Term 2 Magazine April 2019

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The Termly Magazine of Bangkok Patana School

Bangkok Patana

Magazine

Issue 57 Term 2, April 2019

RESIDENTIAL VISITS

Global Citizenship Let There Be Light

Well-Being

Adventures Outside the Classroom

Alumni Stories Life after Patana

Bangkok Patana is a not-for-profit IB World School accredited by CIS




LEARNING

CONTENTS

Issue 57, Term 2, April 2019

RESIDENTIAL VISITS

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Year 3: The First Residential Year 4: So Much to Experience in Kanchanaburi Year 5: Wilderness Adventures in Khao Yai Year 6: Mangroves and Mudskippers

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16 Year 7: To Rayong and Beyond! 18 Year 8: The Best One Yet? 20 Year 9: The Toughest Residential 22 Year 10: Highlight of the Year 24 Year 12: A Thirst for Knowledge

WELL-BEING

26 Adventures Outside the Classroom

GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

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31 33 34

Let There Be Light Alumni Stories: Life after Patana Alumni Visits Alumni Events Make a Name for Yourself ...

Front cover: Artwork by Oscar Lai,Year 4

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L ELAORBNAI LN C G GI T I Z E N S H I P

FOREWORD “... I’ve returned from every Residential Visit proud that I had accomplished something I was totally uncomfortable with at first...” Fresh and his classmates on the Year 4 Residential in Kanchanaburi, 2011

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hen asked what my favourite memory of the year has been, a particular event that I never fail to mention is Residential week. My first Residential was the trip to Kanchanaburi in Year 4. If settling into a new school wasn’t daunting enough, having to spend a whole week away from home with a Year Group, most of whom were complete strangers to me, definitely was! I remember fighting away tears as I bid my parents farewell for the first time in my life. My mom always comforted me by patting a 500 baht note in my hand which I promised to exchange for some souvenirs for everyone back home. As the years went by, the goodbyes got a lot easier and,

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as I entered my teenage years, the bitter sweetness turned into embarrassment of having parents following you to your bus, asking for a last hug. That’s the thing about Residentials: they teach you how to evolve into a stronger, more independent person who is able to adapt to a foreign environment away from home. Residentials also push you out of your comfort zone as you will see over the following pages of this magazine. On the Year 7 Residential, I signed up to sing for the very first time in public at the talent show night. I vividly recall sitting backstage, fidgeting with the thumb drive that contained my backing track as the act before me was fast approaching an end. It ended up being the

Editor: Rebecca Meadows Tel: +66 (0) 2785 2200 Email: reme@patana.ac.th Advertisement: Finn Balslev Tel: +66 (0) 2943 7166-8 Email: finn@scandmedia.com

first of a long series of performances which I could never have imagined. Whether it was entering a river which potentially contained blood-sucking leeches, sharing a tent with someone I didn’t know very well, or cooking up a meal on a trangea, I’ve returned from every Residential Visit proud that I had accomplished something I was totally uncomfortable with at first. Other than the fire drills (although I appreciate that this is for our safety!), I’ve thoroughly enjoyed every part of my Bangkok Patana Residential experience. I think it is an essential break from the emphasis on academics to instead focus on personal development. – Palis (Fresh) Pisuttisarun, Year 12

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WELL-BEING

THE YEAR 3 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

THE FIRST RESIDENTIAL Hannah McLaughlin, Assistant Leader of Learning, Year 3

Once again, Year 3 returned to the Royal Varuna Yacht Club at Jomtien Beach for their first ever Bangkok Patana Residential Visit! The trip always generates a mixture of excitement, wonder and of course, a little trepidation!

Dear Diary,

I am very excited for Residential. I think it’s going to fun, in fact, I think it’s going to be the best Residential ever! They gave us a packing list but what does that mean? How am I supposed to choose just four t-shirts? It says no electronics but my torch and camera are both electronic – will I get into trouble? What if it runs out of batteries? I’m too excited to sleep. My roommates and I are planning a dance party and a jumbo pillow fight! I’m looking forward to feeling the sand in my toes and building a huge sandcastle on the beach. Have you ever tried wave jumping? I can’t wait to do that with my friends! Hopefully it will be an amazing trip. Good night, Diary. – 3K

Dear Diary,

On Wednesday morning we went on our first Residential Visit. First, we heaved our luggage onto the bus and bravely waved goodbye to our families. Then all of a sudden, we were off. There was such a buzz of excitement on the journey; some children were singing, some were telling jokes and some were reading but all of us were full of joy! After two hours, which seemed more like two years, we arrived at the Royal Varuna Yacht Club in Pattaya. We jumped off the bus and hugged our friends. Our first Residential had finally begun! – 3A

Dear Diary,

Following check-in, we finally got to see our rooms! Once the beds had been checked for ‘comfiness’ and our clothes unpacked, we were ready to begin the first activity of the day; team games. The activities included bridge building, fill the bucket, anagrams and the infamous human knot challenge. Before long, it was time for a much needed cool down in the swimming pool, before getting our smart clothes on for dinner. After dinner, we reflected on the day in our Resi diaries. Then, it was story time before getting cosy in bed. We went to sleep dreaming of the fun and adventures that were to come on Day Two. – 3H 8

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Dear Diary,

After waking up on our first bright, sunny morning, we made our way out into the garden wondering the day would bring. Yoga and stretching, catching and throwing, Twister and bowling were just a few of the activities we took part in to energise our brains whilst we waited for our breakfast. Then using paper, string, tape and wooden sticks, we made colourful kites to fly on the lawn. Although they were tricky to make, we persevered and were able to fly our impressive creations once they were complete. After a wonderful start to the day, what more could we ask for? – 3J

Dear Diary,

As the sun gradually climbed higher and higher into the clear blue sky, we headed down to the beach and jumped straight into the refreshing, cool ocean. Happily, we splashed in the cold, salty waves again and again! We also built enormous, golden sandcastles and some of us helped turn one of our teachers into a sand mermaid! After having a fabulous time in the sand, we strolled back along the beach and sat on the grass, where we got to eat something delicious…ICE CREAM! There’s nothing like a refreshing ice cream while sitting in the sun with the sound of the waves in your ears. Perfect! – 3M

Dear Diary,

The second night was our favourite! Excitedly, we dressed in our very best clothes ready for dinner and the talent show. We had a delicious barbeque right next to the beach. There was so much food to choose from like salads, potatoes, chicken and sausages – yum! After the barbeque, we were all ready to perform in the talent show. The acts were fantastic! There were dancers, joke tellers and even some magicians! Before long, it was time for a story and bed. We were all so exhausted after the show we fell asleep really quickly. Our first residential had been amazing! – 3F

Dear Diary,

After a delicious lunch of mouth-watering pizza and crunchy French fries, we were ready for the afternoon’s exciting activities. First, we painted the beautiful landscape. During this, we spotted desert islands, pirate ships and some people even thought that they saw a dolphin! Afterwards we carefully put together boats made of lolly sticks, twigs and rubber bands. Once built, the boats were put into the water and off they went - the race was on! Later it was us who were swimming in the refreshing whirlpool in the centre of the swimming pool whilst others enjoyed some time on the lawn. Ms Clare and Ms Dominque even had a cartwheel race! – 3C

Dear Diary,

I can’t believe that today is our LAST day already! Time certainly flies when you are having fun! I’m not really sure how I’m feeling today – I’m feeling a little blue about leaving, however I am also really looking forward to seeing my family. When I heard the knock on the door, I sprang out of bed as I was ravenous! Unfortunately, we had to pack up our rooms ready for inspection, before we could have our last mouth-watering breakfast. However, tidying up and packing was a lot more fun than I had expected as we turned it into a game! After breakfast we had our last opportunity to play before setting off on our two-hour journey. What an amazing time we have had. I can’t wait for the Year 4 Residential now! – 3D TERM 2 – 2018/19

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WELL-BEING

THE YEAR 4 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

SO MUCH TO EXPERIENCE IN KANCHANABURI Julie Kelly, Leader of Learning and Welfare, Year 4

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ince the start of the year, the Year 4 Residential Visit has been a hot topic of conversation with students asking about the resort, the activities and more importantly who they will be sharing a room with! So, we posed a question to the children: What is the purpose of Residential Visits? Here are some of their responses: • So we can have fun! • Because we can learn new things that we can’t learn at school. • We need to become more independent and learn how to be away from our families. • To make new friends and meet different people from other classes. • Because we can solve problems like how to keep your room tidy and how to look after friends that are feeling homesick.

“On the first day, I was really excited to play on the grass and choose from all the activities. I was also looking forward to seeing my room and relaxing with my roommates. Once I arrived at the Felix Hotel, I felt like I was in heaven for the first day.” – Molly, 4S “On the way back from the cave, I was chatting with my friends and we played a wonderful Japanese game called Osara.” – Otys, 4A

Enriching the Curriculum: A Journey Back in Time… Children learn much more efficiently when they actively engage with their subject. Having learned about the French explorer Henri Mahout, who is acclaimed for rediscovering Angkor Wat, the students were eager to explore the ancient ruins at Prasat Muang Singh. “Holy Macaroni! I said to myself when I first took a glimpse of the temple. I knew it

Developing Personal and Social Skills As the students stated, an important part of the visit to Kanchanaburi is spending quality time with friends and learning how to get along in new and sometimes challenging situations. For this reason, we allow students plenty of ‘down time’. They relax by the river; have fun in the pool; hang out in their bedrooms and enjoy mealtimes with friends. would be exciting to go in’. – Min, 4C “Eventually we arrived at the beautiful, mossy ruins. What an amazing sight! Hundreds of bricks piled high on top of each other. Excitedly, I grabbed my camera from my bag and started snapping pictures. The ruins were awesome! I found a lot of stuff that was interesting such as the Khmer library and a giant spider web!” – Saheim, 4K “It felt magical to enter this ancient, mysterious temple and I loved exploring the passageways and climbing the steep stairs. It was like we were real explorers!” – Lily, 4A 10

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Buddhas and Bats The visit to the Wat Tham Kao Pun Cave was a chance to develop resilience as we crept through the dark, twisting pathways. The spirituality of the cave provoked a desire to learn more about the culture of Thailand. The sudden flutter of bat wings made the experience magical as well as observing stalactites and stalagmites forming before their eyes! “Nervous and excited, we entered the mysterious cave. As we arrived in the first chamber, we noticed many golden Buddhas. There was one for each day of the week. Walking deeper inside, we learned about stalagmites and stalactites. We even saw the minerals dripping on the end!” – Riko, 4H “We stumbled upon many amazing things including the sacred Emerald Buddha, with jewels spread across its body, sitting on a flat rock. It was an amazing experience going deep into the crust of the earth.” – Hugo, 4W “I saw tiny, shiny mounds on the ground

which looked like fried eggs! I learned that these were stalagmites growing. Did you know that a stalagmite takes 1,000 years to grow 10cm?”– Tanwaar, 4T

The Trusty Truss Bridge During Term 1, the students learned about the Science of Bridges. As they sketched the famous bridge over the River Kwai from the banks of the river, they were able to engage once more with this amazing feat of engineering. “We got a chance to see the River Kwai Bridge! I did not expect this iconic bridge to be this big.” – Kin, 4S

Strengthening Student-Teacher Relationships The environment created on the Residential Visit allows for a less formal student-teacher relationship. As staff involve themselves in the wealth of activities, the children get to see a different side of the adults.

All Round Talent…

“The judges were super funny especially Troy! But Monkey Magic was a bit mean. Although he was mean, at the end he was being nice. Beautifully, Talullah Topaz liked to walk. She even walked gorgeously to the Topaz Room. For me, Tallulah and Troy were actually funny. I wondered who would win in a comedy contest.” – Nokhook, 4D “When the night came, my heart was pumping so hard I thought I was going to explode. After we had all played the thrilling games and the fabulous dances, we were yawning so much our mouths hurt! It was time to go back to our rooms. As I got ready for bed I whispered to my friends ‘’I wish we could do this every night!” and everyone said “Yeah!’’”– Tess, 4C And Finally… “That was an epic Residential! I really enjoyed the whole thing. When I grow up and look back at my pictures I bet I will smile! Thanks to everybody for making this the best Residential yet.” – Ilda, 4K TERM 2 – 2018/19

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WELL-BEING

THE YEAR 5 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

WILDERNESS ADVENTURES IN KHAO YAI Joanna Mitchell, Assistant Leader of Learning, Year 5

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ear 5 enjoyed their Residential Visit in Khao Yai where a night safari, jungle trek, shelter building and a river study were some of the highlights! Upon arrival at Klong Sai Resort, the students took a tour of the grounds before lunch. Afterwards they took part in a variety of outdoor activities, including cycling, team games and swimming. The teachers were impressed at the resilience and determination of our students when cycling, especially up the hill! Night Safari We set off before sunset into the Khao Yai National Park. Upon arrival we were escorted onto a convoy of songthaews, where we started to add our layers; it was cold in Khao Yai! During the safari we had to be very quiet and keep our eyes peeled in order to spot some of the fascinating wildlife‌ Most of us spotted deer, porcupine and even elephants! Jungle Trek The Year 5 students did extremely well to complete the 5km trek through the uneven terrain of the rainforest. We cast our minds back to our bird watching practice from school and were able to spot a

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few different species, some of the classes even spotted the rare horn bill! Others examined tree trunks carefully and captured glimpses of different insects, including some unusual spiders. Bat Cave On Tuesday evening before sunset, we travelled by bus to the bat cave. We waited patiently for what ended up being a truly magnificent experience. At first several birds of prey circled the caves in anticipation of their next feast. Then as the sun was setting, the bats descended from their cave in a furious wave across the sky. It was fantastic to see millions upon millions of bats soaring through the sky making their journey into the night. Tree Planting and Shelter Building The next morning, we met the rangers where we were taken to the tree planting spot. It was amazing to think that these trees will contribute to the health of our planet and will still be standing in hundreds


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of years! Standing on the outskirts of the forest, we were able to see hotels and other infrastructure on one side and the beautiful rainforest to the other. It really made us consider the devastating effects deforestation has had. We were delighted to be contributing to the environment with our tree planting and hope we have inspired others to do the same in different areas around Thailand, and the world. After lunch, we began an afternoon of shelter building. It was fantastic to see the students collaborating and thinking critically in order to create the best possible shelter. The shelter had to be able to withstand the elements – some shelters provided better protection against rainfall than others as we soon found when we tested them. After completing their shelters, the students were treated to a delicious ice cream. River Study We headed back to the Khao Yai National Park to partake in a variety of studies at the river. The students got into the river (some were shocked at the cool temperature at first!) to measure the river speed and depth. They used fishing nets and magnifying glasses to

capture and study different species found in this habitat and were able to draw conclusions on how clean the river was based on which creatures were found. All insects were returned safely to the river at the end to ensure we were being environmentally responsible visitors to the park. After lunch, we made our descent to the base of Haew Suwat Waterfall. We used this time to create ‘senses’ poems, considering what we could see, hear and even feel while we were enjoying the waterfall. The climb back was a challenge with over 100 steps to the top! The Talent Show With guest judges Troy, Mrs Haden, Simona Cowell, Magical Molly, Kind Katie and Mr Evil making special debuts at Klong Sai Resort, this was sure to be a night full of excitement and laughter! The contestants did a remarkable job, not forgetting our special MC Fred who stole the limelight in Week One. It was a perfect way to end a fantastic week. The Residential Visit was one full of fun, excitement and laughter, but it was also a trip which required students to draw on vital life skills including independence, critical thinking and resilience. Everyone faced different challenges over the week and dealt with them in a variety of ways, and for that the teachers are very proud. I’m sure Year 5 are already counting down the days until their next Residential in Year 6. TERM 2 – 2018/19

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WELL-BEING

THE YEAR 6 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

MANGROVES AND MUDSKIPPERS Thomas Iredale, Assistant Leader of Learning, Year 6

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ith bags packed, spirits high and snacks aplenty, Year 6 headed off to Chanthaburi for their last Residential experience whilst in Primary School. Our current unit of learning is “Human Impact” and the visit to Chanthaburi provides the ideal opportunity for students to enhance this learning by studying both the positive and negative effects of human activity in the area and beyond. Another key aim of the Residential programme is to develop the independence of our students as they try new challenges and take on new responsibilities. Perhaps one of the most eagerly anticipated parts of the Residential is when we spend the night in the wilderness, camping and cooking under the stars. For many of our students this is their first experience of camping. The children prepare and cook their own food on charcoal campfires, and they eat from banana leaves whilst sitting on the floor. At night, after another exhausting day, they retire to their tents and sleeping bags without the usual comforts of air conditioning, soft, fluffy mattress or cotton sheets. This experience of ‘roughing it’ in the wild, encountering and enduring rain, creepy crawlies and cold showers, is for the children, one of the most enduring memories of the whole trip. They put aside their creature

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comforts, material possessions and electronic devices for an evening immersed in nature, enjoying friendships and life at its most basic. A visit to the mangrove forest is the highlight of another day, where we observe the impact that local industries such as shrimp farming, fishing and logging have had on the delicate ecosystem. In a very popular part of our time away, we board kayaks and explore the bay, going deep into the mangrove forest. Through this experience, the children learn very quickly the importance of cooperation and communication in their efforts to navigate their vessels without ending up stuck in a mangrove tree! Whilst in the mangroves we take a nature walk, remaining as quiet as possible in order to spot some of the local wildlife: mudskippers, kingfishers, fiddler crabs and even the odd snake! We also learn about some of the creatures that used to be present in the mangroves, but no longer remain, most notably the dugongs. We also visit the local aquarium and sea-life rehabilitation area, where rich discussion is had about the ethics of animal captivity, its benefits to education and conservation and the quality of life of those animals held captive. On return to school, this feeds back into our learning when we use the experience as an opportunity to


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“I really enjoyed kayaking because I have never done it before and it’s amazing to see inside the mangroves. I learnt how to cook corn in jungle cooking and now I’m very fast at this job. But my favourite part of Residential was enjoying the peace of the National Park compared to the crazy noise of Bangkok.”– Kristina, 6H

“I learnt about the importance of mangroves to the marine ecosystem and I experienced the thrill of kayaking and playing on the beach. I really enjoyed looking for animals!” – Anik, 6N

“The cooking was a very good experience as it was my first-time cooking. Everything tasted amazing and we even made our own fires! The kayaking was an adventure as it isn’t every day you get to go.” – Lucas, 6C “I enjoyed the entire Residential because it was so much fun! I got to go camping for the first time, cook my own meals and go kayaking. I also learnt about human impact and the ways humans have impacted Chanthaburi by cutting down the mangroves.” – Zheng, 6D

“My Residential experience was amazing. I enjoyed playing in the waterfall the most. I learned how to kayak and how we are affecting the world. My biggest challenge was camping because I had never done it before but I had so much fun with my friends!” – Naia, 6N

“What I enjoyed most about Residential was friendship. It was a great opportunity to make new friends and also learn while having lots of fun. This got me involved with the learning and motivated me. This was my first Residential experience and I made lots of new friends that I can talk to at school. Residential is a fun, educational and adventurous opportunity for everyone.” – Amy, 6T

provide context and viewpoints for the writing of discussion texts in Literacy. This year was yet another example of the enriching experience that our yearly Residential Visits provide the students. The children gain valuable learning experiences that enhance the school

curriculum, whilst as importantly, making new friends, and strengthening existing friendships. They encounter new challenges that they will always remember. They learn new skills and take on new responsibilities that allow them to grow. And, as you can see from the photos, they have a great time while doing it! TERM 2 – 2018/19

