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FREE REPURPOSED ROPES Cowboy transforms team roping gear into works of art

TASTY GREENS Grow a fresh taste of spring in your own backyard

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page 8

de e as f or “gre

RECYCLE

T DAY FOR A BETTER TOMORROW

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Cassville company’s “green” mission is fueling growth

MARCH 2013

MARCH 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 1

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MARCH 2013

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contents

CONNECTION MAGAZINE

On the cover: All Points Recycling is guided by an all-female management team, including Leslie Smith, Stacy Runnels, Brenda Fletcher and Bobbi Vanzandt. Photo by Chuck Nickle Photography

MARCH 2013

8

March 2013

GO GREEN ONE STEP AT A TIME Connection offers 10 ideas for “greening” up your lifestyle

11

REPURPOSED ROPES

17

TASTY SPRING GREENS

22

RECYCLE TODAY FOR A BETTER TOMORROW

29

PRESERVING THE PAST

34

PLAYING WITH PASSION

38

HOTSHOE HOT RODS

44

THREE BROADS ABROAD

50

COLLECTIBLES, CUPCAKES AND COFFEE

Cowboy transforms team roping gear into works of art

Try growing a small patch of lettuce and spinach for a fresh taste of spring in your own backyard

Cassville company’s “green” mission is fueling growth

Monett history on display at downtown museum

Purdy’s Addy Roller excels at sport she loves

Restoring classic cars to their former glory

Local writer recommends “gal pal” adventures

Lake area business provides the perfect place to shop

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 5

Connection

A MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO SOUTHWEST MISOURIANS

PUBLISHERS Mike and Lisa Schlichtman EDITOR Lisa Schlichtman editor@monett-times.com ART DIRECTOR Veronica Zucca connection@monett-times.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Robyn Blankenship Greg Gilliam Sheila Harris Marion Chrysler Cassie Brewer GRAPHIC ARTISTS Melody Rust

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CONTRIBUTORS Lindsay Reed Murray Bishoff Meagan Ruffing Jo Anne Ellis Nancy Ridgley Lisa Craft Darlene Wierman Sally Reinhardt Melonie Roberts Sheila Harris Susan Funkhouser Anne Angle Pam Wormington Sherry Tucker Charlea Mills

TO ADVERTISE 417-847-2610 - Cassville 417-235-3135 - Monett Send e-mail inquiries to editor@monett-times.com Mailing address: P.O. Box 40, Monett, MO 65708 Connection is published monthly and distributed free in Cassville, Monett, Exeter, Washburn, Pierce City, Mt. Vernon, Aurora, Verona, Roaring River, Eagle Rock, Shell Knob, Purdy, Wheaton, Freistatt, Marionville, Seligman, Golden and other surrounding areas.

Connection is a publication of the Cassville Democrat, The Monett Times and Rust Communications.

MARCH 2013

EDITOR’SNOTE

W

E LIVE IN A DISPOSABLE WORLD THESE DAYS. If you need proof, take a walk or drive down any country road and start counting the number of plastic grocery sacks, soda cans or fast food wrappers you find caught in a barbed wire fence or littering nearby pastures. Statistics about the amount of waste produced in the United States are staggering. According to the Clean Air Council, the average American office worker uses about 500 disposable cups every year. Americans throw away enough paper and plastic cups, forks and spoons annually to circle the equator 300 times. Every year, Americans use approximately 1 billion shopping bags, creating 300,000 tons of landfill waste. the average amount of waste generated by each person in America per year stands at 1,609 pounds, which is the most in the world. This means that 5 percent of the world’s population generates 40 percent of the world’s waste. And here’s one more alarming fact -- Americans use 2.5 million plastic bottles every hour, and the majority of them end up in a landfill where it takes over 1,000 years elegant sappire bridal for a plastic bottle to decompose. In response to this sobering information, it is imperative that each of us take responsibility for protecting our planet by taking the mantra of “reduce, reuse and recycle” a little more seriously. And in an effort to do our part, Connection magazine is publishing its second annual green issue this month. Our March cover story focuses on a local company dedicated to promoting a more green community. Cassville-based All Points Recycling has been honored numerous times by the Missouri Recycling Association, and most recently, the company won the 2012 “Best Use of a Recycled Material” award for manufacturing T-shaped bricks out of styrofoam, which aresbeing Ca s v iused l ltoe build , mstorm o . shelters 4 1 7 . in 8 Joplin. 4 7 . 2All1Points’ 9 5 motto is “recycle today for a better tomorrow,” and the business definitely lives up to its mission. Of added interest is the fact that All Points Recycling is run by four female family members who serve as positive role models for young female entrepreneurs. In the spirit of recycling through the practice of repurposing, Lindsay Reed has written a profile on Dave Vaught, a competitive team roper who has discovered a new talent for turning old ropes into pieces of art. When Dave is not traveling the rodeo circuit or working his farm, he can be found creating baskets, candleholders and wall hangings out of used ropes. This month, we also welcome a new contributor to our Connection family. Sherry Tucker will be writing a monthly feature story for us, focusing on gardening and MONETT other topics of interest. In honor of our green issue, Sherry has provided an article on 215 4th Street growing leafy greens as well as a short tutorial on how to create seed-starting pots 417-235-2020 from recycled newspapers. And for my part, I compiled a list of 10 ways to add a little more “green” to your AURORA lifestyle. It was a writing and research project that reminded me that I make recycling MOSTthan INSURANCE ACCEPTED 930 S. Elliot harder it is. In January, I made a New Year’s resolution to start using cloth bags NEW PATIENTS ALWAYS WELCOME Dr. Justin Hart rather than plastic when I do my grocery shopping. To date, I’mO.D. probably417-678-2161 batting .500 on that pledge. About half the Dr. time,Greg I’m inHuntress such a hurry I leave the cloth bags in the O.D. F.A.A.O. car and am too lazy to go back to get them. As a result, I end up bringing home more Dr. Larry Pratt O.D. REPUBLIC plastic bags, which end up in the trash. With our readers as my witness, I vow to try 612 E.them Elm the provides families - adults, harder. MyVisionhealth cloth bags areEye nowCenter riding shotgun in the hopes that I won’t forget next time I head into theand store. children seniors - with exceptional medical 417-732-5575 It is my hope that our March issue glasses of Connection will inspire you to make small care for their eyes. From prescriptions and changes in contact your lifestyle for the benefi t of the natural world around created GREENFIELD lens fittings to vision health screening and us. god the land, and it’s up to us, as good stewards, to protect it. emergency eye care, we help your family see, feel 401 W. College

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CONNECTION MAGAZINE CONNECTION MAGAZINE| | 57 7

E E R G GnO m i t a t a e step o

CH TM AN BY LI SA SC H LI

Connection offers 10 ideas for “greening” up your lifestyle “GOING GREEN” ISN’T AS difficult as it may seem. We don’t need to completely remodel our home or throw out every convenience. Instead, we can do our share of saving the planet one green choice at a time. It’s a matter of shifting our habits slightly to lessen our impact on the world around us. We’ve assembled a list of 10 green alternatives that are simple to achieve. You don’t need to do them all at one time. Pledge to embrace one green alternative a month until you’ve accomplished all 10. Being environmentally friendly can also mean saving money. Green alternatives are often cheaper (like using old newspapers instead of paper towels to wash windows) or if they require a greater upfront cost (like the purchase of CFL bulbs), the savings over time is substantial. Now that you have added incentive, here are Connection’s suggestions for living a greener lifestyle. 8 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Unplug appliances and chargers when they are not in use. Even when turned off, these devices can use energy if they’re plugged into an electrical socket. This type of energy loss is often referred to as a “phantom” or “vampire” load. In a typical house, people live with 20 “vampires,” which can add about $200 a year to your electric bill.

1

3

2

Plant trees and shrubs around your home, especially on the west side, to provide natural shade and windbreaks and reduce home cooling and heating costs by up to 30 percent.

Eliminate harsh chemicals in your home by using green cleaners. I particularly love Mrs. Meyer’s Clean Day cleaning supplies (available at The Herb Depot in Monett.) To save money, try making your own household cleaners. Here is a simple recipe for an all-purpose cleaner: 2 tablespoons vinegar, 2 cups hot water, 1 teaspoon washing soda, one-fourth cup liquid soap and 20 drops of your favorite essential oil. Mix together in a spray bottle and you’re ready to clean.

Repurpose something. Instead of sending that old framed picture of dogs playing cards to the dump, why not apply a bright coat of paint to the frame, cover the picture with fabric and ribbon and create a bulletin board for your kitchen. If you’re not the crafty type, then be sure to take your unwanted furniture, clothing and household goods to Crosslines in Monett, the Second Act in Cassville or the Hope Center in Mt. Vernon, so someone else can enjoy them in their home.

4

MARCH 2013

N E me 5

Replace incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps. CFLs cost a little more, but they use 75 percent less energy and can last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs, so you save money in the long run. According to Barry Electric, you can save $30 off your electric bill during the life of each CFL you use.

9

Start using cloth bags to tote your groceries. It can be a hassle at first to remember to bring the bags with you into the store, but once you establish the habit, it’s easy. And if you forget your bags and have to use the plastic variety, be sure to recycle the bag by using it as a trash bag at home.

Schedule an energy audit for your home. You can do an informal audit yourself by walking through your home and looking for air leaks and checking insulation or you can hire a professional to conduct a more thorough analysis. The result of the survey is a list of cost-effective measures that can be followed to improve your home’s comfort and efficiency.

6

7

Program your thermostats to 62 degrees or lower in the winter and 78 degrees or higher in the summer when you are not home or when you’re asleep. This practice will save you 10 percent on home heating and cooling costs.

Stop buying plastic bottles of water. Instead install a water filter on your sink at home and fill a reusable BPA-free plastic bottle for water on the go.

10

8

Plant an indoor herb garden. Growing your own basil, cilantro and thyme will add flavor to your meals and get you in the habit of enjoying fresh ingredients. The next step is establishing an outdoor vegetable garden in the spring or purchasing fresh produce and home-baked goods at your local farmers market. A great place to find additional green ideas is Pinterest. In a quick search of popular boards, we were able to find a recipe for making your own laundry detergent and instructions for making a worm composter bin from an old plastic bin. Monett High School senior Cassie Hagedorn contributed research for this article. Cassie is currently involved in an internship at The Monett Times through Scott Regional Technology Center.

