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Ice Yachting: Need for Speed  Explore Mackinaw City

Huron

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Ontario

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Michigan

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Erie

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Superior

Princess Yachts 42 Flybridge MY

BIOFUELS & BOATS:

E-15 primer

lakelandboating.com March 2011

Display Until March 31, 2011

F lying High

RACING IN THE GREAT LAKES

in this issue

Features 16

Princess Yachts 42 Flybridge MY

20

All-American Treasure

26

Wintery Wonder on the Great Lakes

32

Need for Speed

38

Thrill Ride

44

A Place for All Seasons

52

Ain’t it Grand

An American beauty built in the United Kingdom

Efforts continue to save the SS United States A story and pictorial by Richard Thompson

Ice yachting is one of the region’s best-kept secrets Powerboat racing in the Great Lakes Mackinaw City has something for everyone Visit Mackinac Island’s impressive Grand Hotel PHOTO BY MACKINAC ISLAND STATE PARKS COMMISSION

Departments

32

PHOTO BY GRETCHEN DORIAN

38

4 6 8 11 12 13 14

From the Helm

23

Roundup

55

Shoreleave

57 PHOTO BY PAUL KEMIEL

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Mail Call Scuttlebutt Gear Guru Corke Board Electronics

58 74 77 80

Marina Watch Lakeshore Life Classifieds Above the Waterline

On the Cover

The Chandlery Watersports gear

Ski & Wakeboard boats Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum

Ask an Expert

An ideal family cruiser, the Princess 42 Flybridge MY combines confident sea-keeping with strong on-water performance, elegance and class.

from the helm March 2011 Volume LXV, No. 3

Time for a Turnaround

Publisher Walter “Bing” O’Meara editorial staff Editor: Lindsey Johnson Senior editor: Dave Mull Editors-at-large: Heather Steinberger & Roland Schultz Field editor: Tom Thompson Creative staff Art director/production manager: Brook Poplawski Creative consultant: Christy Tuttle Bauhs Contributors Elizabeth Altick, Lee Boyt, Bill Colclough, Mark Corke, Gretchen Dorian, Vdovina Elena, Steve Fritz, Mike Harris, Michael Hauenstein, Paul Kemiel, Zuzana Prochazka, Jacqui Ronan, Joe Rota, Richard Steinberger, Devon Stephens, Richard Thompson, Colleen H. Troupis, John Wagner, Dave Wallace, Chris Woods business staff Associate publisher: David Leli Eastern advertising representative: Mark Conway Regional and classified sales manager: Kirsten Moxley Marketing director: Linda O’Meara Circulation director: Sharon P. O’Meara

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y plan for today was, among other things, to sit down and write my publisher’s note. I wasn’t sure how to begin, when up on my computer screen what should appear but an alert from the New York Times that said the Ford Motor Company earned $6.6 billion in 2010, its largest profit in 11 years and the result of surging global sales and cost cuts made during a lengthy turnaround. The performance for the year, a substantial reversal from several years ago when Ford appeared to be the sickliest of Detroit automakers, means the company’s 40,000 hourly workers will receive profit-sharing checks averaging $5,000 per person. Congratulations to Alan. R. Mulally, Ford’s CEO, and the workers who were so instrumental in making it happen. The marine business owes a debt of gratitude to the automobile. During the heyday, those year-end bonus checks put a lot of boats in the water. Like the auto business, Detroit gave birth to production boatbuilding. Foremost among the early builders was Chris-Craft—one of the only marine brands to become an iconic name. Interestingly over the years, car dealers as an occupational group have owned more boats than any other professional group to speak of. We seem to be joined at the hip, cars and boats.

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Many faithful readers have contacted the offices of Lakeland Boating regarding the status of the Lake Erie & Lake St. Clair Ports o’ Call Cruising Guide. The latest volume includes new port photography for every navigable port on Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair, as well as every marina and its amenities. The guide also provides you with the latest information on restaurants and businesses for each port, as well critical information you need to know to cruise the waters safely and enjoy your trip. We will begin accepting orders for the new Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair cruising guide in April, with a late May delivery scheduled. The retail price will be $49.95; however, you can order online at lakelandboating.com and save 10 percent. Just three months left to go!

editorial & advertising offiCe 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone: 312-276-0610 | fax: 312-276-0619 email: staff@lakelandboating.com website: lakelandboating.com Classified advertising 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone 800-331-0132, ext. 21 | fax 312-276-0619 subsCriPtions P.O. Box 15396 | North Hollywood | CA 91615-5396 Customer Service: 800-827-0289 O’Meara-Brown Publications Inc. Walter B. O’Meara, president Timothy Murtaugh, secretary Tracy Houren, controller Lakeland Boating (ISSN 0744-9194), copyright 2011, is published eleven times per year (except November) by O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc. Editorial and advertising offices are located at 727 S. Dearborn St., Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605; 312-2760610. Annual subscription rates: United States, $24.95 per year; International and Canadian, $36.95 per year (11 issues), includes 7% G.S.T. tax (G.S.T. registration number 894095074-RT0001) and $12 postage included. Single copies are $4.99 for U.S. and Canada. Only U.S. funds are accepted. Subscription correspondence should be addressed to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396 (U.S.), or call 800-827-0289. Known office of publication: 727 South Dearborn Street, Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, please send all address changes to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396. Lakeland Boating is a registered trademark of O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc., Chicago, Illinois. Published as Lakeland Yachting 1946-1955. Unsolicited work may be submitted at the author’s, photographer’s or artist’s own risk. Lakeland Boating assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited material. All submissions must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope with sufficient return postage.

Printed in the U.S.A

mail call

Overprotective I would like to comment on the article that appeared regarding U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) requirements when entering the U.S. after a day trip to Canada (June 2010, p. 6). I canceled a trip to Pelee Island (which we love) due to our own country’s ridiculous rules for re-entering the United States. I have suggested to Border Patrol that the captain of the boat be required to get an I-68 form and call in when leaving and arriving. Make the captain responsible (most are hard working, honest citizens) and have everyone on board carry a valid passport. Let’s try doing it like the Canadians. In years past, we’d cruise along the Detroit River and go to Canada for dinner, call the Canadian authorities, register everyone on the boat, and enjoy a fine evening. From past experience, they generally knew who I had on board when I called. Hello, CBP; we are your eyes and ears! You have blocked boating in this area, and your policy is costing millions in losses to the economy. When I went to get the I-68 form at Ambassador Bridge, I was told to get in my car, drive to Canada, and I could get the form by vehicle on the return. Brilliant! I truly believe the purpose of this rule is to stop boating traffic crossing the border. Why else would the closest check-in point for a boater on the Detroit River be at the tunnel, especially when a border patrol office is located in Gibraltar, Michigan? Does anyone recall the 9/11 terrorists had passports? We love your magazine and appreciate the knowledge and fun in each issue. Scott Ross Gibraltar, MI

Got something to say? We love hearing from you! E-mail us at staff@lakelandboating.com, or drop us a line at Lakeland Boating, 727 South Dearborn, Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. The opinions expressed in Mail Call are not necessarily those of Lakeland Boating. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. PHOTO BY USCG PO BILL COLCLOUGH

scuttlebutt

Operation Summaries From the 9th District U.S. Coast Guard. 11/26 Woman Medevaced Put-in-Bay, Oh A USCG crew from A/S Detroit medevaced an 84-year-old woman reportedly experiencing shortness of breath from Put-in-Bay, Ohio. USCG was notified by Put-in-Bay EMS as to the woman’s condition. USCG Station Marblehead was unable to launch because of weather limitations, so an HH-65 Dolphin rescue helo from A/S Detroit performed the medevac. The woman was taken to the Port Clinton airport and transferred to awaiting EMS. case closed

a break in the clouds allows sunlight to momentarily illuminate the ice-covered cleveland harbor West Pierhead Lighthouse on December 14, 2010.

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12/01 Hunter Rescued Saginaw, MI USCG crewmembers hoisted a disoriented hunter to safety after he lost his way while duck hunting in southern Saginaw, Michigan. A USCG rescue crew from A/S Detroit launched an HH-65 Dolphin helo, and crewmembers from Station Tawas, Michigan, drove to the area in an automobile to try and locate the hunter. The crew located the man, and he was okay. case closed

12/12 Man Medevaced DeTour Village, MI Crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mobile Bay, homeported in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, medevaced a 61-year-old crewmember from the motor vessel Algoway in the St. Marys River just off DeTour Village, Michigan. The man reportedly began experiencing high blood pressure and mild heart-attack symptoms the previous evening, but took medication and believed the problem was under control. Crew of the Algoway, a 646-foot bulk freighter, contacted USCG officials again at approximately 16:00, when the man’s symptoms returned. As a precaution, USCG Sector Sault Ste. Marie decided to medevac the man while weather conditions permitted. CGC Mobile Bay, which was about a half-mile away assisting with Aids to Navigation and icebreaking duties, transported the man to shore. He was reportedly in stable condition during transport and taken to a local hospital for further evaluation and treatment. case closed r

PhOTO By PO2 LAUrEN jOrGENSEN

Calendar of Events march 9 – 13 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Sports Show West Allis, WI jsonline.com/sportsshow

march 11 Door County Wine and Cheese Gala Sturgeon Bay, WI doorcountywineandcheese.com march 12 St. Patrick’s Day Parade Sturgeon Bay, WI sturgeonbay.net

march 12 | St. Patrick’s Day Parade | Sturgeon Bay, WI

phOTOS By STuRGEON BAy vISITOR BuREAu

march 17 – 20 Spring Boating Expo Novi, MI | boatmichigan.org

scuttlebutt

Ultimate Sport Show Grand Rapids, MI showspan.com/usg march 25 – 26 Door County Home and Garden Show Sturgeon Bay, WI dchba.org march 25 – 27 Cottage & Lakefront Living Show Grand Rapids, MI showspan.com/clg march 30 – april 3 Northwest Sportshow Minneapolis, MN northwestsportshow.com

9 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

scuttlebutt

Biofuels and Boats

Ethanol is OK, but beware too much. BY LE E BOYT

T

o reduce our country’s dependence on petroleum products (especially the oil we import from nations that would just as soon nuke us as take our money) and to improve the quality of the air we breathe, the U.S. government requires that most of the fuels we use contain some type of renewable energy in the mix.

The upside For most of us, the renewable component in the gas we buy is ethanol, a type of alcohol made by fermenting agricultural and/or cellulose-based products. Pull up to the pump and the sticker says “E-10,” meaning there is roughly 10 percent ethanol in every gallon of gas. Recent legislation says refiners can now increase the amount of ethanol per gallon to 15 percent, called E-15. On paper, E-15 is only for use in 2007 and newer lightweight on-road vehicles. Do NOT use E-15 in your boat! Pretty cool, huh? Moonshine to give the plain ol’ fossil fuel a bit of a kick, we can grow as much of the stuff as we want, and this is the best part: Eventually we’ll be able to tell OPEC to pound sand. In theory.

The downside Adapting marine fuel systems and engines to gas/alcohol blends is challenging at best on new boats and a true nightmare on older boats. Ethanol is a marvelous solvent; it’ll remove any crud in your boat’s gas tank and send contaminated fuel on to the engine. But on the flip side, ethanol literally dissolves some built-in fiberglass fuel tanks, and the resulting goo mucks up the entire fuel system, including the engine. Ethanol dissolves water; boats operate in wet conditions, and because most marine fuel systems

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vent to the atmosphere, potential for water entering the gas tank is high. Too much water in ethanol-blended gas creates a condition called phase-separation: The ethanol/ water mix settles to the bottom of the tank and the gas floats on top. Net result is often engine damage.

Is the sky falling? The key to making the best of things is to develop an obsessive attitude towards maintaining your boat’s fuel system. Install the best fuel filters available and change them more frequently than the manufacturer recommends. Do not re-use filters; skimping now will cost you big-time in the future. And don’t forget fuel filters on the engine! Inspect fuel lines. They shouldn’t feel mushy when squeezed. Disconnect the lines and look inside for signs of deterioration (internal swelling, bits of material/debris in the line, etc.). If anything seems questionable, have it fixed before you go for another boat ride. Jerry Nessenson, president of ValvTect Petroleum Products, one of the leaders in fuel treatment technology, suggests using multi-functional fuel additives containing ingredients to control moisture (to avert phase separation); avoid rust and corrosion; stabilizers (anti-oxidants); and detergents/dispersants (averts and cleans up deposits). Nessenson cautions boaters to avoid additives that aren’t approved by engine manufacturers or independent testing organizations (like ASTM and SAE, for example). Diesel fuels aren’t immune from governmental improvements. The wheels in Washington, D.C., are turning to create laws requiring that diesels clean up their act. According to ValvTect’s Nessenson, ultra-low sulfur and biodiesel fuels can cause seal and gasket leaks in older engines. The fuels also tend to be less stable and more susceptible to water contamination. Ultra-low sulfur blends don’t offer as much lubricity, causing premature wear; and both types of fuels are more conducive to increased levels of bacteria. As with blended gas, reformulated diesel fuels will need multiple fuel additives to minimize the non-positive aspects of the new fuels. These additives ought to contain biocide, stabilizers, moisture dispersants, corrosion inhibitors and detergents to make fuel more palatable to your boat’s diesel powerplant. If you’re a diesel boater, you already know the importance of replacing fuel filters and keeping the system sanitary; but be prepared to up the ante on maintenance to keep your combustion-ignition engine chugging along.  PHOTO BY VDOVINA ELENA

gear guru

On-Water Action

Gear up for thrills this boating season. by z uzana prochaz ka All teRRAiN Biodegradable Sunscreen

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Active lifestyles, especially boating, mean you’ll need to take extra care with sunscreen—not only because the protection can wash or sweat off, but also because the intensity of exposure is heightened by glare from the water. Many sunscreens are available, but they’re not all created equal. All Terrain, a New Hampshire-based company, offers a line of biodegradable sunscreen that’s all natural and really works. AquaSport provides UVA/UVB protection and is based on zinc oxide, so it’s great for sensitive skin. Eye irritation is reduced, and it’s both sweat- and water-resistant. The product is FDA approved and free of oxybenzone, avabenzone and nannoparticles. AquaSport comes in SPF 15 and 30, and you can get it in a lotion or an easy-to-apply spray. A 3-oz. tube of SPF 30 sells for $10.99. allterrainco.com

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HObie Oasis Kayak

Hobie has been building versatile kayaks since the 1990s, and they keep getting better. The company’s redesigned Oasis model now comes in a tandem version that can accommodate two, but is easily driven by one. The Oasis measures nearly 15 feet long and weighs 550 pounds. It has quick acceleration, excellent tracking and maintains good hull speed with minimal effort. There are two high-backed seats for lumbar support, two-piece paddles that store on the hull when you want your hands free, and three hatches and two mesh pockets for stowage. With the dual steering controls, stowable rudder and two patented Mirage Drives, the Oasis packs a lot of activities into one platform. But the best part? Like many Hobie models, you can accessorize the Oasis with a sail kit for downwind sailing, add a livewell for fishing, and even take it easy with the eVolve electric motor by Torqeedo. You can paddle, peddle, sail or fish, and it comes in a choice of five colors. The Oasis retails for $2,699. hobie.com

fUll tHROttle Water Sports Gloves

ZUZANA PROCHAZKA is a U.S. Coast Guard 100 Ton Master with 20 years boating experience. Her work has appeared in numerous national boating magazines, and she authors a popular gear and boat review blog, TalkOfTheDock.com.

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Wakeboarding and waterskiing are fun, but hard on the hands. Gloves are key, and Full Throttle, an Absolute Outdoors brand, has a pair of performance gloves that won’t break the bank. The Full Throttle G110 gloves feature a reinforced, dual layered palm, raised grip for better holding power and are adjustable with turn-back straps and a secure hook-andloop closure. New gloves can be tough to break in, but the G110s stretch easily and are pre-curved, so they’re comfortable right out of the box. The G110s retail for $27 and come in sizes from small to extra-large. absoluteoutdoorinc.com 11 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

corke board

Trailer TLC

A little maintenance goes a long way. BY MAR K COR KE

T

hose of us with small boats seldom give thought to the trailer we tow behind our cars. We hitch it up and expect it to perform flawlessly. Many trailers sit for weeks or months untouched, and during that time issues can develop. Typically, the trailer works fine; but breakdowns aren’t uncommon—and a little care before hitting the road can save a lot of hassles.

Visual inspection Whether you’re going across town or across the country, walk around the trailer and make a visual check. Are the tires in good shape and correctly inflated? If they appear soft, stop at the gas station and check the pressure. There should be no cracks in the side walls of the tires; storing the trailer with the wheels removed or at least chocked up clear of the ground will do much to prolong their life.

Treads Check that the trailer tires have sufficient tread. Insert a penny into the treads; if Lincoln’s head disappears, then the tires have sufficient tread left. While looking at the wheels, make sure that all wheel nuts are in place and correctly tightened. This is especially important if the trailer was stored with its wheels removed during the winter months. If the hub is fitted with a grease cup, remove it and make sure there is sufficient grease; a dry-running hub will overheat and potentially lead to bearing failure.

Safety cables Should the unthinkable happen (i.e. the trailer separates from the tow vehicle on the road), ensure the trailer stays connected to the vehicle via safety chain or cables. These should crisscross under the hitch. With the trailer lights plugged in, ask someone to help you operate the

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turn signals, rear and brake lights while you check to make sure they are in proper working order. Replace any defective bulbs. Check that the license plate is attached to the vehicle (the one pictured is hanging by a piece of thin rope; ideally, it should be bolted on properly).

Tie down Finally (and most importantly), make sure the boat is secured properly and tied down to the trailer. The winch is okay for securing the bow, but the rear of the boat should also be strapped down. I’ve lost count of the amount of times that I have been passed on the highway by a large boat on a trailer, and the only thing holding the two together is the winch attached to the bow eye. This is very dangerous for several reasons. If the towing vehicle has to swerve or stop in a hurry, the boat can become detached from the trailer. Secondly, the u-bolt at the front of the boat isn’t designed to carry the amount of stress to which it is subjected. Also, an unsecured boat on a trailer can bounce up and down independently of the trailer; if the trailer has rollers the point loadings will be tremendous, and damage to the boat is a distinct possibility.

Road test When you’re satisfied that all’s well and you’re set to head out on the road, don't forget to raise the trailer jack and release the handbrake. Take it easy, though; remember with the trailer on the back, you’ll be at least twice the length of the car alone. Allow more time for stopping, turning and over-taking. Pull over after a couple miles of driving and place a hand on the wheel hubs, which should all be the same temperature. If one is noticeably hotter than another, it could mean there is insufficient grease in the bearing, or that a brake is binding on. Investigate and rectify the deficiency before proceeding further. 

