Page 1

FATHER FIGURES

Tracking down Vermont priests accused of abuse PAGE 12

DATING GAME

Comic Tracie Spencer’s new one-woman show PAGE 22

RABBLE ON

VE RMO NT ’S IN DEPE NDEN T VO IC E SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019 VOL.24 NO.51 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Nutty Steph’s rousing re-brand in Montpelier PAGE 42

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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW

emoji that

SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN & ANDREA SUOZZO

HOT TOPIC

TOP TIP

Vermont State Police honored a New York teen who alerted authorities last year about a potential school shooting in Fair Haven. Good call.

HAPPY TRAIL

COURTNEY LAMDIN

A newly opened Burlington path will take hikers from Salmon Hole Park through the Intervale and into Ethan Allen Park — all within city limits.

Mayor Miro Weinberger presenting the Net Zero Energy Roadmap

B

urlington city officials unveiled a dozen energyefficiency programs on Monday as part of an ambitious plan to cut fossil fuel consumption to zero by 2030. Mayor Miro Weinberger called on all city residents and businesses owners to help “show the country that another future is possible.” Most of the proposals in the “Net Zero Energy Roadmap” rely on power from the city-owned Burlington Electric Department, which boasts that 100 percent of its energy comes from renewable sources. “We want to electrify everything,” BED general manager Darren Springer said. “No sector goes untouched.” The roadmap lays out four ways to get to zero. According to the plan, Burlington can reduce 60 percent of its dependence on fossil fuels by encouraging BED customers to switch to electric heat. It can shave off another 20 percent if drivers transition to fully electric or hybrid vehicles. Burlington’s plans for a district energy system could cut an additional 15 percent by capturing steam from the Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station to provide heat for large energy customers such as the University of Vermont

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Medical Center. And finally, drivers choosing alternative modes of transportation could bring it down another 5. BED will also offer incentives for residential natural gas customers who buy heat pumps and for those who purchase used electric vehicles or plug-in hybrid cars. In all, the roadmap calls for the city to use 65 percent more renewable electric energy to meet the 2030 goal. The plan was a cornerstone of Weinberger’s 2019 State of the City address, in which he called it “the most ambitious climate goal of any city in America.” Officials again presented the plan later Monday to the Burlington City Council, which seemed generally receptive to the ideas. And the councilors unanimously passed a resolution to expand the city’s tree-planting program, an effort they said would complement the net-zero proposal by capturing carbon emissions. “With this resolution, we can hit the reset button,” Councilor Franklin Paulino (D-North District) said. “We can set our city on a new path.” Read reporter Courtney Lamdin’s full account at sevendaysvt.com.

The Vermont State Ethics Commission withdrew its ruling that criticized Gov. Phil Scott’s financial relationship with his former company. Whoops.

PASS ON PUFF

Vermont health officials say they are investigating a case of severe lung disease that is potentially linked to vaping. More incentive to quit.

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1. “Small Dog Electronics Is Moving to Burlington” by Courtney Lamdin. After 13 years in South Burlington, the Apple product purveyor is relocating to the busy corner of Flynn Avenue and Pine Street. 2. “Foam Brewers to Open a Restaurant” by Sally Pollak. The new waterfront spot will have about 60 indoor seats, plus an outdoor patio. 3. “Hartford’s Postmaster Claimed a Man Attacked Her. A Judge Said She Lied” by Derek Brouwer. A federal judge wrote a blistering decision saying the postmaster could be prosecuted. 4. “Shannon MacVean-Brown Is the First Black Woman to Lead Vermont’s Episcopal Church” by Derek Brouwer. Later this month, MacVeanBrown will become the state diocese’s 11th bishop. 5. “Michael’s on the Hill Is Open and for Sale” by Sally Pollak. The married duo that runs the restaurant will operate the Waterbury Center spot until they find new owners.

tweet of the week @wallydubz Just crossed the border to Vermont. I think it’s in the air or something because I instantly feel more granola-y. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

DRIVING ABSTINENCE?

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ETHICAL DILEMMA

4

That’s how many bridges a contractor built in southern Vermont using “non-conforming” methods. VTrans says the bridges are safe, but the agency has shortened their lifespans.

ere’s some sex education: A newly released study by a Hunter College economics professor has found that nighttime driving curfews can decrease teen fertility by 3 to 4 percent. You won’t find that form of birth control in the Green Mountain State, though. Vermont is the only state without a nighttime driving curfew for teens. The lack of such a law hasn’t led to a baby boom. Mirroring national trends, Vermont’s teen pregnancy and birth rates have dropped over the last several decades to a low of 13.9 pregnancies per 1,000 teens in 2017, according to data from the Vermont Department of Health. During that year, Vermont’s teen birth rate was among the lowest in the country, above only New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show. What’s the secret to success? Comprehensive sex ed classes in middle and high school, according to Sara Chesbrough, the health

department’s adolescent health program manager. The state also offers the Personal Responsibility Education Program, aka PREP, a federally funded sex ed course offered outside of school that’s “medically accurate, evidence-based and developmentally appropriate,” she said. More important to the decline, both nationally and in Vermont? “An increased use of birth control by teens and young adults,” Chesbrough said, often “highly effective forms of contraception.” Cheryl Morse, a rural geographer and associate professor at the University of Vermont, hadn’t seen the new fertility study but had discovered another teen pregnancy deterent 20 years ago. While studying risky behavior among teens along Vermont’s rural northern border with Canada, Morse found that girls were parented more strictly than boys who, as the old adage goes, were allowed to be boys. One young woman, Morse recalled, mimicked her father’s voice when explaining the different rules for the different genders: “’cause girls can get pregnant, and guys can’t.” SASHA GOLDSTEIN SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

5


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Michelle Brown, Kristen Hutter, Logan Pintka MArketing & events direCtor Corey Grenier sAles & MArketing CoordinAtor Katie Hodges A D M I N I S T R AT I O N business MAnAger Cheryl Brownell direCtor of CirCulAtion Matt Weiner CirCulAtion deputy Jeff Baron

FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

NO EMPATHY

I’m so saddened by Mark Syzmanski’s letter, “Enough about Addiction” [Feedback, August 28]. He is apparently without any vice of his own. Two biblical passages come to mind: one says that he who is blameless can cast the first stone; the other cautions that we should be hesitant to point out the speck in another person’s eye while ignoring the spike in our own. I feel so sorry for this man who apparently has no empathy for anyone else. Amanda Conley 

SOUTH BURLINGTON

“HOOKED” DESERVES PULITZER

Writer Kate O’Neill strikes to the heart again. The way she weaves painful and personal prose with well-researched information in “How Far Along?” [August 21] takes journalism to new levels. We may never know the number of people trapped inside the isolation of an addiction who feel less alone or meet those who have been helped and saved by this brilliant series. “Hooked” fits a number of Pulitzer Prize categories for journalism and reporting. I fully expect O’Neill will be getting one. S. J. Cahill

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Luke Baynes, Justin Boland, Alex Brown, Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Rick Kisonak, Jacqueline Lawler, Amy Lilly, Bryan Parmelee, Melissa Pasanen, Jernigan Pontiac, Julia Shipley, Molly Zapp CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Luke Awtry, Harry Bliss, Luke Eastman, Caleb Kenna, Marc Nadel, Tim Newcomb, Susan Norton, Oliver Parini, Sarah Priestap, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

IT’S EASIER THAN YOU THINK.

C I R C U L AT I O N : 3 6 , 0 0 0 Seven Days is published by Da Capo Publishing Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Northeast Kingdom, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans, St. Johnsbury, White River Junction and Plattsburgh, N.Y.

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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EAST BURKE

PORN PROBLEM

I was disappointed in Dan Bolles’ article praising Dan Savage and his amateur porn productions [“Come Together,” August 28]. We have a problem in our country today with people being oversexed and unable or unwilling to control themselves. The fallout from this activity is plain to see: powerful men forcing girls into prostitution, molestation of children by people in positions of influence, sexual harassment and rape. The porn industry feeds this passion and is part of the problem. There was a time, long past, when sex was for the producing of offspring and bonding of the couple in a committed relationship, but today it is simply an adult pleasure activity. This twisted

CORRECTION

Last week’s article about Episcopal bishop-elect Shannon MacVeanBrown, “A Sense of Holy Scrappiness,” used an incorrect name for the progressive advocacy group Vermont Interfaith Action.


WEEK IN REVIEW

seriously as a media source that Vermonters can depend and rely on for accurate and truthful information, maybe you should get a better understanding of the state you are trying to appeal to. Morrisville is not in the Northeast Kingdom! Please do a bit more research before this information gets out to travelers from other parts of the country — and world!

TIM NEWCOMB

Corey Walsh

BROWNINGTON

RECYCLING OR NOT?

idea has negative consequences, and, by publishing that article and praising Savage, you become part of the problem. Let’s try to be part of the solution. Thomas Prindiville

BARRE

AT WHAT PRICE?

You say a $2,500 grant to buy 50 solar lanterns for the homeless [“Lighting the Way,” September 4]. That’s $50 each. But the picture in Seven Days shows a type of lantern commonly available for $10. Who is pocketing the money? Dick Mills

SOUTH BURLINGTON

Editor’s note: As the story noted, the Howard Center has not yet purchased the lanterns. The photo depicted an approximation of the product.

NEXT-GENERATION MEDIA?

Your exploration of the delocalization of Vermont’s media outlets [“Meet the News Boss,” August 7] poses the question, “… who will cover town construction projects, community gatherings and high school sports?” as commercial news institutions continue to shrink or disappear. These hyper-local events will be covered by organizations that have been doing so for decades: Vermont’s 25 community media centers, commonly known as public, educational and government access television. Vermont’s community media centers produced 18,000 hours of local programming in 2017, covering municipal meetings, school functions, sports, elections, arts …

the list goes on. As independent, noncommercial entities, they do so without influence from advertisers or parent companies. They also provide training and support for community members and organizations to produce their own content, providing a valuable platform to share messages. Community media centers are facing their own challenges amid a rapidly changing media landscape and increasing telecommunications deregulation. However, both individually and through the efforts of their state advocacy organization, Vermont Access Network, they’re working to continue providing these vital media connections to Vermont communities. Efforts include participation in a legislative study committee charged with finding a path toward sustainability — its meetings are covered by ORCA Media, Montpelier’s community media center, of course. Community media centers provide citizens with their most immediate and comprehensive link to the places they live, act as vibrant digital soapboxes, and facilitate government transparency and a healthy democracy. Centers in Vermont and across the country are working to secure their futures, especially in light of the struggles of commercial media outlets. Kevin Christopher

COLCHESTER

Christopher is president of the Vermont Access Network.

GEOGRAPHY LESSON

[Re BTV: “Getting In Gear,” Fall 2019]: If you want to be respected and taken

I was very glad to see this article in Seven Days [“Are Chittenden County Recyclables Getting Recycled?” August 28]. However, some comments gave me cause for concern. Chittenden Solid Waste District general manager Sarah Reeves’ comment that “We’re very confident that the material ... is getting recycled ... it’s in their best interest...” suggests to me that CSWD does not actually know where the stuff goes once it’s sold. I too hope it’s being recycled, but who knows? As recent exposés have shown, now that the prices have fallen considerably, a lot of it gets buried or burned, and the rest goes to poor countries that then do the same or worse — such as dump it in the ocean. Is there no audit trail of what happens to our recyclables so we can be sure? The fact that “CSWD glass is crushed and ... used in engineering projects such as road building” says that our glass is not being recycled, at least not how I imagined it would be. Crushing it does not reduce the amount of glass we produce, although I’m glad it’s not simply being buried. It would have been helpful to have an outside point of view from someone who monitors the Vermont recycling industry. CSWD employees have a vested interest in presenting their work in the best light, but they might not present the entire picture, such as how much is going into the dump due to market concerns? Thanks again for covering this important topic! Harry Goldhagen EAST FAIRFIELD

SAY SOMETHING! Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number.

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019 VOL.24 NO.51 22

NEWS & POLITICS 12

Seven Days tracks down expriests “credibly accused” of abuse in Vermont BY MOLLY WALSH & DEREK BROUWER

12

13

Godforsaken

Vermont Woman Publishes Final Issue, Seeks Buyer BY MOLLY WALSH

42

Curb Sides

Burlington’s first ‘Great Street’ confounds drivers

ARTS NEWS 20

BY COURTNEY LAMDIN

14

Retired Probate Judge Reprimanded Over Guardianship Case BY PAUL HEINTZ

16

The Search for EB-5 Accountability

A VTDigger legal fight reveals that key docs are missing

66

Williston Teacher’s Project Explores Storytelling as the Key to Resilience

BY MARGARET GRAYSON

21

Quick Lit: Speak, Memory

22

Comedian Tracy Spencer Debuts Her One-Woman Show ‘60 First Dates’ BY DAN BOLLES

FEATURES Online Thursday

30

Show and Tell

Performing arts: The 2019-20 performing arts preview BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

40

Where There’s a Will

Honey, I’m Home

11 19 42 48 62 66 74 80 84 88 C1

Crowded House

Music: The commotion and community of Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble BY JORDAN ADAMS

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 27 29 43 67 71 74 80 89

Work WTF Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Art Review Movie Reviews Ask the Reverend ADVICE

Theater review: Shakespeare’s Will, Lost Nation Theater BY ALEX BROWN

42

SECTIONS

Food: Fruit-and-honey preserves bring V Smiley back to her family’s New Haven farm BY MELISSA PASANEN

66

BY MARGOT HARRISON

BY PAUL HEINTZ

VIDEO SERIES

46

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Food + Drink Calendar Classes Music + Nightlife Art Movies Fun Stuff Personals Classifieds + Puzzles

FATHER FIGURES

Tracking down Vermont priests accused of abuse PAGE 12

DATING GAME

Comic Tracie Spencer’s new one-woman show PAGE 22

RABBLE ON

Nutty Steph’s rousing re-brand in Montpelier

V ER M O NT ’S I ND EP E N DE NT V O I C E SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019 VOL.24 NO.51 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

12

Rabble on Main Street

Food + Drink: Nutty Steph’s reinvents itself with a new location, business model and name

PAGE 42

BY SALLY POLLAK THE 2019-20 PERFORMING ARTS PREVIEW

Underwritten by:

Stuck in Vermont: Galen Ettlin from WCAX and his fiancé, Rick Morante, joined the Stuck crew for its third annual Creemee Tour, which included stops in Bristol and Waitsfield. Both creemee spots will be open into October.

PA GE 30

COVER IMAGE COURTESY OF RACHEL NEVILLE COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

LOCALLY-MADE

JEWELRY

Order online at phoson.net

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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9


THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT

JAMES MARSH PROFESSOR-AT-LARGE

Ending the American Revolution: RECONCILIATION AND REVENGE

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CALL FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY.

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SATURDAY 14

Libation Station Whether you crave a well-rounded IPA, an adventurous mead or a sparkling seltzer with 5 percent alcohol by volume, the Steeple Market Brewfest is sure to offer something to quench your thirst. More than 20 vendors — think Lagunitas Brewing, Havoc Mead and Truly Hard Seltzer — take over J & L Field in Fairfax, selling food and drink to benefit the local fire department. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 54

FRIDAY 13

Setting the Tone A 2012 American Psychological Association article lists stress reduction and increased focus among the benefits of meditation. Those in need of a mental and emotional boost head to the Vermont Statehouse for a lunchtime meditative concert by Montpelier flutist Karen Kevra. Relaxation and reflection are encouraged during this 30-minute solo performance — the second in a three-part series presented by Capital City Concerts. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 52

THURSDAY 12

Reading Out Loud Directed by prize-winning writer and University of Vermont professor Major Jackson, the Painted Word Poetry Series shines a light on established and emerging wordsmiths. Sue D. Burton, the Burlington scribe behind the 2018 collection Box, and Sara London, the Northampton, Mass., author of Upkeep, take the floor at the Fleming Museum of Art in Burlington for the series’ latest installment.

THURSDAY 12

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 52

SOLO SHOW Before it became a heralded BBC TV series, Fleabag was a one-person stage show hilariously examining a thirtysomething woman’s life. Six years after Phoebe Waller-Bridge debuted the monologue that the Guardian called “filthily funny,” the writer and actor is staging a final run in London’s West End. The play is broadcast to St. Johnsbury’s Catamount Arts Center as part of the National Theatre Live series. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 51

SATURDAY 14 & SUNDAY 15

Summer Sendoff It has become a tradition for Grand Point North to cap off summer in the Queen City. The 9th annual music festival presented by Vermont native and headliner Grace Potter, with Higher Ground, brings national acts such as Gov’t Mule, indie artists including Lucy Dacus and local favorites such as Francesca Blanchard to Burlington’s Waterfront Park. SEE SOUNDBITES ON PAGE 67

ONGOING

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Seasons Change Vermonters fall hard for the season after summer. With the state’s ample leaf-peeping and cider-sipping opportunities, why wouldn’t we? St. Johnsbury residents welcome fall a few days early with the Colors of the Kingdom Autumn Festival. Downtown happenings include a parade, a farmers market, an arts and crafts fair, scenic train rides, and more. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 54

The exhibit “East to West: A Ceramic Dialogue: Sculptural and Functional Objects by Liz Quackenbush, Mark Pharis & Cappy Thompson ompson” confirms that the world of ceramics is as varied as the imagination. The artists’ works include embellished functional pottery, slab-built earthenware utilitarian objects and narrative images on glass. Amy Lilly reviews the exhibit at Rochester’s BigTown Gallery. SEE REVIEW ON PAGE 74

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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news

MORE INSIDE

MEDIA

CONDUCT BOARD WHERE’D THE EB-5 SLAPS FORMER JUDGE DOCS GO?

Vermont Woman Publishes Final Issue, Seeks Buyer

PAGE 14

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FILE: SASHA GOLDSTEIN

Bishop Christopher Coyne

RELIGION

Godforsaken

Seven Days tracks down ex-priests “credibly accused” of abuse in Vermont B Y M OLLY WA LSH & DEREK BROUWER

J

ohn “Jack” Kenney happened to be standing in his front yard when a reporter drove up the long dirt drive to his two-story home in West Glover last Thursday. The 91-year-old ex-priest is among those “credibly accused of sexual abuse” according to a recent report from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington. Kenney had little to say when asked about the list of alleged perpetrators Bishop Christopher Coyne released last month. “I’m not interested in it, thank you very much,” Kenney said initially, as he stood in the September sunshine. Asked again, Kenney responded, “The whole thing is a big farce. These people don’t know what they are doing.” Was he aware of the allegations against him? Kenney said he was but declined to offer any details. “This is old, 1962 stuff,” he said. “It’s all part of the past. … It’s time to set the thing to rest instead of agitating it on and on, with more and more articles.” 12

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

He added: “It’s ridiculous. The whole thing is stupid.” Kenney suggested the reporter “drive up here and back out,” then turned slowly and headed for his door. On August 22 the Burlington diocese revealed that, since 1950, 39 priests or former priests have been credibly accused of abusing children while assigned to a church in the state. The group of lay Vermonters who compiled the official report decided to include biographical information R O NAL D A. and the parish assignments of the accused priests but not to disclose any details about the allegations or to explain when church leaders learned of them. To qualify for inclusion in the report, an abuse allegation had to be “natural, plausible and probable.” Although most of those on the list are either dead or already notorious for abusing children, some of the names caught former

congregants by surprise. For example, those who had contact with the late Father Charles Towne are trying him posthumously on a Facebook group called “You Knew You Grew Up in Winooski Because…” Twelve of the accused men are still alive. For some of them, including Kenney, last month’s report was the first public reckoning for alleged behavior that happened decades ago. To speak with them, Seven Days knocked on the doors of the seven men with Vermont addresses — down dirt S O UTIE R E roads, in condos and senior living complexes, and within eyeshot of local schools — and attempted to contact five others who reside out of state. Some had disconnected phones or addresses that couldn’t be verified. Of those who could be reached, none confessed.

I’M SORRY.

I DON’T HAVE ANYTHING TO SAY.

GODFORSAKEN

» P.14

B Y M OLLY WA LSH

Vermont Woman, a newspaper founded 34 years ago that rejected stale stereotypes about what constituted women’s issues, has published its final edition and is for sale. “Letting go is tough. Anytime a newspaper closes, the community it served loses,” publisher Suzanne Gillis wrote in the farewell issue that hit newsstands on September 6. The tribute examines the paper’s legacy of reporting on news, arts and the politics of everything from reproductive rights to feminism.

“We did not cover fashion, diets or hairdos,” Gillis wrote. As the publication sought to shine a spotlight on the inequities facing women, it rarely included men’s viewpoints because, Gillis explained, “they were massively covered in the dominant male-owned and -staffed media.” The goodbye includes a note that the paper is for sale for an unspecified price. Reached by phone Monday, Gillis, 74, of South Hero, said she’s ready to “get off the stage” and believes the right buyer can refresh and grow the periodical. “I hope I can find somebody to take it on,” she said. “There’s such a need for the voice in my opinion.” Vermont Woman endorsed political candidates, covered state politics and hosted a lecture series that brought notables such as Ann Richards, Gloria Steinem and Helen Thomas to the state. The publication won honors, including the New England Newspaper of the Year award in 2007. The award brought Gillis to tears, she wrote: “I wept for women everywhere as they are so rarely acknowledged for excellence.” In 2010, Gillis was inducted into the New England Newspaper Hall of Fame. The newspaper began as a monthly and eventually published just five issues a year. Leading up to the final edition, there were no full-time staff positions, and the paper was produced by parttime and freelance editors, writers, and production and sales people, Gillis said. The final issue includes first-person stories by editors and writers about the history of the publication, along with a story titled, “A Short History of Lesbian Feminism in Vermont.”  Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com


N E E B E V WE’

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Burlington’s first ‘Great Street’ confounds drivers DIANE SULLIVAN

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laine Russell was trying to avoid Pine Street. She and her husband were driving from Burlington home to Vergennes, and road construction was the last thing they wanted to wrangle on Labor Day Weekend. So she motored east on Maple Street past Pine to the four-way stop with St. Paul Street, with plans to turn right there. It was dark by 9 p.m., but Russell could see that the familiar intersection had changed. Brandnew granite curbs jutted into the roadway, narrowing the passage by several feet. In an effort to avoid a large pickup turning west onto Maple from St. Paul, Russell kept hard to the right and heard her vehicle’s rocker panel scrape along the new curb. The noise was so loud that patrons at the nearby St. Paul Street Gastrogrub jumped out of their seats. The truck drove off, and Russell drove home with at least $1,000 in damage to her 2017 Nissan Sentra. “It just totally upset me,” Russell said. “I did not expect that at all.” St. Paul Street is the first example of Burlington’s Great Streets Initiative, which aims to create friendlier roadways for walkers and cyclists by building wider sidewalks, tree belts and bike lanes. What Russell encountered is a streetscaping feature known as a “bump-out,” which is intended to lessen the road-crossing distance for pedestrians. As part of the initiative, the city wants to make 26 downtown blocks — all contained by Maple, Battery, Pearl and South Union — narrower, some dramatically so. Main Street could go from 71 feet wide at one spot to a slim 38. The redesign would also eliminate dozens of parking spots along the stretch.

Great Streets is a long-range plan with no real timeline, but the concept alone is controversial. Burlington has long struggled to balance the needs of people who use alternative transportation and those who drive and park on city streets. The project, with its bike lanes and traffic-calming designs, is an ambitious attempt to serve the former. But if St. Paul, a major transportation artery, is their introduction, drivers won’t likely think these Great Streets are so great. “I think it’s bad. I just think it’s a tough intersection,” City Councilor Franklin Paulino (D-North District) said of St. Paul at Maple. “It’s always going to be … no matter what kind of city planning we end up doing.” The Burlington City Council first documented a desire for street design standards in a 1996 municipal plan. Fifteen years later, a 2011 transportation plan coined the term “Great Streets,” which were codified in the 2013 planBTV Downtown and Waterfront Master Plan. In 2015, voters OK’d a $10 million tax-increment financing bond to improve St. Paul and Main streets. The city council approved the St. Paul project, which spans two blocks from Main to Maple, last August. Construction began the day after Labor Day 2018 with an expected completion date of May 24, 2019. Nearly four months after that date, the project is still unfinished. Crews from S.D. Ireland hit snags when they unearthed contaminated soil and fuel tanks in the construction area last fall. Engineers also spent an inordinate amount of time coordinating with private utilities after discovering that many subterranean service lines CURB SIDES

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

and golfing with friends. His last public post is dated January 30 — the day before his name appeared on an abusive priest list issued by the Catholic diocese in Houston, Texas. The Houston list states that Laroche left the priesthood in 1987, but the Burlington diocese list reveals that he actually served in Vermont for five additional years, including as an assistant priest at St. Joseph Cathedral, in Burlington, and at St. John Vianney in South Burlington. He was ordained in the Maryknoll order. A woman who answered the door at the Swanton address said the former priest wasn’t home and that he’d call a Seven Days reporter if he had anything to say. He didn’t call. In Burlington, a condo unit linked to Conrad A. Bessette is located across North Avenue from Burlington High School. Bessette, a Burlington native, was removed

THIS IS OLD, 1962 STUFF … PART OF THE PAST. … IT’S TIME TO SET THE THING TO REST INSTEAD OF AGITATING IT ON AND ON, WITH MORE AND MORE ARTICLES. J O H N “JAC K ” K E NNE Y

from duty in 1990 by then-bishop John Marshall after serving for 17 years in eight Vermont parishes. He was later defrocked. One neighbor knew him only as “the priest” next door. There’s a cross in a front window of the condo unit, but the occupant did not answer the door on three occasions or reply to a message requesting an interview. Bessette’s name had not appeared in publicized lawsuits or online abuser databases before last month, though attorney Jerome O’Neill, who represents survivors of abuse by Vermont priests, said Bessette is the subject of one of five lawsuits O’Neill filed against the Burlington diocese earlier this summer. He declined to elaborate on his client’s allegations against Bessette because the lawsuits were filed under seal. O’Neill, who has brought 55 lawsuits against the diocese and obtained a combined $31.5 million in settlements, said few, if any, of Vermont’s accused priests have acknowledged or accepted responsibility for their behavior. “There was such denial that the conduct was wrong to begin with,” he said. “They got away with it for so long, they

can’t believe they’re being identified and held accountable.” Kenney, of West Glover, was named in a 2006 abuse complaint against the diocese, but the allegations against him didn’t receive press coverage at the time. His was one of more than two dozen cases the diocese settled collectively in 2010 for more than $20 million. Possibly because other cases were more high-profile, Kenney’s name didn’t appear in news stories or the online priest database at bishop-accountability.org or in Google search results until recently. Even the bishop’s report left out the fact that the diocese removed Kenney from his priestly duties in 2006, which Seven Days learned last week after contacting the diocese for information about Kenney’s status in the church. The complaint Kenney dismissed as “1962 stuff ” alleged that he sexually abused a young parishioner named David Fortin at St. Joseph Cathedral in Burlington, where Kenney preached from 1962 to 1965. Fortin, a retired U.S. Navy hospital corpsman who lives outside Boston with his wife, recounted what happened to him in a telephone interview with Seven Days last Friday. Whatever Kenney says now, he exploited Fortin when he was a naïve teen who looked up to the priesthood, Fortin said: “He was a perpetrator.” Fortin said he was 15 years old when the abuse began. He had graduated from the eighth grade at St. Joseph parochial school and entered ninth grade at Burlington High School. Both his parents had a strong faith, and Fortin felt a reverence for the church and for the priests who seemed so close to God as they stood at the altar. “I admired them. There was something about them that was beautiful,” he said. His mother suggested that her son speak with Kenney about how to become a priest. Fortin did so, and at the close of their first meeting, Fortin said Kenney asked him: “How about a hug?” Another meeting followed, with another hug, and then a pat, and more encounters that evolved into sex. Fortin recalled feeling confused, scared and sinful, but Kenney had reassured the teen by telling him, “God knows what we’re doing.” The abuse went on for several years. Fortin never told his parents, or anyone else, and believes that in that era it would have been difficult to do so. “The priest would have obviously denied it, like he’s doing now. He would have turned it around, and I would have been the one in trouble,” Fortin said. “Because priests don’t lie. Adults don’t lie. It was just a different day back then.” GODFORSAKEN

» P.17

Retired Probate Judge Reprimanded Over Guardianship Case B Y PAU L H EIN T Z

Vermont’s Judicial Conduct Board has publicly reprimanded Bernard Lewis, who served as Orange County’s probate judge from 2002 until his retirement earlier this year. F IL E: In an order issued late MA TT MO last week, the board RR wrote that Lewis had violated the Code of Judicial Conduct by failing to dispose of cases “promptly, efficiently and fairly.” Lewis formally accepted the reprimand instead of fighting it at a hearing that was scheduled to take place in October. At issue was the judge’s handling of a nearly decade-long family feud over the guardianship of an elderly Newbury woman, Miriam Thomas, who has since died. As Seven Days reported last year, three of her children had accused a fourth of abusing his power as her court-appointed guardian and depleting her assets by more than $1 million. In its reprimand, the board wrote that Lewis’ “repeated failure to address and decide issues” that came before him had cost the aggrieved siblings “significant attorney fees” and wasted both parties’ time and resources. “The chronic failure to hold the guardian accountable for his actions with respect to his obligations while allowing him to pay himself enormous amounts of money over 7 ½ years, despite repeated filings that brought such issues to the Court’s attention, exemplifies a failure to dispose of issues fairly,” the board wrote. Lewis declined to comment, saying only, “There’s two sides of every story.” The judge’s decision not to seek reelection last year may have spared him a heavier penalty. “The board does have the authority to take more severe sanctions if it were a sitting judge, but Judge Lewis is no longer presiding,” said Andrew Maas, the Judicial Conduct Board chair. Lewis is the second probate judge to face sanctions in recent months. In June, the board publicly reprimanded Chittenden County Probate Court Judge Gregory Glennon for asking lawyers who practiced in his court to be on his election campaign committee. According to Maas, it’s highly unusual for a judge — let alone two — to be disciplined. “It’s not often that these kind of events happen in Vermont,” he said. m

IS

Details about many of the priests named in the report are already known, as the result of two decades of civil lawsuits against the church. For instance, Alfred Willis, who was defrocked in 1985, was considered a “sociopath” by church leaders, according to internal records made public through a mid-2000s lawsuit. Willis, 75, was last known to live in Virginia; he could not be reached for comment. The 79-year-old James J. McShane Jr., also listed, has been named in multiple sex abuse lawsuits, including one in which camp counselors were said to have found dozens of images of naked boys in the priest’s cabin. Seven Days traveled to a Rutland County house linked to McShane, where figurines of Jesus decorated the front steps, and stained glass panels were visible through the windows. No one responded to a knock on the door. Charles G. Many, accused of molesting boys in Connecticut and Vermont, lives at a retirement home in Williston. He did not respond to messages left through an intercom system but has denied all allegations in years past. Among the living locals newly linked to abuse claims is Ronald A. Soutiere, a Winooski-born former priest who served in Vermont for 12 years over four decades. Soutiere was assigned to St. Monica Parish in Barre in 1974 before joining the faculty at Rice Memorial High School in 1978. He spent 16 years in the U.S. Navy, then returned to Graniteville’s St. Sylvester church as an administrator in 1999. He resigned as pastor at St. Ann in Milton in 2002 and was placed on leave two months later. The late bishop Kenneth Angell removed Soutiere from his work as a priest in 2004. The 82-year-old Soutiere lives in a red brick condo complex in South Burlington. On a recent sunny afternoon, the blinds were drawn. Soutiere came to the front door of his darkened apartment wearing a T-shirt. He had bags under his eyes. Peeking around a partially opened door, the former priest said he was aware of the diocese’s report but declined to respond. “I’m sorry, I don’t have anything to say,” he repeated several times, then shut the door gently. A couple of the newly outed priests haven’t been hiding. A Swanton address connected to native Vermonter Dennis J. Laroche boasts an enormous American flag hanging over the front yard, a garage full of tools and a family nameplate affixed near the front door. His public Facebook profile suggests the 73-year-old former priest has enjoyed his golden years boating

COURTS

Contact: paul@sevendaysvt.com


COURTNEY LAMDIN

Curb Sides « P.13

Street’s 99-foot public right-of-way — the widest in the city — lends itself to a dramatic needed to be replaced before they were Great Streets transformation, Weinberger paved over. The delays added $260,000 to said. Burlington is moving from an autothe $4.9 million project, which is primar- mobile-centric city to an environmentally ily paid for with TIF dollars and several conscious one, he said. special revenue funds, such as from parking “You still get a lot of parking,” Weinmeters. berger said, adding that Great Streets The renovation caused even more head- represents a “holistic understanding of how aches August 30 when an excavator hit a gas the public right-of-way should be used.” line, disrupting the Friday night Church Burlington Public Works Director Street dinner rush. Chapin Spencer said the parking sacrifice Richard Vaughn, owner of Perky Planet will be worth it: Tree canopies will flourish, Coffee at St. Paul and King streets, said and businesses will get more frontage for he never would have opened in January outdoor seating — all elements “essential if he’d known the project would drag on. to a thriving downtown,” he said. The shop’s mission is to hire workers with Before Spencer took the public works disabilities, but Vaughn says he’s only gig in 2013, he founded and led Local Motion, a Burlington nonprofit that promotes biking and walking. The group’s current executive director, Karen Yacos, said that cars should no longer be king of the streets. Wider sidewalks encourage people to mingle and shop, and narrower streets will force drivConstruction on St. Paul Street ers to slow down. “A street with just a making enough to pay four very part-time narrow sidewalk and a bunch of car parkemployees; most days, he’s the one behind ing is not a vibrant place,” Yacos said. She the counter. said the new thoroughfares would feel Vaughn said the construction has cost “like Church Street without shutting off Perky Planet $10,000 a month. In late July, the whole street.” he filed a claim against the city’s insurance Paulino, the city councilor, noted that seeking $62,500 in relief. The city has not biking isn’t practical for everyone, and yet responded. his constituents have expressed a desire “This isn’t who I am. This isn’t what for more car parking downtown. They’ve I want to do,” Vaughn said of his formal also complained about the St. Paul-Maple complaint, adding, “The original timeline street curb design. So Paulino stood at the that I relied on when I built this place was corner on September 2 for 20 minutes and fantasy.” watched vehicles negotiate the tighter turn. The city now estimates that St. Paul “It was crazy,” he said in summary. will be open to traffic and business by the Seven Days, too, did some unscientific end of September. When it is, Mayor Miro analysis. Over the course of an hour on Weinberger says the area will go from “a September 3, approximately 600 vehicles little-visited, peripheral part of our down- passed through the intersection during the afternoon rush. Only three drivers hit the town” to “one of the nicest streets.” Indeed, all Great Streets include a vari- curb, but the vast majority made extra-wide ety of amenities. Illustrations show wider, turns in an effort to avoid colliding with it wheelchair-accessible sidewalks; gardens or another driver. that capture and filter storm water; terraces After the new features were installed a for art installations or covered bike parking; few weeks ago, the staff at the Gastrogrub and decks with built-in seating. Promo- on St. Paul started a “curb kill count” and tional documents speak to the possibilities: tallied a dozen hits in a single evening, “What if you could watch the sun set over bartender Rob LaClair recalled. The scuffed the lake while sitting on a swing at Main and blackened curb is evidence. and Pine?” one reads. Similar stories have been told at nearby But something has to give to make room Handy’s Lunch and on Front Porch Forum, for all these perks, and on Main Street, it’s where one woman lamented that she had parking. The Great Streets design cuts 43 to “back up halfway down Maple” to make of the 161 existing parking spots and transitions them from diagonal to parallel. Main CURB SIDES » P.17

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news

The Search for EB-5 Accountability A VTDigger legal fight reveals that key docs are missing B Y PAUL HEI N TZ FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

A

protracted legal battle between a Vermont news outlet and the state attorney general has revealed gaps in the public record of how the state oversaw a fraudulent development project. According to a tech company hired to track down the missing emails of a state official, many appear to have been deleted years before the wrongdoing was exposed. Others were found only recently — on a forgotten backup drive in a government storage closet in Montpelier — after the news outlet, VTDigger.org, repeatedly asked for them. The state’s inability to locate key communications raises new questions about whether there will ever be a full accounting of how much Vermont officials knew about the $200 million scheme perpetrated by Jay Peak Resort developers — and whether the government should have done more to prevent it. As regional administrator of the federal EB-5 investor visa program, which was used to fund the developments, the state was required to keep tabs on the projects. Gov. Phil Scott, who inherited the mess from his two predecessors, former governors Peter Shumlin and Jim Douglas, called the revelation of missing emails surprising and concerning during a press conference last week. In a separate interview, Scott spokesperson Rebecca Kelley said the discovery should prompt a new review of unexamined files. “This is about restoring the public trust,” Kelley said. “So if there’s documents that haven’t been looked at, they should be looked at.” The situation came to light last month at the conclusion of an eight-month legal fight between VTDigger and Attorney General T.J. Donovan over a request for records related to the Jay Peak development. Confidential legal documents obtained by Seven Days show that the tussle became heated at times as the nonprofit news outlet demanded more documents and Donovan’s office could not produce them. In May, four months after VTDigger sued the state for the records, Donovan’s office threatened to countersue, accusing the news outlet of violating a settlement agreement and questioning whether it was working in the public’s interest or its own. “It is increasingly difficult to escape the conclusion that your client is using these

LEGAL

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

T.J. Donovan

FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

16

Anne Galloway

negotiations to pursue goals unrelated to the settlement of this case,” Solicitor General Benjamin Battles wrote to VTDigger’s lawyers on May 31. Months later, Battles wrote that he was “extremely frustrated with [VTDigger’s] approach to these negotiations,” complaining that the state had spent “literally hundreds of attorney and staff hours

— across multiple agencies” responding to its requests. After participating in two rounds of mediation with the state and acquiring multiple batches of documents, VTDigger withdrew its lawsuit in August. But in subsequent news stories it published, its reporters suggested that they had failed to obtain all the records they sought

— including communications between the state and the office of U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), a champion of the EB-5 program. VTDigger was barred from publishing details of the mediation proceedings because they are confidential. For the same reason, founder and editor Anne Galloway declined to comment for this story. Donovan, who is charged with defending the state and its officials in lawsuits involving the Jay Peak fraud, said he was simply doing his ethical duty on behalf of his clients. The AG downplayed the seriousness of his office’s dispute with VTDigger, saying, “At the end of the day, it’s lawyers being lawyers.” But he also chided the news outlet for dragging its heels in negotiations and demanding more documents after he believed the state had fulfilled its obligations. “The goal posts kept moving,” Donovan said. The public records suit is the latest development in a years-long saga surrounding what authorities have referred to as a “Ponzilike scheme” in the Northeast Kingdom. In 2016, the federal government charged Jay Peak owner Ariel Quiros EB-5 ACCOUNTABILITY

» P.18


Curb Sides « P.15 room for a turning school bus. Green Mountain Transit is avoiding the junction altogether after concluding “from a geometry perspective, it was too tight,” interim general manager Jon Moore said. “Green Mountain Transit does support pedestrian infrastructure improvements,” he added. “There are some merits there. We just want to be sure we can be compatible.” Once St. Paul reopens, GMT’s green line will resume traveling north and south on that street, no turns necessary; Weinberger expects that will be true for most drivers. But Paulino said the road design won’t completely dissuade larger vehicles from taking turns.

THE STAFF AT THE GASTROGRUB ON ST. PAUL STARTED A “CURB KILL COUNT”

AND TALLIED A DOZEN HITS IN A SINGLE EVENING. “We’ll never be able to tell people which way to go to work,” he said. “People drive the shortest route.” City Councilor Brian Pine (P-Ward 3) said he tested the intersection in the smaller of his family’s two vehicles. He made it without striking the bump-out, but in doing so, crossed into the opposing lane of traffic. Pine said he’s reserving judgment until the project is fully complete. “If it doesn’t work, we have to be ready to do something about it,” he said. “I hope we don’t, because that will be very costly.” City engineer Norm Baldwin said drivers are coming to conclusions before the intersection is finished. Traffic will flow differently after upper St. Paul is open:

Godforsaken « P.14 Fortin says he kept the abuse “locked away” for decades until about 2002 after the Boston Globe’s investigative reporting on priest abuse. That’s when some church leaders started urging victims to contact their dioceses, he recalled. Fortin, a father and grandfather who remains a faithful Catholic, eventually made a complaint to the Burlington diocese. He also entered counseling, which he said has helped him stop asking, “why me,” and focus on healing. He declined to discuss the sum he received in his portion of the lawsuit settlement, other than to say it was

A fresh coat of pavement will reduce the curb’s height, and crews will paint stop bars in the proper places, he said. Still, the city is taking citizen concerns to heart. Baldwin said planners are leaving the curb unfinished while they monitor traffic over the next few weeks. If the city concludes the bump-out is too intrusive, workers could fix it before finishing touches are made, Baldwin said. In the meantime, people are certainly taking the turn more carefully than ever before. Does that mean the city’s plan to slow traffic is working? “In some ways, it is; in some ways, it’s not,” Baldwin said. “That’s why we’re monitoring the situation, and our team is on it.” Spencer, the DPW director, acknowledged drivers’ frustration but said the Great Streets success story shouldn’t be marred by the curb conundrum. Despite the St. Paul project’s delays, he said, the initiative’s coordinated approach — to bury utility lines, improve water infrastructure and repave streets all at once — saves more time and money than if the city were to tackle these issues separately. Future Great Streets projects will likely be just as complex as St. Paul, but in Spencer’s view, the temporary disruption is well worth it to reinvest in the city’s aging infrastructure. “At some point, we can’t just sit around and put a Band Aid and duct tape on stuff,” he said. “Are we going to be perfect on our first install? No,” he added. “But this street is going to be remarkably great for the city for generations to come.” As for Russell, the Vergennes driver, the hefty repair bill from her curb encounter was enough to make her reconsider ever driving down St. Paul again. “I took that one off my list,” she said with a laugh. “I’ll fight with Pine Street from now on.” m

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“considerable” and that he believed it helped push the diocese to stop covering up for abusing priests. Any legal obligation he had to remain silent was lifted last year, when Coyne released all church abuse survivors from non-disclosure agreements. The report released last month is another important step, Fortin said, adding that he hopes it prompts victims to seek counseling if they have not already. “It’s an issue that needs to be fully responded to, fully answered to,” he said. “It needs to come out, and people need to know who these perpetrators are.” m

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news « P.16

and president Bill Stenger with 52 counts of securities fraud, accusing the men of misusing $200 million invested in a series of rural development projects, some of which were never built. The money came from foreigners who invested half a million dollars each through the federal EB-5 program in exchange for green cards. In an unusual arrangement, the state’s Agency of Commerce and Community Development operated a federally designated “regional center” that both promoted and regulated the Jay Peak development and other area EB-5 projects. Quiros and Stenger have settled the federal securities fraud civil suit, and a corresponding one filed by the state, but they and two associates now face federal criminal charges. Both men have denied wrongdoing. Foreign investors have also sued the state. VTDigger, which raised questions about the fraud years before authorities shut down the projects, has continued to probe the state’s role in overseeing them. In December 2017, it filed a public records request for years’ worth of financial updates on the EB-5 projects that the state had been required to provide to federal regulators. The news outlet later explained in mediation filings that those documents could “fill in critical gaps in the story as to what state regulators knew or should have known each year that the [Jay Peak] owners were progressing in their scheme.” The state denied the request, arguing that nearly all documents associated with the fraud should be shielded from public view as the various court battles played out. After failing to obtain the financial updates again the next year, VTDigger sued the state in January 2019. During a mediation session in March, Donovan’s office agreed to turn over what it had: a handful of the financial updates, though none from before 2009. In lieu of paying VTDigger’s attorneys’ fees, as government agencies are required to do when they lose a records suit, the AG’s office said it would provide two additional batches of documents: communications between Leahy’s office and Vermont officials, and those between a whistleblower and the state. The news outlet eventually received just 200 pages of Leahy-related documents — including press releases and duplicative email chains — a quantity it later suggested 18

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

Since the hard drive hadn’t previously been known to exist, its contents had not been available to state and federal investigators who had probed the matter. And as Competitive Computing pointed out in its report, “It is possible and even likely there may be other email data in similar ACCD archives.” Donovan said it was “hard to believe” that the state had done such a poor job of retaining records a decade ago, and he acknowledged that it was impossible to know what communications may still be missing. “The idea that there was an external hard drive in a closet — I think I’ll just say it’s frustrating,” the AG said. But, he added, his office had found no evidence to suggest that any records were The former Q Burke Mountain Resort intentionally deleted to avoid accountability. According to Kelley, Scott’s with Hulme. When the news outlet spokesperson, the key to restoring public subsequently obtained another 36 pages confidence in the state’s handling of of Hulme emails from an unnamed third the EB-5 scandal is to release as many party, it cried foul — questioning why documents as possible. To that end, the the state hadn’t turned over those docu- administration made available more than ments, too. 700,000 pages in March and April, though VTDigger appeared particularly inter- they are impossible to search without ested in Hulme’s contacts with James specialized software. Other documents won’t be available to Candido, an Agency of Commerce official who ran the state’s regional center from the public for some time. Former gover2006 to 2012 and authored the regular nor Shumlin, a close ally of the Jay Peak reports to the feds. In mediation filings, developers, sealed many of his records for the news outlet questioned whether six years after his January 2017 departure Candido knew about the Ponzi scheme from public office. and suggested that he “may have had a Shumlin has, however, provided his motive to destroy evidence that would EB-5-related documents to state Audiinculpate him at a later date.” There is no tor Doug Hoffer, who is conducting an public evidence establishing that he did so. independent examination of the state’s Candido did not respond to requests role in the Jay Peak fiasco. The former for comment. governor and other officials involved with Donovan’s office eventually hired an the situation — including Candido — have outside firm, Competitive Computing, agreed to be interviewed by the auditor, to determine why it couldn’t track down Hoffer said. Candido’s missing emails, particularly “We’re basically trying to tell the story those dating to a four-month period in about how the state and successive agency 2010. What the firm found was disturbing: heads and other employees handled this,” At the time, the state did not regularly back he said. up email data and encouraged employees But Hoffer can’t tell that story, he to download or delete messages when they believes, until the state and federal court exceeded “strict storage quotas.” cases are complete. “We just don’t want According to a July report from to interfere with the litigation,” he said. Competitive Computing, an external That means a full accounting could be hard drive containing emails belonging to years away. Candido and other Agency of Commerce Donovan, for his part, said he’s looking officials turned up in an agency storage forward to that moment. closet during the review. But the drive “I want the story to be told,” he said. didn’t include the communications “Let’s learn from this.” m VTDigger had obtained independently, perhaps because those and other emails Contact: paul@sevendaysvt.com had been deleted. FILE: DON WHIPPLE

EB-5 Accountability

was implausibly small. Leahy spokesperson David Carle said he did not know the extent of his office’s communications with the state at the time and wasn’t familiar with the AG’s search methodology. Congress has exempted itself from public records laws, and Leahy has refused for years to release EB-5-related documents.

THE STATE’S INABILITY TO LOCATE KEY COMMUNICATIONS

RAISES NEW QUESTIONS ABOUT WHETHER THERE WILL EVER BE A FULL ACCOUNTING OF HOW MUCH OFFICIALS KNEW. The whistleblower, Florida immigration attorney Douglas Hulme, had spent years steering foreign investors to the Jay Peak projects. In 2012, he had a public falling out with Quiros and Stenger, accusing them in a letter to other immigration attorneys of misrepresenting their finances; he later shared those concerns with state officials. Internal emails suggest that state officials brushed off Hulme’s warnings and proceeded to work with and vouch for the developers. VTDigger’s request netted just 22 pages’ worth of state communications


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B Y M A R GA R ET GR AYSON

CULTURE

Michael Kellogg storytelling at Williston Central School

M

remembers a nugget of knowledge he heard from a man he interviewed at the Champlain Senior Center: “Problems aren’t problems. Problems become your experience of the world.” Kellogg teaches third and fourth grades at Williston Central School. With support from the VERMONT FOLKLIFE CENTER, he and former VFC staffer MARY RIZOS have been conducting interviews at the senior center all summer as the first part of a project funded by a BURLINGTON CITY ARTS grant. Spearheaded by Kellogg, it evolved from work he did with his students on storytelling and interviewing. Kellogg relayed the phrase on a recent morning in Burlington as he explained the motivation behind the project’s second phase: a live storytelling event called Cedar: An Evening of Interactive Storytelling, Music and Food, to be held at MAIN STREET LANDING PERFORMING ARTS CENTER on Saturday, September 14. When people hear the phrase “live storytelling,” they may think of events like the Moth that feature rehearsed storytellers onstage. Cedar is different. First, staff from the Middlebury-based VFC will lead a workshop on the nuts and bolts of ethnography and how to listen with the goal of understanding someone else’s perspective. Next will come a musical interlude from Kellogg’s ensemble CLYDE POWERS, 20

ICHAEL KELLOGG

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

featuring electronic sounds and some a cappella compositions. (In case all that listening sounds like it could be tiring, there will also be multiple snack breaks.) Finally, attendees will have the chance to enter a “story booth” where they can share and record their own stories. While Kellogg hopes the entire event will create a space that allows people to be vulnerable, he said, the story booth is a physical manifestation of that space. The booth will accommodate small groups, who will find prompts painted on the wall that encourage storytelling. Kellogg said participants can decide what happens to any recordings of their stories. He further hopes MIC H AE L that the VFC workshop and the presence of an intimate space will provide people with the opportunity to share their knowledge and experience with others. “In life, how many times do we have things that we think, and yet it’s hard to create that space to really engage in that conversation?” he said. Two years ago, Kellogg hit a turning point when he was nominated for Vermont Teacher of the Year. Though he didn’t

win, he recalled, the experience gave him an opportunity to think about what his students needed most. At the same time, he was experiencing health problems that he attributes to “secondary traumatic stress” from work — or the emotional toll of caring for children who have undergone trauma. “I didn’t understand how bad it was until it was really bad,” Kellogg said. “I did not have the tools to manage my own care.” But he found that opening up to his family and support system about his experiences helped him heal. Looking for ways to help his students handle life’s curveballs, Kellogg came across a study from Emory K E L L O GG University called “Do You Know…: The power of family history in adolescent identity and well-being.” The researchers examined the evidence that, as they wrote, “narratives of one’s own personal experiences are critical for identity and well-being.” People who have “coherent and emotionally expressive narratives” about stressful times in their lives are less likely to exhibit depression or anxiety, they theorized. And those stories,

KIDS WHO KNOW MORE ABOUT THEIR FAMILIES …

TENDED TO SHOW HIGHER LEVELS OF EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING.

OLIVER PARINI

Williston Teacher’s Project Explores Storytelling as the Key to Resilience

when told by family members to children, help kids build their own life narratives. To reach those conclusions, the researchers asked kids 20 “Do you know…?” questions, such as “Do you know how your parents met? Where your grandparents grew up? Some of the injuries and illnesses your parents experienced when they were younger? Some of the lessons they learned?” “There’s a correlation here. Kids who know more about their families … tended to show higher levels of emotional wellbeing,” Kellogg said. “And if that correlation existed, I think the question that I found myself wondering was Could I create a unit in my classroom with my kids to interview their moms and dads to facilitate that or encourage that?” He attended a summer professional development course and then spent two years experimenting with storytelling and interviewing units in his classroom. One year he had children interview their parents, and the next year the students interviewed each other. But he wanted to take the idea bigger. “If this is true for families, if families see these benefits, can we see emotional well-being in communities?” Kellogg asked. “Can neighbors experience this? Can colleagues? Can coworkers? Can friends?” He imagines that by encouraging event attendees to share the stories of their lives with fellow community members — in the story booth or in the weeks and months after the event — the project could foster connection and render the entire community more resilient. Kellogg received $1,500 from BCA in July, which funded his interviews at the senior center, the Cedar event and the construction of the story booth. One question he keeps coming back to is a simple one: Do you know the source of your name? A name can illuminate plenty about a person’s background, including ethnicity, religion and family traditions and values. Kellogg knows the origin of his own name, though it’s pretty simple — his parents just liked “Michael.” Talk to him for more than a few minutes, and you’re likely to get that question turned back on you: Do you know?  Contact: margaret@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Cedar: An Evening of Interactive Storytelling, Music and Food, Saturday, September 14, 5-8 p.m., Black Box Theatre at Main Street Landing in Burlington. $20. Tickets at cedarsounds. eventbrite.com.


GOT AN ARTS TIP? ARTNEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

QUICK LIT: SPEAK, MEMORY By the end of Made Holy, an essay collection by EMILY ARNASON CASEY, readers may feel as if they’ve visited the lakeside cabin where she spent her childhood summers and where “[s]ilence opened up around me like a secret kingdom…” (“The Cabin”). We may imagine we’ve been in her grandmother’s house in Minnesota, where a mirror in the stairwell “seemed like a vital organ in the house or a necessary appendage” (“Ancestry of Illness”). We may even feel as if we sat with the author in the Vermont rental where she watched trees outside the window and experienced “[a] luminosity akin to water” as she first celebrated a pregnancy and then mourned its loss (“Alchemy of Shadow”). Casey teaches at the Community College of Vermont in Winooski. Many of the 20 essays in this debut collection appeared in journals such as The Rumpus, upstreet and American

BOOKS

Literary Review; one was honored as “notable” in The Best American Essays 2014. The essays in Made Holy raise many subjects — childhood, motherhood, addiction, recovery, misogyny, feminism, grief, transcendence. Because all are intensely personal and intimate, however, and because many cover the same autobiographical ground, they give the impression of a continuum, merging in a reader’s memory. Memory is the theme to which Casey returns obsessively, just as she returns obsessively to her own memories. She describes remembering, hauntingly, as a sort of out-of-body experience: We travel along the surface of time and then suddenly the layers give way and we are in another body, another year, another place. We’ve dipped down into a different layer on the geological map of life, and for a split second we really are the other self again.

