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ISSUE NO. 1

UNITING CREATORS AND CONSUMERS OF FASHION IN INDIANAPOLIS

(amazing)

Grace

+ CONVERSATIONS WITH AMERICAN COLORS, BILL JONES, ROBERT INNIS, EMILY CLARK, MICHAEL MAZOR

fashioning a community patternindy.com

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Welcome to Pattern.

Pattern is a new way of thinking and doing fashion in Indianapolis. It endeavors to become a safe space for fashion-minded individuals to engage with each other, and create a network of people with diverse backgrounds and ambitions. Whether through our monthly meet-ups or online presence, we hope to foster a sense of shared creativity, and to encourage the grassroots growth of our burgeoning local fashion industry. In October of 2011, we debuted our vision with a sold-out gathering at iMOCA. In November, we hosted a streetwear-focused lineup of Indy designers at the IndyFringe Theatre. This year, we had the opportunity to meet at the newlylaunched Speak Easy for our independent jewelry-themed January event. Each of these delightful and inspiring events has reinforced our passionate belief that individual artistic growth is catalyzed when the artist engages with a vibrant community. In this debut issue of Pattern, we celebrate the creative forces of Indianapolis fashion. We are excited to present exclusive interviews, stunning editorials, and a glimpse into what it means to work in the world of fashion. We hope to leave you inspired, and that it moves you to get involved! At the front, you’ll find a calendar of events, including our monthly Pattern meet-ups, that we hope you will attend. We appreciate your encouragement and support, and look forward to building a fashion community with you!

BEST REGARDS, THE TEAM AT PATTERN

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EDITOR IN CHIEF Polina osherov

EDITORIAL/FASHION DIRECTOR nikki sutton

DESIGN DIRECTOR Kathy Davis

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Janneane Blevins

FEATURES EDITOR Benjamin Blevins

SENIOR COPY EDITOR sean P. Dougherty 

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS catherine fritsch Erica sagon annie stultz Jeremiah Williams

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS stacy able Julie Boyle John Bragg Larry Endicott Jason gaskins Larry Ladig Jason Lavengood Eric Lubrick Polina osherov adam Roth stephen simonetto

CONTRIBUTING STYLISTS Benjamin Blevins Janneane Blevins stephen garstang annie stultz nikki sutton

Published by Pattern Uniting & Growing creators and consumers of fashion in Indianapolis www.patternindy.com for more information, email marketing@patternindy.com © 2012 Pattern. All rights reserved. The material of this magazine may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Pattern. all photography rights belong to the each individual photographer.

A SPECIAL THANKS TO: Ka+a for creating a vision and a brand for Pattern. mass. ave. Wine shop for supporting us as we grow. indyfringe for providing a space and structure for our organization. sunKing for providing delicious craft brews for our events. imoca and scott Johnson of axiom for their support and space. Lmodelz and helen Wells agency for providing models for our shoots.

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CONTENTS PATTERN ISSUE NO. 1 patternindy.com

departments Q+A WITH GRACE HARTZEL: MODEL, 10 WEARABLE: STATEMENT TEES, 14 BOUTIQUES: PITAYA, 18 by Annie Stultz

TAILORS: MADE TO FIT, 20 by Catherine Fritsch

Q+A WITH BILL JONES: PHOTOGRAPHER, 26 DESIGNERS: EMILY CLARK, 28 by Catherine Fritsch

DESIGNERS: AMERICAN COLORS, 32 Q+A WITH ROBERT INNIS: MERCHANDISER, 92 STYLISTS: HAIR, 94

features STICKS + STONES, 36 photographed by Larry Ladig

TRASHED: A DENIM AND TEES STORY, 42 photographed by Stephen Simonetto

THE CLEARING, 54 photographed by Jason Lavengood

BODY CHECK, 62 photographed by Larry Endicott

SECRET AGENT MAN, 72 photographed by Polina Osherov

SALVAGE BEAUTY, 82 photographed by John Bragg

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INDY FASHION EVENTS

SPONSORED BY INDYSPECTATOR. DISCOVER NEW WAYS TO LOVE INDY. indyspectator.com

MARCH

APRIL

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 6:30PM Nourish Café & The Toby

APRIL 17 Indiana Roof Ballroom

Cocktails and Talk: Fashion’s Empire: Royal and Court Style in NineteenthCentury Europe

Pathfinder Awards

FAS PICK

imamuseum.org/support/ membership/fashion-arts-society

INDYHUB PICK

JUNE JUNE 1 Indy Fashion Time:Unzip the Runway iftworld.com

indianasportscorp.com/ programs/pathfinder-awards/

INDYHUB PICK

PATTERN

Zoobilation

APRIL 26, 6:30PM

JUNE 8, 7PM Indianapolis Zoo indyzoo.com/SitePages/ SpecialEvents/zoobilation.aspx

MIDWEST FASHION WEEK EVENTS

Style Blogs with special guest Jessica Quirk of What I Wore

MARCH 10-17 Locations around Indy

meetup.com/Pattern/

PATTERN

INDYHUB PICK

JUNE 21, 6:30PM Larry Endicott Studio

APRIL 27 AND 28 The Stutz

Fashion Photography

Check out the Midwest Fashion Week Event schedule online: midwestfashionweek.com/ event-calendar

MARCH 13 Madame Walker Theater Emergence Fashion Show

MARCH 14, 10:30AM Woodland Country Club Spring into Fashion: Fundraiser for Prevail indianapolisfashion.org/ event/spring-into-fashion/

PATTERN MARCH 21, 6:30PM; The Murphy Building Construction & Production meetup.com/Pattern/

The Stutz Artists Open House stutzartists.com/openhouse.html

MAY

meetup.com/Pattern/

SEPTEMBER PATTERN

SEPTEMBER 20 23, 6:30PM City Gallery Neighborhood Street Style meetup.com/Pattern/

OCTOBER FAS PICK

OCTOBER 11, 7PM The Toby Project IMA, Another exciting fashion show…. imamuseum.org/support/ membership/fashion-arts-society

JULY

PATTERN & FAS

FAS PICK

JULY 26, 6:30PM The IMA

THURSDAY MAY 17, 7PM The Toby

meetup.com/Pattern/

Planet Indy Talk: Zero-Waste is Sexy with Timo Rissanen of Parsons School of Design and PUP’s Michael Bricker

AUGUST

imamuseum.org/support/ membership/fashion-arts-society

AUGUST 23, 6:30PM

PATTERN

Business of Fashion meetup.com/Pattern/

PATTERN MAY 24, 6:30PM The Space/The Stutz Building Makeup & Hair meetup.com/Pattern/

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STACY ABLE PHOTOGRAPHER

BENJAMIN BLEVINS WRITER + STYLIST

PHOTOGRAPHED “HATS OFF TO EMILY” PAGE 28

STYLED “SECRET AGENT MAN” PAGE 72

PHOTOGRAPHED “SALVAGE BEAUTY” PAGE 82

Stacy Able is a midwest fine art wedding photographer who loves Barbet and Macaron.

Benjamin is a writer, poet and the editor & content strategist for IndySpectator.

How did you first get interested in fashion? I've been drawing ever since I can remember which led me to graphic communications and eventually to being a wedding photographer.

How did you first become interested in/aware of fashion? Fashion, as an artistic endeavor and cultural marker, has always fascinated me. Ever since the emergence of designers like Hedi Slimane, I have immersed myself (albeit from a distance) in the world of fashion, examining its significance as both a personal and universal construct.

JULIE BOYLE PHOTOGRAPHER

John Bragg specializes in portraiture for advertising, magazine and corporate clients. He also enjoys photographing architecture, food, cars, fashion, glamour, and fine-art.

How did you first become interested in fashion? I spent most of high school trying to be like Gwen Stefani...and the outcome was usually less than successful. I've come a long way since learning you can't put temporary pink hair dye on brown hair!

What was your inspiration for the shoot? I like creating images that feel like they came from another era. Once I knew I would be partnering with Annie Stultz, we brainstormed about locations. Since the clothing would all be vintage, we came up with Doc's Architectural Salvage; he has such a great inventory of antiques.

Where do you envision the Indy fashion scene to be in 5 years? I hope to see more fashion & design shows and more boutiques selling locally made goods. stacyable.com

about.me/ballarde

JANNEANE BLEVINS WRITER + EDITOR

CO-STYLED “SECRET AGENT MAN” PAGE 72 Janneane is a project manager at KA+A, curator and orchestrator of IndySpectator, and event planner for Pattern.

BLEVINS BENJAMIN

What first got you interested in fashion? While a student at Butler, I worked part-time at Pitaya – a haven for a college girl on a budget. The store received new shipments every week, and I relished the morning shift where we ripped open the boxes, played dress up, and styled new looks for the window displays. Seeing people walk out of the store with a style I pieced together was absolutely thrilling. Who are your muses? I love the 60s' Rock & Roll and French New Wave: the kohl rimmed eyes of Anna Karina, Charlotte Gainsbourg's effortless le bobo look, and Freja Beha Erichson, tattooed and glam. Equally, I adore Coco Chanel's chic menswear inspired style. about.me/janneane

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JOHN BRAGG PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHED “STATEMENT TEES” PAGE 14

Where do you envision the Indy fashion scene to be in 5 years? Independent and locally owned shops are on the up and up, and I hope these unique shops become more prevalent. buliejoyle.blogspot.com

You've traveled all over Europe. What's one thing you wish you could bring back to Indianapolis? I would love to transport a lot of the architecture. Europeans are so much more bold in what they do with design. They understand form and function which really creates a more interesting sense of place. What's your next project that you're looking forward to? I actually want to start teaching photography workshops with the goal of taking my class to Europe and teaching the workshops there. johnbragg.com

S E BLEVIN JANNEAN

DICOTT LARRY EN

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KATHY DAVIS ART DIRECTOR Kathy is a freelance art director in Indianapolis focusing on magazine development, cookbook design and catalog work and has contributed her magazine expertise to this debut issue of Pattern. What do you like most about designing magazines? I started in the advertising business but fell into the magazine biz early in my career and haven’t looked back. The creative freedom you have in the world of editorial, is so satisfying, it’s not like work at all. I’ve been lucky to work with photographers, stylists and chefs all over the country, shooting and designing catalogs, cookbooks and locally working for Indianapolis Monthly and Dine magazine. I’m excited to be working on Pattern, it’s 180 degrees from shooting food. Then again, they say food is fashion. kathydavisdesign.com

LARRY ENDICOTT PHOTOGRAPHER

LARRY LADIG PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHED “BODY CHECK” PAGE 62

PHOTOGRAPHED “STICKS + STONES” PAGE 36

Photographer Larry Endicott reigns over Fountain Square in a 100 year old tavern with his lovely pinked haired wife and a black cat. Together they create art, smoke hookah and plan for the zombie apocalypse. In the spring they will open Monster Gallery.

