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Del Mar College

Popular Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year Ended August 31, 2011

Del Mar College • 101 Baldwin Blvd • Corpus Christi, TX 78404-3897

Del Mar College was honored to receive the prestigious Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting, the Distinguished Budget Award and the Popular Annual Financial Reporting Award from the Government Finance Officers Association for 2010. The Certificate of Achievement is the highest form of recognition in governmental accounting and financial management. – Dr. Mark Escamilla, President

On the cover: Winning design by Michael Diamante, art major, for the Del Mar College 75th Anniversary poster contest.

Message from President Escamilla Del Mar College Board of Regents 2010-2011 Trey McCampbell Chair Elva Estrada Vice Chair Minerva P. Arriaga Secretary Dr. Nicholas L. Adame Assistant Secretary James B. (Jim) Boggs Parliamentarian James Matthew Duerr Regent Susan E. Hutchinson Regent Gabriel Rivas III Regent Guy Leland Watts Regent

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October 2011

Celebration of our 75th Anniversary, reaffirmation of our accreditation, $2.66 million for student scholarships and national certification of our financial reporting practices — 2010-2011 was a red-letter year for Del Mar College! The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools reaffirmed Del Mar College’s educational accreditation for the next 10 years, without a single recommendation for improvement or need to produce a follow-up report. In higher education circles, this equates to scoring 100 on a final exam. I extend my sincere appreciation to the entire team who committed efforts toward the success of this critical process. My appreciation also goes to Mr. Eugene Bouligny, a local businessman who issued a $1 million challenge to raise scholarship funds for our students, and to the leadership of the Del Mar College Foundation for meeting and exceeding that challenge within the one-year deadline. The final total was $2.66 million in scholarship funds that will provide access to students for decades to come. To improve the transparency and accountability of our financial reports, the College produced three reports—this Popular Annual Financial Report, the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report and the Distinguished Budget— within the year. Each received national certification from the Government Finance Officers Association. We also celebrated our 75th Anniversary during 2010-2011 year by recognizing a 750,000th registrant, identifying 75 Distinguished Alumni, enjoying an Alumni Roundup barbecue and western dance, and commemorating each year of our history as part of the 75th Anniversary Commencement Ceremonies, among many other events and recognitions. Last year was a very good year for Del Mar College. Please review the many other highlights in this Popular Annual Financial Report.

Mark Escamilla, Ph.D. President

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year

Please refer to pages 19-20 for a list of those goals and objectives.

September 2010

• Video Praise. “Sharing Our Success” video earns Customized Training and DMC-TV recognition from American Society for Training and Development. Objective 3.3

• Register Round-the-Clock. Del Mar College enrolls additional 500 students, for an all-time record exceeding 12,245 with 24-hour campus registration. Objective 1.1

• Alumni Recognition. Alumni Association recognizes 75 Distinguished DMC Alumni as part of the College’s 75th anniversary activities. Objective 6.5

• Two New Deans. College appoints Dr. Larry Lee dean of Business, Professional and Technology Education and Dr. Jonda Halcomb dean of Arts and Sciences. Objective 3.2

• Legal Lab. Court Reporting and Closed-Captioning students demonstrate new court reporting lab, made possible by $381,000 grant to launch Judicial Realtime/Closed Captioning Program. Objective 2.3

• Art Fund Raiser. The Red Dot Art Auction raises funds to purchase campus art pieces. Objective 6.3 • Cake Champions on Campus. Three FOOD NETWORK and The Learning Channel cake champions lead the 2010 Sugar Art Showcase for the Culinary Arts Program. Objective 1.6 • Geospatial Grant. Four biotechnology students and their faculty advisor utilize $115,000 National Science Foundation grant to developing a curriculum under the College’s National Geospatial Technology Center of Excellence. Objective 1.5

• GIS Innovation. Hewlett Packard Catalyst grant provides GIS Center $150,000 to support global social innovation in science, technology, engineering and math education worldwide. Objective 1.7 • Prize Package. Austen Turner, “honorary” 750,000th DMC student to register, wins tuition and fees for 12 credit hours, a laptop computer and reserved parking space for 75th Anniversary. Objective 1.2 • Student Excellence. Natural Sciences student interns Jennifer Chancellor, Tamara Griffiths and Kristina Lardner conduct research for national technological conference and agriculture program. Objective 1.1

Highlights from the College’s 2010-2011 Academic Year, presented in this Annual Report to the Board of Regents, reference the specific goals and objectives stated in the Access to Excellence, Del Mar College Strategic Plan 2009-2014.

