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02 ISSUE 01:

HERITAGE & INNOVATION

WHAT WILL YOU MAKE TODAY? WELCOME TO THE

MOHAWK MAKER QUARTERLY HERITAGE & INNOVATION

Our collective commitment to the art of craft has never been more cherished. It’s time we share our ideas.

You, as designers, illustrators, photographers, and artists, hold a unique and influential position in the new craft movement. Not only are you contributing your own visions and products to the world, but you are also advocates for other craftspeople. As we rediscover established artists and champion the growth of emerging talent, we strengthen our entire community. And as we spread the word through digital avenues as well as print media, we change the way the world thinks about design, innovation, quality, and heritage. We have the rare opportunity to shape the wider conversation about the craft movement from our positions within it.

more for items made with care because we like to know where they came from, who made them, and how they were made.

Although we in the creative community have adapted to, and, in many cases, even embraced the ephemeral nature and immediacy of online media, we find ourselves reveling in the return to the physical. We are invigorated by the rising popularity of the heritage craft movement and the renewed appreciation it is inspiring for well-made, lasting objects. We are eager to celebrate the artistry and innovation in one another’s work.

Together, we as craftspeople and artists know that attention to craft and commitment to quality are timeless values that thrive in the technological age. Craft is about sharing. Craft is about creating something you can feel, something you can care about. It’s about an exchange of ideas. Craft is borderless, without language, but recognizable and unifying in its goal to create memorable experiences.

The new craft movement is more than a trend: it is a way of life. Instead of valuing speed over quality, we relish our single-cup pour-over coffee and invest in products that we know will last. We are willing to pay a little

Join us in celebrating heritage craft in our digital world. Welcome to the first issue of the Mohawk Maker Quarterly.

We, at Mohawk, understand this. We know that behind every great creation is a story. Our own began in 1931, during the tumult of the Great Depression, when George O’Connor took a chance and bought an Industrial Revolution-era paper mill in Upstate New York where the Hudson and Mohawk rivers converge. Inspired by the ideals of the Arts & Crafts Movement, he strove to create paper that was as enduring as it was beautiful, a product that has flourished for over three generations.

—Thomas D. O’Connor Jr.

ADDITIONAL CONTENT

TABLE OF CONTENTS Letter from the Editor

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Craft 2.0

Mohawk Live

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Augmented Reality App

The Story of Superfine

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Luxe Business Cards

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Massimo Vignelli

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The Movement

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Mohawk Live incorporates augmented reality, a new technology which allows access to content from web-based channels via scanned images on printed paper. The app was specifically designed to enhance materials printed on Mohawk fine paper, enhancing packaging, publications, point of sale displays, and other projects printed on Mohawk products. Mohawk Live seamlessly integrates print with dynamic, interactive content and transforms a one dimensional image to a multidimensional experience featuring 3-D images, videos, photos, infographics, text, websites, and animations.

Departments

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Mohawk Live is easy to download and use, following these steps: 1

Download the free app from the Apple App Store or Google Play.

2 Point and hover a mobile device at the image that has the

Mohawk Live icon.

3 Wait for the enhanced content to load. WiFi connections are

recommended for faster load times and enhanced quality.

4 The app will launch enhanced content, seemingly bringing

the printed piece to life.

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A . B EST MAD E CO.

P ORTS BIS HOP

CRAFT 2.0 BY

Craft is more than how we make things; it’s a thriving language in a borderless world of creative communication. How a new craft revolution came to be.