Mark Corke is an accomplished journalist, author and sailor and creator of the popular blog onboardwithmarkcorke.com, focusing on various DIY boating projects.

PHOTOS BY MARK CORKE

electronics

A Long Way From Home

Trust Vesper Marine to get you to port safe and sound. BY TOM THOM PSON

I

’ve met many interesting people in my years writing for Lakeland Boating, but a particularly unique story surfaced during a product demo for a new line of Automatic Identification System (AIS) gear. That’s when I first met New Englander Jeff Robbins. Jeff was born in Connecticut and eventually made his way west to Colorado and Seattle, working in the technology sector before he and his wife, Deirdre, decided to sell all their worldly possessions and sail off into the sunset. In the seven years that followed, the two would travel halfway around the world, adventuring on the high seas and visiting exotic ports of call. They established New Zealand as a temporary base in the Pacific Rim. Its inviting nature and laid-back culture ultimately lead them to select it as their new home. While sailing the seas on their Nordic 40 sailboat, Vesper, Jeff and Deirdre experienced both the pleasures and perils of sailing. Using their technological backgrounds to enhance their own safety, they fashioned a device that would allow them to track and plot the course of big ships to avoid collisions. Word spread of their gadget, and people started asking the couple to build one for them. The proverbial light bulb went on in their heads, and Vesper Marine was born. Today, Vesper Marine sells three versions of its AIS WatchMate, providing varying levels of functionality combined with one of the most intuitive and innovative AIS presentations on the market. The 850 model, which recently received FCC type approval, has a built-in transponder for two-way communication. The 750 is a

receive-only model, and the 670 is a display that can be used with an external receiver or transponder. Jeff explained the units are designed to make sense of AIS information clutter. Vesper WatchMates can filter out non-priority targets and only show vessels that may be on a collision course. They also use minimal power, so they can be left on all the time—an important feature for sailboats. Jeff explained that after setup, the AIS WatchMate is easy to use. “It’s like a smoke detector,” he said. You can take his word. WatchMate has taken him a long way from home. VESPERMARINE.COM 

GEONAV: UP-AND-COMER Although the Geonav brand has been popular in Europe for some time now, it’s a relatively new, up-and-coming player in the North American marine electronics market. Johnson Marine, the company that owns Geonav, as well as the Humminbird and Minn Kota brands, is promoting a range of products including a pair of multi-function displays, side imaging sonar and an autopilot. The Geonav GIS 10 and GIS 12 have bright color displays, 10 and 12 inches respectively. They feature built-in 2kW dual frequency fishfinders with side imaging capability. The displays interface with either NMEA 0183 or NMEA 2000 data and have Ethernet, video and USB ports, as well as an SD memory card slot. What really sets them apart, however, is that they read either Navionics or C-MAP cartography. HD Ethernet radar is an optional accessory. The Geonav GSC 110 Autopilot control head can be mated with a matching multiinstrument display that includes wind, speed and temperature data, as well as fuel flow rate. GEONAVMARINE.COM 13 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

the chandlery

Get Out, Get Active Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got the gear to get you up and moving this boating season.

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PHOTO DEVON STEPHENS

PARTY PLATFORM

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the chandlery

What better way to get in shape than diving and swimming off your boat’s swim platform. Don’t have one? Swim Platforms Inc. will custom make a

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SAFETY FIRST

The only thing more important than having fun is being safe. The Extreme Paddlesport Vest from Stearns is specifically

platform to fit your boat. They add more useable space onboard, not to mention more value and more fun! $1,095 & up SWIMPLATFORMS.COM

designed for kayakers, canoers and other watersports enthusiasts. Key features include a short cut and large armholes for maximum movement and zipper pockets to stow valuables. Multiple sizes available. $59.99 DEFENDER.COM

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GLOW IN THE DARK

Keep the fun going into the wee hours of the night. The FLIR First Mate lets you navigate with confidence anywhere, anytime. The world’s first waterproof, handheld, high-performance maritime thermal night vision camera gives every mariner the power

EXTREME FUN

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to see in the dark. $2,999 TECHNICALMARINE.COM

Flex those muscles atop the Aqua Extreme Wakeboard from Full Throttle, an Absolute Outdoors brand. The Aqua Extreme provides easy riding for novices and experts alike. Features include defined channels that run from tip to nose for increased stability and control; a small, beveled edge for forgiving landings; and a step cap for lightweight, faster performance. $229.99 FULLTHROTTLEWATERSPORTS.COM

LET’S BOUNCE > Waboba (short for Water Bouncing Ball) is a Lycra-covered rubber ball that can actually bounce on water. How fun is that! Choose from the Extreme Ball or the yellow BLAST model, which is designed primarily for pool-side use. There’s also a Pro version and a new multi-sided Street Ball, which will be available this spring. $8.99 WABOBA.COM 15 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

boat test

Princess 42 Flybridge An American beauty built in the United Kingdom. by b i ng o â&#x20AC;&#x2122; m eara

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boat test

phOTOs COurTEsy Of prINCEss yAChTs

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boat test

I

n 1995, Viking Yacht Company formed a strategic alliance with Princess Yachts International, builder of luxury yachts in the United Kingdom. David King, founder of Princess, represented the ideal partner for brothers Bill and Bob Healey, founders of Viking. Their goal was to deliver the best combination of performance, quality and luxury in a class of cruising yachts designed for the American market. Viking brought Princess creations to its home plant in New Gretna, New Jersey, and outfitted them for the North American market. These Princess products are graced with the tag line: Delivered with the Viking Difference. Both companies remained under private ownership until 2008, when Princess was acquired by LVMH, a French holding company that describes itself as having “a unique portfolio of prestigious brands.” This portfolio includes Louis Vuitton, Moet, Hennessy, Dior Watches, Dom Perignon, DeBeers, Fendi—a total of 60 names that most Lakeland Boating readers would recognize. I made the one-hour drive from Chicago down to Seneca, Illinois, where Spring Brook Marina had the new Princess 42 Flybridge ready to sell. My January walk-through showed just how exquisite this yacht is, inside and out.

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The design provides for an interior more spacious than one would expect on a 42-foot yacht. She sleeps four people in two staterooms, each with its own head. The master stateroom forward is roomy and includes a generous en-suite head with submarine shower. The guest stateroom is starboard and has two twin beds; its attached head also is accessible from the passageway to the master stateroom, making it the day head. The galley is portside, with the dinette perched a couple of steps up on the salon level—well within reach to pass food from the prep area to the dining area. Well-appointed, the galley can produce the most sophisticated of menus that you and your guests may desire. Sit on the U-shaped sofa to dine at the table; a loveseat to port can seat two additional diners. A party of eight could comfortably enjoy a meal here. The main helm area has dual helm seats, each covered in soft, brown leather with a gloss walnut back. The console is well laid-out, with everything you need for safe passage. The helm-area ceiling is raised, welcoming to the tallest of people. The entire salon area is bright and airy; a brightness the cream-colored leather furniture further enhances. Wood throughout is the same warm, beautifully grained gloss walnut as the backs of the helm seats. The aft salon door is an engineering marvel. Made of tinted glass, it folds accordion-like, allowing it to open two-thirds of the way. When fully open, the salon, in effect, extends to the aft deck, doubling the area for entertaining. Teak on the broad swim platform, bridge, aft deck and walkways adds to the balance and beauty of this elegant yacht. A safety detail that enhances the aesthetic lines of the ship are the beefy 11/2-inch bow rails and grab rails that are generously located wherever potentially needed. The flybridge, accessed up portside steps from the aft deck, is quite spacious, and this helm also has dual chairs. This is a nice area to enjoy at the marina or on the lakes, too, with a convertible sun pad and table with a wraparound sofa. The engine room is under the aft deck and easily accessible through a large hatch. Here are housed the twin Caterpillar C7 diesel engines, each kicking out 455-hp. Company data shows the top speed of this yacht is 32 knots, and she cruises nicely at 26 to 28 knots. Gorgeous and eye-catching, the Princess 42 Flybridge Motor Yacht packs a lot of amenities into a 42-foot ship, without compromising the kind of space a cruising couple would like to have on any boat. If you’re in the market for an elegant, luxury motoryacht in the 40-foot-plus category, the Princess 42 Flybridge has to be on your list! r

The Princess 42 Flybridge Motor Yacht features a bright, open, airy salon and comfortable, roomy staterooms (opposite). The boat’s galley (above) is to port and easily within reach of the main dining area—a key convenience while entertaining guests on board.

Princess 42 FB MY As Equipped Bow thruster (80kgf/176lbf); 24v DC/240v AC electrical system; 240v shore power w/ 60-amp float battery charger; dual station (ds) remote control electric anchor winch; ds electric trim tabs w/ indicators; ds VHF w/ DSC R/T w/ intercom; ds speed and distance log; ds echo sounder w/ alarm; ds autopilot; remote control searchlight; microwave/oven/grill combo; cocktail cabinet; flybridge top loading coolbox; electric quietflush toilets; CD/radio; flybridge sunbed and cushions; triple opening stainless steel-framed salon doors; transom door; hot and cold transom shower; cockpit night cover.

Specifications Viking Sport Cruisers distributes Princess Yachts through two dealerships in the Great Lakes region: EaStErn GrEat LakES Jefferson Beach Yacht Sales 866-490-JBYS | jbys.com WEStErn GrEat LakES Spring Brook Marina 815-357-8666 | springbrookmarina.com

LOA: 44'3" Beam: 13'7" Draft: 3'7" Weight: 30,864 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 360 gals. Water Capacity: 120 gals. Power: Caterpillar C7 Acert dsls 455-hp MSRP: $1,059,800 princessyachts.com

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Treasure

All-AmericAn

The fight to save the SS United States gets a major boost. by Colleen H. Troupis

AS AmericAn AS the SS UniTed STaTeS.” it may not roll off the tongue as easily as “apple pie,” but it’s just as fitting, if not more so. From its name to its place in U.S. maritime history, the SS United States truly is an American classic. in recent years, the survival of this majestic ship, which holds the record for the fastest transatlantic voyage and currently is docked in Philadelphia, has been in jeopardy. recent efforts to sell the SS United States—intact—have failed, and the threat of a sale to scrappers loomed. But preservationists and one generous philanthropist fought to ensure the ship’s survival.

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Dreams of the Young William francis gibbs fell in love with ships as a young boy. But it’s a rare few who can leave their mark on the sea the way he did. “When my grandfather was a little boy, his family had a summer house on the Jersey shore,” says granddaughter susan gibbs, president of the ss United States Conservancy, an organization dedicated to preserving the ship. “he watched these great european ocean liners head into and out of new York harbor, and he just fell in love.” he pursued that love his whole life, designing thousands of ships, including some 5,000 during World War II alone— about 70 percent of the marine tonnage built during that war. that experience gave gibbs the valuable knowledge and experience he would need for the ss United States, his ultimate achievement. “the ss United States drew upon all of the innovations that were devised during World War II,” gibbs says. “It wasn’t just a luxury cruise liner; it also was a convertible troop ship and Cold War asset.” Indeed, although construction on the ship did not begin until 1950, the cost was largely subsidized by the u.s. government on the condition that it could be quickly converted into a wartime vessel capable of carrying 14,000 troops. gibbs was happy to oblige. When the “Big u” set off on its maiden voyage from new York on July 3, 1952, he was on board. he was still there three days, 10 hours and 40 minutes later when it reached Bishop rock, england—breaking the world record by more than 10 hours at an average speed of 35.59 knots. several days later, the ship left to head back west and set a record for that trip as well. Both records still stand today.

phOTOs COurTEsy Of jOE rOTA

In her heyday, the SS United States (pictured in Southampton, England, opposite, in 1955) was a ship to the stars. She entertained the likes of celebrities such as hopalong cassidy and his wife (opposite bottom) and Judy Garland (top), among many others. Joe rota (pictured above and below) spent four years as a crew member aboard the SS United States and is now a major part of the movement to see her restored.

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Learn more To learn more about the SS United States and find out how you can contribute to the Conservancy’s efforts, visit ssunitedstatesconservancy.org/SSUS/Home.html.

GLORY DAYS Today, the SS United States sits in Philadelphia, in a state of disrepair irreconcilable with her glamorous past. The SS United States Conservancy purchased the ship in 2010 and plans to see she’s eventually restored to her former glory.

The SS United States’ maiden voyage may have been the ship’s defining moment, but she crossed the Atlantic many more times over the next 17 years, transporting movie stars, European royalty, even four U.S. presidents. Through it all, William Francis Gibbs’ enthusiasm for the ship never waned. “He would call the ship every single day while it was at sea,” Gibbs says. “And not only would he be the first one on the ship when it docked, he would have his driver take him over to Brooklyn [New York] so he could be the first to see it coming over the horizon.” Conservancy board member Joe Rota spent four years as a crew member aboard the ship, doing jobs including first-class elevator operator, radio bell boy, waiter and ship photographer. “I’m from a small town in New Jersey,” says Rota, 77. “It was amazing to be in an elevator, the door opens and Burt Lancaster or Judy Garland is standing there.” Rota once had the pleasure of delivering telegrams to President Truman’s stateroom. “He was a delightful man,” he recalls. “If we passed each other on the deck, he’d say, ‘Hello Joe, how’s New Jersey today?’ “It was a fascinating place to work. It was immaculate, and the food was incredible. And it was fast.” The other ships in the United States Lines’ fleet, he says, traveled at 24 or 25 knots, while the SS United States did 32 cruising and 44 on her speed trials. “Her maximum speed was never known,” he says. But as passenger jet travel took off in the 1960s, the demand for crossing the Atlantic by sea declined. In 1969, United States Lines withdrew the SS United States from passenger service.

A PLACE IN THE WORLD Ownership changed hands several times in subsequent years. One developer bought it in the 1980s, hoping to turn it into a time-share cruise ship. At one point the ship was transferred to Europe for asbestos removal. It arrived back in the U.S. in 1996, docking in Philadelphia. In 2003, Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) purchased the ship 22 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

with the intent to retrofit it and put it into service in Hawaii. When those plans fell through, however, the Big U was again in trouble. “NCL had been paying the rather hefty maintenance and dockages fees every month for the ship,” Gibbs says. “They listed it for sale in 2009. We worked with them to stipulate that it would be sold to a domestic purchaser and for nonscrap.” By early 2010, however, a buyer still had not emerged. NCL and its parent company, Genting Hong Kong, had to sell. This time, they opened it up to bids from scrappers. “The Conservancy went wild at that point,” Rota says. “We made all the contacts we could; we got on TV and in the newspapers.” “Then our kind-of white knight came in,” Gibbs says, referring to H.F. “Gerry” Lenfest, a Philadelphia philanthropist whose dad it is believed helped design the watertight door system for the ship. In June, Lenfest pledged $5.8 million in support of the ship. That number includes $3 million to buy the ship and the cost to maintain it for some 20 months, while it’s being redeveloped.

WHAT’S NEXT Today, the Conservancy is working with the Environmental Protection Agency to negotiate a safe remediation plan, before the title is officially transferred. “The ship is completely gutted, and a number of the hazardous materials are gone, which is fantastic,” Gibbs says. “But there are some PCBs aboard the ship. We’re working to ensure the plans for the refit are done in an environmentally appropriate manner.” “The physical work of refitting the ship could take a year or more,” explains Dan McSweeney, executive director of the Conservancy. “The cost will depend on the mix of uses that emerges, but estimates range from $200 to $350 million.” That mix may include hotel, retail, dining, entertainment, meeting and educational space, spread over some 600,000 square feet. “A big part of the program will be a Conservancyadministered museum,” McSweeney adds. It will likely sit in a bustling waterfront city, such as New York or Philadelphia, a la the Queen Mary in Long Beach, California. “We are being very diligent in ensuring we understand the local community perspectives, as we very much want to offer a mutually beneficial and acceptable redevelopment plan for the ship and its new setting,” McSweeney says. Once that site is selected, the SS United States will be on its way to being restored to its former glory. As Gibbs says, “It will save this ship for future generations.”  PHOTO BY CHRIS WOODS

towboats roundup

LIVIN’ ON THE Wakeboarding and waterskiing combine athleticism, individual style and pure, unadulterated excitement to provide just about as much fun as a body should be allowed to have on the water. Today’s boats not only tow these skiers and boarders with aplomb; they also provide a comfortable ride and ample amenities for family and friends—whether they’re waiting their turn on the rope or just along for the ride.

Bayliner 215BR

Chaparral 204 Xtreme

Cobalt 242WSS

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 20'6" Draft .................................................................................................................... 3'11" Weight capacity .................................................................................................. N/A Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 37 gals. Seating capacity.........................................................................................9 people Base power ................................................................ 220 Mercury MPI/A1 4.3L Base price ...................................................................................................$29,661 Website ................................................................................................. bayliner.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 20'6" Draft ........................................................................................................................23" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 1,400 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 35 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 10 people Base power ...................................................Mercury 5.0 MPI DTS B3 260-hp Base price ...................................................................................................$57,283 Website ....................................................................................chaparralboats.com

LOA ...................................................................................................................25'11" Draft ........................................................................................................................37" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 2,250 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 50 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 13 people Base power .......................................................................................................... N/A Base price ...................................................................................................$87,943 Website ..........................................................................................cobaltboats.com

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towboats roundup

NAME GAME

HERE & THERE This is a photo of our 1988 Sea Ray 268 Sundancer. The name pretty much sums up our boating travels.

Glastron Bowrider GLS 215

Malibu Wakesetter 247 LSV

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 21'4" Draft .................................................................................................................... 16.5" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 1,475 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 34 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 10 people Base power ......................................................... 5.0 GXiC Volvo Penta 270-hp Base price ...............................................................................$36,988 (w/ trailer) Website ................................................................................................ glastron.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 24'7" Draft ........................................................................................................................27" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 2,400 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 84 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 17 people Base power ....................................................................................................410-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website .........................................................................................malibuboats.com

MasterCraft X-25

Rinker Captiva 226 BR

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 21'5" Draft ........................................................................................................................28" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 2,440 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 53 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 16 people Base power ..................................................................................Indmar RTP 5.7L Base price ...................................................................................................$75,700 Website ...........................................................................................mastercraft.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 23'6" Draft ........................................................................................................................36" Weight capacity .................................................................................................. N/A Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 42 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 10 people Base power ........................................................ MerCruiser 5.0 MPI A Catalyst Base price ...................................................................................................$43,450 Website ...........................................................................................rinkerboats.com

Sea Ray 230 SLX Fission

Stingray 208LR Sport Deck Bowrider

LOA ......................................................................................................................... 23' Draft .......................................................................................................................2'2" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 1,400 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 50 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 10 people Base power ........................................ MerCruiser 350 MAG Bravo III W/DTS Base price ............................................................................................................ N/A Website ................................................................................................... searay.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 20'8" Draft ........................................................................................................................34" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 1,715 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 35 gals. Seating capacity.........................................................................................9 people Base power ................................................... Volvo Penta 4.3L GXI 225-hp SX Base price ...................................................................................................$32,517 Website ........................................................................... stingrayboats.com/208lr

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Colby Smith Stoughton, WI

HIGH EXPECTATIONS My boss constantly used the phrase, “My expectations are that…” I couldn’t stand it. When I bought this boat new in 2004, I couldn’t think of anything better than High Expectations. Conversely, the dinghy is named Low Expectations. Jim Radyko Macomb, MI

PLANE 2 SEA Here is a picture of our beloved 1992 Sea Ray 270 Weekender, Plane 2 Sea. We have an aircraft electronics and flying business, and after flying we’re all about heading out on the boat! Just a quick additional note: The dingy is called Off-plane. Mark R. Evans Traverse City, MI

towboats roundup CANINE CREWMEMBER This is Capt. Bosley at the helm of his favorite place: Our Sea Ray. His crew is Donna and Duane Swank. He is an 18-month-old, 78-pound (and growing!) Chow on his first boat trip to the North Channel. Turns out he was the most photographed dog up there—and he loves his Tilley hat! He’s taking a break from his show-dog career to visit his friend at the North Channel Yacht Club. Bosley loves to travel ashore in the dinghy to explore the wonderful Canadian islands.