One of the things Casey recalls in these essays is her long battle with “the family disease of alcoholism” (“Ancestry of Illness”). Drinking, too, is an outof-body experience: “I began to lose myself,” she writes in “The Blue Room.” In the same essay, Casey describes in wrenching, visceral terms “How it felt to get sober: A body is forced through the surface, a body that has lived submerged in water for years. It doesn’t know how to breathe in air. The sun in its open eyes burns.” Casey has been sober for years, but she still feels “that familiar pattern of want creep into my days,” she writes in “That Kind of Blue,” “like a pulse flickering alive, its all-consuming desire for more.” A beloved cousin, also an alcoholic, continues to drink. In several essays, Casey expresses love and fear and anger as she contemplates this path not taken. Communications from her cousin are erratic, leaving her “tired of living clenched with fear — not knowing,” she writes in “Prayer for the Scavenger World.” QUICK LIT

» P.22

INFO Made Holy: Essays by Emily Arnason Casey, University of Georgia Press, 200 pages. $24.95. Book launch, Friday, September 13, 6-8 p.m., at BCA Center in Burlington.

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Comedian Tracie Spencer Debuts Her One-Woman Show ‘60 First Dates’ B Y DA N B O LLES

COMEDY

Tracie Spencer

Montpelier comedian regularly booked Spencer for showcases and benefit shows; she offered invaluable stage time when opportunities to perform for an audience were infrequent.

EVERYTHING IS FUNNY, IF YOU CAN FIGURE OUT

HOW TO MAKE IT FUNNY. TR AC IE S P E NC E R

“I remember really loving her material and loving her delivery,” Kanz recalls. Spencer considers herself a stronger writer than performer. That strength is evident in her material, which tends to be nuanced and thoughtful and relies on

Quick Lit « P.21 Those words exemplify the candor that permeates the whole collection and compensates, to a degree, for its repetitious, overlapping, merging quality. This reader sometimes grew impatient with Casey’s frequent return to the same constellation of memories, wishing for an essay that would transport us somewhere we hadn’t been yet. None appeared. Despite this element of sameness, Casey’s insights are raw and powerful. Her prose is most compelling when she gives free rein to poetic, elliptical tendencies, building image on image in seemingly random chains that return unerringly to her central preoccupations. 22

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JAMES BUCK

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ive years ago, comedian TRACIE SPENCER found herself at a daunting life crossroads: freshly divorced, unemployed and about to turn 50. So she did what she does best: She joked about it. Over the next several years, the Burlington mother of two reentered not just the workforce but a dating world that, thanks to online apps, had profoundly changed since she was last single decades ago. Spencer collected those experiences — the good, the bad and the ugly — into a onewoman comedy show called “60 First Dates,” which premieres this Saturday, September 14, at the FLYNNSPACE in Burlington. Spencer refers to her new hourlong set as a “coming-of-middle-age story.” As its title implies, the show centers on the trials of being a newly single woman in her fifties. But, as she has done so often in her comedy since breaking into standup 12 years ago, Spencer digs deep, riffing not only on romantic follies but on family, aging and life. “Everything is funny, if you can figure out how to make it funny,” she says. Spencer first made her mark in local comedy at the 2006 Higher Ground Comedy Battle, a formerly annual standup competition that helped lay the groundwork for Vermont’s comedy boom of recent years. That event connected her with a generation of local standups who would shape the then-nascent scene: folks such as JOSH STAR, KATHLEEN KANZ and JOSIE LEAVITT. The last founded the VERMONT COMEDY DIVAS, of which Spencer is a member, and will host Spencer’s FlynnSpace show. Kanz, the winner of the 2017 Vermont’s Funniest Comedian competition at VERMONT COMEDY CLUB, was especially instrumental in Spencer’s development as a comic. After meeting her at the Comedy Battle, the

hairpin-curve misdirection. But the key is Spencer’s wry delivery, a measured cadence that exudes impish but confident cool. “She gets into a certain feel, and you can just tell it’s going to be funny,” Kanz says. “A little smile comes onto her face, and it’s like she’s almost laughing to herself before she begins. She’s one of my favorites.” “There are so many comedic types out there, but I don’t fit into most of those types,” Spencer says of her standup style. Nor does her material fit neatly into a category. Spencer describes “60 First Dates” as a blend of standup and storytelling that, while undoubtedly funny, touches on heavier themes. She’ll divulge hilarious dating horror stories, sure — like the one about the time she got in a shouting match about white privilege over drinks with a political conservative. “Yeah, that was a one and done,”

“Laughing Water” describes a family game of free association and then mimics one; each section builds on a single word or idea from the last. What emerges is a powerful portrait of the author’s brother and a family’s cycles of love and loss. When Casey engages in overt philosophizing, her writing is less fleet. “I want to believe in her final moment. I want to believe there is some thought, attuned to grace, that arose,” she writes in “Prayer for the Woman Murdered in My Neighborhood,” about the community response to the 2010 murder of Kathleen Smith in Burlington’s Old North End. But Casey also movingly evokes the neighborhood’s grief and fear and the memorial shrine that arose outside Smith’s home.

Spencer says, chuckling. “There were a lot of one and dones, actually.” But she also lets the audience in on deeper fears and insecurities. “What the hell do you do when you’re 50 and single again?” she says. It’s an unapologetically open and exposed approach not unlike that of Jen Kirkman’s or Patton Oswalt’s more recent standup specials. “My standup has always been about my life and kind of self-deprecating,” Spencer says. “But I realized that, to do an hour, I didn’t want it to just be that. There had to be more to it.” So she began writing more involved narratives to weave in with the cheeky one-liners and riffs. According to Kanz, who has seen most of Spencer’s show in various stages of development, that blend of comedy and stories gives the performance uncommon substance and depth. “Her material is always very personal,” Kanz says. “The vulnerability in this performance is right out front. It’s very daring.” And yet, Kanz continues, Spencer’s material is anything but a downer. “It’s the same old mischievous thing that’s in her eyes when she’s going to tell you something that’s quite serious, but you know she’s going to have some sort of a sarcastic take on how absurdly horrible something may have been,” Kanz says. Spencer is quick to note that, lo and behold, she actually enjoys dating these days. “I love meeting new people; I love hearing their stories. And I’ve made a couple of really good friends from dating,” she says. “If I ever get married again, I’d like to keep dating, because it’s really fun.” m Contact: dan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Tracie Spencer, “60 First Dates,” Saturday, September 14, 7 p.m., FlynnSpace in Burlington. $18. flynntix.org

One of Casey’s recurring themes is the leap of faith involved in loving objects and people whose loss is unavoidable. Or is it? Using her talent to speak her memories back into being, she gives them an afterlife in her readers’ minds, too. In “Laughing Water,” Casey writes, “The things we search for only in moments of inspiration are the things we know will eventually return to us. That we instinctively know what is truly lost and what is only misplaced doesn’t surprise me.” Writing becomes a way to find “what is only misplaced” and raise it into the daylight. MARGO T HARRI S O N

Contact: margot@sevendaysvt.com


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EAT, DRINK & BE MERRY

So Much to See & Do! _________

Waterbury is the perfect place to experience the best of our region, offering unrivaled places to explore, play, dine and shop. “We are a quick drive from both Burlington and Montpelier,” said Karen Nevin, Executive Director of Revitalizing Waterbury, “making it a great place to meet friends, or for an easy family getaway right here in the heart of the Green Mountains.” Waterbury’s local setting makes for peaceful rambling hikes, invigorating mountain biking, and fun family treks – time well spent whether among the forest trees, along our sparkling rivers or on the reservoir. The opportunities are endless for people of all ages and expertise by foot or by bike! In Waterbury’s historic downtown, independent boutiques and stores feature local artists and finds for everyone. “I highly recommend spending some time at our unique shops,” said Alyssa Johnson, Economic Development Director. “I guarantee you’ll discover a treat for yourself or someone special!” There are wonderful places to pick up items for the home or gifts for any occasion at the Stowe Street Emporium, The Tiny Acorn and Bridgeside Books. Delicious and quick meals to go can be found at Stowe Street Café, K.C.’s Bagel Café, or the Village Market. You can even bring along your 4-legged family member to experience Waterbury Unleashed, our safe and accessible dog park. Most locals know that a drive through Waterbury can be a foodie trip from heaven. Starting in town

Dining in Waterbury is fun and varied. When it comes to food and beverages, visitors are in for a treat. The town continues to be a center for imaginative dining made by creative, award-winning chefs using the abundant fruits of our local landscape. Early fall is full of vegetables, fruit, meat, cheese, maple, and other specialty products direct from local farms. “I love how our Waterbury businesses are filled with locals and visitors alike,” said Karen Nevin. “Everyone is welcome here.” There’s always something inspiring on the menu, whether it’s at the finest dining establishment or at the bar.

barbecue, and smoked meat are united at Prohibition Pig, serving lunch and dinner. Unmatched regionally crafted beers on tap or by the bottle are featured at the Reservoir Restaurant and Tap Room, Craft Beer Cellar and the Blackback Pub as well as many other wellstocked shops and restaurants. New to Waterbury is The Wine Vault, offering wine tastings every Friday. “Exit 10 off Route 89 is a convenient on and off for so many reasons” said Cynthia Ryan, Chair of the Revitalizing Waterbury Marketing Committee, “Our vibrant small town is perfect for a memorable meal, specialty shopping, to impress visiting relatives or to simply meet friends.” Waterbury relishes the past, keeps pace with the present and can’t wait for the future. Think local, buy local, be local.

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4711 Waterbury-Stowe Rd. Waterbury Center, VT 05677

GIFT SHOP & BOUTIQUE 23 Stowe Street, Waterbury Village • 802-244-5321

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Waterbury’s full spectrum of restaurants range from New York style bagels to barbecue, classic diner fare to romantic, farm-to-table dining, and quaint cafés to perfect pub nachos. Our best kept secret is our very own hole-in-the-wall Mexican favorite, Atzlan Foods, with the best burritos this side of the border. Join us for a meal or a snack on any budget and taste the flavors that now call this part of Vermont home. Only in Waterbury will you find two of Vermont’s best romantic restaurants, Hen of the Wood, an historic grist mill sited by a dramatic waterfall and Michael’s on the Hill, a rambling historic farmhouse set upon a hill. Each have an emphasis on locally sourced food offering their own flare with simple yet surprising flavor. Classic specialties like duck, rabbit, and lamb are regularly on the menu at both restaurants. A visit to either is a stellar way to end your day in Waterbury.

CHEERS TO OUR BREWERIES Waterbury is commonly known as a world-class beer town. An extensive selection of craft beer, serious SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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WET N WILD! Makin’ ripples since 1995*

LEFT TO RIGHT: Logan Pintka, Robyn Birgisson, Ken Picard, Kristen Hutter, Kevin McCallum, Alison Novak, Mary Ann Lickteig, Molly Walsh, Derek Brouwer, Brooke Bousquet, Margot Harrison, Cheryl Brownell, Eva Sollberger, Chelsea Edgar, Jordan Adams, Paula Routly, Courtney Lamdin, Jordan Barry, Pamela Polston, Elizabeth Seyler, Michelle Brown, Margaret Grayson, Don Eggert, Cathy Resmer, Matthew Roy, Dan Bolles, John James, Candy Page, Sasha Goldstein, Matt Weiner, Gillian English, Kirsten Cheney, Katie Hodges, Paul Heintz, Corey Grenier, Bryan Parmelee, Michael Bradshaw, Colby Roberts, Diane Sullivan, Jeff Baron GONE OVERBOARD: Harry Applegate, Joe Bouffard, Pat Bouffard, James Buck, Colin Clary, Elana Coppola-Dyer, Donna Delmoora, Carolyn Fox, Matt Hagen, Nat Michael, Kaitlin Montgomery, Bill Mullins, Dan Nesbitt, Ezra Oklan, Sally Pollak, Kristen Ravin, Andrea Suozzo, Brett Stanciu, Dan Thayer, Josh Weinstein, Steve Yardley PHOTOGRAPHER: Luke Awtry LOCATION: St. John’s Club, Burlington *We turned 24 on September 6, 2019! 26

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019


WORK VERMONTERS ON THE JOB

Seeing the Forest and the Trees

WORK

B Y E L IZA B ETH M. SE YL ER

DARIA BISHOP

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n the 1800s, approximately 80 percent how to manage forested land. We take a of Vermont forests were cleared for walk in their forest and talk about how to pasture-based agriculture. That land manage it or what’s going on there. use remained dominant for more than a The third thing I do is assist communicentury. The practice may have been good ties with their municipal lands, and I write for commerce, but it was a “catastrophic forest management plans for town forests. disturbance” for forests, said Chittenden I’m involved in a project now in HinesCounty forester Ethan Tapper. burg, demonstrating modern, responsible Trees began to reestablish themselves in active forest management and doing it the 1940s and ’50s, and forests now cover in this really open and transparent way: about 75 percent of the state, bringing timber harvestbut “they’re essentially in a ing out of the shadows and NAME state of recovery,” Tapper said. reframing it as something Ethan Tapper, 30 He’s among the Vermonters that can be done responsidevoted to helping them. bly. If it’s done responsibly, TOWN Tapper assists private it’s really exciting because Burlington landowners and municipaliyou’re providing all kinds JOB ties in responsibly stewardof benefits, as well as a local Chittenden County renewable resource. ing their forests, which cover forester some 60 percent of ChittenFinally, the most exciting den County. A Saxtons River part of my job is what I call native and 2012 graduate of the University “whatever.” It’s figuring out how to elevate of Vermont’s forestry program, Tapper has the quality of forest management in Chittenbeen the county forester since 2016. He den County — thinking about what’s going believes his work is important not only to on and what steps we can take to increase forests but to all Vermonters. His monthly the health and well-being of our forests. column “Into the Woods,” geared to the public and published in 11 local newspa- SD: How are Vermont forests faring? pers, covers everything from managing deer ET: They’re recovering more natural pressure to understanding tree species. forest patterns, but they lack diversity. Seven Days spoke with Tapper about They aren’t as diverse as those that what foresters do, how Vermont forests preceded all the clearing in the 1800s. And are faring and why he loves his job. I mean that in terms of species diversity: There are fewer native tree species in a SEVEN DAYS: What knowledge and given area. They also have less structural skills go into being a forester? diversity; they are mostly the same age. In ETHAN TAPPER: There’s an understanding an old-growth forest, you would see a large of how forests work, all these interconnected amount of structural diversity — many parts — from geology to soils to wildlife different ages and sizes of trees coexisting. biology to conservation biology — that Vermont forests are not as diverse as make up how forest ecosystems function. they could be, and the implications are that And there’s the practice of forestry, the field they may be less resilient to catastrophic skills: collecting data on forests, mapping disturbances, and they’ll be less resilient those forests and using that data to prescribe to climate change. active management, if that’s appropriate in But using harvesting now, on a parcela given forest. by-parcel basis, we can reinstall some of the features that may have been present SD: What do you do as county on presettlement forests. forester? ET: Essentially, four things. First, I monitor SD: What else makes forest managethe Use Value Appraisal Program in ment important? Chittenden County, also called “current use.” ET: The reason it’s significant what That’s where, usually, private consulting foresters do — and especially consulting foresters are developing forest management foresters, who work for private landowners plans for private landowners. Those plans — is that 80 percent of Vermont land is are then submitted to me for approval, and I privately owned, yet forests and our native make sure they’re followed. ecosystems are producing a massive Second, people call me for advice on amount of public benefit: wildlife habitat,

Ethan Tapper

clean air, clean water, carbon sequestration storage. And our lives are positively impacted by forests, whether it’s living here where it’s beautiful, or the forest where you walk or run or mountain bike, or having wonderful experiences seeing wildlife. But forests are managed on this private, individual property level, so how we manage them is very important. We’re thinking about: How can I manage this forest to be more diverse, to produce better wildlife habitat, to produce more ecosystem services, to produce a local renewable resource in a way that makes sense? SD: How many Chittenden County landowners are in the current use program? ET: I don’t know for the county, but on the statewide level, participation of eligible lands in UVA is less than 50 percent. It would be great to get that number up. [In the program,] you can’t subdivide or develop your land without paying a penalty, and you have to follow a forest management plan. In exchange, landowners get significant tax breaks. It lowers development pressure on land, and it elevates the quality of forest management because, instead of

landowners doing whatever they want, they comply with a plan written by a consulting forester and supervised by me. I love working with landowners who are open to learning and who are active on their land. These people are all over the place. They are amazing to work with because they have such an understanding of how forests work from immersing themselves in them, and they are willing to do what’s necessary to make the forest healthy. Sometimes you’ve got to be willing to make hard decisions — to cut that tree down when it’s in service to a broader goal of forest health. The forest requires the death of trees. This is how forests change over time and how they become diverse and how they cultivate really high-quality wildlife habitat. This organism requires this disturbance in order to live. m This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity. Contact: elizabeth@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Got an unusual job or know someone else who does? Let us know! ken@sevendaysvt.com SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT BY KEN PICARD

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hat’s up with all the trees that have suddenly been planted in the town of Charlotte in unused farm fields along Route 7?” asked one Burlington reader in a recent email. “At first I thought it was a bunch of new vineyards. Are they to capture carbon? New Christmas tree farms? WTF?” Those lush, verdant bushes sprouting in Charlotte — and elsewhere in the state — are neither Christmas trees nor grapevines. The latter is a good guess, because some of those Charlotte fields lay fallow for years, until farmers proposed cultivating hops to serve Vermont’s craft beer industry. But that crop never made it into the ground: A group of neighbors objected to the potential spraying of pesticides in a residential neighborhood, as well as to the depletion of their wells that might result from hops’ irrigation needs. In fact, those “trees” sprouting seemingly everywhere are hemp, which is now the fastest-growing crop by acreage in the state. In 2013, 175 acres were registered for hemp cultivation in the state, according to the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. By 2018, the number had grown to 3,290 acres. This year, the agency has registered more than 7,800 acres, with cultivation in all of Vermont’s 14 counties. Stephanie Smith, chief policy enforcement officer at the Agency of Agriculture, noted that not all of that acreage is necessarily in production. Owing to this year’s exceptionally wet spring, she explained, some farmers found the areas they had initially registered for cultivation too wet to plant. Nevertheless, the number of commercial hemp farmers in Vermont continues to bloom, from 461 registered growers in 2018 to more than 900 this year. Several factors drive hemp’s popularity. The nonintoxicating cultivar of Cannabis sativa is easy to raise, grows like a weed in virtually any soil or climate, and is naturally resistant to cold, drought and pests. Often referred to as a “miracle plant,” hemp is now grown commercially to make a variety of products, including carpets, paper, insulation, salad oils, diapers and bird seed. But those applications aren’t what’s fueling Vermont’s hemp boom. What is? In a word: cannabidiol, aka CBD. According to Smith, CBD production accounts for 90 percent of Vermont’s hemp crop. Research has shown that CBD has antianxiety, antipsychotic, anti-inflammatory and mood-elevating effects in humans,

Charlotte hemp fields

KEN PICARD

What Are Those New ‘Trees’ Being Planted in Fields Across Vermont?

according to Dr. Dustin Sulak, an osteopathic physician and medical director of the Falmouth, Maine, office of Integr8 Health, who often prescribes CBD for his patients. The hemp extract is now added to personal consumer goods such as lip balm, deodorant, mascara, toothpaste, bath bombs, and even anal and vaginal suppositories. In coffeehouses, a single shot of CBD can raise the price of a $2 cup of joe to $5, making hemp potentially far more profitable than hay, corn or pumpkins. “This crop is … an opportunity for diversification amongst existing farmers, and we’ve got a number of new farmers in the state, as well,” Smith said. “But I think some of those new farmers dug into the land they registered and discovered there were impediments.” Those impediments go beyond rocky or waterlogged soils, neither of which is ideal for hemp cultivation. For one thing, the U.S. hemp industry remains largely unregulated. As Heather Darby, an agronomist and soil specialist with University of Vermont Extension, explained in a May webinar, “There is no real quality control in the hemp seed market — at all.” Hemp seeds can sell for $1 to $2 apiece, and their price could rise as their availability diminishes. Farmers who plant clones started in

greenhouses may pay $3 to $8 per plant, Darby added, which adds up to $5,000 to $6,000 per acre. And, as any experienced farmer knows, there are no guarantees in agriculture. As U.S. farmers prepare for this fall’s hemp harvest — the first federally legal one in decades, thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill — market projections are “mixed,” according to Hemp Benchmarks, an independent price reporting agency for the U.S. hemp industry. The prices for some hemp commodities saw “a sizeable decline” in August, continuing a slide that began in April. Still, the potential return on investment is high. According to a recent report from Hemp Benchmarks, refined hemp oil sold in August for $2,300 to $11,000 per kilo. Feminized CBD seeds — those that have been modified to produce the more desirable female plants — sold for as much as $28,800 per pound. It’s unclear whether hemp is displacing other crops traditionally grown in Vermont; Smith noted that the state agency doesn’t track such figures. Anecdotally, however, she’s heard that some fields previously used for grazing livestock have switched to more lucrative hemp production. Hemp farmers have been subject to

losses due to, frankly, stupid thieves who mistake the plants for marijuana. At the second annual Vermont Cannabis and Hemp Convention, held in May, one grower reported that he lost 20 percent of his hemp crop to theft. Hence the proliferation of red-and-white no-trespassing signs that warn would-be plant pilferers that hemp contains less than 0.3 percent THC, the psychoactive ingredient in pot, and has “zero effects if smoked.” How does all this hemp production affect Vermont’s environment? On the plus side, some studies have found that it sequesters more heat-trapping carbon dioxide than other agricultural or forest products, according to a paper published by James Vosper, president of the Australian Industrial Hemp Alliance. Still, the bushy annual is not without its environmental impacts. As the crop matures, it can make the surrounding area smell like skunk roadkill — or a Phish show parking lot. Hey, even a “miracle” crop has its downsides. m Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Got a Vermont head-scratcher that has you stumped? Ask us! wtf@sevendaysvt.com. SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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SHOW AND TELL TH E 2019-20 PERF ORMI N G ART S PREVIEW B Y SEVEN DAY S STAFF

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f it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. We can imagine that the fine folks behind the Middlebury Performing Arts Series might have a frayed poster with that Vermonty maxim hanging somewhere in their offices. After all, the venerable Middlebury College program has presented world-renowned classical and chamber music — with a sprinkling of jazz, theater and dance — for the past 100 years in the idyllic college town. A century is a long time. For context, when the Middlebury series started, it likely celebrated the 150th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth. Don’t think there won’t be a fuss over his 250th. But more than an achievement in longevity, Middlebury’s centenary speaks to the enduring power and value of the performing arts. Simply put, participating in the arts, whether as players or witnesses, helps make us who we are. They celebrate our differences while bringing into focus our universal humanity. Just as importantly, the arts dare us to think outside of our daily existence and dream big. That’s not opinion; it’s a fact. As Albert Einstein put it, “Logic will take you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” Thanks, Al. The 2019-20 performing arts season in Vermont promises to whisk audiences to new

heights of imagination and whimsy. At venues around the state, programs are loaded with performances that will entertain and inspire: from community theater productions to full-on Broadway blitzes; from noble re-creations of Shakespeare to improv comedy riffs on the Bard; from intimate acoustic sets by such legends as Arlo Guthrie and Graham Nash to tribute acts honoring the Beatles, David Bowie and Eric Clapton; from chamber concerts to orchestral galas; from gravity-defying cirque to elegant dance; from exotic jazz to down-home Americana. The only question is: Where to begin? The answer: on these pages. We’ve pored over season programs and highlighted a sampling from every genre and presenting organization. But of course this is only a snapshot. To fully experience the variety of shows on offer around the Green Mountains, you’ll have to do a little legwork of your own. To help, we’ve made some suggestions, Pandora-style, following each spotlight. But don’t be afraid to take a chance on something new. After all, the Middlebury Performing Arts Series didn’t make it to 100 by simply putting Symphony No. 5 on repeat. m Happy performing arts season — and happy 250th, Ludwig! DAN BO LLE S

Richard Marx: An Acoustic Evening of Love Songs Friday, February 21, 7:30 p.m., Paramount Theatre, $29-59.

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the name Richard Marx? It could be the singer’s raspy tenor, his earnest love songs — like 1989’s “Right Here Waiting” — or maybe even the time he made headlines in 2016 for subduing an unruly passenger on a Korean Air flight. (Google “Richard Marx to the rescue” for one hell of a story.) In-flight heroism aside, Marx is a prolific songwriter, and his name is attached to hits spanning pop, rock, R&B and country — think Keith Urban’s “Long Hot Summer” and Luther Vandross’ “Dance With My Father,” for starters. The Grammy Award winner’s own hits, which pepper his 11 studio albums, include the enigmatic “Hazard,” the bluesy “The Way She Loves Me” and the perennially catchy “Should’ve Known Better.” More recently, Marx has rewarded loyal fans with a live and acoustic collection marking the 30th anniversary of his 1989 Billboard 200 No. 1 album Repeat Offender. He also released a new single, “Another One Down,” this summer. Though he no longer rocks the mullet from the “Hold On to the Nights” video, Marx can still transport fans to those endless summer nights of big hair and even bigger ballads. KRI S T E N RAVI N

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… AN INTIMATE EVENING OF SONGS & STORIES WITH GRAHAM NASH, Saturday, October 5, 7:30 p.m., Lebanon Opera House, $59.50-69.50. ELVIS COSTELLO & THE IMPOSTERS, Sunday, October 27, 7 p.m.,

Flynn MainStage, $45-110. MARTIN SEXTON, Saturday, January 11, 7 p.m., Spruce Peak

Performing Arts Center, $38-68. CROCE PLAYS CROCE, Saturday, April 4, 7:30 p.m., Barre Opera

House, $24-36. 30

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019


Rhiannon Giddens

Sunday, September 29, 7 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $25-55.

A 2010 cover of R&B singer Blu Cantrell’s smash single “Hit ’Em Up Style” launched the Carolina Chocolate Drops to viral fame. Found on the group’s Grammy Award-winning record, Genuine Negro Jig, the twangy interpretation fit well with the North Carolina string band’s eclectic assemblage of original material and traditional Appalachian folk tunes. Throughout that album, the musicians sought to explore and reclaim the black roots of a genre largely dominated by white artists. In recent years, CCD front person Rhiannon Giddens has released a string of solo albums charged with similar explorations. Most recently, the multi-instrumentalist teamed up with Italian

Michael Ian Black: “Shut Up & Comedy” Thursday, November 14, 7 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, November 15 and 16, 7 and 9:30 p.m., Vermont Comedy Club, $25-$32.

jazz player Francesco Turrisi. Together, the duo crafted a borderline experimental collection of songs that combines Giddens’ folk background with modern jazz, opera and traditional Italian music. “It’s not so much that this one is a personal record, but I could express myself using all of what I do in a way I haven’t really been able to do before,” she told Rolling Stone in May. Atop the engrossing effort with Turrisi, Giddens also created the score for the Nashville Ballet’s production of Lucy Negro Redux and contributed to the collaborative anthology Songs of Our Native Daughters. JO RDAN ADAMS

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… BLACK VIOLIN, “Impossible Tour,”

In a recent standup bit, comedian Michael Ian Black relates that he and his wife went to Amsterdam on their honeymoon “for the whores … and the Anne Frank House.” He then riffs about their difficulty in getting pregnant and his fear of ending up “like one of these sad, childless couples … who go through life sleeping late and traveling the world. That would be terrible!” If Black’s name and self-deprecating humor aren’t instantly recognizable to readers, his boyish face and extensive body of work should be. In the mid-1990s he was a founding member of MTV’s cult-hit comedy series “The State.” Black starred in the film Wet Hot American Summer (2001) and was a regular on VH-1’s “I Love the…” miniseries, in which he served up pithy snark about each decade’s pop-cultural flotsam. The 48-year-old comic, who’s worked with such talents as Jim Gaffigan and Amy Schumer, has also penned 11 books, including the 2016 best seller, A Child’s First Book of Trump. It’s a rhyming, field-guide parody about what kids should do when spotting a Donald Trump in the wild.

Sunday, October 13, 7 p.m., Dibden Center for the Arts, $28.50-48.50. ANGÉLIQUE KIDJO, “Remain in

Light,” Tuesday, April 7, 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $12-55. MIPSO, Friday, April 17, 7:30 p.m.,

Lane Series at the UVM Recital Hall, $5-30.

KEN P ICARD

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… NICK KROLL, “MIDDLE-AGED BOY TOUR,” Thursday, September 26, 8

p.m., Flynn MainStage, $37.75. PAULA POUNDSTONE, Saturday, October 12, 8 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $25-52; Friday, February 7, 7 p.m., Dibden Center for the Arts, $25-45. NIKKI GLASER, Thursday through

RON FUNCHES, “MERRIMENT MARAUDER Tour,” Friday and

Saturday, November 8 and 9, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Vermont Comedy Club, $25-32.

COURTESY OF KAREN COX

Saturday, October 17 through 19, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Vermont Comedy Club, $25-32.

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Show and Tell « P.31

Cartography

“It’s such a gift to understand the world as one of migration as opposed to these hot points of tension and trauma,” says author and illustrator Christopher Myers. Along with director Kaneza Schaal, he’s the cocreator of Cartography, a theatrical “live documentary” that stitches together the stories of Eritrean and Syrian refugees fleeing to Europe in one of the largest mass migrations in history. Myers and Schaal conceived the project while working with refugee youth in Munich and discovering how many had shared experiences, regardless of where they came from. “There was one moment where a young woman from Syria, who was living in the same residence as someone from Nigeria, realized they had both been on inflatable rafts on the Mediterranean,” says Schaal. “There was this moment of understanding between them: ‘You know what I am talking about.’” The hope with Cartography is that through a cunning blend of dance, film, sound-sensor technology and, yes, map-making, such understanding passes from stage to crowd. As DC Metro Theater Arts critic David Siegel observed, the ripped-fromheadlines work “explores a world alive with transitions and movement by characters speaking their minds; representing those often made purposely invisible by others.” DAN B O L L E S

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… THE TELLING PROJECT, Saturday, November 23, 7 p.m.,

Northern Vermont University-Lyndon, $25, students free; and Sunday, November 24, 3 p.m., Highland Center for the Arts, $25, students free. ASHLEY FURE: “THE FORCE OF THINGS,” Wednesday

through Friday, April 1 through 3, 7:30 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday, April 4 and 5, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $18-30. MIWA MATRAYEK: INFINITELY YOURS AND MYTH AND INFRASTRUCTURE, Sunday, April 5, 2 p.m.;

and Monday, April 6, 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $21-35.

COURTESY OF JAY NEWMAN

Thursday, April 30, 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $18-30.

Kinetic Light: Descent Wednesday, October 30, 7:30 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $15-45.

More than 100 years ago, French sculptor Auguste Rodin challenged Western ideals of female beauty. In his “Toilette de Vénus et Andromède,” two mythical women from Europe and Ethiopia immerse in the sensuality of bathing, inviting viewers to rediscover magnificence through a multicultural lens. Inspired by Rodin’s sculpture, contemporary choreographer Alice Sheppard’s dance work Descent shows Venus and Andromeda reveling in the sensuality of connection, trust, risk and effort. They invite viewers into the gorgeousness of intimacy, the beauty of racial and ethnic diversity, and the kinetic thrill of dance — in and out of wheelchairs.

Sheppard, a former member of AXIS Dance and winner of a 2019 Creative Capital Award, intertwines art, architecture, movement and social justice to expand the genre of wheelchair dance. Set on a visually stunning ramp engineered with slopes, peaks and flat surfaces, Descent is an adventure in movement that confounds expectations. Illuminated by projections of Rodin’s sculptures, Sheppard and dancer Laurel Lawson careen down the slope, the wheels of their chairs within inches of the edge. They use gravity and centrifugal force to lift each other. They lie prone to caress the air or perch animallike on the ramp’s peak. Throughout Descent, the duo harnesses physics for a joyous romp through the unlimited possibilities of the dancing body. E LI ZABE T H M. S E YLE R

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… KIMBERLY BARTOSIK: I HUNGER FOR YOU, Friday, October 18,

8 p.m., FlynnSpace, $35. MARTHA GRAHAM DANCE COMPANY, Friday, January 17,

7:30 p.m.; and Saturday, January 18, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $18-60. COURTESY OF ELMAN STUDIO

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MOMIX: VIVA MOMIX, Sunday, February 9, 7 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $25-60. PILOBOLUS, Friday, February 21, 7 p.m., Lyndon Institute Auditorium, $15-54.


COURTESY OF ELIJAH HASSAN

Okaidja Afroso

Friday, March 27, 7:30 p.m., Lane Series at UVM Recital Hall, $5-30.

West Africa is rich in accomplished musicians, many of whom reach international renown. Born into a family of musicians and griots in Kokrobite, Ghana, Okaidja Afroso just might have the performing life embedded in his genetic code. Initially, he was a dancer in the prestigious Ghana Dance Ensemble; he later became an instrumentalist — on guitar and percussion — as well as a singer-songwriter and composer. Over time, Okaidja’s career shifted as he began to investigate the music of the African diaspora. Today, his music intertwines with that of North and Latin America, and he cites influences as diverse as Johnny Cash and Bobby McFerrin (though listeners may not readily hear those artists reflected in his Afrocentric rhythms). Okaidja’s aim is to create the music of the human experience. “It is the fluidity of the innumerably

Sesame Street Live!: C Is for Celebration Friday, September 20, 2 & 6 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $15-35; Saturday, September 21, 1 & 4 p.m., Paramount Theatre, $20-40.

Generations of youngsters have learned the ABCs with help from “Sesame Street.” The entertaining and educational children’s TV show reaches 150 million kids around the world and celebrates five decades on the air this year. In a February feature for the Hollywood Reporter, Marisa Guthrie wrote, “There are a few TV shows that have been on the air longer — ‘Meet the Press,’ ‘Doctor Who,’ ‘The Tonight Show’ — but none has made a bigger impact, or at least taught as many people the alphabet.” The program’s furry friends Elmo, Abby, Rosita, Cookie Monster and Super Grover take the leap from screen to stage for Sesame Street Live!: C Is for Celebration, a live-action show that follows everybody’s favorite monsters as they throw a party for their pals. This high-energy production plays out in intimate theater settings at a

complex sounds that makes his music timeless and soothing,” wrote a reviewer for Impose magazine in 2017. As Okaidja himself says in one of his videos, “We are very fortunate to have a solid foundation in the music of West Africa, but at the same time, we want to push the envelope.” An Okaidja Afroso concert of music and dance, he suggests, is “where you can recharge your spirit.” His Vermont audience will no doubt welcome that experience come March. PAME L A P O LS T O N

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… TINARIWEN, Wednesday, September 25, 7:30 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $15-45. MASHROU’ LEILA, Saturday, September 28, 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $12-45. THE GARIFUNA COLLECTIVE,

Thursday, October 10, 7:30 p.m., FlynnSpace, $25.

kid-friendly runtime of 45 minutes. Costumed characters sing, dance and play alongside human castmates on a set that mirrors the TV show’s urban row-house neighborhood. Be they young or young at heart, audience members are sure to be humming the TV theme songs for days: “Can you tell me how to get, how to get to Sesame Streeeet?” K R I S T E N R AV I N

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… THE ADDAMS FAMILY, Thursday and Friday, November 7 and 8, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, November 9, 1 & 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, November 10, 1 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $24-42. NICK JR. LIVE! MOVE TO THE MUSIC, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 4 and 5, 6 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $22.50-107.25. MATILDA: THE MUSICAL, Thursday

and Friday, April 2 and 3, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, April 4, 1 and 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, April 5, 1 and 6 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $24-42. SHOW AND TELL SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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COURTESY OF FADI KHEIR

Show and Tell « P.33

The Just and the Blind

Thursday, January 16, 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $24-40.

“At the DMV, my boy is in line to officially enter his prime suspect years,” Marc Bamuthi Joseph told the crowd at a TEDx event in Palo Alto, Calif., in October 2018. In his reverberating baritone voice, his cadence dancing between lecture and poetry, he spoke of raising a black son, and of his then-upcoming performance piece The Just and the Blind. It premiered at Carnegie Hall in March to a sold-out crowd. Joseph, the vice president and artistic director of social impact at the John F. Kennedy Center for the 34

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

Performing Arts, is a performer who blends dance and spoken word poetry. He developed The Just and the Blind with acclaimed violinist and composer Daniel Bernard Roumain. [See spotlight on page 36.] The performance also features dancer Drew Dollaz and vocalist Somi. Through music, lyrics and movement, the artists explore race and the judicial and penal systems. “It’s a duet for voice and violin,” Joseph told the crowd in Palo Alto, “really about my son, who’s moving from boy to man, and moving from being observed to being profiled.” M A R G A R E T G R AY S O N

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… VERMONT READS: MARCH: BOOK ONE, A VISIT WITH CONGRESSMAN JOHN LEWIS AND ANDREW AYDIN,

Monday, October 7, 7 p.m., Flynn MainStage, free. L.A. THEATRE WORKS: SEVEN, Tuesday and

Wednesday, March 3 and 4, 7:30 p.m., Middlebury College, $6-22. SARA JULI: BURNT-OUT WIFE, Friday and Saturday, April 17 and 18, 8 p.m., FlynnSpace, $30.


RUBBERBAND Dance: Vic’s Mix

Saturday, November 16, 7 p.m., Dibden Center for the Arts, $25-45.

COURTESY OF BILL HEBERT

In the video teaser for Vic’s Mix, members of RUBBERBAND Dance spar for dominance with high-energy hip-hop moves, but to classical music, not rap — specifically, Sergei Prokofiev’s “Dance of the Knights” from Romeo and Juliet. The juxtaposition of these dance and music genres is reminiscent of Jerome Robbins’ 1957 Broadway hit West Side Story, but RUBBERBAND choreographer Victor Quijada propels his blend of ballet, jazz, modern and raw street dance into daring territory. Viewers of Vic’s Mix may find themselves needing to catch their breath. In a duet, dancers play out the psychological torture of love, loss and betrayal with volatile, arresting embraces. Four dancers in the corners of an imaginary boxing ring duel with low-to-the-ground, full-body kicks and reaches. Individuals burst out of a pack to affirm their individuality with fist-pumping, head-snapping, athletic bravado.

Vic’s Mix charts the past 15 years of Quijada’s choreographic repertoire. Born and raised in Los Angeles, he began dancing hip-hop in clubs as a teen and, within years, was dancing with superstar Twyla Tharp and Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. In 2002, he founded RUBBERBAND and created a new movement style that combines classical ballet’s precision, contemporary dance’s freedom and hip-hop’s explosive energy. In seven acts, Vic’s Mix takes dance to new heights. E L I ZA B E T H M . S E Y L E R

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… SWAN LAKE, Thursday, November 14, 7:30 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $30-70. DANCE THEATRE OF HARLEM,

Wednesday, November 20, 7:30 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $25-58.

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STOMP, Friday, January 3, 7 p.m.; and Saturday, January 4, 2 & 7 p.m., Paramount Theatre, $29-49. MALPASO DANCE COMPANY, Saturday, February 29, 8 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $15-45.

SHOW AND TELL

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Show and Tell « P.35

Randy Rainbow Live

Saturday, October 5, 8 p.m., Flynn Mainstage, $50-91.50.

There’s viral and then there’s really freaking viral. Randy Rainbow’s internet videos easily rank in the latter category. His political musical parodies have racked up more than a hundred million views. Rainbow’s videos involve clever appropriation of actual news footage — he inserts himself as an “interviewer” — and compositions that set his hilarious lyrics to well-known pop or musical theater tunes. Way back in time, during the 2016 presidential debates, Rainbow’s video “Braggadocious!” (to the tune: “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”) got 28 million views in just two days. A recent parody is titled “Cheeto Christ StupidCzar” (you got this one). With an angelic face and emotive tenor, Rainbow could be a cast member from Book of Mormon, albeit with pink-framed cat-eye glasses. It’s hard to say which of his talents is most brilliant: songwriting, video editing or keeping a straight face while chiding an agitated president, “Calm down, bitch.”

Daniel Bernard Roumain

Friday, December 13, 8 p.m., FlynnSpace, $25; Saturday, February 8, 10 a.m., Flynn MainStage Lobby, free, preregister; with TURNmusic on Saturday, February 8, 8 p.m., FlynnSpace, $20; with Vermont Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 2, 7:30 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $15-60.

Get to know the name Daniel Bernard Roumain, because the classically trained violinist and composer plans to be in Burlington a lot throughout the coming season. Known to many as DBR, the artist will visit for five weeklong residencies between December and May. A first-generation Haitian American, Roumain creates stimulating, musically complex and thematically diverse work. Calling on movement, opera, spoken word or a combination of artistic disciplines, his inventive performances are rooted in activism. In the past, his compositions and performances have examined topics such as the 1985 bombing of West Philadelphia black liberation group MOVE’s headquarters; the duality of Haitian identity; the 1963 Stand in the Schoolhouse Door protest in Tuscaloosa, Ala.; and the ongoing incarceration of black youth. During his Vermont residencies, Roumain will premiere two new pieces. In October — exact date TBD — he’ll stage a 24-hour piece in front of Burlington City Hall, tentatively titled “Protest Song.” Guest musicians will join him via Skype. In May, he presents “Riots and Prayers” with the Vermont Symphony Orchestra. The new works, and his residencies, will celebrate the positive aspects of immigration. JO R D A N A D A M S

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… JON BATISTE AND STAY HUMAN, Friday, October 4, 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $18-65. CHICK COREA TRILOGY, Tuesday, October 15, 7:30 p.m.,

Flynn MainStage, $25-65. TURTLE ISLAND QUARTET AND CYRUS CHESTNUT, Friday, November

22, 7:30 p.m., Mahaney Arts Center, $6-20. IMANI WINDS AND HARLEM QUARTET: “PASSION FOR BACH AND COLTRANE,” Tuesday, March 31, 7:30 p.m., Hopkins Center

for the Arts, $12-45. 36

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Rainbow’s video “Barr!” was nominated for an Emmy Award this year in the Outstanding Short Form Variety Series — winners will be announced September 22. Soon after that, he’ll appear at the Flynn. If you’re wondering how a YouTube sensation presents an in-person show, not to worry: Rainbow has performed on Broadway and in cabarets and nightclubs, too — and, guurrl, his shows are selling out across the land. PAME L A P O LS T O N

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… JO FIRESTONE PRESENTS: “ZINGERS!,”

Thursday, September 26, 7 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, September 27 and 28, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Vermont Comedy Club, $20-27. THE OFFICE! A MUSICAL PARODY, Friday,

October 11, 7:30 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $39-70.50. NICK OFFERMAN: “ALL RISE TOUR,” Saturday, October 26, 7 & 10 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $42-66. MS. PAT, Friday and Saturday, November

29 and 30, 7 & 9:30 p.m., Vermont Comedy Club, $20-27.


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This Fall at LNT:

Shakespeare’s

Will

Tour-de-Force! The Bard’s Widow Gets the Last Word! “Enthralling” - Times Argus

Luminescent!” - J. Nagle,

Vermont Shakespeare Festival

Just One More Week!

Thru Sept 15

Kate Hamill’s wild, witty & wonderful adaptation of Jane Austen’s beloved novel.

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JANE AUSTEN’S

PRIDE AND PRE JUDI CE

Pride & Prejudice

photo: Wayne Fawbush Margo Whitcomb in LNT’s “Shakespeare’s Will”

Thu–Sun! Oct 3–20 plus

LNT-Aid! One Night Only Thu Nov 21

Vermont’s best music and comedy stars come out for a lallapalooza of a benefit concert! COURTESY OF PETER FRANK EDWARDS

lostnationtheater.org

Remember why you love fall in Vermont as you enjoy a one-of-akind dining experience on the Champlain Valley Dinner Train! Savor a three course meal and signature drinks as you take a relaxing round-trip train ride through the Champlain Valley. Weekend departures from Burlington Union Station. For information and reservations visit:

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Ranky Tanky

Friday, November 1, 7:30 p.m., Barre Opera House, $22-36.

According to Gullah folk medicine, one tried and true way to cure a headache is to tie an eel skin around your head. We might take a pass on that particular remedy from the Low Country region of South Carolina and Georgia. Instead, we’d offer an alternative treatment: the music of Ranky Tanky. OK, so the Charleston, S.C., band’s music isn’t exactly soothing, per se — a loose West African translation for the phrase ranky tanky is “get funky” or “work it.” But their steamy blend of gutbucket blues and spiritual music sure is good for what ails you. Composed of ace jazz players and fronted by vocal dynamo Quiana Parler, Ranky Tanky deliver a nourishing sound rooted in Gullah tradition that NPR termed “soulful honey to the ears.” On its latest album, Good Time, released in July, the quintet updates its sound with its first batch of original tunes inspired by Gullah music rather than drawn directly from that culture. But all you really need to know about them derives from the title track’s lyrics: “Good time, a good time / We’re gonna have a good time.” DAN BOLLES

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… BRIAN MCCARTHY NONET, Thursday and Friday, November 7 and 8, 7 p.m.,

FlynnSpace, $25. DAMIEN SNEED’S “WE SHALL OVERCOME: A CELEBRATION OF MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.,” Wednesday, January 22, 7:30 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $15-50. CHARLES LLOYD & THE MARVELS WITH LUCINDA WILLIAMS, Friday, April 17,

8 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $25-62. SHOW AND TELL

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Show and Tell « P.37

FLIP Fabrique: Blizzard

Thursday and Friday, December 5 and 6, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, December 7, 2 & 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, December 8, 2 p.m., Hopkins Center for the Arts, $12-40; Sunday, March 15, 3 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $25-55.

COURTESY OF SEBASTIEN DUROCHER

One can only imagine what a brainstorming session for show themes at a circus would look like. But whoever came up with Blizzard, the title of FLIP Fabrique’s winter show, deserves a raise. What better inspiration for acrobatic movement than the twisting, twirling, silent cacophony of snowfall? And what better inspiration for theater than the cabin-feverish antics of human beings — cooped up, bundled up and maybe driven a little crazy by the cold? A Québec-based cirque troupe founded by friends, FLIP Fabrique has performed in

Roomful of Teeth and Dublin Guitar Quartet

Thursday, January 20, 7:30 p.m., Mahaney Arts Center, $30.

COURTESY OF BONICA AYALA

Roomful of Teeth are “a lab experiment for the human voice,” wrote Burkhard Bilger in a feature about the new-music singing group for the New Yorker last February. Make that a mind-blowingly innovative experiment. Roomful’s eight singers perform only commissioned works that explore and blend voice techniques ranging from Tuvan throat singing to Korean P’ansori to heavy metal singing. The sounds they make are like those of no other group singing today — “both primal and sophisticated, ancient and startlingly modern,” as Bilger noted.

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In January, the octet comes to Middlebury for its third appearance in Vermont since 2013. (That’s the year the group won a Grammy Award for its first album and member Caroline Shaw — a mezzo-soprano and composer — won the Pulitzer Prize for Partita for 8 Voices, a work she composed for the group.) This time, Roomful are joined by the Dublin Guitar Quartet, a classical group that plays only new music. On the program is a new arrangement of a 2015 work by Vermont-born composer Nico Muhly. If audiences missed Roomful’s appearance at the University of Vermont’s Lane Series in 2014 or New Music on the Point in Leicester in June, this is the time to catch them. Your ears will be amazed. A M Y L I L LY

150 cities in nearly 20 countries. Its shows feature acrobatics, juggling, dramatic storytelling through movement, live music and, in the case of Blizzard, a fair amount of the white stuff. Remember how it felt to play in the snow? You will. MARGARE T GRAYS O N

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… THE CASHORE MARIONETTES, Saturday, November 16, 2 & 8 p.m., FlynnSpace, $25. VITALY: “AN EVENING OF WONDERS,” Friday,

November 29, 3 & 7 p.m., Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, $22-35. PEKING ACROBATS, Tuesday, March 17, 7 p.m., Flynn MainStage, $15-45; and Wednesday, March 25, 7 p.m., Dibden Center for the Arts, $25-45.

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… MATT HAIMOVITZ & SIMONE DINNERSTEIN,

Friday, October 11, 7:30 p.m., Lane Series at UVM Recital Hall, $5-35. NICO MUHLY PROJECT, Saturday, October 26, 7 p.m., Chandler Center for the Arts, $10-20. NEAVE TRIO, Saturday, November 16, 7:30 p.m., Chandler Center for the Arts, $27-30. TAKÁCS QUARTET, Saturday, April 18, 7:30 p.m.;

Sunday, April 19, 3 p.m., Mahaney Arts Center, $6-30.


Student Auditions • September 29th • Flynn Center for the Performing Arts 10:00am Ages 4-5 • 10:30am Ages 6-8 • 11:30am Ages 9-11 • 1:00pm Ages 12 & up

Dom La Nena Friday, October 18, 7:30 p.m., UVM Recital Hall, $5-25.

The University of Vermont’s Lane Series is renowned for meticulously curated programming that stands at the vanguard of chamber, folk and world music. It is less known as a bastion of hipster-approved indie fare. That might change when Brazilian singer Dom La Nena comes to town in October. Based in Paris, the quadrilingual chanteuse has drawn comparisons to an ear-popping array of indie icons. The Wall Street Journal likened her progressive flair for arrangement to that of “a young Brian Wilson.” Time Out New York praised her breezy, multicultural musical influences as akin to “a bossa Joanna Newsom.”

Meanwhile, the website Popdose called her “Cat Power’s lost sister.” In concert, La Nena accompanies herself on cello, guitar, ukulele and percussion, employing an assortment of synths and loops in an ethereal blend that approaches the divine. Or, as the New Yorker put it: “Dom is like a magician, and every song sounds sacred.” DAN BOLLES

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www.AlbanyBerkshireBallet.org

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CELEBRATION SERIES

IF YOU LIKE THAT, TRY THIS… DARLINGSIDE, Friday, September

20, 7:30 p.m., Chandler Center for the Arts, $10-45. ALICIA OLATUJA, Friday, February 14, 6 & 8:30 p.m., Lane Series at FlynnSpace, $35. PATRICK WATSON, Saturday, April 11, 8:30 p.m., Higher Ground Ballroom, $20.

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy 9/28

Sierra Hull, Noam Pikelny & Stuart Duncan 11/23

Jimmie Vaughan 10/4 Leahy 3/7

Vienna Boys Choir 10/20 Croce Plays Croce 4/4

Other BOH-Presented Shows:

Ranky Tanky 11/1

10/5 10/12 10/26 2/29 4/10 4/13

EagleMania Medium Lauren Rainbow Presley, Perkins, Lewis & Cash Socks in the Frying Pan The Friel Sisters One Night of Queen

COURTESY OF JEREMIAH

476-8188, www.barreoperahouse.org Untitled-7 1

Say you saw it in...

J

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NOW IN sevendaysvt.com SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

3D!

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COURTESY OF WAYNE FAWBUSH

Where There’s a Will

Theater review: Shakespeare’s Will, Lost Nation Theater Margo Whitcomb in Shakespeare’s Will

B Y AL EX BR OW N

L

ast Thursday night’s preview audience at Lost Nation Theater laughed as Shakespeare’s wife, Anne Hathaway, described the lovers she’d had while her husband was in London making his name as a playwright. Vern Thiessen’s play Shakespeare’s Will takes a few historical facts, ignores others, and invents enough story to fill a onewoman show about Shakespeare’s spouse. Margo Whitcomb portrays Hathaway as a lusty provincial woman who’s often apart from her husband as she raises their children in Stratford. Whitcomb uses a range of voices and fine theatrical presence to portray the people Hathaway speaks to or recollects. She builds the character physically, slouching her shoulders and walking with a rough gait to show Hathaway’s farm girl upbringing. But when she discusses her children, her hands move with lovely, slow elegance. The play, first produced in 2005, mixes comedy with attempts at profundity. The hard truth is that Shakespeare can’t be explained through his association with Hathaway, though hoping for an insight here is tantalizing. Since interest in Hathaway stems solely from her potential influence on Shakespeare, Thiessen struggles to hint that she had one, but all he can give his character are some knowing looks. The tone of the production is overwrought. Thiessen has written superficial observations for Hathaway and poured a few sticky metaphors over them, such as a yearning for the sea. To give the show weight, Whitcomb and director Eric Love enlarge a lot of moments with dramatic pauses and an overactive soundtrack. 40

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

When little is known of an artist, a tide of curiosity floods in, but all it carries is speculation. The historical record has little to tell us about Shakespeare; his plays and poetry, on the other hand, contain worlds. He left us acutely drawn characters, coined words and phrases that permeate English, and he offered sharp insights into love, world affairs and politics. But he left few hints of the man he was, or of how he possessed the creative freedom to invent so much. Church records verify Shakespeare’s marriage to Hathaway in 1582, when he was 18 and she was 26. Six months later, their daughter Susanna was born. Twins, Judith and Hamnet, followed. Hamnet died at age 11, possibly from the plague. Shakespeare died in 1616, at 52, and Hathaway died seven years later, in her midsixties. That’s nearly all we know about her, so Thiessen is free to invent her; he has Hamnet die by drowning and uses the contents of Shakespeare’s will to fashion an emotional denouement that departs from the documents and distorts the era. Still, the impulse to crack a window on Shakespeare as a person is so powerful that this fan fiction will interest audiences who want to consider Hathaway as an overlooked part of literary history. The story isn’t going to be a woman-behindthe-man revelation, because Hathaway and Shakespeare spent most of their time apart. To Thiessen, this means that the

two had a revolutionary marriage in which both enjoyed jaunty sexual freedom and Hathaway was a vanguard feminist. Thiessen is torn between stirring up sympathy for Hathaway by painting Shakespeare as a cad who abandons her, and emphasizing the only thing that would make her important: an intimate understanding of her husband and an influence on his work. Seesawing between showing us a pitiable woman on her own and suggesting that she alone knew her husband best makes the play a muddle. Shakespeare’s will is one of the few documents historians have to characterize his life, and much attention has been directed to the grumpy overtone in leaving Hathaway his “second best bed.” Along with the shotgun wedding and time away from Stratford, the bequest suggests an unhappy marriage. But the “second best” bed might be the marriage bed if the “best” were for guests. It could have been a sentimental conveyance, not an insult, but no matter — the degree of affection between Shakespeare and Hathaway won’t be objectively resolved. Your own opinion of Shakespeare shapes what you want to be true. As Thiessen dramatizes it, the will is emotionally crushing to Hathaway, and Shakespeare’s sister gets the house, leaving her bereft. The will actually gives his property to Susanna and by extension her husband, the logical disposition at a time when women didn’t manage money.