NINA L ACOUR

The Industrial Revolution, beginning in Europe in the latter half of the 1700s and spreading quickly to the United States, changed manufacturing forever. Machines replaced hand production, advancements in science and technology led to new uses for natural resources, and the wide availability of goods made economies boom. However, economic growth and scientific advancement came at a great cost as the boom cities and their citizens were thrown out of balance by rapid change. Out of the Industrial Revolution, the Arts and Crafts movement was born. Founded on the ideals of dignity through work and the value of aesthetics, it called for fulfilling employment for all, and signified the return of artistry over speed, beauty over accessibility. Without abandoning the advances of the Industrial Revolution, the Arts and Crafts movement restored balance. Tradesmen turned back to craft; consumers became discerning supporters of art and design. The leaders of the movement and their followers believed that every object could— and should—be of high quality and bring joy to the beholder. Through quality and beauty, they believed, people could lead more enriching lives. Now, over a century and a half later, in the midst of the Digital Revolution, we are entering a new era of heritage craftsmanship. Though we aren’t faced with the industrial struggles of our 18th and 19th century ancestors, our age presents its own set of challenges: An overload of information. A sense of impermanence. A tendency towards isolation. We are, at once, more connected to the world than we have ever been, and yet more removed from it. William Morris, champion of the Arts and Crafts movement, advocated for meaningful and beautiful objects. He is famous for saying that art should be “for the people and by the people, and a source of pleasure to the maker and the user.” Once again, we understand the importance

of pleasure and pride in craft. With so many hours of our days spent tuned into a digital existence, engaged in information and ideas, communicating by text message or email, the physical object takes on enhanced meaning. Sometimes we just want the feel of paper between our fingers; we want to turn a page. As in the Arts and Crafts movement, we are moving away from the impersonal and toward the carefully crafted. We are rediscovering and reclaiming the physical. We want to eat small batch artisanal cheese, understanding that each bite is precious. We know that the variations in a piece of pottery tell us that we are holding something handmade, and that the spectacle of cut paper animation leaves us more charmed than computer generated images ever could. Experienced artisans are finding a resurgence of customer interest in their products and their techniques. Young artists and entrepreneurs, born and raised in the digital age, are seeking out traditional methods of craftsmanship, reviving time-honored family traditions or collaborating with expert tradesmen to endow heritage quality to new designs. But just as the participants in the Arts and Crafts movement never forgot the advancements made during the Industrial Revolution, we know that great things happen when the craft world and the digital world come together. Because we live in this exciting age of information, we have unprecedented access to craftspeople. We can follow the creation of a handmade table on Instagram, add a jar of lavender honey to our CSA box through a website, learn about the latest coffee roasting technique via Twitter—and then venture out into the world to try a cup for ourselves, knowing that the best things in life are not only understood, but experienced.

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STORY OF SUPERFINE How a legendary paper shaped 20th Century Graphic Design and redefined the Digital Age. BY

EVAN PRICCO

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Widely known as the finest printing paper in the world today, Mohawk Superfine is the signature paper of Mohawk, one of the leading manufacturers of high quality, digital print-ready paper. Situated in a paper mill in upstate New York, constructed during the Industrial Revolution of the late 1800s and home to Mohawk since 1931, Mohawk today is not only respected as a company that produces a unique combination of luxury and craft, but also a mill that produces paper with amazing response to the age of digital printing. Superfine goes back to the earliest days of Mohawk. The paper was originally made for greeting cards in the late 1940s, created with a rare pulp due to fiber shortages during WWII. After New England salesmen had successfully sold the paper to many accounts, came the biggest breakthrough yet: Alvin Eisenman, one of the 20th century’s leading graphic design educators and founder of Yale University’s graduate program in graphic design, approached Mohawk to develop a custom paper for the production of a book for Yale University Press. With Eisenman developing an enduring relationship with Mohawk, Superfine became a staple in the tool kit of the aspiring graphic designers whose careers Eisenman nurtured. As such, Superfine has been used on projects as diverse as annual reports, collectable posters by Paul Rand and Seymour Chwast, writings by Benjamin Franklin and Dwight Eisenhower, as well as fine art books ranging from the photographs of Alfred Stieglitz to Madonna’s iconic 1992 book, Sex.