I started off at a university because I wanted the complete college experience. In some of the classrooms, we had 300 students so I struggled to stay focused. When I got to Del Mar, I saw most of the classes were small and I was able to get that one-on-one attention that I needed to be successful.

– Emily Gonzalez Business Administration major

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year • Cool Jazz. Texas Jazz Festival celebrates its 50th anniversary with College and the media in the East Campus Harvin Student Center, the location where the dream began half a century ago. Objective 4.3 • High Water. Twenty Air Conditioning and Building Maintenance Technology students repair homes, appliances and air conditioners damaged by flooding for residents of Los Encinos area. Objective 1.8 • Teaching Award. Mike Jones, associate professor of speech, named 2010 Community College Educator of the Year by Texas Speech Communication group—fifth DMC faculty so recognized. Objective 3.3 • White House Visit. President Mark Escamilla attends the Executive Order Signing Ceremony for Educational Excellence for Hispanics as part of the National Education Summit in nation’s capitol. Objective 5.5 • Poetic Ambassador. DMC Librarian and poet Alan Berecka reads original works for 2010 Druskininkai Poetic Fall, in Lithuania—one of only three Americans and 26 poets invited worldwide. Objective 3.7

• Funding Grant. Child Care Access Means Parents in School grant provides childcare and education for 15 children of low-income students in the Morris L. Lichtenstein, Jr. Center for Early Learning. Objective 1.2 • Pell Promotions. President Escamilla promotes Pell Grant applications through Englishand Spanishlanguage radio and television promotions. Objective 5.4 • Music Instruments. The Coastal Bend Community Foundation and Wayne M. Squires, president of the DMC Foundation Board of Trustees, provide $25,000 to buy instruments students can’t afford. Objective 4.3 • Small Business. $180,000 Microentrepreneurs grant from U. S. Small Business Administration expands Small Business Development Center’s services to nine-county region. Objective 6.5 • Student Focus. “Partnering for Student Success” $1.4 million grant from U. S. Dept. of Education supports academic achievement and internships through the Title V and Student Success Center. Objective 1.10

We get hands-on experience right away. The instructors are tough, but if you do what they tell you, you’ll be okay. The DMC Nuclear Medicine program has a 100% passing rate on the Board exams, so it all pays off.

– Jeremy Aleman Nuclear Medicine major

October 2010

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year

November 2010 • Leadership Honored. Beverly Cage is named president and first community college representative to serve in executive role on the Southern Association of Student Employment Administrators’ board. Objective 3.2 • National Competition. Biology graduate Jennifer Robles beats out Ivy Leaguers in Science and Energy Research Challenge for research on radiation sensitivity in human cells. Objective 1.9 • Dig It. Introduction to Archaeology added to curriculum to teach excavation theory and human origins and adaptation. Objective 3.1 • The Beat. Sound Recording Technology major Jonathan Cardenas competes against other top-notch drummers to earn a shot at $43,000 grand prize in Guitar Center DrumOff Regional Competition. Objective 1.9

• Engineering Emphasis. Two new degrees, Associate in Science in engineering with a mechanical option and Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in engineering technology swell enrollment. Objective 1.6

December 2010 • Scouting Members. West Campus hosts “jamboree” as hundreds of Boy Scouts Celebrate 100 Years of Scouting with all-hands events and demonstrations to encourage Coastal Bend involvement. Objective 4.5 • Angels Again. Duplicating Services staff organize 119 employees to support 160 youth through Salvation Army’s Adopt-An-Angel Program for the 20th year. Objective 4.3 • Million-Dollar Smile. DMC Foundation announces $1 million challenge, issued by local businessman and philanthropist Eugene Bouligny, to match his offer by Sept. 30, 2011. Objective 6.3 • Trustee Service. Del Mar College Foundation Board of Trustees names local CPAs Willie Kosarek of Kosarek Davenport & Cudd and Sylvia Whitmore of Frost National Bank “Trustees Emeritus.” Objective 6.5

• Anniversary Homecoming. South Texas Alumni Round-up, featuring gunslingers, country music and barbecue, brings 450 alumni back to campus and nets $25,000 as part of College 75th Anniversary. Objective 4.1

Before Del Mar College, I worked a number of entry-level jobs but I never seemed to get anywhere. And then I saw a billboard that asked, ‘What’s Your Dream?’ And that inspired me to ask, ‘What is my dream?’ I knew what my dream was; I wanted to become a veterinarian. I’m going to go to Del Mar College – and that’s how I got started.