Supra Launch 242

Donna Swank | Ocala, FL

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 24'1" Draft ........................................................................................................................26" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 2,400 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 68 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 17 people Base power ................................................................ Indmar Assault V8 325-hp Base price ...................................................................................................$74,900 Website ...........................................................................................supraboats.com

Supreme Towboats v226 Supreme LOA ..................................................................................................................... 22'6" Draft ........................................................................................................................28" Weight capacity ...................................................................................... 2,350 lbs. Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 45 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 15 people Base power ................................................................ MerCruiser 350 DTS CAT Base price ...................................................................................................$65,995 Website .......................................................................................... skisupreme.com

Tahoe Q8 SSi LOA ..................................................................................................................... 21’8” Draft ........................................................................................................................24” Weight capacity .................................................................................................. N/A Fuel capacity ................................................................................................ 54 gals. Seating capacity...................................................................................... 10 people Base power .......................................................................................................... N/A Base price ............................................................................................................ N/A Website ................................................................................. tahoesportboats.com 25 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

WINTERY

WONDER ON THE

GREAT LAKES story an d photog raphy by r ichar d thom pson

The phenomenon of winter on the Great Lakes is breathtakingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth braving the cold to experience up-close and personal. Each year during the frigid winter months, the lakeshores are transformed into wintery white worlds full of splendor and beauty. Along the frozen shores, wayfarers will encounter scenery sure to amaze. Bitter cold wind and gelid water shape frosty dunes extending hundreds of yards offshore. Icy shelves give way to vast expanses of pack ice. Cracks and crevasses expose currents flowing beneath the crust. Wind-sheared ice forms exquisite crystalline sculptures, and wind-blown snow accumulates in shapely drifts. The wintery shores of the Great Lakes are dynamic environments continually in flux and constantly revealing strange new visions. The lakes themselves play a significant role in weather conditions across the region. Lake-effect snow and wind create stormy periods of precipitation along the leeward shores. Snowbound beaches heave ice and sedimentary debris. Ice-rimed piers drip with icicles. Miles of crushed ice clutter shores in disarray. The onslaught of winter in the snow belt regions conjures fantastic scenes that challenge visual perceptions. Come late January, winter briefly relents as temperatures slightly rise. Vast stretches of melting sheet ice create thinly glazed, mirror-like surfaces. Fractured ice floes and drifting ice stalk open water, and unusual ice deformations bewilder the eyes before surrendering to some of the coldest winter days in February. Wintertime on the Great Lakes can be both fascinating and frightful, and commands admiration and respect for all its brumal beauty. For adventurous souls and pioneering spirits alike, the thrill and excitement of a winter wonderland awaits discovery.

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a decaying ice foot incrusts a row of timber pilings frozen in the surface of Lake huron at dawn in the bitter-cold month of march.

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Shards of ice lay strewn like panes of broken glass under the immense stresses of Lake Erie in the frigid wake of the January thaw. across the glassy water some 40 miles off, the plume of industry wakes to the pastel colors of dawn. 29 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

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a fragile skin of lake ice buckles and heaves on a rocky perimeter of the Lake Erie shore gleaming beneath a luminous dawn sky in December.

About the photogrApher: Michigan photographer Richard Thompson continues his pursuit of scenic beauty along the shores of the Great Lakes throughout the year. For additional information and to view more of his work, visit richardthompsonphotography.com.

PHOTOs By rICHArD THOMPsON PHOTOGrAPHy / rICHArDTHOMPsONPHOTOGrAPHy.COM

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chris clark of Birmingham, michigan, races in the DN Gold cup World championships in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

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PHOTOS BY GrETCHEN DOrIAN PHOTOGrAPHY / GrETCHENDOrIAN.COM

need for speed Ice yachting is one of the Great Lakes region’s best-kept secrets. by e lizab eth altick

B

aby, it’s cold outside! And the lake is still frozen. What’s a sailor to do? Go sailing, of course! One of winter sports’ best-kept secrets is an obsession among a dedicated group of Great Lakes boaters. It is probably the fastest sport on ice, arguably faster than bobsleds or luge. Imagine lying on your back, four inches above the ice, skimming along at breakneck speeds up to 140 mph. That’s ice yachting, a.k.a. hard-water sailing, and you can get your thrills and chills on inland lakes throughout the Upper Midwest. And if you think that ice boating is just an off-season substitute for wet-water boating, think again. Some aficionados resort to warm-weather sailing just to keep in shape for the days when the north wind blows. “It’s a hoot! ,” exclaims Randy Johnson, commodore of Gull Lake Ice Yacht Club near Kalamazoo, Michigan, the first such club in the Midwest, founded more than a century ago. Having enjoyed the sport for more than 50 years, Johnson says, “There is little, if anything, I would rather do in the winter than race across a frozen lake.” 33 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

Ice yachting’s origins date back to the Netherlands in the 1600s. Today, the sport enjoys worldwide popularity, and the Great Lakes plays host to several ice yachting championship events.

Jack Jacobs, who lives on Elk Lake in northern Michigan, turns 70 on his next birthday and has been an ice boater since he was four. “You can go as fast as you can stand. It’s all about acceleration and adrenaline. But you don’t have to be a speed jockey. Some people just like to sightsee around the edge of the lake. Our group sails just for fun.”

ICE YACHTING ORIGINS Ice boating originated in the 1600s to transport goods on the frozen canals of the Netherlands. Dutch immigrants brought the pastime to New York, where they raced ice boats on the Hudson River, trying to outpace locomotives steaming by on the riverbanks. Early ice boats were simply boxes on blades, catamaranstyle. They have since evolved into sleek, quiet, graceful speed demons. DN ice yachts, named for a boat-building competition sponsored by the Detroit News in 1936, are the most popular. Small, light and relatively inexpensive, DNs carry 60 square feet of sail. This is the only design that offers international racing, with active fleets throughout Europe and Russia. Special DN sail designs and related equipment are available through Traverse City, Michiganbased Bluewater Sail & Canvas (bluewatersail.net).

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Renegade has been a winner and trend-setter since 1947. The two-seat Nite debuted in 1976, and The Skeeter is the “Formula One” of ice yachting, a wide-open development class and the fastest boat on the ice. Many ice boaters build their own boats. Jacobs designed the J14 and offers free plans through his website, elklakeiceboating.com, where you’ll find everything you’ll ever want to know about ice boating, including helpful forums, photos, videos—even a live Elk Lake “ice boating cam.”

HOW FAST? REALLY, REALLY FAST! Ice boats, depending on design and class, will reach speeds up to five times the wind velocity, thanks to the low friction between the runners and the ice and sail shape. DNs achieves speeds of 50 to 60 mph, while the class A Skeeters reach speeds well over 100 mph. To determine which boats were fastest, the Kalamazoo Ice Yacht Club hosted the first regatta to compete for the Stewart and Hearst trophies on Gull Lake in 1904, and the DN World Cup took place in 1973, where Randy Johnson came in second. Ron Sherry, who has won the world championship four times, and Matt Struble, another world champ, also hail from Michigan.

PHOTOS BY GrETCHEN DOrIAN PHOTOGrAPHY / GrETCHENDOrIAN.COM

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You don’t have to be young and fit to ice boat, but it helps to have a strong upper body. When racing, you lie back in the boat, steering its front skate while holding the sheet line with both arms. Recreational ice boats allow you to sit up, taking pressure off the neck. It’s recommended that novices purchase a DN, join a local club and sail a few seasons before they consider changing classes.

Skeeter sailor Jordan Glaser raises the mast on his boat, No Fear, in the early morning light on Lake Winnebago.

New Sails Service & Repair Rigging Furling Systems Sailing Accessories Hull Covers Mast Covers Plank Covers Runner Bags

JOIN THE FUN Ice boats range in cost from a few hundred dollars for an un-classified, home-built model to $60,000 for a championship A Skeeter. Between the $200 beater and the multi-thousand-dollar championship contender are many boats that can be had from around $2,500 to $7,500. Everything you want to know about ice yachting is found on the Jacobs’ website, elklakeiceboating.com. Also visit Four Lakes Ice Yacht Club, iceboat.org, gullakeiyc.org, and many others for additional information. 

www.bluewatersail.net Bill Buchbinder Tom Babel Dave Gerber Patrick Gerber Bob Clark

10531 E. Carter Rd. Traverse City, MI 49684 231-941-5224

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Thrill ride

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Great Lakes powerboat racing primer and season preview. STORY BY M ICHAE L HAU E N STE I N

or a sport that traces its roots back more than a century, powerboat racing remains relatively unheralded in the sports world. Even setting aside ball-and-stick sports, other motorsports far outpace boat racing in terms of general public awareness, from cars to motorcycles to, as some boat racers like to say only half jokingly, barstool racing. Though less than a decade younger than automobile racing, it lags in popularity while upstart motorsports—many carrying the certified “extreme” tag—gobble up TV exposure. But if the powerboat racing community is small, it’s equally as passionate and dedicated, each summer holding hundreds of officially sanctioned races across the country and around the world. What follows is a look inside this exhilarating, compelling sport. From the self-professed “excessive” size and speed of Unlimited hydroplanes and offshore super boats to the grassroots of Junior Class outboard racing, “circle boats” have a lot to offer. A celebration of excess

Unlimited hydroplanes might be the most-recognized category of powerboat racing. Much of this publicity is thanks to the sinceretired Miss Budweiser, the iconic red hydroplane featured in a handful of national ad campaigns over the years for Budweiser beer.

&

PHOTOG RAPY BY PAU L KE M I E L

Dave Villwock drove Miss Budweiser from 1997 until its retirement in 2004. The 56-year-old from Auburn, Washington, has continued racing—and winning—since then. “Unlimited racing really is a celebration of excess,” says Villwock. “Everything about them is big—it’s excessive—and that’s what’s really secured their future: People are still compelled to watch them.” Indeed, the boats measure 28 feet in length, with a 14-foot beam and displacing 6,500 pounds. Villwock describes an Unlimited hydroplane as “four times the size of an Indy car.” For power, hydroplanes are fitted with a turbine engine from a Chinook helicopter that produces between 3,000- and 4,000-hp. Villwock holds the top speed record for an Unlimited hydroplane at 230 mph. He’ll regularly see 205 mph in competition. Of course, he didn’t get to the top all at once. “Super Dave” has been racing powerboats for 40 years, starting out in smaller inboard classes before moving up to the Unlimited class in 1988. He is the winningest living driver in the sport’s history, tied with the late Bill Muncey at 62 wins. A typical hydroplane race consists of four heats in a day. However, the Union of International Motorboating (UIM) World Championship and the American Power Boat Association (APBA) Gold Cup race each require additional heats with more laps, too.

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The Gold Cup race is traditionally held in Detroit, home of the 107-year-old APBA (apba-racing.com). “It’s a very difficult race to win,” says Villwock. “It’s longer, and there are a lot more ways to lose it than to win it,” he says. In 2010, Villwock swept the Gold Cup in Detroit and the World Championship held in Doha, Qatar—fittingly, Villwock is sponsored by the country of Qatar. The 2011 H1 Unlimited season should see hydroplanes back at historical race venues such as the Madison Regatta in Madison, Indiana; the Gold Cup in Detroit; and races on the Pacific coast from Seattle to San Diego, before again shipping the fleet of huge race boats overseas. The limited inboard classes race from coast to coast in the U.S. and Canada each year. Classes range from inboard hydroplanes to flatbottoms and other runabouts— including a pair of throwbacks: the Crackerbox “flyers” and the rather unpredictable Jersey Speed Skiff lapstrake runabouts, both complete with ride-along mechanic, are fan favorites. Offshore racing

Only one type of race boat is more “unlimited” than the Unlimiteds: The offshore go-fast powerboat. The catamarans and monohulls can measure up to 50 feet in length and weigh more than 5 tons, are powered by a variety of engine combinations—from production gasoline sterndrives to turbines and other exotic powerplants—and the fastest classes can reach speeds more than 150 mph in competition. And in 2011 they’re coming to a Great Lake near you. The Third Annual Great Lakes Grand Prix is scheduled for August 2-7 in Michigan City, Indiana.

chris Fairchild wins the 23rd annual river roar on the Saginaw river in Bay city, michigan, in his Formula One tunnel boat (top). racers compete in the stock outboard runabout marathon class on the Detroit river in Trenton, michigan (bottom).

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“It’s a good and exciting race,” says Rodrick Cox, marketing director for the long-running offshore race series Super Boat International. “We’re bringing some of the biggest and fastest boats around.” The Michigan City race has practically turned into a week-long event, he says, with pre-race activities such as a parade and street party leading up to race weekend. The 2010 race drew an estimated 100,000 spectators, according to figures from the LaPorte County Convention and Visitors Bureau. Spectators line Washington Park Beach in Michigan City—about 60 miles from Chicago. “There’s a good spectator’s view all the way up and down the beach,” says Cox. A large spectator fleet of recreational boats lines the Lake Michigan course, too. “This year we anticipate a very good turnout with boats and teams,” says Cox. “The teams really enjoy the hospitality of the Michigan City area, and they enjoy racing up and down the beach, with a turn right in front of the lighthouse.” Additional offshore powerboat races are held by the Offshore Super Series, including a race in conjunction with the APBA Gold Cup in Detroit. Formula One racing

“Fifty laps in the boat is one of the few things in the world that I do for me and no one else,” Chris Fairchild says of his involvement in powerboat racing. Fairchild, 41, is a residential contractor and marine engine rebuilder from Paw Paw, Illinois. He races what’s commonly referred to as a “tunnel boat,” a 17-foot catamaran powered by a single 380-hp outboard and considered the Formula One of powerboat racing. “It’s the hardest-turning vehicle on Earth—the acceleration and the g-forces are the best, bar none, that I’ve experienced,” says Fairchild. The 1,150-pound rigs

reach top speeds of 135 mph in competition, and measure 6 Gs as they snap through the tight turns on a typical race course. Tunnel boats, like the limited and Unlimited hydroplane classes, ride on a cushion of air “trapped” beneath the hull, but the tunnel boat’s sponsons run the entire length of the hull and, coupled with hydraulic engine trim, produce impressive turning speeds. The 20-year veteran races not only throughout the United States but internationally, too—he’s raced everywhere from the Middle East to a grueling 24-hour race on the River Seine in Rouen, France. Through racing, he’s tested new outboard technology for Mercury Marine, including development of next-generation

Photographer Paul Kemiel (kneeling) experiences the ride of a lifetime in a Formula One tunnel boat on the Kankakee river at the OPc Nationals in Kankakee, Illinois, alongside champion driver chris Fairchild (seated in the cockpit).

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OptiMax low-emission outboards. He and others in the racing community are helping to push powerboat racing into the 21st century. The 2011 season will find Fairchild racing in the North American F1 powerboat series with a tour stop in Bay City, Michigan; a world championship regatta in Trenton, Michigan; and the APBA national championships in Kankakee, Illinois, which are held on the Kankakee River over Labor Day weekend. The APR Powerboat Superleague, another major tunnel boat series which runs Formula 2 and Formula 3 class boats, will host races from Pittsburgh to Memphis and everywhere in between in 2011. For a detailed description of all tunnel boat classes, visit opcrace.com. “There’s definitely a future for [tunnel boat racing] because it’s a unique sport that can be put into small rivers or large lakes, and it doesn’t require a track built,” says Fairchild. “If a town wants it and they have a waterfront, we can make it happen.” Alcohol-burning outboards

The Professional Racing Outboard (PRO) category is the descendent of the oldest form of outboard racing in the U.S. It comprises small-displacement outboards that run on methyl alcohol mixed with castor oil, from which it derives the nickname “Alky” racing. Engines range in size from 125 cc to 1100 cc, and are recognizable by the long “expansion chamber” exhaust systems that aim aft from the powerhead and create the telltale high-rpm whine as they speed around the race course at speeds from 80 to 120 mph. The smaller classes race in open-cockpit hydroplanes and runabouts, with the driver in a kneeling or lying position, working the throttle with his or her left hand and the steering wheel with the right. The classes with larger engines, which reach speeds above 100 mph, use an enclosed safety capsule. Drivers are strapped into their seats with a five-point harness, as in auto racing—except in boat racing, it’s a good idea to bring along “spare air” in the form of a miniature SCUBA tank. Brandon Thirlby, 23, of Traverse City, Michigan, races a bevy of PRO classes, both hydroplanes and runabouts, from 250 cc to 1100 cc. He also races dirt-track Late Model race cars professionally. The biggest difference between the boat racing and car racing worlds, he says, is the feeling of sportsmanship on the course and camaraderie in the pits. “The car racing I do is definitely a lot more of a cut-throat deal," says Thirlby. “But, we are racing for thousands on top of thousands of dollars, versus racing for a trophy and pride [in boat racing].” 42 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

Thirlby races in the US Title Series, host club of the APBA PRO national championships in Depue, Illinois, for more than 20 years, which will host races across the Midwest this summer, with stops in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Connecticut and Florida . Grassroots racing