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“ The qualities and results that made Superfine respected and exceptional 40-50 years ago are the same traits that make it a leader in the digital world today,” says Mohawk’s VP of Business Development, Chris Harrold. “ Superfine has beautiful formation, legendary feel, and unmatched variety of white shades. Businesses have selected Superfine because of its tactile elegance.” The industry’s move to digital printing—a shift so paramount that Mohawk has called it the “most significant watershed shift since offset lithography replaced letterpress”—proved that Mohawk was still an innovator in its field and a leader in its craft: in the early 2000s, Mohawk turned Superfine into the ultimate digital sheet. “ Everything we do with Superfine Digital also has a ref lection on the reputation of our heritage Superfine products and we simply can’t afford to lower the bar,” says Gavin Gaynor, Vice President Research & Development at Mohawk. “From the very beginning of product development we insisted that Superfine Digital would ‘simply be the best.’” And the best it is. Superfine Digital, with unique testing of coatings, has allowed designers and printers the highest quality against any other digital sheet.

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“Our manufacturing team takes tremendous pride in producing Superfine, and relishes the opportunity to see a beautiful printed piece,” Gaynor continues. “Many of our employees are second, and even third, generation Mohawk employees and they all understand that it is one of the pillars on which Mohawk has been built. We have a number of great products that we are very proud of, but Superfine is the one product family that elicits a nearly unanimous emotional attachment. Our employees on the f loor will simply not compromise when it comes to product going out the door wearing a Superfine label.” “ Using Superfine for digital print can be the best way for designers or printers to realize their best projects,” Harrold explains. “Because the default paper most printers use is coated gloss, Superfine helps any project become a more beautifully executed physical, tactile presentation. The results and quality will be resoundingly better.” E

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HERITAGE & INNOVATION

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Venture Beat labeled it, our “technology-focused times,” a reverse phenomenon emerged: people longed for the tactile, hand-to-hand exchange of something of permanence. Cards made people stand out with their personal design, sleek look, and their physical presence in an increasingly non-physical world.

WHERE NO CARD HAS GONE BEFORE The Biggest Social Networking Tool of All-Time? (Hint: You can design it yourself!) BY

EVAN PRICCO

Starting in 2004 in Shoreditch, London, Moross noticed a demand for physical exchanges in an increasingly digital world. MOO’s first product, the MiniCard, stood out because of its unique and thoughtful design: it was the width of a normal business card, but half as high. “When we decided to launch business cards, we were aware that it is a commodity product,” Moross has said. “We had to inject as much fun and design [as possible] to make it less commoditized.” The hard part was creating a user-based platform that would appeal to techies as well as casual users, just starting out in their own business ventures. MOO’s appeal is that they strike a chord with both groups, making them a leader in the business card field. H

Most of us in the vast universe that we call the “Business World” live a virtual existence. We communicate through our mobile devices via text, email, video chat, Instagram, blogs, Twitter, and Facebook—and surely by the time we finish this article there will be yet another platform that has changed the game of communication in the 21st Century. Actual face-to-face, human contact is becoming a rarity these days, and yet there is one physical component of our business lives that seems to be more relevant than ever. As small as it is, the business card has become a crucial piece of our identity. “[The business card] is the single biggest social networking tool of all time,” says Richard Moross, founder and CEO of MOO, an award winning, world-leader in online-print business that allows users to upload and design their own business cards, stationary, and stickers. “And it doesn’t require batteries.” MOO was founded on an ambitious but logical idea: “Making design accessible for people.” And for the past 9 years, MOO has given people products that will help them or their business look great. The business card as we know it has been around since the American Revolution, and prior to email addresses and mobile phone communication, was the most efficient way for colleagues and new business relationships to connect and create meaningful interactions. As the Internet became the primary platform for making contact in, as

“ The business card is 300 years old,” Moross told the FT. “It has not been displaced by mobiles, the Internet or Bluetooth—it’s here because it really works.” Even with business cards’ long history, MOO knows there is room for innovation. In 2012, MOO created one of the most ambitious business cards ever assembled, taking Mohawk Superfine paper, widely known as the finest digital printing paper on the market, and engineering a 4-layer business card, three times thicker than the average, with the ability to add strips of color in the center of each card. With the Luxe card’s exceptional printing quality, extra fine detailing, and thick, commanding presence, MOO once again changed the way we make exchanges in the business world. “ The more virtual our professional lives become, the more precious and intimate the physical world is to us,” Moross says. “Using mobile devices, I can beam you my telephone number any time. But that is not going to tell you much about me. It won’t say ‘what kind of design did I use?’ When you meet someone in ‘Second Life,’ it’s not real. You really get to see who that person is in that card. It’s something data transfer just can’t do.”

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MASSIMO VIGNELLI MAKES BOOKS

Intelligent Elegance: How starting by hand defines the work of master craftsman, Massimo Vignelli BY

EVAN PRICCO

It’s easy to give such advice as “If you can design one thing, you can design everything,” when you are already a master designer and craftsman, widely regarded as an influential leader in your creative field. Include designs for American Airlines, the NYC Subway Map, IBM, Bloomingdale’s, and an AIGA Gold Medal, you are getting positive reinforcement from a bona fide legend. The wisdom comes from Massimo Vignelli, a designer whose career has spanned nearly six decades with landmark works in book design, corporate identities, packaging design, interior design, poster art, architectural graphics, furniture and product design, and magazine layout. We guess Vignelli is right: in his case, if you design one thing, you do design everything. And when a master speaks, we should all listen. “ Design is a profession that takes care of everything around us,” Vignelli has said. “Politicians take care of the nation and fix things—at least they are supposed to. Architects take care of buildings. Designers take care of everything around us... This table, this chair, this lamp, this pen has been designed... I think that it is my responsibility to make the work better than it is.” Since first entering the world of design as a profession in 1960 in Milan with the Vignelli Office for Design and Architecture, his work has been called “essential, intellectually elegant, strong, timeless.” By the time he opened his Vignelli Associates firm with wife Lella in 1971 in New York City, he was already widely known as one of the world’s greatest design talents. Yet his minimal, smart, almost technocratic style (Vignelli would most likely say “appropriate, and pragmatically understandable”), is anything but the work of a machine or computer. Vignelli is an old-school craftsman, beginning each project by hand, sketching his layouts before considering a project’s final look. And some of his greatest craftwork comes in his book design projects.

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An ardent supporter of the grid, a structure on which all design should be based, Vignelli has a clear vision of how a specific look should be approached. “Nothing could be more useful to reach our intention than the Grid,” he wrote in The Vignelli Canon, a collection of the master’s tricks and tips on design. “The grid represents the basic structure of our graphic design, it helps to organize the content, it provides consistency, it gives an orderly look and it projects a level of intellectual elegance that we like to express. For the design of a book the grid provides again structure and continuity from cover to cover.” “One of the things that I design most of the time is books,” Vignelli says. “The way I do them is take a sheet of paper, (and by hand) devise a grid, determine the position of the photographs. I try and position photographs with white space to give reverence around each picture. And not only do I draw the position of the picture and its proper dimension, but I draw every damn picture! I could do the work with a computer these days, but I’m faster, and better, by hand.” Those hands have been behind hundreds of books over the years, including books published by leading art houses Rizzoli, Penguin, Aperture, and Pantheon, as well as leading institutions such as MoMA, MOCA, the Guggenheim, and New Museum. Even though what we see in the final published collection is what appears to be an unaffected, concise presentation, Vignelli has delicately drawn each page with a purpose and the unmatched scrutiny of the scriptwriter, director, and cinematographer of a film. “ That is why I love books!” Vignelli states. “My (handmade) grid is not something you physically see. It’s just like underwear! You wear it but it’s not to be exposed. The grid is the underwear of the book!” D

“Not only do I draw the position of the picture and its proper dimension, but I draw every damn picture! I could do the work with a computer these days, but I’m faster, and better, by hand.”