– Kristina Larnder Biology major

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year • Initial Offering. Alumni Association awards first 10 student Alumni Scholarships for academic achievement, community involvement, veteran and alumni status and as dependents of alumni. Objective 1.2 • Engineering Handshake. DMC and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi sign articulation agreement allowing engineering majors option to transfer credits for mechanical engineering degree. Objective 4.1 • International Acclaim. Music Department’s Dr. Scott Hagarty publishes article, “Repertoire of the New York Brass Quintet,” in scholarly publication International Trumpet Guild Journal. Objective 3.2

February 2011 • Financial Advice. DMC Financial Aid Office partners with KIII–TV for second annual South Texas Financial Aid Fair to assist Coastal Bend residents with financial aid applications. Objective 1.10 • Grant Information. The Defense Logistics Agency awards $241,000 grant to Procurement Technical Assistance Center to assist business owners pursuing federal, state and local government contracts. Objective 4.2

• Act One. Fine Arts Center expansion “raises the curtain” to announce $10.2 million expansion including 340seat proscenium theater and more space for the Drama, Art and Radio/TV Programs. Objective 2.2 • Youth Talent. Art Program hosts 2011 Region 2 Visual Arts Scholastic Event with 400+ high school students’ work showcased as part of Texas Art Education Association annual competition. Objective 4.1 • National Show. The 45th Annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Show opens with 37 pieces––including 21 drawings and 16 sculptures–– selected from 176 entries by U.S. artists. Objective 4.3 • Safety Job Fair. Over 100 students from Moody, Miller and Ingleside High Schools explore career opportunities from 15 area fire, emergency medical services, police and law enforcement agencies. Objective 4.6 • Attractive Salaries. Transportation Training Services hosts free truck driving fair for new applicants. Trucking careers offer beginning salaries ranging from $35,000 to $40,000 in South Texas. Objective 1.7

By teaming up with other institutions to help students complete their degree programs, Del Mar College has helped my achieve my dream. DMC faculty welcomed me with open arms. Their enthusiasm and support has been encouraging and inflamed my passion for learning, cooking, sharing and working with others.

January 2011

– Fernando Cardenas Culinary Arts major, transfer student

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year • Global Social Connection. The Stone Writing Center’s tutor blog logs users from Russia, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, India, Malaysia and other countries to see what Roxy Writer has to say. Objective 1.5

• Active Admissions. New student information systems initiate expanded applications for recruitment, retention and engagement. Objective 5.2

March 2011

• Reading Tradition. College hosts 11th Annual Children’s Book Festival, “Hair Raising Adventures in Reading,” with four Texas authors reading to more than 1,000 precocious four-year-olds. Objective 4.6

• Retention Improvement. Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board provides $90,000 grant for “At-risk Student Tracking and Intervention Project” to assist nursing education students. Objective 1.4 • Cuddly Comfort. Twenty Early Childhood Club students provide 200 stuffed animal toys to the American Red Cross to comfort young children experiencing the aftermath of disasters. Objective 4.3 • Telling Time. Alumni and Former Students’ Associations bury 75th Anniversary time capsule on West Campus with scheduled opening in 2036 when the College celebrates its 100th anniversary. Objective 5.6

• Added Emphasis. The General Education Development Program offers online distance learning that allows students to focus on areas needing more attention using resources outside the classroom. Objective 1.2 • Ready Writers. Journalism students collect 36 awards, including seven firstplace, five second-place, 10 third-place and 14 honorable mentions, from Texas Intercollegiate Press Association. Objective 3.1 • Ad Awards. “Where you want to go.” television ad campaign wins district and national awards from the American Advertising Federation and the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations. Objective 5.1 • Four Faces. Jessica Davila-Burnett, of AEP Texas; D. Scott Elliff, CCISD Superintendent; Joe A. McComb, of McComb Relocation Services and Joseph C. Wise, Jr. with Merrill Lynch join Former Students Wall of Honor. Objective 6.4