Small outboard racing is the backbone of powerboat racing in the U.S. The basic premise is you clamp a gasoline-burning fishing engine on the back of a plywood hydroplane or runabout, kneel in the cockpit, grab the throttle in your left hand, and race. While nothing is quite that simple—the days of heading to your local marina and walking out with a race-ready, lightweight outboard are long gone—the mind-set remains the same. “I like the challenge of competing against other racers with all things being equal,” says Amy Sweeney, 44, a bank branch manager from Delaware, Ohio, who started racing Stock Outboard hydroplanes 14 years ago. Stock Outboard and its fraternal twin, Modified Outboard—the preferred category of tinkerers and other would-be engineers—are predicated on creating a fun, relaxed atmosphere for racing families. Classes range from 55 mph—with a stock 15-hp Mercury or Johnson/ Evinrude fishing engine bolted to a special racing lower unit—to beyond 90 mph for the fastest modified class. Where most racing categories are series-based, stock and modified outboard drivers compete on a local level, with events held across the U.S. and Canada. “Race weekends are something we work toward and look forward to doing as a family,” says Sweeney. “We usually travel about 10 weekends per year on average.” Naturally, there’s not a lot of sponsor involvement at this level, but that’s hard to detect when a full field of boats hits the flying start. “The thrill of racing to the first turn with 11 other competitors, hanging it out there and knowing that the boat you’re driving is on the very edge of control and barely in the water, is one of the most exciting aspects of boat racing,” says Sweeney. Long after the adrenaline rush subsides, though, the sense of camaraderie with her fellow racers remains. “Many of our closest friends are racers and their families, and even though we sometimes only see them a few weekends in the summer, they will always be very close to us,” says Sweeney. “Outboard racing has a true family feel that many other forms of racing could only hope for.” The APBA Stock, Modified and Junior Class National Championships will be held in Wakefield, Michigan in early August, followed a week later by the Marathon

National Championships, held each year on the Northern Michigan Inland Waterway and featuring an 87-mile course for runabouts as well as superlight tunnel boats—a two-person inflatable with tiller steering. All about the kids

Racers are born into the Sweeney family. Amy Sweeney’s sons, Michael and Logan, race boats. Michael has moved up to the adult classes; Logan, just 10 years old, already has a national title under his belt in the junior classes. There are two junior classes: J Hydro and J Runabout. Top speeds are right around 40 mph—the engine of choice is the same 15-hp outboard used in the adult classes, but with a restrictor plate placed in the carburetor. The beauty of grassroots racing is it’s a breeding ground for future racers in all racing categories, while at the same time a challenging, competitive environment for veteran racers. “Everyone in the family can compete on any given weekend in one class or another,” says Amy Sweeney. “We race boats because we enjoy the many aspects it provides for our family: The anticipation of going to the race, the thrill of competition, the education my children get from working on equipment, driving boats at high speeds and even how to win and lose with dignity and class.” Local stock and modified outboard racing clubs throughout the Great Lakes region hold “racer school” at certain races. For a small fee, interested parties can learn about racing and take a few practice laps, with the option of racing the following day, before taking the plunge and buying their own equipment. APBA holds similar schools for the inboard hydroplane and tunnel boat categories. r

Jimmie merleau celebrates with his fater, Jim, after capturing the UIm World championship in the Formula Two/SST-120 class at Trenton, michigan (opposite, top). Driver Steve David pilots his Unlimited hydroplane on the Ohio river en route to claim the 2010 National championship crown (opposite, bottom). David’s Oh Boy! Oberto/Miss Madison team celebrates after his victory at the Indiana Governor’s cup race in madison, Indiana (above).

43 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

A

PLACE

44 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

FOR ALL

Seasons

PHOTO BY RICHARD STEINBERGER

Michigan’s Mackinaw City offers rich history and family fun, year round. BY H EATH E R STE I N B E RG E R

ome boaters might not consider visiting their favorite ports when the water’s hard, but there’s something undeniably appealing about an upper Great Lakes town in the offseason. At first glance, it seems flash-frozen, with empty restaurants, shuttered gift cottages and lonely marina pilings hibernating until Memorial Day weekend brings the first summer crowds. But when you look past the ice shoves and snowdrifts, it reveals its soul. So I leaped at the opportunity to visit Mackinaw City, at the northern tip of Michigan’s lower peninsula, on a breathtakingly cold weekend in January. I love winter travel, plus I’d never been able to forget my first cruise through the Straits of Mackinac. Most visitors arrive in the Straits eagerly craning their necks to catch their first glimpse of the world’s third-longest suspension bridge, as well as fabled, Grand Hotel-adorned, lost-in-time Mackinac Island. When I cruised beneath the iconic Mackinac Bridge, however, I scarcely glanced at the open-grid roadway soaring 200 feet above me, and I certainly didn’t scan the heaving, slate-gray seas for the island. I was looking for that one particular harbor. Mackinaw City was to be our overnight refuge from relentless 25-knot winds; steep, breaking waves that sent us surfing several miles per hour faster than our preferred cruising speed; and the writhing bout of seasickness that set in somewhere around Grays Reef. Seven rollicking hours after we’d departed Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, I was ready for a hot meal, a warm bed and quiet waters. 45 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

The 1892 Old mackinac Point Lighthouse (pictured here and below) and the reconstructed 18th century fort at colonial michilimackinac (opposite) welcome visitors from may until October. Both are part of mackinac State historic Parks, managed by the mackinac Island State Parks commission.

An unforgettAble port Leaving the Mighty Mac’s twin 552-foot towers in our wake, we spotted the castle-like Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse to starboard. Here, where Lake Michigan’s waters meet those of sister Huron, we rounded the peninsula’s tip and entered Mackinaw City’s bustling harbor. We refueled at the Shepler’s Marine fuel dock, remembering to keep a weather eye on the inbound island ferries, and finally slid into our berth at the Mackinaw City Municipal Marina. From May 1 to mid-October, this full-service marina provides restrooms, showers, laundry facilities, WiFi, a picnic area, a marina supply 46 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

store, on-site mechanic service, gas and pump-out. It accommodates vessels up to 100 feet in its seasonal and transient slips, while trailer boaters can take advantage of the low-incline launch ramp with room for two. The marina lies within easy walking distance of downtown; if you need a ride, however, marina staff can arrange a grocery store shuttle, a courtesy shuttle and even courtesy bikes. Unfortunately for us, we only had time for a quick bite to eat before lights out. Bound for Georgian Bay, we had a long day ahead of us. But I definitely didn’t forget Mackinaw City. It intrigued me, from the mysterious wood-palisade walls near the Mighty Mac’s southern foot, to Central Avenue’s broad shopping boulevard, to the warmth and revelry spilling out of the Dixie Saloon. It seemed that this place might be underestimated; that it might be so much more than just a jumping-off point for Mackinac Island or even as a much-needed refuge in a tempest. I simply had to see if the village—“city” is a misnomer—could be a rewarding destination in its own right. This time, I motored into town with a Dodge Grand Caravan rather than with a 50-foot cruising boat, and instead of tying off the docklines, I fumbled with mittens and an electronic key at one of the EconoLodge Bayview’s cozy one-and-a-half-story log cabins near the waterfront on South Huron Avenue. Complimentary breakfast would be served at a neighboring hotel property, and the delightfully uncrowded Pirate’s Adventure Indoor Waterpark lay within acceptable swimsuit dashing phOTOs By MACKINAC IsLAND sTATE pArKs COMMIssION

distance across the icy parking lot. Perfect, since our not-quite-2-year-old daughter was in tow. As daylight faded, a sublime moonrise illuminated the ice-strewn Straits, empty but for a lone freighter making her way toward Lake Michigan and her winter layup. These waters seemed so remote, yet the Straits of Mackinac are an important crossroads for every type of mariner: Cruisers, fishermen, Chicago- and Port Huron-Mac racing sailors, day trippers and scuba divers. Then there are the commercial ships, which ply the Great Lakes from March until January.

Where history comes to life The Straits have been a crossroads for thousands of years. Native peoples arrived at the end of the last ice age, drawn by the abundant fishing and good land to grow corn. When the French arrived in the 17th century, they encountered the Ojibwe, the Potawatomi and the Odawa, who had a village near what would later become Mackinaw City. The Ojibwe called the area Michilimackinac, or Great Turtle. In their creation story, when a great flood destroyed the earth, the Great Manito recreated it on the back of the Great Turtle. While the Great Turtle was actually Mackinac Island, the name Michilimackinac soon fell to the mainland settlement south of the Straits. Working with native peoples and relying on their support, the French built a formidable North American trading empire and used Michilimackinac as a jumping-off point for the west. To protect this valuable location from

the English and hostile native tribes, French soldiers built Fort St. Philippe de Michilimackinac in 1715. The fort was a meeting place for military men, explorers, fur traders and natives, and its name was well known throughout the New World and even in western Europe. Following their conquest of French Canada, the English took the fort in 1761 and remained until concern over the American Revolutionary War led them to establish Fort Mackinac on the island. In 1781, with their move complete, they burned the fort at Michilimackinac. 47 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

During mackinaw city’s 2011 Winterfest, marshall’s Fudge sponsored free sleigh rides for winter revelers. The village is home to more than 10 candy kitchens, including such prominent names as marshall’s, murdick’s and Kilwin’s.

The fort was not lost, however. When Mackinaw City was platted in 1857, the northern area was left as a park to protect whatever was left of the fort, as well as to provide a location for a lighthouse. In 1909, the state of Michigan created its second state park to preserve the site. And in 1959, the Mackinaw Island State Park Commission began excavating the ruins.

How do you say it, anyway? Never mind how it’s spelled. “Mackinac” is always pronounced “Mackinaw.” The Straits and the island share the original -ac spelling, while the mainland village and former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter share the later -aw spelling. The alternate spelling likely was adopted to alleviate confusion between the island and the village; when she was launched in 1944, the USCGC Mackinaw was named for the village. — H.S.

Enter those wooden palisades. Fifty-plus years of excavating and archaeological research allowed the commission—which manages all the Mackinac State Historic Parks—to accurately reconstruct the fort. Colonial Michilimackinac appears as it would have in the 1770s, with structures in their exact historical locations. Kate Arbogast, Michilimackinac interpretation supervisor, gave us a winter tour through the fortified village. Open May 4 to October 8, the living-history site incorporates 13 authentically reconstructed buildings and more than 1 million artifacts. In season, it comes 48 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

alive with pageants, re-enactments, children’s activities, a colonial wedding, traditional lacrosse games, fresh bread baking and even the occasional cannon blast. This year, Colonial Michilimackinac will host Voyageurs Rendezvous Weekend August 6-7, the 250th anniversary of the British occupation August 20, Fort Fright on October 7-8 and family overnight programs throughout the season. Next, we joined Arbogast at the Old Mackinaw Point Lighthouse, part of Mackinac State Historic Parks. Constructed of Cream City brick in 1892, the lighthouse closed in 1957 when the Mackinac Bridge rendered it obsolete. Now incorporated into Michilimackinac State Park, it showcases a series of exhibits in its assistant lightkeeper’s quarters, while the main lightkeeper’s quarters are being restored to their 1910 appearance. Also on property are the fog signal building and barn, home to the museum store, and the “Shipwrecks of the Straits of Mackinac” audiovisual program. Since the lighthouse’s original fourth-order Fresnel lens now resides in a protective case within the keeper’s quarters, the lantern room provides just enough space for those on a tower tour to comfortably enjoy the view.

savor the city These have always been dangerous waters. When storms barrel into the region, the Straits act as a funnel for winds and seas, while the deep Straits gorge—295 feet beneath the bridge’s center span—can mean strong, strange currents. phOTOs By RIChARD sTEINBERGER

It makes sense this is where you’ll find the Straits of Mackinac Underwater Preserve, a 148-square-mile stretch of water popular among Great Lakes shipwreck divers. The preserve’s myriad wrecks include the 588-foot steel freighter Cedarville, which lies east of Old Mackinac Point in 40 to 106 feet of water. Interestingly, one of the ships that raced to assist the Cedarville’s crew now makes her permanent home in Mackinaw City. She is the former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw, now the Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum; she’s open for public tours at the historic Chief Wawatam dock just south of the marina (see “Shoreleave,” page 55.) The lantern room provided a bird’s-eye view of one small portion of the Mackinaw Historical Pathway system, which winds throughout the village and incorporates nearly 40 markers illuminating the area’s rich history. If you’d rather not walk, you have options. The Mackinaw Old Time Trolley Company and Mackinaw Trolley Company both provide a wide variety of tours; Shepler’s Ferry Lighthouse Cruises allow visitors to view area lighthouses; and Mackinaw Parasailing will give you, well, the real bird’s-eye view. As the wind chill dipped into the single digits, we decided that walking to lunch didn’t sound terribly appealing. A short drive down the road, and we were thrilled to discover that the Mackinaw Pastie & Cookie Company’s bridge location is open seven days a week, year round. You can’t visit the Straits and not sample a piping hot, savory pasty. While the restaurant offered pasties in a rainbow of flavors, from stroganoff to taco to Italian, we opted for traditional pasties and homemade gravy. Hats off to the Hunt family for their memorable renditions of the traditional miner’s lunch. The rest of our Mackinaw City meals were equally memorable. For supper, we tried the Dixie Saloon, another year-round village eatery. They bring in their whitefish daily from a local fishery, and my husband scarcely uttered a word throughout the entire meal, courtesy of an expertly prepared rack of ribs. The saloon is named for the Old Dixie Highway, organized in 1914-15 to connect the Midwest with the southern states. It traveled from Miami, its southern terminus, to Mackinaw City, where travelers were known to celebrate at the Dixie Tavern. The original 1890 tavern has been replaced by an airy, welcoming, two-story lodge. The Old Dixie Highway has been replaced, too, along with the railroad and car ferries that carried private and commercial traffic across the Straits for decades. Today, Interstate 75 travels across the Straits on the Mackinac and winds its way south to Miami. Breakfast lovers will have a field day at the Pancake Chef on Central Avenue. Although the buffet looked inviting, I couldn’t resist the array of pancake options on the menu—pumpkin for me, chocolate chip for Jo.

Flavors oF THe NoRTH

M

ost travelers would agree that sampling local cuisine is one of the best parts of a new destination. Visitors to the Great Lakes often are eager to try fresh and smoked fish, maple syrup, jam, even wines produced from locally grown fruits and hybrid varietal grapes. Then there are flavors unique to one particular spot. In northern Michigan, those flavors are found in two distinct types of establishments. The first is the candy kitchen, the hallowed ground where homemade fudge and caramel apples take shape right before your eyes. Mackinac Island fudge has become virtually synonymous with the entire Straits region. As soon as you arrive in Mackinaw City, a tempting, mouth-watering scent drifts on the air courtesy of more than 10 businesses, including such famous names as Murdick’s, Marshall’s and Kilwin’s. It’s been a staple in the region since the late 1880s, when the Grand Hotel’s opening launched the tourism boom to the island; local boatbuilder Henry F. Murdick capitalized on the trade by opening the area’s very first candy store. The rest is history. Pros protect their family recipes, but main ingredients include cocoa, milk, butter and three types of sugar—granulated, brown and confectioners. Then there are

the extras, everything from nuts and peanut butter to Irish cream and maple syrup. The first things you’ll notice in a proper candy kitchen are marble slabs. They’re unique to Mackinac Island fudge, which is cooled, flipped and cut in full view of customers. Those slabs also hold trays of homemade caramel apples; the confectioner swirls the apples in a copper kettle filled with caramel, rolls them in different types of nuts and places them carefully on trays to cool. Before satisfying a sweet tooth, fill your empty stomach with a hearty, savory meal. Look no farther than the nearest pasty shop. (Remember, it’s “a” as in apple—PAH-stee; never PAY-stee!) A mainstay in the Upper Midwest since the 19th century, pasties’ roots lie in the U.K., where they were a popular lunch in Cornish mines. When the “Cousin Jacks” immigrated to the New World and took up mining in the U.P., pasties came with them and later were adopted by new immigrants from Finland. In Michigan’s north country, pasties are still made in the traditional fashion, with beef, potato, onion and rutabagas baked into a folded pastry with pinched, half-moon crust. They were the perfect meals for miners, as they could stay warm for up to 10 hours and were easy to eat without utensils. And, as modernday connoisseurs would agree, they’re simply delicious. — H.S.

49 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

Amateur and professional snow sculptors contribute their creative work to Winterfest’s snow sculptures, located near the foot of Central Avenue and the Shepler’s parking lot.

The Pancake Chef is in the perfect location for visitors who want to fuel up for a full day ashore. Colonial Michilimackinac, the lighthouse, the Mackinaw and the historical pathway are all nearby. It lies at the foot of the Central Avenue shopping district, which comprises every imaginable type of gift shop and candy kitchen; Animal Tracks Adventure Golf is just down South Huron Avenue; and it’s a stone’s throw from Mackinaw Crossings.

1. Colonial Michilimackinac (102 West Straits Ave.) 2. Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse (526 North Huron Ave.)

East Moran Bay

3. Mackinaw City Municipal Marina (102 North Huron Ave.)

St. Ignace

Mackinaw City

Mackinac Br

idge

West Moran Bay

Trails End Bay

Mackinac Island

Round Island

4. Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum (131 North Huron Ave.) 5. Mackinaw Crossings (248 South Huron Ave.)

Bois Blanc Island

French Farm Lake

Where to Dock or Launch the Boat Mackinaw City Municipal Marina 231-436-5269 | mackinawcity.org/marina-34/ It’s advisable to make reservations for this full-service marina facility during the height of the summer season, as many Great Lakes boaters bound for Mackinac Island will choose to tie up in either Mackinaw City or St. Ignace and day-trip to the island. To book your slip, call 800-447-2757 or use the Michigan DNR’s online reservation system at midnrreservations.com. If you’re a trailer boater, the municipal marina has a low-incline launch ramp with room for two, a loading dock, restrooms and ample parking.

50 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

This development is a shopping and dining destination in itself, as more than 50 businesses make their homes here. The younger crowd will get a kick out of attractions such as A-Maze-N-Mirrors, Freaky’s Funhouse and the Mackinaw Manor Haunted Mansion, while adults will enjoy browsing Jim Wehr’s Mackinaw Outfitters and sampling Michigan wines at the Mackinac Trail Winery. If you have time and access to transportation, you might want to take a few day trips. Just 5 miles south of Mackinaw City on Highway 23 is Mill Creek Discovery Park, part of Mackinac State Historic Parks. Established in 1790 and abandoned in the mid-1800s, the mill was rediscovered in 1972 and reconstructed after extensive archaeological work. Visitors can watch the sawmill in operation and explore the natural history of the area through trails, exhibitions and naturalist programs. If you follow Central Avenue and head 3 miles west, you’ll reach The Headlands, a 600-acre park with trails and walkable Lake Michigan shoreline. Roughly 4 miles west of the village is the municipal bathing beach known as “First Beach.” Both it and nearby “Second Beach” are great spots to enjoy sunbathing, swimming and lake sunsets. Finally, there is Mackinac Island. Visit Fort Mackinac and the island’s historic downtown, rent bicycles and

Where to Fix or Service the Boat Shepler’s Marine 800-828-6157 | sheplersferry.com/sheplersmarine Shepler’s Marine is open seven days a week, May to October. It offers fiberglass and gelcoat repairs and finishing; wood repairs and varnishing; bottom painting; polishing and waxing; haul-out; and engine service, with technicians certified to work on Yanmar, Detroit Diesel, MerCruiser, Westerbeke, Universal Marine Power and Crusader power plants.