08 ISSUE 01:

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HERITAGE & INNOVATION

MOVEMENT CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

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Leslie Williamson

The photographer bringing craft culture to life San Francisco, California LES LI E WI LLIAM SO N .CO M

“ For me the details are where the beauty is and where people’s lives are. It is true with everything really. Details reveal character and, in the best cases, our humanity. Because I photograph a lot of homes of architects and designers, the details can reveal personal preferences and/or funny little pet peeves or ideas that they want to try out. I find I get to know people, especially in house museums where the original owner is deceased, through small details left behind. Where the phone is kept, what the most worn seat is in the living room, where the coffee stain is on the table, how worn one side of the couch is compared to the other. The overall look of a room says a lot about vision and aesthetic, but the details tell the personal story. Heritage is relevant to all culture because we are all the product of what we have grown up with and learned—our personal heritage. It is a beautiful and a unifying thing, even if our heritage differs greatly from the next person or even if someone is actively trying to deny their heritage­­—which I have witnessed, as well. It is all rather revealing. We reveal ourselves at every turn. That is just what human beings do.”

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Shugo Tokumaru

Singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist Tokyo, Japan S H U G OTO KU MAR U.CO M

In discussion with Directors Kijek/Adamski, the team behind Shugo Tokumaru’s incredible stop-motion music video for the track, “Katachi” Popular Japanese singer/songwriter, Shugo Tokumaru’s “Katachi” music video is a stunning display of stop-motion animation meets hands-on craft aesthetic. Directors Kijek/Adamski say of the process, “Craft is a chance to revise the creative process; to get back to the simplest means; often to eliminate the digital middleman and the dirty hands touching one’s work.” Shugo was proud of the results for “Katachi.” “I think it fits the music so well,” he says. “[Like my songwriting methods] it builds things up from scratch and then recreates these objects into a more certain form.”

Unionmade

Purveyors of well-made classic goods San Francisco and Santa Monica, California U N I O N MAD EG OO DS .CO M

“Craft by nature is limited. Skill, materials and process limit production. Contemporary culture has been trained to expect abundance and quickly changing fashion cycles. We believe that there is a divide now between meaningless products and the treadmill of fashion cycles and hardwearing, well-made clothing and products that are made rationally and deliver emotionally. We see cycles changing, specifically fashion cycles becoming less important as products are made to last longer, wear harder and become more beautiful with time... We believe that people are much more interested in the meaning and value behind products over looks or novelty. Craft continues to replace fashion.”

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MOVEMENT CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

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Taylor Stitch

Makers of fine craft tailored clothing San Francisco, California TAY LO RSTITC H .CO M

Tugboat Printshop

Hand-carved woodblock printing Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania TU G B OATPR I NTS H O P.CO M

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“ We have always liked making things—the process as well as the joy of completion are sort of bookends to our rhythm of working and living everyday. The ability to carve a sustainable, self-sufficient living with our own two hands gives us a sense of pride... We are always interested to see the relationship of the printing itself to the artisan involved, as well as the relationship of printmaking to a culture. In contemporary America, we feel like we are playing a role by sharing images that are relative to our environmental, social, agrarian, utopian and fantastical interests.”

“ We owe most all our knowledge of the construction of a great shirt to the Gambert family. Single needle tailoring with French seams. This is how a shirt was meant to be sewn. We modernized things a bit by taking all the pleats out of the cuffs and back panel in order to create cleaner lines. Innovation allows us to adapt old world craftsmanship to a new business model.”

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Alabamboo

Eatwell CSA

Makers of the bamboo bike frame Greensboro, Alabama

Organic farmers and CSA box providers Dixon, California

R I D E AL ABAM B OO.CO M

E AT W E LL .CO M

“ First of all, building a bike by hand totally changes your relationship to the machine. Secondly, many of the problems in both our urban and rural areas stem from a lack of meaningful jobs that can produce income, satisfaction and self reliance. The Alabamboo project, bikes and farming, are a small attempt to create some economic development in rural Alabama.”