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WELL-BEING

THE YEAR 7 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

TO RAYONG AND BEYOND! Tracey Barton, Head of Year 7

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We’re all going on a residential holiday, No more studying for a day or two. Fun and laughter on our residential holiday, Where our dreams come true, for a day or two! We’re going where the sun shines brightly…Rayong! We’re kayaking in the sea so calm and blue, We’re watching the teachers kayak so delightfully, Especially when Mr Liam capsizes in front of the crew. We’re all going on a resi holiday, Trekking in the jungle is what we do best. Listening to Mr Hume and Mr Burrell carefully, Whilst watching the gorgeous orange sunsets. We’re all going on a resi holiday, Jumping off boats and scuba diving is what we loved most, Fixing our masks and snorkel so we can snorkel off the coast, Swimming with the fishes and snorkelling through caves, Discovering quiet beaches and jumping over the waves. We’re all going on a resi holiday, To learn about the turtles and lend a helping hand, A lot of them needed rescuing some stuck upon the land. Say no to plastic, bags and straws, That way we get to save a whole lot more. We’re all going on a resi holiday, Trash fashion and making clothes created such a mess, A hat made of paper card and pens came off the best, A parade of stylish students wore their outfits with pride and glee, Demonstrating their superior artistic skills and creativity. We’re all going on a resi holiday, Singing, dancing and acting in the infamous talent show, A few jokes from Miss Perriam and Miss Barton a one hit wonder comedy duo. Dancing on the beach to Mr Rowley and Mr Sowerby’s tunes, Whilst eating toasted marshmallows in the light of the moon. We’re all going on a resi holiday, To have fun, new challenges and engage in laughter, We know it cannot last forever but for that one week we holidayed happily ever after. Thank you to the Year 7 Residential Visit team, Wild Planet, The Rayong Chalet and a huge thank you to the Year 7 students who are truly amazing. – Tracey Barton, Head of Year 7 TERM 2 – 2018/19

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WELL-BEING

THE YEAR 8 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

THE BEST ONE YET? Stewart Anderson, 8W

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any us in Year 8 might say that this Residential Visit was the best one yet. We enjoyed lots of fun day activities such as paddle boarding, cycling, visiting a waterfall and much, much more in Kanchanaburi. I woke up excited on Monday morning which was how it was for a lot of us because we were going on Residential that day, and we were going to experience one of the best Residentials yet! After greeting our friends and waving our parents goodbye, we left hastily; our journey was going to be a long one. Some played card games, some sang songs, others just sat and talked. However, we were all excited for the fun ahead of us. One of the highlights of the trip was visiting the Erawan Falls. The walk may have been long with many flights of stairs, but it was worth it. We swam in and around the waterfall and we had a great time sliding down the rocks into the water below. Once we returned from the waterfall, we went on the obstacle course. The course seemed intimidating at first but my friends supported me, so we were all able to complete the course in record time.

We visited the Death Railway Museum, the War Memorial and Hellfire Pass. At each place, we learned about things that happened in the Eastern Hemisphere during World War II, though mainly focusing on Kanchanaburi and the ‘Death Railway. Although it may not have been the most exciting of activities, it was by far the most interesting one. We also visited an elephant sanctuary where we learned about the elephants native to the area, the history of the sanctuary, and last but not least we fed the elephants! I doubt many of us had ever fed elephants before then. My favourite daytime activities have to be the cycling and paddle boarding. I had never paddle boarded before but I caught on quite quickly whilst the cycling was also fun. The groups were split up partly by cycling skill so I got to cycle with people my speed (no pun intended!). I enjoyed it and was surprised that I wasn’t too tired after the 12km trail. While all the daily activities were fun, I have yet to write about what we did during the evenings after each tiring day. On Monday evening we watched a movie enjoyed some popcorn, Tuesday was quiz night, Wednesday was the Talent Show, and lastly on Thursday evening we had a disco. There were countless things to do during this Residential Visit and I am sure that everybody had at least one activity that they enjoyed; there’s just no way anybody could have possibly found it boring. I enjoyed almost everything that we did! On the last day, we were quite reluctant to go home after a fun week in Kanchanaburi. We had breakfast, packed our bags and loaded them onto the waiting buses. After a long drive, we finally arrived back at school. This time around, we were waving goodbyes to our friends and greeting our parents. 18

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TERM 2 – 2018/19

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L ELAORBNAI LN C G GI T I Z E N S H I P

THE YEAR 9 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

THE TOUGHEST RESIDENTIAL Kate Flynn, Head of Year 9

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f you ask students in Year 13 which was their favourite Residential Visit, they will almost always say the Year 9 Resi to Chiang Mai… but why? This is a trip where students have the opportunity to try physical activities which are not only enjoyable, but also help to improve skills that are difficult to develop in lessons. After all, it’s hard to manoeuvre a full-sized kayak in a classroom! The fun started with an early morning flight up to Chiang Mai. The airport was buzzing with the excitement of 190 students and staff, the Year 9 students had never looked so awake at 6:00am! After a drive through the beautiful countryside of Northern Thailand, we arrived at the hotel, enjoyed lunch and then had ice breaking activities. Most of the activities involved a great deal of communication; for example, during white water rafting everyone had to work as team, depend on and talk to each other in order to safely move forwards. And that was just during the warm up games before we even got into the raft! At the camp site, students had to stay with people who weren’t 20

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in their room and had to be independent and responsible to organise this to make sure that no one was left out; it was great to see so many students being friendly and inclusive. As a reward for completing this challenge successfully there was a secret talent show (with marshmallow prizes), with many weird and wonderful ‘talents’ on display. At the Pun Pun Centre, we learnt about the challenges involved in growing food sustainably and about the potential joys of living in a simpler way. Students did activities such as brick making (with some very muddy participants), seed storing and cooking, all fueled by a tasty organic, vegetarian lunch, made with produce grown on the farm. One day was spent cycling in the morning and kayaking in the afternoon. Cycling was the most challenging activity for some students, but the trepidation came with elated pride when they managed to overcome obstacles on the course or make it all the way around the ride. Even students that struggled at some activities found value in them, “After I jumped into the water, I couldn’t get back out into the kayak. Partly this was because I


