Page 18

THE FOSSE GALLERY’

A FEAST for the Eyes

Meet the artists featured in The Fosse Gallery’s new exhibition, Lyrical Colourists (3 - 23 May 2020) At the Fosse Gallery’s brilliant new show, Lyrical Colourists, four artists with very different approaches to the definition of colour are showing their work together. Whilst the paintings are similar in their strong figurative approach, each artist is expressing their love of colour with something new and fresh in their work. Interestingly, they all hail from the surrounding area of the Cotswolds, with Em Isaacson living near Burford, Christopher Johnson from Tetbury, June Redfern from Oxford and Anthony Yates a little further afield in Birmingham.

Christopher Johnson has colour pouring out of his canvases, probably because he was born and raised in Zimbabwe, where light and colour are in huge supply. June Redfern is a renowned artist and takes her love of colour from the Scottish Colourists. Em Isaacson has lived in South Africa for long periods of time and her take on colour is again completely different. Meanwhile, Anthony Yates’s colour palette is more muted and rooted in the English light, presenting a delightful contrast to the other works in the show. These four artists might be very different, but their eye-catching images all exude a joy of life.

Em

Isaacson Em Isaacson uses her pastels to express her love of colour, her fascination with texture and exploration of line.

if they were thread, watching an image emerge from the paper, weaving together the power of colour with the control of line to capture the essence of her subjects.

Graduating with an honours degree from Loughborough College of Art in 1976, her background as head of one of the country’s largest woven textile design studios, as well as in teaching, led to her involvement with both the British Crafts Council and The Royal Society of Arts.

In 1998, she left the UK for South Africa, where her work was hung at The Everard Reed Gallery in Cape Town, as well as the Residence of the British High Commission. She became noted for her pastel paintings of African women who moved and inspired her.

She has developed a unique style of painting from her heritage of weaving and defines imagery by manipulating her pastels as

“To embrace them with colour, to define them with line and texture is the only way I know to express my admiration for their beauty and their strength,” Em says.

18

COTSWOLD HOMES MAGAZINE

Profile for Cotswold Homes

Cotswold Homes Spring 2020 Edition  

Welcome to the Spring 2020 edition of Cotswold Homes Magazine. In this seasonal edition, we’ve asked our business experts and editorial co...

Cotswold Homes Spring 2020 Edition  

Welcome to the Spring 2020 edition of Cotswold Homes Magazine. In this seasonal edition, we’ve asked our business experts and editorial co...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded