracking foundations, soil erosion, or water in your basement. Till next time hope, this info helps you and saves you any unnecessary stress or frustration. If you have any questions about a matter concerning real estate and the market climate, please call Eileen or Travis.

Dawson Trail Dispatch

crowded, Feilberg said. Feilberg has been participating in the development of a curriculum that combines museums with education for schools from kindergarten to grade 12. “Midwinter School Heritage Site houses many interesting collections that are suited to History and to Social Studies of all of these grades,” Feilberg continued. “Having students visit the one-room school museum will bring good energy to the National Heritage Site as well as teach pupils the rich history of pioneers and ancestors who have gone before us.” The one room school museum represents all the one-room schools in the area. There are pictures of former students and all former one-room schools in the Reynolds and Whitemouth area, as well as of all present and former churches and former Red Cross nursing stations. The site is a member of the Association of Manitoba Museums and the grounds and buildings are designated as a Regional, Provincial and National Heritage Site. Midwinter School Heritage Museum is used for many things including a dropin-centre, as well as a community place where school groups, bus tours, weddings, memorials, potlucks and farmers’ markets can be accommodated. The Heritage Site is run entirely by volunteers and opens by appointment for tours year round on Saturday and Sunday from two to 4 pm in July and August. Call Margaret and Bill at 204 287-2316, Lorna at 204 422-5284, Lindi at 204 918-9998, Alex at 204 4265282, or Teddy at 204 426-5310 for more information on the Midwinter Heritage Site or about their next event and fundraiser.

Skinned Carcass Determined to be Coyote Several weeks after the disturbing discovery of a skinned animal in a ditch near New Bothwell, police are saying that DNA results have confirmed the carcass was a coyote, not a domesticated animal. In early January, a passer-by spotted and snapped photos of what appeared to be a skinned dog propped up in the snow with a set of footprints leading to the site. Police responded by sending the carcass to the provincial vet for DNA testing to determine if the animal was a wild animal or a domestic pet. RCMP Spokesperson Miles Hiebert said the dead animal may look like a dog but DNA results have determined the animal was a coyote. “It is possible the animal was shot, killed and skinned by a hunter,” stated Hiebert. Over the past few months the disappearance of several dozen dogs throughout the area sparked rumours of poisonings, dog knapping and possible dog fighting rings keeping residents on high alert. “I would caution people not to come to conclusions and don’t become panicked about your animals,” Hiebert stressed. “We’ll go where the evidence leads us and we’ll follow this through, however, it’s our opinion at this time there’s really nothing to indicate that there’s any kind of abduction or wholesale kidnapping of dogs.” Police are asking anyone with information on suspicious vehicles or having eyewitness accounts of dog thefts to report them to their local RCMP.

The women from the Midwinter Heritage Association gave their big hats a trial run in preparation for a big celebration for the 60th anniversary of the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth while raising funds for the local heritage site.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

Tache Fire Department Takes Saving Pets Seriously By Marianne Curtis Saving lives and protecting property are both high priorities during emergency response by rural fire departments. Now thanks to a new piece of equipment the RM of Tache fire department has the capability to extend their life saving expertise to include four-legged family members. On February 13, the RM of Tache Fire Department became the first rural fire department in southern Manitoba to become equipped to save a pet’s life. Thanks to the donation of pet oxygen resuscitation masks by Invisible Fence Brand’s Project Breathe program, Tache fire fighters have a better chance of saving the lives of pets who are suffering from smoke inhalation. Brenda Griffith, owner of Invisible Fence Brand of Southern Manitoba, explained that the program recognizes the trauma sustained when a family loses their belongings and their family pets. “When a family suffers the tragedy of a fire, lives are turned upside down. Pets are valued family members, so we want families to know that their pet can be cared for if tragedy strikes,” explained Griffith. “We realize that humans are the first priority, but in many cases, pets can be saved if firefighters have the right equipment. Project Breathe is simply a way of giving firefighters the tools necessary to save pets’ lives.” RM of Tache District Fire Chief Jason Kroeker said the donation is an asset to the department. “We’ve seen residents try to run back into burning homes to save a pet; it is understandable but extremely dangerous,” stated Kroeker. “These masks will give residents comfort in knowing that we have the proper equipment to help their pets if they are suffering from smoke inhalation.” While there are no official statistics, it is estimated that thousands of pets die in fires each year, most succumbing to smoke inhalation. In most occurrences, emergency responders are not equipped to deal with pets. The 30 firefighters in the Taché Fire Department serve the communities of Landmark, Lorette and Ste. Genevieve, as well as surrounding areas when required. Taché receives about 170 calls a year for accidents and fire-related emergencies, many of them involving household pets. When needed, the department has used respirators designed for people on rescued pets but experienced some challenges due to

Clarification Last month in the article Ile Des Chenes Climber Ready for Everest on page 2 it was reported that Dean Carriere would become one of less than twenty climbers to climb all seven of the highest summits in the world. This statement should have read that Carriere is one of less than twenty climbers from Manitoba to take on Mount Everest. Once he completes this climb, he will actually be the first Manitoban successful to climb all seven summits. The Dawson Trail Dispatch apologizes for any confusion this may have caused.

improper sizing. The new oxygen resuscitation masks are specifically designed for proper fit on cats and dogs. Invisible Fence Brand has donated more than 10,000 pet oxygen masks to fire stations throughout Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom over the 10-year life of the program. Over a hundred pets have reportedly been saved by the donated masks so far, but that number continues to increase with each donation. Fire stations interested in receiving a free Pet Oxygen Mask kit are invited to contact Sue Thompson at (800) 661-6286 or sthompson@ifco-jgb.com.

Tache Fire fighters Jeff Shelby, Jason Kroeker and Pete Skjaerlund receive a hands-on demonstration on how the oxygen resuscitation masks specially designed for pets work by Brenda Griffith, from Invisible Fence Brand of Southern Manitoba, and Danica.

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March 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

Otterburne Bilingual Graphic Designer Wins Video Contest By Marianne Curtis A bilingual graphic designer from Otterburne has been declared the winner of this year’s “Just Watch Me” contest that honours disabled entrepreneurs. On February 26, Candace Lipischak and her company Productions Canart Productions were named as the winner of the top prize in the “Just Watch Me” video contest, Prairie Edition. The bilingual graphic designer and desktop publisher was one of four finalists competing for the $1,000 top prize in the competition. In an online vote, she received over 45 percent of the 3,646 votes cast. The video contest is an initiative of the Community Futures Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Program (EDP), and aims to get more people with disabilities interested in being their own bosses. Since the contest went live in December 13 entries were received from people with self-identified disabilities or ongoing health conditions operating a business in rural Saskatchewan or Manitoba. Along with the $1,000 cash prize, Lipischak also receives mentoring and business prizes from several sponsors. “It’s great being my own boss as I can set my own hours,” said Lipischak. “Sometimes living with a disability is not easy and you have to work around that. So, being able to be my own boss and have my own work hours and work schedule allows me to give my clients a better product and keeps myself in check and in health as well.” In 2000, Lipischak was diagnosed

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De Salaberry Signs New Vet Agreement The RM of De Salaberry recently signed a new agreement with St. Pierre and District Veterinary Services that will see more funding going into the organization. According to council, the new rates are based on a study conducted by the Veterinary Services Commission Board. The study, which was conducted based on the most recent census, found a way to calculate fair and equitable financial contributions by all partners within the existing Veterinary Service District Boards across the province. The RM of De Salaberry, along with the RM of Franklin and the Village of St. Pierre-Jolys, all financially contribute to the St. Pierre and District Veterinary Services. The RM of Franklin will be contributing $4,338, the Village of St. Pierre $2,805. The RM of De Salaberry’s portion is $10,056.

Steinbach 55 Plus at the Pat Porter Centre offers programs, activities, services and volunteer opportunities, striving to promote healthy and active living for older adults of the southeast region. We invite you to come and pay us a visit and consider participating in some of our programs. For more information drop by the Centre, Monday to Friday 9 am to 4 pm, call 204-320-4600 or online steinbach55plus.com. Membership at Steinbach 55 Plus is only $25 per year due in January of each Candace Lipischak (right) winner of this year’s “Just Watch Me” video contest shows off year for those 55 years of age and older. Benefits include reduced program rates, a some of her work at the RM of De Salaberry office. voice in business meetings, voting rights, and eligibility to serve on the board or with Multiple Sclerosis. When that could assist in their business committees. working regular business hours operations. Up and Coming Events: became difficult after her diagnosis, The video contest is being run Regular Fitness Classes have started with your instructor Christel and new she started her own business in 2007 jointly by the Manitoba and pricing options. Space is available. On Mondays and Thursdays from 9:30 - 10:30 to expand her creativity as well as Saskatchewan Community Futures am. supplement her income. She heard Entrepreneurs with Disabilities The Afternoon Country Jam will be on Thursday, March 7 from 1:30 - 4 pm. about the contest after visiting Program (EDP) and is open to people March Pot Luck is on Thursday, March 14. If you know that, you would like Community Futures to obtain a small with self-identified disabilities or to attend please call ahead and let us know what you would like to bring. As loan to upgrade her computer ongoing health conditions always needed are salads, casseroles, desserts and buns. software. operating businesses in rural Old Time Country Dance on Friday, March 22, from 8 pm - midnight. Live The “Just Watch Me” video Saskatchewan or rural Manitoba. band The Fugitives. Tickets available at the centre, advanced tickets $10 for contest encourages disabled The Community Futures members, $12 for non-members, $14 at the door and lunch is served at 10 pm. entrepreneurs to share their Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Workshops/Groups - Monthly Programs: business success story and inspire Program helps rural entrepreneurs Foot Care: The first and third Tuesday of the month from 9:00-3:00 pm. Run other people with disabilities to with disabilities to pursue their by a professional foot care nurse. Cost $30. Bring your own towel. Call the center become their own boss. Two business goals by providing to book an appointment. winners from both Manitoba and business advise, training, Pot Luck Supper: The second Thursday of every month at 6 pm. Meat and Saskatchewan were awarded cash mentorship and access to repayable beverages are provided. Cost $5 per person. Bring along a casserole, salad or prizes and a number of other tools business loans. desert. Call the centre to reserve your seat. Birthday Party on the first Wednesday of the month. All members with a birthday in that month are invited for complimentary cake and coffee. Guests are asked to pay $2. Beltone Hearing: On the third Friday of each month. Call 1-800-661-2653 for appointment. Brain Injury Support Group: On the last Monday of the month at 7 pm. Parkinson’s Support Group: On the fourth Wednesday of the month at 1 pm. Monday