Bangkok Patana Magazine

couldn’t stop laughing! I need to give a huge thank you to my friends who helped get me up onto the boat. And then when one of my friends couldn’t get up too I was encouraging her and supporting her and finally she succeeded.” and “Archery was my favorite activity during this residential. We were taught how to shoot the arrow the correct way and we took turns shooting the target. I was rubbish at it but I didn’t care about the points because I really enjoyed it.” The evening activities were ably organised by the Junior Delegates and included a quiz night and games. Although some students weren’t so impressed with the squats, as one student said, “I will revenge one day!” Often it is the unforeseen challenges that students are the proudest of overcoming, “I managed to sleep in a tent without aircon which I found really hard at first because it’s not what I am used to.” and “I went out of my comfort zone by not wearing shoes at the Pun Pun Centre when mixing mud so I could feel the dirt from the Earth.” Overwhelmingly, students said that they didn’t miss social media on the trip. It was fantastic to see people interacting with each other without a screen between their faces. Our return flight to Bangkok was delayed meaning another test of resilience. Students and staff were fantastic; playing cards, chatting and being positive. Although when the flight was finally announced there was an enormous cheer from the Bangkok Patana ‘camp’, with the teachers possibly cheering the loudest! Arguably, the Year 9 Residential to Chiang Mai is the toughest, the one that pushes students out of their comfort zone, with challenging but achievable physical activities. But could this be the secret of its success, and why students are still talking about it months and even years later? The Year 9 students had plenty of advice for the Year 8s who will go on this Residential Visit next year; • For the Pun Pun Centre, try the lettuce - it tastes like wasabi! • For camping, wear long sleeves shirt and long trousers, it may be hot in the day but it can prevent mosquito bites and it is pretty cold in the night. • Pack non-expensive clothes and shoes that you don’t destroying because the activities you do require getting wet, dirty and very sweaty! • Don’t worry about not having a phone. You have such fun socialising that the week long Resi feels short. • During camping keep your tent closed at all times or your tent could end up filled with ants who wanted to eat your sweets. • During the uphill ride, if you go slow then it’s more tiring so it’s better to go faster and to quickly get it over with! • Don’t worry if you don’t know your group, I thought my travel group wasn’t going to be good because there were so many people that I didn’t know but it turned out that it was the best travel group ever. We sang along together and shared snacks.

It’s not hard to agree, That this year’s Resi, Is better than others combined, Some may disagree, But it’s not hard to see, That everyone had a good time. Let’s start with the camping, Well, where to begin, How about the tents we were in, Though a bit hot, And pretty damp, We had a fab time at the camp. Now onto the rafting, How should I start? Well, eating a big breakfast was not so smart, We hurled down the rapids, Not as easy as it seems, That was when I realised rafting wasn’t for me! Kayaking was next, Wow, what a hoot, Except for the tanlines from my swimsuit, The water was deep, It was also cold, My fingers were wrinkled so much I looked old. Cycling was here, I didn’t know what to do, Because when you’re on Resi you can’t hide in the loo, But as we got going, I had so much fun, Riding outside in the bright midday sun. Up at the crack of dawn, We mindlessly packed, And onto the song teaws we were stacked, The things I learned, The food I made, Our day at the Pun Pun was a haze. To bring it to a close, Archery was last on the list, Although not a professional I got the gist, I got a few ‘good try’s’, And ‘Just try one more time’ I’m sorry I tried really hard but I can’t find a rhyme. – Polly Nevin, 9M TERM 2 – 2018/19

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LEARNING

THE YEAR 10 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

HIGHLIGHT OF THE YEAR Tavisha Khanna, 10T and Pim Wongswan, 10R

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hy do the Residential Visits always turn out to be a highlight of the school year? How on earth can Trangias, cow poo and waterslides be related to overcoming challenges? They’re all part of the Year 10 Residential activities in Khao Yai, of course! This year, our Residential Visit focused primarily on ‘overcoming challenges’, meaning numerous challenges lay ahead for us throughout the week including compost making using cow poo with Dr Heddle, Thai cooking, and the long-awaited two-day trek. The most challenging part of the week was perhaps the 17km practice trek that required each student to carry a 10kg rucksack in preparation for the Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award. The goal? Simply get to the campsite... Yet like they say, it’s easier said than done. This trek required masterful navigation skills, exquisite communication and collaboration skills, only the toughest would survive…well, thankfully everyone made it. Our group got lost numerous times and were one of the last groups to arrive, having overcome the climate of Thailand, bugs and the heavy bag – perseverance, optimism and energy bars got us through. Looking back, I realise that I have grown closer to my friends and developed valuable life skills that could not be learnt inside the classroom making the struggles totally worthwhile.

Compost making with Dr Heddle was another enjoyable activity as we learned how to compost using rotten vegetables, cow poop and other food waste. We learned that disposing food in this way is not only better for the soil as it does not contain any chemicals but is also is a sustainable method of farming. At first, many of us were against the idea of touching cow poo and rotten vegetables. However, when we learned about the benefits, it felt really good to give back to the environment. This activity was great because we learned so many new things and had to work as team to make sure that our compost was made correctly. Throughout compost making, it was enjoyable to listen as Dr Heddle explained how waste can turn into something that gives back so much to the environment. Later, we used the vegetables from the garden to cook our own Thai dishes which was really fun as we were able spent time with our friends and of course, eat the food! No Residential Visit would be complete with the evening activities, ours included the quiz night, disco and a games night. All of these events allowed us to bond and work with people we wouldn’t normally spend time with, work better as a team and develop our communication skills, whilst having fun and possibly looking rather odd thanks to the variety of challenges the games night had to offer. Organised and hosted by Mr Thombs, it was possibly one of the best game nights

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Bangkok Patana Magazine

“The trekking for me was very hard, my feet hurt very much and our group was really low on energy at the end but we worked hard to push through it. Being with other people I don’t really know challenged me to get out of my comfort zone and learn to socialise a bit more with people outside of my friendship group. All in all, I made some great memories on the trek.” – Tosca, 10G “I really enjoyed the quiz night because I got to have a fun, competitive night with my friends. I found the camping to be fun as it was in a safe environment, but we still got to do activities like swim in a river.” – Peter, 10G

we have encountered, although the activities were silly and at times embarrassing, it was nice to have a laugh with our friends and take a break from the regular school routine. The visit to Splash World was a highlight of the week, giving us time to rejoice in the simple pleasures of the lazy river, catching up with friends and cooling down from the sizzling Thai sun. The various waterslides

“When I reflect back, some moments are very funny and it was definitely a wonderful experience with good memories. I learnt how to be part of a good team and when to be patient. I was very happy and proud of myself and my group when we arrived at the campsite on the first day.” – Ena, 10R

were thrilling and it was nice to relax before setting off on our trek, even though, the stairs proved to be even more tiresome! Throughout the week, without even realising it, we overcame a wide variety of challenges through teamwork and we, ourselves, grew as individuals. I don’t think that I would have ever made compost or set off on a 17km hike if it wasn’t for this Residential. Overcome challenges that seem impossible? Become a risk taker? Improve communication and collaboration skills? Check, check and check!