“ We are farmers, we grow food. It is both a craft and an art. We celebrate the hard work of the individuals who put their heart and soul into growing this great food. We grow some heirloom varieties of crops but we use the most modern, fuel-efficient tractors. The produce is delivered in ultra low emission Sprinter vans. Our equipment to weed the crops is the latest from Europe. Eighteen families depend on the farm for their livelihoods. What we do is fun, important and relevant work.”

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Andante Dairy

Biochemist turned craft cheese maker Petaluma, California AN DANTE DAI RY.CO M

“ Science is the language that explains what’s happening and why, which gives the power to understand what I am doing and how I can solve problems. My knowledge in science gave me the foundation to understand cheesemaking, which has been very helpful. I don’t think there is any real innovation without understanding heritage. For a good craftsman, heritage and tradition is the root, and resulting innovation is the flower.”

10 ISSUE 01:

HERITAGE & INNOVATION

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S L E S L I E W I L L I A M S ON H I DEK I OTSU K A A N DR E W PAY N T ER VA L ER I E LU ET H & PAU L RODEN M I K E A R M EN TA JOH N BI EL EN B ERG

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Colossal Media

Tim Kerr

The people behind the hand-painted billboard New York and greater USA

The musician’s musician and an artist’s artist Austin, Texas

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“ We ‘always hand paint’ it’s what we do best. We think using paint for execution brings a life and soul to what would otherwise be a trumped up tarp. We get a lot of positive feedback from people watching us work. There’s always an appreciation, curiosity, and excitement that comes from what we do. Advertising has always been about getting eyeballs, and hand-painting is an attention getter. Imagine seeing a few guys hanging off the side of a ten-story building in the dead of winter painting a portrait of your favorite TV actor? That’s attention you can’t get anywhere else.”

“ Maybe people see this new Craft Movement and realize it’s more unique, more personal and fun to just make something on your own. It’s your interpretation from the materials that you have. Your own self-expression. Playing ‘old-time music,’ there is community and a welcomeness to it, and for the most part, anyone can join in. It has a lot of the same attitude that the DIY scene had in the late 1970s and early ‘80s.”

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Stephen Shore

Photographer, bookmaker, and professor Annandale-on-Hudson, New York STE PH E N S H O R E . N E T

“ Print-on-demand makes the medium of the book available to anyone. When I’m working on a book, I take photographs with the book in mind. In other words, as I am photographing I’m thinking about each picture I take in relation to the others I’ll be including in the book.” In 2005, Shore had the goal to create an entire book on days The New York Times published a headline that grazed across their six-column, full-width banner headline space. Shore ended up producing 83 print on-demand books that became The Book of Books, a highly collectible, two volume collection (250 copies) containing the complete project in all their original layouts.

Best Made Co. Makers of tools and other goods New York, New York B ESTMAD ECO.CO M

“ We seek to empower people to get outside, use their hands, and in doing so embark on a life of fulfilling projects and lasting experiences. A Best Made axe is a tool for survival and productivity and at its heart it’s a symbol of many admirable virtues. Purchasing a Best Made axe is more than a simple transaction; it’s an investment into substantial, lasting products and relationships: between you and your new purchase, between yourself and those you spend time with around the campfire, and between you and Best Made.”

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DEPARTMENTS OBSESSIONS

What are you obsessed with right now?

Patrick Buckley Co-founder, DODOcase

Principal, Hybrid Design

Design & illustration

Shay Ometz

Lab Partners Design & illustration

Design & illustration

D O D OCAS E .CO M

H Y B R I D - D ES I G N .CO M

B E E -TH I N GS .CO M

LP- S F.CO M

WO R K BY L AN D.CO M

“ I am currently obsessed with small scale manufacturing and the new businesses that are rediscovering how rewarding it is to make physical items. Little known fact, 48% of all jobs in manufacturing are with firms smaller then 200 people.”