My dream is to become a police officer like my father back home and perhaps one day join the FBI. I am grateful for the support I have received from DMC faculty and staff; I know they care about me and are working hard to make sure I succeed in life. – Wei Han Criminal Justice major from China

• Burning Desire. Ray High School student Tiffany Rivera, a junior welder with spina bifida, accepts full DMC Welding Program scholarship from anonymous donor to fund five semesters. Objective 1.2

April 2011

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year • Honor Tradition. The 60th Recognition Ceremony adds liberal arts major John Michael Cave, marketing major Shauna M. Mondragon and biology major Samantha Sanchez to Hall of Fame. Objective 1.8

by guest composer Dr. Benjamin Sabey, are part of 75th Anniversary music celebration. Objective 3.2

May 2011

• Family Tradition. Leanne Mulholland, inducted into DMC Alpha Beta Gamma International Business Honor Society in 2006, pins daughter Elizabeth Mulholland as one of 21 new inductees. Objective 4.5 • High Touch. A $55,200 grant from EDUCAUSE and the Gates Foundation provides iPad Touch devices to Biological Concepts I students for research as part of a mobile learning initiative. Objective 1.6 • Love Locks. Cosmetology majors join Regional Technical Center and Miller High School students to collect Locks of Love hair donations for making hairpieces for youth with long-term hair loss. Objective 1.8 • New Music. World premieres of cantata, “The New People” by faculty member Dr. Neil Flory and “Moonlit”

• Gold Medal. College earns highest financial certification from Government Finance Officers Association for Comprehensive and Popular Annual Financial Reports and Distinguished Budget. Objective 2.1 • Graduation Day. 75th Anniversary Commencement graduates 755, including 65 from the Collegiate High School, after hearing keynote address from 1982 DMC honors graduate Joseph C. Wise, Jr. Objective 5.5 • Cadet Success. After completing the Regional Police Academy’s Basic Peace Officers Program, 20 cadets earn pins and are ready for public safety careers. Objective 1.7 • Cadet Success II. In the largestever class of DMC Fire Academy cadets, all 44 graduates passed the Texas Commission on Fire Protection certification exam on their first attempt. Objective 1.6

I joined SEMMO (Science, Engineers, Math Majors Organization) to meet students who are on my career path. It really helps to know that there’s someone there who’s taking the same classes that you are, that you get along with and you see all the time.

– Erica Littleford Electrical Engineering major

• Top Teachers. Student Government Associations honors Instructors of the Year Richard Rupp, associate professor of mathematics, and Tonya B. Pigulski, assistant professor of nuclear medicine. Objective 3.3

• Lantern Tradition. Dressed in white uniforms and holding battery-operated “lantern candles,” more than 70 nursing graduates received their pins and take the time-honored Florence Nightingale pledge. Objective 1.1

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year

• NISOD Nod. Barbara Finnegan, Associate Professor of Mathematics, earns College’s 2011 National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development Excellence Award for teaching excellence. Objective 3.7 • Renewed Certification. Occupational Therapy Assistant Program and the Pharmacy Technology Program each achieve continued accreditation status from national accreditors. Objective 3.1

June 2011 • Court Support. Court Reporting Program organizes annual Texas Court Reporters Association convention for more than 400 court reporting and realtime translation/closed captioning professionals. Objective 5.5 • Employment Success. The Career Planning and Placement’s intern program provide students with handson job experiences, a good living wage and potential employment opportunities after graduation. Objective 1.10

• Advisor Honor. Phi Theta Kappa National Honor Society’s Center for Excellence honors Amy Tilton Jones,

Speech Associate Professor, for 10 years as advisor of five-star Gamma Sigma Chapter. Objective 3.2 • Local Premiere. Texas Association of Black Personnel in Higher Education and Diversity and Ethnic Awareness committee host a screening of “A War for Your Soul—Knowledge is Power.” Objective 4.3

July 2011 • Habitat Help. Twenty-three Air Conditioning Applied Technology students get on-the-job training through Habitat for Humanity by installing a residential A/C unit in a home built by the local program. Objective 1.8 • Real Applications. Chemical Laboratory Technology majors demonstrate for media how to separate a mixture of compounds using distillation methods found in petrochemical industry. Objective 5.6 • Green Efforts. Volunteers from Natural Sciences and Social Sciences Departments manage the Third City Glass Recycling Event collecting three “box-car-sized” recycling containers with glass. Objective 2.6 • One-of-a Kind. Kristopher Pickle, voice major, conducts a new music reading session during the Texas Choral Directors Association conference. DMC was the only community college represented. Objective 3.1

The classes in Nuclear Medicine are challenging, but small. We’re like a little family. Our clinicals take what we learn in class and put it into a real-world setting, and everything we learn starts to make sense and come together. We also get to meet with professional technologists and get the benefit of their experience. I love it.

• Career Award. Glen Ellis, Occupational Safety and Health program coordinator, named “Safety Professional of the Year” by Coastal Bend Chapter of the American Society of Safety Engineers. Objective 3.7

– Pamela Palacios Nuclear Medicine major

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Highlights for 2010-2011 Academic Year • Program Approval. The Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Echocardiography programs receive “continuing accreditation” by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. Objective 1.7 • Perfect Score. The Radiologic Technology Program announces a 100% pass rate by the Class of 2011 on their first attempt at The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists Exam. Objective 3.1

August 2011 • DREAM-IT. A $300,000 National Science Foundation grant funds Discover, Relate, Engage, Attract, Motivate with Interactive Technologies project to add first generation computer students. Objective 2.3

• All Aboard. The “Kingsville Connection” makes commuting easy as Paisano Transportation provides rides between DMC and Texas A&M University-Kingsville for students and staff. Objective 4.3 • Career Bound. College credentials Workforce Solutions of the Coastal Bend Career Ready graduates who earn 2.2 Continuing Education Units while learning application and job skills. Objective 4.4 • SACS Success. The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools reaffirms Del Mar College’s educational accreditation for the next 10 years with no recommendations. Objective 3.1

• Excellence Award. Dr. Loyd Poplin, Chair of the Department of Natural Sciences, receives the Dr. Aileen Creighton Award for Teaching Excellence during Fall Convocation. Objective 3.2 • Book Work. DMC’s Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education chapter awards textbook scholarships totaling $2,100 to seven students following a barbeque fundraiser. Objective 1.2

– Roger Santoya III Registered Nursing Education major

I’m very thankful to the DMC Foundation for the scholarship because it’s provided me tremendous help. Because of it, I haven’t had to work as much to pay for school. And that’s been a tremendous help in providing me success here within the nursing program.

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2010-2011* 2009-2010

20000 16,923 16,182

15000 12,069 12,236

10000 8,399 8,468

5,882

5000

0

6,079

11

Degrees and Certifications 2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011*

1532 1545 1489

1109

1110

1033

642

449 389 385

70

43 37

8

22 29

583 595

423

456

435

12

Financial Aid Distribution

13

Del Mar College Annual Financial Report Del Mar remains fiscally sound. A complete financial condition and history based on assets, liabilities and net assets for all funds and account groups is detailed extensively in the College’s Annual Financial Report for each of these years and Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2011.

Assets Current assets are those resources reasonably available within one year. Unlike other forms of assets, cash and equivalents such as checking account balances and demand deposits, can be used immediately for current operational needs, such as meeting the payroll or paying vendors. Short-term investments represent the College’s holdings in allowable financial instruments due within one year. Receivables represent those monies due to the College but not yet available for use; examples include property taxes not yet paid and accrued interest. Noncurrent assets are the College’s long-term financial and plant resources.

Restricted cash is the College’s endowed scholarships transferred to the Foundation in 2011. Bond issuance cost was the cost of issuing bonds which is being amortized over the life of the bonds. Plant and equipment account for the College’s equity in land, buildings, real estate improvements (such as roads and security lighting), and capital equipment expenditures such as computer network servers and digital projectors.

Liabilities Current liabilities are short-term obligations. Accrued payroll, accounts payable, and other accrued liabilities represent amounts due to employees or vendors for services, supplies or equipment provided to the College. Unearned revenues include property taxes and student tuition billed for the fall term and not yet earned.

Net Assets Net assets are the accumulated resources invested in plant and equipment.

Property Taxes The local property owners provide almost 44 percent of total resources for the fiscal year 2011. However, for a typical homeowner, Del Mar’s 2011 rate of 0.258 dollars per $100 assessed valuation represents only 11 percent of the tax bill. This compares with a local school district rate of about 1.237 dollars and the City of Corpus Christi rate of 0.572 dollars per $100 assessed valuation. Property taxes are a significant source of revenue for all Texas community colleges.

Noncurrent liabilities represent longterm obligations, usually due over a number of years.

College District Tax Fiscal Year

Tax Year

Tax Rate

Net Assessed Valuation

Percentage of Valuation Change

2006-07

06

.255723*

$14,084,424,382

9.47

2007-08

07

.242089*

$16,144,199,746

14.65

2008-09

08

.241782*

$17,389,133,032

7.71

2009-10

09

.251391*

$17,966,262,266

3.32

2010-11

10

.258003*

$17,264,336,756

(4.07)

Based on 100% of market value of property. All percentages are rounded off. * Includes debt service for $108 million capital improvement program.

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Del Mar College Financial Report 2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

$59,707

$55,647

$54,993

$48,789

$15,489

-

-

-

16,021

39,100

Accounts Receivable

7,474

7,009

4,197

4,171

5,454

Taxes Receivable

1,372

1,450

1,375

1,250

1,127

25

14

43

111

745

-

-

102

1,342

293

IN THOUSANDS Current Assets Cash & Cash Equivalents Short Term Investments

Other Noncurrent Assets Endowment Cash & Cash Equivalent Endowment Investments Bond Issuance Cost Net

982 1,222

1,379

1,542

1,709

1,232

158,279

156,700

158,802

154,272

138,290

$228,079

$222,199

$221,054

$227,665

$202,712

-

-

-

$395

$387

Accounts Payable & Accrued Liabilities

5,539

3,074

1,752

2,402

4,199

Retirement Incentive Payable

2,373

-

-

4,389

Funds Held for Others

1,315

1,431

1,620

1,499

1,251

11,004

9,921

9,313

8,656

8,087

7,885

7,763

7,262

7,827

5,356

4,453

4,666

4,106

4,025

5,414

513

1,187

2,265

2,889

1,466

Bonds & Notes Payable

110,572

117,327

124,004

130,100

109,807

TOTAL LIABILITIES

143,654

$145,369

$150,322

$137,014

$116,687

$62,437

$58,615

$50,721

$46,090

$43,079

4,747

2,559

3,629

4,739

5,135

17,241

15,656

16,382

14,655

18,531

$84,425

$76,830

$70,732

$65,484

$66,745

Capital Assets Net TOTAL ASSETS Current Liabilities Cash Overdraft

Deferred Revenue Current Portion of Non Current Liabilities Noncurrent Liabilities Accrued Compensated Liabilities Leases Payable

Net Assets Invested in Capital Assets - net of related debt Restricted for Debt Service Unrestricted TOTAL NET ASSETS

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Revenues by Source Local residential and business property owners continue as the primary source of revenues for the College, followed in order by federal financial aid and grants, state apportionment and then student tuition and fees. Operating revenues decreased by $1.6 million from 2010 to 2011 fiscal years, primarily due to an increase in scholarship allowances funded by the federal government. Non-operating revenues increased by $2.1 million primarily from an increase in federal financial aid. Scholarship allowances are reductions of tuition and fees funded by outside sources such as federal Pell grants.