Weekly Programs:

9 am - 12 pm Ladies Pool 9:30 - 10:30 am Fitness (with instructor) 12 - 4:30 pm Drop-in Pool 1 - 4:30 pm Model Trains 1 pm Canasta 6 pm Wood Carving 7 pm Tai Chi Beginners 7:30 pm Tai Chi Continuing Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm Ladies Pool 9:30 am - 3 pm Circle of Friends 12 - 4:30 pm Drop in Pool Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm Ladies Pool 9 am Tai Chi Beginners 10 am Tai Chi Continuing 10:30 am Choir Practice 12 - 4:30 pm Drop in Pool 1 pm Floor Curling 1 - 4 pm Cribbage 1:30 pm Floor curling 7 pm Old Time Country Band Practice Thursday 9 am - 12 pm Ladies Pool 9:30 - 10:30 am Fitness Class (with instructor) 1 - 4 pm Whist Friday 9 am - 12 pm Ladies Pool 8:30 am - 3 pm Circle of Friends 12 - 4:30 pm Drop in Pool Noon meals are available Monday through Friday. Cost $5. Call 204-320-4605 by 9 am to reserve your meal for that day. Purchase your meal ticket at the receptionist desk before noon. Monthly menus available at the office or in the newsletter. Bring a friend. Computer Lab fro Monday to Friday, 9 am - 12 pm and 1 - 4 pm. Cost $1. Lessons with Alex Cupples every other Wednesday from 9 am - 12 pm. Call the Centre for more information and to book an appointment. Volunteer Opportunities include perogy making, decorating and setting tables, birthday party hosts, food preparation and serving, clean up, greeters, receptionists.


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More Than Just News!

March 2013

Fundraising Continues for Richer Monument

SplishSplash… Rub-a-Dub Oh, you caught me! Yup, I’m soaking in the tub AGAIN! I just returned from my busy winter travels and had to use showers for the whole two weeks. I went 15 days without a nice relaxing bath. The aches, pains, poor sleep and toxic feeling sure tell me I have disrupted my soaking routine. Unless you actually have a soaking routine, you probably haven’t had the pleasure or knowledge of bathing benefits. This article is my attempt as a wellness professional of stressing the importance of water therapy and bathing. The calming, sensual, invigorating, uplifting, therapeutic and medical benefits of a bath are not new ideas. Baths have been around since 2,000 B.C. with big advances having been made by the Romans. Our present life is one that requires an expert time manager to actually accomplish all we need to get done in a day, and none of us has our own time manager! The day is packed and busy. Time for us is the last thing on the list. Time cannot be wasted! We get up, shower and go! Soon, as days go by, you start to notice a few body aches, stiffness, low energy, low immune system, frazzled nerves, restless sleep, and at times we feel a little depressed with it all. I also have taken note that men prefer showering and rarely bathe, and women are finding it more difficult to squeeze in that soak time. It’s this rushed approach to life that is preventing us from hopping into the tub. Another fact that our lifestyle has given us is the build-up of toxins. Toxin build-ups are caused by stress, slow digestion, poor waste elimination, too much coffee/tea/chocolate, alcohol, nicotine, and fatty, processed foods. If we leave life to fate and refuse to heed health advocates, these built up toxins will bring on poor health. But, if we wish to address the problem, there is a simple and very pleasurable way. Massage, regular moderate exercise, and here it comes... drum roll please... A HOT BATH can kick-start a sluggish system. A hot soak will induce perspiration which aides the elimination of toxins, soothes soreness, calms your nerves, and embraces your soul. We should definitely add a bath to our regime, not just to reduce toxins, aches and pains, but for our mental health too. At home, study and purchase an essential oil that suits your needs to add to the bath. The distilled scents of plants have a powerful effect on mind and body. Just put about five drops in two tablespoons of almond oil and add it to your bath water. Here are a few benefits of common essential oils: - Cinnamon Bark Oil: Restorative, combats fatigue, good for poor circulation, spasms, cramps and sluggish digestion. - Peppermint Oil: Energizing, clears the mind, good for muscular aches and stomach cramps. - Ylang-ylang Oil: Very gentle and soothing, promotes deep relaxation. - Lavender: Soothing and helps with muscle ache, combats insomnia, anti-depressant, decongestant, antiviral, comforting. You cannot equal the bliss of sliding into a warm bath deliciously scented with a few drops of aromatic and health giving essential oils. When added to the hot water, it enables your body to absorb the oils simultaneously through your nose and skin. Mmmm… what pleasure. Stepping up the effect of water treatments to increase the powerful healing qualities of water is available by the use of Commercial Hydro therapy. It can work at many levels and for many ailments. A visit to a wellness spa for more intense water therapy can be very beneficial and detoxifying. Applying water, first the hot jets/hot tub/hot steam/ and then cool or coldwater application, will soothe aching joints. The cold-water application will reduce inflammation. This type of hydrotherapy, well used by the Swedes, will alleviate those bad attacks of rheumatism and arthritis. This form of detoxifying lowers the acid level in your body thus reducing arthritic symptoms. In addition, you will feel very energized. Hopefully, I have convinced you that the Romans and Swedes know the facts. Water is the source of life in so many ways. So get the water running, fill that tub, and know that you are doing something wonderful for you body and your mind. Hop in, close your eyes, and drift away into serenity. Make it a routine. You’ll be singing one of my favourite ole tunes… “Splish splash, I was takin’ a bath.” Stay well, stay healthy. Raylene Snow owns and operates Raylene’s Wellness Spa on Hwy 210 South (5.2 km south of Ste. Anne and 5.7 km north of Giroux).

Health Authority Reports Small Funding Surplus

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Despite a number of changes going on within Southern Health, the organization is reporting a modest surplus at the end of the third quarter. “Although there is not much difference in what has been previously reported to the Board, we are pleased that we continue to manage the bottom line,” said Ken Klassen, Vice President of Finance & Capital. The modest surplus was announced when the Southern Health Santé Sud Board of Directors recently approved the third-quarter financial statement, which indicates a year-to-date operating funding surplus of $58,800.

The Enfant-Jésus Heritage Site committee is in the process of raising money to erect a memorial in honour of Father Jean Baptiste Thibault in Richer and the group is looking for local support. On behalf of the Enfant-Jésus Heritage Site committee, Patricia Gendreau explained that donations are needed to make the monument a reality. “This is a very important project because Father Thibault is part of Richer’s history,” said Gendreau. “The community was named after him.” In 1862, Father Thibault, under the advice of Archbishop Provencher, was sent to oversee sawmill operations on Prosper Nault’s land in Richer. The wood was needed for the building of the cathedral of Saint Boniface (Red River Settlement). In 1901, the name of Oak Ridge (Coteau des Chênes) was changed to Thibaultville in his honour. Upon the arrival the post office, the name was changed to Richer. The monument is flame-shaped made of mahogany brown polished granite on a granite base that sits on a pillared foundation. The total cost of the project is $8,000 of which $4,000 is already secured through donations and a grant. However, more funding is needed and a special event has been planned for June for the official unveiling. “Fundraising is ongoing, but we are having an event this summer,” explained Gendreau. “This meal is also a fundraiser for the maintenance of the Enfant Jesus Church.” The event will include a music program featuring Clint Dutiaume, which will start at 10 am followed by a mass, presided over by his Grace A memorial in honour of Father Jean Baptiste Most Reverend Albert LeGatt, Thibault will be placed on this stone and Archbishop of Saint Boniface. After unveiled in Richer this summer. the mass, Archbishop LeGatt will lead the assembly to the cemetery for the unveiling and blessing of the Father Jean-Baptiste Thibault Commemorative Monument. The fundraising banquet is being held on Sunday, June 23 in Richer with a limited amount of space. Tickets may be purchased by contacting Yvonne at 422-9369 or Marcel at 422-6880.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

Landmark Curling Champ Heads to Russia By Marianne Curtis An 18-year-old from Landmark is heading to Russia at the beginning of March where he will be representing Canada at the World Junior Curling Championships. This success comes after the team took home a gold medal in junior curling for the first time in eleven years. Brendan MacCuish, along with

More Than Just News!

March 2013

Southern Health to Consolidate Language Services The Southern Health Board of Directors will be spending some time over the next few months working on consolidating French language services in the region to the benefit of all residents within the newly amalgamated health district. According to Claudette Lahaie, Communications and French language Services Administrator with Southern Health, the board of directors has been given a method to follow as they move towards consolidating existing French Language Services. “The French Language Services regulation under the RHA Act requires the health authority to submit a proposed plan to the minister for their approval,” Manitoba’s newly crowned Canadian Junior Men’s champions, from left, coach Scott Grant, explained Lahaie. “Recognizing that both former regions recently completed plans, skip Matt Dunstone, third Colton Lott, second Daniel Grant and lead Landmark teen Brendan the process will be to merge strategies and best practices MacCuish (centre). into a common approach for Southern Health.” It was noted that the merged strategy would acknowledge skip Matt Dunstone, third Colton Lott, the World Juniors from February 28 to that 70 percent of rural French-speaking Manitobans live second Daniel Grant and their coach, Scott March 10, in Sochi, Russia, which will serve within the boundaries of Southern Health. Grant, are heading to Sochi, Russia where as a test event for the 2014 Winter Olympics they will represent Canada at the World curling competition. Canada has won a Juniors February 28 to March 10. leading 17 world junior men’s titles since Dunstone’s team from Winnipeg claimed 1975 and eight women’s crowns (one behind the gold medal with a 4-3 win over Alberta in Scotland) since 1988. The last Canadian the men’s final of the 2013 M&M Meat teams to win world junior titles were skipped Shops Canadian Junior Championships in by Saskatchewan’s Marliese Kasner (Miller) Fort McMurray in the middle of February. in 2003 in Flims, Switzerland, and by Alberta’s The Manitobans will represent Canada at Brendan Bottcher last year.

Mavis Taillieu Resigns After nearly ten years as MLA for Morris, Mavis Taillieu has announced that she is leaving provincial politics. Mavis Taillieu, MLA for Morris, announced recently that she is leaving provincial politics. Taillieu was first elected in 2003 and again in 2007 and 2011. She served as the MLA for the Morris constituency for almost 10 years. “I feel incredibly honoured to have been the MLA for the Morris constituency for nearly ten years,” said Taillieu. “It has been an enriching and rewarding experience serving the people in the constituency and I am thankful for the support they have shown me.” Taillieu said she plans to focus on family, life changes and attention to health and wellbeing, as well as be a mentor to her two sons who are forming a new business venture. Opposition leader Brian Pallister said his caucus is sorry to see her go. “In her 10 years in provincial politics Mavis proved time and time again that she is a formidable, determined person who gets the job done,” stated Pallister. “She is a tremendous asset to our caucus and we will miss her.” Provencher MP Vic Toews echoed that sentiment. “While constituents in the riding of Morris will no doubt miss her hard work on their behalf, I’m sure her family will be pleased to have the opportunity to spend more time with her,” stated Toews. “I have had many opportunities to work with Mavis over the past ten years and she has served her constituents with passion and dedication.” As the MLA for Morris, Taillieu became the representative for Niverville, Ste. Agathe and Tourond after the province realigned the constituency boundaries prior to the previous provincial election. Taillieu was the first woman to represent Morris in the Manitoba

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Nine months before announcing her retirement Niverville Mayor Greg Fehr welcomed Morris MLA Mavis Taillieu to her first official event in the community after boundary reconfigurations included the community within her jurisdiction.

Legislature and served in many roles including critic for Advanced Education; Culture, Heritage and Tourism; Multiculturalism and Immigration; Manitoba Public Insurance, the Workers’ Compensation Board, Small Business, Regulatory Reform, Privacy Issues; Family Services and Housing, Persons with Disabilities and Labour and as House Leader. A by-election is expected to be held in the next few months.


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More Than Just News!

March 2013

New Bothwell Students Find Their Voice

As a reminder to fellow classmates, Bothwell School students created these ceiling tiles which will be hung over each classroom door as a reminder to stop bullying in the school.

With all the focus in bullying, the students of Bothwell School are taking a stand and finding their voice. According to Yvonne Schroeder, Principal of Bothwell School, her students surprised her by bravely stepping out to share their perspectives of life in their school recently. “This seemingly inconspicuous visit with the principal one afternoon really was a fantastic beginning in our school,” stated Schroeder. “Finally, Bothwell School had its first authentically created Student Voice Group. A group of students stepped up to not only point out a problem, but also to work at a solution!” Schroeder explained that students voiced their concerns about bullying happening to them and to others around them. “These students believed that they had something valuable to

It’s Real Question: Does God really love me? Answer: With all the difficulties, trials, hardships and temptations along life’s journey, it is a very real and valid thing to question or doubt the love of God. It is not wrong to have an honest question or doubt, even about God. It is how you handle that doubt that makes the difference. Rather than discuss personal feelings and opinions it is always wise to go to the Word of God to find the answers to our problems. I John 4:8 says, “God is love.” I don’t need to be afraid of what I’ll find in my search because verse 18 says, “There is no fear in love but perfect love casteth out fear.” First, God’s love is REAL. Some people can pretend to love others and then suddenly drop them. God demonstrated His love for us 2,000 years ago by giving us His Son, Jesus Christ, to pay the full penalty for sin. He died in our place. When we recognize our sinful state, then trust Christ to forgive us and cleanse us through His shed blood, then and only then do, we begin to experience the reality of God’s love. People who haven’t experienced God’s love can argue that it’s not real but once you feel it inside and watch God work in your life, nothing will dissuade you. It is impossible to persuade young lovers that love is not real. I have spent sleepless nights as a veterinarian because I separated two dogs very much in love. Love is real and God’s love is more real than any earthly illustration you could use. Second, God’s love is EVER PRESENT. In Hebrews 13:5 God says, “I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee.” Once you come to God and experience His love for you, He promises never to leave you for eternity. No one else’s love can carry through on that promise. Thirdly, God’s love is SUFFICIENT. God, in His love will give you everything you need in life. Human love is satisfying and fulfilling but God’s love goes beyond the human level. Philippians 4:19 says, “But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” There is no physical, emotional or spiritual need that God cannot supply. Fourthly, God’s love is UNCONDITIONAL. Jeremiah 31:3 says, “I have loved thee with an everlasting love.” There is nothing you can say or do to stop God from loving you. Our human understanding of love is full of limitations and conditions but God’s love is open-ended. Romans 5:8 says, “But God commendeth his love toward us.” But, no love relationship works well on the animal level, the human level or the spiritual level unless it goes both ways. God has given Himself for you. Have you given yourself to Him? I trust you will not only find God’s love but also continue to grow in it. God Bless. David Millar has been involved with pastoral work for the past 22 years and is currently pastoring First Baptist Church in Steinbach. Any questions are welcomed and can be sent to dmillar@nlis.ca.

share from their experiences,” Schroeder continued. “As we met to share experiences the group soon moved to clarifying the message that they wanted to convey to the rest of the school.” As a result, the school held a student led assembly on bullying. “The assembly was student created and from a student perspective,” Schroeder added. “The committee focused on subtle forms of bullying; the kinds that are not always recognized as hurtful.” As a follow-up to their assembly, the group created a commitment activity, Lend a Hand – Don’t Bully. The newly formed group visited each classroom and helped students leave their handprints on ceiling tiles. The tiles will be placed above the classroom doorways as a visual Fifteen years ago, the Town of Ste. Anne reminder to those coming in and going out, that everyone needs to got the province to declare the Piney Road Bridge as a heritage site. lend a hand and stop bullying. On February 12, the Town of Ste. Anne began the process to remove the heritage site designation, which was granted on the basis that the site was of architectural or historic value. While the bridge is of historical significance to the area, it has been closed to vehicular traffic for the past few years after sustaining structural damage from ice dams and flooding.

Ste. Anne to Remove Heritage Status for Bridge

Piney Investigates a Woodridge Heritage Site

The RM of Piney is looking to hire an archaeological consultant to look into a piece of property near Woodridge that is currently under consideration for subdivision by the municipality. According to council, the Minister of Culture, Heritage and Tourism has reason to believe that human remains may be present on lands proposed to be subdivided by the RM of Piney. The property in question consists of 146.5 acres, which the municipality would like to

Dawson Trail Dispatch

subdivide into 50 lots and 2 public reserves. “The intent of the subdivision is to create new residential lots within the community,” noted council. As a result, the municipality is looking to contract a qualified archaeological consultant to conduct a heritage Resource Impact Assessment on the proposed development in order to identify and assess any heritage resources that may be affected by the project.

The Piney Road Bridge was built in 1921 to replace a wooden bridge constructed at the site in the 1870s. It is a fine example of the engineer’s trade, an elegant expression of strength and grace carried out in formed concrete. In 1987, the Piney Road Bridge was designated by the province as a Manitoba Heritage Site. It was the first structure in the region to receive such a designation and is officially the fifth official heritage site in Manitoba.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

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How are the Dead Raised? 1 Corinthians 15:35-42 ... 35) But someone may ask, “How are the dead raised? With what kind of body will they come?” 36) How foolish! What you sow does not come to life unless it dies. 37) When you sow, you do not plant the body that will be, but just a seed, perhaps of wheat or of something else. 38) But God gives it a body as he has determined, and to each kind of seed, he gives its own body. (NIV1984) This month we will celebrate Easter, the death and the resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ. Before we begin to try to interpret this section of Scripture, we would do well to remember one thing. All through this text, the Holy Spirit is directing the apostle Paul to talk about things that no one really knows much about. None of us here have died and come back to tell everyone else what it was like on the other side; therefore, we must remember that he is not talking about verifiable matters of fact, but about matters of faith. Paul is trying to communicate the inexpressible and to explain the indescribable, and he is using human ideas, words and things that we are all familiar with. Part of living is managing pain. In fact, very early in life we find pain is not a thing we want to experience very often. We do not like pain and who can blame us. I do not know anybody who has ever told me that they are just crazy about pain and enjoy every moment of it. Another indication or sign is that all of us are growing older; we are changing physically. It is the natural process of aging. (We know we look better than anyone else) We are really not very passionate about the aging process. However, we are wise enough and smart enough to face the fact that we are growing older and we look old no matter how many surgeries we have had. We will eventually pass on. For some that passing is a little worrisome. We can express sympathy and we do. For the Christian, however, there is good news. The good news is that although we cannot do anything about the fact that we are growing old and one day we will pass away, we also believe and know that one day we will be raised from the dead. The Bible teaches that we will receive resurrection bodies. In our own resurrection, we will receive a body different from our current one, yet will still reflect who we are. It will be made for the eternal kingdom. It will be a glorious, powerful spiritual body. This changes everything. This gives us hope. The apostle Paul uses the metaphor or image of a seed. He says that the seed is put in the ground and dies, but in due time it rises again and does so with a very different kind of body from that which was sown. Paul is showing us that at the end of our earthly life, we enter a new/different life. The seed is dissolved. When it rises, again there is a huge difference in its body. The seed that you and I plant in the ground breaks down, but it does not take long for a new plant to poke its way to the surface. Despite the change and the difference, it produces the same kind of seed that we had planted. So likewise, our earthly bodies will dissolve; they will rise again in very different form, but it is the same person who rises. Dissolved by death, changed by the resurrection, it is still we who exist. What Paul is saying is that in the world, even as we know it, there is not one kind of body; each separate part of creation has its own. God gives to each created thing a body suitable for its part in creation. If that were so, it is only reasonable to expect that He will give us a body suited for the resurrection life. It is true that we have a physical body to begin with, but it is also true that one day we shall have a spiritual body. This can never happen here, and the Spirit will truly use us, as is never possible now. Then we will be able to render the perfect reverence, the ultimate service, the perfect love that now can only be a vision and a dream. Would you pray this prayer with me … “Lord Jesus, come into my heart. Forgive my sins. I want my life to change. My thoughts and my attitude need to change. I do not have the peace in my heart that I yearn for. I really want that peace, joy and happiness that will fulfill my heart’s desire. Please let the Holy Spirit help me be the kind of Christian that will honour Your Name.” Amen. One of the blessed hopes of every Christian is that one day Jesus will return to this earth and give to all who have accepted Him as their Lord and Saviour a new Spiritual Body. One question that comes to mind today will be answered. Just what kind of body will we receive? On the surface, it seems to be a reasonably valid question. Not only will we have a new body, but the new one will be fitted for eternity. Unlike the one we currently have, which is made for this world, our new resurrection bodies are going to be made for eternity... the present one is a natural body; the future one will be a spiritual one. Our present one is an imperfect vessels and an imperfect instrument for the Spirit, but in the life to come we will be such that the Spirit can truly fill us, as can never happen here, and the Spirit can truly use us, as is never possible now. Then we will be able to render the perfect worship, the perfect service, the perfect love; that now can only be a vision and a dream.