THE PLAY MIXES COMEDY

WITH ATTEMPTS AT PROFUNDITY.

THEATER

Though the play tells it differently, Hathaway continued to live in the house after Susanna and her husband moved in. The monologue makes sister Joan a cruel sort who comes to the house the night of the burial to gloat about her claim. And, because Thiessen wants to supercharge things, Joan implies that Shakespeare blamed Hathaway for the death of Hamnet. Historical basis for this notion? Zero. The production’s scenic design, by Lost Nation founding artistic director Kim Allen Bent, is beautifully austere. Three rough-hewn wooden beams hang above a set anchored by a writing desk, a trunk and a table. On a shelf backlit by a white scrim sit the few daily implements of Hathaway’s life. Costume designer Jan Bodendorf outfits Hathaway in a suite of period clothes, from cloak to dresses to drawers. Along with Bent’s set, the costumes give Hathaway a reality deeper than the script’s platitudes. Charlotte Seelig’s lighting design and Love’s sound design echo every emotional nuance in the show. Lights roar red when Hathaway describes the fires lit to consume those dead from the plague, and the mix of sound effects and anachronistic music amplifies every significant word in the script. The multimedia is overkill for the shallow material, but the precise coordination of cues and dialogue is stupendous. Shakespeare’s Will comes from the author’s imagination, not biographical fact. Thiessen’s conjectures are questionable efforts to modernize a 16th-century woman, shedding more light on the author’s contemporary point of view than on the subject. This is a Hathaway that today’s audience might recognize — bawdy recollections and all — but she’s an invention, not a window into Shakespeare. m Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Shakespeare’s Will, by Vern Thiessen, directed by Eric Love, produced by Lost Nation Theater. Thursday through Saturday, September 12 to 14, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, September 15 and 16, 2 p.m., Montpelier City Hall Auditorium. $10-30. lostnationtheater.org


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food+drink

Rabble-Rouser in Montpelier

PHOTOS: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Rabble on Main Street Nutty Steph’s reinvents itself with a new location, business model and name BY S AL LY P O L L AK

A

brand-new spot in Montpelier is the subject at hand, but first: a quick vocabulary lesson. The word is “rabble.” Its 13th-century meaning is “pack of animals,” according to the etymology dictionary etymonline.com. It could be related to the Middle English word “rablen,” which means “to gabble, speak in a rapid, confused manner.” Similar words are found in German and Dutch. Rabble has come to mean a “disorderly crowd,” as well as common folk, the general populace. Add the word “rouser” and you get rabble-rouser: “a leader or speaker who stirs up the passions of the masses,” says the American Heritage Dictionary. Rabble-Rouser is also the name of the business, or collection of businesses, that opened on Labor Day weekend in Montpelier. The venture is spearheaded by Jaquelyn Fernandez Rieke, founder of Nutty Steph’s, which makes artisan chocolate and granola products. She started her business in 2003 at the former Coffee Corner,

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A flight of drinking chocolates at Rabble-Rouser

located at State and Main streets in Montpelier, using the kitchen at night to make granola. She later moved the enterprise to Middlesex. LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

Now Fernandez Rieke, 39, is back on Main Street; the 4,400-square-foot Rabble-Rouser is leasing a renovated space that had been a used clothing

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shop. A bit of a mash-up, Rabble-Rouser offers a chocolate bar; wine and beer, with cocktails expected this week; coffee (an espresso machine is forthcoming); a florist; Jamaican food; bags of granola; CBD lip balm; and a coffee-table book called A Celebration of Vulva Diversity on a table near benches and couches for hanging out. The businesses, including cotenants Kool Runninz (a food purveyor) and Regal Flower Design, all operate within the big, open space that is the new Rabble-Rouser location. Nutty Steph’s has a production area in the back, displays and sells an array of its products out front, and runs the chocolate and beverage bar that takes up the center of the room. “I feel really confident the diversity of functions in the space will give it a stability that isn’t enjoyed by singularly focused retail operations,” Fernandez Rieke said. The opening of the Montpelier space RABBLE ON MAIN STREET

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SIDEdishes SERVING UP FOOD NEWS

Farm Birthday

TASTY BITS FROM THE CALENDAR AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM

A dinner to celebrate a century of farming at Parsons’ Farm in Richford will be held Saturday, September 14, at a historic inn in Montgomery. Parsons’ Farm was founded as a dairy farm in 1919; since 1985, it has run a livestock operation. The five-course menu includes lamb raised on the farm, with a vegetarian option of portobello mushroom Napoleon. PARSONS’ FARM CELEBRATION DINNER Saturday, September 14, 5:30-8:30 p.m., at Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery. $65; preregister. Info and reservations, 326-3269, blacklanternvt.com.

Parsons' Farm in Richford

Smoked pastrami, yellow beer mustard and pickle poutine

Poutine Power POUTINERIE OPENS IN ISLAND POND

Hand-cut fries, local cheese curds and scratch-made gravy form the foundation of the food at VULGAR DISPLAY OF POUTINE, a poutinerie that opened over

Labor Day Weekend at 69 Cross Street in Island Pond. Chef-owner RYAN FISHER builds on that base to create a variety of poutines. “It’s like pizza,” he said. “You can put a million things on it. I’ve got about 50 ideas.” SIDE DISHES

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NORTHEAST SEAFOOD

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Rabble on Main Street « P.42

Worcester, two teenagers and their mother, who decided to meet at RabbleRouser for their carpool starting point. The Lamb-Leach family opted for the new spot over the usual convening at Shaw’s supermarket. Nellie Lamb, 16, is a junior at Montpelier High School. She ate a quick chicken

also signals the renaming and rebranding of Nutty Steph’s: The Middlesex business and its products will be known as Rabble-Rouser by the end of September. (Though the Montpelier location includes cotenants, the experience of a patron would suggest Rabble-Rouser is one big bazaar.) “Nutty Steph’s had become my alias,” Fernandez Rieke said. “And it’s kind of hard to be taken seriously as a woman in business.” New to the company, too, is its business model: In the spring, it became a cooperatively owned enterprise in which an employee can earn an ownership stake through a two-year process. “Profits are distributed based on hours worked,” Fernandez Rieke explained. “It makes a terrible amount of sense.” The name Rabble-Rouser was the inspiration of her colleague and rising co-owner, Ryan Geary. He’s an artist and owner of the Hive, a gallery and gift shop that adjoins Rabble-Rouser in Middlesex. The wall, figuratively and literally, between the two places is coming down this week as they join together to create one entity under the auspices of RabbleRouser: a union of confectionaries, crafts and beeswax candles. The business partners tossed around ideas for “a million names,” Geary said, until he was certain there were no names left. Then, in early July, another name Patrons chatting at Rabble-Rouser popped into his head and he texted “Rabble-Rouser” to Fernandez Rieke. “Oooooh, Rabble Rouser!!!!!!!!!!!!!,” she wrote back with 13 exclamation points. “Oh my goooooooood!” Fernandez Rieke likes the way Rabble-Rouser rolls off your tongue. She also applauds its sensibility. “It’s a way to take ownership about the fact that we do things differently,” she said. “It’s still fun and self-deprecating, but it has a surety to it.” Five days after RabbleRouser opened, I stopped in for a glass of wine and a swig of chocolate — the liquid Pride Bar. Its ingredient list, starting with lemon and ginger, forms the acronym LGBTQ. Mainly, I checked out the crowd and found that it failed to rise to an unruly one. The Rabble-Rouser gatherers appeared to be common folk, Maia Castonguay working at Rabble-Rouser in their own uncommon ways. I met a lovely family from

curry dinner from the Kool Runninz Jamaican-food vendor before heading to school to watch a soccer game. “It’s a nice aesthetic,” Nellie observed, taking in the varied aspects of the space. “I wouldn’t expect these things to go together.” Later, she insisted that her mother

IT’S JUST DIFFERENT HERE.

THE SECOND YOU WALK IN THE DOOR, YOU FEEL THAT.

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

PHOTOS: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

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check out the “tiny toilet” in one of the bathrooms — a feature so unusual it warranted a look. (On Nellie’s recommendation, I snuck a peek into the bathroom and found side-by-side toilets — one the standard size and one in miniature, each gleaming and beckoning.) Her 19-year-old brother, Cooper, a freshman at Middlebury College, noted that you could eat every meal of the day at Rabble-Rouser: granola and coffee for breakfast, lunch and dinner from Kool Runninz. There are also baguettes and croissants from Red Hen Baking and cheese from local makers. Cooper drank his appetizer — a glass of thick, dark chocolate dressed up with roasted pistachios and maple-sugar buttercrunch. “It’s just a pretty cool spot,” he said. The teens’ mother, Rosemary Leach, 49, is a para-educator at the Rumney Memorial School in Middlesex. She fondly recalled the weekly Bacon Thursday that was held for a time at Nutty Steph’s in Middlesex. “I thought they were so much fun,” Leach said of the events, which brought together bacon, dipping sauces, live music and community. “Just knowing they were there made me happy.” Bacon Thursday will be making a comeback, this time in Montpelier, starting in October. I talked to a couple, Kevin and Julia Page from Ottawa, who had stopped in Montpelier en route to Cape Cod. Montpelier is their usual stopover, and they know the city well enough to have spotted the new hangout. Each drank a mug of coffee while reading their books. (It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis for Kevin, an economist; and The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah for Julia, a bookkeeper for small businesses.) Julia talked about the kinds of businesses that she sees succeeding (or not) in her work. “If you create something that’s more of the same, you’re just dividing the market,” she said. “It’s just different here,” she said of Rabble-Rouser. “The second you walk in the door, you feel that.” Finally, I talked to Jane Osgatharp, 80, president of the Vermont chapter of the Alliance for Retired Americans. She’s lived in Montpelier for nearly half a century and said there’s excitement in town about the opening of Rabble-Rouser. “I think it’s just wonderful,” Osgatharp said. “What could be better? These are the basic foods — chocolate and wine.” Together, she said, they add up to fun. m Contact: sally@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at nuttystephs.com.


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food+drink Side Dishes « P.43

Moog's Joint

MOLLY ZAPP

Fisher is a longtime cook and a punk rock drummer who toured for eight years with the band Off With Their Heads. Living on the road, he gravitated toward buffet eating. “I love a variety of food,” he said. “That’s my jam.” A “variety of food” can be found on the poutine Fisher makes at the counter-service eatery he owns and operates with his girlfriend, SHANNON SHEPARD. Priced at $10 to $15, most of the poutines start with fries, curds and Fisher’s gluten-free gravy; he also makes veggie gravy for his vegetarian and vegan poutines. One of his poutine variations is the North Shore 3-Way, with slow-roasted top round, James River BBQ Sauce, American cheese and griddled onion roll aioli. It’s a nod to a popular sandwich in Fisher’s home turf of Billerica, Mass. Another poutine, called Aren’t We Doing a Pastrami One?, features smoked pastrami, yellow beer mustard and a house pickle. Vulgar Display of Poutine builds on the mobile outfit of the same name that Fisher operated for three years in Lowell, Mass. He named it for the Pantera album Vulgar Display of Power. “Pantera is my favorite band of all time,” Fisher said. “The name kind of stuck and was a little too perfect for me personally.” In 2016, he notched up a best-poutine victory at NH PoutineFest in Merrimack, N.H., for a variation called A.P.I.G. (All Pork Is Good). The poutine, which ran as a special last weekend in Island Pond, features 16-hour pork shoulder, bacon-onion jam, crispy

shiitake mushrooms and scallions. Vulgar Display of Poutine is open Thursday through Sunday. Fisher plans to extend the hours soon. Sally Pollak

If locals still have free gas station coffee from 2017 on their minds, that’s an indication of the state of Johnson. With the notable exception of DOWNTOWN PIZZERIA & PUB, the college town has lacked nightlife and dining options for some time. Now comes Moog’s, which is open nightly until 1 or 2 a.m. and serves elevated pub food. Crab cakes, mussel chowder and burgers grace the menu, developed by MATT LEBLANC, who was previously chef at

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Fresh Joint MOOG’S JOINT OPENS IN JOHNSON

In the former Long Trail Tavern building, which most recently held Hogback Snacks, MOOG’S JOINT was hopping on its second evening open in late August. Owner and Johnson resident TOM MOOG, who also owns 8-year-old MOOG’S PLACE in Morrisville, buzzed around the restaurant, bar and live-music venue chatting up customers. A mix of Lamoille County musicians had played the house piano the night before; that Friday, Moog projected a live-streamed Phish concert. Locals seemed thrilled that the place was open. “It’s the most exciting thing in Johnson since MAPLEFIELDS reopened and gave out free coffee,” deadpanned Johnsonite RAY KANIA.

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HARRISON’S RESTAURANT AND BAR in Stowe. Vermont

microbrews and inventive cocktails make up the drink list; DON HORRIGAN, formerly of EDSON HILL in Stowe and the SCALE HOUSE in Hardwick, bartends. Moog said he hopes his second restaurant will help “create new ideas and new events that help Johnson and bring the town together.” He plans to host local and touring musicians “just about every night,” he added, and is open to a variety of genres. “I’d love a punk show,” he said. “And let’s not forget about hip-hop.”

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CONNECT Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Sally Pollak: @vtpollak. On Instagram: Seven Days: @7deatsvt; Jordan Barry: @jordankbarry. Untitled-81 1

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Honey, I’m Home Fruit-and-honey preserves bring V Smiley back to her family’s New Haven farm B Y M E L I SSA PASANEN

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rowing up, it was our job to fill the pantry,” V Smiley said on a recent tour of her childhood home in New Haven. A wall held glass jars of pantry staples, while a woodstove burned against the misty chill of a late-summer morning. It all evoked a bygone era, perhaps the early 1800s, when the oldest parts of this farmhouse were built. “Mostly, I grew up sitting on a box by the woodstove. We didn’t get central heat until I was 13,” Smiley, 35, continued. “My parents were trying to do the subsistence thing.” In 2015, Smiley returned to live on her family’s farm with her partner, Amy Johnson. She’d spent a dozen years away from Vermont, including seven cooking professionally on the West Coast, working in Seattle for James Beard Foundation Awardwinning chefs such as Renee Erickson and Matt Dillon. Coming back to Vermont had been Smiley’s goal since her early twenties. “It was kind of unfinished business,” she said. “I saw a thirst in myself. I needed to be back here.” But the way home wasn’t a straight shot. Her journey involved the death of a parent, the birth of an award-winning food business and finding a life partner who supported her dreams. When Smiley finally made it home to New Haven, she brought with her both Johnson, who farms, and V Smiley Preserves, the enterprise she had launched in Seattle. “I’ve been intentionally gathering skills in order to get back to the land,” she said. “I started this because I knew we were moving back and Amy would be growing stuff for me … I want the farm to be the engine behind the business.” V Smiley Preserves are not your grandmother’s jams. Among her dozens of seasonal offerings are: raspberry, redcurrant and geranium jam; pear, sage and lemon marmalade with lavender and white peppercorn; and a tomato jam that packs warm, smoky heat from three kinds of chile peppers. That last one won a 2019 Good Food Award, Smiley’s first in the prestigious national competition. Smiley’s preserves deliver a kaleidoscopic fusion of tastes and textures. They are sophisticated with subtle sweetness; fruits and aromatics dance together, often in unexpected pairings. 46

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Apricots, honey and lemon from V Smiley Preserves

V Smiley

You can slather them on toast, but they also take plain yogurt and sandwiches to a celestial level, swirl beautifully into pan sauces and partner exceptionally well with cheese. Smiley suggested, for instance, pairing the nectarine-lemon with bee balm and lemongrass with bloomy-rinded, creamy cow cheeses such as von Trapp Farmstead’s Mt. Alice. Her approach stands out in other ways. Smiley uses no added pectin and sweetens her preserves with honey alone instead of sugar. That’s not cheap: She estimates that the almost 4,000 pounds of honey she will buy this year from beekeeper Kirk Webster of New Haven cost more than six times the price of refined sugar. Still, she described using Webster’s honey as “the most exciting thing.” Some of the fruits, herbs and flowers in her preserves come from the 150-acre New Haven farm that Smiley’s back-to-thelander parents bought in 1972. She sources many of the remaining ingredients from Vermont and New York.

The transition from Seattle to Vermont has meant a partial shift to fruits that grow better in the Northeast. “I love elderberries for their deep, dark, winey flavor,” Smiley said, clipping berries from large bushes near the farmhouse. “There’s something so homey tasting about them; it really draws out the nostalgia.” She uses both the flowers and fruits in combinations such as: apricot, yarrow, plum and elderflower; elderberryplum; and gooseberry, grapefruit, elderberry and white pepper. White pepper is another of her unique ingredients. “It elongates the flavors,” she explained. “I can tell my time in restaurants influenced me. I think of building a jam flavor like building a dish.” A short drive down the road from the farmhouse, Smiley navigated a tangle of thriving plants in what she calls “Amy’s garden.” Johnson is inspired by pioneering Japanese farmer Masanobu Fukuoka, known for his 1975 book The One-Straw Revolution: An Introduction to Natural Farming. “It’s about how little intervention you can take in growing food,” Smiley said. The tomato jam award was particularly gratifying because Johnson grew all the tomatoes. “It was so sweet to win for that, because it was a collaboration between us,” Smiley said. “When Amy brings me what she’s grown, there’s nothing better.”

In addition to heirloom tomatoes, currants, gooseberries and jostaberries, the garden contained scented geraniums — rose, orange and lemon — and herbs such as sage, lavender, rosemary and thyme. “I love the herb garden; I build flavors around it,” Smiley said. A variety of Agastache called Tutti Frutti is “my secret weapon,” she added, handing over a few tiny purple blooms. “It sweetens like vanilla but doesn’t truncate the other flavors.” Some aromatics go into the jam pot at the beginning; others, like yarrow, are reamed against the side of the pot at the end of cooking. As she prepared to leave the garden, Smiley gestured to the far edge of the property and said, “Dad is planted under that maple.” Smiley’s parents ran an Angus beef and market garden operation. She and her three siblings contributed countless hours of work, which she does not always remember fondly. Their mother, Susan Smiley, traveled for her off-farm job; Jerry Smiley homeschooled the kids until they went to Catholic school in Burlington. “He was the stay-at-home parent, very critical and super-involved,” Smiley said. “Dad was the boss.” By the age of 13, Smiley knew she was queer; she also knew she couldn’t tell her


food+drink parents. Her father was, in his daughter’s Honey was Smiley’s go-to sweetener, words, “intensely homophobic” — in reac- but conventional wisdom held that it tion, she suspects, to his own mother’s could not be used reliably in jams or other coming out later in life. preserves. The Seattle Public Library When Smiley finally shared the truth came to her rescue with a 1979 book with her parents, at age 20, her father wrote called Putting It Up With Honey: A Natuher a 10-page letter that essentially said, ral Foods Canning and Preserving Cook“You’re dead to me,” she recalled. She didn’t book by Susann Geiskopf-Hadler. “It was talk to her parents for more than two years like a little hand on my shoulder saying it afterward — although, she said, her mother was OK,” Smiley recalled. tried to keep in touch. In 2012, Jerry Smiley died. V Smiley After graduating from Preserves launched in 2013; college with a degree two years later, the couple in art history and writmoved back to Vermont and ing, Smiley headed to Los into the old family farmAngeles to work in the arts. house with Susan Smiley. “Mom had really tried to A couple years in, “I was pretty disgusted with the maintain contact,” Smiley art world,” she said. “I was said. “She would send me struggling a lot in LA. That beautiful Mason jars, honeycity was eating me alive.” sweetened cookies. She was V SMILE Y But she had no idea what excited about us coming. She she wanted to do or where was planting fruit for us.” she wanted to be instead. “It was fucking Smiley’s journey continues. In late terrifying,” she admitted. August of this year, she moved her busiSmiley turned to something that she ness offices out of the farmhouse into a did remember warmly from her Vermont space in Bristol. She already cooks and childhood: cooking. “I just needed to do this jars her products in a shared commercial thing where I made food for people,” she kitchen called Tandem on the town’s Main said. “I needed something really tangible. Street. Last year, she produced 26,000 I was always cooking for my friends.” At jars of preserves by herself with just three one dinner party, she served blue cheese- months of holiday help from one person. stuffed eggs and fennel-pear soup. Among This year, she expects her business to grow the guests were the owners of a restaurant, by 25 percent. who ended up offering her a prep cook At Tandem, Smiley set four copper pans position. over heat for one of her simplest jams. ApriIronically, as she started her culinary cots from New York had been maceratcareer, Smiley was experiencing serious ing with lemon juice and Vermont honey gut health issues. “I thought the city was overnight, which helps generate juice and making me sick,” she said. She ended up improves the final texture, she explained. on Whidbey Island, near Seattle, cooking The fruit glowed almost the same shade as at an arts residency, then moved on to a the cooking vessels. coffee roastery and restaurant. There she Smiley sells about 60 percent of her met Johnson, who was learning to farm at product wholesale to retail accounts, the time. mostly on the coasts. E-commerce and the “We bonded over scones and hot sauce,” year-round Burlington Farmers Market Smiley said with a chuckle. “She ate scones make up the remainder; she hopes to ramp and hot sauce together.” up direct sales, which improve her bottom The couple moved to Seattle, where line. Smiley spent several years working at two She also hopes to launch a café project in of the city’s highly regarded restaurants: late winter out of Tandem. All day, on weekRenee Erickson’s the Whale Wins and Matt ends only, she’ll serve honey-sweetened, Dillon’s Sitka & Spruce. grain-free baked goods, coffee, toast, yogurt But she was still figuring out how to get and cheeseboards with preserves; evenings home to Vermont. will bring vegetable-focused sit-down While working for Dillon, Smiley spent dinners with simple meats. a day each week on food preservation proj“I’ve been home long enough to see ects. That planted the idea to start a jam where there are needs in the community company. and [to] pivot back to cooking,” Smiley There was just one problem: For her said. “I started the farm business to cook health, she had eliminated all refined sugar. for people.” m “I thought, I can’t do this. I’m going to start a jam company using sugar, and I won’t be able Contact: pasanen@sevendaysvt.com to eat it. I have to make something I love and crave,” she said. “I was around cooks who INFO cooked from their own hunger. One way to Learn more at vsmileypreserves.com, or on make great food is to cook what you crave.” Instagram @vsmileyjam.

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calendar S E P T E M B E R

WED.11

agriculture

EXTENDING THE GROWING SEASON: Green thumbs get the dirt on seed saving, composting and cover cropping from author and teacher Ron Krupp. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

business

BUSINESS PLANNING COURSE: In a 10-week class presented by the Center for Women & Enterprise, aspiring entrepreneurs gain the confidence and knowledge to launch a small business. Rutland Economic Development Corp., 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

community

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: Creative types get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746. KNITTER’S GROUP: Needles in tow, crafters share their latest projects and get help with challenging patterns. All skill levels are welcome. South Burlington Community Library,

University Mall, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

dance

SQUARE DANCING: Swing your partner! Dancers foster friendships while exercising their minds and bodies. Barre Area Senior Center, 1-3 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

environment

FACILITY TOUR: Recyclers see in real time how blue-bin items transform into marketable commodities. Materials Recovery Facility, Williston, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 872-8100.

etc.

MILTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY BUSINESS MEETING: Members and locals stay up to date on current projects and learn about opportunities to get involved. Milton Historical Society, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1604.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘THE FULL MONTY: Viewers are in stitches over this 1997 comedy about six unemployed factory workers who develop a male striptease act. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7-9 p.m. $5. Info, 533-2000. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: Some of the Pacific Ocean’s most beautiful islands and marine national monuments grace the screen. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5

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plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: Advanced filming techniques expose the planet’s top hunters on land, under the sea and in the air. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: Actor Kate Winslet narrates a virtual odyssey into the largest and least-explored habitat on Earth. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon, 2 & 4 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘STAR WARS: EPISODE VI — RETURN OF THE JEDI’: Luke Skywalker attempts to retrieve Darth Vader from the dark side — without falling into the evil Emperor’s trap. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘THE SURGEON AND THE SHEPHERD’ WITH MEG OSTRUM: Vermont author Meg Ostrum presents a new documentary film inspired by her book, The Surgeon and the Shepherd: Two Resistance Heroes in Vichy France. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. WED.11

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At the end of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale, it seems that the unnamed protagonist has fled the misogynistic and oppressive Republic of Gilead. Readers can find out for sure when the book’s sequel, The Testaments, enters the world this week. To mark the occasion, the Canadian author discusses her career with fellow writer Samira Ahmed at London’s National Theatre. The conversation is transmitted to more than 1,000 cinemas around the world, including two in Vermont. Representatives from advocacy groups such as the Vermont Women’s Fund and the Clarina Howard Nichols Center are on hand at the Stowe screening.

MARGARET ATWOOD: LIVE IN CINEMAS Thursday, September 12, 2 & 7 p.m., at Palace 9 Cinemas in South Burlington. $15. Info, 660-9300. Tuesday, September 17, 7 p.m., and Wednesday, September 18, 1 p.m., at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. $10-17. Info, 760-4634, margaretatwoodlive.com.

SEP.12, 17 & 18 | WORDS

COURTESY OF LIAM SHARP

COFFEE TALK: Friends, neighbors and AARP Vermont volunteers catch up on upcoming activities and issues facing older Vermonters. Nomad Coffee — South End Station, Burlington, second Wednesday of every month, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, vt@aarp. org.

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Book Club

Get to Work Job-search strategies, community activism and work-life balance are just a few of the topics on the table during the fifth annual Young Professionals Summit of Vermont. Open to anyone interested in contributing to the state’s future, this oneday gathering is a chance for attendees to network, exchange ideas and confront current workforce issues. The jam-packed schedule includes a professional development panel, breakout sessions, mingling opportunities and “Playing Politics: The Psychology of the Human Workplace,” a keynote speech by Bostonarea Zen Workplace founder and Forbes contributor Karlyn Borysenko.

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS SUMMIT OF VERMONT

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE! ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT SUBMISSION FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN AND DAN BOLLES. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + nightlife Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

Saturday, September 14, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., at Paramount Theatre in Rutland. $10-30. Info, hello@ypsummitvt.com, ypsummitvt.com.

SEP.14 | BUSINESS


Words Endure “We die. That may be the meaning of life. But we do language. That may be the measure of our lives.” The late author Toni Morrison (pictured in circle) spoke these words while accepting a Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993. Described by O magazine as “a beacon in African American culture,” the writer made her mark with novels such as the Pulitzer Prize-winning 1987 novel Beloved and 1977’s Song of Solomon. Vermont poet Toussaint St. Negritude (pictured right) honors Morrison, who died on August 5 at age 88, with the We Do Language Symposium, a week of poetry, music, workshops and discussions. Participating local voices include St. Negritude, University of Vermont professor Major Jackson, published poet Reuben Jackson and Afro-jazz musical artist KeruBo.

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WE DO LANGUAGE SYMPOSIUM Sunday, September 15, through Wednesday, September 18, at various locations statewide. See website for additional dates. Donations. Info, stnegritude@gmail.com, wedolanguage.com.

GOT THE

BLUES Jonny Lang released his first platinum-selling album, Lie to Me, the day before his 16th birthday in 1997, but he’s much more than a teen prodigy. Now 38, the blues guitar player and singer has toured with legendary acts such as B.B. King and Aerosmith, and he has earned three Grammy Award nominations and won a Grammy for Best Rock Gospel album for his 2006 record Turn Around. Fender Telecaster in hand, the North Dakota native lends his deep, gritty voice to blues, rock and gospel numbers from powerhouse albums such as 2017’s Signs. JONNY LANG

COURTESY OF DANIELLA HOVSEPIAN

Sunday, September 15, 7:30 p.m., at Lebanon Opera House, N.H. $49.50-69.50. Info, 603-448-0400, lebanonoperahouse.org.

SEP.15 | MUSIC SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: An immersive film reveals the astonishing lives of the smallest of animals — think chipmunks and grasshopper mice. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30 & 4:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

food & drink

COOK THE BOOK: Foodies bring a dish from Whiskey in a Teacup: What Growing Up in the South Taught Me About Life, Love and Baking Biscuits by Reese Witherspoon to a palate-pleasing potluck. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

games

BEGINNERS’ BRIDGE: Those looking to get in on the card game learn the basics from longtime player Grace Sweet. Waterbury Public Library, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

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BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. MAH JONGG IN BARRE: Fun, friendship and conversation flow as players manipulate tiles. Barre Area Senior Center, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

N OW LE AVA IL A B LE AT K IN N EY D R U G S! DR

MAH JONGG IN WILLISTON: Participants of all levels enjoy friendly bouts of this tile-based game. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

health & fitness

RESILIENCE FLOW: Individuals affected by traumatic brain injuries engage in a gentle yoga practice. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262. YOGA4CANCER: Meant for anyone affected by the illness, this class aims to help participants manage treatment side effects and recovery. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

holidays

DAY OF REMEMBRANCE: Contemplative amblers get free admission to the historic site for Patriot Day. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 273-2282.

language

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: Grammy Award-winning pianist Mona Golabek performs a stirring classical music concert inspired by her own mother’s story of survival during World War II in this Hershey Felder Presents production. Sylvan Adams Theatre, Segal Centre for Performing Arts, Montréal, 8 p.m. $30-67. Info, 514-739-7944.

music

Find club dates in the music section. OLD NORTH END NEIGHBORHOOD BAND TEEN MUSIC JAM: Be they accomplished or beginner musicians, young players find harmony in the traditional music of Burlington’s past and present immigrant groups. Boys & Girls Club, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 881-8500.

outdoors

SUNFLOWER HOUSE: Families find their way through a half acre of rooms and hallways made of several thousand towering blossoms. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 457-2355.

talks

ERIN MAILE O’KEEFE: The Tiny House Fest Vermont cofounder shares her expertise in “Live Large, Build Tiny,” presented as part of the Yestermorrow Speaker Series. Yestermorrow Design/Build School, Waitsfield, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-5545. NICHOLAS GOTELLI: The 25th annual Current Topics in Science Speaker Series continues with “Forecasting Nature: Ecological Experiments in a Time of Planetary Change,” presented by the University of Vermont biology professor. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, les.kanat@northern vermont.edu. STEVE TAYLOR: History hounds get an education on one-room school houses. Greater Hartford United Church of Christ, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 296-3132.

tech

SENDING PROFESSIONAL EMAILS: Job seekers get familiar with using Google tools to stay organized, search for open positions and correspond effectively. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: This ArtisTree’s Music Theatre Festival production

offers a funny and touching look at a real-life — and tone deaf — New York socialite who fancied herself an opera singer. The Grange Theatre, South Pomfret, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $28-35. Info, 457-3500.

words

BOOK SALE: A genre-spanning selection of page-turners pleases bookworms of all ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, fletcherfriends@ gmail.com. WRITING CIRCLE: Words pour out when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

THU.12

environment

VERMONT NATURAL RESOURCES COUNCIL ANNUAL MEETING: Former governor Madeleine Kunin is honored with the Arthur Gibb Award for Individual Leadership during an open meeting complete with local food and a cash bar. Coach Barn at Shelburne Farms, 5:308:30 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, kgibb@vnrc.org.

etc.

FEAST & FIELD MARKET: Prepared foods and the “rad trad” stylings of the Fretless are on the menu at a pastoral party. Feast and Field, Barnard, 5-9 p.m. $5-10. Info, feastandfield@ gmail.com. TROPICAL FISH CLUB MONTHLY MEETING: Speakers ranging from local hobbyists to nationally known aquarium aficionados share their expertise. Essex Junction VFW Post, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 372-8716.

fairs & festivals

BATTLE OF PLATTSBURGH COMMEMORATION: Locals remember the decisive War of 1812 battle with four days of family-friendly events including reenactments, performances, fireworks and a parade. See cityofplattsburgh-ny.gov for details. Various Plattsburgh locations, N.Y. Prices vary. Info, 518-563-7702. TUNBRIDGE WORLD’S FAIR: A tradition since 1867, this fair hosts sheep dog trials, tractor pulls, live music, dance performances and agricultural shows. Tunbridge World’s Fairgrounds, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. $8-35; free for kids under 12; additional cost for rides. Info, 889-5555.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.11. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.11. ‘MAJOR!’: The Marna and Stephen Wise Tulin 2019 Fall Community Education Series


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

commences with a screening of a 2015 film about the life and work of Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a black transgender woman and activist. A panel discussion and Q&A follow. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 488-6912. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.11. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.11.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOUR: Foodies sample local eats on a scrumptious stroll dedicated to the Queen City’s culinary past. Awning behind ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 1 p.m. $55. Info, eliseandgail@burlingtonedible history.com. COMMUNITY LUNCH: Gardengrown fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309. FOOD — FIRE — FOAM: Wood-fired pizza and other palate-pleasing provisions fill bellies as Local Dork provide the musical backdrop. Terrace, Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 5-9 p.m. Free. Info, 855-650-0080. IN-STORE TASTING & DEMO: Foodies drop in for samples of cucumber salad with smashed garlic and ginger. Kiss the Cook, Middlebury, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 349-8803. SPINNING PLATES: The alleyway next to the theater is transformed into an outdoor dining room with food truck fare and a beer and wine garden. See town halltheater.org for restaurant information. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 5-9:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 388-1436. VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local food and crafts, live music, and hot eats add flavor to summer evenings. Vergennes City Park, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-9180. WORCESTER COMMUNITY MARKET: Fresh organic produce, live bands and kids’ activities bring neighbors together. 66 Elmore Rd., Worcester, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, thelandingvt@gmail. com.

games

CHITTENDEN COUNTY CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Strategic thinkers make calculated moves as they vie for their opponents’ kings. Shaw’s, Shelburne Rd., South Burlington, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-5403. CRIBBAGE: Friends connect over a fun-spirited card game. Barre Area Senior Center, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

health & fitness

ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION EXERCISE PROGRAM: Seniors rise and shine with an exercise program meant to increase bone density and muscle strength. Barre Area Senior Center, 8:309:45 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

CHAIR YOGA: Comfortable clothing is recommended for this class focused on balance, breath, flexibility and meditation. Barre Area Senior Center, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9512. CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. FALLS PREVENTION TAI CHI I & II: Students improve their ability to stay steady on their feet. Barre Area Senior Center, 3:45-4:45 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512. KARMA KLASS: DONATIONBASED YOGA FOR A CAUSE: Active bodies hit the mat to support local nonprofits. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 540-0186. YANG 24 TAI CHI: Slow, graceful, expansive movements promote wide-ranging health and fitness benefits. Shelburne Farms, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CATHERINE MACLELLAN: Folk fans lend their ears to the acclaimed Canadian singersongwriter who won a Juno Award for her 2014 album The Raven’s Sun. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7:30-10 p.m. $18-30. Info, 382-9222. HUNGER MOUNTAIN CO-OP BROWN BAG SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: This weekly series continues with the 17-piece Green Mountain Swing serving up big-band favorites. City Hall Plaza, Montpelier, noon. Free. Info, 223-9604.

outdoors

SLOW & EASY HIKING: Walkers enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of the forest while moving at a gentle pace. Ilene Elliott leads this public Barre Area Senior Center outing. Barre Town Forest, Websterville, 10:10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512. SUNFLOWER HOUSE: See WED.11. SWIFT NIGHT OUT: SWIFTS AT SUNSET: Fans of feathered fliers join Audubon Vermont members to learn about its Chimney Swift Recovery Project. Teams then carpool to various Queen City locations to seek the birds before regrouping at the brewery. Switchback Brewing Co., Burlington, 5:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3068.

politics

ELIZABETH WARREN DEBATE WATCH PARTY: Supporters of the U.S. senator from Massachusetts gather to watch the Democratic primary debate and discuss her plans for big structural change in the United States. Board Room, second floor. Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7:30-11 p.m. Free. Info, 829-1359.

seminars

HOMESHARING INFO SESSION: Locals learn to make the most of spare space in their homes by hosting compatible housemates. Refreshments are served. HomeShare Vermont, South Burlington, noon-12:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-5625.

talks

TAKE A WALK. GRAB SOME LUNCH.

Go Public. Listen to Vermont Edition

weekdays at noon on Vermont Public Radio.

CAITLIN & COLLIN DAULONG: The Co.Starters Speaker Series gets off the ground with a talk by the Kingdom Cycling & Experiences owners. Do North Coworking, Lyndonville, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, team@donorthcoworking.com.

tech

107.9 | VPR.org

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

theater

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NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘FLEABAG’: Fans view a broadcast production of Phoebe Waller-Bridges’ acclaimed one-person show that inspired the BBC TV series about a selfobsessed, emotionally fractured thirty-something seeking redemption through heartbreak — and a guinea pig. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600. ‘A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN’: Vermont actress Elizabeth Wilcox portrays Virginia Woolf in this solo performance based on an extended essay by the 20th-century English writer. QuarryWorks Theater, Adamant, 7:30-9:15 p.m. Free. Info, 229-6978. ‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: The Bard’s wife gets the last word in a humorous solo show inspired by the few historical facts known about Anne Hathaway. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier City Hall, 7:30-9 p.m. $10-30. Info, 229-0492. ‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: See WED.11.

words

BOOK CLUB: Bookworms bond over the written word. Barre Area Senior Center, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

9/7/18 12:16 PM

Find your direction

AND FOLLOW IT. OPEN HOUSES SIGN UP TODAY! NorthernVermont.edu/Visit Johnson Campus: Friday, September 13 Lyndon Campus: Friday, September 20

BOOK SALE: See WED.11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. CADWELL TURNBULL: Fans of the genre perk up their ears for a discussion of The Lesson, the author’s debut science fiction THU.12

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novel. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3350. MARGARET ATWOOD: LIVE IN CINEMAS: The author of the 1985 dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale marks the release of the book’s sequel, The Testaments, with a live broadcast appearance. See calendar spotlight. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 2 & 7 p.m. $15. Info, 660-9300. PAINTED WORD POETRY SERIES: Sue D. Burton and Sara London, authors of the respective collections Box and The Tyranny of Milk, read aloud. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, 6 p.m. Regular admission; $3-10; free for members and for faculty, staff and students. Info, 656-0750. YA BOOK CLUB: Young adult readers share their perspectives on I’m Not Dying With You Tonight by Kimberly Jones. Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

FRI.13 activism

DON’T STOP 4T-GreatEasternRadio062619 1

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the presses!

Keep this newspaper free for all. Join the Seven Days Super Readers at sevendaysvt.com/super-readers or call us at 802-864-5684. 52

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S: Activists gather outside Sen. Bernie Sanders’ office to protest his support of bringing F-35 fighter jets to Burlington International Airport. Please bring signs. Senator Bernie Sanders’ Office — Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 786-423-1403.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Singles, couples and beginners are welcome to join in a dance social featuring waltz, tango and more. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, 8-9:30 p.m. $10. Info, 862-2269. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Inspired by the 5Rhythms dance practice, attendees move, groove, release and open their hearts to life in a safe and sacred space. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, fearnessence@gmail.com. ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE: Gotham Carnival provide music for newcomers and experienced movers alike. Val Medve calls. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7-9:30 p.m. $10-15; free for ages 35 and under. Info, 881-9732. QUEEN CITY CONTRA DANCE: Turning Stile come through with live tunes while Rich Sbardella calls the steps. North End Studio A, Burlington, beginners’ session, 7:45 p.m.; dance, 8-11 p.m. $9; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 877-3698.

education

ALUMNI REUNION & FAMILY WEEKEND: Athletic matches, an ice cream social and a color run are among three days of events dedicated to former students and families. Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 9:30 a.m.-11

p.m. Prices vary; most events are free. Info, 635-1241. OPEN HOUSE: Prospective pupils tour the campus, meet current students and faculty, and learn about academic programs. Northern Vermont UniversityJohnson, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 635-1219.

etc.

CIRCUS ARTS TRAINING JAM: Daring individuals perfect skills ranging from juggling to tight-rope walking with CAMP Burlington members. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, burlingtoncamp@gmail.com. JANE AUSTEN WEEKEND: ‘EMMA’: A leisurely weekend of literary-inspired diversions includes dessert, tea, a Regency-style dinner party, Sunday brunch, a quiz and talks. Governor’s House in Hyde Park. $395-445; $14-35 for activities. Info, 888-6888. LOUNGE 91: Green Mountain Railroad passengers delight in live music, cocktails and hors d’oeuvres as picturesque scenery rolls by. Union Station, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $60. Info, 800-707-3530. QUEEN CITY GHOSTWALK DARKNESS FALLS TOUR: Local historian Thea Lewis treats pedestrians to tales of madmen, smugglers, pub spirits and, of course, ghosts. Arrive 10 minutes early. Democracy sculpture, 199 Main St., Burlington, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 324-5467. STARGAZING: Clear skies at night mean viewers’ delight when telescope users set their sights on celestial happenings. Call to confirm. Mittelman Observatory, McCardell Bicentennial Hall, Middlebury College, 8:30-10 p.m. Free. Info, 443-2266.

fairs & festivals

BATTLE OF PLATTSBURGH COMMEMORATION: See THU.12. BRITISH INVASION: From motorcars to lifestyle, all things British drive a three-day bash boasting a Main Street block party, an auto show, a marketplace and more. See britishinvasion.com for details. Various Stowe locations. $15 for a two day pass. Info, mgaetano@maainc.com. TUNBRIDGE WORLD’S FAIR: See THU.12, 7 a.m.-9 p.m.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ANIMÉ NIGHT: Enthusiasts view and chat about the latest animated shows from Japan. Enter through the side door. Laboratory B, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 777-9012. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.11. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.11. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.11. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.11.

food & drink

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: Passengers feast on a three-course meal while riding the Green Mountain Railroad from Burlington to Middlebury and back. Union Station, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $89. Info, 800-707-3530. FARM TABLE DINNER SERIES: A picturesque mountain setting is the perfect backdrop for a feast under the stars featuring a Vermont-inspired four-course menu. The Lodge at Spruce Peak, Stowe, 6 p.m. $155.25. Info, 282-4625. PASTURE-RAISED FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS ON THE FARM: Foodies fête the farm’s 20th season with a hearty meal, lawn games and live music. Save room for scoops from Sisters of Anarchy Ice Cream! Maple Wind Farm, Richmond, 5:30 p.m. $10100. Info, 434-7257. PUBLIC CUPPING: Coffee connoisseurs and beginners alike explore the flavor notes and aromas of the roaster’s current offerings and new releases. Brio Coffeeworks, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 777-6641. RICHMOND FARMERS MARKET: An open-air marketplace featuring live music connects cultivators and fresh-food browsers. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@richmond farmersmarketvt.org. SPINNING PLATES: See THU.12, 5-10 p.m. SUN TO CHEESE TOUR: Fromage fans go behind the scenes and follow award-winning farmstead cheddar from raw milk to finished product. Shelburne Farms, 1:45-3:45 p.m. $20 includes a block of cheddar; preregister. Info, registration@shelburne farms.org.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11, 9:15 a.m. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS: Imaginative teens and adults exercise their problem-solving skills in battles and adventures. Arrive early for help with character design. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA: Students with limited mobility limber up with modified poses. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262. GONG MEDITATION: Sonic vibrations lead to healing and deep relaxation. Yoga Roots, Williston, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $18. Info, 318-6050.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CAPITAL CITY CONCERTS: KAREN KEVRA: Listeners relax and reflect during a 30-minute meditation concert by the Grammy Award-nominated flutist. Cedar Creek Room, Vermont Statehouse,


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Montpelier, 12:15 p.m. Free. Info, info@capitalcityconcerts.org. CATHERINE MACLELLAN: See THU.12, Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7 p.m. $10-15. Info, 533-2000. THE FRETLESS: Four innovative string players bring a fresh approach to folk music. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 7:30-10:30 p.m. $10-35. Info, 728-6464. FRIDAY NIGHT FIRES SUMMER MUSIC SERIES: Traditional and contemporary bluegrass tunes get toes a-tapping while local food and wine please palates. Fresh Tracks Farm Vineyard & Winery, Berlin, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 223-1151.

outdoors

FRIDAY MORNING FALL BIRD WALKS: Fans of feathered fliers search for fall migratory songbirds. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 7:30-9 a.m. $10; free for members. Info, 229-6206. SUNFLOWER HOUSE: See WED.11.

seminars

GENEALOGY: Using their memories, the internet and a library card, folks work with Carl Williams to record their own family history. Barre Area Senior Center, noon-1:30 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 479-9512. MEDICARE MADE CLEAR: An informational session helps newcomers get acquainted with this government-provided health care coverage. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

sports

BURLINGTON STUDENTS FOUNDATION GOLF OUTING: Friends, families, coworkers and community members come together for an 18-hole scramble followed by a food-and-drink social. Rocky Ridge Golf Club, St. George, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $140. Info, bsfgolf2019@gmail.com.

talks

AMY MORSMAN: In “Votes…For Women?,” the Middlebury College professor of history discusses national and local tactics of the women’s suffrage movement. Mahaney Arts Center, Middlebury College, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-5937. EDUCATION & ENRICHMENT FOR EVERYONE: University of Vermont associate professor of political science Lisa Holmes shares her expertise in “The U.S. Supreme Court in a Time of Political Chaos.” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, coffee hour, 1:15 p.m.; talk, 2-3 p.m. $5. Info, 658-6554.

theater

‘SENT HIM MENTAL: THE HUMANITY AND INSANITY OF G. RICHARD AMES’: From a 2000 hostage incident in Winooski to interactions with Shirley

Phelps-Roper of the Westboro Baptist Church, details of the Vermont writer’s life propel two one-act plays. QuarryWorks Theater, Adamant, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 229-6978.

community-building gathering. Family Tree Hemp Farm, Sheldon, 4 p.m. $65. Info, btvlocal420@ gmail.com.

‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: See THU.12.

VISION FOR VERMONT SUMMIT: Coming from all corners of the state, residents representing diverse perspectives consider the theme “Raise Up Voices for a Vermont That Works for All.” Bread Loaf Campus, Ripton, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $5-15 includes lunch and beverages; preregister. Info, cat@visionforvermont.org.

‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: See WED.11.

words

ART & AUTHOR NIGHT: Writers Barry Goldensohn and Lorrie Goldensohn share poems following a reception for creatives Helen Rabin and Marge Pulaski. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, art opening, 6 p.m.; reading, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. BOOK SALE: See WED.11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. EMILY ARNASON CASEY: Lit lovers join the author for a reading, discussion and signing of her debut essay collection, Made Holy. BCA Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 338-2436. WRITER’S BLOCK: Scribes bring essays, short stories, one-act plays and poems to be critiqued by a supportive audience. Barre Area Senior Center, 10-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

SAT.14 activism

FAIR TRADE 101: GLOBAL TRADE & RACISM: Attendees gain an understanding of the effects of U.S. trade policies on marginalized populations. Stick around after to learn about PJC volunteer opportunities. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2345, ext. 3.

bazaars

25TH ANNUAL LAWN & BAKE SALE: Homemade treats sustain shoppers as they hunt for gently used treasures. Bethany United Church of Christ, Montpelier, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2424. NORWICH ANTIQUES SHOW: Dealers display a wide variety of attic treasures and collectibles. Food, a raffle and informal appraisals round out the event. Norwich Historical Society and Community Center, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $5; free for kids under 12. Info, 649-0124.

business

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS SUMMIT OF VERMONT: Careeroriented adults network and brainstorm ways to contribute to the future of the state. See calendar spotlight. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $10-30. Info, hello@yp summitvt.com.

cannabis

FAMILY HEMP FARM VIBES: Cannabis education, a smoking lounge, and CBD-infused cuisine and mocktails are among the attractions at this sunset

conferences

dance

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BRETON DANCE WITH DANSE CAFE: The sounds of western and central France inspire movement. All dances are taught. Charlotte Grange, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, mikemando@ gmail.com. COMMUNITY DANCE: Hosted by Revels North, a traditional shindig features live music and a dance caller. LISTEN Community Dinner Hall, White River Junction, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 866-556-3083. ‘GAZE ON THIS’: Cyndal Ellis and Toni Nagy grace the museum grounds with a moving performance of choreography by Ellis. Rain date: September 21. The Kent Museum, Calais, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 223-6613.

education

ALUMNI REUNION & FAMILY WEEKEND: See FRI.13, 11 a.m.

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etc.

CLOTHING SWAP: Locals tap into the spirit of giving at an exchange of gently used threads. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. COLORS OF THE KINGDOM TRAIN RIDE: Leaf peepers climb aboard for a journey down the tracks of the Connecticut and Passumpsic Railroad. St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, 9:30, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. $7-14. Info, 748-2600. E-BIKE & BREW TOUR: Electric bicycles transport suds lovers to three local beer producers via scenic routes. Lamoille Valley Bike Tours, Johnson, noon-4:30 p.m. $75 includes an appetizer and two souvenir pint glasses. Info, 730-0161. HISTORIC TOUR OF UVM: A walking tour of New England’s fifth oldest university brings its illustrious history to life. Ira Allen Statue, University Green, University of Vermont, Burlington, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 656-8673. JANE AUSTEN WEEKEND: ‘EMMA’: See FRI.13. LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118.

ARTIST AT WORK

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 6 - 7:30 PM, FREE EXHIBITION ON DISPLAY UNTIL OCTOBER 6, 2019

LOUNGE 91: See FRI.13. SAT.14

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Howard Center presents

FALL THE MARNA AND STEPHEN WISE TULIN

COMMUNITY EDUCATION

PRESENTING UNDERWRITER:

SERIES

MAIN STREET LANDING FILM HOUSE

Suicide: The Ripple Effect. A film that chronicles the impact of Kevin Hines’s suicide attempt on others and his work as a mental health advocate since that time.

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QUEEN CITY GHOSTWALK DARKNESS FALLS TOUR: See FRI.13. THE REACH OUT, SPEAK UP — SUICIDE AWARENESS RIDE: Motorcyclists hit the open road in honor of Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Green Mountain Harley-Davidson, Essex Junction, registration, 9 a.m.; speakers, 9:45 a.m.; ride, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4778.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

SEPTEMBER 26 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Followed by discussion and Q & A facilitated by Charlotte McCorkel, LICSW

SAT.14

802-488-6912 howardcenter.org

9/9/19 12:46 PM

SANCTUARY CITY COFFEEHOUSE: Locals bring a dish to pass and a song, poem or story to share in an open-mic setting. First Unitarian Universalist Society of Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Donations. Info, herbschr@gmail. com. STUNT KITE FLIERS & ARCHERY HOBBYISTS MEETING: Open to beginning and experienced hobbyists alike, a weekly gathering allows folks to share information and suggestions for equipment, sporting locations and more. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. TOURS OF THE HISTORIC BARN HOUSE & EXHIBITS: Attendees view authentic African art, impressive architecture and antique fixtures during a stroll through historic buildings. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, 10-11:30 a.m. $10; preregister at clemmonsfamilyfarm. org. Info, clemmonsfamilyfarm@ gmail.com.

fairs & festivals

BATTLE OF PLATTSBURGH COMMEMORATION: See THU.12. BRITISH INVASION: See FRI.13.

