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The greatest casuality is being forgotten What started in 2003 as a program to provide comfort items to wounded service members, has grown into a complete rehabilitative effort to assist warriors as they recover and transition back to civilian life.

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t Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP), we understand the greatest casualty is being forgotten™. Watching the first wounded return home from the current military conflicts, our founders were inspired to help others in need. As veterans of prior conflicts, many of our founders knew firsthand the struggles of coming home and transitioning to civilian life. They founded WWP with the goal to make this the most successful, well-adjusted generation of wounded warriors in our nation’s history – something WWP has adopted as its vision statement. Their hope was that this generation would be welcomed home with open, supportive arms – a privilege that veterans from prior generations were not awarded. What started in 2003 as a program to provide comfort items to wounded service members, has grown into a complete rehabilitative effort to assist warriors as they recover and transition back to civilian life. WWP was founded on this idea of one warrior helping another, and it has become intrinsic to our organization. It’s depicted in our logo – one warrior carrying another. While not everyone can serve, everyone can support. And so, once these warriors are carried off the battlefield, it is our responsibility to carry them the rest of the way home, ensuring they accomplish every success in life they desire and deserve. Wounded Warrior Project has a simple, yet vital mission: to honor and empower wounded warriors. We know it is not just the warrior whose life is changed after injury, but the family as well. Which is why our mission carries over to military families and caregivers. Although they may never set foot on a battlefield, the courage and sacrifices of these families are just as significant as the heroes they support. Just as our returning warriors come home to a “new normal,” so does every member of that service member’s family. WWP Executive Director Steve Nardizzi remembers his first visit to a military hospital: “I remember a blur of young faces, too young for the injuries I was seeing. Amputated limbs, gunshot wounds, and disfiguring burns and scars – not to mention the invisible wounds of combat stress. In each room I went to, I handed out a WWP backpack filled with comfort items and offered that Wounded Warrior Project would be there to support them through their recovery.”

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July 2014 / HOMELAND

Homeland July 2014  

Real stories from real heroes; service members, veterans, the wounded and the families that keep it together.

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