“I really liked the Thai cooking because I got to work with new people as well as eat some really good food. I also loved Splash World because I love water parks and exciting activities.” – Nick, 10G “I liked the trek even though I didn’t really enjoy it whilst I was walking. I would never have been able to do something like it if I didn’t go with the school. It was really challenging and I had to try a lot, but I felt really accomplished at the end. I learnt so many new skills, like teamwork as we had to stick together and help each other no matter what. We lost the route card but still managed to find the campsite with only the help of the map.” – Tam, 10G

“I learned that mindset is more crucial than I expected; thinking in a constructive and critical way allows me to complete tasks easier. The environment of Residential made me much more positive and open to new ideas and new people. It gave me lots of skills that are transferable into a school environment.” – Amery, 10C TERM 2 – 2018/19

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WELL-BEING

THE YEAR 12 RESIDENTIAL VISIT

A THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE Matt Jones, Head of Year 12 Real-life situation: Year 12 Residential Visit, Nakorn Nayok, November 2018 Knowledge question: Can we accurately measure success in the pursuit of knowledge?

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n first reading, student Millie Morton’s statement that the Year 12 Residential Visit was, “the first one where we all had to work and not do outdoor activities all day” has the potential to paint a negative picture, implying the week adheres to the old adage of ‘all work, no play’. But one of the things about Theory of Knowledge (ToK) is that it encourages us to recognise that her statement is partially true: Year 12s are mostly engaged in workshops/seminars during the daytime. It is an established fact that this Residential week is different. Comparing the schedules of the Year 12 week with those of previous years will provide evidence to support this fact. But how can we know if a ‘different’ Residential Visit is more or less valuable? Perhaps we need quantitative evidence to help here. 91% of students who courteously responded to our survey reported their enjoyment. Given that this is a significant percentage, we can conclude that the trip’s value has been positively measured by the levels of enjoyment. However, surely the value also depends on the depth of learning, on further social-emotional development, and even the beneficial opportunity to spend a few days away from the usual routine. After all, another adage goes: ‘a change is as good as a rest’. As the purpose of this article is to summarise and reflect on this year’s trip, there is an inherent inevitability that it will be portrayed in a positive light. We also know that the writer/editor of this article is the Head of Year (who co-ran the week), and an English teacher. Therefore, we can accurately predict the use of emotive language to highlight the positive aspects: engaging workshops provided enlightening moments for our knowledge-thirsty Year 12s; 80’s music and day-glo fashions united tutor groups in a unique way; ‘The Hungry Games’ revealed awe-inspiring characteristics and a 24

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new-found respect for the more flexible members of the Year group; superb time management, conduct and an upbeat approach to all aspects of the week. The latter cemented the teachers’ pre-existing knowledge that this is a Year group that has truly grown in maturity, independence, responsibility and reliability. If the previous paragraph seems too biased, then perhaps we need qualitative evidence gathered from samples of our student voice. The more sceptical ToK student would now reason that the quotations gathered and

printed below demonstrate selection bias, having been carefully chosen to ensure that a positive picture is painted. Maybe, but rather than dwell on that, let’s relish the fact that we have nurtured this level of critical thinking… Value judgements courtesy of student voice: “It was a really good experience” [also Millie] as “there was no shortage of fun in this trip,” said Oak Kornsri. Jonathan Cheng, “learned how ToK


Bangkok Patana Magazine

would link to a lot of the subjects we take and it gave [him] a different perspective on all the subjects.” Jamie Wuetrich valued, “time to chill and socialise with everyone.” Moniqa Nielsen reflected on how our assumptions can be adjusted through our open-mindedness when she reported that, “The ToK sessions and workshops were also interesting and very engaging, which was something I did not expect.” Alex Steffen

further recognised how, “[we] were able to work, collaborate and learn in a universitylike environment. It was a great mix of fun, hanging out with friends and academics.” A recurring theme from this trip echoes an aim of all our Residentials: to nurture those bonds with others. Kelly-Anne Tan summed this up when she said, “Having just joined Grad20 this academic year, I certainly appreciate the opportunities the Residential gave me to become closer to the Year group.” Finally, to really emphasise the tone of

an article like this, let’s recognise the great power in ending on an emotional high note. So, over to Navraj Singh: “The whole Year group really bonded and it’s one of those memories that we can reflect on when we are all Patana alumni...All in all, there couldn’t have been a better last Residential.” Fundamentally, when interpreting the opening statement as a positive reflection or not, it is very much subject to the reader’s own emotional response, which in itself is dependent on personal experience…Welcome to the wonderful world of ToK! TERM 2 – 2018/19

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WELL-BEING

ADVENTURES OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM Cindy Adair, Assistant Principal, Extra Curricular Activities and Sport

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angkok Patana School offers a biannual Secondary Ski Trip to Verbier, Switzerland to give interested students the opportunity to experience the thrill of skiing or snowboarding in the European Alps. The week-long trip is supervised by our staff but hosted by Les Elfes, a company who specialise in hosting school ski trips. The group stay in a gorgeous, custom built chalet only minutes away from literally hundreds of ski runs. A typical day includes a hearty breakfast followed by a ski/snowboard lesson in the morning, lunch on the slopes and then more time to explore in the afternoon, before returning to the chalet for dinner and a range of après ski activities such as ice skating, swimming, quiz night and more. Students are assessed upon arrival and placed in ability-based groups to maximise their improvement over the course of the week. Whether your child has never seen snow before or is a seasoned expert keen to take on the black runs, they will be catered for. The students also have the chance to meet and mix with other school groups being hosted by Les Elfes. It’s not unusual to find yourself sharing a hot chocolate with an international student from South America or South Africa!