And, in Case You Don’t Want to Leave... Murray’s Mackinac Realty 906-847-0000 (Mackinac Island) | 906-430-0308 (St. Ignace) murraysmackinacrealty.com Many Straits visitors find themselves relocating to the area as permanent or seasonal residents. If the occasional summertime cruise isn’t enough, check with Murray’s Mackinac Realty. It lists properties on Mackinac and Bois Blanc islands; in Mackinaw City and St. Ignace; and in the northern Lower Peninsula, the western Upper Peninsula and Little Traverse Bay.

To Plan Your Trip Mackinaw Area Visitors Bureau 800-666-0160 | mackinawcity.com Chamber of Commerce 888-455-8100 | mackinawchamber.com Chamber of Tourism 800-577-3113 mackinaw-city.com | mackinawinformation.com

PHOTOS BY RICHARD STEINBERGER ILLUSTRATED MAP BY JACQUI RONAN

circumnavigate the island, take photos at Arch Rock, savor high tea at the Grand Hotel and don’t miss the new Richard and Jane Manoogian Art Museum at the Indian Dormitory, which opened in July 2010. Shepler’s Mackinac Island Ferry, Arnold Transit Company and the Star Line Mackinac Island Ferry offer service to Mackinac Island. Last year, with their franchise agreements drawing to a close, Arnold Transit and the Star Line announced plans to merge and create the Northern Ferry Company. While discussions are ongoing, 2011 schedules for all three had been approved at press time. Once you dig into Mackinaw City, you may find time has run out for excursions to other destinations. There’s so much to see and do, particularly if you’re in the village for one of its annual events. The official kickoff to summer season is the Fort Michilimackinac Pageant and parade on Memorial Day weekend, which includes a foot race across the Mighty Mac. Bicycle enthusiasts converge on Mackinaw City in mid-June and mid-September for the annual spring and fall scenic bike tours, and golfers arrive in July for the Mighty Mac Golf Outing. That’s also the month to catch the Fourth of July fireworks from the deck of the Mackinaw, courtesy of the maritime museum. The Corvette Crossroads Auto Show lands on August 27 this year, and the famous Mackinac Bridge Walk is scheduled for September 5. Each year, thousands join Michigan’s governor on a Labor Day stroll across the Straits.

October 7-16, visitors revel in the Fall Shoppers’ Fest and Color Tours, and seasonal merrymaking kicks into high gear December 3-5 for Christmas in Mackinaw. None of this includes additional special events at hotspots such as the Mackinac State Historic Parks, the Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum and Mackinaw Crossings. Then there’s Winterfest. In the depths of winter, crowds line South Huron Avenue to watch amateur and professional snow carving. They wait outside Marshall’s Fudge for free sleigh rides. They dash in and out of local businesses on a poker run. They ice skate, ice fish and play ice hockey with brooms. Rumor has it they toss frozen fish and bowl frozen chickens. And they race outhouses. On our last afternoon in Mackinaw City, we admired the snow carvings, particularly those by area schoolchildren. We gave Jo a ride on a mechanical horse at Devon’s Delight and tried to peel her away from the make-your-own-teddy-bear section in Marshall’s. We ate steaming bowls of chili in the Dixie Saloon, and we cheered uproariously for the inspired souls tugging creatively decorated outhouses across Shepler’s parking lot. Toilet paper fluttered gaily in the breeze, and barking dogs joined giggling children as they tumbled down snowbanks and dashed across the racers’ path. The marina still lay quiet and empty, but Mackinaw City was far from lifeless. It teemed with energy, vigor and good humor, proving that once and for all it’s worth the trip, regardless of season. r

competitors bring high levels of energy, enthusiasm and humor to the outhouse races, a major highlight of mackinaw city’s Winterfest celebration.

51 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

Aint’ itGrand

Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel is a can’t-miss stop on any visitor’s island tour. BY H EATH E R STE I N B E RG E R

Just about everyone who visits Michigan’s Mackinac Island has a carefully considered list of must-sees and -dos to make the trip memorable. Sailors who finish the legendary Chicagoand Port Huron-Mac races can’t wait to celebrate at The Pink Pony. Couples tour the historic downtown in horse-drawn carriages, or circumnavigate the island on tandem bicycles. Families watch re-enactments at Fort Mackinac, scream their way through the Haunted Theatre, or delight in the enchanting Mackinac Island Butterfly House. Outdoorsy types explore Mackinac Island State park. History buffs take walking tours and visit museums that illuminate the island’s rich history. 52 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

Of all these diverse offerings, however, there’s one island destination that tops everyone’s list: The Grand Hotel. The Grand Hotel has been the jewel in Mackinac Island’s crown since it opened nearly 125 years ago. At that time, the island was a popular retreat for city dwellers. While industrial barons owned opulent summer homes here, tourist accommodations were limited; so the Michigan Central Railroad, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, and Detroit & Cleveland Steamship Navigation Company got together and formed the Mackinac Island Hotel Company. They built the Grand Hotel in 1887, and holidaymakers arrived in ever-increasing numbers. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE GRAND HOTEL

Over the years, the hotel has attracted five U.S. presidents and welcomed an array of celebrities, including Mark Twain; Esther Williams, who filmed “This Time for Keeps” at the hotel in 1947; and Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour, who filmed the cult classic “Somewhere in Time” here in 1979. A third-generation, family-owned resort, the Grand Hotel has a AAA Four Diamond rating. Travel + Leisure magazine named it one of the world’s 500 greatest hotels, and Travel + Leisure Family pronounced it one of the 10 kid-friendliest resorts in the U.S. and Canada. Open from May to October, the hotel welcomes approximately 130,000 guests each season. Its 660-foot-long front porch is the longest in the world and is adorned with 2,500 geraniums, the hotel’s signature flower. It offers 385 rooms, of which no two are alike. Guests may dine in the gracious Main Dining Room or in the more casual Gate House, Jockey Club, Grand Stand and Carleton’s Tea Store. There’s also The Pool Grill and the inspiring 1987 Cupola Bar, with its jaw-dropping views. The Victorian era comes alive here. You can “take the lake air” while strolling the front porch’s elegant promenade. Sample an elegant afternoon tea. Play lawn games such as croquet and Bocce on the hotel’s beautifully manicured lawns. And, come 6:30 p.m., you must don evening wear—coats and ties for the gentlemen, dresses and pantsuits for the ladies—in all areas of the hotel.

The Grand Hotel offers tennis; golf at The Jewel, with its 1901 Grand Nine and 1994 Woods Nine; and swimming in the 500,000-gallon, 220-foot, serpentine swimming pool. Guests also will enjoy children’s programs, babysitting services, live music, the full-service Astor’s Salon and the boutique-style Shops at the Grand Hotel. For more information, or to make reservations, call (800) 33-GRAND, or visit grandhotel.com. r

The Grand Hotel’s iconic, 660-footlong porch is the longest in the world (opposite). Of its 385 rooms, no two are identical (above).

53 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

special advertising section

Shepler’s Ship Store For all your boating needs.

sheplersmarine.com

Ph: 231.436.5025 or 800.828.6157 Conveniently located next to the Mackinaw City Marina. Jerry Murray (owner & sales associate) Carrousel #106 • P.O. Box 1920 Mackinac Island, MI 49757

906-430-0308

Seller willing to finance We can meet all of your real estate needs, whether buying or selling, private or commercial property.

BOIS BLANC ISLAND, MI

Four beautiful Lake Huron waterfront building lots. All lots have views of the Straits of Mackinac shipping channel and the Mackinac Bridge. Local custom builders available on island. Prices range from 100’ of frontage (1 acre lots) at $135,000 to 525’ of frontage (33 acres) for ONLY $539,900. Please visit our website for picture and aerial views. Terms available-seller motivated!

W W W. M A C K I N A W C I T Y. O R G

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MACKINAW CITY

MARINA 102 S. Huron · Mackinaw City, MI 231.436.5269 · marina@mackinawcity.org

Transient and Seasonal Slips Available

Open Early May to Late October

For harbor reservations please contact 800.447.2757 or www.michigan.gov/dnr

54 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

shoreleave

The Other Mighty Mac

Visit the USCG icebreaker in Mackinaw City.

V

isitors to Mackinaw City, Michigan, have a special opportunity to become acquainted with one of the Great Lakes’ most beloved heroes. She’s been called the “Queen of the Lakes,” and although she’s aging, this still-striking 67-year-old icon willingly shares her most intimate details with the crowds who come to see her at her permanent waterfront home. She’s the former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw. Launched in December 1944 at the Toledo Shipbuilding Company, the 290-foot icebreaker played many roles in her six decades of working life. Able to break through several feet of solid sheet ice and nearly 40 feet of broken ice, she protected shoulder-season shipping from Lake Superior and the Soo, through the Straits and down to the lower Lakes. She carried fuel and supplies to the light stations, she serviced buoys and she served as both a training ship and goodwill ambassador. Her six 10-cylinder, opposed-piston, 10,000-horsepower diesel electric engines also leaped into action when disaster struck. Able to reach a top speed of 22 miles per hour, she raced to assist any vessel in distress or search for those lost at sea. The sight of the Mackinaw was an enormous relief to those who needed her, and after each trip, her proud homeport of Cheboygan, Michigan, welcomed her with open arms. Today, the Mackinaw continues to turn heads—this time as the Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum in

by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

her namesake Straits community. Decommissioned in 2006, she has seen nearly 70,000 people tour her decks and interior spaces—20,000 in 2010 alone. Through tours and group events, visitors may see the bridge, captain’s quarters, mess deck, ward room, engine room and much more. Boaters arriving at the Mackinaw City Municipal Marina and those driving or strolling South Huron Avenue along the city’s waterfront can’t miss the Mackinaw. Her red hull and gleaming white superstructure lie at the old Chief Wawatam railroad dock, looking as if the ship might steam for open water at any moment. It’s difficult to believe this happy second life was once far from certain. “Cheboygan wanted to keep her, but it was an expensive endeavor,” said Lisa Pallagi, the museum’s operations manager. “They didn’t have the property or the money, and they likely wouldn’t have had the tourist traffic.” Enter ferry owner Bill Shepler who, along with several other prominent community members, spearheaded an effort to purchase the ship and convert her to a floating historical museum. Shepler also provided mooring space at the historic Mackinaw City dock. “Had the boat not found a home, she would have gone to scrap,” said RJ Fisher, one of the museum’s original board members. “That would have been a terrible thing.” Commissioned just days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Mackinaw helped keep supplies of iron ore, limestone and coal moving to the southern steel mills 55 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

shoreleave

to support the war effort. And in the years following World War II, keeping the Great Lakes shipping lanes clear from mid-March to mid-January helped fuel the growth of industry nationwide. “And she’s got quite a history here in the Straits,” Fisher added, “from ice-breaking to the rescue effort when the Cedarville went down.” In May 1965, the 588-foot freighter Cedarville collided with the Norwegian ship Topdalsfjord in a heavy fog and, while attempting to reach safety at Mackinaw City, rolled over and sank. Ten men lost their lives.

From sea to shore Transforming the Mackinaw from a working U.S. Coast Guard ship to a floating maritime museum wasn’t easy—or inexpensive. “We ran power to the ship, we winterized it, and we made it accessible for tours,” Fisher explained. “We put in a lot of half doors, and we put Plexiglas in the bridge so people could see everything but not touch. “We had to protect these areas, but we also wanted people to see what life on the ship was really like,” he said. “A lot of museum ships are stripped, sanitized, and we didn’t want that.” In the beginning, the museum staff offered simple deck tours. Every year, as the number of visitors increased, Pallagi said the team sought new ways of accommodating more people and improving the tours. “Right now, in conjunction with an Eagle Scout project, we’re working on opening the sick bay, as well as some machinery areas,” she said. “We’re also hoping to add more interactive displays with user-friendly technology and interactive children’s activities.” Education is an important component of the museum’s mission. In addition to expanded children’s activities and a popular sleep-aboard program, an education committee puts together school tours focusing on safety and seamanship. 56 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

Another important element is community outreach. “When the boat was in port, she always was open for tours,” Pallagi said. “We want to continue that open, welcoming feeling.” The museum accomplishes this with its public events. Its second annual “Welcome Aboard!” Open House is scheduled for June 5, and the Mackinaw Maritime Festival will take place June 11. The festival will incorporate a special Cedarville ceremony. On July 4, the ship will be open to the public for a holiday celebration and for viewing fireworks. The ship also will host “Music on the Mack” on select evenings in July and August, and the museum’s 5th anniversary celebration will take place in late August. “People have heard of the Mackinaw who’ve never been to the Great Lakes,” Fisher marveled. “They come from Kansas, Montana. Her background has a mysterious flavor, and the museum shares that—when the guys walked off in 2006, they only took what they needed. This ship is still alive.” The Mackinaw is open for tours daily from May 20 to October 9. For details about supporting the museum through a new annual membership program, and to learn more, call 231-436-9825 or visit themackinaw.org. r

at press time, the museum announced it launched a capital campaign to purchase the dock at which the Mackinaw is berthed, and to construct a year-round, 20,000-square-foot education center adjacent to the ship. These illustrations (above) detail plans for the future museum grounds.

PHOTO BY jOHN L. WAGNEr ILLusTrATIONs BY sTEvE FrITz

ask an expert

Building a dream For 50 years, Phil Engelsman has custom-built and restored canoes and kayaks out of his shop, Dreamcatcher BoatWorks.

CONTACT Dreamcatcher BoatWorks

LB: There are few modes of transportation that can be viewed as works of art. What is it about canoes and kayaks that appeals to one’s aesthetic sense? Engelsman: It is the wood. Aluminum is noisy and cold, and fiberglass pounds on impact with water. Wood is different from these materials in that it flexes like tree branches in the wind, and is quiet and warm to the touch. It also is beautiful to look at. In fact, some people hang them over their fireplaces; but I urge people to use them instead!

8-year-old to a very large adult. For instance, I had a couple who used to flip their canoe because the husband was 320 pounds, and his wife was only 130. So I customized their canoe in terms of the seat placement and shape of the hull. I even added seats for their grandchildren.

LB: What types of wood do you use? Engelsman: We love red and northern white cedar with mahogany trim; walnut, sassafras or other hardwoods for trim or inlays. Cedar from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is particularly attractive, with warm traces of iron and tanzanite. We create custom designs and inlays, so no two boats are alike.

LB: What criteria should I use when choosing a canoe or kayak for my family? Engelsman: Ask yourself: How and where will the boat be used? What is the level of ability of the people using the boat and their physical build? How much does the boat weigh?

5655 Far Hill Dr. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546 616-676-1578 phil@dreamcatcherboatworks.com dreamcatcherboatworks.com

LB: Wood is lovely and lightweight, but is it strong enough for rugged waters? Engelsman: That’s why we build the core from wood and cover it with a layer of clear fiberglass. Its toughness has been tested. Once, we had a canoe fall off a trailer at 55 mph. Though a bit scratched, we picked it up and hit the water. We can lay carbon fiber on the inside, making the boats even stronger. LB: Why do you customize your canoes and kayaks? Aren’t they one-size-fits-all? Engelsman: No! A kayak should fit a person’s body. With adjustable foot braces, hip pads and back brace, we can fit anyone from an

PHOTO BY DAVE MULL

LB: What is the best way to see if I like kayaking or canoeing before I buy one? Where can I get instruction? Engelsman: Please try before buying. There are lots of cheap boats on the market that really don’t paddle well, but will give you a good idea if this activity is for you. There are classes available, as well as books and videos on the subject.

LB: How much do canoes and kayaks cost? Engelsman: This type of boat is available for a few hundred dollars on up. The cheaper manufactured boats are heavier and harder to paddle and maneuver. They are designed for mass production; not for their paddling efficiencies. The most expensive manufactured boats are designed for a specific use. My boats are lightweight, efficient and can either be displayed as works of art or enjoyed on the water. 

Want to watch Phil Engelsman work his magic? See him March 25-27at the Cottage & Lakefront Living Show in Grand Rapids, MI. For more details about the show, visit showspan.com/CLG.

57 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

marina watch

Crosswinds Marine Service

reliable, friendly service is the name of the game. by colle e n h . trou pi s

Crosswinds Marine Service 302 s. Lake st. whitehall, MI 49461 231-894-4549 crosswindsmarineservice.com

Amenities Transient slips: yes Pump-out: yes Gas: yes Diesel: yes Lifts: yes Launch ramp: Nearby Engine repair: yes hull repair: yes marine store: yes restaurant: yes Showers: yes Laundromat: yes

58 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

N

eatly positioned on White Lake between the ports of Muskegon and Pentwater, Crosswinds Marine Service sits less than 5 miles from Lake Michigan. The most established service facility on White Lake, the marina has been family-owned and -operated since its inception in 1986. That means consistency and reliability—and when the family’s philosophy is to treat others how you would like to be treated, it also means consistent service. “We don’t throw big parties; we’re a boatyard that knows how to fix things, treat people well and establish good relationships,” says Eric Harsch, co-owner and service manager of the marina. “A lot of our customers have become our good friends.” When Crosswinds started 25 years ago, it had 36 slips. A second dock was added in 1989, and a third in 1990, bringing the number of slips to the current total of 96. “In 1999 we paved the parking lot and bought a building that houses our bathroom facility, parts department and laundry,” Harsch says. “That was really our last big project.” The marina can accommodate everything from 18-foot ski boats to 105-footers, and the average water depth is 7 feet. There are typically five to seven transient slips

available, and Harsch recommends making a reservation, particularly around the busier holiday weekends. There’s an extensive fish cleaning station, as well as an onsite restaurant. And the marina can do anything and everything in terms of service. “There isn’t anything we can’t get fixed,” Harsch says. They also offer outside cold storage onsite for up to 220 boats and 57,000 square feet of indoor heated storage in two nearby buildings. “It’s heated to 55 degrees, and people can come in and work on their boats themselves,” Harsch says. “It’s a great way to get projects done in the winter.” Whitehall itself is a sleepy, family-friendly town with less tourism and nightlife than is found in other nearby towns. “In the summer, people come from all over,” Harsch says. “Whitehall is becoming a little bit more artsy, which is nice, and there’s a great local theatre here, too.” Though the marina doesn’t do a lot in terms of events, they do run a sailboat regatta that attracts some 35 boats every August during the White Lake Area Maritime Festival. “We offer top-notch service with nice clean facilities—and we have access to one of the most beautiful lakes in the world.” r

AErIAL phOTO By MArGE BEAvEr / MArINA phOTOs COurTEsy Of CrOsswINDs MArINE sErvICE

Windy City Yacht Brokerage, llC

85 Brokers

800 Listings

20 Offices

We post all listings on 16 different multiple listings.