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March 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Second Annual Actif Epica Challenge Successful By Marianne Curtis

Destino in Concert

Thursday, March 14 at Grace Mennonite Church in Steinbach at 7:30 pm ‘Destino’ means destiny, so maybe it was just that which brought Destino together. Destino’s newest addition is New Yorker Terance Reddick, whom the other three members – Joey Niceforo, Roy Tan and Rosemary Siemens – found on Facebook. The man can sing – everything from R&B to Gospel and Jazz. Mix in Joey’s rich tenor, sweet violin from Rosemary and masterful piano by Roy, and you have the inimitable fusion of classical and pop that makes this group so unique. Destino has performed at two World Olympics, St. Peter’s Basilica and Walt Disney World, just to name a few. Call for tickets: Adults $18, Students $8, Music Students (any age) $6. See more at destino4.com or steinbachartscouncil.ca. The Dance Floor Swing into March with The Dance Floor. Offering West Coast Swing or Country Two Step lessons for Beginners! Tuesday nights at the Steinbach Cultural Arts Centre. Intermediates, brush up on your technique with West Coast Swing or East Coast Swing classes on Thursday nights. Call to register. Get Snappy Digital Photography classes start March 5 & 6 at the Arts Centre! For Kids Ages 9-12. Kids will love this class for young photographers, encouraging them to do more than just push the shutter and lots of in-class shooting and ideas to take home and practice. For Teens (Ages 13-16). In today’s world, everyone is a photographer on Facebook. Learn to take photos you want to share plus the history of photography, camera basics and handling, isolating your subject, cropping, storytelling and capturing the mood. For Adults (Age 16+). Get to know your camera and learn how to create a good photograph. Call to register (204) 346-1077. Latin Heat Social March 16 at Steinbach Cultural Arts Centre, 304 Second Street, 8:00-1:00 pm. Heat up your Winter at this Latin-themed party. Snacks provided, please bring your beverage of choice. Purchase tickets at the door, $8/per person. Presented by Steinbach Arts Council and Wild Purple Productions. Our Gallery You are invited! The biggest event of our Gallery Season. Over 70 artists from Southeastern Manitoba! Come celebrate with us from 7-8 pm at the Cultural Arts Centre, Steinbach: Adult Opening Ceremony is Wednesday, April 3 and Juvenile Opening Ceremony is Friday, April 5. Vounteers wanted! Please email Yvonne at visualarts@steinbachartscouncil.ca if you would like to help at the Opening Ceremonies on April 3rd and 5th. Arts for Tots Preschool Program Early Fall Registration starts April 1st. Parents love our Arts focus! Ages 3-5 learn early childhood education through dance, theatre, music and visual arts. Join instructors Miss Treena and Miss Pam on Mondays through Thursdays, morning or afternoon. Concerts in the Park Performers! We are now taking applications for the KR Barkman Concerts in the Park series. These are free concerts in KR Barkman Park on Main Street, proudly sponsored by Barkman Concrete Foundation. Download application forms online. The deadline is March 30. ‘Celebrate the Arts’ …in Broadway Style! Save the date for our Bright Lights, Big City Fundraising Gala coming up on May 3 at Friedensfeld Community Centre. Watch for early bird ticket specials. Spring Classes Spring Classes are just around the corner! Sign up for Power Pilates, Gentle Hatha Flow Yoga, Absolute Abstract or Mix n’ Match Watercolour & Acrylics classes. Chair covers for rent! Beautiful white chair covers to add that extra touch to your special event. Best prices in town – only $1.50/cover. Call for info. Photo Contest See this month’s theme on the Century 21 Gold Key Realty Facebook page, then submit your photo (don’t forget to tag ‘Steinbach Arts Council!’) for your chance to win $50, plus a tax receipt in your name for $100, donated to SAC. The Sound of Music The Sound of Music will be showing April 17-21. Show times are 7:30 pm from Wednesday to Saturday, with a 2 pm matinee on Sunday. There are currently no tickets available. For those still wanting tickets, a waiting list has been started in case of cancellations. Get Involved Get involved with the Arts and make a difference in your community! Steinbach Arts Council is looking for volunteers for our Board of Directors, Exhibit Committee and Southeast Visual Arts Committee. Call (204) 346-1077 to find out more. View all our events on steinbachartscouncil.ca.

Organizers of this year’s Actif Epica outdoor winter race are thrilled with the success of this year’s event. The one-day winter adventure took place on February 16 and consisted of a 130kilometre bike challenge, which kicked off in St. Malo and ended in St. Boniface. As expected, Actif Epica brought together participants of all backgrounds, ages and activity levels who participated, gathered to support the participants or just came out to enjoy the wintry weather, stated organizer David Pensalo. “After last year ’s strong beginning, there was no question about whether we would do it again, and I am once again pleased to report that an incredible time was had by all,” said Pensalo. Forty-two individuals signed up for either the race including 13 runners and 29 cyclists who took on a 130 km bike ride or 80 km run. This is ten more than last year. Paul Lapointe was the first to cross the finish line at the Festival du Voyageur in St. Boniface after completing the 130 km ride in seven hours. The last cyclist crossed the line at 14 hours and 47 minutes. Craig Desjarlais was

the first of eight runners who finished the race that lasted from 16 to 21 hours. The last runner took 21 hours and 52 minutes to go the distance of 80 kms. New this year was live coverage of the event. “Thousands of people from across the continent followed our live coverage of the event— something both unexpected and encouraging,” Pensalo continued. “We set out to celebrate human resilience, using the sheer will of these amazing racers as inspiration, and it seems that people are up for it.” Pensalo added a special thank you to the host communities that opened their doors to the group including the St. Malo and Festival

Forty-two cyclists and runners took on the challenge of this year’s Actif Epica, a 130-kilometre adventure that started in St. Malo and ended in St. Boniface.

des Amis, Saint-Pierre-Jolys Museum, Providence College, Niverville Arena and St. Adolphe Bible Fellowship Centre. The finish line was in St. Boniface at the Festival due Voyageur. “With racers from as far away as California and Colorado, the warm reception given to us from the communities along the route and the dedication and determination of our many volunteers, nearly as many volunteers as racers! It’s clear that something special is happening here,” Pensalo concluded.

Landmark Boys Bring Home Championship On February 26, the Landmark Junior Boys Basketball team took home their first Junior Volleyball Championship banner. The historic win took place during the basketball playoffs that took place in Niverville. Going into the Zone 13 tournament the Landmark 96’ers, coached by Tim Rogosky, had six wins and zero losses. In the first game Landmark took on Green Valley and won 7646. The next game was against the Ross L. Gray Raiders from Sprague. While the game was not easily won, Landmark finally ended the day with a 70-56 win over Sprague. This is the first time the Landmark Junior Boys Basketball team has hoisted a banner in their history and the first win for any of the teams in The Landmark Junior Boys Basketball team celebrate earning their first zone championship nearly two decades. banner. The team now heads to Somerset for the provincial championships on March 8 and 9.

Comedy Fundraiser for the Dogs

The Niverville Dog Adoption Fair is sponsoring a fundraiser comedy night on March 24 as part of an effort to raise funds for a reward leading to the arrest of persons responsible for dog-napping family pets throughout the southeast. Entertainment will feature “Raise the Woof” from Los Angeles. All profits will go to help animal rescues with a portion going towards rewards for information that lead to the arrest of those responsible for the missing dogs in Southeast Manitoba. According to organizer Barry Piasta, if the reward is not needed, the funds will go in support of a number of animal rescue operations in the area. The event will be held at the Niverville Community Fellowship Church, 116 3rd Avenue S. Doors open at 6:30 pm and the show starts at 7 pm. Tickets are $20 each, available at Ruffmutts Grooming (18 Hill Crest Court), Niverville Bigway, or by calling Barry at 204-388-9676.


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Dawson Trail Dispatch

Ile des Chênes Athlete Earns Scholarship

Alex Sabourin

An Ile des Chênes athlete has been named as one of five recipients of the Dr. Dale Iwanoczko Memorial Volleyball Scholarship from the Manitoba High School Athletic Association. On February 20, Alex Sabourin of the College Regional Gabrielle-Roy Les Roys Volleyball team was named as one of five recipients of the Dr. Dale Iwanoczko Memorial Volleyball Scholarship. The $750 scholarship is awarded annually in memory of Selkirk, Manitoba volleyball player, Dr. Dale Iwanoczko. To be eligible for this scholarship, a student must be proceeding to a post-secondary institution and have a minimum 65 percent academic average. The individual must have proficiency in

volleyball, while academic standing, community activities, and citizenship are also considered. Sabourin first caught the attention of the Manitoba High School Athletic Association when he was named Tri-Star Rural High School athlete of the week back in November. The 5’9" setter led his team to the “AAA” Provincial Volleyball Championship. For his efforts, he was also named the Dairy Farmer’s Player Choice Award corecipient and the Championship MVP. Coach Pascal Guenette said that Sabourin is, “A great ambassador and role model for the sport of volleyball and sports in general.” The grade 12 student maintains an average of 88 percent, while also competing in soccer, badminton, basketball and baseball. After graduation, Sabourin hopes to pursue a career in Veterinary Medicine. The Dr. Dale Iwanoczko Memorial Volleyball Scholarships are awarded annually in memory of Selkirk, Manitoba volleyball player, Dr. Dale Iwanoczko. Iwanoczko played volleyball with the University of Manitoba Bisons where he was named a five-time All-Canadian. He obtained his medical degree from the University of Manitoba before passing away at the age of 30 from Hodgkin’s disease. A number of Dale’s friends have organized an annual golf tournament to raise funds for this scholarship named in his honour and memory.