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

Student Tuition and Fees Gross

$25,247

$22,874

$21,692

$20,680

$21,590

Scholarship Allowance

(15,134)

(13,313)

(9,712)

(6,648)

(7,685)

Federal Grants and Contracts

4,083

4,663

4,148

3,358

3,894

State Grants and Contracts

2,027

1,825

2,358

1,689

1,140

Local Grants and Contracts

535

1,863

957

698

1,015

Auxilary Enterprises Net

1,426

1,276

1,471

1,212

1,307

General Operating Revenue

1,089

1,636

1,260

1,465

1,490

Total Operating Revenue

$19,273

$20,824

$22,174

$22,454

$22,751

Total Operating Expense

($103,883)

($104,853)

($99,304)

($98,019)

($88,683)

($84,610)

($84,029)

($77,130)

($75,565)

($65,932)

$23,890

$24,247

$25,144

$25,069

$24,716

33,967

35,059

32,550

29,428

26,600

9,801

9,031

8,736

8,643

8,935

29,626

27,184

20,843

15,760

14,563

491

465

802

1,985

3,634

(5,695)

(5,950)

(6,140)

(5,735)

(5,313)

Other Non-Operating Expenses

(215)

(19)

(87)

(1,078)

(1,126)

Other Non-Operating Revenue

340

110

530

232

393

Total Non-Operating Revenue

$92,205

$90,127

$82,378

$74,304

$72,402

$7,595

$6,098

$5,248

($1,261)

$6,470

IN THOUSANDS Operating Revenue

Operating Loss Non-Operating Revenue and Expense State Appropriation Operating Property Taxes Debt Service Property Taxes Federal Revenue Investment Income Interest of Capital Debt

Increase in Net assets

16

Revenues for Year Ended August 31, 2011

19% .4% 22.4% 7.4% 25.6% 18% .8% 1.1% .4% 1.5% 3.1% .3%

17

Expenses The cost of instruction includes those activities that deal directly with, or aid in, the teaching process. Instruction expenditures include not only personnel costs and supplies but also the personnel and materials required to plan, implement and manage the instructional programs. Academic support comprises those programs that directly support the instruction process, such as tutoring, library operations and instructional media services. Student services include registration and records, financial aid, counseling and other activities that provide non-academic support services to students. Operation and maintenance costs relate to those maintenance, housekeeping, public safety and other costs necessary for the proper and safe operation of the physical plant of the College. General institutional support encompasses general regulation, direction and administration, as well as those costs applicable to the College on an institution-wide basis, such as Commencement and accreditation activities. Auxiliary enterprises are those activities that charge a fee for service, such as the food services and other business-type activities. Depreciation represents the financial acknowledgement of the costs of fixed assets prorated over their estimated useful service lives.

Expenses by Type for Years Ended August 31 IN THOUSANDS Instruction

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

$35,632

$35,082

$33,919

$35,833

$34,004

97

37

30

35

36

5,852

5,899

5,964

6,083

5,713

Student Services

11,315

10,870

10,647

12,379

10,746

Institutional Support

15,603

14,511

14,153

14,496

12,356

Plant Operation and Maintenance

9,486

11,131

11,620

11,281

9,766

18,925

20,066

15,559

10,970

10,136

Auxiliary Services

1,304

1,483

1,726

1,737

1,608

Depreciation

5,669

5,774

5,686

5,205

4,318

$103,883

$104,853

$ $99,304

$98,019

$88,683

Public Service Academic Support

Scholarships

TOTAL

As with any service organization, personnel costs – salaries and benefits – make up the largest single cost category at 58.8 percent. Salaries alone represent 43.6 percent of total costs. Benefits, including health, unemployment and Medicare insurance costs, constitute 15.2 percent of total expenditures. Supplies and service expenditures account for nearly 14 percent of operating expenditures. They include services provided by outside agencies, as well as instructional and administrative supplies. Scholarships, mostly funded by federal financial aid, represent almost 18 percent.

Expenses by Type of Costs for Years Ended August 31 IN THOUSANDS

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

Salaries

$45,279

$47,275

$46,742

$49,074

$44,370

Benefits

15,786

13,404

11,783

12,437

12,281

Utilities

3,972

3,861

3,817

3,109

3,117

Supplies & Services

14,628

14,473

15,717

17,224

14,825

Scholarships

18,549

20,066

15,559

10,970

9,742

Depreciation

5,669

5,774

5,686

5,205

4,338

$103,883

$104,853

$99,304

$98,019

$88,683

TOTAL

18

Income and Expenses for Year Ended August 31, 2011

34.3%

Instruction

1.3%

Auxiliary Services

18%

Scholarships

9%

Plant Operations and Maintenance

15%

Institutional Support

11%

Student Services

6%

Academic Support

5.4%

Depreciation

44%

Salaries

18% Scholarships 14% Supplies and Services 4%

Utilities

15% Benefits 5%

Depreciation

19

Del Mar College 2009-2014 Goals and Objectives Goal 1: Student Success

Goal 2: Operational Resources

• Objective 1.1 Quality: Maximize student learning

• Objective 2.1 Budget: Assure fiscal responsibility connected to the planning process