OLD SPOKES HOME'S ANNUAL FUNDRAISER RIDE SIGN UP BY SEPTEMBER 15 TH FOR EARLY REGISTRATION PRICES

COLORS OF THE KINGDOM AUTUMN FESTIVAL: Train rides, a parade, a farmers market, arts and crafts, planetarium shows, and more honor the upcoming fall season. Various St. Johnsbury locations, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Prices vary; most events are free. Info, 748-3678. GRAND POINT NORTH: Vermont native Grace Potter returns home to headline two days of lakeside tunes. Gov’t Mule, Lucy Dacus and others round out the roster. See grandpointnorth. com for details. Waterfront Park, Burlington, 3 p.m. $64-89; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 652-0777. GREEN CORN CEREMONY: Locals join the Alnôbaiwi Abenakis as they celebrate the first corn harvest with singing, drumming, ceremonies and traditional cooking. Ethan Allen Homestead Museum, Burlington, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Regular admission, $6-10; free for kids under 5. Info, 865-4556. ST. JOHNSBURY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Beg, Steal or Borrow, Jes & Jakob and the Blackberry Bushes, and others transform Railroad Street into an all-afternoon picking party. Kingdom Taproom & Table, St. Johnsbury, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

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STEEPLE MARKET BREWFEST: Suds lovers tap into local libations and flavorful fare at a fourth-annual shindig benefiting the Fairfax Fire Department. J & L Field, Fairfax, 2-6 p.m. $40. Info, 849-6872. TUNBRIDGE WORLD’S FAIR: See THU.12, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. VERMONT GOLDEN HONEY FESTIVAL: Festivalgoers are abuzz with arts, crafts, vendors and local food products that celebrate the state insect and all things honey. Golden Stage Inn, Proctorsville, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 226-7744.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘THE BELOVED ROGUE’: John Barrymore stars in this silent adventure based on the life of 15th-century French poet François Villon, shown with live piano accompaniment. Brandon Town Hall, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 603-236-9237. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.11. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.11. ‘THE KID’: Charlie Chaplin’s character cares for a cast-off child in his first full-length feature. Vermont-based composer Bob Merrill provides live piano accompaniment. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 603-448-0400. ‘MISSILE TO THE MOON’: Newman Center film series host Andy MacDougall describes this 1958 sci-fi flick as “old Hollywood’s gonzo, monsterfilled idea of the moon.” Shown on reel-to-reel 16mm film. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@yahoo.com. ‘MONOS’: Set on a remote mountaintop, a 2019 drama follows eight armed children watching over a hostage — and a milk cow. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.11. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.11.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOUR: See THU.12. BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: More than 90 stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. 345 Pine St., Burlington, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket. org@gmail.com. CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET: Meats and cheeses join farm-fresh produce, baked goods, locally made arts and crafts, and live music. 60 State Street, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, manager@ montpelierfarmersmarket.com. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: See FRI.13. CHOCOLATE TASTING: Candy fanatics get an education on a variety of sweets made onsite. Nutty Steph’s Granola &

Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090. NORTHWEST FARMERS MARKET: Locavores stock up on produce, preserves, baked goods, and arts and crafts. Taylor Park, St. Albans, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, alavista@myfairpoint.net. PARSONS’ FARM CELEBRATION DINNER: Appetizers, cocktails, a five-course meal and bluegrass music on the porch fête the Richford milk, beef, egg and vegetable producer’s 100 years of operation. The Black Lantern Inn & Brewpub, Montgomery, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $65; preregister. Info, 326-3269. PIE SALE: Sweets lovers browse a mouthwatering array of double-crusted desserts. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost of pies, $12 per pie. Info, 745-1392. ROAST PORK SUPPER: Families feast on pork, mashed potatoes, stuffing, vegetables, applesauce and dessert, served buffet-style. Takeout is available. Vergennes United Methodist Church, 5-6:30 p.m. $5-9. Info, 877-3150. SHELBURNE FARMERS MARKET: Harvested fruits and greens, artisan cheeses, and local novelties grace outdoor tables. Shelburne Parade Ground, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 482-4279. SPINNING PLATES: See THU.12, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

games

VERMONT HISTORY TRIVIA: Teams and individual players put their knowledge of the Green Mountain State to the test. Vermont History Museum, Montpelier, 1-2:30 p.m. Regular admission, $5-7; $20 for families; free for members and kids under 6. Info, 479-8500.

health & fitness

COMMUNITY YOGA: Active bodies get their stretch on with Carolyn Hannan and Marger Maldonado, increasing balance and flexibility. Namaste! Old Stone House Museum, Brownington, 10-11 a.m. Donations. Info, 754-2022. SELF-MASSAGE YOGA CLASS: Students learn to relieve aches and pains using foam rollers and tennis balls. Free People, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 658-1064.

language

‘LE DEUXIÈME SAMEDI’: Frenchlanguage speakers chat and chew in a casual atmosphere. La Villa Bistro & Pizzeria, Shelburne, noon-1:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, michelineatremblay@gmail. com.

lgbtq

PRIDE YOGA: LGBTQ individuals and allies hit the mat for a stretching session suited to all levels. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

music

Find club dates in the music section. ALL THAT: The 10-piece band brings crowd-pleasing, danceable tunes to a Hispanic Heritage Month kickoff party hosted by TV and radio personality Toni Basanta. A cash bar and Latin-flavored food offerings fuel the fun. Enosburg Opera House, 7-10:30 p.m. $10-13. Info, 933-6171. COUNTRY CELEBRATION: Fingerlicking barbecue fare from Willy’s Catering fuels revelers for a night of honky-tonk and westernswing sounds by the Crusty Pickups. Proceeds go toward Northern Vermont UniversityLyndon scholarships. Tempson Barn, Lyndonville, 6-10 p.m. $100. Info, 748-2600. DICK FORMAN JAZZ GROUP: The New England ensemble highlights sophisticated mainstream jazz selections. Robison Hall, Mahaney Arts Center, Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. GREG & AIDAN RYAN: Highenergy numbers inspired by gypsy jazz master Django Reinhardt fill the air, courtesy of the fatherson duo. Burnham Hall, Lincoln, 7:30 p.m. $10; free for kids and teens. Info, 388-6863. MICHAEL ARNOWITT & THE IMPROVISIONS JAZZ QUINTET: The celebrated pianist plays with genre in a program of jazz music based on works by classical composers Chopin, Debussy, Stravinsky, Bernstein and Copland. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 229-0984.

outdoors

BENEFIT TRAIL RIDE: Equestrian enthusiasts enjoy Lake Champlain Islands scenery on horseback to support the Champlain Adaptive Mounted Program. Good Hope Equestrian Center, South Hero, arrival begins, 8:30 a.m.; ride departs, 10 a.m. Minimum $125 in funds raised. Info, 372-4087. BIRD MONITORING WALK: Ornithology enthusiasts join members of the Green Mountain Club Burlington section on an easy hike in search of shore birds, waterfowl and bald eagles. Contact trip leader for details. Delta Park, Colchester. Free; preregister. Info, 863-5744. CORN MAZE: Twists and turns challenge families’ directional skills. Funds raised support low-income campers. River of Life Camp, Irasburg, 1-5 p.m. $5; free for kids 5 and under. Info, 754-9600. FERNS ON THE MOUNT: TALK & WALK: Lynne Levine, a forest ecologist and author of Identifying Ferns the Easy Way: A Pocket Guide to Common Ferns of the Northeast, leads an exploration of flowerless plants with feathery fronds. Mount Independence State Historic Site, Orwell, 1-3:30 p.m. $5; free for kids under 15. Info, 948-2000.

HERE BE DRAGONFLIES: Entomology enthusiasts capture and identify species during this basic introduction to the winged insects. B-Side Beach, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 1 p.m. $24; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. MAKING TRACKS, SEEING SKINS & SKULLS: Outdoorsy types search for signs of fur-bearing animals and make plaster-ofparis track casts to take home. Nature Center, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 4:30 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. MUSHROOMS DEMYSTIFIED: Fungi fanatics learn about different varieties — fabulous and fearsome alike — found throughout the park. Nature Center, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 2:30 p.m. $2-4; free for kids ages 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. OWL PROWL & NIGHT GHOST HIKE: Flashlight holders spy denizens of dusk on a journey to 19th-century settlement ruins, where spooky Vermont tales await. History Hike lot, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 6:30 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. SUNFLOWER HOUSE: See WED.11. SUNSET AQUADVENTURE PADDLE: Stunning scenery welcomes boaters, who explore the Waterbury Reservoir in search of crepuscular wildlife. Contact Station, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 9:30 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; limited space; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

sports

COCA-COLA LABOR DAY CLASSIC: Start your engines! Speed racers go for glory while completing laps around the track a rescheduled holiday event. Thunder Road Speed Bowl, Barre, 5 p.m. $25; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 244-6963. RECOVERY WALK: Participants put their best foot forward to celebrate National Recovery Month. Kingdom Recovery Center, St. Johnsbury, sign-making, 10 a.m.; walk, 11 a.m. Info, 751-8520. SPARTAN MOUNTAIN SERIES: VERMONT ULTRA, BEAST & SPRING WEEKEND: Iron-willed athletes tackle steep slopes and muddy waters on challenging 30-, 13- and 3-mile courses. Killington Resort, 6 a.m. $25.99294. Info, 800-734-9435.

theater

‘A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN’: See THU.12, 2-3:45 p.m. ‘SENT HIM MENTAL: THE HUMANITY AND INSANITY OF G. RICHARD AMES’: See FRI.13. ‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: See THU.12, 2 & 7:30-9 p.m. ‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: See WED.11.

words

BOOK SALE: See WED.11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. CHAPTERS IN HISTORY FOUR: TURMOIL PERENNIALLY SWIRLING: Nonfiction fans sink their teeth into No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. EMILY BERNARD: The University of Vermont professor takes a penetrating look at race in her memoir, Black Is the Body: Stories From My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time and Mine. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, 4-5:30 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 765-560-5445. POETS IN CONVERSATION: NADELL FISHMAN & JANE SHORE: Where does poetry come from? Two writers address this and other questions during a discussion of their craft, inspiration and revision process. Adamant Community Club, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 454-7103.

Sale Starts Aug. 30

SUN.15

472 Marshall Avenue, Williston • (802) 658-2433 128 Intervale Ave, Burlington • (802) 660-3505 220 Mechanic St., Lebanon, NH (603) 448-6110 www.GardenersSupplyStore.com

bazaars

25TH ANNUAL LAWN & BAKE SALE: See SAT.14, noon-3 p.m.

community

BABYSITTER MINGLER: University of Vermont students interested in caring for area children convene for a meet-andgreet with local families. Kids are encouraged to attend. Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 656-9405.

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COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS PRACTICE: Sessions in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh include sitting and walking meditation, a short reading, and open sharing. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, newleafsangha@ gmail.com.

dance

BALKAN DANCE PARTY: Five master Bulgarian musicians provide the tunes for a high-spirited shindig followed by a potluck supper. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 3-6 p.m. $10-30. Info, 426-3210. ‘THE GREEN MOUNTAIN NUTCRACKER’ AUDITIONS: Modern, contemporary and ballet performers try out for roles in Moving Light Dance’s localized take on a holiday classic. Moving Light Dance, Montpelier, 2-5 p.m. Free. Info, movinglightdance@ gmail.com. SALSALINA SUNDAY PRACTICE: Salsa dancers step in for a casual social. Salsalina Dance Studio, Burlington, 5:30-8 p.m. $5. Info, eingelmanuel@hotmail.com.

SUN.15

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GRAND POINT NORTH: See SAT.14, 2 p.m.

education

ALUMNI REUNION & FAMILY WEEKEND: See FRI.13, 10 a.m.

etc.

HU CHANT: SOUND OF SOUL: People of all faiths lift their voices in a spiritual exercise followed by contemplation and conversation. Eckankar Center, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 800-772-9390.

TUNBRIDGE WORLD’S FAIR: See THU.12, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.11. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.11. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

JANE AUSTEN WEEKEND: ‘EMMA’: See FRI.13.

‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.11.

MIDDLETOWN SPRINGS HISTORICAL SOCIETY 50TH ANNUAL MEETING: After a dessert buffet and brief business meeting, historian Philip Crossman delivers “Frisbie’s Fourth Lecture: Things Left Out of The History of Middletown, Vermont, 1867.” Middletown Springs Historical Society, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 235-2376.

BRUNCH & BLOOMS: A buffetstyle feast fuels diners for a self-guided tour of the cut-flower farm. Attendees also design their own take-home floral arrangements and snag a to-go cookie from the bakery. Ardelia Farm & Co., Irasburg, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $75. Info, 323-4178.

RESCUE ME VT DOG RESCUE FUNDRAISER: Games, raffles, local spirits and Nomadic Kitchen confections encourage attendees to support local canine adoption. Wild Hart Distillery, Shelburne, noon-5 p.m. Free. Info, 922-1520.

fairs & festivals

BATTLE OF PLATTSBURGH COMMEMORATION: See THU.12. BRITISH INVASION: See FRI.13.

food & drink

CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.14. EAT UP! AT THE GREEN: Locals skip cooking dinner in favor of food and drink from area purveyors served amid art, live music and good company. Camp Meade, Middlesex, 4-9 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2108. SOUPER SUPPER: Take-home handcrafted bowls hold nourishment from area restaurants at a fundraiser for the Randolph Area Food Shelf and the Brookfield

Community Partnership. Brookfield Old Town Hall, 6 p.m. $10-25; preregister. Info, 276-3448. STOWE FARMERS MARKET: An appetizing assortment of fresh veggies, meats, milk, berries, herbs, beverages and crafts tempts shoppers. Red Barn Shops Field, Stowe, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, stowefarmersmarket@ gmail.com. WATERBURY BREAKFAST CLUB: Foodies bring picnic blankets and their appetites for a pop-up meal and community gathering complete with live music. 18 Elm, Waterbury, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, georgiayers@gmail.com. WINOOSKI FARMERS MARKET: Families shop for fresh produce, honey, meats, baked goods and prepared foods from vendors at an outdoor marketplace. Champlain Mill, Winooski, 10 a.m.2 p.m. Free. Info, farmersmarket@ downtownwinooski.org.

games

GAMES PARLOUR: Strategic thinkers bring favorite tabletop competitions to play with others. Champlain Club, Burlington, 2-8 p.m. $5. Info, orsonbradford@ gmail.com. REVOLUTIONARY WAR BOARD GAME AFTERNOON: Martial mavens ages 12 and up engage in games of strategy. Hubbardton

Battlefield State Historic Site, 1-4 p.m. $3; free for kids under 15. Info, 273-2282.

language

‘DIMANCHES’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlez-vous français? Speakers practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, steve norman@fastmail.fm.

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: See WED.11, 2 & 7 p.m. PIKNIC ÉLECTRONIK MONTRÉAL: DJ sets and beat-driven music propel a dance party of epic proportions. See piknicelectronik. com for details. Plaine des jeux, Montréal, 2-9:30 p.m. $16-119. Info, 514-904-1247.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CATHERINE MACLELLAN: See THU.12, Richmond Congregational Church, 4-6 p.m. $15-23. Info, 434-4563. DURHAM COUNTY POETS: Whether they’re rocking out or playing unplugged, the Canadian quintet captivates Levitt AMP St. Johnsbury Music Series listeners with a mix of sounds ranging from folk to blues to gospel to rock.

Dog Mountain, St. Johnsbury, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. GREEN MOUNTAIN SWING: Bearing chairs, blankets and picnic meals, music lovers take in big-band favorites by the 17-piece ensemble. Isham Family Farm, Williston, noon-2 p.m. Donations. Info, westonforte@yahoo.com. JONNY LANG: From his days as a teenage prodigy to his time on tour with the likes of B.B. King and Aerosmith, the platinum-selling guitarist has proven himself as a formidable bluesman. See calendar spotlight. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $49.50-69.50. Info, 603-448-0400. ‘THE VERMONT CIVIL WAR SONGBOOK’: Singer and researcher Linda Radtke lends her voice to a noteworthy interpretation of the state’s major events. United Church of Westford, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 879-4028.

outdoors

CORN MAZE: See SAT.14. LITTLE RIVER RAMBLE: Hikers explore the trails on a route they plan with a park interpreter. Park Office, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 2 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. POINTS OF INTEREST: LAKE CHAMPLAIN BRIDGE GUIDED WALK: Picnics are welcome

before a round-trip stroll by the lake. Chimney Point State Historic Site, Addison, 1-3 p.m. $8 includes museum admission. Info, 759-2412. SUNFLOWER HOUSE: See WED.11. TOUR OF WATERBURY DAM: Visitors explore a reforested encampment and discover how the Civilian Conservation Corps saved the Winooski Valley from flooded ruin. Meet at the top of the dam, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 11 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. WAR OF THE WEEDS!: Garden helpers maintain and expand the park’s pollinator habitat restoration areas. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 10 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. WOMEN WHO BIRD: Open to women and woman-aligned individuals, a new group finds common ground in the mutual love for nature and birds. No dogs, please. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, ekaplita@audubon.org.

sports

CHRIS LUDINGTON MEMORIAL TRAIL RUN/WALK: Athletes honor the memory of the husband, father, athlete and Trapp Family Lodge employee on 5K and 10K courses. Proceeds benefit a

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Call 861.7373 for a viewing or visit us at www.getahome.org/available-homes for additional information, listings and homebuyer education. 56

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FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS

scholarship fund in Ludington’s name. Trapp Family Lodge, Stowe, registration, 8 a.m.; race, 9 a.m. $20-25. Info, 760-8521. PROFESSIONAL SKI INSTRUCTORS OF AMERICA JAMES LEADER MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT: Golfers hit the links to raise scholarship dollars for PSIA members who wish to further their education in snow sports instruction. Killington Golf Course, registration, 1 p.m.; shotgun start, 1:30 p.m. $60. Info, 422-6700. SPARTAN MOUNTAIN SERIES: VERMONT ULTRA, BEAST & SPRING WEEKEND: See SAT.14, 7:30 a.m.

talks

BRENNAN GAUTHIER: The archeologist digs into “The Siege of the Moses Pierson Blockhouse.” Ethan Allen Homestead Museum, Burlington, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-4556. JANE AUSTEN IN VERMONT: Devotees of the 18th-century English novelist geek out over “Jane Austen: Working Woman ‘I must keep to my own style and go on in my own way,’” presented by Jane Austen Society of North America president Liz Philosophos Cooper Temple Sinai, South Burlington, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 503-5109.

theater

‘A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN’: See THU.12, 2-3:45 p.m. ‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: See THU.12, 2 p.m.

words

BOOK SALE: See WED.11, noon-5 p.m. WE DO LANGUAGE SYMPOSIUM: Seven days of poetry, writing, music, film, workshops and more honor the legacy of the late author Toni Morrison. See calendar spotlight and wedolanguage. com for details. Various locations statewide. Donations. Info, stnegritude@gmail.com. WORDS OUT LOUD: Novelist Susan Z. Ritz and poet Sue D. Burton excerpt original work as part of a series highlighting Vermont writers. A reception at the Kent Museum follows. Old West Church, Calais, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 223-6613.

MON.16 business

STEPS TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS: Enterprisers bank strategies for boosting their companies to the next level. Center for Women & Enterprise,

Burlington, 2-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

crafts

HANDWORK CIRCLE: Friends and neighbors make progress on works of knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch and other creative endeavors. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘3 FROM HELL’: Rob Zombie wrote and directed this gory sequel to the 2005 horror movie The Devil’s Rejects. Shown on September 18 as a double feature with The Devil’s Rejects. Cumberland 12 Cinemas, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. $15-18. Info, 518-324-3888. Essex Cinemas & T-Rex Theater, 7 p.m. $10-12.50. Info, 878-7231. ‘A BEAUTIFUL MIND’: Russell Crowe portrays John Nash, a brilliant real-life mathematician who developed paranoid schizophrenia. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.11. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.11. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

SEED DOCUMENTARY: Green thumbs join members of the Burlington Garden Club to watch an Emmy Award-nominated documentary focused on issues such as GMOs and the corporate consolidation of seeds. See south burlingtonlibrary.org for the film title. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.11.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11, 6:30 p.m.

looking to care for themselves using natural remedies. By appointment only. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, and Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 4-8 p.m. $10-30; additional cost for herbs; preregister. Info, 224-7100.

SAMBATUCADA OPEN REHEARSAL: Burlington’s own samba street percussion band welcomes new members. No experience or instruments required. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5017.

GUIDED GROUP MEDITATION: In keeping with the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh, folks practice mindfulness through sitting, walking, reading and discussion. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:15-8 p.m. Free. Info, 505-1688.

outdoors

language

MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 7-11 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498.

ENGLISH CONVERSATION CIRCLE: Language learners make strides — and new friends — in an ongoing discussion group. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, noon-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

PITCH: Players compete in a tricktaking card game. Barre Area Senior Center, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

PLATTSBURGH CONVERSATION GROUP: French speakers maintain their conversational skills in a weekly meetup. Plattsburgh Public Library, N.Y., 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, ajobin-picard@ cefls.org.

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Heineberg Senior Center, Burlington, 10:45-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY HERBAL CLINIC: Supervised clinical interns offer guidance and support to those

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: See WED.11, 7 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section.

SUNFLOWER HOUSE: See WED.11.

talks

DAMIAN COSTELLO: A historical lecture explores the life and legacy of Lakota holy man Nicholas Black Elk. Lincoln Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2665. ROBERT GOSENDE: Current challenges facing U.S. international affairs drive a discussion with the veteran ambassador. Perry Hall, Champlain College, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, patricia@ vermont.org.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.11.

words

VOICES OF COLOR SHOWCASE: People of color exercise their artistry when sharing stories and poetry. Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 8-10:30 p.m. $1. Info, 660-9346. MON.16

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Friday, October 4, 2019 8 AM – 4:30 PM DoubleTree by Hilton Burlington, Vermont VERMONTCANCER.ORG A FREE COMMUNITY EVENT HOSTED BY

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR 2019 PRESENTING SUPPORTER

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WE DO LANGUAGE SYMPOSIUM: See SUN.15.

TUE.17

agriculture

FALL GARDENING: See WED.11, South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

community WALK in purple shoes (the color of domestic violence awareness) through Burlington’s South End to stand together in solidarity. BID on amazing auction items to support free services to about 2,000 people each year. LISTEN as those impacted by domestic violence share their stories from the ArtsRiot stage.

Saturday, October 5

Starting at noon

ArtsRiot | 400 Pine St

Burlington

REGISTER | FUNDRAISE | DONATE: STEPSVT.ORG/TAKE-STEPS

COMMUNITY DROP-IN CENTER HOURS: Wi-Fi, games and art materials are on hand at an open meeting space where folks forge social connections. GRACE, Hardwick, 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 472-6857.

crafts

COMMUNITY CRAFT NIGHT: Makers stitch, spin, knit and crochet their way through projects while enjoying each other’s company. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

dance

LAKE CHAMPLAIN SQUARES FALL SEASON NEW DANCER CLASS: Neophytes find their footing in an introductory square dance lesson. Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School, South Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 985-2012. Untitled-29 1

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SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy Hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

environment

SAVING THE CHUBBY UNICORN: After sipping beers and screening a video, animal lovers hear updates on efforts to save the critically endangered African black rhino. Queen City Brewery, Burlington, 5:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 425-5725.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘3 FROM HELL’: See MON.16. ‘DANCES WITH WOLVES’: Kevin Costner directs and stars in this 1990 drama about a Civil War lieutenant who finds common ground with a group of Native Americans. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.11. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.11. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.11. ‘ROCK ‘N’ ROLL HIGH SCHOOL’: With the help of punk band the Ramones, a group of musicloving students takes on an oppressive school administration. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7-8:45 p.m. Donations. Info, 540-3018.

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‘ROOM WITH A VIEW’: Helena Bonham Carter plays a young woman who makes a connection with a free-spirited man while on holiday in Italy. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.11.

food & drink

OLD NORTH END FARMERS MARKET: Locavores score breads, juices, ethnic foods and more from neighborhood vendors. Dewey Park, Burlington, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, oldnorth endfarmersmarket@gmail.com. PENNYWISE PANTRY TOUR: On a guided exploration of the store, shoppers create a custom template for keeping the kitchen stocked with affordable, nutritious eats. City Market, Onion River Co-op, Burlington South End, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 861-9753. TUESDAY LUNCH: An in-house chef whips up a well-balanced hot meal with dessert. See barreseniors.org for menu. Barre Area Senior Center, noon. $6; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11, 7 p.m.

health & fitness ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION EXERCISE PROGRAM: See THU.12.

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE TAI CHI: Whether they’re new to Sun-style practice or wish to review core moves, students join Elizabeth Wirls for some gentle exercise. Homestead Gardens, Wheeler House, South Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. COMMUNITY HERBAL CLINIC: See MON.16, Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED TAI CHI: Time for individual questions and mentoring augments an hour of instruction. Homestead Gardens, Wheeler House, South Burlington, 10:3011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. MEDITATION GROUP: Nick Cavanaugh leads a guided meditation and open discussion geared toward relaxation, contentment and self-understanding. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0595. REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments foster physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203. TUESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: Participants learn to relax and let go. Stillpoint Center, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 318-8605.

language

ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Parla Italiano? Language learners practice pronunciation and more in an informal gathering. Hartland Public Library,

12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 436-2473. ‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners say it all in French at a social conversational practice. Red Onion Café, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652.

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: See WED.11, 8 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section. ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC: Local instrumentalists step into the spotlight to showcase their skills. Charlotte Grange, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 923-6096. CATHEDRAL ARTS: A program of duets performed by Letitia Quante and Emily Taubl on violin and cello spotlights pieces by Kodály and Halvorsen. BYO lunch. The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 879-5360. DR. DOG & SHAKEY GRAVES: Two indie-rock bands bring fans to the Ben & Jerry’s Concerts on the Green series. Liz Cooper & the Stampede open. Shelburne Museum, 7 p.m. $43-47. Info, 877-987-6487. ‘A NIGHT WITH JANIS JOPLIN’: Tony Award nominee Mary Bridget Davies reprises her role in this stirring Broadway tribute to the rocker’s life and work. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $64.50-84.50. Info, 603-448-0400.

outdoors

BIRDING WALK: Joel Tilley of the Rutland County Audubon Society leads ornithology enthusiasts on a search for fall warblers and other migrating birds. Bring Water, bug spray and binoculars and meet at the rail crossing. Poultney River & Rail Trail, 7:3010:30 a.m. Free. Info, jptilley50@ gmail.com. SLOW & EASY HIKING: See THU.12. SUNFLOWER HOUSE: See WED.11.

seminars

MEDICARE MADE CLEAR: An informational session helps newcomers get acquainted with this government-provided health care coverage. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140. OUTDOOR ADVENTURES WITH YOUR DOG: Humans fetch tips and tricks for hitting the trails


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

with their four-legged friends. Well-behaved dogs are welcome. L.L. Bean, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 888-615-9973. WOMENSAFE VOLUNTEER TRAINING: Community members prepare to lend a hand to the Addison County nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing sexual and domestic violence. Location and details provided upon registration. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 388-9180.

sports

FREE AIKIDO CLASS: A one-time complimentary introduction to the Japanese martial art focuses on centering and finding freedom while under attack. Open to prospective students. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6:15-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, 951-8900.

talks

BRIAN WARWICK: The assistant professor and Grammy Award-winning recording engineer dishes on his work with crooner Michael Bublé. Northern Vermont University-Lyndon, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, brian.warwick@ northernvermont.edu. CURRENT EVENTS DISCUSSION GROUP: Informed individuals reflect on the news and its context and ramifications. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. RACE CONVERSATIONS: Guided by Ijeoma Oluo’s book So You Want to Talk About Race, community members explore concepts of culture, power and equity with facilitator Life LeGeros. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

tech

ELECTRONICS MEETUP: Vermont Drone founder Steve Mermelstein delves into the unique dangers of lithium polymer batteries and special precautions needed to offset their volatility. Generator, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0761. INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT WINDOWS: Let’s get technical! Students learn to use the mouse, keyboard and operating system components. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

words

BROWN BAG BOOK CLUB: Readers voice opinions about Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. BURLINGTON FREE WRITE: Aspiring writers respond to prompts in a welcoming atmosphere. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 999-1664. GARRETT M. GRAFF: The former Politico magazine editor talks about The Only Plane in the Sky: An Oral History of 9/11, his latest

book. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3350. MARGARET ATWOOD: LIVE IN CINEMAS: See THU.12, Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $10-17. Info, 760-4634. MICHAEL SNYDER: Words meet the woods in the writer’s essay collection Woods Whys: An Exploration of Forests and Forestry, a companion for those with a love for the outdoors. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 229-0774.

picture features a time-traveling boy and his genius dog. Call for film title. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. ‘THE GREATEST SHOWMAN’: Inspired by the real-life story of P.T. Barnum, the 2017 picture takes audience members on a musical journey through the creation of the Barnum & Bailey circus. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7-9 p.m. $5. Info, 533-2000. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.11.

WE DO LANGUAGE SYMPOSIUM: See SUN.15.

‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.11.

WINE & STORY OPEN MIC: Prompts inspire first-person narratives told to a live audience. Shelburne Vineyard, 7:30 p.m. $5. Info, 863-1754.

ITALIAN MOVIE: The Vermont Italian Club hosts a screening of an international flick, complete with light refreshments. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

WED.18 business

#ASKMEANYTHING: Q&A DISCUSSIONS FOR CURIOUS BUSINESS OWNERS: Proprietors take notes during a Q&A on budgeting and building wealth. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, 8:30-10 a.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 391-4870. BUSINESS PLANNING COURSE: See WED.11. VERMONT WOMENPRENEURS BIZ BUZZ MEETUP: Members of the business community connect and share resources over coffee, tea and pastries. Nomad Coffee — South End Station, Burlington, 8:30-9:45 a.m. Free. Info, 870-0903.

community

‘BURLINGTON TELECOM: THE PROMISE AND THE REALITY’: Dean Corren, Sandy Baird and Steve Goodkind — plaintiffs in the case to keep Burlington Telecom public and local — lead a discussion as part of the Vermont Institute for Civic and International Involvement’s fall conversation series. Third floor, O.N.E. Community Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 355-4968.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: See WED.11. KNITTER’S GROUP: See WED.11.

dance

SQUARE DANCING: See WED.11.

etc.

MEMORABLE TIMES CAFÉ: Those living with mild to moderate memory loss and their care partners convene for casual social time. Refreshments are provided. Vermont History Center, Barre, 1:30-3 p.m. Free. Info, 476-2681.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘3 FROM HELL’: See MON.16. ALMOST THERE: MOVIES ABOUT THE FUTURE: Based on a 1960s cartoon, a 2014 animated motion

‘MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER 3000 LIVE’: Joel Hodgson, Tom Servo, Crow and Gypsy wisecrack their way through some of the worst sci-fi movies ever made in this live version of the cult TV show. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $30.50-311. Info, 863-5966. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.11. ‘TINTORETTO: A REBEL IN VENICE’: Helena Bonham Carter narrates a 2019 documentary celebrating the 500th anniversary of the birth of the Italian Renaissance painter born Jacopo Comin. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $6-15. Info, 748-2600. ‘TINY GIANTS 3D’: See WED.11.

games

BEGINNERS’ BRIDGE: See WED.11. BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11. MAH JONGG IN BARRE: See WED.11.

health & fitness

RESILIENCE FLOW: See WED.11. YOGA4CANCER: See WED.11.

language

ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE OF THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN REGION SOCIAL HOUR: Francophones fine-tune their French-language conversation skills over cocktails. Juniper, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@aflcr.org. BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: See WED.11. FALL OPEN HOUSE: The French Club at Howe Library welcomes prospective members. Bring French-themed hors d’oeuvres to share. Howe Library, Hanover, N.H., 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 603-643-4120. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.11.

WED.18

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lgbtq

GAYME NIGHT: Friends bond over contests such as Cards Against Humanity, Jenga Giant and Scrabble. Bring or borrow a game. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812.

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: See WED.11, 1 & 8 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section. LEARN TO PLAY MUSIC: Wayne Hankin leads would-be musicians in “Jubo: The New Easy Way to Play Music,” a program that

enables participants to quickly read, write, compose and perform using a four-hole flute. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

reducing energy costs through affordable efficiency improvements. Yestermorrow Design/ Build School, Waitsfield, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-5545.

OLD NORTH END NEIGHBORHOOD BAND TEEN MUSIC JAM: See WED.11.

talks

SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182.

outdoors

SUNFLOWER HOUSE: See WED.11.

seminars

SLASH YOUR ENERGY BILLS: Are you ready for winter? Dave Keefe of Efficiency Vermont leads an introductory workshop on

ALVIN ACERBO: The 25th annual Current Topics in Science Speaker Series continues with “Using a Synchrotron X-ray Microprobe for Imaging and Microspectroscopy Research in Biology and Geochemistry.” Room 207, Bentley Hall, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, les.kanat@northern vermont.edu. CAROLINE BEER: “What Can We Learn From Mexico About Gender Equality?: Comparative Politics and Global Gender Inequality” provokes thought. Memorial Lounge,

Have you seen or heard the ads asking ‘Can your pharmacy do ________?’

Waterman Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 656-1297. CURRENT EVENTS CONVERSATION: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal discussion. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918. STEPHANIE SEGUINO: The coauthor of the study “Driving While Black and Brown in Vermont,” which reports on the role of race in Vermont policing, reveals her methodologies, findings and ongoing investigations. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1408.

tech

complex exploration of traditional gender roles and the struggles within human relationships. Byrne Theater, Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7-8:30 p.m. $17.75-57.75. Info, 296-7000.

REPAIR CAFÉ: Folks join Flipped Vermont Technology Solutions’ lead technician for an evening of tinkering and talking about all things tech. Spark Co-Working Space, Greensboro, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 433-3547.

words

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.11. TECH TUTOR: Techies answer questions about computers and devices during one-on-one help sessions. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

theater

MARGARET ATWOOD: LIVE IN CINEMAS: See THU.12, Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 1 p.m. $10-17. Info, 760-4634. WE DO LANGUAGE SYMPOSIUM: See SUN.15. WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.11. m

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P R E S E N T S

EXHIBITORS (SO FAR)

1 DAY THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 9 A.M.-5 P.M. • FREE ONLY! CHAMPLAIN VALLEY EXPO, ESSEX JUNCTION

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classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

art ART & CLAY IN MIDDLEBURY: Adult: Clay Mon. & Thu. Wheel, Wed. series the Cup, Fruit Bowl, Putting it Together, Glaze. Mon. afternoon Hand Building, Oils, Pastels, Drawing, Watercolors With Ashley Wolff, Digital Photography. Kids: Create With Color, DIY Room Decor, Art of Nature, Holiday Gifts, Clay Wheel and Hand Building, Home School Clay and Art Classes. Location: Middlebury Studio School, 2377 Rte. 7, Middlebury. Info: Barbara Nelson, 247-3702, ewaldewald@aol.com, middleburystudioschool.org. HAITIAN PAINTING & CULTURE: Chill with Julio Desmont, the Clemmons Family Farm’s artistin-residence. Paint to your heart’s content, learn about Haitian culture, and pick up a few words of patois at his “Art That Binds” community-building painting classes. Learn more at bit.ly/CFFArtBinds. Sun., 3 p.m., multiple dates. Cost: $35/2 hours. Location: Clemmons Family Farm Authentica Art Gallery, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: Clemmons Family Farm, 765-560-5445, clemmons familyfarm@gmail.com, clemmonsfamilyfarm.org.

BCA Studios

Burlington City Arts Fall Class Registration is now open! Find these classes and many more at burlingtoncityarts.org. ACRYLIC PAINTING: This class introduces students to the tools and techniques artists use to create successful works of art in one of the most versatile mediums available: acrylic paint. Learn the basics of mixing colors, blending and a variety of acrylic painting techniques. No experience necessary. Price includes all basic materials, as well as open studio access during the weeks of your class. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts. org. Tue., Oct. 1-Nov. 5, 6-8:30 p.m. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@ burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. ARTIST BOOKS + ZINES: Ages 18 & up. Prerequisite: Basic digital editing skills. Have you wanted

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to make a book or zine but don’t know where to start? Bring your project ideas and create unique artist books and zines from start to finish in this eight-week hands-on class. Sequencing choices, layout in Adobe InDesign, digital printing and hand-binding techniques will be covered. Class price includes darkroom and digital lab access during open lab hours. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts. org. Thu., Oct. 17-Dec. 12, 6-8 p.m. (no class Nov. 28). Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. DARKROOM CRASH COURSE: Ages 18 & up. No experience necessary. Explore the traditional, analog, black-and-white darkroom! Learn how to properly expose black-and-white film, process film into negatives, and make silver gelatin prints. Students will leave with the skills and confidence to join the darkroom as a member. All 35mm film, paper and darkroom supplies included. Bring your manual 35mm or medium format film camera to the first class. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Mon., Nov. 18-Dec. 9, 6-9 p.m. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY: Learn the basics of making a great photograph from initial exposure to editing and printing in this comprehensive class. Organizing and editing files in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop will also be covered, and students will leave with a selection of high-quality prints made on our archival Epson printer. A DSLR or digital Mirrorless Rangefinder and a Mac-compatible portable hard drive or flash drive required. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Mon., Sep. 16-Oct. 28, 6-9-Cost: $240/ person; $216 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@ burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS: Ages 18 & up. Prerequisite: Basic proficiency with manual camera settings and Adobe Lightroom. Do you shoot digital images or scan color film and have a project idea to explore? This eight-week class will challenge you to edit and refine your photographs to create the

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

portfolio of work you envision. Organizing and editing techniques in Adobe Lightroom, printing on our Epson large format printers and more will be covered, tailored to individual student interests. Class price includes darkroom and digital lab access during open lab hours. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Mon., Nov. 4-Dec. 16, 6-9 p.m. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. FRIDAY ADULT WHEEL: Ages 18 & up. Curious about the pottery wheel? Spend a Friday night with our pottery instructors at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket includes a wheel-throwing demonstration at the beginning of class, access to a wheel, and time to try making a bowl or cup. There is a $5 additional fee per clay piece to be fired and glazed by the studio. Ticket purchases for this class are nonrefundable. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Fri., 7:30-9 p.m., starting Sep. 20. Cost: $10/ person; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@ burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. FRIDAY FAMILY CLAY: Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay, and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who would like to join the fun and either hand build or use a wheel of their own. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece. Finished pottery will be available for pickup three weeks after visit. Class ticket purchases are nonrefundable. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.

org. Fri., 5-7 p.m., starting Sep. 20. Cost: $10/person; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org.

Location: Petra Cliffs Climbing Center, 105 Briggs St., Burlington. Info: Andrea Charest, 657-3872, andrea@petracliffs.com, petracliffs.com.

JEWELRY: Ages 18 & up. Learn the basics of creating metal jewelry. Techniques covered will include sawing, piercing, filing, annealing, soldering, texturing, cold connections, basic hollow construction, ring sizing and more, so that students can create at least two completed pieces. The class includes copper and brass and use of all basic tools, as well as studio access during the weeks of your class. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts. org. Tue., Sep. 24-Oct. 29, 5:30-8 p.m. Cost: $255/person; $229.50 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. LIFE DRAWING: Ages 18 & Up. Spend the evening with other local artists drawing from one of our experienced models. Please bring your drawing materials and paper. Purchase a ticket to hold your spot; drop-ins are welcome if space is available. Ticket purchases for this class are nonrefundable. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts. org. Fri., 7:30-9 p.m., starting Sep. 20. Cost: $10/person; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. PRINTMAKING: Ages 18 & up. This class will show you a whole range of printing techniques that can be used on their own or in combination to create unique artwork. Through demonstrations and hands-on learning, you’ll be introduced to the studio’s equipment and materials. Students will also be encouraged to explore these techniques and have fun experimenting. Class price includes basic supplies and open studio access during the weeks of your class. No previous experience needed. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Tue., Sep. 24-Oct. 22, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cost: $212.50/nonmembers; $191.25 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org.

climbing ADULT CLIMBING CLINICS: In addition to being a full-body workout, climbing is a great way to meet new people. Our adult clinics offer a friendly environment to learn (or improve upon) skills while experiencing the growing Vermont climbing community. Our instructors are trained to focus on movement while also building proper technical skills. Weekly classes start Sep. 17. Cost: $105/3 2-hour sessions, incl. gear & 3 additional visits.

ornament! All ages welcome. Thu., Sep. 12, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $30/adult, $10 children. Location: Twiggs American Gastropub, 28 N Main St., St. Albans City. Info: Once Upon a Rock, Sarah, 343-6866, once uponarockvermont@gmail.com, onceuponarockvermont.com.

dance

craft ARTS & CRAFT WORKSHOPS: North Country Studio Workshops offers a five-day intensive workshop for advanced- to professional-level artisans January 29 to February 2, 2020. NCSW fosters an atmosphere of discovery, energy, collaboration and inspiration. Workshops include basketry, book arts, brushes, clay/hand-building, clay/wheel, encaustic/cold wax, fiber 2D and 3D, metal jewelry, painting/ drawing, photography, printmaking and sculpture. The campus of Bennington College provides workshop facilities, accommodations and an inspirational setting. Explore, expand and create in a community of fine craft and fine art professionals. Jan. 29-Feb. 2, 2020. Cost: $1,350/person for full resident schedule; $1,150 for commuter. Location: North Country Studio Workshops at Bennington College, 1 College Dr., Bennington. Info: Jeanne Haskell, 603-3804520, registrar@ncsw.org, ncsw. org/workshops. BIRDS ON A BRANCH PEBBLE ART WORKSHOP: Join Spanked Puppy and Once Upon A Rock for food and fun at our first-ever themed class: Birds on a Branch! Participants are provided with an abundance of pebbles, sea glass and driftwood to create birds on a branch or their own unique piece of art. All ages welcome. Tue., Sep. 17, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $30/adult; $10/child. Location: The Spanked Puppy, 116 Main St., Colchester. Info: Once Upon A Rock, Sarah, 343-6866, onceuponarock vermont@gmail.com, onceupon arockvermont.com. PEBBLE ART WORKSHOP: Join Twiggs and Once Upon A Rock for a night of food and fun! Participants are provided with an abundance of pebbles, sea glass and driftwood to create their own unique piece of art. The first 15 people to register online will receive a driftwood Christmas

ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES: Tango is playful, elegant and affectionate. Beginners: Step into the basics. Interm/advbeg: Polish your technique and learn something new. No partner required. LGBTQ+ friendly. Stay for the milonga (social tango dance) 7:45-10:30 p.m. Bring clean, smooth-soled shoes. Instructor Elizabeth Seyler PhD makes learning a breeze. Classes may continue into Nov. Sat., Sep. 7 & Oct. 5, and Fri., Sep. 20 & Oct. 18; interm/adv beg: 7-7:45 p.m.; beg: 7:45-8:30 p.m. Cost: $10/person, incl. free admission to milonga. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington. Info: Queen City Tango, Eloise Beil, 999-1798, qct@queencitytango.org, queencitytango.org. DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes: nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in anytime and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@salsalina.com.

drumming TAIKO AND DJEMBE CLASSES IN BURLINGTON!: Sessions begin monthly for adults, kids, parents! Parade and conga classes, too. Intermediate Taiko: Mon., 6-8:20 p.m. Taiko, adults: Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m., and Wed., 6:30-7:50 p.m. Djembe, adults: Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m. Taiko, kids and parents: Tue., 4:30-5:20 p.m. World Drumming, kids and parents: Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Drums provided. Schedule/ register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

fitness STAY ACTIVE AT THE YMCA: New session starts this week with youth swim, gymnastics and tween/teen fitness; adult TRX, small group Womens’ Weight Lifting, Stroller Bootcamp, Spanish and more! Join our fall hikes with Ryan, or spin, Zumba, yoga and more group exercise classes. Oh, and cardio and weights, two pools, and a welcoming community. Be a member! Location: Greater Burlington YMCA, 266 College St., Burlington. Info: 862-9622, gbymca.org.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

gardening ALL ABOUT HYDRANGEAS: This class will focus on the four species of hydrangeas, how and when to prune them, and proper fertilization for max blooms. Register at gardenerssupplystore. com. Sep. 14, 11-12:30 p.m. Cost: $15/person. Location: Gardener’s Supply-Williston, 472 Marshall Ave., Williston. Info: Meredith White, 658-2433, meredithw@ gardeners.com, gardenerssupply store.com. ART OF PLANT MOUNTING: In this class, students will learn about mounted plants, what plants are well-suited for mounting and how to take care of them. They will also create one to take home. Register at gardenerssupplystore.com. Sep. 21, 2:30-4 p.m. Cost: $50/. Location: Gardener’s SupplyWilliston, 472 Marshall Ave., Williston. Info: Meredith White, 658-2433, meredithw@gardeners. com, gardenerssupplystore.com. FERMENTATION FOR BEGINNERS: Learn the basics of lacto-fermentation, the science behind how it works, the health benefits and how you can do it yourself. Please bring a cutting board, sharp knife and expect to leave with a jar of ferment, class handouts and fermentation fervor! September 22, 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $28/register at: gardenerssupplystore.com. Location: Gardener’s Supply-Williston, 472 Marshall Ave, Williston. Info: Gardener’s Supply Company, Meredith White, 658-2433, meredithw@gardeners.com, gardenerssupplystore. com. LANDSCAPE DESIGN: Are you an avid gardener looking for new inspiration? Want a better understanding of selecting and placing plants? This four-part series by landscape designer Silvia Jope is the answer. Register at gardenerssupplystore.com. Wed., Sep. 25-Oct. 16, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $180/person. Location:

Gardener’s Supply-Burlington, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington. Info: Meredith White, 800-876-5520, meredithw@gardeners.com, gardenerssupplystore.com.

healing arts SOMATIC MOVEMENT WORKSHOP: Amber Arnold is a sound healer of a somatic movement practice that calms the nervous system and helps to release patterns of stress, stagnant energy and imbalance in the body. Participants finish with a vibrational sound bath to realign and bring vibrational balance back into the body. Sat., Sep. 28, 1-2:30-Cost: $25/person. Location: Clemmons Family Farm, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: Clemmons Family Farm, 765-560-5445, clemmons familyfarm@gmail.com, clemmonsfamilyfarm.org.

SOUND BATH & MEDICINE MAKING: Join sound healer Amber Arnold of Sacred Vibrations for an afternoon of herbal medicine making, somatic alignment and sound healing. Participants will journey into plant spirit medicine, engage in a nourishing somatic practice to release stagnant energy, make healing tinctures and elixirs, and end with a healing sound bath. Sun., Sep. 29, 1-4 p.m. Cost: $40/ person. Location: Clemmons Family Farm, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: Clemmons Family Farm, 765-560-5445, clemmonsfamilyfarm@gmail.com, clemmonsfamilyfarm.org.

herbs DIY ELDERBERRY SYRUP MAKING!: In the class we will learn all about the benefits of elderberry syrup, some great recipes and how to make your own batch of syrup. Everyone will go home with medicinal syrup to keep away seasonal colds and flus. Tue., Sep. 17, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $25/2-hour class. Location: Railyard Apothecary, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 540-0595, emma@railyardapothecary.com, railyardapothecary.com. HERBS FOR STUDENTS: In our modern world, challenges abound. Good news: Nature has solutions! In this class for anyone, learn about herbs that calm the nerves, reduce tension, uplift the mood and increase resilience to stress. Additionally, we’ll discuss herbs that increase mental clarity and focus. Mon., Sep. 16, 6:30-8 p.m. Cost: $16/1.5-hour class. Location: Railyard Apothecary, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 540-0595, emma@railyardapothecary.com, railyardapothecary.com. UNDERSTANDING & TREATING LYME: With Brendan Kelly, LAc. Using Chinese medicine disease progression theory, we’ll discuss how an initial tick bite can lead

SPANISH CLASSES STARTING SOON: Spanish classes start in September. Learn from a native speaker via small classes or personal instruction. You’ll always be participating and speaking. Lesson packages for travelers, lessons for young children; they love it! English as Second Language instruction online. Our 13th year. See our website or contact us for details. Start week of Sep. 16. Cost: $235/10 weekly classes, 90+ min. each. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 5851025, spanishparavos@gmail. com, spanishwaterburycenter. com.

to a wide range of symptoms, including pain, headaches, gastrointestinal issues, fatigue and late-stage neurological Lyme. Brendan will share his integrative approach to using western herbs, diet and lifestyle, informed by Chinese medical theory. Sat., Sep. 28, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost: $45/4-hour class. Location: Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, 252 Main St., Montpelier. Info: 2247100, vtherbcenter.org.

kids JAMAICAN MUSICAL STORYTELLING: Authentic Jamaican music, culture and storytelling with Vermont Artist Michael Dyke for children 6 to 9 years old. Your young citizens of the world will enjoy a musically immersive experience, mindfulness and fun connections with the artist and with others. Songs, demonstrating a variety of musical instruments, and learning rhythms are part of the class. Sat., 10-11:30 a.m, multiple dates. Cost: $10/90-minute class. Location: Clemmons Family Farm Authentica Art Gallery, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: Clemmons Family Farm, 765-5605445, clemmonsfamilyfarm@gmail. com, clemmonsfamilyfarm.org.

language ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE: FALL SESSION: Our fall session starts on September 16. Morning, afternoon and evening classes are available in Burlington, and there are evening classes in Colchester and Montpelier. We serve the entire range of students from the true beginners to those already comfortable conversing in French. Begins Sep. 16. Location: Alliance Française of the Lake Champlain Region, Burlington, Colchester and Montpelier. Info: Micheline Tremblay, 881-8826, education@ aflcr.org, aflcr.org.

martial arts

FRENCH AT WINGSPAN STUDIO: Adult, kid and pre-K classes. Get your brain whirring and you speaking French in no time! Eight-week sessions held in beautiful atelier, off of Shelburne Road, South End Arts & Industry District. Led by fluent speaker, longtime French teacher. Supportive, fun, structured. Allons-y! Adults: Tue., Sep. 24-Nov. 5; Beg 5:30-7 p.m.; Interm 7-8:30 p.m. Kids Afterschool FRArt: Tue., Sep. 24 p.m. Nov. 5, 3:45-5:15 p.m. Pre-K FRArt: Thu., Sep. 26-Nov. 7, 10-11 a.m. Cost: $240/person for adults & kids afterschool FRArt; $175/kid for pre-K FRArt. Location: Wingspan Studio, 4A Howard Street, Burlington. Info: Maggie Standley, 233-7676, maggiestandley@gmail.com, wingspanstudioeduc.com.

AIKIDO CLASSES: Discover the dynamic, flowing martial art of aikido. Learn how to relax under pressure and how aikido cultivates core power, fitness and flexibility. Aikido emphasizes throws and pinning techniques rather than strikes.The philosophy and movements cultivate the harmonious resolution of conflict. Classes for adults, families and youth. Visitors are always welcome! Free workshops Sat., Sep. 7: Youth (ages 7-12), 10 a.m.; Adult, 11 a.m. Adult classes begin Oct. 1, 6:15 p.m.; youth classes ongoing. Membership rates incl. unlimited classes. Contact us for info about membership rates for adults, youth & families. Location: Aikido of Champlain Valley, 257 PIne St., Burlington. Info: Benjamin Pincus, 951-8900, bpincus@burlington aikido.org, burlingtonaikido.org. VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, CLASSES

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Justice & Mentoring Programs

Become a Mentor. Support an incarcerated or criminal justice-involved woman in building a sustainable life in Northwestern Vermont.

Training runs Wednesdays October 2 - October 30 • 5:30-7:30pm For details and a complete schedule, visit mercyconnections.org and contact Joanne Nelson: (802) 846-7164 or jnelson@mercyconnections.org The Vermont Women’s Mentoring Program | A partnership with: Untitled-32 1

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classes CLASSES

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military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF and CBJJ certified black belt sixthdegree instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Taught by qualified meditation instructors at the Burlington Shambhala Meditation Center: Wed., 6-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-noon. Free and open to anyone. Free public meditation: weeknights, 6-7 p.m.; Tue. and Thu., noon-1 p.m.; Sun., 9

a.m.-noon. Classes and retreats also offered. See our website at burlington.shambhala.org. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795. LIVING WITH A TENDER HEART: Meditation Retreat with Chas DiCapua. Sponsored by Wellspring Insight Meditation Community. During this retreat, we deepen our understanding of how the practices of mindfulness and loving-kindness support one another. Information can be found on the meditation page of the Wellspring website. Oct. 25-27. Location: Rock Point (formerly Bishop Booth) Conference Center, 20 Rock Point Rd., Burlington. Info: Wellspring Insight Meditation Community, 472-6694, wellspringinsight@gmail.com, wellspringvt.org.

psychology PAST LIVES JOURNEY OF THE SOUL: This course examines topics including life after life, reincarnation, the Bardo, and karma in an experiential format. Learn several techniques for accessing your past lives in this workshop that provides hands-on ways of drawing on past-life memories. To register, call Sue 244-7909. Wed., Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23 & special workshop, Sat., Oct. 26; 7-9 p.m. Cost: $80. Location: The Jungian

Center For The Spiritual Sciences, 55 Clover Ln., Waterbury. Info: Sue Mehrtens, 244-7909, info@jungian center.org, jungiancenter.org.

tai chi SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 363-6890, snakestyle.com.

8-9, Mar. 7-8, Apr. 4-5, May 2-3, Jun. 6-7, Jul. 11-12, Aug. 15-16, Sep. 12-13, Oct. 17-18, Nov. 14-15. Cost: $2,795/person. Location: The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont, 34 Oak Hill Rd., Williston. Info: Allison Morse, 872-8898, ayurvedavt@ comcast.net.

yoga

well-being 200-HOUR AYURVEDA INTEGRATION PROGRAM: Join us in learning and immerse yourself in the oldest surviving preventative health care system. This program is ideal for yoga teachers, counselors, therapists, bodyworkers, nurses, doctors, wellness coaches, herbalists, etc. VSAC approved and payment plans available. Can transfer hours to Kripalu’s Ayurveda Health Counselor program. More information at ayurvedavermont. com/classes. 2020 schedule: Feb.

preserve. This small-group format is limited to 10 students, and no previous experience is necessary. Led by Ann Turkle, MFA, Ph.D. Registration required. Mon., Sep. 9, 16, 23, 30 & Oct. 7, 7-9 p.m. Cost: $75/person. Location: Jungian Center for the Spiritual Sciences, 55 Clover Ln., Waterbury. Info: Sue Mehrtens, 244-7909, info@jung iancenter.org, jungiancenter.org.

writing WRITING MEMOIR: Get support and encouragement in writing about your life in this class that can help you give some order and focus to memories you want to

EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. All are welcome. New this Fall: Heated Flow, Pilates Flow, Community Y12SR and more! Daily drop-in classes including $10 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Dive deeper into your practice or register for our Yoga Teacher Training for Healthcare Providers. $10-$15/class; $140/10-class card; $10/community class. New students $100/10-class card. New! Student Monthly Unlimited just $55/mo. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com.

high-quality classes, workshops and trainings taught by experienced teachers who honor the beauty and wisdom of the yogic tradition. Check our website to learn more about our life-changing 200-hour teacher training and upcoming We Rise training. All bodies and abilities are welcome. Daily classes, workshops, 200- and 300-hour yoga teacher training. Cost: $65/first month of unlimited classes; workshop & training prices vary. Location: Laughing River Yoga, Chace Mill, Suite 126, Burlington. Info: 3438119, laughingriveryoga.com. SANGHA STUDIO |: NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily classes. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. & 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, info@sanghastudio.org, sanghastudio.org.

LAUGHING RIVER YOGA: Located in a beautiful setting overlooking the Winooski River. We offer

Strong-willed. Loyal. Free spirit.

That’s how Angela Bowser-Camilletti’s mother described her after she passed away from opioid-use disorder.

Lost a loved one to this disease? Please consider submitting their story to All Our Hearts, Seven Days’ new online project memorializing those with opioid-use disorder who have died. Your remembrances can educate, change minds, awaken empathy — and inspire action.

SHARE A STORY AT:

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Sharing stories of love, grief and hope in the face of the opioid crisis

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L❤ ve food? L❤ ve farms! Eating with the seasons is eating with savings! Shop locally, buy what’s in season–for example squash & tomatoes are abundant now– and you’ll save when you buy directly from your farmer. Find farm stands, farmers markets, and CSAs at nofavt.org/buydirect.