Volunteers Needed for Keystone Cup in St. Malo By Marianne Curtis The community of St. Malo is excitedly preparing to host the Keystone Cup in the middle of April. While the event is still a few weeks away, organizers are putting out a call for volunteers to assist the community to put on a successful event. On April 17-21, St. Malo will play host to the Keystone Cup Western Canadian Junior B hockey tournament. The Keystone Cup is a six-team competition that brings together the provincial champions from across Northwestern Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, along with the host team, the St. Malo Warriors. It is a 4-day round robin tournament with the top four teams advancing to the Gold and Bronze medal games. St. Malo Chamber of Commerce President Agnes Gooselin said the community is excited about the upcoming tournament. “The upcoming Keystone Cup Western Canadian Junior B hockey tournament will bring many new people into our community from across Canada,” stated Gooselin. In preparation for the event, the community spent $60,000 on arena upgrades that included replacing the rink boards, doors, glass and purchasing a zamboni. Funding was raised through federal, provincial and municipal grants plus community fundraising. St. Malo Warriors Coach Ralph Collette said that his team is excited about the upcoming competition. “We are very excited! We think it is past due,” stated Collette. However, he did say the hosting was a surprise. “Most of these tournaments go to very big venues. St. Malo is probably the smallest town to ever host the tournament.” The last time the St. Malo Warriors participated in the Keystone Cup was in 2009 and the last time they participated and won was in 1998 when they came home with a silver medal. The community will be busy over the 4-day tournament. Collette said they would need around 200 volunteers to make it happen. St. Malo’s population is expected to at least double, if not triple, their numbers during the championships. “We are hoping to get a couple thousand people coming into our region a day over five days.” Potential volunteers can call 204-347-5003 to offer their services.

Steinbach MLA Loves to Read

February was “I love to Read” month and Steinbach MLA Kelvin Goertzen got in on the fun when he presented books to Blumenort School Librarian Ruth Lees. During the month, Goertzen presented books to each elementary school in his riding and read in several schools.

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More Than Just News!

March 2013

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Some Lesser Known Tax Credits My previous article for February had the basics of taxes and how they work. Here are several tax credits and deductions that may not be known by all tax payers. Caregiver Amount - this credit is available if you provide in-home care to a parent or grandparent age 65 or older. The credit is up to $4,402; but the net income of the dependant must be less than $19,435. There is a similar credit for Infirm Dependents for any dependent relative who is 18 and over and infirm and living with you. But, the net income of the dependent must be less than $13,078. Attendant Care is a medical expense credit that can be claimed by anyone eligible for the disability tax credit and pays for attendant care. This can be claimed by those living in Senior Assisted Living and the monthly payment includes fees for housekeeping, food preparation, recreational services and/or laundry service. The operator of the “retirement home” should provide a receipt showing the “attendant care” portion of the rent. Medical Expense Tax Credit is known and claimed by most tax payers, but remember to include premiums paid to a health plan via your pay cheque or pension payment plus the out of pocket costs that are not covered and any travel health insurance premiums. And remember the medical travel (47 cents/km in 2012 for 40 km or more one way) for any appointments for services you cannot receive locally (often specialists in Winnipeg). If it is more than 80 km one way, you also get to claim the meal ($17). Refundable Medical Expense Supplement is for those with a lower income but high medical expenses. It is a refundable credit of up to $1,119. But, you need to have employment (or self-employment) income of more than $3,268. If you a have lower pension income and higher medical expenses and are capable of working, it might be worth considering getting a part time job! Children’s Fitness and Arts Credits are available up to $500 each per child under the age of 16. Keep those receipts for all your children’s activities. There is also a Manitoba Young Adult Fitness Credit for those 16-24. Keep those receipts for the Gym

membership or other activities (including curling!) There is an adoption credit for expenses relating to the adoption of a child. Maximum amount is $11,440. The credit can only be claimed in the year the adoption is finalized, but may include eligible expenses incurred in previous years. Disability Tax Credit is a credit I write about often because it is a credit worth $7,546 and can reduce taxes payable up to $1,800 per year. If you have difficulty walking, hearing, feeding yourself, dressing, seeing, speaking, elimination (bowel or bladder functions), or performing the mental functions necessary for everyday life, or if you need life sustaining therapy (often diabetics who regularly test their blood and adjust their insulin) then you may be eligible. There is also a section for “cumulative effect of significant restrictions” that applies to two or more of the above items. So if you are not “markedly restricted” in one, but “significantly restricted” in two or more, you may still qualify. The Working Income Tax Benefit provides a refundable tax credit up to $931 for an individual, or $1,762 for families, couples and single parents. If you can get a part time or casual job (earn at least $3,000), it may be worth considering. If you are receiving CPP disability, you can earn up to $4,600 and not affect your CPP disability eligibility. And if you are receiving the Guaranteed Income Supplement, you can earn up to $3,500 without a reduction. Tradesperson’s Tools Deduction is $500 but I think it is overrated. You need to spend $1,595 to get the full $500 deduction that is worth $75 to $145 in actual savings, depending on your federal tax bracket. Don’t buy tools just to get this credit, but if you are buying the tools anyway, keep the receipts.

Community Credit Union Merger Approved During a mid-February meeting, members of the Community Credit Union voted overwhelmingly in favour of a merger with Access Credit Union. Out of the 6,300 members in the credit union, 149 turned out for the vote on the issue of amalgamation. The results were 95 percent positive so the two organizations will officially come together on July 1. Ross Ballentine, CEO for Community Credit Union, said the merger will benefit members. “The advantages of being part of a larger organization are numerous,” stated Ballentine. “Service to members will stay the same and we should be able to increase some services by being part of a larger organization.”

Community Credit Union has over $100 million in assets, approximately 6,300 members, a staff of 30 and branch locations in Grunthal, Vita and Sprague. Given that the assets of Community represent less than 10 percent of Access Credit Union’s assets, the membership at Access were not required to vote. As part of the merger, the credit unions have agreed that all branches will remain open for a guaranteed period with the belief the three Community Credit Union locations will thrive when offering the most competitive rates and products. All Community Credit Union staff will have the ability to move forward with the new credit union and enjoy the many opportunities that a larger

organization offers. As of July 1, Access Credit Union will be comprised of 17 branches, $1.75 billion in assets under an administration and a staff of 275.

This credit may not apply to us in the rural area, but if you know someone in Winnipeg, make sure, that if they are using transit that they know about the Public Transit amount and claim their transit costs. Moving Expense deduction is not well known, but you do need to move at least 40 km to start a new job or a business. Pension Income Splitting is known to most pensioners. It can be a private pension plan at any age, or Registered Retirement Income Fund payments at age 65+. Charitable Donations are well known too, but remember you can carry them forward up to five years, so keep them even if they are small. You get a small tax break for the first $200, but a bigger break on the amount over $200, so you may not want to claim them every year. GST Credit is available once you turn 19, so young people should be filing a tax return regardless of their income. Remember that the Government of Manitoba refuses to increase their credits with inflation (ok, the basic has increased a very small amount) and so they are far behind the federal tax credits. So with all these tax credits, you might reduce your federal taxes payable to zero, and yet still have provincial taxes to pay. If that upsets you (and it should!) contact your MLA and our provincial Minister of Finance! After you have filed your taxes for 2012, compare your federal tax payable to your provincial tax payable. In the year 2,000, the Manitoba taxes payable used to be 50 percent of the federal taxes payable. I don’t see that much anymore. More and more tax filers are paying way more Manitoba taxes than they used to because our current provincial government refuses to increase the tax credits with inflation. Make some noise and let all the provincial parties know this is not acceptable and should be an election issue next time around! There you have the sometimes lesser known tax credits and deductions. Keep them in mind when you file your own taxes (I shudder to think of what you might be missing) or when you visit a tax professional like myself. Anni Markmann is a Tax Professional and owns Ste. Anne Tax Service. She lives, works, and volunteers in our community. Contact her at 204-422-6631, annimarkmann@mymts.net or 36 Dawson Road in Ste. Anne.


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Dawson Trail Dispatch

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St. Labre Community St. Labre 200 Seeks Community Groups in Need Go-Carters Donate Money By Marianne Curtis Organizations from the southeast looking for extra funding are invited to put in an application to the organizers of the St. Labre 200. While the event does not take place until July, organizations have the month of March to apply for a grant courtesy of the group. What started out as a friendly competition between brothers has turned into a community event that draws hundreds of spectators to the community each summer. Lucien Grenier, one of the organizers of the event, confirmed that the St. Labre 200 “Giving Back to the Community” campaign has become a successful spin-off of the annual event. “St. Labre 200 is all about getting people together and having a great time,” said Grenier. “We can accomplish this all while raising money for many local organizations, charities and/or causes.” Profits from the community supper, concessions, merchandise, team auction, onsite donation jar and a raffle are what make it possible for organizers to “Give Back to the Community.” Over the past four years, the organizers of St. Labre 200 have given back over $22,000 to local organizations. Last year’s recipients were Treasure Keepers Daycare, Les P’tits Brisous, and East Borderland Community Housing. Other organizations that have benefited from the event include Out of the Blue, Seine River Services for Seniors, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Le Chalet expansion project and Ecole Saint Joachim. In preparation for this year’s event, the committee is currently accepting applications from anyone or any organization looking for funding for miscellaneous reasons. “The application process is simple. Send your name, a brief description of what you do, the amount you’re requesting, an explanation of what you would like to accomplish with this money and your contact info to the St. Labre 200 committee,” Grenier added. The deadline for applications is March 31. This year’s St. Labre 200 will take place July 12 to 14. The main event is a 24-hour go-cart build-off followed by a 200-lap race (50 miles). Other activities on the grounds include excavator rodeo, bounce castles, R/C racecars, Rubber Boot Toss and live bands.

Green Projects Get Grant Funding

East Borderland Community Housing Chair Elsa Laing accepted a $4,000 cheque from St. Labre 200 organizer Joel Grenier while La Verendrye MLA Dennis Smook looked on.

On February 25, East Borderland Community Housing Chair Elsa Laing accepted a $4,000 cheque from St. Labre 200 organizer Joel Grenier. The presentation was one of three made by the organizers of the St. Labre 200, a yearly go-cart event and competition that takes place in the community while raising funds for local organizations. Two other recipients to receive support from the St. Labre 200 group are Treasure Keepers Daycare and Les P’tits Brisous with $2,000 each.

By Marianne Curtis At the beginning of February, the province announced funding for 21 green projects in the province, including four within our region. The province confirmed a funding partnership with students, businesses and municipalities for projects that make a positive impact on the environment while gaining an economic advantage through innovative technology. Over $360,000 in grants will be dispersed to groups from the Waste Reduction and Pollution Prevention (WRAPP) Fund. Four projects in the southeast will receive a combined total of $43,000 in funding for one project aimed at recycling waste material and three for composting programs. The RM of Hanover is receiving $3,000 to help them purchase recycling bins and make improvements to the community’s recycling program. The Conseil de développement economique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) has collaborated with both the Town of St. Pierre-Jolys and the RM of De Saleberry in two separate programs. The Village of St. Pierre-Jolys will receive $10,000 to support of their composting pickup program while the RM of De Saleberry will receive $15,000 to develop a composting processing site. The Hanover School Division will receive $15,000 to implement a waste management system that is expected to divert 50 percent of the school division’s waste. This initiative, spearheaded by Russ Dirks and the students at Landmark Elementary School, is expected to divert the entire school division’s waste by using green products and increasing recycling and composting activities. This includes transporting material to the City of Steinbach’s composting facility. Schools within the division who develop greenhouses and community gardens will have access to the finished compost along with the public, free of charge. The WRAPP Fund supports improved waste reduction and pollution prevention practices in Manitoba. Since 1999, with the support of the WRAPP Fund, Manitobans have recycled more than 811,501 tonnes of material, equal to almost 101,000 full garbage trucks, stated Gord Mackintosh the Minister of Conservation and Water Stewardship. The minister also added that a total of 315 projects have been supported with more than $5.4 million in grants since the fund’s creation in 2,000.

Stuartburn Names New Fire Chiefs The RM of Stuartburn has revoked the appointment of the municipal fire chief and appointed two successors effective at the end of February. After holding an emergency meeting on February 27, the RM of Stuartburn council has appointed Bob Fosty and Steven Kiansky as the new joint fire chiefs for the municipal fire department. While the municipality remains mum on the reason behind their decision, the announcement came after council “revoked the appointment” of former Fire Chief Orest Paciorka. Paciorka has been at the helm of the RM of Stuartburn fire department since 2003. Fire season may still be a few months away but the RM of Stuartburn council has also issued a call for volunteer fire fighters in preparation for the summer. For the past two years, the Vita volunteer fire department has spent hundreds of hours fighting wildfires due to dry weather conditions. Last fall a wild fire destroyed several homes in Vita and burned thousands of acres of property. Anyone interested in joining the RM of Stuartburn Fire Department is encouraged to contact the municipality. Criteria include obtaining a valid Class 4 drivers license and finishing Level 1 firefighting courses, access to a vehicle and the ability to be on call. Training is provided to successful applicants. Resumes should be dropped off in person, sent to Box 59, Vita, MB R0A 2K0 or emailed to inquiries@rmofstuartburn.com.

Peter Dyck Named to Hall of Fame A long time coach and official from the Steinbach area is among nine individuals scheduled to be inducted into this year’s High School Sports Hall of Fame. Steinbach’s Peter Dyck is being recognized as a “dedicated builder” after he spent over three decades dedicated to the development and growth of sports in the Eastman area. Dyck was well known for his passion for local sports that he continued to coach and support until he passed away suddenly in December 2012. During his lifetime, Dyck was a well-known respected coach and official for over 35 years. He also volunteered as a former Manitoba High School Athletic Association board member and served as board president for two terms. Dyck will be inducted posthumously into the Manitoba High School Sports Hall of Fame during a special ceremony on April 13. Other inductees include Former Winnipeg Blue Bomber Gord Patterson, high school athletes Jamie (Hancharyk) Jones, Joe Ogoms, Ron Hinkewich and Ken Opalko. Other builders being inducted include Dick LaPage, former Physical Education Director for the Department of Education and Jerry Ilchyna, a long time coach. The Hall of Fame Team award will be presented to the Lord Selkirk Royals Ladies Volleyball Team.


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March 2013

COMMUNITY EVENTS

More Than Just News!

pm. Selection of books in both French and English, all ages. Over 21,000 books including audiobooks, DVDs, CDs, large print books and magazines plus they can import books from any library in Manitoba. EMAIL YOUR COMMUNITY EVENT TO EDITOR@DAWSONTRAIL.CA OR FAX 204-422-8548 Special requests can be made to the librarian, Brandi Schmitz at 204-878 Grunthal along with a large open space for the 9488, bibliotachelibrary.com or in person. Corporate Farms and Farm Estate Rollover kids to play while the moms visit. Contact - On Thursday, April 5 from11:30 am -1 Karen at klenzrpeters@hotmail.com. Steinbach pm at New Horizons Centre. Have lunch, Healthy Eating Cooking Classes - At South sponsored by Tim Driedger and John Mahi Prawda East Helping Hands a free workshop every from Investors Group with Marke G Dally Circuit 30 - Alternate aerobic and weight other Thursday March 7 & 21 from 5 - 7 on tax efficient methods that help corporate exercises, with cool down and stretch pm. Enjoy a meal with other community farms and aid in farm estate transfer. exercises. Wear comfortable clothing, members as you learn how to plan and Contact John Mahi 371-2967 or Tim clean runners, and bring a bottle of water. prepare healthy meals on a budget. Driedger at 371-1081 to register. Door Cost: $2/class Mondays and Thursdays Contact Carol Vogt Funk at 204-326prizes for early registrations. at 7 pm, in the Reynolds School Gym. 2599 or Contact Wendy 204-348-2433. southeasthelpinghands@gmail.com to Spring Stop & Shop – On Saturday, April register. 13 at 9 am - 3 pm at the New Horizons Busy Bodies Playgroup – Every Wednesday Centre. What’s new and Who’s new in from 9 - 11 am at the Reynolds School On the Road to Freedom - Mennonite home-based businesses, sales, door prizes Gym. Free to parents and children. Snacks Women of Courage and Faith by Ray Dirks and coffee while you shop. Looking for provided. Contact Cassie 204-793-8290. will be opening in the Gerhard Ens Gallery vendors to participate call asap. at Mennonite Heritage Village. Open Richer Monday - Friday from 10 am - 4 pm. Hadashville Monday Night Bingos - to raise funds for Exhibit runs until March 8. Tae Kwon Do - Every Wednesday at 6 pm at Stacey Pchajek Memorial Foundation Inc. the Hadashville Community Club The foundation provides scholarships, Decision Making Tools Workshop – (Reynolds Recreational Centre) from 6 years bursaries and prizes to students Wednesday, March 6 from 6 – 9 pm with old to adults. Pursue a black belt or learn graduating grades 8 and 12. Children Andy Sirski 42 years working with farmers new skills, great stress release and have an Under 14 must be accompanied by an specializing in taxes, business and excellent workout at the same time. Cost adult to be on premises and must play investments. Financial plan “5-legged after registration fee is $40/month per bingo. Doors Open at 5:30 pm at the stool”. Cost $20 at the Steinbach, person. Ask about 2 week free trial. Contact Young at Heart Club in Richer. MGCC Academy of Learning, 248 Lumber Avenue. Shelly at 204-426-5266 or e-mail License # BI/BO4164. Contact: Doreen Register in advance with Tracey DrabykKSTA.academy@gmail.com. Pchajek at 422-5243 or email Zirk at 204-268-6094 or at your local doreen@spmf.ca. Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Kleefeld Initiatives office. Community Playgroup - for parents, St. Adolphe caregivers and children ages 0-5. Activities The St. Adolphe Couvent/PCH Historical Steinbach & Area Garden Club meeting include time for playing, stories, songs and Book Committee - publishing a bilingual On Monday, March 11 at 7 pm at the snacks. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the book about the St. Adolphe Couvent Mennonite Heritage Village. Presentation month at the Kleefeld Rec Centre. Contact rebuilt as a Personal Care Home. The by Better Gardens with Advice From a Irene Ascough 377-5013. Committee is looking for stories, pictures Plant Expert, Jan Pedersen from Bylands and related documents when it was a Nursery, BC. Refreshments and Door prizes. La Broquerie Convent and school for local students Everyone welcome. $5 walk-in fee. Contact Seine River Services for Seniors- Health and boarders. We are looking for sagardenclub.com or 204-326-2396. Centre/Centre de Santé from Monday to information from family and friends of Friday 8:30 am - 4 pm. Offers services and former residents of the Personal Care Women’s Networking Breakfast – On programs for seniors. Income Tax help, Home and former employees. Contact Wednesday, March 13 from 7:30 - 9 am at Lifeline, mobility equipment, foot care, hair and receive a questionnaire Rhéa Trudeau Uncle Jake’s Restaurant. Breakfast care, transportation, home maintenance, 204-883-2181 or send information to St. available. Table Topic- Ideas to attract new yard maintenance, Telecheck, the E.R.I.K. Adolphe PCH Heritage Group Book 420 customers and celebrating International program, puzzles and games. Contact Main St. St. Adolphe, Manitoba R5A 1B7. Women’s Day. Contact Tracey Drabyk-Zirk, Community Resource Coordinator Juliette tracey.drabyk-zirk@gov.mb.ca or Jeannette Rowan at 424-5285 or St. Pierre-Jolys Brigit info@turning-points.ca. labseinerss@gmail.com. Shopping Trips - Sugaring-Off Festival – On Saturday, Winnipeg’s St.Vital Mall every first Thursday April 13 and Sunday, April 14 from 10am Spring Swimming Lesson Registration of the month, leaving at 10 am - 3 pm. - 4 pm. Traditional food & music, Maple Steinbach Aquatic Centre spring Cost $15. Steinbach’s Clearspring Centre Taffy, Horse drawn rides, Children activities swimming lesson registration begins on every last Thursday of the month, leaving at 1- 3 pm. Historical Interpretations and Thursday, March 21 at 8 am. Contact 204at 10 am - 1 pm. Cost $10. displays 11 am - 3 pm, much more. Free 346-6207 or in person at the Steinbach Admission. At the Musée de Saint-Pierre- Aquatic Centre. Lorette Jolys Museum 432, rue Joubert Street. Frere Jacques Nursery School - English I CAN DO 5 – On Mondays, March 25, Nursery School Program, registration night Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba April 1 and 8, for individuals who are newer on Thursday, March 21 from 6 - 7:30 pm at – Depression support group meetings held to running, want to an active and healthier Ecole Lorette Immersion Library. on the 4th Tuesday of every month at 7 pm. lifestyle. We will help you learn to meet Located at the Health Corner DeSalaberry your running goals. A7-week fun program Annual Metis Cultural Event - Lorette Metis Hospital. Contact Judy Dunn 444-5228. is also scheduled to help you prepare for Local presents Patti Lamoureaux. Buy tickets the Run for Mom 5km on May 12. Contact by March 30 to be entered for free draw. Ste. Anne gregandtanya@hotmail.com. On Saturday, April 13 from 7:30 pm -12:30 Hypnotist Night - organized by the Ste. am, at the Lorette Parish Hall, Dawson Rd. Anne Recreation Committee on Saturday, Bethesda Auxiliary Weekly Book Sale A 3 time Canadian Grand Master Fiddling March 16 at 9 pm at the Thirsty Cactus - Weekly book sale, every Tuesday. Cost is champ, 3 time North America Fiddling Ste Anne Hotel. $20 ea, tickets available 50 cents each. Contact Verna Thiessen Champ, 1st Women & 1st Western at Old 12 Restaurant, Ste. Anne Hotel or 204-326-3028 at the Clearspring Centre Canadian to win Grand Master. Ticket contact Nicole at 422-5000. All monies (across from Blue Notes). $12.50 ea. Contact Lorraine (204)878- raised will go towards the Ste-Anne 3704 Cell (204) 771-2101, Emile (204) Skateboard Park and Splash Pad. Adult Book Club - Tuesdays from 7 – 8:30 422-6040 or Merle (204)878-3213. pm. Bring book suggestions or peruse our Bibliothèque Ste. Anne Library Used Book book lists. Meet some other book lovers Mitchell Fundraiser – Sale of huge selection of too and bring a friend. At the Jake Epp Breakfast and Social - every Tuesday used book proceeds will be used towards Library 255 Elmdale St. morning, 7:30 - 9:00 am except the last new library books. For further information Tuesday of the month when the social is call Mona at 422-9958 or drop in at the Ladies Get Fit Classes - Sponsored by held instead. Lunch starts at noon at the library at 16 Rue de l’Église. Cost of books Eastman Immigrant Services, every Mitchell and Area Seniors Centre. Contact $1-$5. Wednesday at 7:15 pm at the Woodlawn 204-326-6944. School gym. Aerobic, circuit training, Seine River Services for Seniors – Invite all weights, mats and stretching exercises. Niverville seniors interested in the Wii Bowling game Suitable for all ages and levels of fitness. Niverville Dog Adoption Fair - Comedy to come, try it out, and have fun. Monday Register contact Lois 204-346-6609. Fundraiser Night on Sunday, March 24. afternoons, at Le Club Jovial. Contact Entertainment will feature “Raise The Woof” Juliette Rowan at 204-424-5575 Hockey For Seniors (60+) - One hour of from Los Angeles. All profits go to help Community Resource Coordinator for fun, exercise, friendship at the Steinbach animal rescues with a portion going local services or e-mail Arena on Mondays from 10:30 - 11:30 towards rewards for information that lead labseinerss@gmail.com. am. Contact Bob Barrow, 204-392-3596, to the arrest of those responsible for the bob.r.barrow@gmail.com or Darrell missing dogs in Southeast Manitoba. At Ste. Geneviève Delong, 204-371-0229, the Niverville Community Fellowship S.G.C.C Annual General Meeting- AGM djdlong@mymts.net. Church, 116 3rd Avenue S. Starts at 6:30 on Sunday, March 10 at 2 pm, pm, Tickets are $20 ea available at refreshments afterwards. Our current Steinbach Girl Guides - Every Tuesday at Ruffmutts Grooming (18 Hill Crest Court), Executive Committee is seeking your help the United Church of Steinbach, 541 Main Niverville Bigway or contact Barry 204-510- in making our community even stronger. St. Registration for girls 5-17. Develop 4229 or 204-388-9676. Contact Tashia at 422-9964 for more personal values and well-being, selfdetails or questions. The board meets once respect and respect for others; promote fun, Moms N’ Tots Playgroup - Moms with a month and would love to see more friendship, adventure and challenges children up to age six. Wednesday people contributing to positive change. through new experiences; develop mornings from 9:30 - 11:30 am located in leadership and decision-making skills; give the lower level of Fourth Avenue Bible Library Night - Bibliothèque Taché Library service to the community; value the natural Church (62 4th Avenue S.). Free drop-in at the Community Centre on the 2nd and environment. program with coffee and snacks provided, 4th Tuesday of each month, from 6:30 - 8