Brian Flynn

“ I couldn’t talk obsessions without mentioning vintage Japanese Kaiju and Tokusatusu figures. But lately I’ve been really into the illustrations of J.P. Miller. The blend of simple shapes and textures to create his illustrations are incredibly fun and playful to look at.”

“Anything Japanese, furnishings, clothing, packaging. I LOVE the New York Times for the content and the amazing design and illustration. Indigo-dyed fabric, stop-motion animation apps, vintage picture books, learning to play piano with my son, Calder.”

LAND

“ We are currently really into the ceramics of Swedish designer Lisa Larson. We especially dig her designs from the Lilla Zoo and Stora Zoo lines she created in the 1950s. The way she stylizes animals creating these bold, sophisticated and yet playful shapes in her work is so fantastic. They’re always a delight to look at.”

“ The desert, metal, marbling, death and life, canyon carving, sage, getting lost, cosmic American vibes, repetitive drawing, making rules, breaking them, high lonesome, reappropriation, surrealism, figure art, rye whiskey, fast machines, no masters, no gods.”

PAPER GRADES QUICK REFERENCE

MOHAWK PAPER SELECTOR To make our product line simpler, easier to specify and to reduce our environmental footprint, we have streamlined our product portfolio, merging brands and eliminating redundant colors.

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Superfine

Options

THE ULTIMATE PAPER

THE INXWELL PAPER

Mohawk Superfine is the finest printing paper made today. No other paper has the same reputation for quality, consistency and uniformity. Superfine inspires great design with its superb formation, lush tactility, archival quality and timeless appeal.

Options features Mohawk’s exclusive Inxwell surface technology, combining the tactile feel of uncoated paper with the ink density and sharp detail of coated. Now including ultra-smooth Navajo, Options features six premium white shades to complement a range of styles.

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THE RESPONSIBLE PAPER

THE ECONOMICAL PAPER

Via

Strathmore

Mohawk Loop is a complete collection of extremely high PCW recycled papers to support sustainable design. With a range of print surfaces and a fashionable palette of whites, pastels, jewel tones and earthy fibered shades, Loop enables environmental responsibility the Mohawk way.

Via is the best-selling uncoated paper in America, offering Mohawk quality at an affordable price. Featuring popular textures, colors and highly printable white shades, Via is a paper for today and for every day.

Setting the standard for design and innovation since 1895, the Strathmore Collection is a diverse assortment of cotton papers, colors and finishes that honor tradition while striking new ground with contemporary colors and surface technologies. They add an image of luxury to all print communications.

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Carnival

Digital

Loop

THE COVER PAPER

THE IMAGING PAPERS

Mohawk Carnival has set the standard for intense saturated color, especially for pocket folders and other converted items. Designed for excellent score and fold properties, this cover grade offers primary hues in distinctive textures with complementary whites and text weights.

Mohawk features a comprehensive collection of digital substrates including a family of reliable and economical coated and uncoated papers specially made for digital presses as well as a unique offering of specialty substrates for digital printing that help place you and your customers on the cutting edge.

Brought to you by:

THE LUXE PAPER

LEARN MORE AT MOHAWKCONNECTS.COM

We believe that partnership is essential to furthering the interests of craftspeople everywhere. Mohawk is proud to partner with craft printers to bring you the Mohawk Maker Quarterly.

D ES I G N & CU R ATI O N

465 Saratoga Street Cohoes, NY 12047

Mohawk Superfine, Eggshell, White, 80 Text (118 gsm)

+1 (518) 237-1740 customerservice@mohawkconnects.com mohawkconnects.com

Hybrid Design Hybrid-design.com T Y PE FAC ES

Chalet New York Nineteen Sixty, Sentinel PAPE R

PR I NTE R

Shapco Printing Inc. Minneapolis, MN

Shapco.com I N KS

4cp, 2nd black, match light green and dark green, spot dull varnish, gloss black foil, UV inks. ITE M N U M B E R

76-702620313 June 2013

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