• Objective 1.2 Access: Enhance student access to College • Objective 1.3 Enrollment Management: Streamline registration, advising, counseling, admissions and financial aid processes

• Objective 2.2 Facilities: Integrate facility-wide planning process • Objective 2.3 Technology: Expand web-based functions and activities

• Objective 1.4 Retention: Maximize student retention and re-entry

• Objective 2.4 Data Management: Enhance financial and personnel data management

• Objective 1.5 Course Delivery: Enhance the means by which courses are delivered

• Objective 2.5 Operations: Coordinate institutionwide planning

• Objective 1.6 Programs: Provide programs that enhance a student’s ability to progress to higher levels of academic achievement

• Objective 2.6 Going Green: .Assure a proactive stance and constructive programs related to the protection of the environment

• Objective 1.7 Workforce Development: Provide courses that support those students seeking occupational and career advancement

Goal 3: Professional Capablities and Procedural Improvements

• Objective 1.8 Community Leadership: Advance programs to focus on the development of community leadership • Objective 1.9 Personal Enrichment: Provide courseware to meet the individual needs of a wide range of community interests • Objective 1.10 Services: Improve quality of student support services • Objective 1.11 Information Management: Enhance the management of student information

• Objective 3.1 Instruction: Enhance quality of instruction • Objective 3.2 Leadership: Expand leadership skills of all cadres at DMC • Objective 3.3 Performance: Monitor and maximize the performance of all employees • Objective 3.4 Planning: Maximize systemwide planning protocols and resulting intercommunication • Objective 3.5 Personnel: Improve the hiring process to accelerate/enhance recruitment • Objective 3.6 Compensation: Review the effectiveness of the compensation process. • Objective 3.7 Professional Improvement: .Assure a high standard of capability of all personnel

20

Del Mar College 2009-2014 Goals and Objectives Goal 4: External Partnerships

Goal 6: Governance

• Objective 4.1 Educational Institutions: Improve linkages with current and potential allies

• Objective 6.1 Mission: Review and/or revise College Mission Statement

• Objective 4.2 Government: Enhance interaction with all related government agencies

• Objective 6.2 Board of Regents: Facilitate Board level information and communication

• Objective 4.3 Communities: Reinvigorate regional relationships

• Objective 6.3 Foundation: Support the mission of the Del Mar College Foundation

• Objective 4.4 Workforce: Expand relationships with business/industries/military leaders

• Objective 6.4 Alumni: Expand alumni program.

• Objective 4.5 Capabilities: Influence the development of advanced skills within community leadership • Objective 4.6 School Relations: Enhance the working relations with area schools Goal 5: Positioning • Objective 5.1 Marketing Plan: Enhance branding and marketing plan • Objective 5.2 Student Recruitment: Stimulate the enrollment of new students • Objective 5.3 Communications: Maximize internal/external communication efforts • Objective 5.4 Market Segmentation: Differentiate marketing based on targeted client groups and programs • Objective 5.5 Influence: Shift public perception as to the value of education • Objective 5.6 Media: Positively champion the College throughout the media

• Objective 6.5 Resources: Optimize the range of funding sources • Objective 6.6 Policies: Expand, maintain and support policy development for all College operations

Del Mar College 75th Anniversary Commencement, 2010

101 Baldwin Blvd. Corpus Christi, TX 78404-3897 www.delmar.edu Del Mar College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and Educational Institution. The College takes affirmative action to endeavor that no person shall be denied the benefits of equal employment or be subjected to discrimination in employment or educational programs and activities of Del Mar College on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, disability, or any other constitutionally or statutorily impermissible reason. Š 2011 Del Mar College. All rights reserved.


Del Mar College Popular Annual Financial Report 2010-2011