Dawson Trail Dispatch Green Drinks South Eastman - South Eastman Transition Initiative presents Green Drinks South Eastman. On the 3rd Tuesday of every month at 7 pm at LBees, 5-275 Main St. Grab a coffee and discuss sustainable living. Contact rebecca_hiebert@yahoo.com. Seniors (60 +) Shinny Drop-in Hockey every Monday from 10 -11 am at Centennial Arena. Contact Bob Barrow at 392-3596 or email bob.r.barrow@gmail.com. The Steinbach Rotary Club - meets every Monday at noon at Steinbach 55 Plus Centre. Contact Cornie at 326-3155. Mental Health Information and Support sessions - for family and friends of people with mental health issues are held the 2nd Tuesday of every month from 7 – 8:30 pm at the Eden East building, 21 Loewen Blvd. Contact Kim at 371-0824 or email eastmanmss@mts.net

snacks and milk coupons for all participating expectant moms or mothers who have babies up to six months of age. Contact: Terry from Super Start at 3467021 or just drop in. Blumenort - EMC Church on Thursday, March 7 and April 4 at 10 am – 12 pm Niverville - Community Fellowship Church on Tuesday, March 12 and April 9 at 10 am - 12pm Ste. Anne - Dayspring Fellowship Church on Wednesday, March 13 and April 10 at 10 am – 12 pm Kleefeld – EMC Church on Thursday, March 14 and April 11 at 10 am – 12 pm St. Malo -St. Malo School on Wednesday, March 20 and April 17 at 10 am – 12 pm St. Pierre-Jolys - St. Pierre Health Corner on Thursday, March 21 and April 18 at 10 am – 12 pm Ste. Agathe - Community Hall Centre on Tuesday, March 19 and April 16 at 10 am – 12 pm Lorette - Seine River Church on Tuesday, March 26 and April 23 at 10 am – 12 pm Mitchell - Fellowship Church on Thursday, March 28 and April 25 at 10 am – 12 pm Grunthal - Family Hut South Oaks School on Tuesday, March 5 and April 2 at 10 am – 12 pm

MS Monthly Self-Help group meeting - for people living with multiple sclerosis. The group meets on the second Thursday evening of each month from 6 - 7 pm at Fernwood Place apartments. Contact Nadine Konyk, Rural Client Services Free monthly bus trips to the casinos of Coordinator at 1-800-268-7582 or email Winnipeg for a fun day at the Casinos. Pick up in Steinbach at 8:30 am, Ste. Anne nadine.konyk@mssociety.ca. and Paradise Village at approximately 9 MS Lunch Group- on fourth Thursday of am. Must be 18 years of age or older. Prizes every month, from 12 – 1 pm at the Village and $10 cash for everyone. Bingo on the Green Restaurant. Contact Nadine Konyk, bus. Call Marilyn at 204-326-4939 for Rural Client Services Coordinator 326- date information and to reserve your bus 1434 or email seat. Next scheduled trips Tuesdays, March 12, April 16 and May 21. nadine.konyk@mssociety.ca. Mood Disorders Association of Manitoba individual and support groups - for persons experiencing depression, anxiety, stress, bipolar disorder and other mental health/ emotional concerns. Meets on the first Wednesday of each month at Jake Epp Library from 7 – 9 pm. Contact Judy Dunn 204-444-5228. The Bethesda Regional Healthcare Auxiliary - meets on the first Tuesday of every month except for the months of July and August at the Bethesda Hospital. We welcome anyone interested in auxiliary work. Contact Verna Thiessen at 326-3028. Steinbach and Area Lions Club

Volunteer Firefighters to Meet in Woodridge The RM of Piney invites anyone

Lions Club - meets on the second and interested in volunteering as a fourth Wednesdays of every month at the firefighter for the community of Magnolia Restaurant. Contact 204-326- Woodridge to a special 2313. Carillon Toastmasters - meetings are open to adults who want to improve their leadership and communication skills. Thursday evenings starting at 7 pm at the Jake Epp Public Library 255 Elmdale Street, Contact Doreen 204-326-7525. Steinbach AA 12 Step Recovery Program Meetings are held on Wednesdays at 7 pm. Steinbach United Church, 541 Main St. Ring the front door bell. Young moms to be - Bi-weekly support group starts at 4:30 pm at Anna’s House B-11, Hwy 12N. Contact 346-0413. Whitemouth Quilt Club- Every Monday from 4 – 6 pm at the Whitemouth School in the Home Ec Room. Cost $10 per session. Contact Patti Enns 204-369-5577 or penns54@gmail.com. Shotokan Karate – For all ages, this martial art uses only the body to promote fitness, self-defense and confidence. Cost: $100 for all 10 class and pro-rated after. Classes held Thursday at 7 pm days at the Whitemouth School Gym. Contact Michel or Jenny to 204- 348-2473. Circuit 30 - Alternate aerobic and weight exercises with cool down and stretch exercises. Wear comfortable clothing, clean runners and bring a bottle of water. Cost $2/class. Mondays from 6 -7 pm, in the Whitemouth School Gym. Contact Carolien 204-348-2932. General The Super Start Program, A Healthy Baby program with the Southern Regional Health Authority. Program for pregnant women and families with infants up to one year of age. Sessions include song and rhyme time, discussions and games on topics related to healthy babies and healthy moms. Door prizes, nutritious

information meeting in the middle of March. The municipality has called a meeting for March 14 where they will take names and provide information for anyone willing to become a paid volunteer fire fighter for the community. “We are asking for all individuals who would like to volunteer as firefighters to join us to reach the next step towards the goal of a Woodridge Fire Department,” stated council. In order for the department to be effective, at least a dozen volunteers would have to step forward. Twenty would be ideal, council noted. To become a volunteer firefighter with the municipality applicants may be required to meet criteria that could include obtaining a medical exam and upgraded drivers licence. Any training, including Level 1 fire training, will be provided by trained professionals and funded by the municipality. The meeting will take place March 14 at the Woodridge Hall starting at 7 pm. Anyone requiring more information can call the municipality at 204-437-2284 or Mario Boily at 204-429-2145.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

March 2013

Mayor, Reeve Honoured with Jubilee Medals By Marianne Curtis

RM of Tache CEO, Dan Poersch, presents Mayor Bill Danylchuk with a Diamond Jubilee Medal on behalf of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.