Buy direct.

nofavt.org/buydirect | (802) 434-4122 SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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music+nightlife LUKE AWTRY

Henry Finch

Crowded House The commotion and community of Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble B Y J O RD A N AD A M S

W

hen watching Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble play for the first time, it’s not immediately evident which member is Henry Finch. It wouldn’t be outrageous to think that maybe there is no Henry Finch. Edward Sharpe, Hootie and Steely Dan aren’t real people, after all. Onstage, something in the ever-evolving cluster of Burlington-area players’ freewheeling energy belies the fact that Henry Finch is not only real but is reservedly masterminding the show. In concert, Finch, 35, sits unassumingly behind his piano, supporting his cohort. The bespectacled, curly-haired artist doesn’t sing solo, showboat on the keys or even act as MC. Instead, he lets the group simply be the monstrous, undulating mass of soulful rockness it needs to be. Catch Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble’s last show of 2019 on Friday, September 20,

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at Radio Bean in Burlington. (The band is named for that café’s low capacity, and how quickly a big group can help reach it.) “I’m not the core of the band,” Finch insists while drinking coffee on his Old North End porch. The statement is and isn’t true — really, it’s a matter of semantics. Finch is largely the group’s songwriter. But because of his loose leadership style and how the team functions, what audiences hear is a wholly communal effort. H E NRY “Henry writes the songs, and we cover them,” Capacity Ensemble member Adaline Herbert writes in an email. With elements of ’70s piano rock and gospel-inflected R&B, Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble fill a void in the Queen City’s music scene that most probably didn’t even know existed. Anywhere from

five to eight dedicated foreground vocalists sing in both unison and harmony over an assemblage of multiple instrumentalists, which can range from a standard rock setup to one with woodwinds and strings. The band has gigged relatively stripped down but also has substituted harpsichord for piano. Not many local groups operate in such a fluid and unpredictable way. Only a few recordings of the saucy posse are available for consumption. The F INC H meandering “Nearness,” a boozy anthem about the desperation of a life without intimacy, is one of the group’s flagship tunes. Seen and heard online only in a one-take YouTube video, the plodding, bluesy song features layered vocal harmonies that abruptly shift to a deathly shriek after the words “Everybody shout” are

I DON’T HAVE A DESIRE

TO PUT MYSELF ABOVE ANYONE.

sung. This kind of uninhibited, expressive risk taking is emblematic. “It’s almost the illusion of chaos, but it’s wound up tightly in these amazing songs,” says bandmate Ethan Tapper. Currently, Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble’s catalog of music is relatively slim, making them a largely experiential project. A lone studio recording, a silken R&B gem called “Without You,” is available on Bandcamp. Producer extraordinaire Urian Hackney (of Rough Francis fame) produced the track at his Burlington studio, the Box. Though Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble generally sing as a group, the song features scorching solo vocals from Hackney’s brother, Julian. Finch is a relative newcomer to Burlington’s music scene. The North Carolina native arrived in the Queen City in 2016 after spending years in Maine and the Boston area and a stint at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa. A poet as well as instrumentalist, Finch has been published nationally as well as locally in journals such as Green Mountains Review. Browsing the writer’s selected works highlighted on his website makes it clear that Finch is a Renaissance man. A deeply personal treatise on creativity, published in North American Review, is particularly noteworthy. Also worth reading: a facetious, epicurean journey through an entire box of frosted-confetti-cupcake-flavored Pop-Tarts written for McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. In his literary endeavors, Finch seamlessly switches from highbrow to lowbrow. With a few local contacts established before moving to Vermont, Finch started connecting with area musicians soon after landing. The band’s first outing was in December 2017. Over the next year, the band evolved into the furious powerhouse it is now. Henry Finch and the Capacity Ensemble have no set lineup. Honestly, who’s onstage at a given show is likely whoever was available. The group does, however, share a few key members with the similarly chaotic Burlington garage punks, the Bubs — Finch, Herbert, Tapper, Joe O’Brien and Ian Hartman among them. Both troupes evolved somewhat side by side with a similar “spirit of play,” says Finch. “[We’re] both experimenting with the magic that happens when you get all your friends together and make a band,” says Tapper, the Bubs’ bandleader. “It translates into this really sharable and special experience.” CROWDED HOUSE

» P.72


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News and views on the local music + nightlife scene JORDAN ADAMS

B Y J O R D A N A D A MS

242 Main original office door

Small Wonder

COURTESY OF MICHAEL SCHMELLING

Have you all ever noticed that sometimes I start this column with a friendly greeting and other times I just jump right into whatever’s going on? That’s because I can never make up my mind if I want a friendly greeting to be a permanent fixture of this column. Just about every week, as I sit down to write it, I debate which way to go. I suppose I’m bucking tradition this week by being meta about it all. Let’s try a friendly greeting for today’s installment. Howdy, folks! I hope you’re all recovering nicely from this past weekend. Whether you hopped ’til you dropped at the South End Art Hop, shined this little light of yours at various Vermont Pride events or got down like nobody’s business at the Otis Mountain Get Down, I’m sure you’re all looking

forward to a few days of peace and quiet. (Warning: Terrible segue alert.) You know what’s always a nice place to be peaceful and quiet? A museum. And speaking of museums (I warned you), Vermont nonprofit music archive, radio station and general hub of musicminded happenings Big Heavy World just unveiled its new permanent tiny museum at its new-ish Howard Street location. Temporarily housed at the Vermont History Museum in Montpelier, the modest collection showcases a number of artifacts from the 802 music scene, such as the actual main interior office door from fabled Queen City rock club 242 Main. Plastered in stickers, the piece rests right next to an engaging interactive exhibit also related to the bygone venue. Utilizing a touch screen, users can watch brief interview clips from local

filmmaker BILL SIMMON’s forthcoming documentary No Stage Diving: The Story of 242 Main. The former punk club was a vital force and creative incubator in Burlington’s music scene. It closed in 2016 when all tenants from the building, Memorial Auditorium, were ordered to vacate because of its structural issues. In the clips, people from all over Burlington’s creative scene reminisce about 242, discussing what made it special and how it affected them. No release date has been set for the film. Other interesting attractions at the pocket exhibition include a metal filing cabinet that was bashed to smithereens during a circa 2000 CHAINSAWS.AND. CHILDREN show at Club Metronome, a virtual reality drop-in on a broadcast of BHW’s weekly live music radio program “Rocket Shop Live,” as well as another interactive setup featuring selected photos from MATTHEW THORSEN, Seven Days’ beloved staff photographer who died on New Year’s Day 2019. The museum isn’t going anywhere, so you have plenty of time to check it out.

2020 Vision

Sound the alarm: The first huge concert of 2020 has been announced! The stateliest band Columbia University ever graduated, VAMPIRE WEEKEND, are set to perform on Thursday, May 28, at the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex Junction. To the best of my knowledge — as well as that of Higher Ground Presents’ ALEX CROTHERS — this is the first time the indie-rock group has performed in the state. Tickets go on sale this Friday, September 13. The band released its long-awaited fourth studio album, Father of the Bride, earlier this year … and I still haven’t listened to it! I wouldn’t call myself a Vampire Weekend super fan or anything, but I’ve done my fair share of listening and was quite taken by their first three records. I worried a little bit when original member ROSTAM BATMANGLIJ left the band in 2016, since he was the group’s main producer. Maybe that’s why I’ve put off listening to the new one. I hope this show sells well, because it would be great to be able to snag more artists of this vein and caliber. Vermonters often miss out on tours

Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig SOUNDBITES

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MON 9.16 104.7 The Point welcomes

Illiterate Light Father Figuer THU 9.12

Parallels & Nina

FRI 9.13

104.7 The Point welcomes

SAT 9.14

A Tribe Called Red

TUE 9.17

99.9 The Buzz welcomes

WED 9.18 THU 9.19

Night Protocol

Enter The Haggis, Adam Ezra Group

Kali Stoddard-Imari

The Struts Des Rocs

Quinn Sullivan

104.7 The Point welcomes

Nahko & Medicine for the People

THU 9.19

East Forest

FRI 9.20

STRFKR

FRI 9.20

104.7 The Point welcomes

SAT 9.21

Com Truise

Josiah Johnson

Photay, Beshken

11.3 Mister Chris & Friends 11.22 Guster 12.27. + 12.28 moe. 12.31 New Queers Eve 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

4V-HG091119.indd 1

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music+nightlife WED.11

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

outside vermont

burlington

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

THU.12

FOAM BREWERS: Familiar Faces (jam, eclectic), 6:30 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Bella and the Notables (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Giovanina Bucci (singersongwriter), 9 p.m., free.

free. Lush Honey (funk, jazz), 10 p.m., $5.

THU.12 // PARALLELS & NINA [ELECTRO-POP]

RED SQUARE: Dave Mitchell’s Blues Revue (open jam), 3 p.m., free. L&M Rhythm Kings (roots, R&B), 7 p.m., $5. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 11 p.m., $5. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Two Rivers (open format), 10 p.m., free.

burlington

DELI 126: Vinyl Me, Please presents the Spins (vinyl listening party), second Thursday of every month, 6 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): The Larkspurs (roots), 7:30 p.m., free.

DRINK: Downstairs Comedy Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

SWITCHBACK BREWING CO.: Mitch & Devon (rock), 6 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9:30 p.m., free.

FINNIGAN’S PUB: DJ Disco Phantom (open format), 10 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Chloé Hilliard (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20/27.

NECTAR’S: Knights of the Brown Table (Ween tribute), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

FLYNN MAINSTAGE: Paula Poundstone (standup), 8 p.m., $25-52.

chittenden county

RADIO BEAN: John Kitonis (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Mosaic featuring members of Kat Wright and the Welterweights (jam), 10 p.m., $5.

FOAM BREWERS: Seba Molnar (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Robin Gottfried Band (rock), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: RambleTree with Special Guests (Irish, folk), 7-10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Godfather Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Indie Rumble (improv), 7 p.m., $5. Open Mic, 8:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Michael Hahn and Sid Gulick (singer-songwriter), 6:30 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Granger Smith featuring Earl Dibbles Jr., Joseph Gallant (country), 8 p.m., $25/28. MONKEY HOUSE: Grivo, Father Figuer, Community Garden, ouzkxqlzn (indie), 8 p.m., $7/10. THE OLD POST: Karaoke with D Jay Baron, 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free. Jim Charanko (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Wednesday Night Dead with Nugent, Privett & Marc (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke with DJ Amanda Rock, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/ northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Blues Jam, 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

68

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Enter the Haggis, Adam Ezra Group (Celtic, rock), 8 p.m., $15/17.

HALF LOUNGE: DJ SVPPLY & Bankz (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 7 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: George Petit Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

MAGIC HAT ARTIFACTORY: Sputoola (jazz, funk), 7 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $5. Light Club Jazz Sessions and Showcase, 10:30 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Shane’s Apothecary (folk-rock), 5 p.m., free. The Hitmen (rock), 9 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Pilaf (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Mania, 7 p.m., free. ORLANDO’S BAR & LOUNGE: Leather Neck (jam), 8 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: The Flycatchers (altcountry), 7 p.m., free. DUEFUNK (funk-rock), 10 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: The Rough Suspects (rock), 6 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (open format), 10 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Chloé Hilliard (standup), 7 p.m., $15. The Mainstage Show (improv), 9 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

Where Two or More

and, frequently, crystalline female vocalists, the subgenre is known for its dramatic tone and cult-like following. and London, respectively, team up to create a neon-streaked

SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., free. Vincent Flats Blues Band, 9 p.m., free.

night in heaven. Picture disco-ball sparkles, purple gel

WHAMMY BAR: Annie’s Dance Party, 7 p.m., free.

filters and lots of fog. Catch Parallels and Nina on Thursday,

stowe/smuggs

PARALLELS

and NINA, two likeminded projects from Toronto

SWEET MELISSA’S: David Karl Roberts (singer-songwriter), 8 p.m., free.

South Burlington. Locals NIGHT PROTOCOL add support.

middlebury area

CLUB METRONOME: Dirtwire (electro-country, world), 9 p.m., $18/20.

MOOGS PLACE: Blackwolf (Americana), 9 p.m., free.

middlebury area

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Lowell Thompson, 8:30 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Bounce (hits), 9:30 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

HIGHLAND LODGE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Twiin Speak (folk, soul), 7:30 p.m., free. Humbird (indie folk), 9 p.m., $5. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

champlain islands/ northwest

stowe/smuggs

outside vermont

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Disco Phantom (open format), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. Brothers & Sister: A Vermont Tribute to the Allman Brothers Band featuring the Tenderbellies wtih Ryan Clausen, Mike Fried and Lara Cwass, Red Hot Juba, 9 p.m., $5.

THE DEN AT HARRY’S HARDWARE: Kyra Gordon (jazz, blues), 7 p.m., free.

EDSON HILL DINING ROOM & TAVERN: Blackwolf (blues, roots), 6:30 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: No Left Turn (rock), 7 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic Night, 8:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

TAP 25: Cooie Sings (Americana, jazz), 7 p.m., free.

FRI.13

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

EL TORO: Stefani Capizzi (folk), 7 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Mike Brinkman’s Open Mic, 8:30 p.m., free.

THE OLD POST: Salsa Night with DJ JP, 7 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): D. Davis and Django Soulo (folk-rock), 7 p.m., free.

GUSTO’S: Elizabeth Renaud (singer-songwriter), 5 p.m., free. Shot of Poison (Poison tribute), 9 p.m., $5.

hitting beats and bass, swaths of metallic synthesizers

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Granger Smith featuring Earl Dibbles Jr., Joseph Gallant (sold out) (country), 8 p.m., $25/28.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Old Time Music Session, 6 p.m., free.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Ian Steinberg (singersongwriter), 6 p.m., free.

inspired by the music of the 1980s. Decked out with hard-

September 12, at the Higher Ground Showcase Lounge in

MONKEY HOUSE: Bear’s Tapestry, Two Stroke Motors (folk-rock), 8:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

barre/montpelier

Synthwave music is a danceable brand of electro-pop

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 6:30 p.m., free. Jam Nation (open jam), 7:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Parallels, Nina, Night Protocol (electro-pop), 8:30 p.m., $10/12.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Christine Malcolm Band (folk), 8 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free. ZENBARN: Jon Stickley Trio (rock), 9 p.m., $8/10.

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Sean Rowe, A Box of Stars (folk), 8:30 p.m., $15. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Chris Peterman (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. BURLINGTON ST. JOHN’S CLUB: Karaoke, 8:30 p.m., free.

ORLANDO’S BAR & LOUNGE: Fossa, Waved Image (funk-rock), 9:30 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Andrew Neil (folk), 7 p.m.,

14TH STAR BREWING CO.: Ryan Sweezey (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: Buck Hollers (country), 5:30 p.m., free. THE OLD FOUNDRY AT ONE FEDERAL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE: Tim Brick (country), 7 p.m., free. TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Chris and Erica (rock, pop), 7 p.m., free.

FRI.13

» P.70


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obsessed?

COURTESY OF PETECIA LE FAWNHAWK

Find, fix and feather with Nest Notes — an e-newsletter filled with home design, Vermont real estate tips and DIY decorating inspirations. Sign up today at sevendaysvt.com/enews. Lucius

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11/18/15 12:07 PM

THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT

Max Hatt/Edda Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/27 The Jeremiahs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/5

because we don’t have a dedicated concert venue that can accommodate shows of this magnitude. Maybe if this one does well, other bands will follow suit.

The End

Speaking of Higher Ground Presents, the promoter teams up with GRACE POTTER this weekend for the Grand Point North music festival, aka the final word on summer. Say goodbye to the season as you watch the sun dip into the Adirondacks at Burlington’s Waterfront Park on Saturday and Sunday, September 14 and 15. This year’s lineup is pretty fantastic. Potter, of course, headlines both nights of the festival. Of particular note on 2019’s bill: guitar hero LUCY DACUS, soulinfused alternative rockers RAINBOW KITTEN SURPRISE, and chameleonic group LUCIUS, who completely reinvented themselves between 2016, when I saw them, and 2018. The 2016 show jived with the punchy pop-Americana heard on their sophomore record Good Grief. But two years later, they’d stripped everything down to a warm, ’70s soft-rock/country sound — like the material on their 2018 album, Nudes. This time around, the band continues the sound of its Nudes tour, with a string trio in tow. One thing Grand Point North does oh-so-right is bringing in the local scene. This year’s lineup of Vermontbased openers includes R&B producer/ singer-songwriter PRINCESS NOSTALGIA, West African fusion ensemble SABOUYOUMA, bummer rockers J BENGOY, trash kittens the BUBS, pop-rock supergroup MATTHEW MERCURY, soulful

singer-songwriter FRANCESCA BLANCHARD, and country artist BEN FULLER. (Fuller won his slot on the stage through Seven Days’ Grand Point North Band Contest.) You can find past coverage on all these fine folks at sevendaysvt.com. I have pretty much only one complaint about Grand Point North. I’m sure this was an unfortunate oversight, but, last year, I could not find a single cup of coffee within the festival’s extensive selection of food and beverage vendors. Indeed, I was hoping for iced coffee, but I would’ve settled for hot. I think I asked just about every vendor if they had any and found zilch. For those of us who don’t really do the alcohol thing, we’d love some rocket fuel this time around. 

Matt Haimovitz, cello & Simone Dinnerstein, piano . . . . . . . . .10/11 Dom La Nena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10/18 Alon Goldstein, piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10/25 Sam Reider and The Human Hands . . . . . . 11/1

2019–2020 Perfor mance Seaso n

Modigliani String Quartet . . . . . . . . . . . . .11/15 Kinan Azmeh CityBand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11/16 Dar Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11/22 A Medieval Christmas Concert with The Boston Camerata: Puer Natus Est, with special guests The UVM Catamount Singers, David Neiweem, Director . . . . . . . . . . 12/6

10.5

Lucas & Arthur Jussen, duo piano . . . . . . . 1/31

THE JEREMIAHS

Skride Piano Quartet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/6 Meow Mix: A Collegiate A Cappella Festival . 2/8 Alicia Olatuja

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/14

Actors from the London Stage: . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/20–2/22 The Tempest Dervish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/29

10.18

Gryphon Trio with Patricia O’Callaghan, soprano . . . . . . . . . 3/6

DOM LA NENA

David Kaplan, piano; Tessa Lark, violin; Colin Carr, cello: My Favorite Beethoven . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/20

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. GRIMES & I_O, “Violence” THE KINKS, “Lola” VAMPIRE WEEKEND, “Diane Young” LUCIUS, “Almost Makes Me Wish For Rain” FROM ANNA AND THE APOCALYPSE,

“Turning My Life Around”

Okaidja Afroso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/27 Mipso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4/17 Jeremy Denk, piano: The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1 . . 4/24

4.24

A Lane Series/Flynn Center co-presentation Below: Okaidja Afroso, 3/27

JEREMY DENK

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music+nightlife FRI.13

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northeast kingdom

KINGDOM TAPROOM & TABLE: VSO Jukebox (classical), 7:30 p.m., $7-20.

outside vermont

LEBANON OPERA HOUSE: Mike McDonald’s Boston vs. New York Comedypalooza Rumble, 7:30 p.m., $32-38. MONOPOLE: The Blind Spots (rock), 10 p.m., free. MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Oxford and Clark (Americana), 7:30 p.m., free.

SAT.14

burlington

ARTSRIOT: VSO Jukebox (chamber music), 6:30 p.m., $10-100. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Jeff Wheel (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Kitchen Dwellers, Strange Purple Jelly (bluegrass, jam), 9 p.m., $15. FLYNNSPACE: Tracie Spencer: 60 First Dates (standup), 7 p.m., $18. FOAM BREWERS: The Wormdogs (bluegrass, rock), 9 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Julian Loida (alt-pop), 7:30 p.m., free. Alpacka, Couchsleepers (indie), 9 p.m., $5. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5. NECTAR’S: The Lemon Flyers (rock), 7 p.m., free. Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson featuring Yaadcore and Satta Sound, 9 p.m., $5. ORLANDO’S BAR & LOUNGE: The Hot Chocheys, Sam Luke (jam), 9 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Plastic Angels (indie), 7 p.m., free. Stillhouse Junkies (roots, bluegrass), 8:30 p.m., free. Jeff Beam (rock), 10 p.m., $5. Greg Mastes Group (rock), 11:30 p.m., $5.

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

RED SQUARE: Left Eye Jump (blues), 3 p.m., free. DJ A-RA$ (open format), 11 p.m., $5.

THE DEN AT HARRY’S HARDWARE: Spencer Lewis & the Old Vermonters (folk), 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (Latin), 6 p.m., free. DJ ATAK (house), 11 p.m., $5.

WHAMMY BAR: Christine Malcolm (folk), 7 p.m., free.

REVELRY THEATER: Revelry’s First Birthday (variety), 9 p.m., $7. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Dakota (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Troy Millette & the Fire Below (folk-rock), 1 p.m., free. Nico Suave (rock), 10 p.m., free. SMITTY’S PUB: Pam McCoy (singer-songwriter), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Chloé Hilliard (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20/27.

chittenden county

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Joshua Glass (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: A Tribe Called Red, Kali Stoddard-Imari (electronic), 8:30 p.m., $20/23. MONKEY HOUSE: Ghastly Sound (album release), Barishi, Caustic Casanova (hardcore), 8 p.m., $3/8. 18+. THE OLD POST: Saturday Night Mega Mix featuring DJ Colby Stiltz (open format), 9 p.m., free. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: S. A. S (rock), 5 p.m., free. Phantom Airwave (rock), 9 p.m., free. PARK PLACE TAVERN: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: The Owl Stars (folk), 8 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: DJ Stevie Beats (open format), 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation. Barry Bender (singersongwriter), 6 p.m., free. ESPRESSO BUENO: Jazzyaoke (live jazz band karaoke), 7:30 p.m., $5. GUSTO’S: DJ Kaos (hits), 9:30 p.m., $3.

Cheers!

Pop open a cold one with your friends at Seven Days. 70

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

4h-7dstore0816.indd 1

stowe/smuggs

EL TORO: John Howell (rock), 7 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Rocky Ridge String Band (Americana), 9 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Earl (hits), 9 p.m., free.

rutland/killington THE HOWLIN’ MOUSE RECORD STORE: Animal, Adhara, Shun, Blind Threat, No Soul (rock), 7 p.m., $5.

champlain islands/ northwest 14TH STAR BREWING CO.: Shake (rock), 6 p.m., free. THE OLD FOUNDRY AT ONE FEDERAL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE: Blue Rock Boys (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free. TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: O’hAnleigh (Celtic, bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Lush Honey (funk, jazz), 10 p.m., free.

SUN.15

burlington

THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL: The Lemon Flyers (rock), 6 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Open Decks, 10 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Pete Sutherland and Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session, 1 p.m., free. Kyra Gordon (jazz, vocalist), 7 p.m., free. Tony & the Velvetones (blues, soul), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Matt Francis and Dave Titus (bluegrass), 4 p.m., free. Barbacoa (surf), 7 p.m., free. RUBEN JAMES: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

SAT.14 // MI YARD REGGAE NIGHT FEATURING YAADCORE [REGGAE]

Dancehall Days Every week, Burlington DJs

JAHSON

and BIG DOG throw

Vermont’s biggest reggae party, Mi Yard. For its next installment, the pair invites special guest YAADCORE, a Jamaican DJ known for popularizing some of the biggest contemporary

reggae artists on his home country’s airwaves. In 2018, the selector made the jump from spinning tunes to recording them. His first singles, “No Fenke Fenke (featuring Shanique Marie & Kabaka Pyramid)” and “Ready Now” are a pair of bouncy, rootsy bangers. Check out Mi Yard Reggae Night featuring Yaadcore on Saturday, September 14, at Nectar’s in Burlington. Locals SATTA SOUND add support. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Teacher’s Lounge (improv, standup), 7 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Ukulele Shenanigan with Ukulele Clare (ukulele jam), 4 p.m., $5. MISERY LOVES CO.: Disco Brunch with DJ Craig Mitchell, 11 a.m., free.

MON.16 burlington

THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL: Cooper-Childs Duo (jazz), 6 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Jack Bandit and Friends (EDM), 10 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone, 7 p.m.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

RED SQUARE: Four-D (hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. DJ KermiTT (open format), 10 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Beg, Steal or Borrow (bluegrass), 5 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Illiterate Light (indie), 8:30 p.m., $12/14. MONKEY HOUSE: Erin CasselsBrown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Art Herttua and Ray Caroll (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. Dirty Mae (indie folk), 8:30 p.m., free. Duke Aeroplane & the Ampersand Band (blues, rock), 10 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

chittenden county

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 7 p.m., free. Quasar Valley Band (country), 9:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Eric Friedman (folk), 11 a.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

mad river valley/ waterbury

LAWSON’S FINEST LIQUIDS: The Brevity Thing (folk-rock), 5 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free.

TUE.17

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Designed by local artist Steve Hadeka, this hand-cut, lacquered and wall-mounted bottle opener features a laser-etched design and hidden magnets to catch the falling caps. Size: 4”x7”x1”, includes mounting hardware. $25.

buy it now: sevendaysvt.com/store 8/30/16 5:23 PM


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

5 NIGHTS

REVIEW this Greaseface, You Fucked Up My Car (SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL)

Greaseface have a reputation. Most folks familiar with the Burlington punk rockers will expound some variation of “Dude, they’re sick”; or “They rock”; or “They’re fucking crazy, man.” And it’s true. The college-age crew of Champlain Valley Union High School grads — guitarist Liam Thomas, bassist/vocalist Jackson Glover and drummer Brenden Provost — put on a fierce show. But the nuance of the trio’s songwriting can sometimes get lost in the fury of its live performance. Greaseface’s third album, You Fucked Up My Car, captures their onstage passion without obfuscating the fine details that make their work so interesting. From their desperately barked lyrics to the ways they fill space with both noise and silence, the

Fossa, Bones (SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL)

Some people put a lot of faith in astrology. I’m not knocking it, just observing that it isn’t uncommon for people to tell me about Mercury in retrograde or make a remark such as “You’re such a Gemini” after I order a beer I forgot that I hated. My understanding of astrology is (clearly) limited. But I remember an old guy with a huge, white beard once telling me that to be a Gemini is to not know who or what you really want to be, ever. He was a transpersonal psychology professor, but he doubled as a traveling magician, so of course I fucking listened. Fossa are musical Gemini in all the ways that might apply under my wizard friend’s definition: They have no idea what they want to be. After a few listens through the Burlington band’s debut EP Bones, well, I had some questions. Not in relation to the quality of the band — Fossa

COMEDY

A WEEK THIS WEEKEND! band’s members show that they are crafty operators with plenty of bite. Onomatopoeic opener “Clack!” brings roiling surges of bass under a clicketyclack percussive gallop. Glover’s short lyrical bursts switch to drawn-out wailing as a flood of power chords annihilates the spacious opening section. A 46-second distorted dirge (“Pony”) introduces “Car,” a sullen yet forceful elegy for a fallen ride. “You fucked up my car / Aw my baby’s been made / She’s rusting at the seams / There’s nothing left to save,” Glover squeezes out. Subsequent lyrics (“These damn things / Will eat you / One bite at a time”) suggest the underlying, almost dystopian reality of the auto industry’s stranglehold on America. Taking stock of the targets of the #MeToo movement, “Dads” is a slackerrock quagmire of revolving riffs and twitching cymbals. The group holds no quarter for the accused, though they also see no end in sight: “One by one they all

go down / The ones who don’t are worse somehow.” With tunes that mostly come in under the three-minute marker, the majority of the record zips by. Tracks such as “Whole Lotta,” which dabbles in surf language, and “With You,” an effusive jangle-rock exploit, are fleeting. The final three cuts are much more measured. “Newie” drags a bit, but the album’s energy recalibrates on the slaphappy rocker “Pocket.” A sudden burst of piano at the song’s conclusion is a welcome addition. Closer “Pistachios” is a visceral, almost perverse slow jam. Sour chords envelop Glover’s final, sensual offer: “Pistachios / On a summer night … You lick the salt / Off your lips / You miss some / I’ll get the rest.” A percussive battle of kick drum and toms descends into a false fadeout, only to blast off into a world-ending patchwork of distortion. Greaseface harness elemental forces on You Fucked Up My Car, their strongest effort to date. But behind the madness, they have their wits about them. You Fucked Up My Car is available on Spotify.

are a dynamic, chameleon-like trio with chops for days. I just couldn’t get a handle on what Fossa is. Throughout the EP, the band bobs and weaves stylistically. The title track is split into two parts, the record’s prologue and epilogue. “Bones I” comes in with a folk intro, as guitarist Tommy Ott’s acoustic work underscores vocalist and drummer Alex Wuestneck’s yearning melody. Within a few minutes bassist Matthew Bradshaw and the drums come in for a full-on blues-rock jam. “Heart Gone Black” is one of the few tracks that retain traces of the trio’s more jam-band-centric live nature. Ott takes the lead vocal and rips some hot-fire solos as the band moves through a Nectar’sfriendly sort of groove. I’ve never warmed to Burlington’s jam scene, but if it’s going to produce bands like Fossa, I may have to rethink my stance. That being said, Fossa seem to wear genres as costumes. Like a cat letting you pet it one moment before it sinks its claws

into you, the band will come out of a hazy jam into stomping garage rock, embracing the raw side of being a trio. “Sweet” moves into a ’90s stoner alternative rock, somewhere between Pavement and King Missile. On first listen, I was shook by how out of place the song seemed on the EP, then started wishing all the tracks were in the same vein. But I was missing the point of the record. The cross-genre thing isn’t just in my head. In the YouTube description for one of their videos, Fossa are described as an “emo folk funk rock power trio,” for fuck’s sake. Ordinarily I would absolutely rip a band apart for a description like that. It’d literally be my first shot. But by the end of Bones, I had to admit that the characterization fits. Fossa are all over the place. Yet, rather than scattershot, the approach feels weirdly appropriate, a canny beast that won’t be cornered. Maybe they don’t know who they want to be, but maybe that doesn’t matter. Download Bones at fossaband. bandcamp.com. Fossa celebrate the album’s release on Friday, September 13, at Orlando’s Bar and Lounge in Burlington.

GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED:

THU 12 | FRI 13 | SAT 14

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HILLIARD NEXT WEEKEND! THU 19 | FRI 20 | SAT 21

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ST. GERMAIN STUDENTS GET IN FOR FREE!* WEDNESDAYS (ALL SHOWS) THURSDAYS (9PM ONLY) SUNDAYS (ALL SHOWS) * some restrictions apply

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THURSDAYS AT 9PM

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ARE YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

101 main street, BurlingtoN SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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WINTER BLUES STUDY In winter, do you wish you were here? DO YOU: Want to hibernate? Feel fatigued and down? Change your sleeping and eating habits? You may be eligible to participate in a research study on seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Diagnostic assessment and treatment consisting of a light therapy box or cognitive-behavioral “talk” therapy will be offered at no charge. Eligible participants will be compensated up to $530 for completing study-related questionnaires and interviews. Volunteers, 18 or over, please call 802-656-9890 or visit our website at uvm.edu/~sadstudy

music+nightlife MON.16

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TUE.17

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Guerilla Toss, Jaw Gems (post-punk), 8:30 p.m., $12. DELI 126: VSO Taste Test (classical), 6:30 p.m., $15. THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL: Cowboys and Angels (country), 5:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Dayve Huckett (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

Highway Hypnosis In his project the

DEAD TONGUES,

and a darkened temperament, the Durham, N.C., artist creates moody, progressive bluegrass tunes that inspire images of a blurred, passing roadside through a car window. Given that he hails from the heart of Appalachia, Gustafson shapes his

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Grup Anwar (classical Arabic), 7:30 p.m., free.

music with the mountainous region’s traditional

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Wonderkid (singer-songwriter), 9:30 p.m., free.

sounds. But he also instills whispers of panglobal elements into his largely Americana

NECTAR’S: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., $5/8. 18+.

tunes. The Dead Tongues open for the RIVER

RADIO BEAN: Alex Smith (folk), 7 p.m., free. Shawn Butzin (folk), 8:30 p.m., free. Honky-Tonk Tuesdays with Pony Hustle, 10 p.m., $5.

WHYLESS

RED SQUARE: CRWD CTRL (house, techno), 7 p.m., free. DJ A-RA$ (open format), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Ukulele Kids with Joe Beaird, 9:30 a.m., free.

chittenden county

ArtsRiot in Burlington.

WED.18 burlington

ARTSRIOT: River Whyless, the Dead Tongues (folk), 8:30 p.m., $15. CLUB METRONOME: Dude York, the Onlys, Trackstar (indie), 8 p.m., $1.

MONKEY HOUSE: Vinyl Night with Sean Martin, Bryan Parmelee and DJ Disco Phantom, 7:30 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Giovanina Bucci (singer-songwriter), 9 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Molotov, 9:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (Americana), 7:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Alex Stewart Quartet (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Andy Frasco & the U.N., LITZ (rock, funk), 8 p.m., $10.

9/6/19 1:04 PM

barre/montpelier

p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: John Lackard Blues Jam, 7:30 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: RambleTree with Special Guests (Irish, folk), 7-10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Godfather Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Indie Rumble (improv), 7 p.m., $5. Open Mic, 8:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Tim Berry and Ian Steinberg (singer-songwriter), 6:30 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Quinn Sullivan (rock), 7:30 p.m., $15/20. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: The Wrecks (rock), 7

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Trivia Night, 8 p.m., free.

Friendship and hanging out are the group’s core values, as is freedom of expression. “I want it to be a permissive space where people can be themselves — the most themselves they can,” Finch says. “That means being permissive to not everyone playing the same part, [or] not having the same level of musicianship or musical ability.” “I get the feeling he would be thrilled if I burst into a spontaneous water-gargling solo,” Herbert writes of Finch. Despite his obvious and diverse talent, Finch insists on keeping his ego in check. Untitled-31 1

WED.18 // THE DEAD TONGUES [AMERICANA]

RADIO BEAN: Fendrick & Peck (Americana), 7 p.m., free. Mosaic featuring members of Kat Wright and the Welterweights (jam), 10 p.m., $5.

Crowded House « P.66

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

on Wednesday, September 18, at

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: The Struts, Des Rocs (rock), 8 p.m., $27.50.

barre/montpelier

72

singer-songwriter Ryan Gustafson

makes music for wanderers. Armed with a banjo

THE OLD POST: Karaoke with D Jay Baron, 8 p.m., free.

“I don’t have a desire to put myself above anyone in the community,” he says. The truth of that statement is evident in his lack of desire for the spotlight. Given that Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble and the Bubs are structured similarly — wild party vibes, a mass of bodies onstage — it’s understandable if things get tricky for the shared members as they bounce back and forth between projects. But Finch and Tapper (who, coincidentally, are next-door neighbors) have their own leadership styles and have found ways to navigate the power dynamics at play as they cede control to one another. “We’ve formed a cool partnership,” says Tapper.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free. Jim Charanko (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke with DJ Amanda Rock, 9 p.m., free. HATCH 31: Tom Caswell Blues Jam, third Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): String Band Karaoke, 6 p.m., free. m

Tapper thinks he leads with a fairly loose attitude, but compared to Finch, he “looks rigid.” That’s not to say Finch’s seemingly blasé approach indicates a lack of concern. Rather, he seems to have some kind of unspoken pact with the universe that things will just work out. He even has a motto for it. “If someone takes a risk, and it doesn’t come out in a way that they hoped for, it’s another night on Earth,” he says. m Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Henry Finch & the Capacity Ensemble perform on Friday, September 20, 11:30 p.m., at Radio Bean in Burlington. 18+. $5. radiobean.com


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73

9/6/19 1:08 PM 9/6/19 10:46 AM


art REVIEW

Clay Play

“East to West: A Ceramic Dialogue with Liz Quackenbush, Mark Pharis & Cappy Thompson,” BigTown Gallery B Y AMY LI LLY

I

n an article called “Art Escapes: Four functional: teapots and cups, plates, Galleries Worth the Trip,” Art New butter dishes, vases, candle and tea-light England recently named BigTown holders. In addition to being useful, Gallery in Rochester the must-see though, they are beautiful art objects. Or gallery in Vermont. as Mackay puts it, “ceramics of a certain The decidedly small-town gallery, caliber I don’t think of as craft, even bordering the edge of the Green Moun- though I know it is.” tain National Forest along Vermont Route 100, is indeed a trip from local population centers: an hour from Dartmouth College, an hour and 10 minutes from Stowe, an hour and a half from Burlington. But the Vase by Mark Pharis latest offering from owner and director Anni Mackay is, as usual, a show of compelling artists that Vermonters are not likely to see elsewhere. It’s a ceramics show featuring three artists with very different practices, of whom only one has a tie to Vermont. Pharis’ geometrically oriented pieces “East to West: A Ceramic Dialogue with Liz Quackenbush, Mark Pharis & are almost sculptural in their presence. Cappy Thompson” moves geographi- One very large vase recalls the rusty cally across the U.S. Quackenbush, color and slightly twisting curve of a based in the East, is a retired Penn State Richard Serra sculpture. The vase’s long, University art professor who spends textured, earthenware surface sports part of her summers in Vermont. Pharis two or three crescent-shaped bands of is a longtime University of Minnesota glazed color — green, black — in a minifaculty member, and Thompson lives malist vein. Though the opening would and works in Seattle. hold only a few flowers, the entire inteMost of the ceramics on show are rior is glazed. 74

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

Money bank by Liz Quackenbush

In several trays and plates, Pharis plays with form by disassembling expected shapes and reconnecting them in unexpected ways. Four rectangular plates have been sliced lengthwise, their rejoined halves now several millimeters off. The artist has painted them with geometric forms that accentuate the split on one end and mask it on the other. Color appears to be of particular interest to Pharis. That reddish-brown earthenware color becomes a perfect foil for his yellow, peach, mint green and other glazes, particularly in his octagonal teacups. He uses color with a certain economy, though: No one piece has more than three. Often, one is black, as in some trays painted with boldly Detail of “Heavenscape” a r c h i t e c - by Cappy Thompson tural forms. Quackenbush’s work couldn’t be more different. With white porcelain as a base, her works exhibit minute attention to detail in carved textures and glaze-painted decoration.

Her French vase, an unusual form mimicking a tree stump beside a steep hill, is carved with a pattern of tiny suns, leaves, flowing water and wood grain. Unlike Pharis’ vase, this one, with its three glazed openings, would not intimidate the flowers it holds. In an online artist statement, Quackenbush writes that she seeks “to develop my own ‘garden of earthly delights’ motif.” Her work — here, 42 pieces arranged on two tabletops and some pedestals — achieves this with a profusion of references to nature. A butter dish is capped with the compact body of a frog; syrup pitchers resemble small, cute rodents; tiny tree stumps project from the sides of vases; colorfully painted hens sit atop round dishes. Golden details blaze out from the hen covers, and the warm color of egg yolk reveals itself as the glaze inside a white teapot. Quackenbush’s unusual money banks draw the eye. Each is formed from three intricately carved porcelain spheres stacked on a pedestal, with slots cut into each sphere. The slots are big enough for the insertion of coins and folded paper money but too small for their retrieval. As if in acknowledgment of these works’ sculptural rather than functional presence, one bank is topped by a windowed gallery with a circular peaked roof. Thompson, an artist with an interest in folk forms across cultures, has created a wall installation of 36 pieces made from earthenware glazed in muted colors using yellow salt, white and blue celadon. With its figure -bearing, cloud-shaped shelves and star and sunburst elements, “Heavenscape” suggests a reimagining of a m e d i eva l depiction of Heaven, though it’s not so crowded with figures. Instead of having gold-leaf halos that reflect the light, Thompson’s angels stand beside tea lights; nearly every piece has a place for a candle.


ART SHOWS

PHARIS PLAYS WITH FORM

FREE CLASSES — FALL REGISTRATION NOW OPEN HealthSource education programs and healthy lifestyle classes are offered by the Frymoyer Community Health Resource Center, a consumer health library at the University of Vermont Medical Center.

BY DISASSEMBLING EXPECTED SHAPES AND RECONNECTING THEM IN UNEXPECTED WAYS. Thompson’s figures — crowned angels, fawns, beehives, a donkey — echo forms from South American, Western medieval and Indian cultures. What ties them together, she writes in a statement, is that “My expression focuses on the human experience of goodness, of hope, and of love.” Gallerygoers who make the trip to BigTown will most likely find all three in

CALL TO ARTISTS 2020 ONE & ONLY SERIES: MOXIE Productions and the Grange Hall invite submissions for solo performance shows of all kinds for its 2020 season, January to April. Submitted proposals may represent storytelling, improv, dance, musical, puppetry, multimedia, variety, spoken word, cabaret, burlesque, standup, magic, tragedy, comedy or other forms. Pieces must be 45-90 minutes total running time. Guidelines at grangehallcc. com. Deadline: September 15. Grange Hall Cultural Center, Waterbury Center. Free. Info, grangehallcc@gmail.com. ANEW CALL TO ARTISTS: Inclusive Arts Vermont invites established and emerging artists to participate in a showcase of work by artists with disabilities, which will tour the state in 2020. Submit work interpreting the theme beginnings, openings, doorways and new starts. Download application at inclusiveartsvermont.org. Deadline: September 30. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery, Burlington. Info, 871-5002. ‘BRING YOUR BEST’: Artists are invited to apply to this open-theme juried show with abstract or representational works. Download guidelines and application at strandcenter.org. Drop off between September 14 and 21. Strand Center for the Arts, Plattsburgh N.Y. $25 and up. Info, 518-563-1604. CALL FOR EXHIBITORS: Artists and crafters are invited to apply to participate in the Fall Foliage Art in the Park Festival, October 12 and 13, held at the Main Street Park in Rutland. For info and application, call 775-0356, email artinthepark@ chaffeeartcenter.org or visit chaffeeartcenter.org. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland. Through October 11. Info, 775-0356. CALL FOR MURALISTS: If you’re an artist looking to display your

perusing the work of these experienced ceramic artists. m Contact: lilly@sevendaysvt.com

INFO “East to West: A Ceramic Dialogue with Liz Quackenbush, Mark Pharis & Cappy Thompson,” through September 28 at BigTown Gallery in Rochester. bigtowngallery.com

work in a public location, Arts So Wonderful has locations. No funding, but supplies provided. Email artssowonderful2@ gmail.com if interested or for more information. Various Burlington locations, Through September 25. Info, artssowonderful2@gmail.com. CALL TO ARTISTS FOR ‘CHILDHOOD’: We are interested in seeing images that reflect memories of childhood, whether through allusion to your own experience or your current experience with a child. All capture and processing methods are welcome. More info at photoplacegallery.com/ online-juried-shows/childhood. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. Through October 14. $39 for up to 5 images, $6 each additional image. Info, photos@ photoplacegallery.com. CALL TO ARTISTS: BOTANICAL BLITZ: During the coldest months of winter, the gallery will turn into a botanical refuge with paintings and drawings, sculptural works and installations that depict the plant, insect and animal worlds. We are looking for new work, in traditional and nontraditional media, for an exhibition January 21 to March 7, 2020. Deadline: November 15. For details, visit studioplacearts. com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. $10 / free for SPA members. Info, 479-7069. ECOSYSTEM SERVICES THROUGH AN ARTIST’S EYE: The Orleans County Natural Resources Conservation District and the Memphremagog Arts Collective are looking for artists of all types to submit work around the theme of ecosystem services and agriculture. The juried exhibition will open on April 3, 2020, at the MAC Center for the Arts in downtown Newport. More info at vacd.org/conservationdistricts/orleans-county or emily.irwin@vt.nacdnet. net. Memphremagog Arts Collaborative, Newport. Through December 31. Free. Info, 624-7022.

LAKE PLACID CENTER FOR THE ARTS OPEN JURIED SHOW: For a showcase exhibition of the art of the region and beyond, artists are welcome to submit work in any style, genre or subject matter. For more info and forms visit lakeplacidarts.org/gallery/ artist-opportunities. Lake Placid Center for the Arts, N.Y. Through September 14. $25 entry fee for up to two works; four work limit. Info, anya@ lakeplacidarts.org. MURAL OPPORTUNITY IN DOWNTOWN BURLINGTON: Burlington City Arts and the Community and Economic Development Office seek mural artists to paint 8-by-10-foot panels that are part of the construction barriers surrounding the CityPlace Burlington site. $1,000 stipend. Must be able to paint on October 4 (rain date October 5). For more info or to submit application, login or create an account at burlingtoncityarts.awards platform.com and select the Public Art Submission category. BCA Center, Burlington. Through September 17. Info, skatz@burlingtoncityarts.org.

Secrets of Survivors

Thursday, September 19, 6 - 7:30 pm | UVM Medical Center, Davis Auditorium Theodore (Ted) Marcy, MD, Marie Segerstéen Lorrain, RN, Chittenden County Medical Reserve Corps Secrets of Survivors is a course in personal or family preparedness that helps you create a plan and disaster supply kit. Learn your Vermont resources for an emergency.

Dietary Patterns for A Healthy Weight

Saturday, September 21, 1 - 3:30 pm | Richmond Community Kitchen, Richmond Alison Precourt, Registered Dietitian and Leah Pryor, Chef Educator, University of Vermont Medical Center This class will provide a review of current trends such as the keto diet, intermittent fasting and other popular programs. The focus will be adopting a “diet for life” with sustainable changes for a healthy diet. Learn about preparing meals and snacks to keep you feeling full and balanced. View all our classes online at UVMHealth.org/MedCenterHealthsource. Pre-registration is required by calling (802) 847-7222 or by registering online.

FREE parking is available onsite for all classes.

UVMHealth.org/MedCenterHealthsource

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JOEL BARBER & THE MODERN DECOY

VERMONT STUDIO CENTER RESIDENCY FELLOWSHIPS: VSC announces more than 50 new residency fellowships, which are merit-based and open to all artists and writers living and working anywhere in the world. A list of awards and eligibility requirements is at vermontstudiocenter.org/ fellowships. Deadline: October 1. Vermont Studio Center, Johnson. $25. Info, 635-2727.

Decoys, drawings, historical photographs, and watercolors celebrate the life and artwork of the author, illustrator, and pioneering decoy collector.

WILMINGTON PUBLIC ART PROJECT: Seeking artist or artist team to create a site-specific mural on a downtown retaining wall 137 feet long. Info and application at BeaverStreetArt.com. Deadline: September 30. Wilmington Works. Info, wilmingtonworks@gmail.com.

NEW THIS WEEK

9.14.2O19– 1.12.2O2O

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Joel Barber & the Modern Decoy is sponsored in part by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation, Guyette & Deeter, Inc., Copley Fine Art Auctions, and in honor of Ellin N. London. SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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p.m. September 18-November 10. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

NEW THIS WEEK

ART EVENTS

burlington

26TH ANNUAL BENNINGTON QUILTFEST: An exhibition with more than 150 quilts and wall hangings, plus vendors, demonstrations, a consignment boutique, raffle quilt and special exhibit of 25 quilts by local quilter Beth Helfter of EvaPaige Quilt Designs. Mt. Anthony Union Middle School, Bennington, Saturday, September 14, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, September 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $8. Info, chair@benningtonquiltfest.com.

KEN RUSSACK: “Another Roadside Attraction,” recent paintings by the Burlington artist. September 13-30. Info, 863-6458. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery in Burlington.

chittenden county

f ‘JOEL BARBER & THE MODERN DECOY’: The first major exhibition to explore the life, collections and artwork of Barber (1876-1952), with objects including decoys, drawings, photographs and watercolor paintings from the museum’s collection. Opening reception: Friday, September 13, 7-8 p.m. (members preview 6-7 p.m.) September 14-January 12. Free with museum admission. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum.

‘ART & CONVERSATION’: A discussion in the galleries followed by an art activity inspired by exhibition themes and artist materials. Open to adults and lifelong learners 50-plus. BCA Center, Burlington, Wednesday, September 11, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7166.

f MYLISSA KOWALSKI DAVIS AND FIONA COOPER FENWICK: Vermont landscape paintings. Reception: Sunday, September 15, 2-4 p.m. September 15-October 13. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho.

barre/montpelier

f ‘ROCK SOLID XIX’: An annual, since 2000,

showcase of stone sculptures and assemblages by area artists, and other work that depicts the beautiful qualities of stone. September 17-November 2. f DAMARISCOTTA ROUELLE: “Humanity – No Fear of the Other and the Good Life,” recent paintings. Third floor gallery. September 17-November 2. f TUYEN MY NGUYEN: “Perspective,” installations made from tautly strung thread and string that explore scale differences in small and large configurations. Second floor gallery. September 17-November 2. Reception for all: Friday, September 20, 5:30-7:30 p.m. f VERMONT WEAVERS GUILD: “Weaving Community,” new work by contemporary Vermont weavers, a “pop-up weaving studio,” talks and other educational activities. September 17-28. VERMONT WEAVERS GUILD: New pieces from member artisans. Local weavers often will be on hand to explain or demonstrate aspects of weaving. September 17-30. Free. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre.

stowe/smuggs

2019 SMALL WORKS SHOW: An annual exhibition that celebrates the little things, in 2D and 3D pieces 24 inches or less. September 13-November 9. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe.

mad river valley/waterbury

f VALLEY ARTS PHOTO SHOW: An annual group

exhibition of color and black-and-white photography by amateurs and professionals alike. Reception: Thursday, September 12, 5-7 p.m., with catering by

Vermont Pastel Society Don’t confuse the name of the medium pastel with the results it produces. Though pink, baby blue and soft yellow are certainly

options, pastel paintings are often wildly vibrant and dramatic. And mastery of pastel sticks, whether oil or chalk, requires considerable effort. Helping artists achieve that mastery is the mission of the Vermont Pastel Society, and a current exhibition of member works at the T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier puts their successes on display. Through September 27. Pictured: “Sunrise From Cape Porpoise” by Patti Braun. American Flatbread and music by the John Daly Duo. September 12-October 6. Info, 496-6682. Big Red Barn Gallery at Lareau Farm in Waitsfield.

middlebury area

f ‘VOTES … FOR WOMEN?’: An exhibition of vintage photographs, banners and memorabilia that coincides with the 100th anniversary of the campaign to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. Reception: Friday, September 13, 4:30 p.m. in lower lobby of Mahaney Art Center. September 13-December 8. Info, 443-6433. Johnson Memorial Building, Middlebury College.

rutland/killington

f WILDLIFE ART SHOW: Rutland County Audubon presents works in various media of some of the flora and fauna that members appreciate and work to protect. Reception: Sunday, September 15, 3-5 p.m. September 14-29. Info, 325-2603. Slate Valley Arts at Fox Hill in Poultney.

northeast kingdom

f DIANNE SHULLENBERGER: “Outdoor Influences,” works in fabric, thread, grasses, twigs and bark that capture the essence of the natural world. Reception and artist talk: Saturday, September 14, 5 p.m. September 13-October 27. Info, 533-2000. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro.

manchester/bennington

f ‘VISIBLE IN VERMONT: OUR STORIES, OUR VOICES’: A multigenerational photo and story exhibition highlighting the experiences of people of color living in or attending school in Vermont. Reception and panel discussion: Saturday, September 28, 10-11:30 a.m. September 14-December 30. Free with museum admission. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum.

randolph/royalton

f ‘COLORS IN LIFE’: More than 30 paintings by the Connecticut River Chapter of the Vermont Watercolor Society. Reception: Sunday, September 29, 2-4

ARTIST AT WORK: SARAH AMOS: In conjunction with her current exhibit, the artist discusses her newest series of large-scale prints. BCA Center, Burlington, Thursday, September 12, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. ‘BACK TO THE LAND REDUX: VERMONT’S NEW GENERATION OF ARTIST-FARMERS’: A group of working Vermont artist-farmers discusses the intersection and interchange between their art and their farm work, including photographer Dona Ann McAdams and her husband, Brad Kessler, author of Goat Song and several novels; artist Louisa Conrad and poet Lucas Farrell; and oil painters Greg Bernhardt and Hannah Sessions. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Thursday, September 12, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 257-0124. BCA SUMMER ARTIST MARKET: A contemporary outdoor market that offers unique handmade items by Vermont artists including ceramics, woodworking, jewelry, games, clothing, accessories and more. Burlington City Hall, Saturdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free to browse. Info, 865-7166. CATAMOUNT COMICS AND COLLECTIBLES EXPO: Comic books, local artists and creators, professional comic book artists, vintage toys and collectibles. Grand Maple Ballroom, Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, Saturday, September 14, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. $5. Info, catamountcomicsexpo@gmail. com. ‘FALLING INTO LANGUAGE, A TRAVELOGUE: ARTIST CO-CREATION RESIDENCY’: Visual artist Kaylynn Sullivan TwoTrees and composer/musician Mikahely Rakoko Razafy collaborate on a video/installation/ performance; visitors are welcome to join the artists during their open studio hours and learn more about this work-in-progress. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, Sunday, September 15, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 765-560-5445. GRAND POINT WEIRD: Structures, sculptures, models, furniture and artwork by Yestermorrow Design/Build staff, interns, students and instructors

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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ART SHOWS

will be on display in the Tent of Weird, accessible only to ticketed festival-goers. Waterfront Park, Burlington, Saturday, September 14, 3-11 p.m. and Sunday, September 15, 2-11 p.m. Info, 652-0777. OPEN STUDIO FIGURE DRAWING: Sessions featuring a variety of approaches to working from the figure are suited to all levels of drawing, painting and sculpture backgrounds and expertise. Easels and tables available. River Arts, Morrisville, Tuesday, September 17, 3-5:30 p.m. $10. Info, 888-1261. OPEN WEAVING WORKSHOPS: Pop-up weaving sessions in partnership with the Vermont Weavers Guild. Families, students and curious beginners of all ages are invited to try their hands. Materials provided. Studio Place Arts, Barre, Tuesday, September 17, and Wednesday, September 18, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 479-7069. PECHAKUCHA MAPLE CORNER: Concise, fast-paced slide presentations by exhibiting artists. Maple Corner Community Center, Calais, Thursday, September 12, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, thekentmuseum@gmail.com. PHOTOGRAPHERS’ MEET-AND-GREET: Join Jodi Kelly and Kurt Budliger for an informational event with fellow photographers. All amateur and professional photographers welcome. RSVP jkelly@ garageartsvt.com. The Garage Cultural Center, Montpelier, Wednesday, September 18, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 738-3667. RISA PUNO: PERFORMANCE AND PRESENTATION: Artist-in-residence Risa Puno, a New York City-based interactive installation and sculpture artist, discusses her community-driven, site-specific work. Presentation followed by light refreshments and conversation. Cold Hollow Sculpture Park, Enosburg Falls, Saturday, September 14, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 512-333-2119. SMARTPHONE PHOTOGRAPHY FOR THE OUTDOORS: Learn proper techniques and settings to take the best pictures of your outdoor experiences. L.L. Bean, Burlington, Saturday, September 14, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, mkeat@llbean.com. ‘THE STATE OF SCULPTURE 2019’: A dedication of new works by Vermont sculptors Ria Blaas, Joe Chirchirillo, Clark Derbes, Peter Lundberg, Chris Miller, Andrew Hamilton Reiss and Gregory Smith. Vermont Arts Council Sculpture Garden, Montpelier, Thursday, September 12, 5-7 p.m. Info, 828-3291. STEAMROLLER PRINTMAKING: Presented by Helen Day Art Center, an opportunity for families and amateur or professional artists to make large prints; woodblock carving must be done in advance. (Rain date September 15.) Sushi Yoshi (Stowe), Saturday, September 14, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $25, includes coupon to Sushi Yoshi. Info, 253-8358. TALK: GABRIELLA KARSCH: Middlebury-born Karsch, who donated her childhood Girl Scout uniform to the museum, talks about the impact that membership had on her, as well as highlights of her varied career as a model, entertainer and entrepreneurial businesswoman. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont

History, Middlebury, Saturday, September 14, noon. Free with museum admission. Info, 388-2117.