MARCH 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 9

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Repurposed ropes STORY AND PHOTOS BY LINDSAY REED

Cowboy transforms team roping gear into works of art DAVE VAUGHT, OF CASSVILLE, MAY WELL HAVE BEEN BORN with the desire to team rope in his blood. He began competing in the rodeo sport at the age of 10 and made his living team roping for around 11 years. “I have roped my whole life,” said Dave. “My dad and uncle got me started. Roping has always been a big part of my life.” Dave won his first saddle at a team roping competition

MARCH 2013

in 1973. He took home high school championship honors the following year and attended the national junior team roping competition in Aurora, Colorado, in 1975. During his professional roping career, Dave took home numerous awards, won multiple saddles and even competed at the International Finals Rodeo (IFR) five times. In 1989, he brought home Horse of the Year honors from the Professional Rodeo

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 11

Cowboys Association (PRCA) Great Lakes Circuit. “I’m just a weekend warrior now,” said Dave. “I have chicken houses and my kids.” Even though Dave doesn’t team rope full time anymore, he hasn’t lost his edge. He and his partner, Steve Massey, who happens to also be his brother-in-law, placed at the United States Team Roping Championships (USTRC) National Finals in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, last year. “My goal for this year is to make it back there,” said Dave. “I would like to go on to the World Series in Las Vegas, Nevada, where the pay out is $100,000 a man.” In addition to the competition, Dave says he just enjoys the sport. “I just like playing with ropes,” added Dave. A few years ago, Dave made the decision to attempt to turn his pastime into something others might enjoy by creating works of art from used ropes. “I never dreamed I would be doing this,” said Dave. “I made a few things a couple of years ago. This year, at Christmas time, I started to think about something I could give everyone.” Dave went to work on baskets, candleholders, wall hangings and other items, but he was overwhelmed by the reaction from those who received his gifts. “They said I should try selling them,” said Dave. “They thought they were really neat. This is something I had seen out west and decided to try myself. It’s something you don’t see much of around here.” Dave’s artistry began with 30 used ropes he had collected over the years. A friend gave him an additional 50 ropes, and Dave started spending the majority of his free time working on his rope creations. “I wash all of the ropes first,” said Dave. “I can get 28 ropes into a machine at the laundromat. Then I burn them together. The hot iron is what melts them together.” To add unique designs to his pieces, Dave selects used ropes of various colors and uses ropes discolored by team roping. “The black areas are from team roping,” said Dave. “It all adds to the look. None of these pieces can be replicated exactly. They are all one of a kind.”

12 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

Dave doesn’t plan any of his designs in advance. He says the pieces just come together the way they should. “I just see a rope, and I think, that will make a basket or a cross,” said Dave. “I believe my talent for roping was a gift from God, and I actually think this is a gift from the Lord too.” So far, Dave’s pieces have been purchased by individuals, and he is now receiving requests for custom pieces. “The problem now is getting this many ropes,” said Dave. “I’ve went through 75 to

MARCH MARCH2013 2013

80 ropes since Christmas. This week, I got about 40 more, so I’ve been working to get more items made up.” Dave works on his rope art in between tending to chickens, cows and his fescue fields. He also spends time shoeing horses, but most of these tasks slow during the winter months. Still, team roping remains his true passion. “I love the people I meet at rodeos,” said Dave. “There are a lot of really good people at those events, a lot of Christians and just really good people.”

Dave is the son of Willodean and the late Lloyd Vaught, of Cassville. He has four sons, including three, Brant, Braiden and Brody, with his late wife, Tricia. Braiden recently followed in his older brother Brant’s footsteps by achieving Eagle Scout honors. Dave’s sister and Steve Massey’s wife, Tammy, also takes part in team roping competitions. For more information on Dave’s rope artwork, call 417-342-3132.

CONNECTION CONNECTIONMAGAZINE MAGAZINE | | 13 13

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MARCH 2013

TERABITHIA Reviewed by Anne Angle

by Katherine Paterson

Anne Angle is a retired Cassville High School life sciences teacher who now lives in El Paso, Texas. An avid reader, Anne is an associate member of Crowe’s Cronies Book Club based in Cassville.

WHAT AN OMINOUS WAY TO START the first day of the fifth grade. Leslie, the new girl in town won the boys’ foot race at recess! Jess just knew that he was going to be the fastest runner that year, because he had practiced all summer long. And so begins this wonderful children’s (9- to 11-year-olds) book that is being rediscovered after Disney put it into movie form. If you are looking for a way to start a meaningful conversation with a pre-teen you love, reading this book together will give you that opportunity. “Bridge to Terabithia”

MARCH 2013

is a rich tale about the power of friendship and imagination. Even though the book was originally written in 1977, its issues are very current. As Jess and Leslie become friends, they create an imaginary world in the woods, called Terabithia, where they proclaim themselves king and queen. Their imagined lives are very different from the mundane existence they lead in rural Virginia, and they spend hours there every day. As their friendship grows, Leslie teaches Jess how to be brave, and Jess teaches Leslie how to be less cynical and more compassionate. When they go to this secret place, they escape from the bullies they have to deal with at school or the longing Jess has to be accepted by his dad. Jess wants to be an artist, and his father scorns his ambition. This charming, comingof-age tale can be a springboard from which to launch meaningful discussion between you and your favorite youngster without sounding “preachy.” The following questions are a few suggestions for sparking a great conversation. • Should Jess go with his music teacher (on whom he has a crush) on a day trip to the museum in Washington, D.C.? • Should child abuse be kept a “family secret” as the fifth graders believe? If not, how and who do you tell?

• Is “getting even” with bullies the best solution to the problem? • How can Jess survive the terrible tragedy that happens in the story? • How can friendships like that of Jess and Leslie transform lives? • What different views do Jess and Leslie have about religion? • Why does learning about other people’s problems help us understand and sympathize with them? • What lessons do Jess and Leslie learn about consequences to their actions? Because the death of a child is the climax of the story, this novel was on the list of 100 most challenged novels put out by the American Library Association (ALA) between 1990 and 2000. Many censors wanted it banned. That being said, author Paterson was recognized as the most distinguished contributor to American literature for children when she was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1978 for this story. She has since received a second Newbery Medal for “Jacob Have I Loved” as well as the National Book Award, Hans Christian Andersen Medal, Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal from the ALA and the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award. In 2000, at the age of 68, Paterson was also named a Living Legend by the Library of Congress. As far as I have been able to discover, there is no required or recommended reading list for fifth graders put out by area schools. However, several teachers said they do use it in individual classroom settings, and all libraries contacted have copies of it. Whether you are a young reader or just “young at heart,” I recommend this one. CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 15

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MARCH 2013

Tasty Spring

Greens

Try growing a small patch of lettuce and spinach for a fresh taste of spring in your own backyard Story and photos by Sherry Tucker Sherry Tucker is a Barry County native and a produce grower at the local farmers market, The Garden Sass, which is open during the summer months in Cassville. She and her family live on a farm northwest of Exeter. She blogs online about homesteading for Mother Earth News magazine and is a freelance agricultural writer who frequently contributes to Ozarks Farm and Neighbor.

SOMEHOW WE MAKE IT through winter. Though winter is not without beauty and function, it is not a season I enjoy moving through. I appreciate winter, because it helps me look forward to spring. Spring brings life to those things that were dormant and an opportunity to plant and begin something new in the sunwarmed soil. I am a gardener. I have a need to get my hands in the dirt and grow food to eat. In the spring, I can hardly wait to scratch up some soil and plant some salad greens. My body craves fresh green leaves in the spring more than any other time after coming out of winter and being deprived of in-season fresh vegetables. MARCH 2013

Salad greens are a mong the easiest garden plants to grow.

There are several different kinds of lettuce to choose from, and they all can be planted and grown in very cool weather and can even sustain freezes. All lettuce can be picked at the baby leaf stage (never pick more than a third of the leaves at a time), and the plant will continue to grow and produce more leaves. Lettuce leaves can be eaten at any time in its growth, until it reaches maturity (flowering) when the leaves turn tough and bitter. Lettuce is generally classified as either leaf or head. Black-Seeded Simpson is an old favorite leaf lettuce to grow. It has light green, slightly frilly leaves that become large enough to use as a bed for lunchmeat on a sandwich. It’s a favorite among those who love a wilted salad, and its mild flavor makes it perfect to add to any mixed salad. Buttercrunch is a head lettuce that can also be picked like leaf lettuce. Buttercrunch grows dark green, pear-shaped leaves that are good for any purpose. they have a wonderful, mild flavor and a great, crisp texture. If allowed to grow into a full head, buttercrunch becomes a beautiful display to sit ornamentally in a salad buffet. It will keep fresh in the refrigerator if kept in a bag with its base covered with a wet paper towel. Romaine is another head lettuce that grows well in our Ozarks climate. It forms a tighter, cylindrical head, and it’s better if not picked at until it is a full head. Romaine is very good to use for a Caesar salad, and its whole leaves are great used as wraps with a filling and held in place with toothpicks.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 17

There are so many kinds of wonderful lettuces that add various textures and flavors to a salad. I enjoy adding colored lettuce, such as the red oak leaf, and a spicy one, like arugula (my favorite!). Growing a mixed “mesclun” salad, a European blend in which seed packets are easily found with this blend of varieties, will offer enough variety to make a beautiful salad bowl.

SEED SOURCES Good seed can be acquired in various ways. Seed order catalogs are a dependable way to find both common and harder to find seed. Most seed companies will send a free catalog if one is requested. Here are a few common seed companies that I recommend. Most of them provide online catalogs and ordering as well as traditional call or mailordering. R.H. SHUMWAY 1-800-342-9461 www.rhshumway.com MORGAN COUNTY SEEDS 1-573-378-2655 TERRITORIAL SEED COMPANY 1-800-657-3131 www.territorialseed.com BAKER CREEK HEIRLOOM SEEDS 1-417-924-8917 www.rareseeds.com PINETREE GARDEN SEEDS 1-207-926-3400 www.superseeds.com Most grocery and discount stores carry good selections of seeds, as well as plants. Local feed stores sometimes provide bulk seed and plants, as well as seed potatoes, onion sets and onion plants that work very well for spring planting. Wherever your seed is purchased, pay attention to seed packet weights or seed counts for comparison and make sure to get enough of a certain seed for the area to be planted.