1997 70’ nePtunus my 1110HP 12V92 detroits, 2 jet skis tender, tHrusters, staBilizers $799,000

1988 55’ oCean suPer sPort 735HP detroit 8V92s, HeaVy renoVations. looks great $235,000

1971 54’ striKer sPort Fisherman 550HP detroit 1271s, many new uPgrades, 18’ Beam, al Hull $225,000

SiSter Ship

1991 44’ Lee WiLbur Custom 375HP Cat 3208s, Hull Blue awlgriP, suPer struCture wHite awlgriP, fanatiCally maintained $274,900

19698 40’ sea ray sundanCer 350HP Cat 3116ts. VdriVes, 965Hrs, inside Heated, metiCulous maintenanCe, many Custom, fresHwater $139,500

1986 36’ Carver 3607 aFt CBn 350HP Crusaders, gen 2 srs, 2 Heads, 2 Helms great PriCe,fresHwater $37,900

1992 36’ bayLiner 3688 200HP Hino dsls, straigHt driVes, Very Clean, new uPgrades fresHwater $90,000

2003 32’ sea ray 320 sundanCer merC 300HP mag V driVes 410 Hours, generator, radar, fresHwater $84,900

2003 32’ reGaL 3260 Commodore VolVo 320HP 5.7l V driVes only 240 Hours, generator, fresHwater $89,000

SiSter Ship

1991 31’ sea ray sundanCer t-310HP V driVes, only 530 Hrs., furuno radar, garmin gPs, aC, windlass fresHwater $18,000

1990 30’ Carver 30 santeGo twin merC 260HP 5.7l alPHa one 550 Hrs, exCePtionally Clean, fresHwater $24,900

2005 30’ bayLiner 305 twin merCs, Blue Hull, 11’ Beam windlass, Clean fresHwater $49,000

1998 28’ sea ray ss single 385HP merC w/205 Hrs. VaCuflusH Head, 9’6” Beam, fresHwater $34,900

2000 27’ Grady White 272 twin 200HP yamaHas, 782 Hrs, aC, Head, ComP galley, trailer inCluded $39,900

2006 27’ sea ray 270 seLeCt eX HigH end Bow rider, single 350mag w250Hrs, BlaCk Hull, arCH, Head fresHwater $55,000

SiSter Ship

www.WindyCityYachts.com •

Jeff Pierce, CPYB

• 312-440-9500 Email: jeff@windycityyachts.com

Our readers are serious boaters. But are you as serious about the air quality of your vessel as you are the maintenance? With more than 18 years invested in indoor air quality research and improvement, the Kanberra Group has been working closely with various areas of the marine industry to better understand the needs of boat owners, yacht captains and crews to provide detailed, programmatic solutions to enhance marine experience and vessel maintenance. As folks discovered, Kanberra Gel proves invaluable in eliminating molds, fungi and bacteria during boat storage periods and equally valuable in maintaining a healthy, mold- and odor-free environment on board during the boating season. Available in convenient 2-, 4- and 8-oz.-sized containers, Kanberra Gel is a semi-solid, non-toxic, biodegradeable gel made with pure pharmaceutical-grade Australian tea tree oil. When exposed to air, the gel dissipates, effectively breaking down airborne mildew, molds, bacteria and viruses. Unlike other products available on the market today, Kanberra neutralizes odors and impurities in the air, making it safer for everyone on board.

And because it’s completely non-toxic and chemical free, it’s safe for kids and pets alike. Use it on the boat, at home, in your car—practically anywhere! Not only does Kanberra Gel improve your air quality, but it also helps save you money. It’s natural properties protect HVAC components from mildew and mold growth, as well as penetrate porous materials to prevent mold and mildew damage. Everyone who boats knows mold and mildew are a constant headache, due to dampness and temperature fluctuations. Damage to boat interiors and sensitive electronics can cost thousands to repair or replace. Kanberra Gel is the ideal solution! For more information and to see a video on the product,

www.kanberragel.com

Celebrating our Fiftieth Year! DEMO BOAT OF THE MONTH

PRE-OWNED BOATS Sea Ray 200 BR w/5.7L Merc, Trl ...............................................................................9,900 Sea Ray 250 Sundancer w/260, Merc ......................................................................11,400 Wellcraft 2700 Martinque w/7.4L Merc ...................................................................19,900 Sea Ray 270 Amberjack w/350 MAG MPI BRIII .......................................................49,900 Bayliner Contessa w/260 HP Volvo.............................................................................9,900 Sea Ray 290 Sundancer w/7.4 Bravo II 310HP Merc ....................................................24,900 Chaparral Signature w/T-4.3L Volvos .......................................................................49,900 Chris Craft Amerosport T-350 Crusaders ..................................................................24,900 Carver Mariner w/T-270HP Crusaders ......................................................................39,500 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique w/5.7L Merc ..................................................................39,900 Trojan 10 Meter Express w/T-454 Crusaders ...........................................................34,900 Donzi Center Console w/T-250 Johnsons .................................................................19,900 Carver Mariner w/T-5.7 MPI Crusaders ..................................................................229,000 Regal 360 Commodore w/T-7.4L Mercs ...................................................................44,900 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-340 HP Crusaders .....................................................................49,900 Cruisers 370 Express w/T-Yanmar Dsls ...................................................................279,000 Sea Ray MY w/T-8.1S Horizon Mercs ....................................................................329,000 Rinker 420 Express w/T-496 HO Mercruiser BRIII ..................................................199,000 Carver 43 Super Sport w/T-IPS 500 Volvos ............................................................499,000 BROKERED BOATS 07 30’ Cruisers 300 Cxi w/T-225 HP GXI SX Volvos ............................................................84,500

94 85 94 05 85 92 00 87 87 94 90 90 08 89 88 07 07 07 09

20’ 25’ 27’ 27’ 28’ 29’ 29’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 37’ 40’ 42’ 43’

Cruisers 520 Coupe

2008 Cruisers 360 $279,000

2011 Cruisers 48 Cantius 07 05 97 06 95 00 04 88 90 99 02 02 07 85 88 99 01 03 04 06 94 02 03

Ph: 815-357-8666

30’ 31’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 38’ 38’ 38’

Cruisers Cxi w/T-4.3 Volvos, Gen..............................................................................84,500 Formula PC w/T-6.2L Mercs ....................................................................................119,900 Carver 325 Aft Cabin w/T-350XL Crusaders .............................................................54,900 Cruisers 320 Express w/T-6.2 MPI Mercs ...................................................................99,500 Sea Ray 330 Sundancer w/T-7.4L Mercs .................................................................59,000 Wellcraft 3300 Martinique w/T-7.4L Mercs .............................................................74,900 Chaparral 330 Signature w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII .................................................119,000 Mainship Convertible w/T-454 Crusaders ................................................................49,500 Sea Ray 350 Express w/T-7.4L Mercs ......................................................................39,900 Carver 356 Aft Cabin w/T-7.4L Mercs ....................................................................119,000 Carver 356 Aft Cabin w/T-7.4L Mercs ....................................................................129,900 Carver 350 Mariner w/T-6.2 MPI 320 Mercs............................................................89,000 Rinker 350 Express w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII Mercs ..............................................134,500 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-454 CID Crusaders ....................................................................39,900 Carver Mariner w/T-454 CID Crusaders.......................................................................54,900 Carver 36 Mariner w/T-350 Mag Mercs......................................................................74,900 Trojan 360 Express w/T-454 Mag MPI Mercs.............................................................79,900 Carver 360 Sport Sedan w/T-8.1GI Volvos ................................................................172,500 Carver 360 Mariner w/T-6.0L MPI Crusaders .........................................................159,000 Carver 360 Mariner w/T-6.0 Crusaders ..................................................................153,000 Carver 380 Santego w/T-7.4 Mercs ..........................................................................63,000 Carver 380 Santego w/T-6.2L Mercs ........................................................................99,000 Sea Ray 380 Sundancer w/T-8.1L Mercruisers ......................................................169,900

www.springbrookmarina.com

04 05 05 01 03 07 08 85 07 89 05 95 93 01 03 07 01 00 04 86 03

39’ 39’ 39’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 42’ 42’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 46’ 48’ 50’

Silverton MY w/T-3126 CATS .................................................................................279,900 Carver 396 Aft Cabin w/T-8.1 GI Volvos .................................................................219,000 Carver 396 Motor Yacht w/T-8.1 GI Volvos ............................................................289,000 Sea Ray Sedan w/T-3126 Cats ...............................................................................255,000 Cruisers 405 Express Bridge w/T-370 HP Volvo Dsls .............................................215,000 Cruisers 415 Express MY w/T-8.1GXI Volvos .........................................................399,000 Marquis Sport Coupe w/T-D6 Series IPS 370HP ....................................................569,000 Grand Banks 42 Classics w/T-3208 CATS ..............................................................139,500 Carver 42 SS w/T-IPS 370 HP Volvo Dsls ...............................................................349,000 Sea Ray 440 Aft Cabin w/T-330 Mercs ....................................................................89,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-D6 Volvo Dsls .......................................................................289,000 Carver 440 Aft Cabin w/T-420 HP Cummins...........................................................229,900 Carver 440 MY w/T-3116TA CATS .........................................................................169,900 Carver 444 CMY w/T-370 Cummins........................................................................219,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-63P Volvo Dsls .....................................................................295,000 Cruisers 447 Sport Sedan w/T-480 HP Yanmars ....................................................499,000 Silverton 453 MY w/T-450 HP Cummins ................................................................319,000 Sea Ray 460 Sundancer w/T-450 Cummins ................................................................209,000 Carver 466MY w/T-480 HP Volvos..........................................................................399,000 Chris Craft 480 Catalina w/T-350 HP Crusaders ......................................................99,000 Cruisers 5000 Sedan w/T-715 HP D12 Volvos ..............................................................399,000

Fax: 815-357-8678 61 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

marine marketplace

How safe is the air you breathe at sea?

Trawler Charters & Trawler Schools NOW AVAILABLE on the Great Lakes

See our exciting NEW Marketing Plan Below!

More trawlers at one location than anywhere in the Midwest

Come to Manitowoc, Wisconsin We Sell the Dreams, You Build the Memories!

IDEAL GREAT LOOP & FRESH WATER TRAWLERS NEW TRAWLERS

American Tugs 525, 435, 395, 365

41 Camano 2011 $50,000 off new order

31 Camano 2006 $189,000

NEW TRAWLERS

29 Ranger Tug 2010 $239,500

27 Ranger Tug 2011 with trailer $191,000

25 Ranger Tug 2008 with trailer $137,000

BROKERAGE TRAWLERS

21 Ranger Tug 2010 with trailer $63,000

65 Custom Trawler 1998 $585,000

45 CHB Sedan 1981 $110,000

43 Saberline 1996 $375,000

42 Nordic Tug 2008 $649,000

42 Nordic Tug 1999 $339,000

42 Grand Banks 1993 $289,000

42 Grand Banks 1987 $219,000

42 Grand Banks 1977 $109,000

42 Ocean Alexander 1996 $205,000

41 Lindmark 1987 $105,000

40 Ocean Alexander 1983 $109,900

37 Great Harbour 1996 $269,000

37 Custom Steel 1986 $110,000

36 Heisier Lobsterboat 2000 $139,000

36 Grand Banks 1984 $145,000

36 Grand Banks 1973 $63,900

32 Grand Banks 1990 $135,000

32 Cheoy Lee 1983 $64,000

32 Island Gypsy 1983 $59,900

31 Camano 2001 $139,000

31 Blue Seas 1988 $94,500

26 Glacier Bay 2007 with trailer $109,500

26 Nordic Tug 1981 with trailer $75,000

21 Ranger Tug 2007 with trailer $47,000

SOLD 21 Ranger Tug 2006 with trailer $39,000

Our marketing plan includes: an opportunity to place your trawler with Southeast Yachting School & Charters in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, located just 20 miles from us. Your trawler will remain in our brokerage and can be sold at anytime. Call us to discuss the benefits.

*Please note the location of the brokerage boat in the website listing: at Manitowoc or at the owner’s location

www.trawlersmidwest.com • 920-894-2632 • 866-375-1633

marine marketplace

24’7”

1980 Tiara 2500 Pursuit ..............................................$9,900

24’9”

2000 Pursuit 2460 Denali........................................ $32,900

29’0”

1991 Tiara 290 Sportboat ....................................... $36,500

29’0”

2002 Sea Ray 290 Amberjack................................ $78,900

31’6”

1997 Tiara 3100 Open .............................................. $87,000

31’6”

2002 Tiara 3100 Open ............................................$139,900

31’6”

2003 Tiara 3100 Open LE ......................................$149,000

32’0”

1996 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique .......................... $39,000

32’7”

2007 Tiara 3200 Open ............................................$239,000

33’9”

1985 Sea Ray 340 Express ...................................... $19,000

34’0”

2001 Formula 34PC ................................................... $99,000

34’6”

2007 Sabre 34 Hardtop Express .........................$369,000

37’8”

2001 Cruisers 3750 MY ..........................................$164,000

42’6”

2003 Cruisers 4050 Express MY..........................$249,000

64 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

POWER

NEW BOATS IN-STOCK

Live out your dream on the water LET WALSTROM MARINE

TAKE YOU THERE...

2010 Sea Ray 260 Sundeck

2011 Hunt 25 Harrier

Brokerage Boats, for complete specs & additional photos visit IrishBoatShop.com 36’ 36’ 36’ 34’ 30’ 29’ 28’ 28’ 28’ 26’ 26’ 25’

Monk 36 Trawler ‘01 ...................... $ 229,000 Sea Ray 360 Sundancer ‘04 ......... $ 167,500 Tiara 3600 Open ‘87 .......................... $54,900 Sea Ray 340 Sedan Bridge ‘85....... $ 36,000 Regal 3060 ‘06.................................. $ 79,900 Tiara 2900 Coronet ‘07................... $129,500 Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘97 ............. $25,000 Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘00 ............. $29,995 Sea Ray 280 Sundancer ‘03 ............ $68,500 Glacier Bay 2670 Isle Runner ‘07 .. $94,000 Cobalt 263 Cuddy Cabin ‘01 ............. $39,500 Rosborough RF-246 Sdn Cruiser ‘05$ 79,500

25’ Chris-Craft Sportsman ‘48 ............. $120,000 23’ Bayliner 2350 Capri ‘00 .................... $11,995 21’ Zimmer Launch ‘09 ........................... $40,000 20’ Bayliner Capri 2050 LS ‘99 ................. $9,900

Tiara 5800 Sovran Now in Stock

18’ Boston Whaler 18 Outrage ‘81 ...... $14,900 18’ Herreshoff Pilot 18 ‘74....................... $ 9,500 17’ Sea Ray 176 Bow Rider ‘03 ............. $10,500 17’ Boston Whaler Striper 17 ‘89.......... $22,400 17’ ‘08 Assembled 17’ Beach Cruiser70’s $6,900 16’ Chris Craft Deluxe ‘41 ...................... $27,900 13’ Boston Whaler 13’ Sport ‘71 ............ $8,900

13000 Stover Rd. Charlevoix MI 49720

231-547-9967

cvx@irishboatshop.com

400 Bay Street Harbor Springs MI 49740

231-526-6225

hs@irishboatshop.com

www.IrishBoatShop.com

OPEN SPRING OF 2011 2011

Product Catalog EST. 1979

All new $2 million HEATED and SALES

SHOWROOM

CENTER opening spring 2011!

HARBOR SPRINGS, MI

CHEBOYGAN, MI

BAY HARBOR, MI

231-526-2141

231-627-7105

231-439-2741

Visit our website for our complete list of new and used boats including over 20 previously owned Tiara Yachts.

WALSTROM.COM

65 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

marine marketplace

SAIL Alerion Express • J-Boat • Precision • Laser Performance LIFESTYLE Patagonia • O’Brien • Puma • Gill • Rip Curl • Slam

marine marketplace

2007 RayBuRn 92 skylounge

1999 HatteRas 52 cockpit my

2006 tiaRa 4200 open

17’ 28’ 28’ 29’ 30’ 31’ 31’ 32’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 37’ 38’ 38’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 43’ 43’

2006 1996 2001 2006 2008 1995 1997 2007 1986 1986 1988 1989 1995 1988 2003 1967 1987 2005 2006 1975 1995

Grand Haven, MI Contact Brent Reed (616) 402-0180 Lasalle, MI Contact Paul Reed (419) 304-4962

2008 tiaRa 4300 sovRan

Boston Whaler 170 Montauk S-Mercury 90 hp 4-Stroke ......................$ 21,500 Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Yamaha 225 VX, 225 hp .............................$ 49,900 Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Mercury Optimax, 225 hp .........................$ 64,900 Tiara 2900 Classic T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp .......................................$ 129,900 Tiara 3000 Open T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp ...........................................$ 184,500 Tiara 3100 Open - Hardtop T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp..........................$ 89,900 Tiara 3100 Open T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp............................................$ 89,900 CABO 32 Express T-Caterpillar C-7, 461 hp..............................................$ 309,900 Trojan F-36 Convertible T-Crusader 350’s, 270 hp ...................................$ 49,500 Hatteras 36 Sedan T-Crusader 7.4 ltr., 350 hp .........................................$ 79,900 Mainship 36 Double Cabin T-Crusader 350 5.7L, 270 hp ........................$ 57,900 Tiara 3600 Convertible T-Crusader 350 hp ...............................................$ 79,900 Tiara 3700 Open T-Caterpillar, 3208, 435 hp .............................................$ 139,900 Hatteras 38 Convertible T-Detroit Diesels, 6V-71TI ................................$ 164,000 Powerquest 380 Avenger T-Mercruiser 496 MAG HO, 475 hp .............$ 115,000 Hatteras 41’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 6V53N 216 hp .....................$ 79,900 Chris Craft 42’ Commander T-Detroit Diesel 6V71TI’s ............................$ 119,900 Tiara 4200 Open - Plan A T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ............................ Sale Pending Tiara 4200 Open - Plan C T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ............................$ 479,900 Hatteras 43 Flybridge MY T-Cummins VT903, 320 hp .............................$ 99,900 Tiara 4300 Open T-Detroit Diesels 6V92’s, 550 hp ...................................$ 199,900

43’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 47’ 48’ 48’ 48’ 49’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 52’ 58’ 58’ 60’ 85’ 92’

2008 1984 2006 2000 1985 2009 1988 1994 2004 2007 1988 1994 2000 2005 1999 1978 1985 2000 2006 2007