Lowell, Mass. Through October 1. Info, 338-7441. Thirty-odd in Burlington.

Through September 27. Info, 654-2851. McCarthy Art Gallery, Saint Michael’s College in Colchester.

TALK: ‘QUEER BAUHAUS’: Dr. Elizabeth Ott, executive director of the Humanities Institute and associate professor of modern and contemporary art history and visual studies at the University at Buffalo, shares her research on the roles that queer identities and gender fluidity played in the development of modernism’s legendary art school. Mahaney Arts Center, Middlebury College, Wednesday, September 11, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

JOSH KERMAN: “Disc Jockeys in Vermont,” nearly 100 photographs of DJs by the founder of Church Street DJs, aka KermiTT. Through September 30. Info, info@churchstreetdjs.com. Half Lounge in Burlington.

‘WILLIAM WEGMAN: OUTSIDE IN’: More than 60 works from the renowned artist’s collection, including Polaroid photos of his Weimeraners, pages from his handmade book Field Guide to North America and to Other Regions, drawings and postcard paintings. Through October 20. $15 general admission; $12 museum members and seniors; $5 students. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum.

TOURS OF THE HISTORIC BARN HOUSE: The Barn House consists of a granary and a cow barn, built around the turn of the 19th century and now conjoined. The tour features a special exhibit: “Travels of the Intrepid Couple: Stories, Art and Adventures of Lydia and Jack Clemmons.” Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, Saturdays, 10-11:30 a.m. $10. Info, 765-560-5445.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

ALISA DWORSKY & BILL FEREHAWK: “Job Site,” a room-size installation that explores the drawing and choreography inherent in architecture and incorporates paper, graphite, wood and video projection. SARAH AMOS: “Unique Multiples,” innovative prints employing multiple techniques by the Australian artist, who spends part of her time in northern Vermont. Through October 6. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington. ART HOP JURIED SHOW: A group exhibition of works selected by a guest juror, with first, second and third prize winners as well as people’s choice. Open during Flynn performances or by appointment. Through November 30. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. BEN BALCOM: A short film, “The Sequence of Years,” that investigates the relationship between cinematic artifice and experiences of everyday life. KARA TORRES: “Myopia,” artwork in a variety of materials, including cloth, paint and PVC, that plays with visual perception, hidden imagery, subversive ideologies and metaphorical and literal myopia. Through September 30. Info, 391-4083. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. GARRETT MORIN: “Crowd Sorcery,” new works in pastel by the New York-based artist, inspired by Neolithic monuments to the dead. Through November 16. Info, 233-2943. Safe and Sound Gallery in Burlington. GAV’OM & LITTLESTPENGUIN PHOTOGRAPHY: Abstract paintings and photography, a collaboration of 9-year-old Gavin and his mom. Through September 30. Info, 391-4083. Union Station in Burlington. JOHN BRICKELS: New sculptures in red clay in combination with his signature mocha-colored clay, influenced by old mill buildings in his new hood of

f LINDA E. JONES: “Traces,” a retrospective of selected mixed-media paintings including new work inspired by personal archaeological exploration. Closing reception: Friday, September 13, 4-7 p.m. Info, 865-8980. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington. MERCHE BAUTISTA: “Of Joy and Other Acts of Resistance,” mixed-media installations that represent female identity by the Spanish-Mexican artist. Through October 30. Flynndog Gallery in Burlington. MICHAEL METZ: “What Do You See?,” recent color photographs of people looking at art. Through October 1. Info, michaelmetz100@gmail.com. Mirabelles Café & Bakery in Burlington. RACHEL MORTON: The Burlington artist shows her clay figures and heads — human, animal and mythological. Through September 21. Info, rachel@ rachelmorton.com. Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar in Burlington. SCOTT ANDRÉ CAMPBELL: “Distribution,” mixedmedia geometric abstractions that create order from chaos. Through October 31. Info, 324-0014. Soapbox Arts in Burlington.

chittenden county

‘CITY OF HOPE’: Twenty posters, videos and audio collections that document the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign, a grassroots, multiracial movement that drew thousands of people to Washington, D.C., for 43 days. Part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service poster series. Advance registration required. Sundays, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 765-560-5445. Authentica Art Gallery in Charlotte. ‘IN THEIR ELEMENT’: An installation of sculptures on the museum grounds by contemporary artists Rodrigo Nava, Jonathan D. Ebinger and Dan Snow. Curated by Carolyn Bauer. Through October 31. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum. ‘IT’S ABOUT TIME’: Original watercolor paintings by Shelburne artist Katra Kindar. Through September 30. Info, 985-8922. Village Wine and Coffee in Shelburne. VALERIE HIRD: “We’re Not in Kansas Anymore,” new paintings by the Burlington artist that explore cultural mythologies and the roles they play in our perceptions of each other. Through October 15. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne. ‘WE ARE ART & DESIGN: AN EXHIBITION OF FACULTY WORK’: Works in a variety of mediums by Mallory Breiner, Brian Collier, Jordan Douglas, Gordon Glover, Valerie Hird, Deborah Kehoe and Will Mentor.

barre/montpelier

‘200 YEARS—200 OBJECTS’: In the final celebratory year of the university’s bicentennial, the museum exhibits a curated selection of artifacts, documents and images from the school’s collections. Through December 21. Info, 485-2886. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University in Northfield. AMY DAVENPORT: “Visual Splendor: Travels in Northern India,” photographs of architecture, street life, the Taj Mahal and women. Through October 20. Info, moetown52@comcast.net. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. CECELIA KANE: “A Year of Forgetting,” paintings about aging that visually and playfully record a year of the artist’s daily mental lapses. Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, 738-3667. The Garage Cultural Center in Montpelier. ‘CONDUITS’: Painters Liz Hawkes deNiord and Richard Heller and collodion print photographer Rachel Portesi explore underlying realities in their artworks. Through October 31. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier. ELEANOR OTT: “Spirit Beings,” fantastical works by the local artist. Through September 29. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex. GALEN CHENEY & TESSA O’BRIEN: Mixed-media paintings. Through November 1. VERMONT PASTEL SOCIETY: A selection of works by members of the statewide arts organization. Through September 27. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier. GUILD OF VERMONT FURNITURE MAKERS: Fine furniture by master craftsmen George Ainley, James Becker, Chris Ericson, Bob Gasperetti, Dale Helms, Dave Hurwitz, David Lewis, Matthew Ogelby and George Sawyer. Through October 8. Info, 279-5558. Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier. JANE EDWARDS & LINDA HOGAN: Ceramic works and photographs, respectively, by the local artists. Through September 30. Info, 223-1981. The Cheshire Cat in Montpelier. LINDA MANEY: “Plane Geometry,” paintings that explore, and sometimes complicate, common geometric shapes. Through September 28. Info, 479-7069. Morse Block Deli & Taps in Barre. LOIS EBY: “Studies in Rhythmic Vitality,” abstract paintings by the Vermont artist. Through September BARRE/MONTPELIER

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Bolton Valley presents:

Mountain Bike Ride for Children’s Mental Health

to support Washington County Mental Health Services, Inc.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH Join us for a family friendly, fun-filled day packed with activities, races, beautiful foliage and fantastic food + beverages all while giving back to a very worthy cause!

Thanks to our event champion sponsors for their support!

2 MILE WALK | 5K & 10K RUN

For more information, to register, and to begin fundraising for the cause, please visit:

Ride for Children’s Mental Health on Macebook

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27. Info, leby@loiseby.com. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier.

CHANNEL 15

QUALITY DAILY LIFE SUNDAYS > 1:00 P.M. GET MORE INFO OR WATCH ONLINE AT VERMONTCAM.ORG

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‘MONKEYS, MISSILES AND MUSHROOMS’: Paintings and drawings by Marina Epstein that reflect the artist’s life in Vermont and exotic tropical influences from living in the Yucatan. Through October 30. Info, 229-6297. Capitol Region Visitors Center in Montpelier. NITYA BRIGHENTI: “Why Painting?” watercolors and oils, cityscapes and portraits. Through September 30. Info, 808-358-8185. Capitol Grounds Café in Montpelier.

‘REVISION’: A group exhibition of more than 20 artists who cut, edit, stitch, forge, sculpt and assemble alternate views of the world through a variety of materials and styles, stretching the limits 9/9/19 3:16 PM of ordinary perception. Through October 6. Info, 223-6613. The Kent Museum in Calais.

SEPTEMBER SPECIALS

SHOW 34: An exhibition of the latest work by gallery members. Through September 29. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier. SUSAN SAWYER: Botanical artworks. Through September 30. Info, 229-6206. North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier.

Buy 4/Get 4 Laser Hair Removal Sessions

VCFA EXHIBITION: Alums, students and faculty show work on the subject of gender, juried by artist Sheila Pepe. Through October 1. Info, 828-8636. College Hall Gallery, Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier.

15% Off Revanesse Versa

‘THE WAR OF IDEAS’: Propaganda posters from the collections, spanning the Civil War to World War II and illustrating everything from recruitment to support on the homefront. Through October 25. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Center in Barre.

PRODUCT OF THE MONTH

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stowe/smuggs

CECIL GERRY: “Organized Chaos,” acrylic paintings, prints and sculpture by the NVU graduate. Through September 15. Info, 626-6459. Dibden Center for the Arts, Northern Vermont University in Johnson. DUNCAN JOHNSON: “Horizons,” a new body of work using reclaimed wood, assembled into abstract, 2D compositions. Through October 13. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe. ‘EXPOSED!’: The 28th annual outdoor sculpture exhibition, featuring works on the gallery lawn and around downtown Stowe. Through October 19. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe.

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SHOP LOCAL

and say you saw it in...

‘MORRISVILLE MOSAICS’: Multiple artistic interpretations of a sense of place, in a variety of mediums, originating from a community photographic project. Through September 25. Info, 888-1261. ‘UNDERCOVER’: Artwork in a variety of mediums created by members of the Open Studio Figure Drawing group. Through September 15. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville. ‘PEAK TO PEAK: 10TH MOUNTAIN DIVISION THEN AND NOW’: An exhibition of photographs and artifacts to highlight the evolution of the division’s equipment and training since its beginning in 1943. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe. PHILIP HAGOPIAN: “Sequel,” multimedia paintings by the Vermont artist. Through September 20. Info, 635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Northern Vermont University in Johnson.

mad river valley/waterbury

 ‘HUMAN NATURE/NATURE HUMAN’: Paintings by Deborah Brown that focus on a lone female character, and paintings by Mark Barry that provide poignant recognition of the humor, warmth and universality of everyday experience. Weekends only. Reception: Friday, September 13, 5-8 p.m. Through October 13. Info, 583-5832. Bundy Modern in Waitsfield. VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

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Rachel Morton

If you missed the 27th annual South End Art Hop in Burlington last weekend, well, you really missed something. But there’s good news: Some of the artwork remains on view. One such exhibition is the ceramic work of Burlington artist Rachel Morton at Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar — but only through Saturday, September 21. Nestled on shelving and amid wine racks and cheese displays, her sculpted clay figures and heads — human, animal and mythological — might startle, then delight, browsing oenophiles. Pictured: “The Minotaur.” ‘THE VERMONT WE CANNOT SEE’: Infrared photographs by Lisa Dimondstein, Julie Parker and Sandra Shenk. Through September 14. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

middlebury area

‘AMASSED AND UP-ENDED: DECODING THE LEGACY OF STUFF’: Objects, photographs and documents representing four generations of the Robinson family, and exploring how what we save over a lifetime helps to tell our stories. Through October 27. Info, 877-3406. ‘STRUCTURES’: An exhibition repurposing the museum’s historic spaces as settings for contemporary art features work by Meg Walker, Axel Stohlberg, Dennis Versweyveld, Judith Rey, Steve Hadeka, Rob Hitzig and Yoko Ono. An international exhibition of mail art is in the Tourist Cabin. Through October 27. $5. Info, 877-3406. Rokeby Museum in Ferrisburgh. ‘BEFORE HOUDINI: THE MAKING OF A GRAPHIC NOVEL’: Images that show the stages of development of the book by author Jeremy Holt and illustrator John Lucas. Through September 22. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater in Middlebury.

 HANNAH MORRIS: “Waiting to Happen,” a solo

exhibition of new collages, composed of magazine photos and paper detritus, by the Barre artist. Reception: Friday, September 13, 5-8 p.m. Through October 31. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes. MUSEUMLAB: A diverse array of pieces from the museum’s collection selected by professors from a variety of disciplines; visitors are invited to observe the reactions sparked when this “teaching laboratory” displays art supporting various college courses. Through December 8. Info, 443-5258. Middlebury College Museum of Art. ‘THESE LAST WARM DAYS’: Works by William Hoyt, Molly Doe Wensberg and Lori Mehta that express nostalgia for the waning days of summer. Through September 30. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY PAMELA POLSTON. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

‘THESE LAST WARM DAYS’: Works by Joe Bolger, Woody Jackson and Kay Flierl that express nostalgia for the waning days of summer. Through September 30. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls.

rutland/killington

‘ART OF FIRE’: An all-media exhibit by members. Through November 5. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild. SCULPTFEST2019: Site-specific sculptures by nearly a dozen artists, guest-curated by Bill Wolff. Through October 20. Info, 438-2097. The Carving Studio & Sculpture Center in West Rutland.

champlain islands/northwest BARBARA WATERS & TUYEN MY NGUYEN: “Where Do You Draw the Line?” an exhibition of paintings and installation that explores how borders affect habitat. Through October 6. Info, greentaraspace@ gmail.com. GreenTARA Space in North Hero.

upper valley

33RD ANNUAL QUILT EXHIBITION: Quilts made by Windsor County quilters, featuring activities and demonstrations. Through September 15. Free with museum admission. Info, 457-2355. Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock. RACHEL GROSS: “Through the Curve,” new prints. Through October 28. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction. SAMUEL NEUSTADT: “Faces and Places,” digital paintings of local people and architecture by the longtime Pomfret artist. Through September 28. Info, 457-3500. ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery in South Pomfret.

northeast kingdom

 CAROLYN MECKLOSKY: “Dream Portraits,” expressionist paintings celebrating the former Dream Café community in Johnson. Closing reception: Friday, October 4, 5-7 p.m. Through

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ART SHOWS

October 5. Info, carolynmecklosky@gmail.com. 3rd Floor Gallery in Hardwick. ELIZABETH ROBBINS: “We Will Always Be One,” works in stained glass. Through October 5. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild Backroom Gallery in St. Johnsbury. ‘FROM GRANITE TO GOLD’: An exhibit examining the life of Burdean Sebert (1900-95), the daughter of a local stonecutter who became a performer in a touring company, an Emmy winner for a TV show in Ohio, and then an instructor of drama and public speaking in Montpelier. Through October 17. Info, 472-8555. Hardwick Historical Society.

f ‘HANK JENSEN: FIGURE AND SPACE’: An

exhibition in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the installation of the steel sculpture “Etruscan Stripes” on campus, and other work by the late artist. Reception: Saturday, September 21, 3 p.m. Through September 27. Info, 626-6487. Quimby Gallery, Northern Vermont University-Lyndon in Lyndonville. ‘ICELAND’: Eight large paintings regarding Iceland by Elizabeth Nelson. Through October 19. Info, 535-3031. Bread and Puppet Theater in Glover. ‘THE PIVOT AND THE BLADE: AN INTIMATE GLANCE AT SCISSORS’: A collection of objects that conveys the long human relationship to scissors and their design and that explores myriad professional, creative, superstitious, violent and domestic uses. Through December 31. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. ‘ROOTS’: A group show of Vermont artists that celebrates democracy, community and “the digging down of it all.” Through September 16. Info, 533-2045. Miller’s Thumb Gallery in Greensboro.

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘ALCHEMY: METAL, MYSTERY AND MAGIC’: A group show featuring sculptures and painting by Jeanne Carbonetti, Sabrina Fadial, Alexandra Heller, Peter Heller, Pat Musick, Dan O’Donnell, Gerald Stoner and Johny Swing. Through February 29, 2020. Info, 258-3992. The Great Hall in Springfield. DAVID PLOWDEN: BRIDGES: A selection of photographs from the artist’s book Bridges: The Spans of North America. DONA ANN MCADAMS: “Performative Arts,” a major retrospective of four decades of work by the photographer and activist, who now lives in Sandgate, Vt. Curated by John Killacky. Through September 23. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. ‘MADE IN VERMONT’: A group exhibition of new and recently completed work by Vermont artists, including paintings, works on paper and sculpture by Arista Alanis, Steve Budington, Clark Derbes, Jason Galligan-Baldwin and Sarah Letteney. Appointments available 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. MALCOLM MORLEY: Approximately 40 paintings, sculptures and works on paper created between 1964 and 2016 by the British-born American artist and founder of super-realism. Open for tours 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER: Some 40 paintings, sculptures and works on paper that reference everyday objects, symbols, people and places, often made from unconventional and industrial materials. The American painter, sculptor and draftsman died in 2011. Open for tours 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Through December 1. $10. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading. NATALJA KENT: ‘Movement Artifact,” large-scale, camera-less “photographs” created with direct application of light to paper in the darkroom. Through November 1. Info, 251-5130. Epsilon Spires in Brattleboro.

manchester/bennington

22ND ANNUAL NORTH BENNINGTON OUTDOOR SCULPTURE SHOW: Outdoor sculptures and gallery exhibits featuring 41 artists throughout the historic village. Through November 3. Info, 4309715. Various locations around North Bennington. ‘CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN REGIONALISM: VERMONT PERSPECTIVES’: Using works from the center’s permanent collection, the exhibition

invites viewers to consider the framework of regionalism and the role art plays in society; guest-curated by Ric Kasini Kadour. Through October 20. Info, 362-1405. RON ROSENSTOCK: “Sacred Places,” photographs of locations around the world where people have gathered to pray or be inspired. Through October 20. Info, 362-1405. STEPHANIE KOSSMANN: “The 3:30 Project,” a solo exhibition of 30 abstract portraits developed from an appreciative inquiry with trauma survivors. More info at stephaniekossman.art. Through October 6. Info, 782-9426. Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester. JANE STICKLE QUILT: The annual exhibition of the fragile 1893 sampler quilt created by the 19thcentury Vermont stitcher. Through October 14. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum. KATARINA BURIN: “Authorship, Architecture, Anonymity: The Impossible Career of Petra Andrejova-Molnàr,” an installation exploring the career of the fictional 20th-century modernist designer, addressing the erasure of women from the canon. Through October 13. Info, 442-5401. Suzanne Lemberg Usdan Gallery in Bennington.

randolph/royalton

‘AN ARCHIVE OF FEELING’: A group exhibition of photography, sculpture, painting, textiles and installation that ask what we hold and what materials are able to hold us. Artists include Lydia Kern, Caitlin LaDolce, Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Wylie Garcia, Janie Cohen, Josh Urban Davis, Morris Fox and Marina Leybishkis. Curated by J. Turk. Through November 3. Info, seth@chandler-arts.org. Chandler Center for the Arts in Randolph. ATHENA PETRA TASIOPOULOS: Mixed-media collage work by the Barre artist. Through September 14. Info, 685-4699. North Common Arts in Chelsea.

f DEBORAH SACKS: “Cats, Landscapes & Figures,” mixed-media prints by the local artist. Reception: Friday, October 25, 6 p.m. Through October 31. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library. ‘EAST TO WEST: A CERAMIC DIALOGUE’: Idiosyncratic works in clay by Mark Pharis, Liz Quackenbush and Cappy Thompson. Through September 28. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester. ‘HOOKIN’ IN VERMONT’: Textile art by local rug hookers Ina Anderson, Theresa Clark, Jennifer Davey, Bonnie Dore, Susie Gray, Betty LaWhite, Theresa Manning and Fern Strong. Through September 15. Info, 728-8912. White River Craft Center in Randolph.

outside vermont

‘THE 99 FACES PROJECT’: A nationally traveling exhibit designed, by Boston-based visual artist Lynda Michaud Cutrell, to reduce the stigma of mental illness. Photographs, videos, paintings and sculptures present true-to-life images to challenge assumptions about what living with mental illness looks like. Through September 30. Info, 603-4942179. Dartmouth-Hitchcock in Lebanon, N.H. BILL CROSBY: “Land, Water & Sky,” abstracted, gestural paintings of the natural landscape by the longtime North Country artist. Through September 27. Info, 518-563-1604. Strand Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh, N.Y. ‘TRAVIS PAIGE: THE LEICA PROJECT: Eight local photographers were given a 1937 Leica Illa screw-mount camera and given two weeks to master it; this exhibition displays the resulting images. Through September 16. Info, 603-4483117. MARY ADMASIAN: “Marked,” mixed-media sculptural works that symbolize the tension between outer and inner lives. Through October 2. PAMELA TARBELL: “What Is on Your Balcony?” oil paintings inspired by Spanish architecture. Through October 2. ROB HITZIG: “Rough/Polished,” paintings and painted sculpture that use contrasting textures to express emotions, feelings and experiences that are beyond words. Through October 2. ROSEMARY CONROY: “Love at First Sight,” colorful paintings that celebrate the natural world and wildlife. Through October 2. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. m

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movies In the Shadow of the Towers: Stuyvesant High on 9/11 ★★★★

M

any movies have been made about the terror attacks of September 11, 2001. Eighteen years after the atrocity, can there really be anything new of significance to say? As it happens, there can. And what’s poignantly significant about it is that the men and women saying it were just boys and girls that day. The new HBO documentary from director Amy Schatz (“Song of Parkland”) revisits that morning through the eyes of eight former students of New York City’s Stuyvesant High School. Weaving archival footage together with present-day news video and interviews, the film evokes the shock, panic and out-of-body horror experienced by these young Americans who were beginning their day four blocks from ground zero. To grasp the magnitude of their trauma, one should probably consider how it must have been at such a tender age to pledge allegiance to the flag, then glance out the window and watch a passenger jet pierce the north tower. Several interviewees did that and recall it here, along with the difficulty their minds initially had processing the sight. Two young men remember thinking a missile must have gone off course, and then recognizing the tail of a plane as it disappeared into the building.

REVIEWS

Today, of course, schools routinely conduct drills to prepare students for the possibility of attack by a shooter. When I was a kid, we still practiced the old “duck and cover” in the daft belief that our desks would protect us from nuclear Armageddon. Was there any way in a million years these kids could have prepared for the carnage and destruction that rained down on them? As interview subjects recount the sequence of the day’s events, the viewer gradually realizes that the Stuyvesant staff was as shocked and confused as their charges. At first, everyone was instructed to stay put. After the second plane hit, the doors were opened, and students were essentially told to run for it. And what a waking nightmare they describe encountering. These children emerged to the sight of human beings leaping from flamegushing windows. They zigzagged among falling debris the size of freight trucks. When they finally arrived at their subway stops, they found them closed. One witness compares the giant dust clouds that chased them to the CGI sandstorm in one of the Mummy films. Tellingly, virtually all recall feeling like they were in a movie. In the picture’s final section, the filmmaker deftly ties the historical moment to more current events. Interview subjects come from a variety of immigrant communities and back-

WINDOW ON THE WORLD The view from Stuyvesant High School on the morning the World Trade Center was attacked.

grounds. They describe experiencing firsthand the backlash against anyone who had brown skin, in some instances that very day. Several were accosted as they struggled to reach their homes in the city’s outer boroughs. In the Shadow of the Towers: Stuyvesant High on 9/11 issues an eloquent wake-up call on at least two fronts. First, from the Muslim immigration ban to the border crisis, things keep getting worse in this country for people with brown skin. Then there’s the staggering fact that Taliban leaders were invited to Camp

David days before this year's September 11 anniversary. (The meeting has since been cancelled.) “Those who fail to learn from history,” Winston Churchill warned (paraphrasing George Santayana), “are condemned to repeat it.” Paraphrasing Churchill, one might suggest today that “Those who put al-Qaeda allies on planes aimed at America should be condemned — at the very least — to repeat high school history until they have a clue.” RI C K KI S O N AK

It Chapter Two ★★★

T

here’s a reason many horror fans don’t love digital effects: Fear needs grounding. When a cheerful clown opens his mouth to reveal a second set of jaws that put the Alien xenomorph to shame — the signature effect of both It movies — that’s pretty damn scary. But when that clown monster continues to transform, filling the screen with trippy illusions, he stops being scary and becomes a Grand Guignol cartoon. Don’t get me wrong. It was an entertaining horror adventure in the “Stranger Things” vein, and It Chapter Two is still entertaining — though, at nearly three hours, it sometimes wears out its welcome. Both work as thrill rides. But, except for the occasional scenes in which cosmic-evildisguised-as-clown Pennywise (Bill Skårsgard) lures child victims with a seductive purr in his voice, they aren’t very scary. Stephen King’s It is a doorstop of a novel that alternates between past and present narratives. Pennywise preys on the small town of Derry every 27 years; having first battled him on the cusp of adolescence, the members of the so-called “Losers Club” must face him again on the cusp of midlife. Summoned by Mike (Isaiah Mustafa), the only one who stayed in Derry, they return home to defeat a monster they now scarcely believe exists. And what a bunch of non-losers they are: Bill (James McAvoy) is a best-selling author; Eddie (James Ransone) drives a tank of a car; 80 SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

LOSERS CREEPERS The “Losers Club” reteams for a final battle with evil as Muschietti’s twopart adaptation of the King novel concludes.

Richie (Bill Hader) is a famous funnyman; Ben (Jay Ryan) is a prominent architect; Beverly (Jessica Chastain) has her own clothing line. But they still have plenty of secret fears for Pennywise to exploit. Director Andy Muschietti and screenwriter Gary Dauberman chopped the giant, timehopping novel into two films: then and now.

While It told a self-contained story, however, It Chapter Two is stuffed with flashbacks to the characters’ tween lives. At best, these add depth and pathos; at worst, they feel like deleted scenes from the first movie. Until the climactic battle rolls around, this structure dictates that Chapter Two is essentially a series of set pieces in which each pro-

tagonist faces down the demons of his or her past. Some of these are brilliant; others drag. Hader and Ransone emerge as the MVPs of the adult cast, supplying likable comic relief. Certain other Losers are woefully underdeveloped. Sophia Lillis’ bad-girl bravado as the young Bev was a highlight of It, yet the adult Bev is more of a nonentity, a cringing damsel tasked with choosing between two love interests. It’s a waste of Chastain’s cinematic charisma. The villain’s penchant for transformation dovetails with the filmmakers’ penchant for absurdity to make It Chapter Two a strange film at times. It opens with a vicious hate crime and stages a horrifying child murder, yet it also features a ghoul who vomits both slime and the chorus of Juice Newton’s “Angel of the Morning” on Eddie. Such moments suggest a Tim Burton movie with edge (i.e., old-school Burton); when Pennywise gets his circus-illusionist mojo on, he could be Beetlejuice’s nastier cousin. “It’s not real,” the Losers tell themselves whenever Pennywise attacks them with surreal apparitions. It doesn’t feel real, either, and that’s why the bulk of the film is less horror than horror-themed carnival ride. Fans of the book praise King’s powerful evocations of everyday evil and childhood trauma. This version has all the bells and whistles and smoke and mirrors, but it still feels more like a night at the (creepy) circus than a season in hell. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

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NEW IN THEATERS BRITTANY RUNS A MARATHON: Jillian Bell plays a New York millennial who decides to change her unhealthy lifestyle one mile at a time in this comedy from first-time writer-director Paul Downs Colaizzo. With Jennifer Dundas and Michaela Watkins. (104 min, R. Roxy) THE GOLDFINCH: After his mother dies in a bombing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a young man (Ansel Elgort) wanders through a string of strange adventures in this adaptation of Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. With Nicole Kidman, Finn Wolfhard and Sarah Paulson. John Crowley (Brooklyn) directed. (149 min, R. Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Palace, Roxy) HUSTLERS: Strip club workers figure out a not-solegal way to make more money off their wealthy clients in this comic crime drama from director Lorene Scafaria (The Meddler). With Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez and Julia Stiles. (109 min, R. Essex, Majestic, Palace, Sunset) LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE: This documentary from directors Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman (Lovelace, Howl) traces the rise of the pop-rock songstress from the 1960s folk music scene. (95 min, PG-13. Savoy) THE NIGHTINGALE: A young convict seeks revenge for the fate of her family in this dark western set in 1825 Tasmania and written and directed by Jennifer Kent (The Babadook), which was a 2018 Golden Lion nominee. Aisling Franciosi, Sam Claflin and Baykali Ganambarr star. (136 min, R. Roxy)

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice

IT: CHAPTER TWOHHH Pennywise the demonic clown (Bill Skårsgard) returns to his old tricks as the adaptation of Stephen King’s door-stop horror novel wraps up with this sequel set 27 years later. Starring Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Bill Hader and Isaiah Mustafa. Andy Muschietti returns as director. (169 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 9/11) THE LION KINGHHH Stylized animated singing lions are replaced by photorealistic animated singing lions in this remake of the Disney cartoon classic about the heir to an embattled African kingdom, with the voices of Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen and James Earl Jones. Jon Favreau directed. (118 min, PG)

ANGEL HAS FALLENHH1/2 Gerard Butler returns as a heroic Secret Service agent, now being framed for the attempted assassination of President Morgan Freeman, in the third installment of the action franchise, directed by Ric Roman Waugh (Snitch). With Piper Perabo. (120 min, R)

ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOODHHHHH The Manson murders of 1969 are the background for this story of a TV star (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his stunt double (Brad Pitt) in the latest from writer-director Quentin Tarantino. (161 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 7/31)

THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2HHH In this second animated adventure based on the mobile game, “The flightless birds and scheming green pigs take their feud to the next level.” With the voices of Jason Sudeikis, Josh Gad and Leslie Jones. Thurop Van Orman directed. (96 min, PG)

OVERCOMERHH A high school coach faces challenges and finds new inspiration when he’s forced to change gears in this faith-based film from director Alex Kendrick (Fireproof), starring Kendrick and Shari Rigby. (119 min, PG)

ANNABELLE COMES HOMEHH1/2 Imprisoning the demonic doll in a glass case only makes her more resourceful in the third installment of the campy horror franchise. (106 min, R) FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAWHHH Two former antagonists from the Fast & Furious franchise (Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham) team up to defeat a “cyber-genetically enhanced” Idris Elba in this over-the-top action flick from director David Leitch (Atomic Blonde). With Helen Mirren and Vanessa Kirby. (135 min, PG-13) GOOD BOYSHH Seth Rogen produced this pint-size version of Superbad about three sixth graders having a very eventful, R-rated day. With Jacob Tremblay and Keith L. Williams. Gene Stupnitsky makes his directorial debut. (89 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/21) ITH1/2 Half of Stephen King’s horror novel, about a gang of misfit kids fighting a monster that takes on the likeness of a creepy clown, comes to the big screen. Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor and Bill Skarsgård star. Andy Muschietti (Mama) directed. (135 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 9/13/17)

ratings

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCONHHH A young man with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) flees an institution and teams up with a small-time crook (Shia LaBeouf) in the feature debut of writer-directors Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz. (93 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 8/28) READY OR NOTHH1/2 A bride (Samara Weaving) finds herself in a wedding nightmare in this horror flick from directors Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett. With Adam Brody, Mark O’Brien and Andie MacDowell. (95 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/28) SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARKHHH1/2 Alvin Schwartz’s creepy kids’ book series becomes a scare flick about a group of teens facing their greatest fears, directed by André Øvredal (Trollhunter). With Zoe Margaret Colletti and Michael Garza. (111 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 8/14) SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOMEHHH1/2 In his second solo outing with this franchise, Peter Parker (Tom Holland) copes with the post-Avengers: Endgame world. With Zendaya, Angourie Rice and Jake Gyllenhaal. Jon Watts (Spider-Man: Homecoming) directed. (129 min, PG-13) TOY STORY 4HHHH The arrival of a new toy named “Forky” leads the toys on a road trip of discovery in the latest installment of Pixar’s animated series. Josh Cooley makes his feature directorial debut. (100 min, G; reviewed by M.H. 6/26) YESTERDAY 1/2H A young musician (Himesh Patel) wakes up in an alternate timeline where the Beatles never existed and only he remembers them in this comedy from director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire). With Lily James and Sophia Di Martino. (116 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 7/3)

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movies

LOCALtheaters (*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. (**) = SPECIAL EVENTS. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

Healthy, non-smoking participants (18-30 years old) needed for a 4 visit UVM study on a chemical system in the healthy brain. Participants will receive $400 for completion of the study.

Contact us at 847-8248 or brainage@uvm.edu. CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH UNIT

BETHEL DRIVE-IN

36 Bethel Drive, Bethel, betheldrivein.com

Closed for the season.

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Route 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Dora and the Lost City of Gold The Peanut Butter Falcon friday 13 — thursday 19 The Peanut Butter Falcon Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Closed on Mondays

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BIJOU CINEPLEX 4

Route 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 It Chapter Two The Lion King Ready or Not friday 13 — tuesday 17 It Chapter Two The Lion King The Peanut Butter Falcon Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Did you know that a plastic bag can take from 15 to 1,000 years to break down?

LET’S DO OUR PART TO GO GREEN! When you call in a takeout order, let us know if you will be bringing your own reusable bag.

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Angel Has Fallen **Downton Abbey (Thu only) It Chapter Two The Lion King (Wed only) Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Overcomer friday 13 — thursday 19 Angel Has Fallen **Downton Abbey (Thu only) *The Goldfinch It Chapter Two The Lion King Overcomer

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER 21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 **Downton Abbey (Thu only) Good Boys *Hustlers (Thu only) It Chapter Two The Lion King Overcomer Spider-Man: Far From Home (extended edition)

24 Main Street, Winooski 655-4888 • Closed Tuesdays TINYTHAIRESTAURANT.NET 82

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friday 13 — wednesday 18 Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 *The Goldfinch Good Boys *Hustlers It Chapter Two Overcomer **Rob Zombie’s 3 From Hell (Mon-Wed only) Spider-Man: Far From Home (extended edition) **Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979): 40th Anniversary (Sun & Wed only)

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 Dora and the Lost City of Gold **Downton Abbey (Thu only) Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw Good Boys It Chapter Two The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Toy Story 4 friday 13 — tuesday 17 Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw *The Goldfinch Good Boys *Hustlers It Chapter Two The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

MARQUIS THEATRE 65 Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 The Farewell It Chapter Two **The Way Home: Women Talk About Race in America (Wed only) thursday 13 — thursday 19 It Chapter Two The Peanut Butter Falcon **Play the Flute (Wed only)

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS 222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Blinded by the Light **Downton Abbey (Thu only) It Chapter Two Luce Maiden Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood The Peanut Butter Falcon friday 13 — wednesday 18 *Brittany Runs a Marathon *The Goldfinch It Chapter Two Maiden *The Nightingale The Peanut Butter Falcon

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Angel Has Fallen The Art of Racing in the Rain **Downton Abbey (Thu only) Good Boys *Hustlers (Thu only) It Chapter Two The Lion King **Margaret Atwood Live in Cinemas (Thu only) Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Ready or Not Yesterday **You Are Here: A Come From Away Story (Wed only) friday 13 — wednesday 18 Angel Has Fallen **The Game Changers (Mon only) *The Goldfinch Good Boys *Hustlers It Chapter Two Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood **Promare (dubbed: Tue only) Ready or Not **Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979): 40th Anniversary (Sun & Wed only) Yesterday

PARAMOUNT WTWIN CINEMA 241 N. Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Good Boys It Chapter Two friday 13 — wednesday 18

THE PLAYHOUSE CO-OP THEATRE 11 S. Main St., Randolph, 728-4012, playhouseflicks.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 19 It Chapter Two Closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Honeyland Luce The Peanut Butter Falcon friday 13 — thursday 19 *Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice The Peanut Butter Falcon Open-caption screenings upstairs on Mondays.

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX 454 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Angel Has Fallen Good Boys It Chapter Two friday 13 — thursday 19 Schedule not available at press time.

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800, sunsetdrivein.com

friday 13 — sunday 15 It & It Chapter Two It Chapter Two & Annabelle Comes Home The Lion King & Toy Story 4 *Hustlers & Good Boys

WELDEN THEATRE

104 N. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Good Boys It Chapter Two Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark friday 13 — thursday 19 Angel Has Fallen Good Boys (except Wed) It Chapter Two Toy Story 4 (Sat & Sun only)

It Chapter Two Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

LOOK UP SHOWTIMES ON YOUR PHONE!

GO TO SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY SMARTPHONE FOR FREE, UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MOVIE SHOWTIMES, PLUS NEARBY RESTAURANTS, CLUB DATES, EVENTS AND MORE.


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THIS WE E K

Burleseque 101

WED., SEP. 11; WED., SEP. 18; WED., SEP. 25; WED., OCT. 2 GRANGE HALL CULTURAL CENTER, WATERBURY CENTER

THIS WE E K

Burlington Edible History Tour

THU., SEP. 12; SAT., SEP. 14; THU., SEP. 19; SAT., SEP. 21 TOURS START AT THE ECHO CENTER AWNING

Insect Investigations: UnSchool

THIS WE E K

Queen City Ghostwalk Darkness Falls Tour

THIS WE E K

Farm Table Dinner Series

THIS WE E K

BTV Local 420 presents Family Hemp Farm Vibes

THIS WE E K

Exploring Practices & Policies for Improving Soil Health Series

THIS WE E K

THU., SEP. 12 THE GREEN MOUNTAIN AUDUBON CENTER, HUNTINGTON

FRI., SEP. 13; SAT., SEP. 14; FRI., SEP. 20; SAT., SEP. 21; THU., SEP. 27 COURTHOUSE PLAZA, BURLINGTON

FRI., SEP. 13 THE LODGE AT SPRUCE PEAK, STOWE

SAT., SEP. 14 FAMILY TREE HEMP FARM, SHELDON

TUE., SEP. 17 REBOP FARM, BRATTLEBORO

F R EE & O P E N TO T H E P U B L IC

Doing Justice: An Evening with

Preet Bharara Former United States Attorney 2019 GEORGE D. AIKEN LECTURE Join us for a special conversation with Preet Bharara, former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, featuring anecdotes from Bharara’s time as a federal prosecutor, his thoughts on the justice system and constitutional governance today, and more. Fired by President Trump, Bharara now has a vast online and social media presence where people look to him for his critical analysis and keen insights on pressing issues like the Mueller investigation and other important topics of the day. Fresh off the release of his first book, Doing Justice: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law, Bharara comes to the University of Vermont for a candid conversation on his career and America’s justice system.

Hosted by: The University of Vermont College of Arts and Sciences Produced in partnership with: UVM Continuing and Distance Education

Dustin Pari presents: Documenting the Dead

THU., SEP. 19 14TH STAR BREWING, SAINT ALBANS CITY

Friday Night Dinner Party FRI., SEP. 20 RICHMOND COMMUNITY KITCHEN

Acrylic Painting with Robert Waldo Brunelle Jr. SAT., SEP. 21 2CREATIVE COMMUNITY INC., WINOOSKI

The Stranger Play Festival

THU., SEP. 19-21; SUN., SEP. 22 OFF CENTER FOR THE DRAMATIC ARTS, BURLINGTON

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fun stuff

FRAN KRAUSE

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

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MORE FUN! CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.C-4) CROSSWORD (P.C-5)

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The Future of the Global Ocean CLIFFORD SYMPOSIUM SEPTEMBER 19–21, 2019

Thursday, September 19 • 7 PM • Reflections of an Ocean Plastics Scientist Keynote by Kara Lavender Law McCullough Student Center, Wilson Hall Friday, September 20 • 7 PM • Chasing the Thunder Film screening, followed by a Q&A and discussion Sunderland Language Center, Dana Auditorium

go.middlebury.edu/clifford

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Refresh your reading ritual. Flip through your favorite local newspaper on your favorite mobile device. (And yes, it’s still free.)

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY REAL SEPTEMBER 12-18 let’s make these marvels your metaphors of power for the coming weeks. To stimulate your meditations, ask yourself the following questions. 1. How can you harness nature to help you to get where you need to go? 2. How might you transform instinctual energy so that it better serves your practical needs? 3. How could you channel wildness so that it becomes eminently useful to you?

GEMINI

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22):

Novelist Wallace Stegner wrote, “Some are born in their place, some find it, some realize after long searching that the place they left is the one they have been searching for.” I hope that in the last nine months, Virgo, you have resolved which of those three options is true for you. I also trust that you have been taking the necessary actions to claim and own that special place — to acknowledge it and treasure it as the power spot where you feel most at home in the world. If you have not yet fully finished what I’m describing here, do it now.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Hi, I’m your sales representative for UnTherapy, a free program designed to provide healing strategies for people who are trying too hard. Forgive me for being blunt, but I think you could benefit from our services. I don’t have space here to reveal all the secrets of UnTherapy, but here’s an essential hint: every now and then the smartest way to outwit a problem is to stop worrying, let it alone and allow it to solve itself. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): People in Northeast India weave long, strong suspension bridges out of the living roots of fig trees. The structures can measure up to 150 feet and bear the weight of hundreds of people. In accordance with astrological omens,

(May 21-June 20): If you climb to the top of Mt. Everest, you’re standing on land that was once on the floor of a shallow tropical sea. Four-hundred-million-year-old fossils of marine life still abide there in the rock. Over the course of eons, through the magic of plate tectonics, that low flat land got folded and pushed upward more than five miles. I suspect you Geminis will have the power to accomplish a less spectacular but still amazing transformation during the next ten months. To get started, identify what you would like that transformation to be.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 1996, when Gary Kasparov was rated the world’s best chess player, he engaged in a series of matches with a chess-playing computer named Deep Blue. Early on in the first game, Deep Blue tried a move that confused Kasparov. Rattled, he began to wonder if the machine were smarter than him. Ultimately, his play suffered and he lost the game. Later it was revealed that Deep Blue’s puzzling move was the result of a bug in its code. I’ll encourage you to cultivate a benevolent bug in your own code during the coming weeks, Cancerian. I bet it will be the key to you scoring a tricky victory. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): American hero Harriet Tubman escaped slavery as a young woman. She ran away from the wealthy “master” who claimed to “own” her and reached sanctuary. But rather than simply enjoy her freedom, she dedicated herself to liberating other slaves. Nineteen times she returned to enemy territory and risked her life, ultimately leading 300 people out of hellish captivity. Later she served as a scout, spy and nurse in the Union Army during the Civil War, where her actions saved another 700 people. In 1874, the U.S. Congress considered but then ultimately

rejected a bill to pay her $2,000 for her numerous courageous acts. Don’t you dare be like Congress in the coming weeks, Leo. It’s crucial that you give tangible acknowledgment and practical rewards to those who have helped, guided and supported you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Earth’s species are going extinct at a rate unmatched since the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago. Among the creatures on the verge of being lost forever are birds like the cryptic treehunter and Spix’s macaw, as well as the northern white rhino and the vaquita, a type of porpoise. So why don’t we clone the last few individuals of those beleaguered species? Here are the answers. 1. Cloned animals typically aren’t healthy. 2. A species needs a sizable population to retain genetic diversity; a few individuals aren’t sufficient. 3. Humans have decimated the homes of the threatened species, making it hard for them to thrive. Conclusion: Cloning is an inadequate stopgap action. Is there a better way to address the problem? Yes: by preserving the habitats of wild creatures. Inspired by this principle, Libra, I ask you to avoid trying halfway fixes for the dilemmas in your personal sphere. Summon full measures that can really work. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Though patched together and incomplete, the 2,200-year-old marble sculpture known as “The Winged Victory of Samothrace” is prominently displayed at Paris’ Louvre Museum. It’s a glorious depiction of Nike, the winged goddess of victory, and is regarded as one of ancient Greece’s great masterpieces. For hundreds of years, it was missing. Then in 1863, an archaeologist discovered it, although it was broken into more than a hundred pieces. Eventually, it was rebuilt, and much of its beauty was resurrected. I see the coming weeks as a time when you, too, could recover the fragments of an old treasure and begin reassembling it to make a pretty good restoration. SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’ve learned that I must find positive outlets for anger or it will destroy me,” said actor Sidney Poitier. That can be a dynamic meditation for you during the next three weeks. I think you will derive

substantial power from putting it into action. If you’re ingenious and diligent about finding those positive outlets, your anger will generate constructive and transformative results.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1905, at the age of 30, Lucy Maud Montgomery wrote the novel Anne of Green Gables. It was a tale about an orphan girl growing up on Prince Edward Island. She sent the manuscript to several publishers, all of whom rejected it. Discouraged, she put it away in a hatbox and stored it in a closet. But two years later, her ambitions reignited when she reread the story. Again she mailed it to prospective publishers, and this time one liked it enough to turn it into a book. It soon became a bestseller. Since then it has sold over 50 million copies and been translated into 36 languages. I figure you Capricorns are at a point in your own unfolding that’s equivalent to where Anne was shortly before she rediscovered the manuscript she’d put away in the hatbox. AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Toxorhynchites are species of large mosquitoes that don’t buzz around our heads while we’re trying to sleep and will never bite our skin or suck our blood. In fact, they’re our benefactors. Their larvae feast on the larvae of the mosquitoes that are bothersome to us. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose that you be alert for a metaphorically comparable influence in your own life: a helper or ally that might be in disguise or may just superficially seem to be like an adversary.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Audre Lord identified herself as a black writer, lesbian, librarian, mother, feminist, civil rights activist and many other descriptors. But as ardent as she was in working for the political causes she was passionate about, she didn’t want to be pigeonholed in a single identity. One of her central teachings was to celebrate all the different parts of herself. “Only by learning to live in harmony with your contradictions can you keep it all afloat,” she testified. These approaches should be especially fun and extra meaningful for you in the coming weeks, Pisces. I encourage you to throw a big Unity Party for all the different people you are.

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IT’S ALL ABOUT BEING PRESENT I love words and how they can move emotion. Studying to be a poet after 38 years. In the produce business. Going for walks and conversation; love holding hands. No extreme sports. Enjoy going for long rides in the NEK. Love anything to do with water. I am looking for a kind, loving, mature woman with a few extra pounds. poet56, 63, seeking: W, l

TRANS WOMEN seeking... SAPIOSEXUAL, MERCURIAL, HONEST ’TIL DEAD I love learning new things and meeting new people, or learning old things from others’ perspectives. Or old people from new perspectives (says the pot to the kettle). I love it both on intellectual and emotional bases to an extent that I can’t really describe other than “bliss.” Life is so very short, so make every moment count. Wintermute, 36, seeking: M, W, TM, TW, Q, NC, NBP, l GENEROUS, OPEN, EASYGOING Warm, giving trans female with an abundance of yum to share (and already sharing it with lovers) seeks ecstatic connection for playtimes, connections, copulations, exploration and generally wonderful occasional times together. Clear communication, a willingness to venture into the whole self of you is wanted. Possibilities are wide-ranging: three, four, explorations, dreaming up an adventure are on the list! DoubleUp, 62, seeking: Cp, l

COUPLES seeking... EXPERIENCE SOMETHING NEW We are a loving couple of over five years. Love to play and try new things. Spend free time at the ledges. Looking for people to play with. Perhaps dinner, night out and maybe breakfast in the morning. Looking for open-minded men, women or couples who enjoy fun times and new experiences. 2newAdventurers, 51, seeking: M, W, Cp, Gp OPEN-MINDED ROLE-PLAY We are an open-minded couple looking for others. Must be discreet. Please let us know your interests. If you are a male replying, you must be bi or bi-curious. VTroleplaying, 46, seeking: M, W, Cp ATTRACTIVE MARRIED COUPLE Attractive, caring and honest married couple looking to meet a female for fun times both in and out of the bedroom. She is bi-curious; he is straight. We are very easygoing and fun to be around. Will share a photo once we communicate. Let’s see what happens. VTcouple4fun, 48, seeking: W PROFESSIONAL COUPLE LOOKING Professional couple looking for fit, professional men. Ampefm, 44, seeking: M AWESOME COUPLE LOOKING FOR FUN! We are an incredibly fun couple looking for awesome people to share our time and company and play with us. Discreet, honest and chill — request the same from you. Message us; let’s get to know each other, have some fun and see where this goes! vthappycouple, 46, seeking: Cp FULL TRANSPARENCY Adventurous, educated, open couple married 12 years interested in meeting another open couple for some wine, conversation, potential exploration and fun. She is 40 y/o, 5’11, dirty blond hair. He is 41 y/o, 5’10, brown hair. ViridisMontis, 42, seeking: Cp


i SPY

If you’ve been spied, go online to contact your admirer!

dating.sevendaysvt.com

BERLIN SHAW’S NO BASKET As I entered Shaw’s Friday evening, I spied you holding an armful of goods while you were picking up some produce. I approached you and offered my empty basket, which you happily accepted with a smile. We passed again (you without a basket again and goods in arms) and commented. Wish I had also given you my number. Second chance? When: Friday, September 6, 2019. Where: Shaw’s supermarket, Berlin. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914855 WOW CUTIE BESTBUY 9/7 MMORPG man in the peripherals aisle, lvl 120 mouse-clicker hottie. We compared hand sizes, and you pointed me in the right direction. Wish we had exchanged battle net IDs—games and dinner? -PUBG Princess When: Saturday, September 7, 2019. Where: Best Buy. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914854 NIC AT NITE You were my night nurse (LN) getting vitals whilst I got an inpatient DHE infusion first week of Sept. You asked me what my pain level was, and I said it was higher from drinking that stupid soda, and we commiserated over sugar headaches. I then admired your sleeves and felt like a total ham. Less sugary beverages sometime? When: Monday, September 2, 2019. Where: McClure 630 UVM Med Center. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914853 JOHNSON LAUNDROMAT WEDNESDAY 9/4 6:30 You were folding your clothes, and I was seated directly in front of you reading Seven Days at the Johnson laundromat. We exchanged a few glances, and when you left, you said, “Have a nice night.” I replied in the affirmative. I would like to meet you. When: Wednesday, September 4, 2019. Where: Johnson Laundromat. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914852

CV FAIR — LONG SHOT You working the fair, tending refuse receptacles. Petite, short dark hair, really cute. You said last night of the fair was bittersweet. You seemed like a nice girl. Pleasant personality, intelligent, hard working and real cute. Me guarding the gate. I think you’re really cute. Did I mention that? And I’d like to get to know you better. Coffee, drinks, lunch? When: Sunday, September 1, 2019. Where: CV fair. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914851 NEW YORK SPORTS FAN You took my breath away. You were walking into Shaws, pickup truck with NY sports memorabilia on license plate and on dashboard. Probably a month ago after dinner. Wish I had stopped and at least waved hello. goldenmoments329 When: Saturday, August 3, 2019. Where: Colchester Shaws parking area. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914850 BUMPING INTO BEVIE Don’t know you, but we kept “bumping into each other” at the Bevie Warehouse. Sure would like to accidently bump into you again, if you see this. When: Friday, August 30, 2019. Where: Bevie Warehouse. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914849 IN LINE AT WILLISTON WALMART You were standing in line buying a tent. You turned around to smile at someone in a wheelchair directly behind you in line, then looked up to catch my smile as I stood there admiring your beautiful energy. I had long blonde curly hair. Wish I knew how to cross paths with you again. When: Friday, August 30, 2019. Where: Williston Walmart. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914848

Ask REVEREND 

EVERYONE READS THE I-SPYS A year ago, you sat across my desk while I feigned competence and tried to convince myself that you weren’t THAT cute, your jokes weren’t THAT funny, and it wasn’t THAT cool you grew vegetables for a living. I hope things get easier for you. If it helps, remember: I’m frequently thinking of you, and always rooting for you. When: Wednesday, August 29, 2018. Where: not Chittenden County. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914847 ARREST ME! Me pumping gas at the Georgia Mobil, you were babysitting traffic Tuesday, 8/27, early evening. Couple glances and then you were gone. You in your Sheriff’s truck, me in a blue Fusion. I can’t help get your smile out of my head. Would love to buy you a coffee and watch traffic together! When: Tuesday, August 27, 2019. Where: Georgia Mobil. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914846 A DREAM WORTH WAITING FOR You are special to me beyond words — not a day goes by that I don’t think of you. The sparks between us were obvious the moment your eyes first met mine. We’ve spent most of our waking lives on our feet, but not enough time in each other’s arms. Let’s fix that first and figure out the rest in time. When: Monday, August 26, 2019. Where: Antarctica. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914845 EXCHANGED SMILES AT THUNDER ROAD You: eating something hot and worried about burning your mouth. Short, accompanied by a few younger people. White sneakers with blue stripes. Me: one step lower and to your right. I would’ve chatted you up, but I was on the clock supervising someone, and it would’ve been inappropriate. Had to leave early. Just wanted to say I like your form. When: Thursday, August 22, 2019. Where: Barre. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914844 LOVELY LADY AT STARBUCKS You were on your computer. Your computer screen was smudged up, but you looked great. My heart went pitter-patter as I walked by you. I hope I get to see you again. When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Starbucks, Rte. 2, South Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914843

HOT SOUP ON THE CURB I was sitting on the curb in your parking spot, sweating down hot soup on a hot morning. You kindly didn’t run me over before running into the co-op. When: Tuesday, July 30, 2019. Where: Onion River Co-op. You: Gender nonconformist. Me: Woman. #914842

MAL MAÏZ CONCERT You are the cute brunette with glasses who pulled me to the front to dance with you. I was with a friend. Would you like to be friends and dance some more? When: Sunday, August 11, 2019. Where: Middlesex. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914836

SUMMER OF ‘69 AT MSAC You held my hand when we all stood in a circle at the end and sang along with Joe Cocker. Said your name is Rick. In hindsight, I’m intrigued. Wished I’d been a bit bolder. Want to get together and trade Woodstock stories sometime? When: Thursday, August 15, 2019. Where: Montpelier Senior Activity Center. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914841

“WHAT HOLIDAY IS IT?” WINOOSKI Friday night I got out of my car. You asked if I knew what holiday it was, since the parking was free. We laughed about my parking space. I said I’d blame you if I got a ticket! Sorry you didn’t come into Waterworks. Single? If so, meet me so I can tell you what holiday it was! When: Friday, August 16, 2019. Where: outside Waterworks, Winooski. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914835

RESERVOIR ROCK TRAIL ENCOUNTER I ran into you and your puppy on the trail to the “Rock.” Loved your smile and the sparkle in your eyes! When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Waterbury Reservoir Rock Trail. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914840 ROCHESTER ROB If my surgery on Friday doesn’t end well, I just thought I’d say this: I love you, I’m so glad to have met you, be well, eat good food, don’t drink on an empty stomach, and you’re amazing. But if it does go well, LET ME LOVE YOU! When: Sunday, July 20, 2014. Where: Rochester. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914839 BLEW EACH OTHER KISSES Merging onto Rte. 15 in Essex Monday at 5:20 p.m. from I-289. Long line of traffic at the red light by McDonald’s, but you waved my little car in ahead of your tan pickup. I thanked you with a very impromptu “kiss” which you returned. You made my day. Single? Coffee sometime? When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Rte. 15 and I-289, Essex. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914838 NICE BUTT AT DOG PARK Hi. I saw you at the Starr Farm Good Place, and you had a very smelly butt. Gave it a good sniff but would like to sniff again sometime. Please respond and we can maybe share a treat and see where it goes. When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Starr Farm Dog Park. You: Gender nonconformist. Me: Woman. #914837

Dear Felt Up and Furious,

Irreverent counsel on life’s conundrums

Dear Reverend,

A female friend of a friend of mine gets aggressively sexual when she gets drunk. She tries to make out with everyone in the room — male, female, partnered or single — all are fair game in her mind. I’ve repeatedly had to grab her hands to stop her from shoving them down my pants. This makes me (and my other friends) extremely uncomfortable. I try to be polite when I decline her advances, but she’s very persistent. She seems to think it’s funny. How do I make this stop?