18 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Spinach is a nice addition to any salad

Spinach’s dark green leaves and rich flavor makes for a great fresh salad. It also works great cooked, in soups, sauteed with other veggies, made into dip or eaten alone as a nutritious side. Spinach grows very similarly to lettuce and can be started in early spring as well. An old variety that has good flavor and grows well in our area is Bloomsdale Long Standing. Any variety that states “slow-bolting” is good to look for. With our ever fluctuating ozarks weather, a couple of hot spring days can send some spinach and lettuce varieties shooting up their flowers. this is called “bolting” and brings on seeding and the end of this short-lived plant cycle. The earlier in spring that these plants can be started, the longer they will be enjoyed.

Where and when can lettuce and spinach be planted?

As soon as the ground can be worked up, these seeds can be planted. A corner of a garden, a barren flower patch or even a pot full of dirt can be utilized for an early supply of lettuce. Loosen the soil using a garden rake or hand trowel, so that the dirt is fine. Sprinkle

MARCH 2013

RECYCLED NEWSPAPER SEED STARTING POTS In the spring it’s fun to start seeds in little pots indoors to get a head start. It’s helpful to use small pots that will dissolve in the dirt, so that the pot with the seedling can be planted outdoors when it’s time. Newspaper can be used to form easy little, biodegradable pots, making them very economical. To make newspaper pots, cut full lengths of newspaper (4 sheets thick) into 4-inch strips. Using a tomato paste can, wrap the newspaper around the can for the whole length of the newspaper, leaving one inch excess on the bottom. Secure the end with a small piece of freezer tape. On the bottom, start pressing the paper onto the end of the can to form a bottom, pressing firmly all the way around. Once the cup is formed, pull it from the can and set into a seed starting tray, or any water resistant container that can be used to store the pots until they are ready for outdoor transplanting. Once the pots are made and set in the tray, add potting soil and gently sprinkle with water. Now the pots are ready to seed and sprout. Newspaper pots are fragile, so be careful to water gently and not overhandle until you’re ready to transplant outdoors.

a small amount of seed over the surface, lightly cover with soil and pat the ground with either your hand or foot. Keep the soil moist by misting with water every day, or keep the seeds covered with a wet piece of newspaper until sprouts start to emerge. Seeds should start to sprout within a week, as long as the air temperature isn’t dipping too low, and the seeds are kept moist. Once the seedlings are established, plants can be thinned out to about six inches apart.

Are you ready to grow your oun salad?

Let me know what your favorite lettuce variety is or drop me a line if you have questions, at tuckerfamily@mo-net.com.

MARCH 2013

SPINACH SALAD WITH POPPY SEED DRESSING My friend and neighbor, Eunice Sapp, came up with this combination of spinach salad with a poppy-seed dressing. It has become a favorite at our house. Ingredients: 5 cups fresh, washed spinach 3 cups mixed lettuce 3 green onions, sliced into 1/2” pieces

Poppy Seed Dressing: Eun ice occa sion ally lik es 1/3 cup vegetable oil 1/4 cup vinegar to top with slivered 1/4 cup sugar al m on d s or bits of 1 tsp. poppy-seeds cook ed ba co n. 1/2 tsp. prepared mustard 1/4 tsp. salt Mix all ingredients except oil. Add oil and shake in a jar with a lid to combine. Wash and dry spinach and lettuce. In large bowl combine spinach, lettuce and sliced green onions. Drizzle dressing over the salad, and toss.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 19

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MARCH 2013

CUTEKID

Connection’s

proud parent cutest kid contest

Congratula

tions

HUNTER

Tailor

Morgan •••and

Are you a proud parent? If so, take this opportunity to show off that cute kid of yours.

Congratulations to Hunter

We invite you to share a photo of your child to be featured in Connection’s very own proud parent cutest kid contest.

Cleveland, of Mt. Vernon. This

Email your child’s photo to editor@monett-times.com. Photos should be sent in the original JPG format at the highest resolution possible. Remember to include your child’s name, parents’ names, age, city and your contact information. The contest is open to children ages 10 and under. The photos submitted will be used for the sole purpose of this contest.

MARCH 2013

•••

Cleveland, age 6, Tailor Cleveland, age 4, and Morgan Cleveland, age 8, daughters of Jon and Meghan photo was sent in by proud grandparents, David and Theresa Kaler, of Monett.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 21

,

RECYCLE a better for

STORY BY CHARLEA MILLS | PHOTOS BY CHUCK NICKLE

22 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

TODAY tomorrow

Cassville company’s “green” mission is fueling growth WHEN BRENDA FLETCHER and her daughter, Leslie Smith, started All Points Recycling in Brenda’s basement in 2006, it was a two-woman show. The fledgling company, based in Cassville, acted as a brokerage firm for companies, facilitating their recycling needs by finding a buyer for truckloads of materials. Fast-forward seven years and you get a completely different picture of the family-owned and operated business. Two strong women still own it, but the company has grown to include 15 employees, 12 of them full time, and three buildings full of heavy equipment with quirky names like “Bertha Baler” and “Towering Tornita,” a large densifier. By 2008, All Points Recycling was no longer just a brokerage service but also was processing materials on site and finding buyers for those materials. Today, the company accepts a variety of materials and has won numerous awards, both locally and statewide. The company owns three semi tractors and 30 box van trailers. These trailers are either dropped and switched, or used to live load materials at

MARCH 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 23|

BRE NDA FLE TCH ER

LE SLIE SM I T H

various commercial businesses. Each month, All Points brings in about 40 loads of loose material to be processed, resold and reused. the front office is run by an all-female contingent of family members, including Brenda and Leslie, plus Brenda’s youngest daughter and Leslie’s sister, Stacy Runnels, and Brenda’s sister-in-law, Bobbi Vanzandt. Brenda is in charge of the processing plant, Leslie handles purchasing and sales, Stacy serves as the human resources and DOT supervisor, and Bobbi is the company’s logistics coordinator and takes care of the accounts payable and receivables. All Points Recycling currently has three balers, two densifiers and a melting machine at their warehouse. Cardboard is placed into the balers and tightly wrapped to be shipped to a mill for processing and refashioning into other products. Regular paper is shredded first, then baled and sent to the same mill. Plastics are compacted in balers and shipped out to be melted down and remade by other companies. If the material is an expandable polypropylene/

polyethylene or Styrofoam, its journey continues at the Cassville plant, sometimes into an end product. Expandable polypropylene and polyethylene is used to create the foam products typically seen as interior car parts or sometimes used as computer packaging. These materials are fed into a densifier machine that melts the product down into heavy discs or is fed into T-molds to make a T-shaped brick used in the manufacture of storm shelters. Styrofoam goes through a similar process. Since Styrofoam is made by being filled with air and moisture to turn it into a soft, crumbly material, the breakdown involves removing those elements. The Styrofoam is compacted, which forces out the moisture and air until it is compacted into rectangular blocks and shipped off to be repurposed into other materials. One of the end products made from the converted Styrofoam are the cost-efficient picture frames available at many stores. “Most of the time people think its plastic, but it’s not,” said Brenda, displaying one of

the frames. “It’s just a different form of Styrofoam.” The T-bricks manufactured by All Points are a part of Project JOMO, an organization that provides storm shelters for families in the Joplin area affected by the May 22, 2011, tornado. The T-bricks are used in conjunction with concrete to manufacture shelters that are nearly impossible to penetrate by debris during a tornado. “We’ve sent the bricks for official testing, but the guys out here also tried to shoot through [a T-brick] with a revolver at point-blank range, and it didn’t even go all the way through,” says Leslie. The idea for utilizing a dense polypropylene/ polyethylene to build storm shelters came from observing that playground equipment is usually unharmed by tornado debris. The manufacture of the T-bricks was one of the achievements that led to All Points Recycling winning a statewide award from the Missouri Recycling Association (MORA). In 2012, the company earned the “Best Use of a Recycled Material” award. All Points also earned the 2009 Outstanding Small Business

STACY RU NN EL S

BOBBI VANZ AN DT

24 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

Recycler of the year from MORA for the company’s innovative recycling efforts. Along with those awards, AllPoints Recyling has also been National Women’s Business enterprise Certified since 2006 by the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, a difficult accreditation to achieve. Currently, All Points is in the process of moving locations. offices, processing and community drop-off for recyclable materials will be moving from All Points’ Hilltop facility on Highway 112 to the Cassville West business complex at 800 West 10th Street. “We had to move because we simply outgrew our old location,” said Brenda. Expansion is always on the minds of the ladies in the office who have plans to add a plastic processing machine that makes pellets for manufacturers sometime this year. Since 2006, the growth of the company has been exponential. As a brokerage service, All Points Recycling facilitates the exchange of materials from coast-to-coast in the United States. Their pick-up service covers a 200-mile radius with pick-ups as far north as Sedalia and as far west as Norman, Oklahoma. New buyers are often recruited during All Points Recycling’s attendance at the annual National Plastics Convention. New customers are often found by word of mouth from satisfied customers. Brenda and Leslie do not typically require contracts with their industrial customers. Instead, they let their service do the talking. “We feel like if we see to good service, they’ll stick with

MARCH 2013

While most of All Points Recycling’s customers are industrial companies, the business continues to offer a consumer drop-off location for recyclables. There, members of the community can deposit the following materials:

Cardboard and chipboard Magazines and phonebooks Newspapers Junk mail and mixed paper White paper and office paper #1, #2 and #5 plastic Styrofoam (no food or drink containers) Steel cans Aluminum cans Film Rechargeable batteries Cell phones us,” said Brenda. All Points Recycling is the only multi-material location with a customer drop-off in Cassville. All Points provides the community with a green option for their refuse and also supports the area through a variety of events and donations. “We try to get involved in the community as much as we can,” Brenda says. All Points Recycling is an active member of the Cassville Area Chamber of

Commerce, and each of the four women who run the company are involved in various organizations and boards throughout the area. In 2011, the company won the industrial award for their “Recycled Christmas” float in the Cassville Christmas Parade. All Points’ float was made almost entirely of recycled materials, including the borrowed scarves the snowmen donned. Being in the recycling business before opening All Points, Brenda and Leslie knew

what they were getting into and enjoy all elements of their jobs. As far as working with family, all of the women in the office agree that “Family comes first. It gives us a lot of flexibility.” But as far as the actual recycling business goes, Leslie points out, “We couldn’t work in an industry with kinder folks.” It’s clear that this business runs in the family and satisfaction from a job well done helps the environment as well.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 25

The Style You Want

www.allpointsrecycling.com 800 W. 10th Street

Cassville, MO. 65625

417-847-4258

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862-4378

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2309 Fairlawn Dr., Carthage MARCH 2013

BY SALLY REINHARDT

55

Sally Reinhardt is a transplant from the big city of St. Louis, who now lives in Monett with her husband. Sally said it was strictly by accident or fate that she ended up living in Monett. “I never imagined I would one day be living in the Ozarks, much less enjoy the opportunity to share my writings,” said Sally. “This, of course, just proves it is best to keep life’s options open. I have found here an entirely new outlook and a new set of sights, sounds and friendships.”

sidecar-sally@juno.com

I WAS HAVING A DISCUSSION WITH my friend, Marty, the other day about hats and remarking about the definite distinction attributed to male and female. A bit ironic, we agreed, that there should be such a noted prominence between male and female hats, since we are often called upon to wear the same hat, with maybe a different tilt of the head or a sometimes ponderous objective. There are many pertinent phrases we have all experienced pertaining to our hat activities. “Talking through one’s hat, throwing one’s hat in the ring or keeping it under your hat” – all action phrases easily visualized. In theory, our topic of conversation did not center on the purchase of hats but rather focused on the different chapeaus one adorns as we travel through life’s episodes. Some are worn by choice and others by necessity. For myself, I figure I have worn at least eight different and distinctive fundamental hats in my life. Some I’ve worn with ease, and others had to be adjusted to fit circumstances. Although physical strength may not always remain the same, mental and spiritual ability can still offer a new opportunity to adorn a new identity with maybe a slightly different tilt on the head.