Larry Ladig works as a photographer in Indianapolis, making still and moving pictures for corporations, ad agencies and magazines.

larryendicottphotographic.com

STEPHEN GARSTANG STYLIST

JASON GASKINS PHOTOGRAPHER

WARDROBE STYLING FOR “BODY CHECK” PAGE 62, “STICKS + STONES” PAGE 36

PHOTOGRAPHED “COMFORT ZONE” PAGE 32 Jason is a commercial photographer who is currently employed with one of Indianapolis' most established talent and modeling agencies, the Helen Wells Agency. What elements of photography do you enjoy most? Lighting and composition are so important for a good photograph. As I've honed my craft over the last 7 years, they've become essential to defining my unique style. jasongaskinsphotography.com

How would you define fashion? Fashion is social, political and economical. If the world had no written history we could still tell its story through pictures of what we wore and how we wore it. How did you get involved with fashion? I was born in the 60's, grew up in the 70's and started art school in the 80's. I went into the 90's as a fashion designer of some notoriety in NYC and came out of the decade (literally and figuratively) an impresario of art, fashion and decoration.

What was the inspiration for the shoot you did for Pattern? The conversations I had with art director, Kathy Davis, and stylist Stephen Garstang, really helped define the shoot. We discussed everything from insects to snakes, string, finger puppets, worms, tapioca, dark soil….random I know. It was all realized, though, by the organic design of the pieces. What needs to change locally in order for the fashion industry to really flourish? Trust. What exciting personal photography project are you working on? I am finishing up an interpretive ad project for Spotlight, featuring artists of varied disciplines in studio. The best part has been stitching these photos together as a story. larryladig.com

I slave today as I did yesterday only now it is called "stylist". If there is one theme that still connects through me it is that I still see the world as pictures. I see them, direct them and shoot them everyday but, ironically, I've never liked one of me. stephengarstang.com

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SHEROV POLINA O JASON LAVENGOOD PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHED “THE CLEARING” PAGE 54 Jason started developing film when he was 13 years old and has loved it ever since. You travel all over the country on photography assignments. What do you most look forward to when you return to Indy? I look forward to a sense of community. This is a city where all kinds of people are consistently contributing to make Indianapolis a great place to live. What's the next project that you're looking forward to? Another shoot like this. If you had a say in it, which men's clothing store would you like to see open its doors in Indianapolis? Diesel. I like their clothes but their marketing is awesome! I would love to shoot for them. bangbangshoot.com

ERIC LUBRICK PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHED “PITAYA’S STAYING POWER” PAGE 18 Eric Lubrick is a commercial photographer currently living, working and teaching in Indianapolis. How did you get involved in fashion photography? After attending grad school outside of Detroit, I moved to New York City to explore my passion for the arts and photography. For 3 years, I freelanced for publications such as Allure and Complex and companies like Victoria's Secret and Gilt Groupe. I relocated back to the Midwest where I met my fiancé and started my own studio. ericlubrick.com

VENGOOD JASON LA

POLINA OSHEROV PHOTOGRAPHER + WRITER

PHOTOGRAPHED “AMAZING GRACE” COVER AND PAGE 10, “SECRET AGENT MAN”PAGE 72 Polina Osherov is an Indianapolis based commercial photographer specializing in fashion and portraiture. What's the best part of being a photographer in Indiana? The access to locations and people is amazing! In a big city like NYC or London, securing locations is a logistical nightmare that comes with a hefty price tag. In Indy, it's much simpler, which allows me to focus my attention on the actual shooting. Why do you like to shoot fashion? I love the collaborative nature – creative people coming together to make something beautiful. The sky is the limit! Where do you see Pattern in 5 years? I see fashion in Indy a little akin to hosting this year's Super Bowl. Building a fashion community isn't really something we've done before, but their are people who believe in our city's potential. Their energy and enthusiasm can be quite catching, and powerful if harnessed the right way. I'm hoping that Pattern will be able to do just that! polinaosherov.com

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ADAM ROTH PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHED “MADE TO FIT” PAGE 20 How did you get started in fashion?" I honestly can't remember the moment when I first became interested in fashion. The complete freedom to create anything you want is what really drew my attention. Where do you see Indianapolis fashion in 5 years? Indianapolis has grown exponentially over the past few years and I am really excited to see what the future holds. What's the next project you're looking forward to? This year I have a project exploring juxtaposition between clothing and environment.

TH ADAM RO

STEPHEN SIMONETTO PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHED “TRASHED: A DENIM AND TEES STORY” PAGE 42 Stephen Simonetto is one of highest regarded fashion and portrait photographers in Indianapolis. Why do you like shooting fashion? I love being a part of a great team; seeing a model walk through the door and then become completely transformed. It is the hard work of the amazingly talented people behind the scenes that make my job easy. In fashion, there are no creative boundaries. It is very much a dreamers playground, and I love to dream. What was the inspiration for this shoot? I have always loved the atmosphere of martini lounges, and Blu is one my favorites downtown. A "night on the town" for me usually involves a strong drink, a leather couch, and plenty of glass tables, and Blu made it easy to capture just that.

TTON NIKKI SU

ANNIE STULTZ WRITER + STYLIST

What's one thing you miss in Indy when you're traveling? Besides not having to drive everywhere with my GPS out... I would probably say the Monument Circle. I am a big people watcher and there are always a good mix of people there. Plus, architecture fascinates me — no matter how many times I go.

WARDROBE STYLING FOR “SALVAGE BEAUTY” PAGE 82

stephensimonetto.com

How did you get where you are today? Over the past ten years, I've worked with vintage clothing in Indianapolis and at the legendary Cloud Cuckoo Land in London, Islington. While overseas, I received my MA in Fashion Journalism at Central Saint Martins. Through an award from (British) Vogue.com, I was able to cover the runway for the CSM Lancome Awards, Gareth Pugh, and Chanel – pretty amazing!

Annie Stultz is the manager at Girly Chic Boutique, which, under her care, will soon carry women's high end vintage. Also, she founded and administrates the Shared Heritage Creative Writing Workshop.

NIKKI SUTTON STYLIST + DESIGNER

STYLED “AMAZING GRACE” COVER AND STORY PAGE 10, “CULTURE COIFFURE” PAGE 94 Nikki Sutton tirelessly works as an interior designer, wardrobe stylist, fashion advocate and Indianapolis enthusiast. What got you interested in fashion initially? When I wanted to start being by own person, I struck up a passionate love affair with fashion and personal style. I couldn't sing, couldn't dance, I didn't understand my art but I could express myself through my appearance. Who are your muses? Katherine Hepburn, Tara Donovan and Julia Sugarbaker stir me. Where do you see Pattern in 5 years? I'm not sure; it is still so new. We are still experimenting with the programming as we learn what is needed, what is beneficial and what is superfluous. What's the biggest challenge with being a wardrobe stylist in Indy? Being just one person. I want to do everything but time and energy continue to be my nemesis. levelinterior.com

JEREMIAH WILLIAMS STYLIST + WRITER

Q+A WITH ROBERT INNIS PAGE 92 Jeremiah Williams specializes in men’s fashion and style, but enjoys the fun of styling women, too. What was the most surprising thing you learned while writing your story? The exciting thing about fashion and style is that it is relevant to so many aspects of culture, even athletics events, something very germane to Indianapolis. Where do you see the Indy fashion scene in 5 years? Indianapolis needs events that celebrate fashion (Project IMA in 2008 opened my eyes to that possibility). It is great to see a network of fashion industry professionals starting to come together, to help make Indianapolis better. The next 5 years will be really exciting. I know I am watching. What's your favorite local boutique to shop? The men of Indianapolis have been forced to settle for Express or H&M. I plan to stick with internet shopping for now, but there are a few boutiques that have recently opened around Indy that I haven't had a chance to check out yet. I'll keep you posted! about.me/jeremiahwilliams

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A GRACE HARTZEL. MODEL. BEHIND HER SWEET BABY BLUES IS AN INTENSITY BURNING BRIGHT. FROM VERA TO VICTORIA, POLINA OSHEROV CATCHES UP WITH INDY'S MODEL DARLING. TEXT + PHOTOGRAPH BY POLINA OSHEROV I MET GRACE HARTZEL ON A SUNNY SUNDAY MORNING IN APRIL OF LAST YEAR. Her dad dropped her off at the Firestone Service Station on 38th and Lafayette. The service station was a wonderful, greasy mess of old tire racks, empty car bays, hanging electric wires, and lockers of indeterminate color where mechanics once stored their coveralls and street shoes. It was a perfect location for a fashion photo shoot! Grace looked like any other fifteen year-old who just got yanked out of bed on a Sunday morning, only much taller and thinner, and with piercing blue eyes. She had a sweet smile, and a sweeter demeanor, but when I finally got her in front of my camera, the sweetness fled in a second, and was replaced by such intensity and fire that I might have squealed just a little. As a fashion photographer In Indianapolis, always in search of great print fashion models, I knew that I’d just struck gold. While that was my first time working with her, Grace could be considered a pro. Modeling since thirteen, agency represented, having recently walked in a Vera Wang bridal couture show in NYC, and shooting on a regular basis, it’s clear that she is on her way to a very successful career in modeling. Since April, Grace and I have worked on several projects together, and every single time, she has not only impressed me with her talent and skill in front of the camera, but also with her attitude behind the scenes. Down-toearth, polite, helpful and easy going, this girl is going to go far! POLINA: How were you discovered? GRACE: I wasn’t really discovered, but some of my 7th grade teachers kept telling me that I should try modeling! I never really thought I could be a model. I was just the tall, skinny, weird kid. {laughs} Finally, I begged my mom to take me to an open call at Factor Women in Chicago... it was Elite Model Management at the time. We went, but my mom kept telling me not to get my hopes up, that it may not happen. But they ended up signing me, saying that I was a “new-found gem”. My mom and I were completely surprised, but so excited!

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POLINA: You recently modeled some gorgeous wedding dresses at the Vera Wang’s Fall 2012 Bridal Collection in a show in New York. What was the most surprising thing about the experience? GRACE: The most surprising thing were the dresses themselves! The theme for the show was “witchcraft,” and she had created these nude and black dresses—very unusual for the bridal-fashion industry. It was something that had never been done before, so there was lots of press attention, and it was so amazing to be part of it. POLINA: Did you get to meet Vera Wang? Was there any backstage drama we should know about? GRACE: Yes, I did! She is so sweet and so creative and interesting. She is exactly what you would think! So amazingly talented! As far as the drama, I chipped my nail polish, and the person doing nails got really mad. {laughs} POLINA: You’re still in high school, and quite busy with modeling. How do you keep up? Also, which is your favorite subject, and which is your least favorite? GRACE: When I was in New York, I was always online doing my homework that the teachers were emailing me. You just have to keep up. When I got back, I stayed after school every day for like two weeks until everything was finished. I love biology, and I don’t like geometry at all. POLINA: I hear you on geometry! Quite a few famous models have talked about being the tall, skinny, awkward girl in school who often got picked on. Has that been your experience? And if so, how do you deal with it? GRACE: Yeah! I used to be the tall, skinny, awkward girl that was the school funny kid, until I started modeling. Then, I found a new confidence, and felt better about myself, and got more friends and started talking to more boys. One of the things I love about modeling is that it definitely makes you feel better about yourself. Still, some girls are not very nice about it, and make fun of me and call

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me “anorexia” and “skinny girl”. I get made fun of for being a model, and everywhere I go, I get death glares from girls. That hurts. But I’m learning to pretty much just ignore the stares, although sometimes I will call some people out and tell them to please stop staring, you’re being rude!

all trying out for, to be the prettiest. In the end, though, I try not to care too much, and remember that whatever happens was meant to be.

POLINA: You are definitely quite tiny, but I will vouch for you anytime as far as not being anorexic, but rather genetically gifted with just the right proportions for modeling. Born that way, right? Plus, I saw the way you chowed down on a bag of trail mix at our last shoot! Is that your snack of choice? What’s your favorite junk food?

GRACE: I loved New York! I miss it every day and I can’t wait to go back. It breaks my heart to see the homeless people.

GRACE: I love trail mix! Especially at shoots! It’s soooooo yummy! {laughs}  Also, I love fruit snacks and protein bars at shoots. But, what I love the most are Oreos. Sooooo good! POLINA: I’ll keep that in mind with the Oreos! What does your family think about your modeling adventures? Your mom and dad seem super supportive; what about your siblings, and grandparents? GRACE: My family is very supportive of my modeling, and I am so blessed to have them by my side. My mom especially supports everything I do, and I just think she is amazing. She went to New York with me, and she always drives me to my shoots. To be honest, I am positive I would not have made it this far without her. She is my idol, and the best mother a girl could ask for! My dad and mom keep me grounded and on track with school and everything else, and I thank them with all my heart. My grandparents are so supportive, too!!! And my siblings! Like I said, I’m very blessed with a great family! POLINA: You and I worked on the shoot, Afternoon Delight, and that was a pretty “grown-up” story, but you handled it like a pro. What kind of mental preparation do you use to channel a character that is much older than you? GRACE: I pretty much just imagine that I am that character for that whole time of the shoot; it really keeps me focused. I also want to be an actress when I’m older, so this is good practice. POLINA: What’s the plan for after you graduate high school? Are you going to take off for NYC to pursue modeling full-time, or are you thinking about college? GRACE: I think that after high school, I am going to go to New York right away because it’s my dream to be there. New York, modeling, and fashion are my life! I want to work full time right after high school. I might go to college in New York and try to do both, modeling and college. If that is too difficult, I will save college for later in life, but I will definitely get my college degree because I understand how critical it is to have that.

POLINA: See any celebrities? You don’t really strike me as someone who would get starstruck, but who would you be absolutely thrilled to meet? GRACE: I saw Dakota Fanning! She was walking around with her mom and a friend in Soho, shopping. Anyways, I followed them. {laughs}. She looked so cool, and had great style. It was weird seeing her just walking around, though. I actually did get a little starstruck when I saw her! It’s hard not to! She’s such an amazing actress. I would love to meet Karlie Kloss! She is my absolute idol! Stunning! POLINA: Is there anything about Indianapolis that you would miss if you did move away to NYC to model? GRACE: I would miss my friends a lot, and my school, and also my agency here that has done so much for me! They are amazing! And, I would miss doing amazing shoots with you and your team! POLINA: Awww!! Shucks! Thank you! We will absolutely miss you, too! I have to know: Team Edward or Team Jacob? GRACE: Definitely, Team Jacob! He is so hot! And, he’s so sweet and always protects Bella. He is everything I would want in a friend! Also, it’s so cool that he turns into a werewolf! POLINA: I’m too old for all the Twilight drama, but if I was a 16 year old girl, I’d go for Jacob, too. Favorite music, or band? GRACE: I love Vampire Weekend, and Two Door Cinema Club, as well as The Black Keys. You probably have not heard of these because they are indie rock bands! I love different music that’s not mainstream. It’s so creative and interesting to listen to. POLINA: I have heard of those, but wouldn’t be able to recognize their music. As you know from listening to my mix in the studio, I’m pretty much stuck in the 80s! Who is your favorite fashion designer? GRACE: I definitely have a few favorite designers! Coco Chanel is for sure one of them, along with Marc Jacobs. Also, I love fall fashion! It’s always so sophisticated and mature! I love it!

POLINA: What’s been your most memorable shoot, and why?

POLINA: Do you follow any style bloggers? If so, who?

GRACE: It was a shoot I did with photographer Billy Rood at Indiana Dunes. It was one of my first shoot/fashion films, and I was so excited. I got to play a character who was a very weird little girl who has no home, and is very shy. Doing that shoot made me realize how much modeling means to me, and how much I enjoy channeling characters, and bringing them to life in the photos.

GRACE: I follow Vera Wang’s blog because I love her work. I also like to go on style.com and model.com. Being a model, you always have to know what’s going on in the fashion industry, and be up-to-date.

POLINA: What would be your dream shoot and why? What’s the hardest, most challenging thing about being a fashion model?

GRACE: I think that as long as you’re able to be yourself and stay true to who you are you, will go far. Also, remember that people talk. If you’re extremely nice and a hard worker, word will spread, and you’ll get referrals, and more jobs. Trust me! And, always dream big and believe in yourself. Confidence is key. Don’t let others bring you down.

GRACE: My dream is to be a Victoria’s Secret model. I look up to those girls so much! The most challenging thing about being in the fashion industry is that you pretty much have to be EXACTLY what the client or casting directer is looking for, or you’re out. So, it’s just a little stressful sometimes figuring out how to be perfect for them, while being outgoing and super sweet at the same time. My mom always tells me that I’m perfect the way I am, so generally, I feel confident going into casting-As long as I’m myself, I will do great. The other challenge is that there is so much competition with other models to get that job that you’re

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POLINA: You’ve been to NYC quite a few times, how do you like it there? Anything you don’t like?

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POLINA: Any advice or words of wisdom for other young ladies who dream of being high fashion models?

POLINA: That’s great advice! Thanks for agreeing to do the interview, and for being you! Can’t wait to see what the future holds for you. I think it will be a bright future, indeed! Please remember us, the little people, when you’re working the runway in a pair of wings, okay? ✂

Last fall, Grace walked in Vera Wang's much blogged about show in which she showcased 15 black and nude wedding gowns during New York Fashion Week.

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THE UBIQUITOUS SHIRT SHINES WITH THESE UNIQUE DESIGNS. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JULIE BOYLE

PEOPLE FOR URBAN PROGRESS

(PUP) is an Indianapolis-based 501c3 non-profit organization that promotes and advances public transit, environmental awareness, and urban design. We stand for project-based urban progress. We believe in welldesigned products that honor the life and history of Indianapolis.

HAYES & TAYLOR

ROBOTOWEAR

RobotoWear is clothing for humans, inspired by robots. Offering custom streetwear for men, women and children. T-shirts for the weekend, polos for the office and high-end hoodies for the club. RobotoWear has you covered.

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Hayes and Taylor is Vintage Sports and Culture Apparel inspired by Indiana. All the shirts are high quality cotton with that vintage soft feel. All designs and ideas come straight from the handsome brains of Brian Kelly and Joe Schnieders. They both love t-shirts, and prefer not to wear anything else.

HAYES & TAYLOR www.hayesandtaylor.com shirt available online and IndySwank

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ROBOTOWEAR online retailer www.robotowear. com/shop/

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PEOPLE FOR URBAN PROGRESS Murphy Art Center, Studio 213 1043 Virginia Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46203 www.peopleup.com

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PITAYA’S STAYING POWER AS CLOTHING BOUTIQUES ACROSS THE COUNTRY CLOSE THEIR DOORS ONE AFTER ANOTHER, MICHAEL MAZOR OPENS HIS 17TH STORE LOCATION THIS YEAR.

BY ANNIE STULTZ + PHOTOGRAPHS BY ERIC LUBRICK THE YOUNG WOMEN’S CLOTHING BOUTIQUE HAS CONSISTENTLY BEEN NAMED one of Indiana’s best fashion sources by publications like Nuvo and Indianapolis Monthly for over 20 years. In the past decade of recession, depression, and financial indigestion, Michael Mazor, owner of Pitaya, has managed to establish 16 magnet stores in addition to his original shop in Bloomington, IN that opened in 1990. “I’ve always thought we were ‘recession proof’, since we offer great merchandise at great prices, “ says Mazor. “I think we’ve weathered it well by doing what we’ve always done: staying on top of trends, consistently restocking our merchandise each week, offering great service, and providing great products at very competitive prices.” Mazor has modeled his business with these principles since Pitaya’s inception, which was from the trunk of his car. During his senior year at Indiana University, Mazor took a semester off to travel through Mexico and Guatemala. It was in Guatemala that he discovered the name “Pitaya”, which is a prickly pear, or dragon fruit. When Mazor returned to Bloomington, where he had lived since age 16, he sold the items he bought in Central America from the trunk of his car, on the streets, on college campuses, and in a small number of boutiques. A few months later, he opened his first store in Bloomington. His mission in 1990 is the same as it is today: “We try to be on point with trends in cosmopolitan cities . . . for a young woman who wants to look current and cute at fair prices.” Ten years later, Mazor opened his second shop in Indianapolis, which is now the “hub,” and online store headquarters. As the profits became larger, Mazor started opening store fronts in other cities, averaging over one a year. Mazor believes Pitaya’s staying power is due to its “ability to grow and keep a personal touch . . . making our stores feel like independent boutiques.” Further, “We stand out because of our great selection, atmosphere, prices, and a friendly, helpful staff”. The customer is paramount at Pitaya. “We want to make customers, not just sales.” In 2001, the Pitaya domestic line was created out of a demand for a style of pants that were highly requested, but produced in short supply. From there, their dedication to helping clients find what they want is key to turning a “customer” into a “regular”. By establishing a customer-centric business model, Pitaya is a great model of success. When individuals can purchase anything they’d need online, you have to convince them that the store is a lifestyle. Pitaya's stores have always outperformed its online shop, suggesting that the boutique experience is hard to replicate and is just as desirable as the purchase itself. Mazor realizes that his employees need to be treated just as well as the customer. He doesn’t micromanage the boutiques because of proximity, but

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finds that ironically, “the less I micromanage, the better my staff responds. Consequently, the more I show my faith and trust, the more they feel respected, and the more they respect their positions.” When Mazor scouts other potential locations, he seriously considers his staff, and where they would want to relocate. It’s another way of keeping up workplace morale. “I prefer to locate our communities where our staff will thrive both professionally and personally.” For those wanting to start a new business or those with a struggling business, Mazor recommends careful number crunching before you get seriously invested. “Margins are so thin, you make a low paying job for yourself. Be careful, and be prepared to make some sacrifices.” ✂

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LEE’S CUSTOM TAILORING Jin Lee's bespoke suits are designed in house to fit your life and style. KING’S IMAGE Below, find your image at King's Image, offering made to measure and ready to wear essentials.

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MADE TO FIT

In a world of bulk fast fashion, local tailors provide custom-designed pieces that are built to last.

BY CATHERINE FRITSCH + PHOTOGRAPHS BY ADAM ROTH AND POLINA OSHEROV WHILE MOST MANUFACTURING RELIES ON SPEEDY MACHINE ASSEMBLY AND standardized sizing, tailors still take the time to custom pattern and hand stitch details for each individual. “We do things the old fashioned way,” says Larry Ettinger of Leon Tailoring. “We still use hair canvas fronts; we don’t glue, “ he says, referring to fusible interfacing techniques. There is still quite a lot of handwork that goes into these custom pieces. In contrast to their time-honed craft, these Indiana tailors have a fresh new take on their businesses.

LEE'S CUSTOM TAILORING: SEWING A NEW IMAGE FOR AN OLD TRADE. LEE’S TAILOR SHOP ON KEYSTONE AVENUE FILLS HALF OF ITS BUILDING IN AN area where gas stations, fast food chains, and strip malls reign. His business is neither fast, nor cheap—custom suits start from $1300. “We produce about 150 to 250 suits a year,“ says Solomon Lee (son of the proprietor), making their focus quality, not quantity. All suits are custom patterned by Jin Lee to fit the customer's measurements, posture, and lifestyle. Jin is an unassuming, yet knowledgeable, guy. I was impressed with the German tailoring tomes to which he often referred, (he doesn’t speak German). According to Jin, Germany was for many years the best in tailoring, but now Korea has that honor. Jin himself is Korean, and still has a little difficulty with the English language. Luckily, we both speak Patterning. Solomon seems to be the force behind the remodel in the waiting area, an attempt to make customers more aware of all the styles that are available to them. The majority of Lee’s business is in alterations: “I don’t think most of our customers know that we’re bespoke,” says Solomon, with a wry laugh. Solomon attributes the lack of understanding to Jin’s limited English. From the sound of it, the prodigal son has returned to do a little merchandising for Jin Lee. Lee’s doesn’t have a glossy marketing campaign, and they don’t attract customers on Facebook. They rely on word of mouth, and the quality of the work, to bring in new customers. When it comes to picking a suit design, some clients come in knowing exactly what they want. Jin shows me example images clipped to a magazine by a recent client (again, the slim 1960s lapel and shorter suit jacket). For those clients who aren't sure about what they want in a suit, Jin will guide them toward a classic, flattering style. “Sometimes,” Jin says, “what they want doesn’t make sense,” in which case he has to tweak the idea to work. But he likes the unique customers, and those who buy more suits often like to try something more adventurous. Solomon shows off a custom pinstripe wool fabric. The stripes are created by the letters of the customer’s name. Though Lee follows in the footsteps of old world master tailors, he also has kept his business up to date. Using a CAD program of his own design, Lee patterns the suits for each customer based on their measurements and design choice. His computer stores digital photographs of clients‘ build and posture, 21

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LEE CUSTOM TAILORING AT A GLANCE SERVICES: Bespoke suits/coats (men and women), alterations, tuxedo rental CUSTOMERS: Professionals, athletes and those looking for unique hand made apparel PRICE RANGE: $1300 and up for custom suits

slim, stay away from this style to avoid looking like you’re wearing “the skin on a salami.” Larry definitely won’t hold back on you; he’ll tell you what he thinks. If you are from the Indianapolis area, you know Leon’s for its tailoring. They also have quite a bit to offer in retail sales: Men’s accessories ranging from tuxedo accoutrements (including the suit itself), to extra long ties and fedoras. They sell outerwear, jeans, shirts and a selection of Florsheim shoes. Leon’s will alter or re-cut an existing suit, and they also take on bridal alterations. Though custom shirts are made off-site, the suits are made on premise.

WEBSITE: mastertailor.com LOCATION: 7002 North Keystone past client patterns, and inspiration Avenue in Indianapolis pictures. The finished patterns are CONTACT: (317) 251-7002 printed on a plotter, and used to build a test garment in-house. Once the appropriate changes are made to the pattern, the pattern is sent to tailors in Korea. In three to four weeks, the suits are back for a finishing touche at the shop, such as pick-stitched detailing or hand sewn button holes.

LEON TAILORING: WOMEN’S WEAR IN A MAN’S WORLD APPROACHING LEON TAILORING, I WAS IMMEDIATELY STRUCK BY IT'S MODEST, unpretentious appearance. The exterior of the building is dated, and the parking is limited. Once inside, the interior has the feel of a rabbit warren…and business on this Thursday afternoon was hopping. Leon’s is the largest merchant tailor in the United States, according to Larry Ettinger’s woolen dealers. I heard Larry tell a customer, "Once you buy custom shirts, you'll never go back." In another room, a young man was being measured for a tuxedo. I listened to the exchange between Kim Bayer and a female customer as she showed her the finished work. Another gentleman browsed the retail items as he waited for the next associate. It's a busy place. Despite the 106 year history, Leon’s is growing and current. While classic menswear has been the mainstay over the years, women’s wear is the latest push. In late October, the ladies’ department is still in progress: Retail items include classic suiting trousers, button-down blouses, and pashminas. “We are now trying to enhance and build up a female business,” says Larry. Kim notes that the advantage of a great classic suit is that it can be worn for years, updated with accessories and fresh blouses. Another advantage of going the custom route is that unlike off-the-rack suits, a custom suit can LEON TAILORING be easily altered. This is fairly stanAT A GLANCE dard in menswear, but is rare in SERVICES: wardrobe consultation, women’s ready-to-wear. Ladies’ suits design, fitting, alterations, made to at Leon’s range from $395 to $1,995, measure shirts and suits depending on whether it’s a ready SALES: men’s and women’s apparel, made or custom made item. accessories Larry pulls out style books of suiting designs from the 1990s and CUSTOMERS: locals, national and 1940s, showing some examples of international customers. Young items they can build for ladies. Magprofessionals developing a career azines and other industry media wardrobe, old-hands needing keep them up to date on current alterations or repairs styles. The fabric and apparel reprePRICE RANGE: $395-$1,995 for sentatives that Leon’s works with suits as well as a wide range for also advise them on what’s “hot.” retail items New this year is 1960s styling for WEBSITE: leontailoringcompany.com men. Advice from Larry “if you’re not Phone (317) 634-8559 LOCATION: 809 North Delaware Street in Indianapolis CONTACT: (317) 634-8559 22 PATTERN ISSUE NO. 1

KING’S IMAGE: FORMALS, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND TAPAS THE WINDOW DISPLAY AT KING’S IMAGE IS STRICTLY DRESSES: like sparkling fish lures, they attract mall shoppers from across the parking lot. It is truly an exuberant display of fantasy dresses for teenage girls. In the seven years King‘s Image has occupied this building, there have been some changes. At the time of interview, the staff was busy moving inventory, building more fitting rooms, and remodeling. “This will all be prom and social occasion“ says Stephen King, speaking of the main showroom at King’s Image. “We’re in transition right now,“ moving the menswear display off to a smaller room. For King’s, it’s the third year of prom and social occasion, and it’s a growing business with prices ranging $200 to $1000. Before there was prom, there was men's custom suiting, ready-made items like jeans, and custom in-house tailoring. But, King has noticed a cultural shift.“ Now, they offer made-to-measure services, sending out to manufacturers both in the United States and overseas. King’s customers try on sample suits in their size—to make sure the fit will be as expected. King has also learned how to diversify his business by offering complementary experiences and services. When the suits arrive, the customer has a fitting, and an in-house tailor makes the adjustments. During one part of the tour, we wandered into what looked like a bar. The area was built out as a bistro in the building’s previous incarnation. Stephen decided to roll with it, and remodel the area to become a wine and tapas bar. This event facility will be used to host corporate events for the business, with a KING’S IMAGE projected finish date of mid 2012. AT A GLANCE King and his staff also offer consultation to executives on how to SERVICES: Image consulting, present themselves in the business fitting, alteration, made to measure, tux rental world. He works with clients to downplay their figure problems, and make SALES: Women’s formals, men’s and sure they are dressed appropriately women’s accessories, business for their job and position. His ideal casual, tuxedos customer is someone who is still willCUSTOMERS: Professionals (men, women of all ages), young women for Prom and Special Occasion PRICE RANGE: Made to measure $595 and up, prom $200 and up WEBSITE: kingsimage.com LOCATION: 8520 Castleton Square Drive in Indianapolis CONTACT: (317) 842-0579

LEON’S TAILORING Sketched and sewn, Leon's suits have been worn by Indy's gentleman for more than a century. Now expanding into womenswear, the shop is taking measure to keep current.

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THE TAILORED FIT AT A GLANCE SERVICES: Alterations, custom dress making, wedding dress preservation, steaming, sewing classes SALES: Vintage clothing and patterns, one offs CUSTOMERS: Professional men and women, students from the Midwest area PRICE RANGE: $1,000 and up for custom bridal, $40-50/hr in labor for other custom projects WEBSITE: thetailoredfit.biz NEW LOCATION: 559 S Lincoln (1st and Lincoln) in Bloomington, IN CONTACT: For an appointment just ing to “dress-up” for work, and who call 812-323-2665 or email Margaret sees his or her wardrobe as a busiat margaretfette@att.net ness tool. Stephen jokes with me about his social media skills. Although he recognizes its importance, he doesn’t have time to devote to social promotion. King’s Image is keeping current in marketing by exploring social media avenues with a new PR consultant. That seems like a good idea, since their new Big Client is probably hooked on Facebook, Twitter, and her latest stick of gum.

TAILORED FIT: OFF SITE, ON TIME, IN STYLE WITH TRAINING IN WOMEN'S COUTURE, AND A BRIEF STINT MAKING COSTUMES, Margaret Fette of The Tailored Fit may not be your typical tailor. Her custom business, which makes up about 25% of her income, is more women’s formals than suits. However, she makes her bread and butter in men’s and women’s alterations. The Tailored Fit is located in Bloomington, IN. Margaret’s average customer is the educated professional, and, of course, students from the university. Though most of her clients are locals, she’s worked with customers from Chicago, Louisville, Indianapolis, and all over south-central Indiana. The process for custom items at The Tailored Fit is ideally a two to three month process. Clients should expect to pay a starting price of $1,000 for labor for a custom bridal gown, with materials additional. For custom pieces, Fette creates a muslin garment to test the design and fit before investing the time and materials in a project. “Our work includes a very personal touch, and lots of attention to detail.” She works with one full-time employee, and several contractors, all personally trained by Margaret, to get the work done. In the works for the new year is a collaboration with other custom and made-to-measure businesses in the area. “(We’ll be) better able to serve our clients in material selection and turn around time.” Tailored Fit is also adding a “by appointment” service that will offer clients off-site fittings, and garment delivery. ✂

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DO CUSTOMERS UNDERSTAND WHAT’S INVOLVED IN CUSTOM WORK? According to both Stephen King (King’s Image, pictured below) and Larry Ettinger (Leon Tailoring), customers new to the world of custom have no idea of the time involved in major alterations or made to measure items. Time is money. “If you took your car in to have the same amount of repair time, it would cost you ten times as much, “ notes Ettinger. “It‘s a time consuming business.”

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A BILL JONES. FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER. JONES CALLS INDIANAPOLIS HOME, BUT SPENDS THE MAJORITY OF HIS TIME TRAVELING FROM NY TO LA TO LONDON AND PARIS, PHOTOGRAPHING BEAUTIFUL WOMEN. POLINA OSHEROV RECENTLY CAUGHT UP WITH JONES TO TALK PHOTOGRAPHY, MODELS, AND THE FASHION INDUSTRY. POLINA: Tell us a little about your background. What inspired you to get behind the camera? BILL JONES: I started photographing cars at car shows with a film camera in 1984, when I was 14 years old. Eventually, this passion led me to my true zeal: photographing people…which led to my current passion: fashion photography. I did not go to school for photography and am entirely self-taught.

I wanted to be behind the camera because I was tired of being in front of it, I have confidence but others may be a little more exciting to see. Although I travel internationally and have built long-lasting relationships with agencies out of Chicago, Miami, Los Angles, and New York (where I spend the majority of my time), I am originally from Indiana. POLINA: With as much traveling as you do, why did you stay in Indiana instead of moving to NYC or LA? BILL: I split my time mostly between NYC, LA, and Indiana. I have a home and a studio here that I don’t think I will ever sell, even when I purchase a home in NYC or LA. I like Indiana because it’s centrally located between the places I travel to regularly: Chicago, NYC, Atlanta, LA, and Miami. I also have family here. My life does revolve around fashion, though, and I do like the larger fashion markets. I would like for fashion to be more present in Indiana, and actually I am seeing some positive changes in that direction. POLINA: How did you start working with agencies? Which agencies have you worked with? BILL: I started testing with New Faces from Elite and Ford, which eventually led to photographing each of their divisions. I have worked with over 45 agencies worldwide, developing strong relationships with agencies such as: Ford, Women, Next, Elite, Vision, Wilhelmina, and L.A. Models.

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BILL JONES, ABOVE, SHOOTING ON LOCATION IN MIAMI.

POLINA: What is your creative process? How do you decide if you want to shoot color or BW? BILL: My choice for black and white is based on the emotion of the photograph. I truly believe that a black and white photo better depicts emotion than a color photo. POLINA: What kinds of expectations do the agencies have for you? How much creative freedom do you have? BILL: Since I have a vast understanding of what the agencies are looking for, I feel that I have complete control over the entire process. Agencies choose to work with me because they like my style of work, and it is consistent with today’s style, and fashion. POLINA: Who is on your team when you shoot? BILL: Recently, I have partnered with two other photographers because of the sheer volume of work I do. Their experience and understanding of fashion photography has truly brought our team to being what I believe to be the best in the world.

"I MOSTLY WORK WITH VERY EXPERIENCED MODELS WHO KEEP A CONSISTENT MOVEMENT. AND WHEN I SEE THE SHOT I LIKE, I TAKE IT."

POLINA: What are the qualities that make for a great model? BILL: Physically, the model needs to be tall, have good skin, and must have measurements in line with the agency standard. I find that models with a unique look tend to excel in the industry. Also, the model must be outgoing and capable of modeling, which basically means sometimes taking on another personality in front of the camera. Acting skills can also be beneficial. Expression is one thing I am particularly fascinated by.

BILL: Keep practicing and never give up. It's a lot of hard work, and most people give up within a few years. Most successful agency photographers have been shooting strictly agency work for a minimum of 10 years. POLINA: Any advice on how to put an inexperienced model at ease? Any tips on posing?

POLINA: Do you do any kind of post-processing? What's your favorite piece of software? BILL: I feel Photoshop is over-used in this business. I believe it is much more important to create a quality image straight out of the camera. Much of my work has very little, if any, Photoshop work at all. Much of my work is straight out of Lightroom.

BILL: Well, I pose a little bit, and after they see that I can do a pretty good job, I think they realize they can get it right, too. I mostly work with very experienced models who keep a consistent movement. And when I see the shot I like, I take it.

POLINA: Do you ever take on interns?

BILL: Everything you're gifted in has an experience to hold onto.

POLINA: What's in your kit? What's your favorite lens? What's one piece of equipment that you can't live without?

BILL: Peter Lindbergh and Helmut Newton are two of my favorites. ✂

POLINA: If a young photographer wants to be a an agency test shooter, what's your advice for becoming a successful one?

BILL: I sleep with my 50mm 1.4 and eat breakfast next to my Cannon 1D Mark III. I like to sculpt light — setting up light, and then removing it from the places I want to create shadows.

POLINA: What is the most memorable project that you've worked on?

BILL: At this industry level, it is difficult to take on an intern, and stay on schedule. POLINA: Who are you favorite photographers?

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HATS OFF TO EMILY

LOCAL MILLINER, EMILY CLARK, BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO A VINTAGE PROFESSION AND COMES OUT ON TOP.

BY CATHERINE FRITSCH + PHOTOGRAPHS BY STACY ABLE WHEN YOU FIRST MEET HER, EMILY CLARK IS A SHY AND SEEMINGLY VERY SErIous woman. She could very well have stepped out of the pages of a Fitzgerald novel, if not for the mobile phone kept close at hand. It comes as no surprise, then, that she's a milliner, crafting a fin de sièle aesthetic for the postmillennial age. Emily is a Midwestern gal who started in French literature, and ended up in fashion by way of theatrical costume. Cataloging vintage hats in a museum setting initially intrigued her “crafty” side, but soon the world of costume design, and the art of millinery drew her in. The sculptural quality and the organic freedom of design is what excites Clark about hats. “Other than the head size, I really don’t have any limitations,” says Clark. “Drafting a pattern [as for apparel] and being very precise is not my forte.” Instead, she designs from the heart.

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Her work displays a whimsical, sculptural style that evokes the work of Stephen Jones or Philip Treacy. Her pieces are almost weightless in their elegance, and bestow an appearance of effortless grace upon the wearer. After graduating from Cornell, Emily worked for two years New York’s Joffrey Ballet costume department. “I feel like it wasn‘t long enough,“ she says, “but it would be really difficult for me to go back. I am very much in awe of the time table and the tricks of the trade.” Not getting enough opportunities for millinery projects, she broke from Joffrey Ballet and emailed a number of her millinery idols, as well as some designers she didn’t know, in pursuit of an apprenticeship. Her transition from costume to couture was made possible by a designer who would ultimately have a great effect on her work. She was offered a three month internship with Philip Treacy, an internship that soon became a year of

EMILY CLARK This page: As an artisan, Emily often wears her own creations. Opposite page: Her 2012 wedding couture line is now available at select boutiques.

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BRIDAL COLLECTION The upcoming collection is more romantic and less abstract than previous pieces, featuring florals and other natural elements.

employment. When asked what she thought clinched her application for internship, she gave a self-deprecating laugh, saying, “Maybe they were intrigued by an American?” EMILY’S HUSBAND, GRAPHIC DESIGNER NATHAN ZARSE, BROUGHT HER TO INDIanapolis. “For starting my own business, [Indianapolis] was a great place to do it,” she says, “…the tight knit fashion community was really encouraging.” Emily made immediate connections with the Arts Institute of Indianapolis’, Midwest Fashion Week, other designers, and the local journalists. Almost immediately, her hats could be seen on the runway, in fashion shoots, and in the gallery of the Arts Institute. “Everybody was very supportive and encouraging. That gave me the confidence to build a business and take the next step.” When asked about what Indy can do to support new designers, attracting buyers and sales reps is at the top of her wish list. "Participating in fashion shows is fun…but we need to be able to make connections with buyers at the shows.” One of Emily's favorite shows was The Indianapolis Museum of Art's Fashion Unbound show. Twenty to thirty percent of Clark’s business is local. Clark makes a point to keep some of her pieces available in the Indianapolis area, which gives the freedom to design pieces that aren’t bridal whites. She admits that these lower priced pieces aren't extremely profitable, but she likes to support local shops, and show a local presence. You can find her items in Irvington at Homespun Handmade, in Fountain Square at IndySwank, and in Carmel at The Wedding Studio.

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Clark’s approach to spreading the brand nationally is “multi-faceted.“ She markets herself through bridal blog articles, reps some of her own product to independent boutiques, and does her own outreach to online companies. “I love doing the big art pieces, but right now I’m just really driven to build the brand. Having an identity and consistent product that is a good product, something that I am proud of.” Emily has been selling her own products in boutiques, both locally and in NYC, with good success. She hits the streets with product samples to introduce her brand, and in one case, a boutique buyer contacted her after reading about her in a blog (Brooklyn Bride). She currently wholesales to three bridal boutiques in New York. When asked about the reception of boutique owners to cold calls, she replied “I feel like I was fortunate to happen upon some nice people, but there definitely were a few who were like…no way.” She also researched and pursued an account with BHLDN (Athropologie’s bridal offshoot), which she says took a lot of negotiation, but she is proud to be on board. Considering she was asked to intern for Philip Treacy after a cold call, the lesson to be learned is you can’t get what you don’t ask for, and a few negative responses shouldn’t discourage you. “Don’t quit your other job.” She laughs. “Do your research: Get on Etsy, read about starting a business. …There are a lot of online resources, like Square, online accounting, online banking. Take advantage of what’s out there.” She also makes sure to keep in personal touch with her business associates: She goes to New York about every three months to get supplies, to see what new items her vendors are carrying, and to check in with her boutiques. ✂

OPEN FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS; MURPHY BUILDING; FOUNTAIN SQUARE

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BLOOMINGTON COUPLE, ALEX AND SHANNON LEHR, GIVE US ANOTHER REASON TO YEARN FOR THE WEEKEND WITH THEIR LAID-BACK SHIRTS. HERE’S A PEEK INTO THEIR APPAREL COMPANY, AMERICAN COLORS.

BY ERICA SAGON + PHOTOGRAPHS BY JASON GASKINS FOR HELEN WELLS IMAGINE WHAT YOU’D WEAR ON THE BEST SATURDAY AFTERNOONS. PERHAPS, you would throw on a cozy button-up in the chill of a January afternoon. Maybe, in the summer, as the sun bears down, you would lounge in a featherweight cotton tunic that moves as it catches each cool breeze. These are the clothes you could wear everyday, if only you could. Comfortable, stylish clothes that evoke all the romance of a lazy, care-free day. Imagine no more. Led by Alex and Shannon Lehr, both Indiana University alumni, American Colors turns out stylish essentials for men and women. American Colors provides everything from basic T's to casual blazers. Oh, and that light-weight tunic you were just imagining? Yeah, they do those, too. All are comfortable. All are sewn with carefully chosen fabrics. And, all are manufactured in the U.S. American Colors has caught the attention of celebrities such as Molly Sims, Leann Rimes, Kate Hudson and Lauren Conrad, who have sported the Lehrs’ laid-back shirts while out and about.

DESIGN TEAM The Lehrs source organic, fairlabor, and ethically produced fabrics. From tunics to tees, expect to see a celebration of cotton in the Spring of 2012.

FAMILY TIES. Retail has been the Lehr family business for decades. Alex’s father, Henry Lehr, moved his shop to New York City from London in 1974, the year Alex was born. As the business expanded, Henry Lehr stores paved the way in a variety of neighborhoods. A shop opened on Madison Avenue before large corporate retailers arrived, and others followed: One on West Broadway in Soho, and another on Elizabeth Street and Prince Street in Nolita. Now, you can find Henry Lehr shops in Westport, Conn., and in East Hampton and Amagansett, N.Y. To hear Alex tell it, American Colors began as his father’s side project in the late ‘90s. “He thought it would be a nice, quiet thing as he retired,” Alex says. Alex, who studied business at IU and graduated in 1997, returned to New York, and to the family business, after college. In 2003, Alex and Shannon took charge of the growing American Colors brand. In many ways, American Colors is the label as it was first imagined: Comfortable, classic, casual separates that are manufactured in the US. Alex and Shannon have updated the fits and fabrics, and made American Colors hit that sweet spot of effortless style. AMERICAN ARTISTRY. The couple is very hands-on throughout every phase of design, starting with fabric selection. The 2012 Spring line is a celebration of their signature fabric: Cotton. Expect to see whisper-thin cotton voile tunics and the softest organic cotton T-shirts in a variety of colors. The prints, so artfully selected, are both timeless and on trend. For the Lehrs, creating a fantastic product is not an end in itself. It is important to them that their business supports those fabric mills and factories that operate ethically, and utilize fair labor practices. In addition, while much of their fabrics are sourced from abroad, the clothing, is made in the U.S. 33

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CUTLINE TITLE Alex and Shannon moved their family back to Bloomington, one of their most-loved places.

“If we make that choice, that’s how change happens,” Alex says. In the aftermath of 9/11, much of the industry moved abroad, including the factory where American Colors’ clothing was made. Shannon and Alex wanted to keep the label alive, but continue to manufacture within the US, so they sought places that would produce their product lines in small runs, and fabric suppliers who would sell small rolls. This year, a goal is to seek out specialty fabrics that are woven in the U.S.—a “continuously shrinking” market, Shannon says. “We want to focus on the artistry of work that can’t be duplicated on a machine.” American Colors clothing is sold at boutiques across the country, and online at americancolorsclothing.com. ✂

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STONES SILVER AND STONE RINgS by SARA b. JEwELRy & METALSMIThINg ThIS PAgE LEfT: PORCELAIN JASPER SILVER MODERN COCKTAIL RING $190. ThIS PAgE RIghT: TERRARIUM RING -AGATE CIRCLE SILVER MODERN COCKTAIL RING $216. OPPOSITE PAgE: DRUSY & FOSSILIZED CORAL SILVER MODERN DOUBLE COCKTAIL RING $240. INDIANA WALNUT WITH AN INDIANA SHELL FROM LAKE TIPPECANOE $130 by ALLISON fORD. MODEL: UMA AFOAKU/ THE HELEN WELLS AGENCY

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3 LOcAL METALSMIThS CREATE WEARABLE ART USING NATURAL MATERIALS. STONES, FOSSILS, WOOD, FUR AND PRECIOUS METALS. PhOTOgRAPhS by LARRy LADIg. STyLINg by STEPhEN gARSTANg HAIR BY IRINA GREEN/EYEMAX STUDIO MAkEuP by ELLA hATTERy PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT RYAN DUGAN

STICKS + STONES

WOOD INDIANA wALNuT RINgS by ALLISON fORD/STuDIO AMf. THE CROW $370. OPPOSITE PAgE: ROLLY POLLY $150. MODEL: MARTA GRUBER/INDEPENDENT

ALLISON FORD My Material: wood, my central raw material, is inspiring and interactive. working with a piece of wood really brings out its unique personality, the way it smells, the variable grain patterns, the texture under your fingertips. It is a natural and commonplace material that engages the senses. I enjoy creating relationships between wood and different materials including metal, leather, and stone. what I produce is a blend of my aesthetic and nature’s unpredictability. 

ALLISON@STuDIOAMf.cOM STuDIOAMf.cOM STuDIOAMf.ETSy.cOM

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STONES (PAgES 36 + 37) SILVER AND STONE RINgS by SARA b. JEwELRy & METALSMIThINg

SARA BINIECKI I am Sara b. — a creator of uncommon organic handcrafted jewelry. My work is a celebration of nature and modernism. growing up near the shores of Lake huron, I quickly formed a love of the beach stones and fossils the lake had to offer. This passion grew to include colorful semi-precious gemstones, mineral specimens, rough uncut gems and all things petrified. I collect these little pieces of the earth and capture their beauty in one-of-a-kind handmade sterling silver settings. I love to create unconventional jewelry that is natural yet modern with a bit of raw earthiness and asymmetry.

SARAbJEwELRy@gMAIL.cOM SARAbJEwELRy.ETSy.cOM

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METAL METAL, STONE AND fuR RINgS by NANcy LEE METALSMIThINg. FUR RING/RECTANGULAR $69, FUR RING/ROUND $99, SILVER BAR RING $65, COPPER CUFFS $69 EACH. MODEL: TANIA /L MODELZ

NANCY LEE Nancy Lee's work is an experiment in storytelling, of dreams expressed in metal, the meaning or emotion left to the viewers interpretation. her jewelry and small objects are created in silver, brass, gold, gems, and recycled or found objects.

NANcy@NDESIgNSMETAL.cOM NDESIgNSMETAL.cOM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEPHEN SIMONETTO PHOTO ASSISTANTS JARROD BRIDGEMAN + NICK SOUZA WARDROBE STYLING BY AZEEZAT OWOKONIRAN-JIMOH MAKEUP BY DARCIE WATSON (ILEY JEAN MAKEUP) HAIR BY DUSTI SIEFER MODELS: SELENGE ZORIGT, TONI CLARK, DANIELLE ROSSI, REBECCA STROTHER, ALLISON JACK AND SHANNON HUSER. WARDROBE: COAL N TERRY VINTAGE WWW.COALNTERRYVINTAGE.OM LOCATION: CADILLAC RANCH AND BARTINIS

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TRASHED A DENIM AND TEES STORY

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SLASHED

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MODELS: LEFT TO RIGHT, ALLISON JACK, REBECCA STROTHER, DANIELLE ROSSI, TONI CLARK, SHANNON HUSER.

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SHREDDED

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STAINED

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SOAKED

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THE CLEARING

NIGHT FALLS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON LAVENGOOD HAIR BY ANN SPANNAN MAKEUP BY ELLA HATTERY STYLING BY CHRISTINA LAVENGOOD

MODEL PAULINA CHAVIRA: FAUX FUR JACKET BY RACHEL ZOE. LEGGING BY HELMUT LANG. BOTH AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN. MODEL JARED THOMAS: SUIT + SHIRT BY H&M. SHOES ARE MODEL’S OWN.

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DAWN BREAKS

ON PAULINA: JACKET BY HELMUT LANG. SKIRT BY RICK OWENS LILIES. BOTH AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN. ON JARED: SUIT + SHIRT BY H&M. SHOES ARE MODEL’S OWN.

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ON POLINA CHAVIRA: FAUX FUR JACKET BY RACHEL ZOE, $295. LEGGING BY HELMUT LANG, $255. ON JARED THOMAS: SUIT BY H&M, $105. SHIRT BY H&M, $15. SHOES, MODELS OWN. ALL COURTESY 8 FIFTEEN.

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MORNING PAUSE

ON PAULINA: TANK BY VPL. PANT BY L’AGENCE. BOTH AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN. BRACELET + BELT + SHOES ARE MODEL’S OWN.

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AFTERNOON WALK

OPPOSITE PAGE, ON PAULINA: BRA BY VPL. CARDIGAN BY VPL. JEANS BY J BRAND. ALL AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN.

THIS PAGE, ON PAULINA: JEANS BY J BRAND. AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN. CLOAK BY ERIN FORD CUSTOM.

NECKLACE AVAILABLE AT H&M.

ON JARED: JACKET BY BEN SHERMAN. JEANS BY 7 FOR ALL MANKIND. CUFFS AVAILABLE AT H&M. SHOES + BOOTS ARE MODEL’S OWN.

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MODEL: UMA AFOAKU/HELEN WELLS AGENCY SPANX SKIRT AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN. BRINE LACROSSE PADS + HOCKEY GLOVES AVAILABLE AT PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS, CARMEL. JESSICA SIMPSON SHOES AVAILABLE AT MACY’S. YAK TRAX + ADIDAS COMPRESSION SLEEVES + SNOW GOGGLES AVAILABLE AT DICKS’ SPORTING GOODS.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LARRY ENDICOTT PHOTO ASSISTANT KENNETH REHM WARDROBE STYLING BY STEPHEN GARSTANG HAIR AND MAKEUP BY MORGAN PETTY AND DEREK WEST

BODY CHECK

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MODEL: UMA AFOAKU/HELEN WELLS AGENCY FILA TOE SOCKS + SANDAL AVAILABLE AT FINISH LINE. VALEO NEOPRENE WAIST SUPPORT AVAILABLE AT PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS, CARMEL. JILL SANDER SKIRT AVAILABLE AT J. GARDENER, CARMEL ANTIQUE MALL. SPEEDO SWIM CAP AVAILABLE AT DICK’S SPORTING GOODS.

MODEL: JENN KING BLACK SECOND SKIN NIJINSKI TANK AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN. ZELA TANK TOPS AVAILABLE AT NORDSTROM. NIKE ACG ALL TRAC AIRMAX GODOME AVAILABLE AT FINISH LINE.

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MODEL: JENN KING HARDTAIL MESH SHIRT AVAILABLE AT NORDSTROM. WHITE ANKLE SLEEVE BY SHOCK DOCTOR AVAILABLE AT DICK’S SPORTING GOODS. WHITE FILA TOE SOCKS AVAILABLE AT FINISH LINE. BLACK KETTLEBELL WEIGHTS AVAILABLE AT PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS, CARMEL.

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MODEL: JONATHAN GLASS/HELEN WELLS AGENCY DEBEER LACROSSE GOGGLES + SPIDER HEADBAND + FITNESS GEAR BACK SUPPORT AVAILABLE AT DICK’S SPORTING GOODS. HARDTAIL MESH SHIRT AVAILABLE AT NORDSTROM.

OPPOSITE PAGE: CHAMPRO FOOTBALL PANTS + RIDE SNOW BOARD BINDINGS AVAILABLE AT PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS, CARMEL. WHITE T SHIRT + NIKE AIRMAX GOADOME SHOES AVAILABLE AT FINISH LINE.

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MODEL: JENN KING ADDIDAS ADIPURE TRAINER BAREFOOT RUNNING SHOES + ADIDAS ADILIGHT SANDAL AVAILABLE AT FINISH LINE.

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MODEL: JENN KING VPL SHIRT AVAILABLE AT 8 FIFTEEN. NIKE PRO COMBAT SHIRT AVAILABLE AT MACY’S. NIKE SHOX AVAILABLE AT FINSIH LINE. NECK WEIGHT + REEBOK PROLITE FADE COMPRESSION GLOVES AVAILABLE AT PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS, CARMEL.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV + MAKEUP BY KATHY MOBERLY+ HAIR BY IRINA GREEN + WARDROBE STYLING BY BENJAMIN AND JANNEANE BLEVINS

SECRET AGENT MAN

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AGENT MARCEL LAST SEEN AT THE LIBERTINE, 38 EAST WASHINGTON STREET, INDIANAPOLIS, 16:00 HOURS. JACKET VALENTINO. SHIRT BACHARACH. TIE HICKEY FREEMAN. CUFF LINKS SWAROVSKI. PANTS AVAILABLE AT H&M.

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AGENT BORIS LAST SEEN IN THE ALLEYWAY OF EAST COURT STREET AT 16:35. MOTORCYCLE JACKET BY THEORY DERWIN INSTITUTION. PANTS AND GLOVES AVAILABLE AT H&M. SUNGLASSES ARE MODEL’S OWN

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AGENT BORIS LAST SEEN IN THE ALLEYWAY OF EAST COURT STREET AT 16:35. MOTORCYCLE JACKET BY THEORY DERWIN INSTITUTION. PANTS AND GLOVES AVAILABLE AT H&M.

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AGENT VINCENT LAST SEEN 1701 GENT AT 17:00. OHM CLOTHING SWEATER. CHERESKIN JACKET. FRENCH CONNECTION TIE. AKA VALENKI BOOTS. PANTS + SHIRT + GLOVES AVAILABLE AT H&M. OPPOSITE PAGE: MILITARY ISSUE PEACOAT. SWEATER, GLOVES AND HAT AVAILABLE AT H&M.

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AGENT MAXWELL LAST SEEN BREAKING AND ENTERING.

AGENT MARCEL

12:00 HOURS

LAST SEEN AT 132 NORTH ILLINOIS AT 23:00. MARC VEST BY MARC JACOBS. BOW TIE AND PANTS AVAILABLE AT H&M. SHIRT IS MODEL’S OWN. POCKET SQUARE BY BROOKS BROTHERS. OPPOSITE PAGE: TRIM FIT TRENCH COAT BY BURBERRY.

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salvage beauty PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN BRAGG HAIR BY PHILIP SALMON MAKEUP BY JILLIAN MAITLEN WARDROBE STYLING BY ANNIE STULTZ

MODEL: AMANDA PFINGSTON/LMODELZ MODEL MANAGEMENT OPPOSITE PAGE: 1940’S CREPE SILK GOWN WITH BEAD DETAIL. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG PINK SUEDE LACE-UP HEELS. ALL AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK.

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MODELS: AMANDA PFINGSTON/LMODELZ MODEL MANAGEMENT AND LISA ERMEL/HELEN WELLS AGENCY. ON AMANDA, THIS PAGE: RED SEQUIN GOWN + MEDAL BROOCH + AMERICAN FLAG CHUCK TAYLOR HIGH TOPS. ALL AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK.

ON LISA, OPPOSITE PAGE: LIZ ALIG FLOUR SACK DRESS + 1990’S SHEER BLOUSE + 1990’S BROWN LEATHER ANKLE BOOTS. ALL AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK. FINDINGS COCKTAIL RING. AVAILABLE AT GIRLY CHIC BOUTIQUE.

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ON AMANDA, LEFT: 1940’S GREY LAMBSWOOL COAT. 1920’S BEADED CLUTCH. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG PINK SUEDE LACE-UP HEELS. AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK. COMME TOI CROPPED SATIN PANTS. FREE BIRD SHEER NAVY/BLUE PRINT BLOUSE. AVAILABLE AT GIRLY CHIC BOUTIQUE.

ON LISA, RIGHT: 1950‘S BLUE CHECK SWING COAT. 1960’S PAPYRUS WOOL DRESS. 1960’S PONY PURSE. TAN SUEDE LACE-UP PLATFORMS. 1960’S BLUE DOUBLE LAYER BEAD NECKLACE. 1920’S BLUE LAYERING NECKLACE. SKULL CAMEO RING BY KRISTIN HUBICK. ALL AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK.

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ON LISA, THIS PAGE: MEN’S DIOR TUX SHIRT. MARTINE SITBON GOLD LEATHER TUX JACKET. AUTHENTIC BLACK COMBAT BOOTS. 1970’S GOLD MESH PURSE. ALL AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK. GREY MISS ME JEANS. FINDINGS COCKTAIL RING. ALL AVAILABLE AT GIRLY CHIC BOUTIQUE.

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ON LISA, THIS PAGE: 1960’S GREEN BEADED TOP. 1990’S BLACK RIBBED BODY CON SKIRT. BOTH AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK. FINDINGS COCKTAIL RING. AVAILABLE AT GIRLY CHIC BOUTIQUE. ON AMANDA, OPPOSITE PAGE: 1960’S CAPELET SUI. 1950’S BEADED CASHMERE CARDIGAN. 1950’S BLOUSE WITH PINTUCK DETAIL. 1950’S MINK HAT. ALL AVAILABLE AT INDYSWANK.

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A ROBERT INNIS. MERCHANDISER. THE INFLUENCE OF THE SPORTS ON MODERN FASHION CANNOT BE OVERSTATED. ATHLETIC WEAR HAS MOVED FROM THE FIELD TO THE STREET. SPOKE TO ROBERT INNIS OF INDIANAPOLIS BASED USA TRACK & FIELD, ABOUT MERCHANDISING SPORTSWEAR THAT GOES THE DISTANCE. JEREMIAH: Robert, you work with an established sports organization. What does USA Track and Field do?

JEREMIAH: What are the positives and negatives of working with active wear?

ROBERT: USA Track & Field is the National Governing Body for track & field, long-distance running and race walking in the US.

ROBERT: Only in the running community is it OK for men to wear tights, and if people comment, we really don't care. That carefree attitude can carry on to other aspects of life, not really caring what outside factors have to say about your passions. [A negative] is that running is still a niche sport/activity, so the ability to make X amount of dollars is capped by whatever the current trend is in running.

JEREMIAH: How did you get interested in working as a merchandiser? ROBERT: Working with apparel has been something that I have always wanted to do, particularly sportswear brands. Hell, I still have old cover letters for every sneaker company on my computer. JEREMIAH: What do you like about merchandising USATF apparel? ROBERT: I would say my favorite part of merchandising USATF apparel is that I get to forecast items for the future based on what works. I helped compile a lookbook for USATF. I was kind of happy for it to show up in the Washington Times Communities. JEREMIAH: How do you keep sportswear fashionable? ROBERT: I don't think it’s about being fashionable. It’s more about choosing quality items. I try to add a modern twist to whatever items we choose, but I have to pay close attention to our average consumer. What’s important for most of our consumers is functionality. We did our job if it’s an item they can use to effectively complete the task needed. 92 PATTERN ISSUE NO. 1

JEREMIAH: With your experience as merchandiser for USATF, do you want to pursue other aspects of the fashion industry? ROBERT: I think working in merchandising has opened my eyes to other opportunities that exist. Whatever I have done to build relationships with bloggers has definitely made me interested in high-end streetwear, and the evolution of it. Ten years ago, it was a strictly urban thing, and although I can relate to that now, it is more a collage of art forms- from insane PR stunts, like what Nike did with Nike Mags (McFly Sneakers), to vintage yet high quality fabrics and techniques used to make timeless pieces. I would love to have some role that comprises culture, art, fashion, wherever that may be. Ideally, I would like to be at a PR/event marketing company that has apparel companies on its roster.

JEREMIAH: What would your perfect project be? ROBERT: At USATF, I would love to do a collaboration line with some of our Olympians ranging from t-shirts to half-zips. Personally, I would love to have my own denim lab working with high quality cone or selvedge denim. I would probably produce jeans, of course, but design them in unconventional formats, like a chino, and accessories like watchstraps, looped belts, to washed chambray bed sheets. I would make my whole house denim, if I could. JEREMIAH: Do you think that Indianapolis is able to support a growing fashion scene? ROBERT: I think Indianapolis is a blank canvas. I feel that the individuals who want things to happen will make it happen. At the same time, this city is quite spread out, so things happen, and not everyone hears about it. Indy has the talent. What needs to happen is a matter of public relations. The more people that find out about what is going on, the more people will want to get involved. ✂

Robert Innis is a 26 year old New Jersey native, and graduate of East Stroudsburg University, now living in Indianapolis. Currently, he is the Merchandise Sales Coordinator at USA Track and Field.

H CULTURE COIFFURE WE ASKED 6 LOCAL STYLISTS TO CONVEY THE SPIRIT OF INDY’S CULTURAL DISTRICTS THROUGH ONE MEDIUM—HAIR.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLINA OSHEROV + MAKEUP BY KATHY MOBERLY + STYLING BY NIKKI SUTTON

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BROAD RIPPLE PHILIP SALMON FRENCH PHARMACIE SALON frenchpharmacie.com Styling hair for 18 years

I grew up in Broad Ripple—when kids who were thrown out of their homes for being angstfull punks, came to spend nights sleeping under the bridge. This created a rich stage for boldness of spirit, conversation and bad poetry... Things to grow on. FAVORITE PRODUCTS 1. OUI OIL FROM DAVINES 2. RELAXING FLUID BY DAVINES 3. KENRA THERMO PROTECTANT STYLING SPRAY

MODEL: PEARL/LMODELZ

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INDIANA AVE. KIMAYTA ALEXANDER TANGLED SALON SPA AND BOUTIQUE 3720 COMMERCIAL DR. 46222 Styling hair for 8 years

As I envisioned my design, a smooth fluent atmosphere and old jazz sounds surfaced. I created deep, luxurious waves (a signature style of Madame C.J. Walker) and full round hair extensions, finishing with a flower to evoke jazz legends such as Josephine Baker and Billy Holiday. FAVORITE PRODUCTS 1. DESIGN BY ESSENTIAL EDGE CONTROL 2. SILK ELEMENTS HEAT PROTECTION SPRAY 3. NU EXPRESSIONS SPIRITZ AND SHINE MODEL: TELISHA /LMODELZ

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FOUNTAIN SQUARE MEL TERHUNE ALLURE SALON alluresalon-carmel.com Styling hair for 5 years

Fountain Square is a unique, free spirited part of Indianapolis. Loose, lazy, untamed texture was my inspiration to show off the bohemian, hipster, anything goes fashion forward woman. I swept the hair to one side and brought it together in a lose fish tail, wrapping the end with a suede-like string. I defined her texture by wrapping random sections of hair around a medium sized curling rod. I used a styling spray to allow movement but set the tendrils. FAVORITE PRODUCTS 1. BE MORE BY BENNIFACTOR, provides texture and moldablity. 2. BE CONFIDENT BY BENNIFACTOR, provides light hold and allows for movement. 3. #5 BY DAVINES, provides a matte finish & defines texture.

MODEL: ELYSE/LMODELZ

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WHOLESALE DISTRICT IRINA GREEN EYEMAX STUDIO eyemaxmakeup.com Styling hair for 20 years

I was directly inspired by the patterns and scale of the tall buildings in The Wholesale District. Walking around this area, I saw neatly manicured patches, rows of flowers and greenspace. Similarly, I erected a tall, rigid structure using the model’s real hair as well as several hair pieces. Like a sky scraper, there is a steel infrastructure holding the piece. The grid pattern was achieved by weaving hair pieces in and out of the “tower.” I used a few texturing techniques to bring in representations of urban landscaping. FAVORITE PRODUCTS 1. MOROCCAN OIL TREATMENT 2. MOROCCAN SHINE SPRAY 3. KENRA 25 HAIR SPRAY MODEL: ABIGAIL/HELEN WELLS AGENCY

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WHITE RIVER STATE PARK TIFFANY HOLMES A DO HAIR DESIGN adohairdesign.com Styling hair for 8 years The urban and natural elements of the White River Canal provided an palette. The area was developed during the 1800s, so the overall style was based on shapes from that era. I gave the hair a rough, natural texture using a mini crimper, and teased it to add some volume to the top of the style. I created a wave and arches through the front of the hairstyle to evoke the canal and architectural structures that can be viewed from the White River Canal locale. FAVORITE PRODUCTS 1. BUMBLE & BUMBLE HAIR POWER 2. AQUAGE FINISHING SPRAY MODEL: ELIZABETH/HELEN WELLS AGENCY

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MASS AVE JARON FAIRCHILD MERIDIAN DESIGN GROUP meridiandesigngroup.com Styling hair for 8 years The cultural District of Mass Ave was originally developed in the late 1800’s. The concept began with hairstyles of that era - pulled back with long curls. I updated the look by adding a full head of extensions, styling with a marcel iron, and finishing it with a side pony tail. FAVORITE PRODUCTS 1. KERISTASE MEDIUM HOLD SPRAY 2. PUREOLOGY ROOT LIFT 3. OSIS DUST-IT

MODEL: DANIELLE/HELEN WELLS AGENCY

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MASS AVE. WINE SHOP cafe + craft spirits + cordials

open mon-sat 11am-9pm 878 Massachusetts Ave. indianapolis, IN 46204 massavewine.com 317.972.7966

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sunkingbrewing.com tasting room: 135 N. College Ave, Indianapolis, IN 46202


PATTERN Magazine Issue 1 Spring 2012