Felt Up and Furious, (MALE, 33)

I bet that if she remembers any of it, she does think it’s funny, and she probably thinks she can get away with it because she’s a woman. But sexual harassment is never OK. The gender of the harasser and the location, whether work or a party, doesn’t make a difference. Someone needs to talk to this person when she’s sober and let her know that her behavior is totally unacceptable and needs to stop immediately. It wouldn’t

ENAMORED Beautiful eyes. Smooth, perfect shoulders I want to kiss. Skin so soft, perfectly tan. You were in a cemetery and on a park bench after swimming in the lake, at the lookout point, hair blowing in the wind. So beautiful. Smile so mesmerizing. I’ve seen you in my dreams and in the flesh. I’m captivated. Forever enamored. Are you? When: Saturday, July 20, 2019. Where: Burlington area and more. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914834 WAS THAT YOU? Was that you at the Radio Bean? You were looking me down. I did not say anything because I thought you would think I’m too old. I’m 59 and male. If this is you, contact me. When: Saturday, August 17, 2019. Where: Radio Bean. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914833 CBD GIRL ON PEARL ST. I talked to you today, and your name was Kiera. I commented on your cool dress and how good your formulations were. The free CBD roll on sample worked great. I thought you were really cute, intelligent and nice. Are you up for a vegan dinner, hike or the like? When: Tuesday, August 13, 2019. Where: CBD shop, Pearl St., Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914832 HANDSOME MAN AT BLANCHARD BEACH You were out for a bike ride, and you came onto the beach. My friend and I were sitting in the sand. You opened a beer, walked in the water for a little bit, then left. I really wanted to say something, but I just couldn’t find the words. I hope to see you again there soon. When: Tuesday, August 13, 2019. Where: Blanchard Beach. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914831

hurt to mention that she runs the risk of having charges pressed against her if it continues. After that, if an incident happens again, how about you take a video of her? Then send it to her or show it to her in person so she can see what a creep she is. Hopefully, that would be completely embarrassing and make her realize the error of her ways. Another option is to tell the friend who brings this person around that their friend isn’t welcome anymore. Have your other pals back you up on the idea, and make sure your friend knows how serious you all are. Perhaps that will make your problem simply disappear. Good luck and God bless,

The Reverend

What’s your problem?

Send it to asktherev@sevendaysvt.com. SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

89


Separated guy, 57, tall, mostly in shape. Seeking outdoorsy, active lady for adventure and travel and hopefully a longterm relationship. I have many interests. Nonsmoker, 420 OK. Must like dogs, be funny and fun. #L1350 Easy on the eyes. Discreet 52-y/o SWM, 5’9, 160 pounds. Brown and blue. Seeking any guys in shape, DD-free, who enjoy receiving oral and are a good top and last a long time. Well hung guys a plus. Chittenden County and around. #L1349

Single, active male looking for female ages 47-61 with good sense of humor, nonsmoker, love to dance, work out, and sports. Within 50 miles of Rutland. #L1355 Very laidback, sincere, good shape, GL, open-minded, 60s single guy. Very clean and DD free. Interested in meeting a compatible couple or woman. Definitely have oral tendencies and interest in being a willing sub or boy toy. Thanks. #L1354 I’m a white male, 50-y/o, seeking gay men. Joy jelly seeks gay men for fun and play. Come inside and fill me with your warmth. Addison County. #L1351

Fairly fit 57 SWM looking for bright, adventuresome SWF, 45-60, who enjoys outdoors, hiking, skiing, cooking and great food, and new places! Recently returned to central VT after a 14-year absence; semi-retired 30-year Hist/Econ teacher and coach. Seeking companion; some good laughs, travel, and ability to communicate. #L1353 Mountain man, 56-y/o, looking for mountain woman. Enjoys downhill skiing, healthy outdoor activities. Looking for woman with same interests who enjoys laughter, good times, good food. Cat lover. In Lamoille County. #L1352

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

I’m a single male, 62 y/o, seeking a male or female for friendship. Friendly and caring person, 5’9”, 150 pounds. Looking for friends who love running, walking, biking, hiking or other activities, even dancing. I’m a nonsmoker, kind, intelligent and respectful. Still working part time but love being out early a.m. I love folk, jazz and classical music. The summer is still here, but soon the colors will be here. Hope to hear from you. #L1348 I’m a SM, 71 y/o, seeking gal for a blind date for the Gov’t Mule show at Waterfront Park on September 15. #L1347 I’m a SBM, 70 y/o, seeking a SWF or SWM bi, cp, tw, tm. 36 to 70 y/o. Looking for HJ or BJ. Love to perform oral and receive the same. Be discreet and DD-free. Love to kiss, role-play and have sweet sex. #L1346

Internet-Free Dating!

Reply to these messages with real, honest-to-goodness letters. DETAILS BELOW. Old man seeking old woman. Any race. Love more and out more. Lonely. Frisky. #L1345 Beautiful, pretty, handsome, healthy, fun, active, happy and sexy Latino SWM acting 45 w/ natural body features for SWF in the 40s. Hiking, flat-water kayaking, walking, camping, soccer, cooking, dining out, swimming, holding hands, travel, making love frequently. DD-free. #L1344

I’m SWM, young 70, seeking SF. I’m healthy, honest, caring, considerate, passionate and a straight shooter. Seek an unpretentious, reasonably trim gal ready for dancing, prancing and romancing! Let’s share humor and hugs, music, the outside, road trips, firelight and the Milky Way. Let’s begin! Glover, NEK. #L1341

I’m a gay, Christian male seeking to connect with other LGBTQ Christians for socializing and worship. Let’s meet to feed our stomachs and our souls! #L1342

If you are a hot SWF between 24 and 29 and looking for a lion to enter your jungle, then I can do better. I am a “TIGER” ready to roar. I am 29, tall, tan and handsome. I am a one-woman man not interested in polygamy. I work full time, so I can help with the bills. I would like you to be a nonsmoker, athletic, fun, kind and the mother of my future babies. If you are the right gal for this position and ready to be the future Mrs. Tiger, then don’t miss this opportunity. #L1340

I’m a SWF, 73 y/o, NS. Would like to meet a man who is alone like me and wants someone for companionship and to have fun together. #L1336

I am a GWM, mid-50s, seeking bi or GMs for fun and exploration. Married is OK, too. Nice guy with varied interests. Mid-Vermont, Rutland area. #L1331

I’m a SWM, 66, seeking a SWF 55 to 68. I enjoy being outdoors, a nice dinner out and a home-cooked meal at home. Homebody, handyman. Weekend getaways. NEK. #L1343

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1T-punchline-Dan St. Germain.pdf

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2:46 PM

MEDIA SUPPORT

Dan St. Germain

GREAT Funches, Wolf GREATIFIFYOU YOUENJOY...Ron ENJOY...Jack Black, Pete KyleHolmes, Kinane, Michelle Dave Attell THU. SEPT 19, 7 P.M. FRI. SEPT 20, 7 & 9:30 P.M. SAT. SEPT 21, 7 & 9:30 P.M. 10 1 MA I N ST. BU RL INGTO N • VTCO M E DY. CO M

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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2019/2020 SEASON ON SALE NOW! PARAMOUNTVT.ORG

30 CENTER ST. RUTLAND, VT 802.775.0903

SEPT

SCOTT STAPP

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of Creed

The Space Between The Shadows Tour

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THE FOUR ITALIAN TENORS

OCT

OCT

28

SEPT

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C is For Celebration

OCT

3

OCT

5

WYNONNA JUDD & THE BIG NOISE

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JUSTIN HAYWARD

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PINK MARTINI

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KIP MOORE:

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26

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Feat. China Forbes

The Voice of The Moody Blues

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TENTH AVENUE NORTH

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A TRIBUTE TO ERIC CLAPTON

Room To Spare Acoustic Tour

Featuring Kofi Baker

Special Guest: Tucker Beathard

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1

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TWELVE TWENTY-FOUR

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Humane

Society of Chittenden County

Igor AGE/SEX: 10-year-old neutered male ARRIVAL DATE: June 26, 2019 REASON HERE: Found as a stray SUMMARY: Are you the kind of person who has a special place

in their heart for pets who need just a little more TLC? Do you like kittens and puppies but LOVE super seniors? Is your idea of a great night staying in with a good book and a purry companion? All of the above? Great! Igor just may be the meow for you! Igor is FIV+, so his immune system doesn't work as well as a typical cat's. However, with a low-stress and indoor-only lifestyle, high-quality food, and lots of love, Igor has a great chance at a long, happy life. Igor is more than ready to go home with a family who doesn't mind their pets a little on the rumpled side ­— if this sounds like you, come in and meet Igor today!

DID YOU KNOW? FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) is a viral disease in cats spread via deep bite wounds; it makes them more susceptible to disease and infection. To keep them healthy and prevent transmission to other cats, FIV+ kitties should be kept indoors and monitored by their veterinarian. FIV+ cats can even live with other pets as long as they all get along without major fighting. One thing not affected by FIV is their ability to love, so please consider adopting an FIV+ cat!

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1-BR TAFT FARM 2-BR IN WINOOSKI SENIOR LIVING $1,600/mo. Beautiful, 10 Tyler Way, Williston, SM-ClassyDisplay-MartyGil091119.indd 9/9/19 1:43 PM 1 NEED A ROOMMATE? sunny, ultra-modern independent senior Roommates.com will 2-BR, 2-fl oors loft. living. Newly remodeled help you find your Freshly painted, HDWD 1-BR unit on 2nd floor perfect match today! floors throughout, avail., $1,165/mo. incl. (AAN CAN) W/D, natural gas utils. & cable. NS/pets. heat, parking. Avail. Must be 55+ years of 802-425-2910. age. cintry@fullcirclevt. com or 802-879-3333. We Pick Up AFFORDABLE 2-BR APT. AVAIL. & Pay For Junk 2-BR TAFT FARM At Keen’s Crossing. SENIOR LIVING Automobiles! 2-BR: $1,266/mo., heat & 10 Tyler Way, Williston, OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE HW incl. Open floor plan, independent senior AT MAIN STREET fully applianced kitchen, LANDING living. Newly remodeled fi tness center, pet 2-BR unit on main floor on Burlington’s friendly, garage parking. avail., $1,365/mo. incl. Waterfront. Beautiful, Route 15, Hardwick Income restrictions utils. & cable. NS/pets. healthy, affordable apply. 802-655-1810. 802-472-5100 Must be 55+ years of spaces for your KeensCrossing.com. age. cintry@fullcirclevt. business. Visit 3842 Dorset Ln., Williston com or 802-879-3333. mainstreetlanding.com 802-793-9133 DOWNTOWN & click on space avail. BURLINGTON Melinda, 864-7999. Gorgeous, lg., sunny 2-BR apt. Freshly sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM painted, all HDWD floors. Pets OK. On bus line. Avail. now. $1,375/mo. Call for appt. This won’t last! 598-9877.

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL

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EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the law. Our

C-2

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readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High-speed internet. Free installation, Smart HD DVR incl., free voice remote. Some restrictions apply. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN)

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Open to the Public! 300± Cars, Trucks, SUVs & More!

Sat., September 14 @ 9AM (Register & Inspect from 7:30AM)

Buying or Selling?

298 J. Brown Dr., Williston, VT

I work for you! Online Bidding Available on Lane 3

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you!

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services

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x10

’15 Chevy Trax ’14 Chevy Equinox ’14 Honda Odyssey ’13 Ford Focus ’13 Hyundai Sonata ’13 Mitsubishi Fuso ’13 Nissan Altima ’13 Nissan Murano ’12 Chevy Equinox ’12 Chevy Impala ’12 Ford E-Series Cargo ’12 Kia Forte Koup ’12 Mazda 3 AND MORE!!

List Subject to Change

Thomas Hirchak Company THCAuction.com • 800-474-6132

11/12/18 Untitled-65 2:21 PM 1

1185 Shelburne Road, South Burlington

9/9/19 1:01 PM

MOVE IN SPECIAL • CALL FOR DETAILS

COUNSELING INTERFAITH SPIRITUAL HELP Spiritual director, helper, deep listener. For beginners through mystics. Flexible approach to suit your needs. In Middlebury & by phone or video calls. Barbara Clearbridge, 802-3249149, clearbridge@ feelingmuchbetter.org, feelingmuchbetter.org.

CREATIVE ART MARKETING CONSULTANT Are you an artist or crafter struggling w/ the business & marketing side of your creative business? Schedule a consultation w/ artist, author & speaker Corrina Thurston. corrinathurston.com/ consulting.

ELDER CARE A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to

NEW South Burlington property! 1185 Shelburne Road is located 5-10 minutes from downtown Burlington. Amenities include: • Banking • Retail • Dining on first floor of building • Laundry & Parking included

Resident spaces in the building for entertaining and relaxing, a beautiful terrace on our top floor includes a grill and amazing lake views. One bedrooms available for immediate occupancy, $1500-$1575. Open houses daily!

Call Larkin Realty today and schedule your showing, 802.864.7444 4t-larkinrealty091119.indd 1

9/9/19 11:21 AM


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x22.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses LOVELY HOME IN SHELBURNE!

NESTLED IN THE WOODS

SHELBURNE | 87 WILD ROSE CIRCLE | #4774914

WOW! So many updates! Kitchen with open shelving and stainless appliances open to dining area with swank light fixtures. Cozy brick fireplace in living room. Sunroom with vaulted ceiling. Mudroom. Oversized garage. Deep & spacious backyard. Great neighborhood. $535,000

EXCEPTIONAL WATERFRONT COMPOUND

WESTFORD | 42 BROOKSIDE ROAD #LOT 1 | #4744033

This unique & energy-efficient Contemporary offers 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths plus several unique bonus spaces including a top floor cupola, 3-car garage with workshop and more. On 4.61 acres with additional building lots available. Country setting yet only 30 minutes to Burlington! $459,900

Monique Bedard 846.9590 MoniqueBedard.com

LAKE FRONTAGE IN BURLINGTON!

SOUTH HERO | 341 WEST SHORE ROAD | #4743290

A once in a lifetime opportunity to own this year-round lakefront property with 1279' of Lake Champlain frontage on 8.65 acres. Make your way down a longwooded lane to this stunning point surrounded by water on three sides. Enjoy this premier waterfront paradise! $3,900,000

Lipkin Audette Team 846.8800 LipkinAudette.com

CONTEMPORARY CAPE

BURLINGTON | 3201, 3205 NORTH AVENUE | #4666984

STRUGGLING WITH YOUR PRIVATE STUDENT LOAN PAYMENT? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631. (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Eastern) (AAN CAN)

List your properties here and online for only $45/ week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon.

HEALTH/ WELLNESS GENTLE MASSAGE THERAPY Healing, mindful, Swedish massage at your location, or mine in Johnson Vt. Pete Bellini C.M.T. Text 802-4978953 for more info.

Custom 4 BR, 4 BA cape on 55 acres with subdivision potential. Easy commute to Burlington/Middlebury. Lower level has private entrance & bedroom suite that could be an accessory apartment. $498,500

Edie Brodsky

Katrina E. Roberts, Broker

846.9532 EdieBrodsky.com

Greentree Real Estate (802) 989-2833 Katrina@vermontgreentree.com

MASSAGE FOR MEN BY SERGIO Deep tissue, Swedish. By appt. only. In and out calls in the Burlington area. Please call ahead of time. 802-324-7539. PRIVATE SOUND HEALING SESSIONS Book a 30-minute or 1-hour private sound healing session w/ Amber Arnold of Sacred Vibrations at the Clemmons Family Farm. Amber uses carefully tuned singing bowls & other traditional healing instruments played in concert. Their vibrations will help the left & right brain synchronize & rebalance. Relax, mediate & enjoy.

PSYCHIC COUNSELING hw-GreenTree091119.indd 1 Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

buy this stuff

HOME/GARDEN HARVEST SERVICES VT-CBD Labs is able to offer its drying & storage services to farmers throughout Vermont & the northeastern US. Reserve your spot today! www.vt-cbdlabs. com. Contact us at: info@vt-cbdlabs.com, 802-338-9000.

FURNITURE GLASS TABLE TOPS 42” & 36” diameter x 1/2” thick. New & slightly used clear tempered glass. 802-862-9633, beaudin@comcast.net, Shelburne.

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES BIG YARD SALE! Cleaned my mom’s house. Lots of

846.9532 EdieBrodsky.com

homeworks

MONKTON | 306 JUNIPER LANE

OPEN Sunday 12-2 Rare opportunity! This spectacular level lakefront property features unobstructed views of Lake Champlain, the Adirondacks, a wonderful sandy beach and 2 houses. Part-owner is a licensed real estate salesperson. $1,100,000

Edie Brodsky

interesting stuff. Sep. 7 & 8, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 30 Pine St., S. Burlington. Free stuff Sun. afternoon. GARAGE SALE Many portable table/ floor lamps & traditional light bulbs, sheet music & method books, 2 window fans, & more. 27 Tracy Dr., Burlington. Sep. 14. SOBU MULTIFAMILY YARD SALE 8+ family sale at Wellesley Grove, 630 Hinesburg Rd., S. Burlington. Sat., Sep. 7, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Tech, instruments, furniture, kids stuff, more! STUDIO DOWNSIZING SALE! Salsalina Studio, 266 Pine St., Burlington, Vt. Sep. 14-15, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Call or email today to get started: 865-1020 x22, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com

Furniture, electronics, couch, dressers, 9/5/19 2:27 PM Untitled-26 1 cabinets, tables, desk, TV stand, printer, DVD/ CD players. maggier53@ gmail.com. THREE-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat., Sep. 14, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., & Sun., Sep. 15, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 14 Pond Rd., Shelburne. Cash only. Housewares, clothing, sporting, children’s, furniture, books.

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PETS

6/6/16 4:34 PM

IRISH WOLFHOUND PUPPIES They are 5/8 wolfhound & 1/8 each English mastiff, malamute, greyhound. Look like wolfhounds but longer life. Good homes only! $650. 802-324-3370.

WANT TO BUY WANTED: FREON R12. WE PAY CA$H. R12, R500, R11. Convenient. Certified professionals. www. refrigerantfinders.com/ ad, 312-291-9169.

MUSIC » SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Kristen, 865-1020, ext. 22, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

EXECUTIVE RANCH

NORTH HERO FARMHOUSE Executive ranch on 12 acres. Four bedrooms, two-car attached garage. New 30’x40’ out building with heat and hot water, with a 14’x11’ overhead door. $328,500 Tony: 802-6739768

Stunning property on 11.22 acres includes 2 bedroom farmhouse built in 2000, heated studio building and unheated shop building, beach and mooring rights. $392,000. 802-233-0310.

JAY PEAK APARTMENTS

FSBO-khan091119.indd 1

MUSIC

music

INSTRUCTION ANDY’S MOUNTAIN MUSIC Affordable, accessible, no-stress instruction in banjo, guitar, mandolin, more. All ages/skill levels/interests welcome! Dedicated teacher offering references, results, convenience. Andy Greene, 802-658-2462, guitboy75@hotmail. com, andysmountain music.com. BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn piano, voice, guitar, bass, violin, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best instructors in spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates avail. Come share in the music. burlingtonmusicdojo. com, info@burlington musicdojo.com. HARMONICA LESSONS W/ ARI Lessons in Montpelier & on Skype. First lesson just $20! All ages & skill levels welcome. Avail. for workshops,

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too. Pocketmusic. musicteachershelper. com, 201-565-4793, ari. erlbaum@gmail.com. TROMBONE, TRUMPET LESSONS Trombone, trumpet, piano, voice. Teacher w/ over 35 years of experience, M.M. Eastman School. All ages. $60/1 hour, $45/0.75 hours, $30/0.5 hours. 6608524. octavemode@ gmail.com. www. octavemode.me. stuart@octavemode.net 802-660-8524.

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL REHEARSAL SPACE Lovely, air-conditioned & furnished creativespace rooms avail. by the hour in the heart of the south end district. Monthly arrangements avail. as well. Tailored for music but can be multipurpose. info@ burlingtonmusicdojo. com, 802-540-0321.

generally described as The District #4 Environthe demolition of an exmental Commission is 9/9/19 FSBO10:53 marsh091119.indd AM 1 isting shed and construc- reviewing this application of a 1,960 sf building tion under Act 250 Rule containing a garage and 51 - Minor Applications. accessory dwelling. The A copy of the application project is located at 567 and proposed permit are Patton Woods Road in available for review at Charlotte, Vermont. the office listed below. The application and a

Calcoku

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

Cape style, 3 bdr/ 1 bath farmhouse. Completely updated, located in Williston school district. Detached 2-car garage with shop space. Large and private backyard. chipmig@gmail.com $232,500

draft permit may also be and a permit may be viewed on the Natural issued unless, on or 9/9/19 FSBO-Mignano091119.indd 1:15 PM Resources Board’s web before September 25, 1 site (http://nrb.vermont. 2019, a person notifies gov) by clicking on “Act the Commission of an 250 Database” and enter- issue or issues requiring ing the project number the presentation of “4C0435-1”. evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the No hearing will be held matter for hearing on its

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

11+

WILLISTON STARTER HOME FOR SALE

Peace and privacy 8/19/19 2:18 PM of country living in this sweet log home near a brook, surrounded by perennial gardens on a ten-acre wooded lot. Includes lovely small studio/cabin. Contact Peter 802-453-3478 or brymarsh@gmavt. net, $174,500

own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoin-

Sudoku

36x

4 1 7 2 5

9 1

5

6 6 4

4-

1 Difficulty - Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

ing property owner or other interested person 12:55 PM must include9/9/19 a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to

Complete the following puzzle by using the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

8

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ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0435-1 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On August 30, 2019, Matthew & Jennifer Segel filed application #4C0435-1 for a project

CONTACT KRISTEN, 865-1020, EXT. 22 FSBO@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

STARKSBORO COUNTRY HOME

Excellent income 9/2/19 FSBO-antell082119.indd 3:15 PM 1 earner just 10 min from skiing. Used to offer vacation rentals, now has annual tenants. Refurbished 3 two bedroom units, 1 three bedroom. www.vtsaltcaves. com/apt or call 802-578-7103. $195,000

FSBO-142_topper_view 090419.indd 1

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45!

3 3 6 7

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2 6 9

No. 601

SUDOKU

Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

5

6

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ANSWERS ON P. C-6 3 1 7 2 4 6 9 8 5 ★ = MODERATE ★★ = CHALLENGING ★★★ = HOO, BOY!

6 5 2 8 9 1 4 3 7 7 8 9 5 1 2 3 6 4 5 4 1 6 8 3 7 2 9


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by September 25, 2019. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a par-

ticularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 4th day of September, 2019. By: _/s/Rachel Lomonaco_____________ Rachel Lomonaco, District #4 Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-879-5658 Rachel.lomonaco@ vermont.gov CITY OF BURLINGTON ORDINANCE 5.06 SPONSOR: PLANNING DEPARTMENT, PLANNING COMMISSION, ORDINANCE COMMITTEE Public Hearing Date: 08/26/19 First reading: 06/17/19 Referred to: Ordinance Committee Rules suspended and placed in all stages of passage: ______________ Second reading: 08/26/19 Action: adopted Date: 08/26/19 Signed by Mayor: 08/30/19

Show and tell.

»

Published: 09/11/19 Effective: 10/02/19

It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows: That Appendix A, Comprehensive Development Ordinance, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby is amended by amending Section 3.1.2, Zoning Permit Required, Section 4.4.6, Recreation, Conservation and Open Space Districts, Section 5.5.4, Tree Removal, Section 6.2.2, Review Standards, Section 13.1.2, Definitions, and Appendix A-Use Table—All Zoning Districts, thereof to read as follows: Sec. 3.1.2, Zoning Permit Required Except for that development which is exempt from a permit requirement under Sec. 3.1.2(c)

crossword

Extra! Extra!

Post & browse ads at your convenience.

There’s no limit to ad length online.

Appendix A-Use Table – All Zoning Districts

In the Year Two Thousand Nineteen An Ordinance in Relation to COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE – Trees, Junkyards, and Cross Reference Correction ZA #19-04

Open 24/7/365.

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

Urban Reserve

Recreation, Conservation & Open Space

Institutional

Downtown Mixed Usei

Residential

Neighborhood Mixed Use

Enterprise

USES

UR

RCO - A

RCO - RG

RCO - C

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RL/W

RM/W

RH

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NMU

NAC

NAC- RC

NAC-CR

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E-LM

RESIDENTIAL USES

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RCO - RG

RCO - C

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NAC- RC

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*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

***

*****

*****

****

*****

*****

*****

*****

RESIDENTIAL SPECIAL USES

UR

RCO – A

RCO - RG

RCO - C

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RM/W

RH

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NMU

NAC

NAC- RC

NAC-CR

E-AE

E-LM

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

***

*****

*****

****

*****

*****

*****

*****

NONRESIDENTIAL USES

UR21

RCO - A

RCO - RG

RCO - C

I

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RM

RH

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NMU

NAC

NAC- RC

NAC-CR

E-AE

E-LM

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

***

*****

*****

****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Automobile/ Vehicle Salvage Yard

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

***

*****

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****

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nance and removal not otherwise associated with land clearing for new development or site improvements, and regular turf maintenance including re-grading and reseeding shall be exempt from the requirement to obtain a zoning permit. 3. 2. As written. 4. 3. As written.

1. – 31. As written.

Sec. 5.5.4, Tree Removal Zoning permit requests for tree removal are subject to DRB review per the following criteria.

Legend: As written.

(a) – (b) As written.

Junkyard

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

***

*****

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i.

As written.

below, no development may be commenced within the city without a zoning permit issued by the administrative officer including but not limited to the following types of exterior and interior work: (a) Exterior Work:

(12) month period. Such land development shall require the advance approval of the DRB under the criteria set forth in Article 6, Part 2 hereof before a zoning permit may be issued.

1. -8. As written.

(b) Interior Work: As written. (c) Exemptions The following shall be exempt from the requirements of this Ordinance and shall not be required to obtain a zoning permit:

9. Tree removal involving six (6) or more trees, each of ten (10) inches or greater in caliper or the removal of ten (10) or more trees, each of which is three (3) inches or greater in caliper during any consecutive twelve

10. – 20. As written.

1. -2. As written.

3. Within any city park within an RCO zone or Civic district, regular tree maintenance and removal not otherwise associated with land clearing for new development or site improvements, and regular turf maintenance including re-grading and reseeding. 34. -15 16. As written, except renumbered to accommodate new number 3. Sec. 4.4.6, Recreation, Conservation and Open Space Districts (a) – (c) As written.

(d) District Specific Regulations The following regulations are district-specific exemptions, bonuses, and standards unique to the RCO districts. They are in addition to, or may modify, city-wide standards as provided in Article 5 of this ordinance and district standards as provided above in Tables 4.4.6-1 and 4.4.6-2. 1.

As written.

2. Exemptions for Tree removal and Turf Maintenance in City Parks. Regular tree mainte-

Sec. 6.2.2, Review Standards (a) – (o) As written. (p) Integrate infrastructure into the design: Exterior storage areas, machinery and equipment installations, service and loading areas, utility meters and structures, mailboxes, and similar accessory structures shall utilize setbacks, plantings, enclosures and other mitigation or screening methods to minimize their auditory and vi-

LEGALS »

NOVEL COUPLES ANSWERS ON P. C-6

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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1 6 2 3 4 1 6 8 5 3 7 6 4 2 4-9 5 1 4 2 Difficulty - Hard 7 3 9 8 36x

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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5+

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column. No. 601

Calcoku

Difficulty: Hard

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FROM P.C-5

1

Please contact Nathaniel Jamison, Owner’s Project Representative, at (802)

4

Sealed bids will be accepted at Winooski Housing Authority’s office at 83 Barlow St., Winooski, Vermont, until October 2nd at 2:00pm ET. Sealed bids may be delivered via mail or in person. Only hard copies will be accepted. Davis Bacon wage rates will apply. Late bids will not be accepted. Bids will be opened and publicly read aloud.

999-4764 or email at Homeshare-temp2.indd 1 ZA-20-01 Form District 5 nathaniel@pcivt.com Boundaries to express interest and request access to bid The public hearing will documents. take place on Monday, October 7, 2019 during Minority-owned and the Regular City Council Meeting which begins women-owned businesses are encouraged at 7:00 pm in Contois to participate. Auditorium, Burlington City Hall, 149 Church Street, Burlington, VT. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Pursuant to the requireBurlington Comprements of 24 V.S.A. hensive Development §4444(b): Ordinance Statement of purpose: Pursuant to 24 V.S.A. The purpose of this pro§4442 and §4444, notice posed amendment is to is hereby given of a public modify the boundaries of hearing by the Burlington Form District 5 to include City Council to hear comadditional properties ments on the following located along the boundproposed amendment to ary of the current district. the City of Burlington’s Properties considered Comprehensive Developfor inclusion in the FD5 ment Ordinance (CDO): district were evaluated for their current

2

An optional pre-bid conference will meet 31 E. Spring St., Winooski, Vermont, on September 18th, at 9:00AM ET.

Finding you just the right housemate for over 35 years! Call 863-5625 or visit HomeShareVermont.org for an application. Interview, refs, bg check req. EHO

3

This project consists of the complete removal of the existing stoneballasted membrane roof system and replacement with a new mechanically fastened membrane roof system.

6

PUZZLE ANSWERS

Provide light companionship, mowing & snow removal for gentle senior in his 80s. Some understanding of memory loss preferred. Private BA. $400/mo (all inc).

5

Unless defined to the contrary in Section 4303 of the Vermont Planning and Development Act

RICHMOND

INVITATION FOR BID Winooski Housing Authority is soliciting bids from qualified roofing contractors for the 31 East Spring St. Roof Replacement.

2

For the purpose of this ordinance certain terms and words are herein defined as follows:

Share a home w/ senior veteran who enjoys sharing stories. $200/mo. rent in exchange for help w/ light cleaning, cooking 2x/week & companionship. Private BA.

2

Sec. 13.1.2 Definitions.

*** Automobile/Vehicle Salvage Yard: Land or buildings used for the collection, wrecking, dismantling, storage, salvaging, and sale of machinery, parts, or vehicles not in running condition. Three or more unregistered vehicles are considered an automobile/vehicle salvage yard. An automobile/ vehicle salvage yard does not include automobile/ vehicle repair as defined in this Article. *** Automobile Salvage/ Junkyard: Land or buildings used for the collection, wrecking, dismantling, storage, salvaging, and sale of automobile parts from automobiles that are not in running condition. *** Junkyard: Any place of outdoor storage or deposit that is maintained, operated, or used for storing, keeping, processing, buying, or selling garbage, trash, appliances, and/or furni-

MIDDLEBURY

** Material stricken out deleted. *** Material underlined added.

6

Any development involving the installation of machinery or equipment which emits heat, vapor, fumes, vibration, or noise shall minimize, insofar as practicable, any adverse impact on neighboring properties and the environment pursuant to the requirements of Article 5, Part 4 5 Performance Standards.

Additional definitions specifically pertaining to Art. 14 planBTV: Downtown Code can be found in Sec. 14.8, and shall take precedence without limitation over any duplicative or conflicting definitions of this Article.

BURLINGTON

Share home w/ professional in her 60s, passionate about animals & environmentalism. Seeking dog-lover to help w/ pet care & light housework. $500/mo. (all inc). Private BA. No add’l pets.

4

Utility and service enclosures and screening shall be coordinated with the design of the principal building, and should be grouped in a service court away from public view. Onsite utilities shall be placed underground whenever practicable. Trash and recycling bins and dumpsters shall be located, within preferably, or behind buildings, enclosed on all four (4) sides to prevent blowing trash, and screened from public view.

Appendix A—Use Table— All Zoning Districts— *See proposed changes on attached table.

Homeshares

3

sual impact on the public street and neighboring properties to the extent practicable.

ture as articulated under Article III, Division 1, Sec. 18-111 of the City Code of Ordinances. Junkyard does not include a waste facility or a vehicle salvage yard as defined in this ordinance. ***

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as amended, or defined otherwise in this section, definitions contained in the building code of the City of Burlington, Sections 8-2 and 13-1 of the Code of Ordinances, as amended, incorporating the currently adopted edition of the American Insurance Association’s “National Building Code” and the National Fire Protection Association’s “National Fire Code” shall prevail.

use, future potential use, development intensity, and compatibility with adjacent properties. They have been recommended to be included in the FD5 in order to encourage the type and intensity of future infill or redevelopment consistent with adjacent properties, to enable greater flexibility for expansion or reuse of existing uses and structures, and/or reduce existing non-conformities. Geographic areas affected: The proposed amendment applies to 19 parcels bordering on the current Form District 5 boundary immediately surrounding the downtown core. Maps showing the specific areas recommended for rezoning are available at https://www.burlingtonvt.gov/PZ/CDO/ProposedAmendments-BeforetheCity-Council List of section headings affected: The proposed amendment affects Map 4.3.1-1 Base Zoning Districts; Map 4.4.1-1 Downtown Mixed Use Districts; Map 4.4.5-1 Residential Zoning Districts; Map 8.1.3-1 Parking Districts; Article 14- Map 1 Regulating Plan, Map 2 Specific Height Areas, and Map 3 Shopfronts Required. The full text of the Burlington Comprehensive Development Ordinance and these proposed amendments are available for review at the Office of City Planning, City Hall, 149 Church Street, Burlington Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. or on the department’s website at www.burlingtonvt.gov/ pz/cdo.

9/9/19 1:40 PM

STATE OF VERMONT VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT RUTLAND UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO: 511-8-18 RDCV U.S. BANK TRUST NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS OWNER TRUSTEE FOR REO TRUST 2017-RPL1 v. JOHN MARKOWSKI AND JILL MARKOWSKI OCCUPANTS OF: 77 Carver Street, Brandon VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered February 7, 2019, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by John Markowski and Jill Markowski to Beneficial Homeowner Service Corporation, dated June 26, 2006 and recorded in Book 183 Page 172 of the land records of the Town of Brandon, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Beneficial Homeowner Service Corporation to MTGLQ Investors, L.P. dated April 26, 2017 and recorded in Book 235 Page 217; (2) Assignment of Mortgage from MTGLQ Investors, L.P. to Loan Acquisition Trust 2017-RPL1 dated August 10, 2017 and recorded in Book 237 Page 429; (3) Assignment of Mortgage from Loan Acquisition Trust 2017-RPL1 to REO Trust 2017-RPL1 dated January 9, 2018 and recorded in Book 238 Page 410; and (4) Assign-

ment of Mortgage from REO Trust 2017-RPL1 to U.S. Bank Trust National Association, not in its individually capacity but solely as Owner Trustee for REO Trust 2017-RPL1 dated May 2, 2018 and recorded in Book 240 Page 22, all of the land records of the Town of Brandon for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 77 Carver Street, Brandon, Vermont on October 10, 2019 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to John Markowski and Jill Markowski, husband and wife as tenants by the entirety by Limited Warranty Deed of Federal National Mortgage Association, a corporation organized and existing under the laws of the United States having its principal office in the City of Washington, District of Columbia, and an office for the conduct of business at 13455 Noel Road, Suite 600, Galleria Tower II, Dallas, Texas 75240-5003 dated October 21, 1997 and recorded October 27, 1997 in Book 129, Pages 418420 of the Land Records of the Town of Brandon, Vermont, being more particularly described as follows: “The property is commonly known as 77 Carver Street, Brandon, Vermont and is more particularly described as follows: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to M & T Mortgage Corporation by Certificate of Non-Redemption and Writ of Possession and certified copy of the First Amended Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure in a cause entitled: M & T Mortgage Corporation v. Normand Croteau, et al., Rutland Superior Court Docket No. S0412-96 RcC, which Certificate is dated April 3, 1997 and was recorded on April 9, 1997 in Volume 127, Page 462 of the Land Records of the Town of Brandon, and being further described as follows: Being all and the same lands and premises as conveyed to Normand and Susan Crouteau by Warranty Deed of Salvatore Tartamella and Mary Bramlette dated January 10, 1994 and recorded on January 12, 1994 in Volume 117, Pages 106 of the Brandon Land Records and being further described therein as follows:


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to John S. Stark and Susan J. Stark, husband and wife, by Warranty Deed of Alan H. Willis and Heather J. Willis, husband and wife, dated the 6th day of March, 1985 and recorded at Book 89, Page 374 of the Brandon Land Records, and therein bounded and described as follows: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Alan H. Willis and Heather J. Willis, husband and wife, by Warranty Deed of Beulah N. Tierney, which Warranty Deed is dated May 22, 1974 and is recorded in Book 82, Page 184 of the Brandon Land Records, and therein more fully described as follows: `A portion of all and the same lands and premises conveyed to James G. and Beulah J. Tierney, husband and wife, by Quit Claim Deed of Donald G. Papineau dated June 7, 1963, and recorded in Book 76, Page 367 of the Brandon Land Records, and being parcel number one as described in a Warranty Deed from James G. and Beulah N. Tierney to the said Donald G. Paipineau dated 7 June 1963 and recorded in Book 76, Page 365 of the Brandon Land Records, the lands and premises herein conveyed being more particularly described in said deed from Donald G. Papineau to Jam (c.g.) G. and Beulah N. Tierney as follows: `That part of the socalled Lamphere Place that lies next to and on the westerly side of Carver Street, being bounded on the north or northerly by lands formerly of Backus Foundry, Inc.; on the east or easterly by the said Carver Street; on the south or southerly by lands formerly of Martin, now supposed to be owned by Baker, and the west or westerly by lands of the Rutland Railroad Company, containing three (3) acres of land, more or less, and being all and singular the same lands and premises conveyed to Joseph C. Tierney and Mary H. Tierney, his wife, by Catherine E. Dever by deed dated January 6, 1928, and recorded in Book 62, Page 227 of the Brandon Land Records.” Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Grantor herein by special limited warranty deed of M & T

Mortgage Corporation dated October 9, 1997 and recorded October 27, 1997 in Book 129, Pages 416-417 of the Town of Brandon Land Records. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : September 3, 2019 ___/s/ Rachel By: K. Ljunggren_______ Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT VERMONT SUPERIOR COURTCHITTENDEN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISIONDOCKET NO: 1070-11-15 CNCV WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST v. JENNIFER J. HUTCHINS F/K/A JENNIFER J. BARNIER AND SCOTT R. HUTCHINS OCCUPANTS OF: 4 Faith Street, Burlington VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and

Decree of Foreclosure entered August 30, 2016, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Jennifer J. Hutchins and Scott R. Hutchins to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc., dated April 5, 2005 and recorded in Book 913 Page 219 of the land records of the City of Burlington, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Incorporated, doing business as Lendingtree Loans to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., dated November 26, 2014 and recorded in Book 1264 Page 319 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, D/B/A Christiana Trust, not individually but as Trustee for Pretium Mortgage Acquisition Trust, dated February 15, 2017 and recorded in Book 1333 Page 348, both of the land records of the City of Burlington for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 4 Faith Street, Burlington, Vermont on September 26, 2019 at 1:30 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: LOT OF LAND WITH ALL BUILDINGS THEREON SITUATED AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF THE INTERSECTION OF JAMES AVENUE AND FAITH AVENUE HAVING A FRONTAGE ON THE NORTH SIDE OF JAMES AVENUE OF 80 FEET, A FRONTAGE ON THE EASTERLY SIDE OF FAITH STREET OF 110 FEET, A NORTHERLY LINE OF 74.80 FEET AND AN EASTERLY LINE OF 114.81 FEET, IT BEING LOT NO. 4, BLOCK C AS SHOWN ON A PLAN ENTITLED “HOWE FARM ESTATES, SECTION A, LOT LAYOUT OWNED BY ADRIEN B. THIBAULTCONTRACTOR” DATED MAY, 1968. THE ABOVE REFERENCED PLAN IS RECORDED IN VOLUME 188, PAGE 798 OF CITY OF BURLINGTON LAND RECORDS. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

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Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : August 26, 2019 /S/ Rachel K. By: Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 NOTICE: THE LAW FIRM OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, THIS CORRESPONDENCE IS NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED TO BE AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN AGAINST PROPERTY THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0103459 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DRIVE, WILLISTON VT, WILL BE SOLD ON OR ABOUT THE 19TH OF SEPTEMBER 2019 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF ELLEN ROSE BOY. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur.

THE VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION INVITES YOU TO ATTEND A PROJECT UPDATE: EXIT 16 DIVERGING DIAMOND INTERCHANGE (DDI) Tuesday, September 24, 2019 Two Sessions: 1 PM and 6:30 PM Town Select Board Meeting Colchester Town Offices 781 Blakely Road, Colchester, VT Outer Bay Conference Room, 3rd Floor The Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) will present an update on the Exit 16 Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI) project during the upcoming Colchester Town Select Board Meeting. There will be two meeting sessions held on September 24th, at 1:00 PM and 6:30 PM. VTrans is improving the roadway along the US Routes 2/7 corridor, in the vicinity of I-89 Exit 16, to enhance mobility and safety in Colchester, Vermont. The core of the project is to reconfigure the existing tight diamond interchange to a Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI) at I-89 Exit 16. The project team will present information on the project scope, Exit 16 reconfiguration design, bicycle and pedestrian flow, anticipated construction schedule, and project status. The project team will be available to answer questions following the presentation. There will also be an opportunity to take a test drive through the new DDI interchange using the Exit 16 DDI driving simulator. We look forward to hearing from you! If you have questions or would like additional information about the project, please email the team at info@Exit16DDI. vtransprojects.vermont. gov or call the Exit 16 DDI Project Hotline at (802) 595-4399. TOWN OF BOLTON NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD (DRB) AT BOLTON TOWN OFFICE 3045 THEODORE ROOSEVELT HIGHWAY BOLTON, VERMONT 05676 The DRB will hold a public hearing on Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019, starting at 6:30 pm at the Bolton Town Office to consider the following applications: Application 2019-38-DRB:

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. 93 Curtis Lane, Alan Duffy, applicant & owner. Waiver to construct 18x18’ car port within side yard setbacks. The property is located in the Rural I Zoning District. (Tax Map # 15-0100093) Application 2019-36-DRB: 695 Mountain View Dr., Pierre Bernier & Kimberly Moore, applicants & owners. Waiver to demolish & replace existing SFD & replace with 2-family dwelling within side yard setback. This property is located in the Rural 2 Zoning District. (Tax Map #8-4130695) Application 2019-34-CU: 154 Joiner Brook Ln., Amanda Rooney &Tony Wheelock Jr., applicants & owners. Conditional use to demolish & replace existing SFD with larger house in Flood Hazard Zone. This property is located in the Village Zoning District. (Tax Map #15-01501154) The hearings are open to the public. Additional information may be obtained at the Bolton Town Office, Mon.-Thurs. from 8:00-4:00PM. Pursuant to 24 VSA §§4464(a)(1)(C) and 4471(a), participation in this local proceeding, by written or oral comment, is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. If you cannot attend the hearing, comments may be made in writing prior to the hearing and mailed to: Zoning Administrator, 3045 Theodore Roosevelt Highway (US Route 2), Bolton, Vermont 05676 or via email to: zoningbolton@gmavt.net.

NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS STATE OF VERMONT September 11, 2019 Michael Cassara, Select Board Chair Town of Bolton 3045 Theodore Roosevelt Highway (US Route 2) Bolton, Vermont, 05676 (802) 434-3064 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by the Town of Bolton. Request for Release of Funds On or about September 27, 2019 the Town of Bolton will submit a request to the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development (the Agency) to release the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)

funds under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (PL 93-383), the National Affordable Housing Act, as amended, to undertake a project known as Bolton Infrastructure and Development Project for the purpose of upgrading the Bolton Valley Community Water and Sewer System and performing renovations on the Bolton Valley Hotel. The project is located at 3227 and 4302 Bolton Valley Access Road, Bolton, Vermont 05477. The total estimated cost of the project is $2,014,501; approximately $313,377 will be funded by Vermont Economic Development Authority, $696,024 will be funded by Bolton Valley Resort, $2,300 will be funded by Bolton Valley Community Water and Sewer District, $2,800 will be funded by Town of Bolton and $1,000,000 in CDBG funding. Mitigation measures for this project include additional toxic sites investigation work on Recognized Environmental Conditions located on the project parcel, that do not have an anticipated impact on the health and safety of occupants or conflict with the intended utilization of the property with respect to the proposed project, and asbestos abatement prior to hotel renovations. Finding of No Significant Impact The Town of Bolton has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the municipal office of the Town of Bolton at 3045 Theodore Roosevelt Highway (US Route 2), Bolton, Vermont, 05676, and may be examined or copied Monday – Thursday, 8am to 4 pm. Public Comments Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ERR to the Town of Bolton, Attn: Michael Cassara, Select Board Chair, 3045 Theodore Roosevelt Highway (US Route 2), Bolton, Vermont, 05676. All comments received by September 26, 2019 will be considered by the Town of Bolton prior to authorizing the submission of a request

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for release of funds. Comments must specify which Notice they are addressing—the Finding of No Significant Impact or the Request for the Release of Funds. Environmental Certification The Town of Bolton is certifying to the Agency that the Michael Cassara, in his official capacity as Select Board Chair, consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The Agency’s approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and allows the Town of Bolton to use the CDBG funds. Objections to Release of Funds The Agency will accept objections to its release of funds and the Town of Bolton’s certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer, Michael Cassara; (b) the Town has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants in the development process have committed funds, incurred costs or undertaken activities not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by the Agency; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to the Attn: Environmental Officer, Agency of Commerce and Community Development, One National Life Drive, Davis Building, 6th Floor, Montpelier, Vermont 05620. Potential objectors should contact the Agency to verify the actual last date of the objection period.

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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C-8 09.11.19-09.18.19

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POST-A-JOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM Commercial Roofers & Laborers

Year round, full time positions. Good wages & benefits. $16.50 per hour minimum; Pay negotiable with experience. EOE/M/F/VET/Disability Employer Apply in person at: A.C. Hathorne Co. 252 Avenue C Williston, VT 802-862-6473

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To find out more information regarding openings at Bolton Valley Resort, visit our website to apply online. Email resume to: HR@boltonvalley.com. boltonvalley.com/about-us/employment-andmountain-host-program

6/24/192h-BoltonValleyResort091119.indd 6:28 PM 1

MANUFACTURING TECHNICIAN POSITIONS Location: Essex Junction, VT Night Shift: 7pm to 7am

Sr Technician - Manufacturing Engineer Position Requirements: • Assoc. Degree in Electrical/Mechanical Engineering or related degree. Principal Technician - Manufacturing Engineer Position Requirements: • Assoc. Degree in Electrical/Mechanical Engineering or related degree. • 10 years of relevant experience. Pay Rates: Starting at $26.00 per hour (not including shift differential). Schedules: Work approximately 14 Days per Month!! • Includes long 4 day weekends every other week! Eligible for Benefits on Day 1: • Medical, Dental, & Vision Coverage. • Paid Vacation Time: Approx. 3 weeks per year (accrued). • Paid Sick Time: 80 hours per year. • 401k Investing Options. Education Assistance: > Up to $5,250 per year in a degree related field. Apply online at globalfoundries.com/about-us/careers or for more information email jobs@globalfoundries.com.

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BOLTON VALLEY RESORT HIRING ALL SEASONAL POSITIONS!

INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS

Contact Principal Kaiya Korb at kkorb@huusd.org or at 496-3643 for more information and/or to apply. Application should include a cover letter, resume, copy of transcripts, and 3 letters of reference. Positions open until filled. EOE 1

9/9/19

MANUFACTURING OPERATORS Location: Essex Junction, VT Night Shift: 7pm to 7am Pay Rate: $17.44 (includes shift differential)

Part-time Office Assistant

Learn more and apply online at fusemarketing.com/jobs

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Local beverage co-pack looking for warehouse associate. This position involves working with forklifts, pallet jacks, ladders and hand carts. Candidate should be able 2:57 PMto lift up to 50 pounds and work on their feet for a min of 8 hours. Willing to train. Hours are Monday through Friday 9:30 to 6:00. Hourly rate starting at $14 per hour. Please email with resume if interested.

Harwood Unified Union School District has anticipated openings for instructional assistant positions at Crossett Brook, Fayston (part-time), Moretown Elementary School Hiring@adropofjoy.com. and Waitsfield Elementary School beginning in the 2019-20 school year. There are opportunities at various grade levels, from preschool to 8th grade. We have both full and part time 8/29/19 positions following the school calendar and offer competitive 2v-ADropofJoy090419.indd 1 pay and benefits. Love of children and prior experience preferred. Associates degree or equivalent required.

7/29/194t-HarwoodUnionUnifiedSD091119.indd 11:34 AM fusemarketing.com

FUSE IS HIRING

9/6/19

WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE

Schedules: Work approximately 14 Days per Month!! • Includes long, 4-day weekends every other week! Eligible for Benefits on Day 1: • Medical, Dental & Vision Coverage. • Paid Vacation Time: Approximately 3 weeks per year (accrued). • Paid Sick Time: 80 hours per year. • 401k Investing Options. Education Assistance: Eligible after 6 months. • Up to $5,250 per year in a degree related field. Apply online at globalfoundries.com/about-us/careers or for more information email jobs@globalfoundries.com.

9/9/194t-GlobalFoundries073119.indd 2:14 PM 1

10:33 AM

RECOVERY COACH Recovery Coach will be assigned a Working Fields Associate that has been placed on assignment into a temp or temp-to-perm position. 6:27 PM The Recovery Coach will provide weekly support to the Associate, assist in the development of a recovery plan, establish goals, connect Associates to resources and generally guide the Associate in their recovery. Recovery Coaches are required to be trained by a certified recovery coaching program and are expected to support multiple paths of recovery, establish strong boundaries and follow ethical guidelines. Recovery Coach training not necessary to apply for position. Send resumes to: mickey@workingfieldsllc.com

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9/9/19 6:23 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Environmental Services Technicians/Specialists

Howard Center has excellent benefits, combined time off starting at 36 days per year for full-time employees (and increasing with years of service), medical, dental, FSA, 401K, etc. For more information and to apply, pleasevisit howardcentercareers.org. Howard Center is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. The agency’s culture and service delivery is strengthened by the diversity of its workforce. Minorities, people of color and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. EOE/TTY. Visit “About Us” to review Howard Center’s EOE policy. 4t-HowardCenter091119.indd 1

Great opportunity for recent high school grads 17+, college students, or anyone looking to gain workforce skills while making a difference in the community. leapinthenek.com or nationalservice.gov Danielle Hume: 802-626-6638.

enile main uding,4t-LEAP091119.indd but 1 JUDICIAL MASTER cases for cing and FAMILY & JUVENILE LAW

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RECEIVE A $500 SIGN-ON BONUS! Perrigo Nutritionals, in Georgia, VT, currently has an excellent job opportunity for Packaging Operators with a $500 sign-on bonus. For full job descriptions, to view other opportunities, and to apply, please visit our website at www.perrigocareers.com.

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DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

At least five years of development experience, strong relationship-building skills and comfort working independently required.

Excellent educational opportunities

Contact April Hayes ahayes@boltonvalley.com for more information.

We are looking for morning bakers in our busy Shelburne store. Some basic baking experience needed. Some weekend availability. Stop by our store on Route 7 for an application or call 802-985-2000 for more information.

2v-Harringtons041118.indd 1 9/2/19 2:12 PM

Must be licensed to practice law in the State of Vermont. A minimum of five years’ experience in family, juvenile and related criminal law. Starting salary will be $90,000 with excellent benefits, health care, vacation, holiday and sick leave. EOE. Open until filled. Go to vermontjudiciary.org/employment-opportunities/staffopenings for a detailed job description and application. Job # 19036.

Please send cover letter, résumé and three references to Anera Foco at afoco@saraholbrookcc.org.

9/9/194t-SarahHolbrook091119.indd 5:53 PM 1

Baker

The Sara Holbrook Community Center seeks an After School Site Director who will work in collaboration with the Burlington School District to coordinate the afterschool enrichment programs at Hunt Middle School, serving over 375 students yearly. The Site Director is responsible for the overall management of HMS afterschool programs including staffing, budgeting, payroll, contracts, supplies, logistics, and some grant writing. Must relate to and work well with middle school students, have a strong commitment to social justice, flexibility, excellent communication skills, ability to organize multiple projects and confidence in using community resources to develop and implement programming. Full time with benefits. Complete job description on our website.