MARCH 2013

I have learned that the most powerful tool for combating the unsettling thoughts of change is to move on. By all means, we should be happy for what we’ve accomplished, or mindful to change our negativity, but we must also be aware there is always more we can be doing. If we get stuck in either place, we cannot get to what is in our destiny to do. The Light comes when we just keep going. On grateful days, my awareness heightens, pointing out just where He has placed me in the scheme of my life’s adventure. What I have learned thus far is that there are two primary choices in life; to realize the facts as they exist or not. Acceptance is by far the easier route and offers the opportunity to count our blessings. Choose to make your imagination your ally. You do have a say about what pictures live in your head. You get to choose the most positive images to shape your life. The reality of life greets us each

morning. Achievement is attained as we become wiser through our past experiences and seek a proven word of wisdom. Consider how you respond to advice and where you turn for help. Do you ask friends or someone who has proven wise in the past? The Bible offers a proven place to start seeking a comfort zone. King Solomon, as related to us in Ecclesiastes, was a wise man who noted that strength, education and wisdom are not the only deciding factors in one’s life. Opportunity and being in the right place at the right time also impact outcome. The fastest runner doesn’t always win the race, and the strongest doesn’t always win the battles. It is all decided by chance, by being in the right place at the right time -- by wearing the right hat. See ya down the road.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 27

LOVIN’LIFE

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(c) Hospice Compassus 2011 28 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

SWEET CAROLINAS April 13 April 20, 2013

CANTON TEXAS

May 2 May 4, 2013

EUROPE TOUR (6 COUNTRIES) June 5 June 18, 2013

MACKINAC ISLAND & MORE June 14 June 23, 2013

Check out the website for upcoming and new trips each month. MARCH 2013

Preserving the past Story and photos by Melonie Roberts

Monett history is on display at downtown museum STOP! DON’T TOSS THAT relic from the attic or garage, especially if it has ties to Monett. The Monett Historical Museum, located at 705 East Broadway, is building a collection of memorabilia dedicated to preserving the history of Monett. “Rod Anderson and Doug Hobson held a reorganizational meeting of the Monett Historical Society in

MARCH 2013

January of 2008 to revive the organization,” said Bernadine Hobson, publicity chairman for the Monett Historical Society. “At that time, the Monett Chamber of Commerce had moved to its new location and this building was empty. Doug asked if we could use it for our office and a museum.” From that point on, the four lifetime members of the organization -- Doug Hobson, Anderson, Georgeanne

Wormington and Elizabeth O’Connell -- were off and running on their quest to form the Monett Historical Museum. Rod donated a large portion of items from his personal collection to the museum, and Charles Rowell generously donated items from Mansfield Clothing Store, which closed its doors for the final time in 2006. From those initial donations, the museum’s

collection has grown substantially. Permanent displays now include memorabilia from Monett’s railroad, schools, churches, banks, police and fire departments, businesses, military, industries, city buildings and historic landmarks. There is also a sizable collection of items that tell the history of West Hospital (formerly St. Vincent’s Hospital and now Cox Monett Hospital).

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 29

Featured exhibits

By Melonie Roberts The Monett Museum has a variety of exhibits depicting the changes in Monett as the city has grown and evolved over the years.

Early entrepreneur One of the earliest and most prolific businessmen in Monett’s history is featured in the museum. M.E. Gillioz seemed to have his finger in every veritable pie Monett had to offer from banking to whiskey. Gillioz was a businessman and entrepreneur in the community from around 1913 until his death in 1963.

He owned the Gillioz Bank and Trust, Gillioz Clothing, Gillioz Implement Company, Gillioz Paint and Body Shop, Gillioz Used Cars and Gillioz Construction. He also received special orders of Old M.E. Whiskey, which were bottled under his name and handed out freely to other leaders and businessmen in the community.

Sweet treats Two competing businesses served the dairy needs of Monett residents back in its early days. Jerome Creamery offered fresh creamery milk and Just Right Ice Cream satisfied the sweet

30 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

tooth of many youngsters on hot summer days. Photos and memorabilia illustrate simpler times and a slower pace of life as residents enjoyed these dairy specialties.

MARCH 2013

On the rails A commanding display of Monett’s early railroad history features an actual baggage cart used in Monett as early as the 1920s and 1930s. Other display items include vintage kerosene lamps, box baggage, paperwork and other miscellaneous equipment used in the industry. From old eyeglasses, yardsticks and pen sets to hospitals, strawberries and lumberyards, Monett has seen a little bit of every type industry through the years, and it’s all on display at the Monett Historical Museum.

MARCH 2013

“We have several yearbooks,” said Doug Hobson, society president, “not all of them, but quite a few. “Bernadine has done a lot of work on tracking down the history of the schools that were incorporated into the Monett District,” he continued. “She’s done a wonderful job putting it all together.” The museum also boasts one rotating display that showcases collections on loan. The display is changed quarterly. “We have an illustration of Monett dating back to the 1800s when Monett was founded,” said Jeanne Ann Camp, secretary. “There is a lot of history in this building.” So much history, in fact, that the museum is running out of space for the material on display. “We’re preparing to kick off a capital funds campaign this spring to raise money and buy a larger building,” said Georgeanna Wormington, treasurer. The Historical Society is also selling books to raise funds for a new location. Some of the books for sale include: a copy of one of the original Monett cookbooks; a book on Berniece Medlin, a former elementary school teacher for the district; a book on the Waldensians; and the Centennial Salute to Monett’s history. Although space is limited, the Monett Historical Society is still seeking articles for its everexpanding collection. “You’d be surprised at [memorabilia] that people sell on the Internet, auction off or

throw away,” Doug Hobson said. “We are trying to get the word out so people think of us before they get rid of anything that might have ties to Monett.” Dues to join the Monett Historical Society are $10 per year or $100 for a lifetime membership. Members receive a newsletter with updates on the organization’s recent activities three times per year. The Monett Museum is open from 1 to 3 p.m. on Mondays, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Wednesdays and from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. The museum is also open to groups by appointment. Admission is free. For more information on the Monett Museum, call Doug or Bernadine Hobson at 417235-5908 or visit the Monett Historical Society on Facebook.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 31

A NAME YOU CAN TRUST. FAMILY OWNED SINCE 1946

BENNETT-WORMINGTON FUNERAL HOME Attention New Patients: Don't pay to find out what’s wrong, only to fix it!

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Dale A. Kunkel, DDS & Associates ALSO LOCATED IN NEOSHO

Free Exam & X-Rays MONETT 417-635-1173

825 Hwy 60, Suite H Hablamos Español 4statesdentalcare.com 32 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Thankfully, there’s a CertifiedFirst Network repair facility nearby. Now, no matter what happens to your car, you can count on the autobody repair specialists at Ken’s Collision Center to take care of it. From the smallest scratch to the biggest dent, we will get your car looking and performing like new.

712 W. 10th St.• Cassville, MO 65625 417-847-1200 • 800-900-1593 Cell: 417-846-5252 • Fax 417-847-1600 MARCH 2013

WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? By Greg Gilmore

IN GENERAL, A HEALTHY LIFE MEANS taking care of your body. In this pursuit, most people think of a healthy diet and exercise. However, just as with developing and maintaining healthy eating habits, many people neglect their bodies by not being physically active. As a certified athletic trainer (ATC), I have an opportunity to work with many different people in varying degrees of physical fitness. Don’t confuse athletic training with personal training. Certified athletic trainers can do more than provide you with a workout. An athletic trainer is educated in injury evaluation, rehabilitation, prevention, and in some cases, performance enhancement. Athletic trainers can help you no matter what your level of fitness. Exercise can take many forms, and the problem with most routines is just that -- they’re routine! Trying new (to you) activities can keep exercise interesting, and it may give you new outlets for activity.

running and jumping. While the staples of walking, jogging, etc., Let’s face it; diet and exercise are can get it done, sometimes alternative equally important components to a options are helpful or even necessary. healthy lifestyle. Making sure your body One example would be running on an underwater treadmill. The new HydroWorx is performing at its absolute best for your level of fitness is essential to meet your aquatic therapy pool at Cox Monett Rehab health goals. Let an athletic trainer be a part and Sports Medicine can not only help of your healthy lifestyle team to help ensure patients suffering from an injury, but this your success. medium also provides an opportunity for active people to get a great Want to workout without the pain and know more? soreness of Visit coxhealth.com working out to learn how aquatic on land. So, therapy or athletic not only can training services you get a great can get you back in workout, you motion. can avoid some of the common Greg Gilmore is a certified athletic trainer and athletic aches and pains training services coordinator at Cox Monett Rehab associated with and Sports Medicine. The busy father of three has worked for CoxHealth for five years. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time at his kids’ activities and being involved in many different outdoor pursuits.

MARCH 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 33

HEALTHYCONNECTION

Living a healthy life

Addy’s jersey retirement ceremony. Pictured, from left: Grant Young, former PHS girls’ basketball coach; Mattie White, PHS basketball player; Katie Hughes, PHS basketball player; Jennifer Schallert Cornelius, PHS athletic director; Addy Roller; Jayse Henderson, PHS basketball player; Billie House, PHS basketball player; and Kat Hughes, PHS basketball player.