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Bangkok Patana Magazine

“This year was my fourth time on the Bangkok Patana ski trip. I have learned how to ski and have created many wonderful memories which I will never forget thanks to this trip.” – Paphawin (Nicky) Setasawatpong, Year 11 “The ski trip is an excellent environment for students to challenge themselves. Each and every day on the trip students are given the opportunity to take risks, develop new skills and persevere. This year, students benefitted from incredible conditions, skiing in glorious sunshine. Students were also encouraged to practice their French language skills when shopping in Verbier.” – Oliver Blundell, Head of Secondary Physical Education “The 2019 Ski Trip was the first time I went skiing – and also the first time I saw snow! So this trip was definitely an exciting and very memorable experience for me. I enjoyed the choices of after-ski activities and had a lot of fun meeting new people.” – Kirsten Winyard, Year 9 “The sheer delight of seeing a group of 39 children and young adults interacting together so efficiently and respectfully was for me one of the highlights. The Year 13 student’s comforting and consoling arm around the Year 7 student’s shoulder when the younger girl’s biscuit flavoured spread was confiscated at the airport; interactions of our Secondary students with the Primary pupils of the Dubai school; Year 7 and 8 “Midgets” against Year 10-13 “Giants” in the Sports Centre, with everyone, even the Giants, rooting for the Midgets. Not to mention the fresh Swiss air, the awe-inspiring scenery and the perfect weather conditions. What’s not to love?” – Annie Keane, Secondary World Languages Teacher

TERM 2 – 2018/19

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GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

LET THERE BE LIGHT Yuqing Wu, 13T, Rebecca Leiler, 12S and Alexander (Coke) Smith, Environmental Systems and Societies Leader

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hile the rest of the Bangkok Patana community was preparing for their Christmas holiday, a group of 16 Roots & Shoots students and teachers travelled to rural Chiang Mai to install twenty solar kits in Pang Wua village! So Roots & Shoots is a sub-group of the Student Environmental Committee (SEC) and is part of the worldwide Roots & Shoots programme established by Dr Jane Goodall to promote conservation and environmental awareness in the minds of young people around the world. Located in Northern Thailand’s Wiang Haeng subdistrict, Pang Wua village is

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comprised of ethnic Lahu people and is, albeit not by choice, completely off-grid. For us, surrounded by electrical appliances and mobile devices, such a life would be unimaginable. Although they initially had an array of solar panels, these fell into disrepair, leaving the houses without power for many years now. Early last year, Roots & Shoots decided to try to raise funds to help these villagers improve their quality of life by providing them with solar power. As installing a new large solar array was both logistically impractical and far too expensive. Roots & Shoots chose to purchase individual solar kits to provide to

each home in need. Our hope is that by giving each home their own unit, there will be a sense of ownership that will translate into the villagers taking better care of their own equipment. Each solar kit is attached to three LED lights which can be used by the family for approximately six hours at night after a full day’s charge. Over the past year, we managed to raise the money through events such as Fun Day, where we ran a “Sponsor-a-Brick” campaign for the new earthen building in the Outdoor Classroom. Many members of the Bangkok Patana community helped to support us, for which we are very grateful.


Bangkok Patana Magazine

“As a supervisor and teacher of these wonderful young people, I found great satisfaction watching our Roots & Shoots kids integrate into this very different and wonderful culture and watching the smiles on the faces of everyone involved.” – Coke Smith, ESS Leader “Our hard work over the past two years on this project paid off in the moment when we huddled around the bamboo tables in the hut for lunch and the lights were turned on.” – Tina, Year 10

Together with a generous donation from our sponsor Energreen Solar, we managed to secure funding for twenty solar kits, a truly remarkable achievement for the SEC and the Patana community! When we first arrived at Pang Wua, we were rather worried about not ‘fitting in’ with the Lahu culture, which is completely different to the urban Chiang Mai or Bangkok culture we were used to. However, we soon found that the villagers to be friendly and extremely helpful. The installation process was fairly straightforward to learn, and many homeowners helped us to install the solar kits. Several villagers expressed their thanks for our visit with many team members delighted by the looks of joy on the family’s faces when the lights lit up. One villager even shook Mr Smith’s hand and said in rough Thai, “This was the best thing that ever happened to our village.” At the end of the

“My favourite part of the trip was the fact that all our hard work actually had a positive impact on someone’s life.” – Lucia, Year 10

the solar panels. It felt like we had really accomplished something.” – Tavisha, Year 10

“My favourite moment was when we ate the food the villagers prepared.” – Nan, Year 10

“We loved the trip because we got to help people.” – Prim, Year 10 and Lauren, Year 9

“The best part of the trip was seeing the villagers smile when we installed the solar panels and turned the lights on.” – Fai, Year 11

“The best moment of the trip was when the light turned on!” – Candy, Year 10 “I am beyond happy to be given the opportunity to be able to provide the villagers of Pang Wua solar panels, to provide them with lights.” – Tam, Year 11

“I really enjoyed going on the trip, it was an amazing experience that really helped us develop various skills. We had a fun time visiting the village and it felt really good to install

installation process, the villagers showed their thanks by cooking a delicious meal that many of us enjoyed while sitting in their homes under their new lights! When we left, over 10 houses had functioning lighting systems. The Roots & Shoots students felt that the learning experience of spending time with the villagers paralleled the service component of this experience and will be remembered for a lifetime. In the future, we hope to support Pang Wua by fundraising for even more solar sets, enough to electrify all the homes in the village, as well as providing their local school with teaching resources. If possible, we also hope to sponsor one or two local students for higher education in the area of Solar Engineering. Unfortunately, we also noticed whilst visiting that there was litter throughout the village. Even for such remote villages, the problem of plastic pollution remains large.

With this in mind, we hope to work with the village to integrate awareness of plastic pollution into their local curriculum. If you would like to contribute to this incredible project, please contact us by emailing Coke Smith (cosm@patana.ac.th) to become a donor. Below are the categories for our “Sponsor a Brick” program for our new Earthen Building in the Outdoor Classroom. All donations will go directly to help in our effort to provide solar power to Pang Wua Village.