Tiara 4300 Sovran T-Volvo IPS 600, 435 hp...............................................$ 499,900 Viking 44’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesels 671, 450 hp .............................$ 169,900 Tiara 4400 Sovran T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp ...........................................$ 524,900 Silverton 453 Motor Yacht T-Cummins QSM 11, 535 hp .........................$ 229,900 Ocean 46 Sunliner T-Detroit Diesel, 6-71’s ..............................................$ 119,900 Sunseeker 47 Portofino T-Volvo IPS 600, 435 hp.....................................$ 819,000 Ocean 48 Super Sport T-Detroit Diesel 6-71’s, 485 hp ...........................$ 169,900 Hatteras 48’ Cockpit MY T-Detroit Diesel 6V92, 535 hp .........................$ 249,900 Silverton 48’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-12, 700 hp ...............................$ 449,000 Grand Banks 49 Eastbay SX T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp .........................$ 749,900 Bertram 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 8V-92 735 hp..........................$ 449,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 12V-71TA DDEC, 900 hp ......$ 399,900 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ...........................$ 565,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-18, 1000 bhp ...........................$ 899,900 Hatteras 52’ Cockpit MY T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ...........................$ 499,900 Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 550 hp ................$ 299,900 Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 650 hp ................$ 349,000 Hatteras 60’ Convertible T-Caterpillar, 3412, 1350 hp .............................$ 974,500 Pacific Mariner 85’ Pacific Mariner T-MTU 10V2000, 1500hp ..............$4,795,000 Rayburn 92 Skylounge T-Caterpillar C30, 1550hp ...................................$5,500,000

www.reedyachtsales.com

NORTH SHORE MARINA Year Round Full Service Marina 821 W. Savidge, Spring Lake, MI 49456

Ph: 616-604-0234 Marina 616-842-1488 •

www.northshoremarina.com

Newest Great Lakes Edgewater Dealer SEE US AT

grand Rapids Boat Show February 16-20, 2011

Edgewater 245 CX coming soon

north Shore Open House February 25 & 26, 2011

Cruisers 330 Express in-stock

Select Pre-Owned / BrOkerage / rePOSSeSSIOnS / call FOr cOMPlete lISt

57’ ‘01 Carver Voyager, 1 Owner, New Listing,Well Equipped, T-635 Cummins $549,900 48’ ‘88 Viking Covert., Full Elect., Gen, Air/Heat, Fishing Equipment, $ Reduced $189,900 46’ ‘06 Cruisers 460 Exp., Loaded, HT, Air, Gen, Super Clean, T-430 Volvo Dsl ..$369,900 44’ ‘03 Carver MY, Air/Heat, Gen, Full Electronics, Only 213 Hrs, Diesel ............$239,900 42’ ‘01 Cruisers 4270 Exp., Air/Heat, Gen, Nice Elect., T-375 DSL Volvo .............$219,900 38’ ‘90 Carver Aft Cabin, Air/Heat, Gen, Full Elect., Updated Interior, Reduced . $64,900 37’ ‘05 Cruisers 370 Exp., Air/Heat, Gen, Loaded, Less than 300 hrs, T-8.1L ......$199,900 36’ ‘90 Tiara Convertible, Air/Heat, Gen/ Loaded, Full Elect., Low Hrs, T-454 ....$124,900 34’ ‘05 Cruisers 340 Exp., Air/Heat, Gen, Loaded, Radar, Super Clean, T-6.2L ...$129,900 33’ ‘90 Wellcraft 330 Coastal, Air/Heat, Gen. Full Electronics, Fish Ready .......... $49,900 26’ ‘06 Glacier Bay 26’ Power Cat, Air/Heat, Gen, HT, Radar, T-150 Hondas, Trl . $89,900

rePO’S 27’ ‘00 Sea Ray Sundancer 30’ ‘99 Bayliner Express 33’ ‘02 Proline 34’ ‘03 Rinker342 FiestaVee

’90 ’03 ’70 ’79 ’87 ’97 ’08 ’87 ’96 ’00 ’87 ’73 ’85 ’98 ’01 ’89 ’85 ’89 ’81 ’93 ’02 ’90 ’04 ’94

37’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 35’ 34’ 32’ 30’ 30’

’67 ‘99 ‘00 ‘77 ‘76 ‘77 ‘05 ‘73 ‘84

Fleming Pilothouse Motor Yacht...................... $495,000 Sea Ray Sundancer 50......................................... 449,000 Chris-Craft Commander ......................................... 48,000 C&L Trawler ........................................................... 117,000 Jefferson 42 Sundeck .......................................... 129,900 Maxum 4100 SCR .................................................. 119,900 Fathom .................................................................... 499,000 Silverton AFT CABIN .............................................. 49,900 Sea Ray EC ............................................................... 99,900 Sea Ray Sundancer.............................................. 129,900 Grand Banks 36 Classic ....................................... 154,900 Trojan Convertable ................................................. 19,900 Viking Convertible ................................................... 84,900 Nordic Tug 32......................................................... 175,000 Powerquest 340 Vyper 2001 .................................. 91,000 Tiara FLybridge ........................................................ 59,900 Island Packet IP 31 ................................................. 49,000 Sea Ray Weekender............................................... 33,000 Carver AFT CABIN .................................................. 19,900 Sea Ray 300 Sundancer......................................... 29,900 Sea Ray SunDeck ................................................... 49,000 Wellcraft Prima 2600 .............................................. 17,000 Aylward 25 “Rosborough Style Trawler” ............ 39,900 Maxum 2400 SCR .................................................... 14,900 sail Chris Craft Apache Sloop ...................................... 19,900 Catalina 36 MkII .................................................... 110,000 Catalina MkII 2000 .................................................. 99,900 Hallberg-Rassy Rasmus ........................................ 39,900 Hallberg-Rassy Rasmus ........................................ 42,000 Tartan Centerboard ............................................... 26,000 Beneteau 323 ........................................................... 79,900 Pearson ...................................................................... 9,900 Catalina 30 ............................................................... 27,900

36’ ‘88 Regal 39’ ‘07 Cruisers 395 MY 41’ ‘95 Silverton MY 42’ ‘07 Carver Super Sport MORE ARRiVing wEEklY!

66 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

55’ 50’ 47’ 45’ 42’ 41’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 38’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 34’ 34’ 31’ 31’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 27’ 26’ 25’ 24’

info@harborviewyachtsales.com • Traverse City, MI 49684 Call Bill Allgaier office: 231-933-5414 • cell: 231-218-1227

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THINKING OF BUYING A BOAT? Call us to see what options we have for you.

RATES HAVE JUST REACHED A NEW 3 YEAR LOW!

Onekama, MI 231-889-5000

www.onekamamarine.com Bay Harbor, MI 231-439-2675

(2 6 2 8)

1-888-887-BOAT NEW  USED  REFINANCE

www.lakemichiganyachtsales.com Visit our website to view our complete list of new and over 60 pre-owned boats.

‘00 41’ ‘94 41’ ‘77 41’ ‘07 40’ ‘06 40’ ‘05 40’ ‘94 40’ ‘03 39’ ‘97 39’ Riviera 4400 Sport Yacht IN-STOCK ‘02 38’ ‘69 38’ ‘07 37’ ‘89 36’ ‘85 36’ ‘89 34’ ‘00 33’ ‘94 33’ ‘85 33’ Riviera 33 Flybridge IN-STOCK ‘79 33’

Carver Yachts 396 MY ............159,900 Silverton 41 Convertible .........125,000 Chris Craft 410 MY ..................67,900 Riviera Yacht M400 Exp .......... 279,000 Riviera Yacht 40 F.B ...............440,000 Formula 400 Super Sport ........289,900 Tiara 4000 Mid Cabin Exp ......169,000 Sea Ray 390 MY- diesels.........249,000 Cruisers Yacht 3950 ACMY ....149,000 Cruisers Yacht 3870 Express ...154,995 Chris Craft Commandar ............23,500 Formula 370 SS .......................239,995 Cruisers Yacht Esprit .................64,995 Carver 36 Mariner ....................45,000 Luhrs Tournament 342 ..............26,995 Larson Cabrio 330 .....................79,000 Cruisers Yacht 3380 Esprit ........73,995 Cruisers Yacht 336 Ultra Vee.....29,995 Tartan 10 w/10hp Yanmar..........14,500

LIMITED CHARTER BOATS HIGH PERFORMANCE BOATS LOW DOWN PAYMENT PROGRAMS ARE AVAILABLE We offer Personal Service! Terms up to 20 YRS

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marine marketplace

Never Fear a Dead

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Services & Amenities Offered: • Seasonal & Transient Slips up to 120’ • Seasonal & Transient Moorings • Laundry, Shower & Dockside Parking • Indoor Heated & Outdoor Storage • Fuel Dock with Gas, Diesel & Pump-Out • WiFi Internet Access • Near-By Yacht Club • On-Site & Mobile Yacht Repair Services • Complete Mechanical Services • Certified Technicians • 70 Ton Travel Lift • On Site Yacht Sales & Brokerage Services • Launch & Retrieve Program for All Sizes • Member: Boat U.S. & Tow Boat U.S.

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155 EAST REDWOOD ST., STURGEON BAY, WISCONSIN, 54235

68’ 58’ 56’ 56’ 52’ 46’ 44’ 43’ 42’ 41’ 40’ 40’ 39’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 29’ 26’ 25’ 24’ 20’ 19’

2002 2010 1985 2007 2005 2010 2005 2000 2008 1988 2000 1990 1984 1999 1989 2000 1985 1998 1996 1991 1997 1996 2003 2002 1998 1990 2007 1987 1989 1996

Sunseeker Predator Ocean Alexander 58 MY Hatteras 56 Motor Yacht Cruisers Yachts 560 Express Ocean Alexander 52 Sedan Cruisers Yachts 460 Express Cruisers Yachts 440 Express Ocean Alexander 430 MKI PH Cruisers Yachts 420 Express Sea Ray 415 Aft Cabin Carver 404 Cockpit MY TollyCraft 40 Sport Sedan Sea Ray 390 Express Carver 380 Santego Carver 380 Santego Cruisers Yachts 3870 Exp. Dsls Chris-Craft 382 Cruisers Yachts 3870 Exp. Dsls Cruisers 3650 Aft Cabin Cruisers 3675 Esprit Cruisers Yachts 3575 Express Carver 325 Aft Cabin Four Winns 328 Cruisers Yachts 320 Express Cobalt 293 Cuddy Cruisers Yachts 2660 Vee Sport Chris-Craft 25 Corsair Sea Ray S24 Sorrento Wellcraft Center Console Four Winns U-19 Unlimited

• 920-743-6526 • BAYMARINE.NET 1815 Ottawa Beach Road, Holland, MI 49424

Ph: 616-399-6304 • Fax: 616-399-6329

Brokers for Power & Sail

www.anchorageyachtsales.com

TRADES CONSIDERED!

2000 SEA RAY 480 SEDAN BRIDGE

T- CAT 3196, Lift, Hardtop, Twin E-120’s, Teak Floor Ask 359k

2001 TIARA 3500 OPEN

T-Crusader 8.1L, Newer Stamoid canvas, Real Teak Salon, Windlass, None Cleaner! Ask 148k 68 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

1999 CRUISERS 4270 EXPRESS

2002 CARVER 410 SPORT SEDAN

T-CAT 3126, Cherry Int, C-120, Pilot, New Canvas, Mint! Ask 164k

T-Crusader 8.1L, Gen, Air, Cherry Int, Radar/Plot, Low Hours Ask 159k

1994 CARVER 350 AFT CABIN

2006 SEA RAY 340 SUNDANCER

T-Crusader 7.4L, Air, Hardtop, Wing doors, 397 hrs Ask 79k

T-Merc 8.1L, Gen, C-80, Cherry, 3 Flatscreens, Loaded! Mint! Ask 154k

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CELEBRATING 25

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Slips Available for 2011 We are a full service marina located on scenic White Lake in Whitehall, Michigan. We offer floating docks, bath and laundry facilities and a helpful, knowledgeable staff. Crosswinds is Your Service Solution for all major and minor repairs from top to bottom and stem to stern.

 Factory Certified Service  Transient Slips  Gas & Diesel  Pump Out  Monitor Channel 9  50 Ton Travelift  Heated Indoor Storage

www.crosswindsmarineservice.com 302 S. Lake Street  Whitehall, MI 49461  ph: 231-894-4549 69 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

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Swim Platforms Inc. is the world leader in aftermarket fiberglass swim platforms. A platform will enhance the value and enjoyment of your boat. You will appreciate the safety and pleasure to your family, friends and pets. Visit our website and submit your request for a beautiful swim platform. Our experienced crew is ready to build your new swim platform.

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A New Level of Luxury & Performance Comes to the Great Lakes

Creating family & fishing memories for over 20 years.

Visit The Next Generation of Rivieras.

www.beaconpointmarine.com 51 Enclosed Flybridge

Flybridge 38’ 41’ 43’ 45’ 47’ 51’ 58’ 61’ 70’ Sport yacht 36’ 44’ 50 58’ open expreSS 43’ 48’

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40’ Carver 2000 Four O Six T-Dsl Cos Cob ...................... $ 39’ Sea Ray 1988 Express Cruiser T-Gas Cos Cob .......... $ 39’ Mainship 2004 Trawler T-Diesel Cos Cob ................. $ 38’ SeaRay 2006 Sundancer T-Gas Cos Cob .................. $ 37’ Cruiser 2004 Express Gas Cos Cob............................ $ 37’ Sea Ray 1996 Sundancer T- Gas Cos Cob ................. $ 36’ Sea Ray 2002 Sundancer T- Gas Cos Cob ................. $ 35’ Contender 1995 Express T-Gas Cos Cob ................... $ 35’ Jefferson 2002 Marlago Gas Cos Cob ...................... $ 34’ Sea Ray 1999 Sundancer T-Gas Cos Cob .................. $ 33’ Donzi 1987 Cuddy cabin T-Gas Cos Cob .................... $ 32’ Stamas 1993 Express Gas Cos Cob ........................... $ 30’ Bertram 1984 Sportfish T- Gas Cos Cob .................... $ 30’ Stamas 1988 T- Gas Cos Cob ..................................... $ 30’ Pursuit 2001 Express Cos Cob ................................... $ 29’ Formula 1988 Performance Cruiser T-Gas Shelton ..........$ 29’ Pro-Line 2007 Express T-Gas Shelton ....................... $ 25’ Sea Fox 2010 Center console T-Gas .......................... $ 24’ Sea Ray 2007 Sundeck Mercruiser I/O ...................... $ 23’6” Sea Fox 2010 Walkaround Suzuki 250hp ............... $ 23’6” Sea Fox CC Suzuki 200hp ....................................... $ 23’ Everglades 2011 CC Single Yamaha 250hp ............. $ 23’ Sea Ox 1992 walkaround single Suzuki 300hp.......... $ 22’ Harris Floate-Bote 1995 .......................................... $ 22’ Sea Pro 2003 Walkaround.......................................... $ 21’ Sea Ray 1999 Express ................................................ $

199,900 45,000 184,900 210,000 139,500 89,995 145,000 56,500 79,000 79,995 25,995 19,995 42,000 15,000 69,995 15,000 85,000 57,500 38,000 42,500 36,995 76,000 22,900 12,995 17,500 9,995

49 River Road 722 River Road Cos Cob, CT Shelton, CT

203-661-4033 • 203-929-7444

www.technicalmarine.com the Finest Products and best Service

Call or visit our website for specials!

tecHnIcAL SuPPoRt AVAILAbLe Authorized Dealer / Distributor for

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Power Boats

35’ ‘94 Carver 350 Aft ....................... 82,900 43’ ‘95 Wellcraft 4350 Portofino ... 145,000

26’ ‘99 Sea Ray Sundancer ............. 37,500 36’ ‘82 Carver 3607 Aft ..................... 36,500 46’ ‘77 Bertam FBMY...................... 135,000 27’ ‘98 Four Winns 278 ..................... 42,500 37’ ‘88 Chris Craft Amerosport ....... 49,500 52’ ‘ 63 Chris Craft Connie ............... 49,500 29’ ‘87 Cruisers Sea Devil................ 25,500 37’ ‘78 Vinette Steel Trawler ........... 49,900

Sail Boats

29’ ‘04 Four Winns 298 ..................... 72,900 37’ ‘95 Cruisers 3775......................... 89,900 25’ ‘85 Catalina .................................... 6,900 29’ ‘94 Sea Ray 290 ........................... 28,900 38’ ‘88 C.C. 381................................... 79,500 27’ ‘73 Catalina .................................... 8,750 30’ ‘97 Maxum 3000 SCR.................. 42,900 38’ ‘98 Carver 380 Santego.............. 89,500 27’ ‘77 O’Day ........................................ 6,900 31’ ‘92 Silverton 31C ......................... 40,900 38’ ‘85 Bayliner 3870......................... 51,900 30’ ‘84 O’Day ...................................... 24,900 31’ ‘97 Carver 310 EX ........................ 44,900 40’ ‘94 Mainship Sedan ................. 119,900 30’ ‘95 Catalina MK III ...................... 49,900 32’ Wellcraft St. Tropez 4 starting @ 18,900 41’ ‘79 Lindmark Trawler ................. 94,900 32’ ‘78 Endeavor 32 Sloop ............... 26,500 34’ ‘01 Sea Ray 340 ......................... 105,500 42’ ‘87 Carver Aft .............................. 99,500 32’ ‘94 Sea Ward 32 Eagle............... 43,900 34’ ‘87 Sea Ray Express................... 31,900 42’ ‘82 Bertram FBMY .................... 135,900 34’ ‘96 Gemini 105M ......................... 84,950

5309 E. Wilder Rd. Bay City, MI 48706

Ph: 989-684-5010 • info@bayharborbaycity.com

Details on over 150 listings at

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Custom Marine Inc. Innovative Solutions for Your Boat

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BOAT LOANS

Lake Effect Financial Services,

William Otto, III 2907 S. Horseshoe Dr. Grandville, MI 49418

Ph: 616-538-5777 • Cell: 216-577-1460 Fax: 866-530-6058 billotto3@gmail.com Originating agent for:

LLC

Remanufacturerd transmissions in stock. Older transmissions our speciality.

Distributors of the Drivesaver flexible couplings and mounts, oil coolers and dampers.