Playing with pa BY SUSAN FUNKHOUSER

ON FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 21, 2012, the Purdy R-2 School District retired a former student athlete’s jersey number for the first time in school history. During the ceremony, Athletic Director Jennifer Schallert Cornelius reviewed the accomplishments of 2012 Purdy High School graduate Addy Roller, which included: State of Missouri record-holder for career 3-point field goals made, season 3-point field goals made and consecutive games with a made 3-point field goal; 2012 Missouri Basketball Coaches Association Class 2 Player of the Year; 2012 KSPR-33 High School Athlete of the Year; three-year Class 2 All-State Player; member of the 2011 Class 2 State Championship team; one of eight participants in the National 3-Point Competition sponsored by American Family Insurance; and the list goes on and on. As Addy gazed upon her framed retired jersey and tears filled her eyes, the crowd rose to its feet, applauding the athlete and 34 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

her accomplishments, the person and her passion. Canadian-American singer Alanis Morissette tells aspiring songwriters, “Just trust the passion. The passion can write a lot of things.” Her message is heard in the music streaming from stages around the world. It also echoes the beat of a basketball in a gym, as rubber meets hardwood. Passion began writing Addy Roller’s story when she first dribbled a ball in a Springfield YMCA at 5 years of age. Addy was the only girl on her cousin, Phillip Roller’s, basketball team. “I don’t really remember it,” she confided. “People have told me I really liked to shoot it back then. I was bigger than all the boys!” As she continued to dribble, shoot and jump her way through childhood on various private teams, the passion Addy discovered at age 5 continued to grow. Basketball filled her waking hours and

many of the hours she was supposed to be sleeping. “Sometimes I got really bored at night and couldn’t sleep. I used to lie in my bed and shoot baskets at the toy goal on my bedroom door.” As she matured and learned more about the game and herself, Addy discovered that her passion on the court overflowed into her life in general. Where did she find this passion and the skills and will to make it grow? According to Addy, she received it as a gift.

Inherited passion Addy credits various family members with introducing her to basketball. Her grandpa, Bill Haynes, a successful high school and college basketball coach, often took his granddaughter on bus rides with his teams. “I picked up a lot of knowledge on those trips.” Addy’s mom, Kim Haynes Roller, and her dad, Mike Roller, also played pivotal MARCH 2013

roles in their daughter’s love of the game. Kim coached Addy and several other area girls on various traveling teams, beginning when Addy was in second grade. Mike took over coaching duties during her fourth, fifth and sixth grade years. Addy’s “Wildfire” team, coached by Mike, achieved great success. “My parents taught me to be competitive,” said Addy. “I got my passion for basketball from my parents and grandparents. Because they loved it, I fell in love with it, too.”

Passion in practice Because of her deep love of the game, Addy voraciously approached practices, camps, games and any other opportunities she received to hone her skills and play the game she loved. As a young child, she attended basketball camp at Evangel University, where she learned skills and techniques from husband and wife coaching team Leon and Dawn Neal. “They were a real inspiration to me.”

assion

Addy is a self-proclaimed, die-hard Duke basketball fan. “I’ve been obsessed with Duke basketball since JJ Redick played. I was inspired to shoot like him,” said Addy. However, when asked to name her ultimate hero or role model in the basketball world, she bypassed Coach K, Redick and other Blue Devil celebrities and spoke a local name -- Richie Rhea. Addy noted of her workout partner, “He taught me a lot, both on and off the court. He made me a more well-rounded player. I learned from him how to create off the dribble. I could always shoot it, but he taught me how to get myself open, to find a shot.” Rhea also mentored Addy in life. “He taught me that when I’m down I need to remind myself of my accomplishments and experiences, to remember how far I’ve come. He taught me to believe in myself.” In addition to soaking up the wisdom of family members, friends and Purdy coaches such as Kelly George, Grant Young and MARCH 2013

Coach and mom Kim Roller rallies Addy, far left, and her teammates during a time-out. Jennifer Schallert Cornelius, who instilled in her the on-and-off-the court values of gratitude, humility and living in the moment, Addy maintained a positive outlook on the sometimes unpleasant world of practice. “She was a very special athlete to coach,” said Cornelius. “She had a work ethic unlike most that play the game. She also held herself to a standard higher than that which we, her coaches, set for her.” Addy humbly observed, “Of course, you’re not always going to enjoy every practice, but going out there and being competitive, being able to play with your friends . . . that’s what I loved.”

A passionate future Addy currently attends Wayne State University in Wayne, Nebraska, a small college town. She plays basketball, of course. Addy noted of her new team, “We’re an extremely young team, but we have a chance to be really good. We’re learning about each other.” The beginning of hoop dreams

Although she loves Wayne State, Addy has found college to be a profound learning experience and a whole new world. “I don’t have time to do anything. We practice four hours each day. You really have to keep in perspective how much you love it. One of the hardest adjustments for me is playing back-to-back on weekends. Saturday’s game is hard.” Majoring in business marketing and information technology, Addy plans to pursue a dual career in business education and coaching. What kind of coach does she want to be? “A good one!” she quipped. “I want to be an encouraging coach. I want them to play, because they love it, because it’s their passion. That’s the only reason you should play. I also want kids to know that not everything is about basketball, but it can teach you a lot about life.” Addy also dreams of marriage and family in her future. “In 10 years I hope to be coaching and teaching somewhere and to be married with a family.” Will she attempt to pass along her passion for basketball to her children? “I’m going to make them try it. I’m going to make them try a lot of different things; I think that’s really important. Hopefully, they’ll find a passion like I did, whether it’s basketball or something else.”

Paying it forward with passion Addy isn’t waiting until she is a coach or mother to encourage kids to pursue their dreams on and off the court. As a small town celebrity, she is acutely aware that some of her biggest fans are also the smallest. When asked to list her most loyal admirers, Addy quickly responded, “Matthew Cornelius. He’s awesome!” CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 35

thankful. If you spend much time talking to her, you’ll discover that Addy exudes gratitude. What things does she note when counting her blessings?

FAMILY: “My family members are my biggest fans. My grandparents never missed a high school game. Neither did my parents. In fact, they never miss my college games, either. My teammates don’t have that support, and I live the furthest away from my family of anyone on my team. I really appreciate how much support I have from my family.”

COACHES: “I was so lucky to have George, Schallert and Young as my coaches. A lot of kids don’t have that opportunity. In my opinion, they are some of the greatest coaches and greatest people around. They are people I will never forget.”

-- riding on a fire truck; the atmosphere; the excitement. It wasn’t just about me or our team. Everybody was a part of it and will remember it. It was something great for the whole town. I feel like it brought the people of Purdy together.”

THE JERSEY RETIREMENT HONOR: “When I first heard about my jersey being retired, I was kind of shocked and speechless. I knew Purdy had never done that before, so I was extremely honored and blessed to be chosen. Every time I walk in the school and see my jersey, it is going to remind me of the wonderful years I had while I was at Purdy, and the amazing teammates and coaches that helped me achieve this great honor.”

TEAMMATES: “My high school

A junior high jump shot The admiration is mutual. When asked about seeing Addy during her jersey retirement ceremony, the Purdy third grader enthused, “It was awesome. I hadn’t seen her for a very long time. I miss her. She’s one of my heroes.” Why does Matthew think Addy is so great? “She’s got skills! She can shoot 3’s really good.” Addy often reflects on the impact she’s having on the kids who watch her both on and off the court. “I think about it all the time. Kids tell me they look up to me, but it’s hard to believe. I always try to be cautious of what I say and do because they are always watching. I don’t want to disappoint them. I want to prove to them how awesome and fun life can be if you do it the right way.”

Passionate gratitude As Addy’s passion for basketball and life in general continue to write the story of her life, she consistently takes time to reflect on her journey thus far and be

36 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

teammates were more than teammates; we were friends. We still are. We all knew what we wanted, and we knew without even one of us, we couldn’t get it done. I’m so lucky those girls were there.”

FANS: In addition to her family and school friends, Addy counts Tim and Bobbi Jones and Sharon Miller among her biggest fans. Mrs. Miller, her third grade teacher, attended most of her games and encouraged her off the court. She still does. “Mrs. Miller sends me letters at college almost every week. “Tim and Bobbi Jones also supported Addy from the time she was a small child. Bobbi reports, “I knew watching her when she was younger that she was special. She was magic in the making.” Tim adds, “It would take me three notebooks full of paper to tell you what Addy means to us. It was a privilege to get to watch her grow as a basketball player, but it was even more special to see her grow as a young woman.” MEMORIES: “I’m so thankful I got the opportunity to go to Purdy High School, and I wouldn’t change it for anything.” Addy points to the 2011 State Championship as her fondest high school memory. “It wasn’t just winning state; it was the whole experience

Making a passionate difference Addy Roller’s passion for basketball, and more importantly her passion for people and community, are impacting the lives of many people, because she trusts her passion enough to share it and treasures it enough to refrain from taking it for granted. American author T. Alan Armstrong must have had Addy in mind when he penned, “Find your passion, whatever it may be. Become it, and let it become you and you will find great things happen for you, to you and because of you.”

MARCH 2013

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CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 37

Restoring classic cars to their former glory

HOTSHOE HOT RODS

STORY BY SHEILA HARRIS PHOTOS BY KERRY HAYS

 WItH tHe PuRCHASe oF A CHASSIS-BuILDIng AnD CLASSIC CAR restoration business last year, Chad and Docia Morley, along with their two children Shelby and Brandon, now have a family business that has turned them into a true hot rod family. Although a third-generation welder and fabricator, Chad’s employment prior to the purchase had been merely a means of paying the bills, not necessarily something that stirred his passion, nor something his family could become involved in. But that has changed. When Randy Slama, the previous owner of LRS Hot Rods in Mt. Vernon, chose to retire, Chad and Docia believed the purchase of the business was an opportunity they could not pass up. Not only had Slama established a solid reputation in the hot rod market for building quality chassis, the potential for expansion was tremendous. “Hot rods and street rods represent a billion-dollar industry worldwide,” said Chad, “And it’s a world I wanted to become a part of. I knew I could pour my heart and soul into it.” Under the new name of Hotshoe Hot Rods, derived from Chad’s boyhood nickname, the Morleys immediately began to build on the foundation that had been laid. Docia takes care of the business end of things. With her background in office management, her skills have been invaluable to the company. Chad manages the shop and operations.  “Without Docia and her business skills I’d be lost,” said Chad. “I can build cars, but as far as I’m concerned, she handles the difficult part … and does it very well.”