Gold sponsor – 5,000 baht Silver sponsor – 2,500 baht Bronze sponsor – 1,000 baht Regular donation – 500 baht Naming Rights to the Outdoor Classroom Earthen Building – Open to bids TERM 2 – 2018/19

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ALUMNI STORIES

LIFE AFTER PATANA

A Passion for Arts and Design meets the Culinary World

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t has been more than 20 years since Tarica Navarro left Bangkok Patana School as part of the first graduating class in 1997. Tarica was drawn to art and design, and moved to the US to attend the University of Southern California. Although she knew she wanted her career to be in the arts, she found it difficult to nail down her focus. This led her to explore different areas such as advertising and photography before finding her niche in Interior Design. After finishing her university degree, Tarica worked as an interior designer on projects in Los Angeles, Bangkok, New York and Austin (Texas), mostly on highend residential and hospitality projects. Some of the projects she enjoyed best were those with restaurants where she was completely enamoured by chefs and their creations. Although she was an avid home cook, she realised that her place was not in a professional kitchen. Still drawn to kitchens, Tarica was looking for ways to make connections between her career and this interest she had developed with kitchens. In 2015, Tarica and her husband opened Kettle and Brine in Austin, Texas. The retail business offered implements and 30

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accessories for kitchens and homes. The carefully curated selection of functional and artistic items impressed many people, even leading to an article in the well-read Austin Chronicle newspaper. The business was founded on four values: function, design, Earth-friendly materials and the use of minimally processed and non-toxic materials. Some of these values are a reflection of what Tarica said she took away from Bangkok Patana. “Patana formed the foundation of who I am as a person today, from my love for all things creative (I learned how to shoot and develop photos in Patana’s very first dark room) to my passion for sustainable living through Environmental Studies class. The diverse programming helped me to cultivate a mindset for entrepreneurship where I can pull together my various skill sets and become an effective leader.” Kettle and Brine is now evolving into a new venture called “Kinn”. With Kinn, Tarica and her husband have developed and are producing their own line of tableware and are moving to serve a larger market by adding online sales. Tarica spent nine years at Bangkok Patana School. One of her favourite

memories of the school is the International Day parade. She said that being part of an international community greatly broadens a person’s perspective and teaches empathy and tolerance for different ways of living and thinking. “Besides, I could never get enough of the Onigiri rice balls [in the Food Hall].” she added. In ten years’ time, Tarica said that her BHAG (big hairy audacious goal) would be seeing Kinn a leading brand in sustainable living and design.


Bangkok Patana Magazine

ALUMNI VISITS

Antti Markkanen, Class of 2014

Cara Noble, left after Year 10 in 2006

Ida Laulainen, left after Year 6 in 2009

Hyo-jung Ashley Kim, left after Year 5 in 1997

Imogen Marshall, left after Year 4 in 2004

Philip Whitehall, left after Year 9 in 2004

Proud Chanarat, Class of 2015

Roz O’Shea, former PE teacher and Assistant Head of Year 8 and 9, 2001-2003

Visiting Bangkok? Want to come back for noodles? To book your alumni visit, get in touch at alumni@patana.ac.th TERM 2 – 2018/19

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ALUMNI STORIES

LIFE AFTER PATANA

A Healthy Lifestyle Inspires a Food Delivery Business

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f you haven’t already heard about Pranaa, it’s time to get up to speed. Pranaa is a healthy food delivery service, that follows a plant-based diet and is completely vegan. It is the brainchild of Bangkok Patana alum Udit Dhawan. Udit graduated from Bangkok Patana in 2008, after starting 15 years previously in K1. He enjoyed physical exercise and the outdoors, citing Residential trips as a highlight of his Patana years. From a passion for sports he also cultivated an interest in health and diet. He studied Physiology in Australia, graduating in 2012. He worked for three years in Myanmar, taking on the challenge of selling FMCG products in a very new and developing market. This was his first experience learning about sales, marketing and logistics. He followed this experience with an MBA from INSEAD. The impetus to start Pranaa was very much a melding of business skills with Udit’s still growing interest in a healthy lifestyle. “I have seen first-hand the benefits of eating a plant-based diet in my own house, not only in terms of helping people lose weight but also in reducing health risk factors like blood cholesterol and blood pressure. I have family members who suffered from heart disease, which is the leading cause of death around the world. The motivation was simple – if making better food choices can health prolong your good health 5-10 more years, then it is worth pursuing. The traditional method is to use medication to treat symptoms, but we want to try solve the root cause for those symptoms by modifying our lifestyle choices. I truly believe the main concern in the modern world is more diseases from overconsumption and not from lack of resources. We want to help people improve their long-term health & also reduce the environmental impact caused

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from animal agriculture,” he explained. Udit doesn’t have any experience in the food industry or with cooking but his father runs a vitamins and health supplement business in Thailand so he already had a basic connection to health sector. In Bangkok, as the market for food delivery was growing, he saw a gap for vegan food. Pranaa excludes all forms of animal products and the menu items change weekly. They offer a wide mix of Thai, Asian Western dishes to a diverse customer base. The food is cooked fresh daily and now delivered across most of Bangkok. Udit is still really passionate about sports. He continues to play sports on a weekly basis and enjoys playing with his friends from Bangkok Patana. He said he enjoyed competing with the other international school alumni during the Inter-School alumni sports events. While managing the business, he continues to grow his knowledge of the health and fitness sector, attending conferences and

completing online courses to learn more about nutritional science. Udit was the speaker at the 2018/19 Alumni Breakfast, where he had the opportunity to talk to current Year 13 students about his career path.


Bangkok Patana Magazine

Alumni Sports Day

October 2018

Don’t miss our upcoming alumni events, make sure you are signed up to the Bangkok Patana Alumni Platform at http://alumni.patana.ac.th

London Reunion

January 2019

TERM 2 – 2018/19

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MAKE A NAME FOR YOURSELF ... IN OUR THEATRE

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ince it was opened in 2010, the Rosamund Stuetzel Theatre continues to be a highlight of our campus. Most of us have had the opportunity to experience an incredible drama or music performance in this venue. Parents collect fond memories of proudly watching their child on stage, but this is only the culmination many hours of practice and preparation. The Theatre is an incredible teaching venue. Even our very young students can be seen on stage during various assemblies and presentations. A guest on a school visit, gasped in admiration upon walking into the theatre and seeing a Year 1 class working on the stage. “ What an incredible opportunity to perform, speak or address an audience from that stage,” she said, noting that even many adults she knows would not have had such a chance. The entire venue is designed to give a real-life experience to students. It is set up just as a professional venue might be, with small amends that enable students to operate the weights or the lights safely. The many incredible facilities we have on campus are partly in thanks to the Building Patana campaign, through which supporters of our school donate funds to the Bangkok Patana School Foundation. In the Theatre, the Seat Sale programme is a part of this campaign. You may have noticed a brass name plaque on the seat in front of you. The plaque indicates that particular seat has been sponsored in the name of the person/people listed on the plaque. There are 604 seats in the Theatre and 295 of them have already been named. The Seat Sale programme offers each seat for a donation of THB 15,000. Donors can choose any available

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set. Sometimes a Year group will name one or more seats in thanks to a teacher, or parents of graduating students will commemorate their child’s time at Bangkok Patana by naming a seat after them. All plaques remain in place until the next renovation of the Theatre. For more information on how to become a long term supporter of the Theatre or to commemorate a teacher or student by naming them, please contact kusi@patana.ac.th. Seat Sale donations are eligible for double tax deductions.