Several mayors and reeves throughout the province have been recognized with Queen Elizabeth Jubilee Medals on behalf of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. On February 19, RM of Tache Mayor, Bill Danylchuk, was named as one of the most recent recipients of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal. “This was very surprising and it is quite an honour to receive this recognition,” stated Danylchuk. For the past 36 years, Danylchuk has served on the RM of Tache council, most of them as Reeve. He is also an active member of several committees, including serving as the Chair for the Ste. Anne Hospital Board and Southeast Water Management Association. “I have always been an outspoken person when it comes to representing small rural

Lemieux Hands Out Jubilee Medals

municipalities,” Danylchuk added. A few days earlier RM of Ste. Anne Reeve, Art Bergmann was also presented with a medal. “The Federation of Canadian Municipalities selected Reeve Art Bergmann to receive the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in honour of his contributions to the community and to all of Canada,” stated Councillor Laurie Evans, who made the presentation on behalf of the FCM. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities also recognized Town of Ste. Anne mayor, Bernie Vermette, for his work as mayor and involvement with community activities, fundraisers and with the Metis Federation. The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal was created to mark the 60th anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the RM of Ste. Anne Reeve Art Bergmann proudly Throne as Queen of Canada and displays his Diamond Jubilee Medal. honour the significant contributions and achievements of Canadians.

Recipient Eveline Foisy of Lorette with Eva Lebrun, Carmel and Bert Foisy, husband Bert, and Anne Grossman.

Dawson Trail MLA Ron Lemieux hosted a ceremony at his office in the legislature on February 28 to present three of his constituents with the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal. “Each of these recipients is an integral part of their community contributing much of their time to volunteer activities which help enhance their community and neighbours,” said Lemieux. “Whether it’s francophone activities, flooding issues or local community centres and recreation groups, Henri, Eveline and Carmen are always ready to lend a hand. I am so pleased to be able to honour their accomplishments and selflessness.”

Recipient Carmen Allard of Ste. Genevieve with friends Heather McIsaac and Jeanette Saltel.

Recipient Henri Legasse of St. Adolphe (centre) with son Yves Legasse, daughter Melanie Warren, wife Suzanne, daughter Mireille Stewart and son Yvan Legasse.

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More Than Just News!

March 2013

South East Water Companies Win Top Awards

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Linden Man Dies During Storm

The body of a Linden man was found about 50 metres from his truck after being stuck in a ditch about three miles west of Landmark.

A 54-year-old Linden man died after being found unconscious along Highway 210 during the early hours of February 18. According to St. Pierre-Jolys RCMP, a passer-by discovered the unconscious man lying along the highway, just west of Linden at around 6:30 in the morning. Police said it appeared the driver got stuck along the road and, after failing to dig himself out, started walking home. Trent Burling, a long time resident of Linden was only about a mile from his home when the incident occurred. His body was found about 50 metres from his truck. Police said that poor visibility and road conditions could have factored in his death. An autopsy was conducted to determine the cause of death but results will not being released. Foul play is not suspected. For the first time in history, a local water company took home two prestigious awards from the 2013 Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Competition. On February 23, Canadian Gold Beverages from Marchand was awarded two gold medals at the 2013 Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Competition. The locally bottled water won first place in the best-bottled Artesian Still Water and tied with Celvik Dobri Kiseljak, of Tesanj, Bosnia as the Gold winner in Sparkling Mineral Water category. “It is like winning the Olympics for bottled water,” owner Peter de

Jong stated. “No Company has ever won in both categories for bottled Artesian Still Water and Sparkling Mineral (carbonated) Water. We are extremely pleased about this. We’ve got the best tasting water in the world, right here in south eastern Manitoba.” When De Jong purchased the Canadian Gold Beverages in September of 2012 and reopened it, the company already had a credible track record. In 2009, it took a gold medal and in 2012, it won a silver medal from the Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting Competition. Middleboro based Jackson

Springs Natural Premium Spring Water earned a fifth place finish in the Best Sparkling Water category and tied in 4 th place in the Carbonated Bottled Water category alongside Antipodes of Whakatane, New Zealand. The annual Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting competition had more than one hundred waters competing from the US and around the globe. The event is the largest water tasting competition in the world. Municipal waters compete for the coveted honour of best tasting tap, still and sparkling waters along with a new category in purified drinking water.

RRCC Steinbach Expands Nursing Program Starting in August 2013, Red River Community College’s (RRCC) Steinbach Campus will begin offering the LPN to BN (Licensed Practical Nurse to Bachelor of Nursing) Program. The program allows LPN applicants who successfully meet admission requirements, to receive credit for the first year of the BN program, and instead enter at Year 2. It’s part of a wide range of academic and career training options available to area residents through the RRCC’s Steinbach Campus. “Colleges drive the economic and social development of the regions they serve, providing applied learning opportunities that lead students to rewarding careers and

producing a highly skilled workforce for local industry,” says Campus Manager Mary-Ann Shukla. “Red River College Steinbach Campus is

no exception, and this new program will allow us to further enhance the range of training options already available.”

Around the Clock eLibrary Opens at Bibliotheque Tache Library The Bibliotheque Tache Library now has eLibraries Manitoba (eLM), which allows patrons to download popular audio books and eBooks at any time to their personal computers, laptops, iPhones, Kindles, Kobos, iPads or any other electronic devices. These files are accessible from anywhere in the world, 24 hours a day. To access the digital materials you need a valid library card and internet access is also available at Bibliotheque Tache Library. Any computer or electronic device that meets the system requirements for the eBooks can be used. If you would like more information, please contact the head librarian Brandi Schmitz at btl@srsd.ca or 878-9488.


Dawson Trail Dispatch

More Than Just News!

Woodridge Could Goertzen Questions Where Lose Recycling Will Our Teachers Teach The RM of Piney is requesting that ratepayers respect the use of the Woodridge recycling bins after several recent incidents. According to the municipality there has been a reoccurring issue where items dropped off at the community recycling shed have been placed in black garbage bags, which is not acceptable for recycling. “All recycling goods must be placed in clear or blue bags,” stressed councils. “If black bags are placed in the recycling shed they are viewed as garbage and placed in the household pit.” Council stresses that the recycling shed has been placed there for the convenience of ratepayers in Woodridge and the surrounding area but if the problem persists the municipality will have “no choice” but to remove the service.

St. Pierre-Jolys Grow Project Kick’s Off The local Canadian Food Grains Bank (CFGB) project HELP will be holding an open house on March 24 at 2 pm at the Cabane à Sucre in St. Pierre-Jolys. According to Gerald Lahaie, with HELP, the meeting will consist of a question and answer period about the program including a presentation by a representative from the Canadian Foodgrains Bank. “These fields were seeded and harvested by farmers who took time away from their own fields to run their air seeders and combines for this worthwhile cause,” stated Lahaie. “Truly this is a community project, where we unite to help those in greater need.” This is the HELP project’s eighth year in the St. Pierre-Jolys, Grunthal, and St.Malo area. In 2012, the HELP project raised $48,687.51. This amount will be matched up to four to one by the Canadian International Development Agency resulting in $243,435 being sent for food aid. Half of this was sent to Catholic Development and Peace and half to Mennonite Central Committee. This was more than double the previous year of $100,000. For further information, call Gerald Lahaie 433-7475 or Ron Tone 4337189.

Warrant Nets Pot in Falcon Beach On Friday, February 8, after an ongoing investigation, Falcon Beach RCMP executed a search warrant on a local male resident in the Falcon Beach area. The search revealed a substantial amount of Marihuana in the residence. The 55year-old resident who was home at the time of the search was arrested and later released on a Promise to Appear. Drug related charges of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking are pending. The investigation is continuing.

Freedom of Information data reports that there are 525 temporary classrooms at schools throughout the province demonstrating that when it comes to a positive classroom environment, the NDP government has forgotten something—the classroom says local MLA Kelvin Goertzen. “Everyone recognizes and appreciates the quality teachers we have in Manitoba, but they and the students that they teach need to have an appropriate and safe learning environment. The 525 temporary trailers and huts that kids are being taught in because of inadequate school space doesn’t provide that,” said Goertzen who is also the Progressive Conservative Education Critic. Those temporary classrooms are located at 156 schools across Manitoba. Goertzen said that the NDP have failed to provide appropriate classroom space at the same time that they are directing the number of children that can be in the classes and refusing to allow school divisions to close schools that have only a few students. “In Winnipeg and Manitoba you have some schools that have huts all over the place with kids running in and out of schools to get to them, and in other schools the halls and classrooms are empty because there are only a few kids in the schools. And everybody’s hands are tied on this issue and taxes go up because the NDP put in directives without providing the resources to see them through properly,” said Goertzen. Data compiled at the end of 2012 showed that The Winnipeg School Division had 70 temporary classrooms, Pembina Trails had 64 temporary classrooms and the Hanover School Division had 52 temporary classrooms.

March 2013

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March 2013

More Than Just News!

Dawson Trail Dispatch

Dawson Trail Dispatch March 2013  

Southeast Manitoba news and features

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