38 38 || CONNECTION CONNECTION MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

MARCH MARCH 2013 2013

Owners Chad and Docia Morley, pictured third and fourth from the right, pose with employees Moses Martinez, Bradley Porterfield and Jerry Hale.

MARCH MARCH 2013 2013

CONNECTION CONNECTION MAGAZINE MAGAZINE || 39 39

Hotshoe Hot Rods is in essence a two-part business. With the help of three fulltime employees, Moses Martinez, Bradley Porterfield and Jerry Hale, in addition to himself and Docia, classic car chassis are built to order for Speedway Motors in Lincoln,

40 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Nebraska, the nation’s largest aftermarket hot rod supplier. Hotshoe Hot Rods offers chassis that have been welded into one completed unit, called a full rolling chassis, ready for installation of engine and transmission. Other chassis are available in various stages of

completion, depending upon a customer’s desire and budget.   “We are now offering another option as well,” said Chad. “Because a completed chassis that has been entirely welded together is quite costly, we now sell the component parts for the chassis separately

for those customers who are not in a position to purchase the entire chassis at one time. The component parts are made so they can be bolted together, as opposed to needing a weld.” Hotshoe Hot Rods also builds frame rails to order for Pete and Jake’s (known as the Cadillac of the hot rod industry), as well as for renowned hot rod builder, Bobby Alloway. “The frame rails were an important part of early car models,” Chad explained. “They were visible beneath the body, along the sides of the car, and therefore were somewhat ornamental.” Chad calls the chassisbuilding portion “the bread and butter” of Hotshoe Hot Rods. they currently have fixtures in stock to build chassis for an extensive range of classic cars, including all 1928 through 1948 Fords, 1930 Chevys and all Chevy trucks from 1941 through 1959.  Assembling the fixtures (called jig rails) upon which to build the chassis is an extensive job in itself. A frame from the original car model must be brought into the shop as a pattern. A jig rail made from steel components is assembled and welded together in the shape of the curvature of the original rail. With this newly assembled pattern, new steel may be cut to form frame rails in the shape of the original model. Although the assembly of the jig rail to be used for a pattern is quite labor intensive and time consuming, once it is completed, it can be used for all future rails for that model of car. When asked about the market demand for classic car chassis, Chad was quick with a reply. “Although it’s not readily visible locally, when you examine

MARCH 2013

When cars were bad BY SHEILA HARRIS

From an era when gasoline was readily expendable in the quest for raw power came a line of automobiles known as muscle cars. Almost too high strung for the streets, these gas-guzzlers came equipped with huge V-8 engines in midsize bodies, created solely for the purpose of achieving startling amounts of speed within fractions of seconds. Anyone who lived during the 1960s and early ‘70s cannot help but hold fond memories of these cars, for, quite literally, they represent a time when life was much simpler, when emission regulations were non-existent, fuel was abundant and weekends were spent cruising Main Street. Hotshoe Hot Rods is currently restoring two of the most popular models of cars produced during that period, including an electric-blue Chevy Camaro with hand-laid gray racing stripes, owned by Craig House, of Mt. Vernon, since he was in high school. Another work in progress is perhaps the quintessential muscle car of all time, the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS, of which it was said “horsepower can go no higher.” According to Hotshoe Hot Rods owner Chad Morley, the value after restoration of this classic car will be well over $100,000, because only 7,000 of this particular style were produced in 1970. For those interested in restoring a car from their past, either for racing or for show, please contact Chad or Docia Morley at 417-466-0288. the demand for car chassis on a national scale, you’ll get an understanding of how huge it is,” he said. “There are more ‘32 and Model A Fords on the road, and being built, right now than there were during the years they were originally made. “After World War II, there were a lot of old Fords readily available, all models from 1928 through 1948,” Chad continued. “During the 1950s, people began to strip them down, soup up the motors and race competitively. That’s how drag racing was born. It spurred a whole new industry here in the

MARCH 2013

United States.” The National Hot Rod Association was formed during that period as an attempt to organize and provide safety guidelines for drag racers. “Since then,” said Chad, “there’s been a bit of a break-off from hot rods to street rods, which are rebuilt mostly for show purposes. Now, also, we have those nostalgia buffs who like to rebuild cars strictly for the sake of restoration, which is the second part of my business.” Chad calls Hotshoe Hot Rods’ car restoration business the “icing on the cake.”

“This is the fun part of my work,” stated Chad, whose enthusiasm for cars knows no bounds. “We have customers who commission us to rebuild their old cars for them from the ground up.” They currently have five restoration projects in progress, including a 1955 Divco delivery truck, owned by Phoenix Insurance in Dallas, Texas, a company that insures classic cars.  “I met agents from Phoenix Insurance at a local car show in Springfield,” said Chad. “In fact, they had a booth right next to us. They were so impressed with the car we were showing, they asked me if I could help them find a classic car that we could restore and make roadworthy for them. Of course, I couldn’t turn that down. I had a lot of fun with the search. And we’re having even more fun with the restoration. This little panel truck is quite unique, not only because of the body style, but also because we’re putting a

1994 Ford Lightning motor in it. “This little jewel will definitely be ready to go the distance and will be a traveling showpiece to advertise our business, as well as the insurance company’s,” added Chad. Another work in progress is a 1955 Chevy, whose owner is meticulous in his desire for an authentic restoration of a car that will be used for show purposes only. When finished, its two-toned gold and beige exterior will shimmer as though it came straight from the showroom floor. Although Hotshoe Hot Rods does outsource engine and transmission work, as well as the steel-cutting required for the frame rails used for the chassis, when all the components are completed, Hotshoe does the final assembly work and delivers a finished product to their customers. Body type is open to customer preference as well. either fiberglass or steel can be ordered, once again based on a customer’s preference and budget. Chad and Docia enjoy going to local as well as national hot rod shows with their finished cars. In fact, for a hot rod builder, it’s the best form of advertising there is. For an in-depth description of the services and products Hotshoe Hot Rods offers, please visit www.hotshoehotrods.com. CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 41

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Three Let me recommend taking a “gal-pal” trip. An adventure of this kind can be a true bonding experience -- a chance to learn, grow and have a big, big time! Gather girlfriends, or relatives will do, and get going! “The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.” -- St. Augustine I believe in being well-read, and I agree with this quote. I want to be well-traveled. I want to learn and explore as much as I can in the time God allows. I saw “The Bucket List” a few years ago and began taking that philosophy seriously. What do I want to see and do before…”kicking the bucket?” I found a common interest with three other women when we gathered for our Missouri University class reunion in 2005; we decided to start traveling together. Our foursome

We carefully climbed the last 130 steps to the top to see the great view from Angkor Wat, the “temple mountain,” center of one of the “Seven Wonders of the World.”

44 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

included Sally Gunderman from Tucson, Arizona, Darlene Johnson and Axie Hindman from Columbia and me from Cassville. We began as the “Cactus Cuties” in Tucson, became the “Bikini Babes” (don’t even ask) at Shell Knob on Table Rock Lake, transformed ourselves into the “Cabin Cuties” at a cabin in northern Minnesota and branched out to become the “Three Broads Abroad” during

MARCH 2013

broads abroad Get going on a girlfriend getaway STORY AND PHOTOS BY JO ANNE ELLIS

an overseas jaunt to Cambodia and Vietnam in November 2012. Our quartet became a trio, because Axie was already out of the country during our trip, touring Italy with her hubby. Why Cambodia and Vietnam? Because none of us had been there. This

In Phnom Penh, Cambodia’s bustling capital, we saw many colorful pagodas, the elegant Emerald Buddha, the Royal Palace, and in contrast, the Museum of Genocide. Colorful fruit stands lined the rustic highway north to Siem Reap, gateway to Angkor Wat.

MARCH 2013

well-traveled threesome had seen a lot of places but had yet to venture to these two countries that came highly recommended. Our destination proved to be safe, friendly to Americans, not expensive, filled with beautiful, awe-

inspiring temples, pagodas and cathedrals, lots of markets and lovely beaches, excellent hotels, delicious food, amazing massages and did I mention not expensive? What is not to love about Cambodia and Vietnam?

We began our exciting adventure by joining 21 SmarTours travelers in Los Angeles -- about half the expected group because all those traveling from the New York area were held back by

Beautiful Cambodian dancers warmly invited us to come on stage for a photo and bow.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 45

Leaving the excitement of Saigon, we flew to Da Nang then bused to Hoi An, a lovely small coastal city. We had a rainy morning but explored the ancient wooden bridge, found a great place to eat, visited many interesting shops and ordered a handmade dress before going to sit on a wide beach on the South China Sea. Hurricane Sandy. We flew 19 hours on a big, blue Korean Air 380 Airbus with a stopover in Seoul, Korea, landing in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Our small group, a mix of younger and older but all seasoned travelers, proved to be cooperative, fun-loving

and tireless during our 16 days together. Peter, our tour guide, became our best friend as he guided us by bus, on four boat rides and three more airplane transfers to cover the highlights of Cambodia and five locations in Vietnam.

Trip Highlights:

The pinnacle of the trip was seeing the sprawling complex of Angkor Archaelogical park, a 400-square-mile site built by 3,000 slaves in the 12th to 13th centuries. Buddhism later replaced Khmer’s Hinduism, and the site was abandoned in the 13th and 14th centuries, causing a mystery that puzzled scientists. Now almost a million travelers a year visit Angkor Park, one of the “Seven Wonders of the World.” We headed to Hanoi for the last few days. Touring the Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum and Hanoi Hilton, we were reminded of the bad times in Vietnam, but all three of us were amazed at how far the country has come since then. This “vacation of a lifetime” is one I’d recommend to anyone who loves to travel. And if you can, I’d suggest enjoying it with your girlfriends.

46 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

We had a delightful overnight and early morning boat ride on Halong Bay near Hanoi surrounded by 3,000 limestone islands called the “descending dragon.”