Dealer Inquiries Invited 2706 Portage St., Kalamazoo, MI 49001 • 269-345-0629

71 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

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BERGMANN MARINE

Charlevoix, MI 49720 • Phone 231/547-3957

18’ 23’ 24’ 25’ 26’ 26’ 26’ 28’ 28’ 28’ 33’ 33’ 33’ 34’ 35’ 36’ 36’

www.bergmannmarine.com

1955 Chris Craft Sea Skiff .................................$ 1959 Lyman Sportsman .....................................$ 1994 Chris Craft Concept ..................................$ 1986 Bontnia Targa 25 (Diesel)........................$ 1983 Bertram Express .......................................$ 1986 Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ 1957 Chris-Craft Sport Express........................$ 2003 Formula 280BR ..........................................$ 2003 Chris-Craft Launch ...................................$ 2007 Chris-Craft Launch 28 ..............................$ 1983 Bertram Flybridge .....................................$ 2002 Formula Sun Sport ....................................$ 1998 Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ 2002 Pursuit 3400 Express ................................$ 1972 Chris-Craft Salon ......................................$ 1991 Tiara Convertible ......................................$ 1987 Tiara Convertible w/ Diesels...................$ Fiberglass – Woodworking Storage – Heated Storage

72 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

9,500 8,500 12,500 39,000 41,500 10,500 59,900 55,000 54,900 115,000 52,000 82,500 75,000 149,000 29,900 110,000 139,900

36’ 36’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 39’ 40’ 40’ 41’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 43’ 44’ 55’

1996 1997 1996 1966 1966 1977 1994 1994 1994 2002 1975 2006 1992 2000 1995 1992 1996

Saberline Express.....................................$ Cruisers 3650 .............................................$ Sea Ray Express .......................................$ Chris Craft Roamer H/T............................$ Chris Craft Roamer S/T ............................$ Endeavour Ketch ......................................$ Carver 390/404 ...........................................$ Hatteras Double Cabin.............................$ Sea Ray Express Diesels .........................$ Tiara 4100 Open ........................................$ Chris-Craft Motor Yacht ..........................$ Beneteau Trawler.....................................$ Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ Provincial Trawler ....................................$ Tiara 4300 Open ........................................$ Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ Sea Ray Sedan Bridge.............................$ Complete Mechanical Electrical Rigging – Haulout

Propeller Optimization & Repair Bring your propellers to Peak performance

198,000 120,000 87,000 20,000 25,000 34,000 95,000 173,000 125,000 309,000 55,000 349,000 139,000 169,500 199,900 139,000 170,000

lakeshore life

Boyne City, Michigan A boater’s dream, built for a family lifestyle. by colle e n h . trou pi s

Specs Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4 full, 2 half Square Footage: approx. 5,800 Shoreline: 110 feet Price: Starting at $2,490,000

Address 555 Bay St. Boyne City, MI 49712

Contact Pat O’Brien, Broker/Owner Pat O’Brien & associates 128 Water St. Boyne City, MI 49712 231-582-1700 patobrien.com

74 LAKELANDBOATING.COM m a r c h 2 011

T

he lakefront home at 555 Bay Street is a boater’s dream, boasting the widest permanent dock on Lake Charlevoix, a 40,000-pound hydraulic lift and two 70-foot slips. “I’ve represented many homes on Lake Charlevoix, and this one stands out as the complete package,” says Pat O’Brien, listing agent for the property. Maritime details can be found throughout, from the watertight door to the furnace room that is complete with a porthole, to the boat workshop under the garage, to the bar on the lower level: An actual 1941 15 ½-foot Chris-Craft that the owner had restored. “It has a microwave, dishwasher and instant hot water all built in,” he says. “It was a really fun project.” In addition to the bar, the walkout lower level includes a media room with a 60-inch drop-down screen and surround sound, wine cellar, half bath, and three bedrooms with full baths. On the main level, the great room features cathedral ceilings, crown molding, a striking fireplace and cherry wood floors that continue on to the dining area, kitchen and breakfast nook.

Upstairs, the master suite features a full bath with Jacuzzi tub, 42-inch plasma-screen TV with surround sound and a small office. A hall with plentiful closet storage connects the suite to the bonus room. The entire home is wired with surround sound, and in-floor heating can be found throughout as well. Despite all of its bells and whistles, the home is nothing if not comfortable. “It’s perfect for gathering the family,” O’Brien says. “It’s an incredibly warm home.” Also great for the family: The sandy beach, firepit, Jacuzzi and a deck that stretches from one end of the home to the other, offering a fantastic summer spot for dining and grilling. Also outside, the oversize two-car garage includes windows with views of the lake, surround sound—and an elevator that connects the furnace room, garage, and bonus room. “You get sunlight all day long in this area, and you can make the bridge by boat in less than half an hour,” O’Brien says. “No matter how bad it is on the big lake, Lake Charlevoix is protected enough that you can still go boating anytime. And we have the best sunsets.” r PHOTOS COurTESy Of PAT O’BrIEN & ASSOCIATES

REMAX GRAND HAVEN 133 WASHINGTON AVENUE GRAND HAVEN, MI 49417

(616) 502-5551 THE LAKESHORE’S REAL ESTATE LEADER

ERIC HESSE, SR. HOME LOAN CONSULTANT 616-638-5713

WWW.SANDIGENTRY.COM

Lake Michigan Views

Zephyr Condominium Downtown Grand Haven

Lake Michigan Waterfront

On Mona Lake

Charming 2-story cottage with screened in porch. Close to beach. City of Grand Haven. 4 bed | 2 bath

Located in the center of it all. Premium finishes, great views. Close to shopping and dining. 2 bed | 2.5 bath

180’ of frontage. Low bluff slopes to shoreline. Spectacular views. City of Norton Shores. 3600 sf. | 5 bed | 3.5 bath

124’ of frontage. Unique contemporary home. Yard slopes to water’s edge & dock. 3 bed | 2 bath

Mona Lake Frontage

White Lake Waterfront

Muskegon Lake Estate

Grand Haven Cottages

Stunning, completely remodeled home. Pool, patio, deck & deep water dock. 5137 sf. | 5 bed | 4.5 bath

Beautiful White Lake Retreat. 230’ of frontage. 1.6 acres, tiered patios, boat dock. 6700 sf. | 6 bed | 5 bath

Elegance & Luxury! 250’ on Muskegon Lake. 3.5 wooded acres in North Muskegon. 7202 sf. | 4 Bedroom Suites | 7 Baths

Premier Condominiums with views of the channel. Close to downtown and Lake Michigan beach. 2&3 bed floor plans

Lake Michigan Views

Grand River Frontage

Gables by the Lake

Mona Lake Frontage

Two story brick traditional with deeded Lake Michigan access. 3400 sf. | 5 bed | 3.5 bath

97 ft. of frontage. Remodeled to a cottage style interior. Great veiws. Dock & waterfront deck. 2600 sf. | 4 bed | 2.5 bath

New model! Beautifully designed condominiun on the shores of Spring Lake. 2500 sf. | 4 bed | 3 bath

Sprawling ranch with 187’ of frontage. Open floor plan. 3371 sf. | 4 bed | 2.5 bath

Deeded Lake Michigan Access

Lake Michigan Beach House

Lake Michigan Frontage

Spring Lake Waterfront

Contemporary home tucked in the dunes of North Shore. Fantastic water & sunset views. 3826 sf. | 3 bed | 4 bath

100’ ft of frontage. Spectacular sunset & lake views. Located on the North Shore. 2 bed | 2 bath

Quaint cottage with 75’ of Lake Michigan frontage. Gradual slope to water’s edge. 2 bed | 1.5 bath

One-owner ranch with 90’ of private frontage. Fantastic views of the lake. 2980 sf. | 3 bed | 3 bath

FOR MORE PHOTOS OF THESE & OTHER WEST MICHIGAN AREA HOMES

WWW.SANDIGENTRY.COM

1991 TIARA 290 SPORTBOAT – Fastidious original owner; maintained by Tiara dealer; heated storage; All service records available. 920-854-4521. APR11

2008 TIARA 3000 OPEN 100% Freshwater, Crusader 6.0 ltr, 375hp, hardtop, painted arch, transom fold down seat, curved companion L-Lounge, cockpit refrigerator, new salon layout, full Raymarine E-Series package, Must See! Price Reduced - Now Asking $184,500. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS

2003 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 320, 32’, 350 hrs. Twin 300hp inboards. Raymarine electronics w/radar, cabin amenities, $115,000. 574-210-4640, alanwrightcpa@comcast.net. JUN11

2006 SEA RAY 320 SUNDANCER, T6.2 Horizon IO’s, 150 hrs, purchased new in 2007, fully equipped. For info, email edkathys@tds.net, or call 608-576-6906 JUN11

1980 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp Turbo Diesel, 40 gal water, 200 gal fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, well maintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. MAY11

2000 NORDIC TUG 32’ 570 Hours, Cummins Diesel, Bow/ Stern Thrusters, Dish TV, Clean, Great Lakes Only, Heated Storage, $190,000, 616-588-4127. JUN11 1994 CARVER 350. AC, Twin Crusaders, Gen, GPS, Radar, Plotter, Auto Pilot, New Canvas ’09, Excellent Condition. $79,9K OBO, 248-644-2850 or stundo@aol.com MAY11

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1997 SEA RAY SEDAN Bridge CAT3196-660HP w/250 hours. Array of Electronics, Mint+ Condition. $259k 248-912-4789. JUN11

2004 TIARA 3600 SOVRAN. Twin 450hp Cummins, heated storage, excellent, pictures available, $249,000. robert_cummings@ml.com or 920-737-7304 MAR11

1990 BAYLINER 3888 MOTOR YACHT. 175hp diesels. Some upgrades. Low hours fresh water boat. Peoria/ Illinois River. $69,000. 309/696-5672 or josephcin@comcast.net JUN11

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2004 SEA RAY 390 MOTOR YACHT. Twin 480CE Cummins 290 hrs. Bristol condition. Loaded with options. Freshwater only. Heated storage. $199,000. 317-523-8506 MAY11

2005 TIARA 32 OPEN. 8.1 Crusaders, E120 w/ digital sounder, autopilot, open array, pristine, $199,000. Jeff 517-202-2123. NO BROKERS! JUN11

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StoraWinter ge PA ID!

34’ 2001 SEA RAY SUNDANCER. 160 hours, new camper– top, heated storage since new. Excellent Condition. $93,000. 419-571-7997 MAR11

2003 SILVERTON 35C. One Owner, freshwater. T-Crusaders, 240 hours. Loaded-usual + bow & stern thrusters; remote controller; davits. Cincinnati. 218-349-8381 JUN11

2008 RIVIERA 3600 SPORT YACHT. $475,000 Bring an Offer! New Riviera 3600 Sport Yacht ready for delivery with full manufacturer’s Warranty. Twin Diesels. No canvas!! Please call for details. 705-340-1255.. Ask for Rick. NYS

40’ 1967 CHRIS CRAFT CORINTHIAN. Rare awesome award winner. Needs nothing. Nov ‘08 survey. Please, serious inquiries only. 586-791-3744 eve., 248-588-4410 day. MAR11

1986 CARVER 42 AFT/CABIN M/Y. Cats, One Owner, Hard enclosure aft deck. Two Queen staterooms. Fresh water, $125,000. kalconfl@aol.com MAR11

77 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

classifieds: boats for sale

1977 25’ CHRIS CRAFT CATALINA. Single 230hp gas engine, trim tabs. New upholstery in cockpit. Full canvas, fresh water, teak interior, good condition $4000. 773-272-2418. bilgepump54@netzero.net. MAY11

classifieds: boats for sale

1995 TIARA 4300 OPEN 100% Freshwater, excellent condition, 550hp, hardtop, newer aft & drop curtains, newer electronics, upgraded stereo, trolling valves, Must see! Price Reduced - Now Asking $199,900. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS

48’ 1986 CALIFORNIAN MOTOR YACHT. 3208 Cat Diesels Three staterooms three heads Decorator interior MI $159,000. 313-402 9579 MAY11 40’, 60’, 88’ DOCKOMINIUMS FOR SALE at beautiful Duncan Bay Boat Club. Clubhouse, pool, floating docks, wifi & more. Straits of Mackinaw. 866-993-3625, sales@duncanbay.com FEB12

Yacht Delivery MOVE YOUR BOAT WORRY FREE on our air ride hydraulic trailer. Free Quotes! Dave’s Marine Transport. 2009 RIVIERA 44 SPORT YACHT. Brand New with Full Warranties. Please call for more details and photos. 705-340-1255. Ask for Rick. NYS

1991 500 SEA RAY SUNDANCER, One Owner 10 years, many upgrades and accessories, Records and pictures available. 330-550-3714 APR11

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Toll Free: (866) 814-DAVE (3283) www.davesmarinetransport.com

RUC

CAPT. BILL YOUNKIN awaiting orders. At your service in the Great Lakes, Florida, and all points in between. 100 Ton USCG License, references, 561-353-6827. JUN11

2005 OCEAN ALEXANDER. 54 LOA (2)500HP Yanmars300 hrs, dual stations, full Raymarine electronics,12KW gen, Air, Zodiac H/B, deluxe bridge. $585,000. 920-739-7668. MAY11 1997 445 CARVER AFT CABIN. All new canvas & glass. Asking $189,500. ALL OFFERS & TRADES CONSIDERED. Call 920 231-0148 or bacssdb@yahoo.com JUN11

Charters BAREBOAT CANADA’S FABULOUS NORTH CHANNEL, LAKE HURON. 25 power and sailboats, 27’-50’, cruise and learn, skippered. Canadian Yacht Charters, Gore Bay, Ontario. 800-565-0022. email: info@cycnorth.com, www.cycnorth.com RUC

Powerboat 1981 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp Turbo Diesel, 40 gal. water, 200 gal. fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, wellmaintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. JUN11

57’ CHRIS CRAFT 1968. GM diesels. Mahogany hull, teak decks, FBG top. Great Lakes only. Asking $169,000. 954-463-1400 MAR11 2001 460 SEA RAY SUNDANCER, T6.2 Horizon IO’s, 150 hrs, purchased new in 2007, fully equipped. For info, email 847-287-4317 JUN11

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2008 SEA RAY 330/350 SUNDANCER, twin 370 V-drive inboards, 30 hours, all upgrades, never slept on, like new. Freshwater, heated storage only, $195K. 847-848-5199. APR11 TIARA 35 OPEN, 8.1 Crusaders, Hardtop, Full electronics, New Canvas, 500hrs, Glendenning. Oil Changer. Mint 185K. 734-847-8031. JUN11 1987 36’ TIARA CONVERT. Heated stg, pro serviced, 350 HP/905 HRS, all electronics, fresh water, excellent, photos available. Reduced $99,900. Call 616-340-7300 or 616-866-5135 MAY11 2004 SILVERTON 35 MOTOR YACHT, 8.1 gas, 50 hours, fully equipped, pristine, covered slip, pro. Maintained. Reasonable offer. 563-332-7222. MAY11

2008 RIVIERA 47G2 FLYBRIDGE CONVERTIBLE. New with manufacturer’s Warranty. Loaded. Please call for details and special pricing. 705-340-1255 Ask for Rick. NYS

2000 SEA RAY 480, Cats, 600 hrs, thruster, custom interior, one owner. $295K or trade down to 36-40. 231-313-2191. MAY11 78 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

1991 VIKING 66/CMY 1991 VIKING 66/CMY. MAN-T/1200hp, 300hrs. Staterooms(4), F/Heads(3), Walk Around Engine room, Meticulously Maintained, Freshwater, One Owner, OAL 72’6”. $495,000. 800-213-3323, louismunao@dcwis.com APR11

REDUCED AGAIN! ‘95 500 DA SEA RAY. Heated storage, T-550 Detroits. 502 hrs. Clean and equipped. Fresh water only. $235,000. ph: 216-469-7000 MAY11

Slips 40’ SLIP Ellenwood Landing, White Lake, Montague rent for 2011 season $2695. Buy for $12,000. 269-986-9081 MAY11

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79 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

classifieds: boats for sale

The Best Way to D L O S Sell Your Boat Fast!

above the waterline

Demons of the Deep

Some burdens you simply can’t leave ashore. BY DAVE WALLACE

I

n the dim past of the last century, when my mate and I became totally committed to Great Lakes cruising, it didn’t take long for us to face up to the reality that we were destined to head out with a crew of demons on board. Like the famous Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, our demons also have names: Anchor Drag, Bearings Lost, Dense Fog and Wave Height. With the exception of Wave Height, who stands alone as the undisputed leader of the pack, the others have been put to rest by the electronic generation. If you are reading this as the owner of a joystick-controlled cruiser connected with a Sat-Navdirected autopilot, color radar and forward-looking depth sounder, you’ll surely wonder what all the whining is about. If your cruising experience mostly involves running from port to port and tying up safely in a slip, it would be fair to question the demonic power of Anchor Drag. Unfortunately, we were introduced to cruising by a salty group of sailboating purists who were either too proud or too cheap to settle for the soft life of marina security. To them, anchoring was the ultimate confirmation of true seamanship. In spite of all the advice we received about setting the flukes with a length of chain and allowing plenty of scope, more often than not we’d awake to see a different part of the shoreline than the one we went to sleep with. As if that weren’t demonic enough, our second boat had an intermittent short circuit in the wiring system

80 LAKELANDBOATING.COM M A R C H 2 011

that always managed to drain our battery overnight. Sometimes, there would be enough juice left to start the engine—and sometimes not. Anchor Drag loved to play head games like that.

Demons? What demons? My non-boating friends could never understand how Bearings Lost could be a demon, when most Great Lakes cruising involves running up and down a coastline. When I mentioned the challenge of crossing the lake, they became even more insulting. How hard could it be, they wondered, to reach the opposite shore? The secret to success, I reminded them, is knowing whether to turn right or left once you get there. The first time we crossed, Dense Fog took over and put Bearings Lost at the wheel. At the crucial point of making landfall, we had only a fifty-cent piece to guide us. Heads, we go to starboard; tails we go to port! Our last boat was the only one with radar. Prior to that, Dense Fog managed to push all of our terror buttons. Unlike Wave Height, who typically gave us some warning, Dense Fog often drifted out of nowhere and left the helmsman staring in terror at the compass rose for some hint of reality in this grey new world of imagined shapes and non-directional sounds. The first radars were bulky and crude and mostly assigned to larger yachts. By the time we finally got ours, my hair had already turned white. Dense Fog had won that fight. As for Wave Height, it remains the one demon that instrumentation cannot control. It has the intimidation to keep cruisers in port and behind schedule. It has the ability to make crewmembers seasick. In extreme cases, it even has the power to sink ships. And this power quickly builds—usually after we’re well offshore and far from shelter. So, my fellow boating friends, ask yourselves: If you’re haunted by these demons, why do you still love boating? Good question. In my case, I guess it just serves as relaxing relief from my day job: Field-testing experimental new parachute prototypes!  DAVE WALLACE has been boating in the

Great Lakes for more than 34 years. He’s written for Lakeland Boating since 1993 and helped develop the first edition of Lakeland Boating’s Ports O’ Call Cruising Guides. ILLUSTRATION BY MIKE HARRIS

ADVE RTISE I N

CALL 800-331-0132 FOR MORE INFORMATION


Lakeland Boating March 2011