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Competitive salary with comprehensive benefits

PART-TIME, PERMANENT

To apply, visit UVMHealth.org/PMC and click on “Careers” or email a cover letter and résumé to Hollie Bachilas at hbachilas@portermedical.org.

The Vermont State Court System has an opening for an experienced attorney for a new judicial officer position to serve primarily in Chittenden and Franklin counties. This position will oversee Juvenile proceedings to encourage parents to follow case plans and to remain engaged in treatment, and to that end conduct proceedings including, but not limited to parent-child contact, status conferences, screening cases for mediation or restorative processes such as family group conferencing and preliminary proceedings.

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Porter Medical Center is seeking its first full-time Development Director to build upon current success, establish new programs, and introduce fresh endeavors!

AFTER SCHOOL SITE DIRECTOR

Exciting opportunity to be a part of the development of a new, quality program

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Lead a fundraising program for UVM Health Network/Porter Medical Center!

9/9/19 6:37 PM 4t-PorterMedicalCenter090419.indd 1

To find out more information regarding this position & to apply, visit the website below.

➢ Excellent Wages ➢ Great benefits at reduced rates ➢ Quarterly and Annual Bonus ➢ Profit sharing ➢ 401 (k) with Employer Match

9/9/19 4t-Perriogo090419.indd 12:29 PM LEAP AMERICORPS OPEN SERVICE POSITIONS

LEAP is a national service program placing AmeriCorps members with nonprofit organizations throughout Vermont's Northeast Kingdom. LEAP members provide educational programming to area schools and communities. LEAP is currently recruiting for service positions with Green Mountain Farm to School (1700-hour, full time), Vermont Land Trust (1700-hour, full time), Fairbanks Museum (2 positions, 1700-hour, full time), WonderArts Vermont (900-hour, half time), Cobleigh Public Library (2 positions, 900-hour, half time), Kingdom East Afterschool Program (2 positions, 450-hour, quarter time) and the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum children’s library (450-hour, quarter time). Positions are available immediately. Members earn a living stipend and an education award.

nced

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AWESOME CHILD CARE TEACHERS

Full-time/part-time Environmental Services positions available with flexible shifts! Full-time positions are eligible for a $1,000 sign on bonus, (pro-rated for part-time positions) and all positions are benefits eligible. Knowledge of routine and complex cleaning required plus valid driver’s license and transportation.

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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

4/6/18 12:21 PM

DENTAL HYGIENIST Busy dental office in Randolph, VT seeking a part-time dental hygienist. We are a fast paced, energetic office looking to add an outgoing hygienist to our team. The position may work into a full-time opportunity.

Please send resume to dentist@cwilsondds.com.

9/9/192v-WilsonDentistry090419.indd 2:24 PM 1

8/29/19 2:48 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.11.19-09.18.19

NURSE PARALEGAL Sheehey, Furlong & Behm P.C., a Burlington, VT law firm, is seeking to hire a registered nurse to fill a nurse paralegal position. Qualified applicants should possess a nursing degree, clinical nursing experience including reviewing and interpreting medical records, good writing and verbal communication skills, and a willingness to learn. The successful candidate will primarily be responsible for assisting attorneys in reviewing and summarizing medical documents, conducting medical research, identifying and evaluating expert witnesses, assisting in evaluating and organizing medical evidence, and similar tasks. This position may also perform some paralegal work in nonmedical cases as needed.

RESERVATIONS MANAGER

FedEx Delivery Driver Full time/$750/week. Part time on a per day rate. Work seasonally or year round. Send contact info to: Vermontfedexdriver@ gmail.com.

Join VBT and Country Walkers, an award-winning, Vermont-based active travel company and be part of our high performing, international team.

We have an amazing opportunity for an experienced Reservations Manager interested in leading and supporting 1t-FedEx091119.indd a team of professional Tour Sales Consultants selling worldwide, multi-brand, active travel vacations. If you’re passionate, goal oriented, want to make a difference in the lives of others and are looking for balance in your quality of life – check us out!

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9/9/19 2:08 PM

Customer Sales & Service Representative

Champlain Broadband (Burlington Telecom) is looking for an energetic person who is willing to work hard and grow with our company. The Customer Sales and Service Representative CENTER FOR CRIME VICTIM SERVICES 1 9/2/19 1:58 PM 4t-SheeheyFurlong&Behm090419.indd 1 9/2/194t-VBT090419.indd 1:28 PM VERMONT will be responsible for the customer service experience RESTITUTION UNIT related to services for video, high SAINT MICHAEL'S COLLEGE, a NCAA Division II institution COLLECTION CASE MANAGER speed internet and telephone (N. E. 10 Conf.), has an opening for a full-time Head Baseball Coach. Seeking a champion for victims to join our mission-driven team for residential and commercial The position is responsible for directing all aspects of the coaching collecting restitution from criminal offenders. Work includes: customers.

Forward cover letter and resume by email to: hiring@sheeheyvt.com, and include “Paralegal Nurse” in the subject line.

Visit our career pages at www.vbt.com or countrywalkers.com for more details and to apply.

HEAD BASEBALL COACH

and management of the intercollegiate baseball program: recruiting and scouting; coaching in games and practices; coordinating the team strength and conditioning program; managing the team budget, fundraising, and alumni development; supporting the academic and personal development of all baseball student-athletes; hiring and supervising a part-time paid assistant coach; maintaining a visible presence at department functions and events; shared responsibility for supervising the varsity weight room; and some fall event management, to name a few. Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership. Job details and to apply: smcvt. interviewexchange.com.

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contacting and negotiating with criminal offenders via phone For more information concerning and letter to collect outstanding payments and maximize this position or to apply, please the dollars collected for victims; analyzing financial and visit schurz.com/careers. legal information to determine an offender’s ability to pay; researching and investigating each offender to find assets. The right candidate should be a team player, detail-oriented,2v-SchurtzCommunications090419.indd 1 8/29/19 11:45 AM an excellent communicator, a skilled negotiator, self-directed, persistent and goal-oriented. Associates Degree or 2 years work experience in a relevant field. Energetic work environment, great co-workers and Music Contact excellent benefits. Salary range $41,000-$60,000/year. Interational tour Full time position. E.O.E.

MARKETING MANAGER

Email your COVER LETTER and RESUME no later than Monday, September 16th to: hiring@ccvs.vermont.gov.

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LNA TRAINING

9/2/19

PROGRAM OFFERED

Session starts on October 15, 2019. Wake Robin, in partnership with Vermont MedEd, is happy to announce our LNA training program.

STAFF PSYCHOLOGIST We are seeking a clinical psychologist with a strong interest and background in medical psychology, health psychology and behavioral medicine. LEARN MORE & APPLY: uvmmed.hn/sevendays 4t-UVMMedCenter091119.indd 1

Wake Robin is Vermont’s premiere retirement community and ranks among the top 100 nursing homes in the country; an award due in large part to our excellent staff and facility. Our goal is to provide training and employment opportunities consistent with Wake Robin’s unique brand of resident-centered care.

operator seeks marketing manager to manage our multiple web sites, social 2:09 PM media platforms, email marketing campaigns, on-line payment site and more. At least three years of related experience is ideal. International travel experience a plus and position has possible travel opportunities.

If you have at least 2-years experience in caregiving, wish to grow your skills among the best, and begin your career as an LNA, contact us.

Please submit cover letter and résumé to:

Interested candidates, please send resume and cover letter via email to hr@wakerobin.com. For additional information see our Employment page at wakerobin.com or like “Wake Robin Works” on Facebook.

jbreckenridge@ music-contact. com.

Wake Robin is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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9/9/19 5:10 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PLANNING TECHNICIAN CLIMATE AND ENERGY POLICY MANAGER Do you want to be a part of a science-based, nonpartisan and solutions-oriented team that is striving to build a clean energy future where both people and nature thrive? Climate change is one of the most pressing environmental challenges of our time, and The Nature Conservancy in Vermont (TNC) is growing its conservation and policy staff with the addition of a Climate and Energy Policy Manager. The Climate and Energy Policy Manager will play an integral role in co-creating a thriving and resilient Vermont in the face of a changing landscape. S/he will lead efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emission and accelerate the transition to a clean energy future for TNC in Vermont and collaborate with TNC colleagues in other Northeastern states to advance the organization’s regional climate priorities. The ideal candidate will have political savvy, strong advocacy, communication, and organizational skills, a proven ability to work with and convene stakeholders with diverse perspectives, and experience building effective networks. Strong knowledge of climate and energy issues in Vermont and New England, as well as lobbying laws, regulations, and practice, is preferred. The Nature Conservancy is a global organization that has been working in Vermont for nearly 60 years to protect the land and waters on which all life depends. We value collaborative approaches, diverse backgrounds, and innovative thinking. For a complete description and to apply, visit nature.org/careers and search for Job #48001, or follow tinyurl.com/y45l8q7u. Posting closes 10/6/19.

Political Columnist/ Political Reporter

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Are you a political junkie? An authority on Vermont state government and what makes it tick? Do you want to hold those in power accountable? Award-winning, locally owned Seven Days newspaper is on the hunt for a political columnist or a news reporter to join our state government team. We’re looking for a writer with voice who knows how to develop sources, get the backstory and make it matter to readers who don’t live and breathe the Vermont Statehouse. Your beat could include the governor, legislature, congressional delegation, local government, the media — and anything else you think matters. If you want to be our next political columnist, let us know how you’d make a weekly column relevant — and appointment reading — in the age of Twitter. Tell us what subjects you’d like to tackle and how you’d make the column your own. If you’d rather serve as a straight news reporter, tell us what’s missing in Vermont political journalism and how you’d provide it. Let us know how you’d break the next big story and what you’d want to cover outside the Statehouse. Either way, send your résumé, three clips and a cover letter to newsjob@ sevendaysvt.com. E.O.E.

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WE’RE HIRING!

WE’RE HIRING We offer competitive salary & awesome benefits!

The Williston Planning Department Culinary Team Members, is currently seeking applicants for Dishwashers and We offer competitive & awesome be its Planning Technician position. Catering salary Professionals Join a versatile team of planners addressing urban design, land conservation, historic preservation, sustainable transportation, scheduling water quality, energy efficiency and more inUVM historic Dining, as managed• byFlexible Sodexo is a proud dining partner of the U of Vermont. Lake Champlain and the Green Moun and dynamic Williston, VT. Situated eight miles from Nestled in-between •isShift meals provided our talented culinary team dedicated to serving up fresh ingredient downtown Burlington and at the gateway tohealthy the options to a diverse campus community. With a strong comm source from an ever grow Green Mountains and beyond, this town of to sustainability and social• responsibility, Employee we Assistance network of local farms. over 10,000 people offers a chance to experience Programs Join our many of the challenges and opportunities faced byteam; discover our unique dining spaces and experience the Vermont all the while enjoying some awesome benefits! • Career development growing places in New England in a supportive and • Competitive salary opportunities stimulating environment. Apply today! Sodexo.Balancetrak.com (search Vermont) UVM Dining, as managed by Sodexo is a proud dining partner of the University of Vermont. Nestled in-between Lake Champlain and the Green Mountains, our talented culinary team is dedicated to serving up fresh ingredients and healthy options to a diverse campus community. With a strong commitment to sustainability and social responsibility, we source from an ever growing network of local farms.

WE OFFER:

Join our team; discover our unique dining spaces and experience the taste of Vermont all the while enjoying some awesome benefits! • Competitive salary

• Generous accrued paid time off

• 401(K) - 1% automatic enrollment with a 6% max match • Free meal during your shift!

• Home for the holidays! (except for catering)

• Career growth opportunities including, culinary training, mentoring and job shadowing • Company discounts: Theme Parks | Cellphones | Tuition Reimbursement Clothing/Accessories | Computers | Home Goods Financial Establishment | Vehicle Rental and Purchase Health & Wellness | Sporting Events etc.

• Employee Resource Groups & Company wide networking events • Employee Assistance Programs through LifeWorks • Work/Life balance

• Employee recognition programs

• Generous accrued paid time off

Applicants who are beginning a career in planning Free Bus Pass • 401(K) - 1% automatic • enrollment with a 6% max match and looking for valuable on-the-ground experience • Free meal during your shift! • Tuition are encouraged to apply. The town of Williston • Home for the holidays! (except for catering) reimbursement, etc. offers an excellent compensation package• including Career growth opportunities including, culinary training, mentoring shadowing health insurance, retirement, paid time off, and • Shift differential • Company discounts: overtime pay or compensatory time for evening Theme Parks | Cellphones Tuition Reimbursement pay |for working meetings. This is a 40 hour/week Monday-Friday Clothing/Accessories | Computers | Home Goods weekends Financial Establishment | Vehicle Rental and Purchase position with a hiring range of $17.55 to $19.25/hour. Health & Wellness | Sporting Events etc. Reach out to schedule an interview: The preferred deadline for applications is Friday, Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employer

• Employee Resource Groups & Company wide networking events

September 27th at 12:00 noon. Please send a letterAssistanceNICOLE.CANNON2@SODEXO.COM • Employee Programs through LifeWorks and resume in PDF format to Planning Director • Work/Life balance SODEXO IS AN EOE/AA/ M/F/D/V EMPLOYER Matt Boulanger at mboulanger@willistonvt.org. • Employee recognition programs

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Town and Village of Woodstock, VT

MUNICIPAL MANAGER POSITION

FAMILY RESOURCE COORDINATOR

9/9/193v-UVMSodexo010919.indd 6:43 PM 1 1/4/19 11:12 AM Apply today! Sodexo.Balancetrak.com (search Vermont)

Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employe

The Town and Village of Woodstock, Vermont (pop. 3,000), seek an innovative and experienced management professional for this vibrant year-round tourism destination. The ideal candidate will commit to maintaining the town and village’s high quality of life, while focusing on community development initiatives and growing engagement opportunities. This senior management position reports to both the town Selectboard and Village Trustees. They are responsible for daily operations of both municipalities, supervision of +/-30 full- and part-time employees, and administers a budget of $9 million for the town and village. Detailed ad and description: townofwoodstock.org. Salary is $95,000 to $115,000, commensurate with experience and education, with excellent benefits. Requirements: relevant Bachelor’s Degree, senior management experience. Municipal experience preferred. Email cover letter, resume, and 3 references by October 14, 2019 to municipal.recruitment@vlct.org, subject: “Woodstock Manager Search.” Please Indicate where you found this ad.

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Full Time

Family support organization seeks professional in Chittenden County to assist in the development and coordination of early intervention service plans, conduct home visits, and communicate with multiple agencies and school districts. Must have experience parenting a child with special needs, knowledge of familycentered care, and strong communication skills. Cover letter and resume to: HR,VT Family Network 600 Blair Park Road Suite 240 Williston,VT 05495 or email HR@vtfn.org. E.O.E.

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9/9/19 6:19 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-12

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.11.19-09.18.19

SYSTEMS ENGINEER

E-learning Course Coordinator

BURLINGTON ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT

Online education program seeks an E-learning Course Coordinator to update and maintain current courses and help develop new courses. This employee should be an independent, detail-oriented multi-tasker who must be comfortable interacting with students and faculty.

Fiscal & Human Resources is looking for a talented networking and Manager RESPONSIBILITIES: systems engineer to • Maintain and update currently existing online courses; Highland Center for the Arts in oversee its Smart Grid • Work on development of new courses; Greensboro seeks a Fiscal and Human and SCADA networks • Liaise with subject matter experts on course development; and infrastructure. Resources Manager responsible for all • Assess projects and determine the appropriate use of technology; Are you as passionate financial tracking as well as carrying out and other duties as assigned. about Safety, Reliability, duties associated with employee record REQUIREMENTS: Innovation and keeping and benefits administration. • Prefer Bachelor’s degree + 1-2 yrs. of professional experience, Community as BED? • Excellent customer service and communications skills. Do you want to help The ideal candidate will possess Burlington leverage • Must know Word, Excel, PowerPoint and be comfortable familiarity and experience with the learning new software. technology to reach it's policies and procedures associated • Experience with education/online learning environment is a big NetZero Energy goals? with state and federal accounting and plus. Be responsible for • Experience with Canvas, Webex, Storyline, VoiceThread and/or human resources laws. planning, engineering, comparable programs highly desirable This is a part-time, on-site position. and maintaining of Our offi ce atmosphere is relaxed and cooperative. We offer an all aspects of BED’s For more information: excellent hourly rate, full benefits (health insurance plus retirement servers and local and contribution), and generous vacation time. https://highlandartsvt.org/careers wide area networks, Email resume and cover letter to info@iccie.org. insuring the stability, Highland Center for the Arts is an Equal Opportunity Employer integrity, and efficient EOE. No calls, please. operation of those in-house information systems. This 1 9/10/19 11:44 AM Untitled-34 1 9/4/19 5v-ICCIE022719.indd 10:59 AM responsibility includes developing, configuring, maintaining, supporting and optimizing all new HIGH MOWING ORGANIC SEEDS IS HIRING! and existing related Do you want to be part of a fun-loving group hardware, software Looking for a Better Job with a with diverse interests, brought together by our and peripherals. In Successful Career Path? common love of growing, on whatever scale, all addition, this position while appreciating the importance of sustainable is responsible for agriculture? Join us at one of our Job Fairs! internet connectivity, Want your Weekends Free? MSI is remote access, and Saturday September 14th 10am – 12pm MSI has YOUR Solution! HIRING! communications to Monday September 16th 4pm – 6pm GREAT BENEFITS! wireless devices. 76 Quarry Road, Wolcott, VT 05680 To learn more and to apply for this position, visit:

governmentjobs.com/ careers/burlingtonvt WOMEN, MINORITIES, VETERANS AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES ARE HIGHLY ENCOURAGED TO APPLY. EOE

Stop by to fill out an application and participate in an on the spot interview. Hiring decisions will be made by Sept 20th. Visit: jobs@highmowingseeds.com. OPEN POSITIONS: • Seasonal Garlic Packing and Fulfillment Team Members (Estimated dates needed Sept 27th October 18th) 6-10 positions open

COMPETITIVE WAGES!

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS: • Assemblers, 1st & 2nd Shifts • Warehouse Manager • Dump Truck Driver/Laborer • Manufacturing Department Mgr. • Class A CDL Driver

• Seed Packing Crew Leader (Full time, yearround) 1 position open

Located in Beautiful Morrisville, VT Manufacturing Solutions Inc. 153 Stafford Avenue Morrisville, VT 05661

• Reginal Sales Associate (Full time, year-round) 1 position open • Customer Service Associate (December-April) 4 positions open

highmowingseeds.com/staff-and-careers LS-CityofBurlingtonELECTRIC091119.indd 19/10/195v-HighMowingSeeds091119.indd 11:59 AM 1

Apply Online at: msivt.com/careers or Email Resume and Cover Letter to: HR@MSIvt.com.

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9/9/19 1:19 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CUSTOMER SERVICE & SCHEDULING REPRESENTATIVE

This position requires excellent communication and interpersonal skills, and the ability to work with a computer-based customer information system. Working closely with our installation and customer service teams, your commitment to collaborate and provide superior client support will ensure our customer relations are second to none!

Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. Office Manager (Counseling and Psychiatry Services) - Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHWB) - #S2212PO - The University of Vermont’s Center for Health and Wellbeing (CHWB) seeks an organized, energetic and friendly person to provide administrative and operational leadership for our two CAPS locations. The successful applicant will provide supervision to the CAPS scheduling staff and will administratively support the CAPS Director. This position will participate on the CAPS Administrative Lead Team and will support CAPS with communications and messaging within the Center for Health and Wellbeing and for the UVM student community. The successful applicant will adhere to our commitment to excellence in service and quality and our mission of supporting multiculturalism and inclusiveness.

See the full job description at ecfiber.net. Please complete the online Application Form, and submit it with a cover letter and your resume to resumes@ecfiber.net. or via mail to: Human Resources, ECFiber / ValleyNet 415 Waterman Road Royalton, VT 05068

Minimum qualifications include: Bachelor’s degree in a related field, three years’ work experience in a health care setting with supervisory experience. Demonstrated leadership skills, organizational management, creative problem solving and staff development and training. Effective interpersonal skills and organizational skills. Proficiency with office software applications including electronic health records. Commitment to diversity and social justice education and training. This is a 12 month, full-time position. Salary is commensurate with experience and includes a full benefit package. For more information about the CHWB, please visit our website at www.uvm.edu/health. Please submit application, resume, cover letter and references for the position of CAPS Office Manager by visiting our website. The cover letter should include a statement of experience and commitment to working with issues of diversity and inclusion. For further information on this position and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit www.uvmjobs.com. Applicants must apply for positions electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Open positions are updated daily. Please call 802-656-3150 or email employment@uvm.edu for technical support with the online application.

ValleyNet, LLC is an E.O.E.

The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

CHILDCARE PROGRAM LEAD TEACHER

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REGULATORY COMPLIANCE & TITLE IX COORDINATOR Part-Time (20hrs/wk), Non-Union, $19 p/hour + Benefits BASIC FUNCTION: The Regulatory Compliance and Title IX Coordinator coordinates and facilitates the institution’s compliance with Title IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and other discrimination and harassment laws, regulations, and college policies. This position develops and implements educational programs regarding discrimination and harassment prevention, ensuring students, faculty and staff understand their rights and responsibilities under the law and college policy. The Regulatory Compliance and Title IX Coordinator investigates and responds to complaints and collaborates with internal stakeholders to facilitate constructive resolution to complaints relating to harassment, misconduct and discrimination. The Regulatory Compliance and Title IX Coordinator also administers various insurance plans, not including employee benefit plans. For further information please go to: goddard.edu/about-goddard/employment-opportunities.

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Engaging minds that change the world

Seeking experienced Customer Service & Scheduling Representative for ValleyNet LLC, the operating company of ECFiber. Become part of a team of dedicated people providing fiber-optic internet to homes and businesses in East Central VT.

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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Seven Days Issue: 9/11 Due: 9/9 by noon Size: 3.83 x 5.25 Cost: $476.85 (with 1 week on

PAY IT FORWARD

Thisschool schoolyear, year, This PAY IT become the teacher become the teacher FORWARD whoinspired inspiredyou. you. who Transition to teaching in This year, only 8 school months with our Transition to teaching in fast-track tothe a teacher’s become teacher only 8 months with our license designed for new who inspired you. fast-track to aprofessionals teacher’s & mid-career

license designed for new Transition teaching in wanting toto teach grades &only mid-career professionals 8 months with our five through twelve. fast-track a teacher’s wanting toto teach grades Information Session: designed for filicense ve through twelve. Tuesday, September 17 new I 6-7pm

& mid-career professionals Champlain College Miller Center 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington wanting to teach grades Information Session: five through twelve. Tuesday, September 17 I 6-7pm REGISTER

Information Session: Champlain College tapvt.org Tuesday, September 17 I 6-7pm 802.651.5844 Miller Center Champlain College Center 175 Lakeside Ave., Miller Burlington 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington REGISTER tapvt.org 802.651.5844

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Do you love to laugh? Love to play? If you love children and are looking for a job that feels more like play than work, then we are looking for you! The Moretown Education Center for All (MECA Program) is seeking a Full-Time Lead Teacher to join our team.The MECA Program is a Preschool Childcare, PreK 6th Grade After School, and Summer Camp Program based out of the Moretown Elementary School. Our mission is to provide children a safe environment where they are given an opportunity to explore new interests and friendships, and develop tools for growth in their physical, social and emotional selves. At the MECA Program, you will be joining a vibrant team that works collaboratively to create engaging children’s programming. We are fun-loving people who are passionate about creating exciting and enriching environments for kids. We are looking for someone who can bring that same positive energy to our program.Qualifications: Minimum high school graduate or GED; at least 18 years of age; has taken Fundamentals of Education or a 3-credit course in child development; has at least 12 months experience working with children; strong leadership & collaboration skills. Contact MECA Assistant Director Kaitlin Ames at kmcdonagh@huusd.org or (802) 583-7854 for more information and to apply. Application should include a cover letter, resume, and 3 letters of reference. Multiple positions open until filled

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8/29/19 4:20 PM

FARM SHOW MANAGER The Vermont Farm Show is VT’s premier agricultural event and has existed in one form or the other since 1931. It is a three-day event that occurs in late January each year at the Champlain Valley Exposition. The Farm Show is seeking a new manager. The qualified applicant must be able to work independently; contact potential vendors; set up contracts with CVE, vendors and various organizations; organize show site meetings; manage media contacts; and be physically present at the Farm Show site for 4-5 days. The 2020 show will be a transition year with the current show manager as a mentor. This is a part-time contract position and the manager reports to the Vermont Farm Show Board. Please contact Dave Martin at settlementfarm@comcast. net for more information.

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9/9/19 6:47 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-14

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.11.19-09.18.19

WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

Champlain Community Services is a growing developmental services provider agency with a strong emphasis on self-determination values and employee and consumer satisfaction.

SHARED LIVING PROVIDER

Explore the possibilities! When you work for the State of Vermont, you and your work matter. Once you are working for the State, there are many opportunities for career and personal growth!

Open your accessible home to someone with an intellectual disability or autism and make a positive impact on their life and yours! A generous stipend, paid time off (respite), comprehensive training & supports are provided. CCS is currently offering a variety of opportunities that could be the perfect match for your household and lifestyle. Contact Jennifer Wolcott, jwolcott@ccs-vt.org or 655-0511 ext. 118 for more information.

D I R E C T O R O F P O L I C Y, E D U C A T I O N & O U T R E A C H – M O N T P E L I E R The Human Rights Commission (HRC) is seeking a creative, dynamic, and highly skilled team player for the Director of Policy, Education & Outreach position. You’ll support the HRC’s mission to promote full civil and human rights in VT via campaign planning and execution, legislative advocacy, community organizing, and public education, and will assist the Executive Director with shaping and advancing the HRC’s policy agenda. How to Apply: ** Do not apply online** Visit hrc.vermont.gov for full job description and application instructions. For more information Email: human.rights@vermont.gov. Application Deadline: September 15, 2019.

Building a community where everyone participates, and everyone belongs.

ccs-vt.org

Learn more at: careers.vermont.gov

E.O.E.

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DINING FLOOR MANAGER Full Time

This position oversees the daily operations of food service delivery in each dining room.The floor manager is responsible for managing the operational flow of the dining room for the purpose of creating a high quality dining experience for our residents. Duties include coordinating dining room set up and closing functions, greeting and seating dining guests, and overseeing service. Minimum of two years’ experience as a supervisor specializing in food delivery in the health care or hospitality industry highly preferred. If you have high standards of service and a commitment to a dynamic resident-driven community, email hr@ wakerobin.com or fax your resume with cover letter to: (802) 264-5146. E.O.E.

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The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer 9/6/19 12:58 PM

9/9/19 6:18 PM

ONLINE BANKING & CUSTOMER SUPPORT SERVICES TECHNICAL PROCEDURES WRITER BERLIN THERE IS NO BETTER TIME TO JOIN THE NSB TEAM! Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. We are looking for a professional to join our team as an Online Banking & Customer Support Services Technical Procedures Writer. This is a new position and has the flexibility of being performed in our Berlin Operations Center or a Chittenden County location. This position offers a strong opportunity to work for a growing premier Vermont mutual savings bank.

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES & REQUIREMENTS • The Online Banking & Customer Support Services Technical Procedures Writer will be responsible for providing the Community Banking area with all needed procedural resources, ensuring a smooth consumer and commercial customer service experience. • We are looking for someone who has a solid understanding of banking, front line processes, exceptional written communication skills and strong attention to detail. This individual will regularly work as a member of the Call Center team to assist customers. • The selected candidate must have the ability to interact with all departments and all levels of the organization. Requirements include a high school diploma, general education degree (GED) or equivalent and 3 to 5 years of banking experience.

Find out what NSB can offer you • NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits package including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching 401(K) retirement program, professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. Northfield Savings Bank hours of operation are Monday through Friday generally 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please submit your application and resume in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred) Or mail: Northfield Savings Bank - Human Resources P.O. Box 7180 Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

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www.cvabe.org Full–time Teacher/Community Coordinator in Barre Seeking self-directed, outgoing and flexible individual who works well in a team environment and has a strong desire to help others reach their full potential through education. Candidates must have:  Proven capacity for teaching and guiding basic skills instruction for adults and teens in:  Reading, writing, math, computer and financial literacy;  English Language Learning and U.S. Citizenship prep;  High school diploma and GED credentialing;  Career and college readiness.  Experience with developing personalized education and graduation education plans;  Familiarity with Barre City, Barre Town, Williamstown, Berlin, Plainfield, Marshfield and Cabot;  Spirit and capacity for community outreach and student recruitment;  Experience with recruiting and managing volunteers. CVABE, a community-based, nonprofit organization has served the residents of Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties for 50+ years. Hundreds of central Vermonters enroll annually to improve basic literacy skills, pursue alternative pathways to high school completion, learn English as another language, and gain skills for work and college.

Please submit cover letter, resume and three references by September 20th to: Executive Director Central Vermont Adult Basic Education, Inc. 46 Washington Street, Suite 100 Barre, Vermont 05641 info@cvabe.org

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9/5/19 2:38 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

C-15 09.11.19-09.18.19

Opportunity for Private In-Home Caregiving Seeking part-time caregiver to provide care and support to enable a wonderful, active gentleman with dementia to remain at home in his 2-bedroom apartment in downtown Burlington. 2 eight hour days/week, and monthly overnight coverage. Room/ Board, Competitive Compensation, including weekly respite time off, paid vacation, and YMCA membership.

Middlebury College Catering Team Member/Laundry Worker Middlebury College Dining Services Middlebury College is a top-tier liberal arts college with a demonstrated commitment to excellence in faculty, teaching, and research. An Equal Opportunity Employer, the College is committed to hiring a diverse staff as we work to foster innovation in our curriculum and to provide a rich and varied educational experience to our increasingly diverse student body. In addition to excellent compensation and competitive health, dental, life, disability, retirement, and vision benefits, Middlebury offers a generous time-away program. Currently hiring for:

This role best suits a compassionate, active, health-minded individual preferably experienced in caregiving and willing to make at least a one-year commitment. Employment to begin 9/19. Must provide own car. Send a cover letter and resume to: Annmarie Plant, RN BA CCM Aging Life Care Consultant at: annmarie.plant726@gmail.com

Catering Team Member, Driver/Steward/Event Preparation $15.22 per Hour Minimum plus Generous Benefits For full description and to apply, visit: https://apptrkr.com/1599335 Laundry Worker $12.07 per Hour Minimum plus Generous Benefits For full description and to apply, visit: https://apptrkr.com/1599336

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Offers of employment are contingent on completion of a background check. Information on our background check policy can be found here: http://go.middlebury.edu/backgroundchecks

SENIOR CHEF INSTRUCTOR COMMUNITY KITCHEN ACADEMY

EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disability Untitled-33 1

9/4/19 10:55 AM

VERMONT CARES HARM REDUCTION POSITIONS OPEN Vermont CARES has openings in its Harm Reduction Program. Vermont CARES operates a multi-site, statewide syringe service program that provides sterile supplies, safer injection equipment and education, overdose prevention, HIV and HCV testing, and case management.

VERMONT CARES: HARM REDUCTION PROGRAM

We are seeking candidates with leadership skills and a strong desire to work with Vermonters who are actively using substances, ensuring people who use drugs are safer and able to engage with support services. This statewide public health program is rooted in harm reduction; therefore, our ideal candidate must embody compassion, love, and acceptance for people who use drugs. This person will be a part of our wide-ranging Syringe Service Program, assist with community education, case management, program development and potentially supervision. Job includes data entry and reporting on a regular basis. Candidate must be organized and able to work as part of a diverse team. Public-facing engagements in the community are often a part of this job through our extensive education and awareness initiatives. A solid understanding of harm reduction and the ability to convey that will be essential. If you are passionate about improving the lives of Vermonters affected by substance use and are a harm reductionist at heart, working with Vermont CARES in our Harm Reduction Program is the place for you. Transportation is necessary, as this role travels statewide. Your main office will be located at our Montpelier office or St. Johnsbury office, dependent on your home location. Salary range $29,000.00 to $40,000.00 commensurate with experience and position offered. Generous benefits (health, vision, PTO). Send cover letter and resume to Theresa Vezina, Associate Director, Vermont CARES, by email to theresa@vtcares.org. Resumes must be received by 12 noon on Sept. 30th, 2019. Position Open until filled; HIV+ individuals, people with lived experience and people of color strongly encouraged to apply. 7t-VTCares091119.indd 1

9/9/19 6:53 PM

Capstone Community Action’s Community Kitchen Academy (CKA), a workforce development culinary training program in partnership with the Vermont Foodbank, is seeking a dynamic talented Chef Instructor to manage the program in Capstone’s Barre VT headquarters. The Senior Chef Instructor is responsible for managing and overseeing all aspects of operating the CKA including instruction and meal production for Capstone’s food shelf. This position provides three 12-week sessions of instruction to student trainees in classroom culinary theory, hands on practical skills, and career readiness development following the already established accredited curriculum. This position will also be responsible for developing and maintaining food industry sector partnerships to promote the program, and support job placement and employment opportunities for graduates. The right candidate must have experience in culinary education and demonstrate the sensitivity and ability to work with students who have experienced trauma and who may face barriers to employment. The Senior Chef Instructor is a full-time salaried exempt position whose primary duties are student recruitment, culinary instruction, management, administrative, data management, and reporting functions for the CKA. Capstone offers a competitive salary and benefits. Please submit a letter of interest and resume to: Capstone Community Action, Inc. - Human Resources 20 Gable Place, Barre, VT 05641 Or email to: jobs@capstonevtvt.org Capstone Community Action is an E.O.E. and Provider. Applications from women, individuals with disabilities, veterans, and people with diverse cultural backgrounds are encouraged.

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9/6/19 1:39 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-16

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.11.19-09.18.19

HOPS AND HEMP HARVEST STAFF

Seeking 4 full-time and part-time hourly staff members now through October 31, with possibility for work in November. Champlain Valley Hops is located 30 minutes south of Burlington, VT. High-quality, responsibly grown, local specialty crops. The farm manages 26 acres of hops and 20 acres of CBD hemp. Hop harvest is currently underway, and hemp harvest will begin in late September. Pay rate is $14-$16/hr depending on experience. More info: champlainvalleyhops.com/jobs

VT ASSOCIATION OF 9/5/19 CONSERVATION DISTRICTS

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VACD seeks qualified candidates to fill three full-time Conservation positions. These positions will support the work of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to provide conservation planning assistance to farmers enrolled in Farm Bill programs.

EMPLOYMENT SPECIALIST Way2Work, a leading developmental service supported employment program, is seeking a creative and outgoing individual to join their dynamic team. The successful candidate will be responsible for supporting individuals in developing career goals, job-seeking skills, securing employment, and on-thejob training. In addition, the candidate will collaborate with businesses to build partnerships for long-term community-based employment. Must demonstrate 3:09 PM reliability, strong communication skills, and the ability to solve problems effectively and professionally. This full-time position offers a comprehensive benefits package, a great work environment, and the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of others. Submit resume and cover letter to Michelle Paya, mpaya@ccs-vt.org. ccs-vt.org

CONSERVATION PROGRAM ASSISTANT VACD seeks to fill two full-time Conservation Program Assistant (PA) positions. One position is based at the St. Albans NRCS Field Office covering Northwest Vermont and the other is based at the Newport NRCS Field Office covering Northeast Vermont. The Program Assistant (PA) will be a skilled and experienced administrator who will assist and support NRCS field office staff to implement USDA Farm Bill conservation and easement programs and will be responsible for accurate documentation and tracking of applications, contracts, and financial records utilizing customized software. Excellent verbal, written, computer and customer service skills required. The ideal candidate will be well organized and able to work independently with accurate attention to detail. Bachelor's degree with an interest in conservation is preferred.

CONSERVATION PLANNER VACD seeks qualified applicants for a full-time Conservation Planner (CP) position located in the NRCS Williston Field Office. This position will cover Chittenden, Washington and northern Addison counties as needed. The Planner’s responsibilities include providing technical assistance to farmers to prepare necessary information for the development of Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (CNMPs), as well as other planning and implementation assistance to farms seeking assistance from USDA programs administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) or to meet Vermont’s Required Agricultural Practices (RAPs). Knowledge of soils, agricultural conservation and diversified agricultural practices, map development and interpretation, and water quality issues are desired. Excellent verbal, interpersonal, computer, communication skills and completion of a 4-year course of study leading to a bachelor's degree with a focus in natural resources, agriculture, soils, or agronomy is required. Position requires fieldwork and travel in the region. Starting salary for all positions is $16.34 per hour and includes health benefits, sick, holiday and vacation leave. Visit vacd.org for detailed job descriptions. Send resume, cover letter, three references and position preference by September 18th to: Joanne Dion at joanne.dion@vacd.org or to VACD, PO Box 889, Montpelier, VT 05601. EOE.

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9/9/19 6:35 PM

9/9/19 6:18 PM

RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LOAN ASSISTANT We are seeking a full time Residential Mortgage Loan Assistant for our growing South Burlington Loan Office. This individual will be responsible for performing a variety of administrative duties to provide loan origination and documentation support for our Mortgage Loan Union Bank, a highly successful commercial bank headquartered in Morrisville, Vermont Offithroughout cers. Other northern responsibilities overseeing the is seeking an and with offices Vermontinclude and New Hampshire, completion and accuracy of loan documents, processexperienced Information Security Officer. ing loans and ensuring proper loan documentation inResponsibilities cluding for thisinput risk management professional level position will include the of information and preparing all related ongoing management of the Information Security Program and related policies, procedures, loan documents, follow up on verifications and credit risk assessments, and training tools in order to maintain the confidentiality, integrity, reports, preparation of loans for underwriting, as well and availability of bank information systems and information assets. Responsible for as commitment letters, notes, and other loan documencoordinating information security efforts across business departments, ensuring that tation and set up, assisting customers policies and procedures are appropriate and consistent with with daily advances practices and accountable on homecontrols construction providing other loansecurity threats. for ensuring appropriate are in lines placeand to protect the all bank against support needed. Requirements include excellent writRequirements include a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Technology or equivalent field of ten and oral communication, and a minimum of 2 years study; possess two to four years of related network technology experience; CISSP or CISM of prior residential loan experience with a familiarity of certification is preferred; a strong overall understanding and knowledge of Information secondary marketincluding mortgagerisk loanassessment products isprocesses, preferablebank operations Security practices and systems, but not required. Attention to detail, strong organizaand procedures, and regulatory requirements; understand networking protocols, firewall tional skills, and the ability to multi-task are essential. functionality, host and network intrusion detection systems and vulnerability assessments;

INFORMATION SECURITY OFFICER

possess experience in application security, penetration testing and user access monitoring; have an excellent ability to recognize control weaknesses and opportunities for process/ operational improvements and develop viable risk mitigation strategies; and possess excellent problem solving, planning, organization, and administrative skills. Salary will be commensurate with experience. Union Bank offers a comprehensive benefits Union Bank offers competitive wages, a comprehensive program including medical and dental insurance, 401(k) retirement plan with a generous benefits package, training for professional developcompany match,ment, life and disability insurance, and paid leave. strong advancement potential, stable hours and a supportive work environment. ed letter, applications To be considered for this position, please submitQualifi a cover resume, references salaryletter, requirements may apply withand a cover resume,to: professional references and salary requirements to:

Human Resources-Union Bank P.O. PO Box 667 Human Vermont Morrisville, 05661 – 0667 Morrisville, VT 05661-0667 Resources careers@unionbankvt.com careers@unionbanknh.com

Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender

Equal Opportunity Employer

Residential Mortgage Loan Assistant - LPO Seven Days, 3.83 x 7

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E.O.E.

Building a community where everyone participates and everyone belongs.

7/22/19 7:19 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

C-17 09.11.19-09.18.19

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

Located in Johnson, the Vermont Studio Center is the largest international artist and writer’s residency center in the United States. VSC seeks a part time Executive Assistant with excellent organizational skills, proven ability in digital, verbal, and written communications, and who can complete tasks with efficiency and precise attention to detail. For a full job description, please visit our website:

POST YOUR JOBS AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB

PART TIME

PRINT DEADLINE: NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) FOR RATES & INFO: MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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4/25/16 6:25 PM

REGISTRAR RECORDS COORDINATOR Full Time, Benefits Eligible

INDIVIDUAL AIDE

BASIC FUNCTION: The Registrar Records Coordinator will provide essential clerical support to the Office of the Registrar and to students, faculty, staff and alumni.

ABOUT THE POSITION: • Full-time aide will assist preschool teachers in supplying individualized support and social and emotional skill building to specific preschool children in our classrooms, as well as one-on-one with children. • Responsibilities include teaching self-regulation skills and providing individual support to children in using these skills in the classroom. • Lund’s early childhood team is a play-based center that is mission-driven and committed to supporting vulnerable families. • Early childhood teachers collaborate with community partners to ensure all children are receiving services that provide for optimal care and education.

CHARACTERISTIC DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES: • Process transcript requests in a timely manner • Maintain and organize paper academic files • Scan and weed paper academic files consistent with records retention policy • Monitor registrar@goddard.edu and records@goddard.edu accounts • Serve as the front desk staff person and answer calls made to the general office number • Purchase office supplies as needed • Oversee and produce photo identification cards at each registration • Prepare all Federal Express shipments • Retrieve Registrar’s Office campus mail and distribute as appropriate • As capable, assist students, faculty, staff, alumni and external parties in person or by phone or email • Working from an assigned listing, compile, write, edit and proofread student transcripts from paper, microfilm and electronic sources based upon program-specific guidelines • Document transcripts written and approximate duration required for each transcript • Troubleshoot any compiling issues with Registrar’s Office staff.

WHAT WE LOOK FOR:

SUPERVISION RECEIVED: • Supervision is received from the Registrar. • $15.00 per hour—37.5hrs per week

• Some experience with Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, the Multi-Tier System of Supports framework and/or experience working with children to develop social and emotional skills is preferred, but we will train a candidate who is dedicated and passionate about the care and well-being of children. • Experience working with children and families required. • A candidate who is passionate, inspired and committed to working with a dedicated group of professionals.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Education: Undergraduate degree or a combination of education and experience from which comparable knowledge and skills are acquired. • Technology: Experience and facility with computerized information systems (preferably S.I.S.) • Experience/demonstrated competencies: Good administrative skills and exceptional organizational skills and attention to detail. Strong written and oral communication skills. Familiarity with Goddard’s educational approach and format preferred • General understanding of Goddard’s academic programs, policies and personnel structures • General technical experience and knowledge related to managing complex records systems. Ability to work effectively and without support in Word and Excel or their Gmail equivalents • Experience with student records and registration • Excellent organizational skills and attention to detail • Ability to deal effectively with College faculty, students, administrators and staff, as well as various outside organizations and agencies

WHY JOIN OUR TEAM AT LUND:

• Ongoing training opportunities available. • Lund is a multi-service nonprofit that has served families and children throughout Vermont for 125 years. • Our mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. • Commitment surrounding diversity and cultural competence. • Lund offers comprehensive benefit packages for full-time positions including health, dental, life insurance, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual & holiday pay. • Excellent opportunity to join strengths-based team of multidisciplinary professionals.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: To apply, please prepare the following documents and then click: employment@goddard.edu. Paper copies of your application may be sent to the Goddard HR Office at the address below. • three employment references, with contact information • cover letter • current resume APPLICATION DUE DATE: Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. H.R., Goddard College - 123 Pitkin Rd., Plainfield VT 05667, (802) 322.1712, (802) 322.0700 (fax) Goddard College is committed to creating a college representative of a diverse global community and capable of creating change. To that end, we are actively seeking applications from qualified candidates from groups currently underrepresented in our institution for this position. 10v-GoddardCollege091119.indd 1

Please send resume and cover letter to: Human Resources, PO Box 4009, Burlington, VT 05406-4009 fax (802) 864-1619 email: employment@lundvt.org.

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9/9/19 6:25 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-18

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.11.19-09.18.19

Hiring Now!

Immediate full-time and flexible part-time positions Manufacturing, Call Center, Warehouse Apply in person 210 East Main Street, Richmond

Untitled-11 1

9/10/19 11:20 AM

Commando, a luxury womens apparel brand based in South Burlington, is hiring! We are a quickly growing, entrepreneurial company known for innovation and contemporary designs. For more information visit wearcommando.com/pages/careers Please send resume and cover letter to careers@wearcommando.com

Collaborative Solutions Corporation (CSC) programs offer exceptionally high-quality, research-informed clinical care to adults with psychiatric illnesses. Our care team includes psychiatrists, nurses, therapists, case managers, and a music therapist, as well as vocational, recovery and peer specialists. As an alternative to hospitalization, we provide a place for patients to heal and grow in beautiful Vermont country inn settings. CSC is committed to recovery-based care which is trauma-informed and culturally competent.

CLINICAL DIRECTOR

ACCOUNT MANAGER | BOUTIQUE SALES We are looking for an energetic self-starter to join the Specialty & Boutique Sales team. The ideal candidate has an interest in fashion, an entrepreneurial spirit, and a desire to dive into the excitement at a rapidly growing, international fashion brand.

FULFILLMENT ASSOCIATE Searching for detail-oriented and motivated individuals who can switch between assigned tasks as needed. Responsibilities include picking and packing orders according to customer requirements, boxing/tagging/ hanging garments, and participating in physical inventories. Flexibility in scheduling is available.

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST We are looking for an agile team player to join our busy Product Development team. Our ideal candidate thrives in a fast paced environment, works well with deadlines and has strong technical design and sewing skills. You will execute product lifecycle from initial concept through development to production.

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Seeking an apprentice for our Lead Cutter. Commando willing to train the highly technical skill of fabric cutting using die cut presses and rotary tools. Requires precision, accuracy and strong attention to detail.

PRODUCTION SEWERS We need skilled sewers to join our in-house sewing team. Must be focused, meticulous and able to multitask and prioritize.

QUALITY CONTROL ASSOCIATE In need of an organized and detail-oriented individual to coordinate our quality control processes, ensuring that commando’s high expectations are met for all products manufactured.

QUALITY CONTROL SUPERVISOR Looking for a detail-oriented, team player to manage and provide direction to our quality control team. This position is involved in the day to day execution of all quality control processes. Our ideal candidate has previous knowledge of garment construction.

RECEIVING ASSOCIATE

Join Collaborative Solutions Corporation’s dynamic community in its mission to create an organizational culture of compassion, hope and health. Our next Clinical Director will be an individual with great leadership and listening skills, demonstrated ability to successfully lead implementation of organization-wide initiatives, capacity for strategic thinking, an interest in working with stakeholders outside the organization, and a high level of expertise in providing research-informed treatment for individuals with serious mental health diagnoses. This position requires a master’s or doctoral degree and an active clinical license (or ability to obtain an active clinical license) in Vermont. Sufficient years of experience in the field to have demonstrated aptitude and competence for the job.

PROGRAM MANAGER COMMUNITY WRAP INTENSIVE RECOVERY RESIDENCE Looking for a position with great impact and purposeful meaning? Join Collaborative Solutions Corporation’s dynamic community in its mission to create an organizational culture of compassion, hope and health. The Program Manager at our Pearce House Community Wrap Intensive Recovery Residence (IRR) is a key individual in supporting our organizational mission to create caring communities where people seeking mental health find hope, compassion and excellent clinical care. A highly motivated individual in this position will work collaboratively in coordination with the Executive Director and clinical leadership. By bringing stellar organizational skills, communication skills, emotional intelligence, strategic thinking and the desire to engage staff with strength-based initiatives, this individual will provide strong leadership to both staff and residents alike. A strong philosophy for recovery based principles, trauma informed care, consultation for program issues with external and internal stakeholders, and supervisory skills are essential. Master’s degree in Human Services (or related field) preferred; Bachelor’s Degree may be considered. Minimum of ten years’ experience working with people with mental illness with a minimum five years’ experience providing staff supervision, preferably in a residential setting. Excellent communication and computer skills and ability to work in a fast paced, highly collaborative work environment. Valid driver’s license; excellent driving record and have access to a safe, reliable, insured vehicle. Collaborative Solutions Corporation offers competitive health/dental/vision plans along with a matching 403b retirement plan, plus other company-paid benefits such as short and long term disability insurance and life insurance policies. We also offer a generous time off policy.

Please submit letter of interest and resume to: Marianne Mullen, Director of Team Development Collaborative Solutions Corporation MarianneM@cscorp.org

Seeking a highly organized individual to join our Receiving team. This position is responsible for maintaining our warehouse, receiving and transfering goods.

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9/9/19 2:15 PM

9/9/19 6:32 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MULTIPLE MANUFACTURING POSITONS OPEN

The following Temporary positions are available November 1 – March 31 in our Warming Shelter:

MACHINE OPERATORS – Essex & Williston, VT

• The Machine Operator is responsible for monitoring Keurig Dr Pepper’s production processes; including operating manufacturing equipment and maintaining compliance with Keurig Dr Pepper’s high standards for safety and quality. This role will be engaged and understand initiatives to improve safety, quality, delivery, cost and culture. • Full Description: https://bit.ly/2kwtQ3l

Part Time, Saturday-Sunday 5 p.m. and 1 a.m.

MATERIAL HANDLER

Part Time Overnight Saturday and Sunday 12 a.m. and 8 a.m.

• As a Material Handler you will execute storage, material handling, replenish and fulfillment functions within the Plant while meeting our World Class Manufacturing and Distribution standards. • Full Description: https://bit.ly/2kwu3DF

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN I – Williston, VT

Full Time, Monday-Friday 5 p.m. and 1 a.m.

• The Maintenance Technician I at Keurig Dr Pepper is responsible for installation, troubleshooting, maintenance, and improvement of process equipment. Maintenance technicians must be highly quality-conscious, aggressively selfdirected, motivated team players, and willing trainers—eager to gain and share new knowledge. • Full Description: https://bit.ly/2k1ikNf

Full Time Overnight Monday-Friday 12 a.m. and 8 a.m.

PRODUCTION CLEANER – Williston, VT

For more info, go to: https://bit.ly/2lvAUh5

• As a Facilities Production Cleaner you will maintain the common areas of the facility. This role will work with the manufacturing and operations groups aligning themselves with all Good Manufacturing Practices and Safety guidelines. • Full Description: https://bit.ly/2k1iMuV

SHIFTS, SIGN-ON BONUS, WAGES:

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Positions available on all shifts at both Essex and Williston sites. Shifts work approximately 14 days/month with regular overtime opportunities available! Shifts schedules are: • D1 Monday-Wednesday, alternating Thursday 6:00am-6:15pm • D2 Friday-Sunday, alternating Thursday 6:00am-6:15pm • N1 Monday-Wednesday, alternating Thursday 6:00pm-6:15am • N2 Friday-Sunday, alternating Thursday 6:00pm-6:15am • $1,000 sign-on bonus for Williston & Essex opportunities

9/9/19 6:24 PM

METAL WORKER & MAKER

Machine Operator wages range from $17-19 per hour including shift differential. Experienced operators eligible for competitive hourly rate. $5,250 education tuition assistance available for employees with 6 month of service that are enrolled in graduate and undergraduate degrees in related fields. Keurig Dr Pepper (KDP) is a leading coffee and beverage company in North America with dual headquarters in Burlington, MA, and Plano, TX, with annual revenue in excess of $11 billion. KDP holds leadership positions in soft drinks, specialty coffee and tea, water, juice, and juice drinks and mixers, and markets the #1 single serve coffee brewing system in the U.S. The Company maintains an unrivaled distribution system that enables its portfolio of more than 125 owned, licensed and partner brands to be available nearly everywhere people shop and consume beverages. With a wide range of hot and cold beverages that meet virtually any consumer need, KDP key brands include Keurig®, Dr Pepper®, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters®, Canada Dry®, Snapple®, Bai®, Mott’s® and The Original Donut Shop®. The Company employs more than 25,000 employees and operates more than 120 offices, manufacturing plants, warehouses and distribution centers across North America. Benefits built for you: Our people are the heart of our business, which is why we offer robust benefits to support your health and wellness as well as your personal and financial well-being. We also provide employee programs designed to enhance your professional growth and development while ensuring you feel valued, inspired and appreciated at work. Keurig Dr Pepper Inc. is an equal opportunity employer and affirmatively seeks diversity in its workforce. Keurig Dr Pepper Inc. recruits qualified applicants and advances in employment its employees without regard to race, color, religion, gender, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, disability, genetic information, ethnic or national origin, marital status, veteran status, or any other status protected by law. EOE Minorities/Females/Protected Veterans/Disabled. Candidates must be able to pass a background check and drug test, as applicable for the role. 14-KeurigDRPepper091119.indd 1

C-19 09.11.19-09.18.19

Conant Metal & Light is looking for a metalworker & maker to join our production team. You must be a creative problem-solver, good with your hands and capable of mastering a broad array of processes, including welding, machining, cold-working of glass, assembly of electrical circuits, inspection and quality control, and packaging of finished product. It is critical that you maintain a consistently high level of quality, productivity, and excellent attention to detail throughout a diverse set of tasks. Send a resume detailing your interest, experience and skills to jolene@ conantmetalandlight.com

9/9/19 5:48 PM 3v-ConantMetal&Light081419.indd 1

8/11/19 3:24 PM


Dogs are always allowed when you own.

Bauer Monday, Gravel September 30 Farnham, LLP 6-8 p.m. at

Presented by:

Attorneys at Law

the FlynnSpace

A free workshop for first-time home buyers. Talk with experts, ask questions and grab a drink! ATTORNEYS

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RSVP TODAY! C-20

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 11-18, 2019

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Go to: sevendaysvt.com/houseparty 9/9/19 4:10 PM

Profile for Seven Days

Seven Days, September 11, 2019  

Show and Tell: the 2019-20 Performing Arts Preview; Tracking Down Former Priests Accused of Abuse; Nutty Steph's Rebrands as Rabble-Rouser,...

Seven Days, September 11, 2019  

Show and Tell: the 2019-20 Performing Arts Preview; Tracking Down Former Priests Accused of Abuse; Nutty Steph's Rebrands as Rabble-Rouser,...

Profile for 7days