MARCH 2013

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COME ENCOUNTER A PROPHETIC AWAKENING! CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 47

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Collectibles, cupcakes

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MARCH 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 51

FROM THE EXTERIOR, THE RED BARN ANTIQUES IN Shell Knob seems like most other combination flea market/ antique shops in the area. However, stepping inside proves that the business is no ordinary this-and-that shop. The booths are tidy and clean, and each is brimming with the new, the old, the big and the small from jewelry to furniture to collectibles. Patrons are sure to discover something of interest no matter what their age, interest or gender. Red Barn Antiques is owned by Joy Johnson and her husband, John, who bought the business around five years ago. Since taking over, the Johnsons have given the inside a welcoming facelift. The exterior may be a red tin building, but the inside incorporates elements of a traditional handlaid brick café perfect for enjoying a cup of coffee with a friend, as well as barn wood facades behind the booths, and a homey atmosphere throughout. Each booth is situated in its own cozy corner, inviting visitors to meander through the

space looking for a treasure or the perfect gift. “one of the first things people notice when they come in is that it smells good in here, not like a regular antique place,” says Joy. John and Joy have made it their mission that those stopping by Red Barn Antiques will find it to be a pleasant experience. Each of the booths boasts different items and themes. One booth is dedicated to souvenirs for lake goers like cups, hats, shot glasses and T-shirts. It’s a great place to stop for those wanting to commemorate their weekend trip to the quiet side of Table Rock Lake. For those searching for merchandise that’s a bit pricier, the booth also features custom-printed mock-antique signs on wood or metal with Table Rock Lake printed across them. Signs can also be customized with specific cabin or home names or any special saying. Many booths contain new items ranging from a cute little trinket to custom-made picture frames. Purses, scarves, hair clips and jewelry fill one of the booths, while its next door neighbor specializes in higher-end handmade jewelry for a more extravagant gift. Practicality is also at hand with the collection of boating and trailer accessories along with many tools.

“We have later hours than the hardware store on Saturdays, so people come in for a trailer light or a tool they need to work on their cabin,” says Joy. During peak season, it may be hard to find a parking spot with all of the tourists arriving to peruse the booths, which regularly feature new and different merchandise at reasonable prices. Men enjoy viewing the antique fishing reels and rods while women can shop the collection of locally made soup mixes, jams and jellies. Most items that are new are created by local artisans, like the cedar jewelry boxes handcrafted by Elvin Hood, of Shell Knob. Many of Elvin’s creations include small hidden drawers for secret treasures.

52 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013

If you’re spending the weekend at the lake, you won’t find a big box store within 25 miles, so many of the items you need are available right inside. If you need a board game for a rainy weekend or a new fishing pole to replace the one claimed by the lake, you’re in luck. The booths range in size, and some are split between vendors. The Johnsons are always accepting the names of potential vendors who are placed on a waiting list, because there aren’t any empty booths inside The Red Barn. Joy’s daughter, Brandi Sanders, helps her mother by running Cup Cakes and Cream, the bakery and café located inside Red Barn Antiques. The menu includes Starbucks coffee, Schwann’s ice cream and freshly made soups and sandwiches. All of the food is made from scratch or from local mixes. One of the most popular items is the Chicken Salad Sandwich, which features two varieties -- tropical with pineapples and cranberries, and cucumber dill. Delicious cupcakes are made on a rotating schedule, so ask for their flavors of the day. one of the favorites is the chocolate malt cupcake with vanilla malt frosting and hot fudge center. Lunch is available from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. while coffee, cupcakes and ice cream are served during all business hours. Cupcakes can be special ordered as well for any occasion. Whether you need a gift for a friend or a new light for your trailer, Red Barn Antiques has something to offer you, no matter your budget. Joy and Brandi love what they do, and their passion is clear in the way the business operates. “You never know what you’re going to find in here;

MARCH 2013

sometimes we don’t know,” says Brandi. “I look forward to coming to work every day,” adds Joy. And rest assured, you’ll look forward to visiting them, too. Red Barn Antiques is located at 25114 State Highway 39 in Shell Knob. For more information, visit their website at www.newredbarn.com, contact them by phone at 417-8582602 or “like” them on Facebook (https://www.facebook. com/redbarnantiques) to get updates on daily specials. The business is open Monday through Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. During the summer months, business hours are extended.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 53

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54 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Crane Family Dentistry 204 North Commerce Crane, Missouri 65633

417-723-1723

www.cranefamilydentistry.com *Implantology is a specialty area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service. MARCH 2013

and b o t t l e s VARIETY IS THE

SPICE OF LIFE

7 Deadly Zins

Winemaker’s Notes:

7 Deadly Zins is a sinful blend that has become Michael David Vineyard’s flagship Zinfandel. Flavors of blueberry, raspberry, cinnamon and black pepper pack the palate from start to finish, and the silky smooth tannins hold the wine together and deliver a soft, fruit-driven experience. 7 Deadly Zins pairs “sinfully” well with barbecued salmon, prime rib or grilled veggies and is perfect with dark chocolate desserts.

brews La Crema Sonoma Coast Chardonnay

One of La Crema’s most popular releases, the Sonoma Coast Chardonnay opens with an intriguing interplay of lively citrus and subtle toasted oak, laced with just a kiss of butterscotch. The palate is round and nutty with flavors of yellow apple and orange. The wine pairs well with crab cakes, chicken and creamy cheeses.

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Decadent Imperial IPA

Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale Brewed by Boulevard Brewing Co. in Kansas City, Tank 7 begins with a big surge of fruity aromatics and grapefruit-hoppy notes. The flavor of this complex, straw-colored ale tapers off to a peppery, dry finish.

Decadent, an imperial IPA (India Pale Ale), was first brewed by Ska Brewing Co., of Durango, Colorado, in honor of the company’s 10th anniversary. The IPA boasts flavors of bitter grapefuit and caramel-like sweetness combined with just the right amount of finishing hops and carbonation.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 55

A group from Barry County enjoyed a cruise to Cozumel over Thanksgiving. Teresa and Whitney Harrison, Donna Harrington, Kelly Paul, Becca Tyler, Tara Beck, Nancy Bishop and Laura Holycross take time out of their girls getaway to pose with the November issue of Connection.

my connection “My Connection� photos should be e-mailed to editor@monetttimes.com. Photos should be sent in the original JPG format at the highest resolution possible. A short explanation of who is in the photo and where the photo was taken should also be included.

Chantel Martin holds a copy of Connection in front of a fountain in Central Park while on a New York City trip with Making Memories.

56 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Connection went along for a tour of the Alamos Missions in San Antonio, Texas, with Ruth Dickens, of Neosho, Alice Varner, of Washburn, and Sandy Snowden, of Sarcoxie.

MARCH 2013

Jim and Brenda Phelps, of Cassville, hold Connection while getting ready to board the train in Elkins, West Virginia.

Valerie and Keith Speer took the December issue of Connection on their recent trip to Kannapali Beach in Maui, Hawaii.

Jerry and Mary Davis, of Monett, Jerry and Barbara Andrews, of Cassville, and Sue Craig, of Cassville, were photographed with Connection while visiting Boston. The group was part of Making Memories’ New England trip. MARCH 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 57

MYCONNECTION

Jack and Connie Forgey, of Cassville, Jeff, Tasha, Tristan and Jadyn Forgey, of Indianapolis, Indiana, and Michael, Laura, Alexandra and William Holycross, of Cassville, spent Christmas in the Smokey Mountains of Tennessee. The family took Connection with them to Dollywood in Pigeon Forge and also to the Aquarium of the Smokies in Gatlinburg. Will, the youngest family member, is also pictured at left with one of the penguins at the aquarium.

DININGDIRECT DININGDIRECTORY DININGDIRECTORY DININGDIRECTORY DININGDIRECTO

out out Di n e Dine OUT out Dine Dine Dine

D I NI NG DI RE CTORY D I N I NG DI RE CTORY ACAMBARO D I N I NG DI RE CTORY ACAMBARO 505 Plaza Drive DI RE CTORY DACAMBARO IN I NG 505 Plaza Drive MONETT ACAMBARO 505 Plaza Drive MONETT 417-354-8408 MONETT 417-354-8408 Mon-Thu 505 Plaza11am-9pm Drive and Fri-Sun 6am-10pm 417-354-8408 Mon-Thu MONETT11am-9pm and Fri-Sun 6am-10pm

BAYOU Mon-Thu 11am-9pm and Fri-Sun 6am-10pm

417-354-8408 D IUSNHighway ING BAYOU Mon-Thu 11am-9pm 864 60and Fri-Sun 6am-10pm D I N I NG DI RE CTORY BAYOU D I US R Highway ECT 864 60O R Y MONETT

DININGSPOTLIGHT 864 US Highway 60 Monett 417-235-7800

BAYOU 864 US Highway 60 MONETT 417-235-7800 ACAMBARO ACAMBARO MONETT 417-235-7800 Mon-Thu 11am-8pm60 and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm 864 US Highway

505 Plaza Drive 505 Plaza Drive 417-235-7800 Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm MONETT MONETT MONETT BLACK BIRD BAR GRILL Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and&Fri-Sat 11am-9pm 417-235-7800 417-354-8408 417-354-8408 BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL 1321 S. Elliott Ave. 6am-10pm Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm Mon-Thu 11am-9pm and Fri-Sun Mon-Thu 11am-9pm and & Fri-Sun 6am-10pm BLACK BIRD BAR GRILL

1321 S. Elliott Ave. AURORA BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL 1321 S. Elliott Ave. AURORA 417-678-2100 BAYOU BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL AURORA 417-678-2100 1321 S. Elliott 1321 S. Elliott Ave.Ave.60 864 US Highway 417-678-2100 AURORA AURORA MONETT DREAMS DENALI 417-678-2100 417-678-2100 417-235-7800 DENALI DREAMS 316 Broadway Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm DENALI DREAMS 316 Broadway MONETT DENALI DREAMS DENALI DREAMS 316 Broadway MONETT 417-772-7092 BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL 316 Broadway MONETT 417-772-7092 Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm 316 Broadway MONETT 1321 S. Elliott Ave. 417-772-7092 Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm 417-772-7092 MONETT AURORA JO'S MOCHA Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, 7am-10pm 8am-10pm Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri Fri 7am-10pm andand SatSat 8am-10pm 417-772-7092 417-678-2100 MOCHA JO'S 404 Broadway Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm MOCHA JO'S 404 Broadway MONETT MOCHA JO’S MOCHA JO'S 404 Broadway MONETT 417-635-1107 404 Broadway DENALI DREAMS MONETT 417-635-1107 MONETT M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm 404 Broadway 316 Broadway 417-635-1107 417-635-1107 M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm MONETT MONETT M,MONETT T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm FAMILY RESTAURANT M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm 417-635-1107 417-772-7092FAMILY RESTAURANT MONETT 608 E.8am-8pm, Broadway M, T, Th W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm Mon 6-9pm, Tue-ThuFAMILY 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm MONETT RESTAURANT NEW 608 E.BEGINNINGS Broadway MONETT 106 4thE.Street MONETT FAMILY RESTAURANT 608 Broadway MONETT 417-235-3772 MOCHA JO'S MONETT MONETT 417-235-3772 Open 6am-9pm 608 E.7 days Broadway 404 Broadway 417-772-7206 417-235-3772 Open 7 days 6am-9pm MONETT Mon. - Fri. 6:30 a.m. - 6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. MONETT RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ Open 7 days 6am-9pm 417-235-3772 417-635-1107 RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ Open 7 days 6am-9pm Downtown M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ Downtown AURORA DOWNTOWN RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ Downtown AURORA FAMILY 417-678-4294 MONETT RESTAURANT AURORA AURORA 417-678-4294 Call for hours Downtown 417-678-4294 608 E. Broadway 417-678-4294 for hours CallCall for hours AURORA MONETT BEAN UTOPIAN Call for hours 417-678-4294 417-235-3772 BEAN UTOPIAN 200 Washington Street Call hoursBEAN UTOPIAN Openfor 7 days 6am-9pm UTOPIAN BEAN 200 Washington Street PURDY 200 Washington Street UTOPIAN BEAN 200 Washington Street PURDY 417-442-3014 PURDY RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ PURDY 417-442-3014 417-442-3014 Open Tuesday through Saturday 200 Washington Street9:00am - 8:00pm Downtown Open Tuesday through Saturday 7:30am -9:00am 8:00pm - 8:00pm 417-442-3014 Open Tuesday through Saturday PURDY AURORA Tuesday through Saturday 9:00am - 8:00pm 52Open | CONNECTION MAGAZINE 417-442-3014 52417-678-4294 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE Open Tuesday through Saturday 9:00am - 8:00pm To advertise your business here, hours 52Call | for CONNECTION MAGAZINE contact a sales representative today! 52 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE UTOPIAN 417-235-3135 orBEAN 417-847-2610 200 Washington Street PURDY 417-442-3014 58Open | CONNECTION MAGAZINE Tuesday through Saturday 9:00am - 8:00pm 52 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Seafood • Steak • ChopS • paSta Diners who have never tasted a homemade olive salad, salami, mortadella, ham and provolonestuffed muffuletta sandwich should venture into The Bayou, an authentic Cajun restaurant located at 864 E. Highway 60 in Monett. The restaurant serves creamy Creole red beans and rice, jalapeno cornbread muffins, Po-Boy sandwiches and traditional spicy shrimp and sausage jambalaya. Diners can also try the cafe’s lasagna rolls florentine, a fried portobello mushroom or the half-pound Bayou burger. The Bayou offers a variety of other southern-style seafood, steak and pasta dishes and an assortment of desserts, including bread pudding, custard pie and cherry cordial cheesecake. The Bayou is open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Sunday hours seasonal. We pick upwill andbereturn yourThe restaurant bar offers late hours Tuesday through Sunday. Be sure to join us on NFL Sundays during We pick up and return your in up theand Cassville football season for all ofvehicle the pick games. We returnarea. your

vehicle in the Cassville area. We pickinup return your vehicle theand Cassville area. vehicle in ORLEANS the Cassville area. REAL NEW POBOYS

Classic Roast Beef and Debris Gravy • The Ferdi Special • Spicy Cajun Meatloaf Big Italian Meatball • Big Easy Steak and Cheesy • The Original French Fry Po-Boy Cajun Crawfish Tail • Fried Oysters • Hot Beef Links • and more! MUFFULETTAS

We and return your Realpick Newup Orleans Muffuletta Authentic hot baked Italian cold cut and cheese filledarea. with our homemade chopped olive vehicle in thesandwich, Cassville salad which releases the oils into the bread when baked, creating a true Italian delicacy.

All-Star Muffuletta An over-stuffed fried shrimp, catfish and cheese sandwich, covered in our own sweet Vidalia onion dressing and crunchy cabbage.

SOUPS Creole Gumbo • Hot and Spicy Jambalaya • Creole Creamy Red Beans and Rice PASTAS Hand-rolled Meatballs or Italian Sausage and Marinara Lasagna Roll Florentine • New Orleans Mardi Gras Pasta OCTOBER 2012 Grilled Chicken or Shrimp Alfredo •BBQ Shrimp Pasta OCTOBER 2012 OCTOBER 2012 STEAKS Seasoned and Seared Prime Rib Rib-Eye Steak • Filet Mignon

OCTOBER 2012

8 oz. of fine 100% Beef

MARCH 2013 OCTOBER 2012

Rise and shine recipe box RECIPES COLLECTED FROM FAMILY AND FRIENDS

nch Toast Baked Caramel FreSpray a 13x9-inch glass baking dish with xPawem.ll.InComeokdiuovmer

ients; mi Topping: ine all topping ingred IL. r saucepan comb ga su n nstantly. DO NOT BO ow co br ng ed rri ck sti pa ooth, 1 cup medium heat until sm sprayed baking dish. 6 tbsp. butter Spread topping in the la and salt; beat am cre ing ipp bowl. Add milk, vanil 1/3 cup wh Beat egg in shallow ead slices over ce rup egg mixture. Pla br in e slic d ea br 1 tbsp. light corn sy ch ea well. Dip s or overnight. r; refrigerate 8 hour ve Co h. dis g kin ba in topping -25 minutes until r baking dish; bake 20 ve co un 0˚. 40 to French toast: en Heat ov tes; invert on own. Let stand 3 minu br n lde go is st gs toa d eg 3 bubbly an ramel topping onto scraping any extra ca 1/2 cup milk large serving platter, tely. 1 tsp. vanilla toast. Serve immedia lt sa . 1/4 tsp s French bread 8 3/4-inch thick slice

Brunch Scramble

1 med. red onion, chopped In a skillet, saute the 1 med. green pepper, chopped onion, green pepper and 1 4.5-oz. jar sliced mushrooms, mushrooms in butter until drained crisp-tender. In a mixing 3 tbsp. butter or margarine bowl beat the eggs, cream, 12 eggs salt and pepper; add to 3/4 cup half-and-half cream skillet. Cook over medium heat until eggs are almost set, stirring occasionally. Sprinkle with cheese and chives. Cover 1-1/2 tsp. salt and cook until eggs are completely set and cheese is melted. 1/4 tsp. pepper 1-1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 tbsp. minced chives

Cake-Mix Cinnamon Rolls

2-1/2 cups warm water 2 pkg. dry yeast 1 box yellow cake mix 4-1/2 cups flour 1 small box brown sugar 2 sticks butter or margarine cinnamon nuts (optional) Dissolve yeast in warm water. Stir in cake mix and flour; knead in enough flour so dough isn’t sticky. Knead a few more times. Let rise 1 hour or until doubled. Split dough in half and roll into a large rectangle. Spread dough with melted butter, brown sugar and sprinkle with cinnamon and nuts. Roll into logs and slice into 1/2- to 3/4-inch slices. Place remaining melted butter and brown sugar in bottom of 9x13 inch pans. Place slices in pans and let rise until double (about 1 hour). Bake at 350˚ for 15 to 20 minutes. Invert on foil after cooled 3 to 5 minutes. This makes approximately 30 rolls.

If you have a recipe you’d like to share, email to Darlene Wierman at darlene@cassville-democrat.com MARCH 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 59

RECIPES

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The First United Methodist Church in Monett hosted its sixth annual Celebration Tea on January 26. 1. Janan Meier, Judy Hudson, Cindy Casper and Janice Varner. 2. Florene Towers and Judy Scheihing. 3. Norma Washburn and Connie Christen. 4. Carleen Shanks and Karen Washburn. 5. Jamie Fulp, Chris Eden, Nona Delke and Wenoka Fulp. 6. Linda Schelin and Patricia Stanton. 7. Shireen Rack, Salina Jackson and Peggy Costley. 8. Linda Van Eaton and Phyllis Garrett. 9. Kalene Shanks, Kristina Shanks, Jennifer Hawkens and Mary Lou Meyer.

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The Cassville Area Chamber of Commerce hosted its annual banquet on January 26 in the Cassville High School commons area.

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CONNECTION Linn Thornton hosted his annual community Christmas dinner at United Methodist Church of Monett on December 25, 2012. 1. Mary and Sterling Stephens and Leon Stephens. 2. Rick, Lynda and Jordan Painter. 3. Erika and Robbie Harris and Anna Thornton. 4. Lois Hunter and Mary Ryder. 5. Trophy and Racer from BACA. 6. karen kenyon and effie Collins. 7. Laura and Gary Churchill. 8. Don and Brittany Adamson. 9. Joyce Cummings, Robert McMillan and Heidi Costello. 10. Makenzie and Triston Utter, Lareina Cordera, Saun Van Amber, Jarod Utter and Dakota Utter. 11. Mistic Davis, Travis Koenig and McKenzie Holland.

MARCH MARCH 2013 2013

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1. Gary Whyte, Peter Herschend, Mindi Artherton and Dusty Reid. 2. Wayne and Jackie Hendrix. 3. Devon and Annette Henderson. 4. Blake and Debbie Whitley. 5. Sharon and Glen Garrett. 6. Gary and Wanda Whyte. 7. Nancy Foulke and Dr. Connie Butler. 8. Sharon and Jack Farrow. 9. Justin and Mindi Gates. 10. Valarie Hutchens and Debbie Gatley.

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CONNECTION The Aurora Chamber of Commerce held its annual banquet on January 26 at Aurora High School. 1. Melissa Howard and Cindy Fisher 2. Dan Decker and J.P. Lee. 3. Dan and Ann Broyles 4. Jack and Cindy Muench. 5. Theresa and Scott Pettit. 6. Kari and Brad Boettler. 7. Jason and Ramona Bradley. 8. Melissa Briggs and Ana Aparicio. 9. Debbie and Larry Stanley. 10. Shannon Walker and Representative David Sater. 11. Dr. David and Valene Price. 12. Harv Welch, Charles Burbridge and Annette Burbridge. 13. Grace Lawrence and Joe Hadley. 14. Shea and Kristi Newbold.

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14 Call me for details

You don’t have to be a farmer to save on insurance! FARM BUREAU INSURANCE

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62 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE 62 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Chad Yarnall Multi-Line Agent 601 W Street, Cassville, MO 65625 417-847-3399 cyarnall@mofb.com MARCH 2013 MARCH 2013

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Community CONNECTION Cox Monett Hospital hosted its 11th annual Dining for Diabetes on Saturday, January 19 at the Pierce City Armory. The event was headlined by Mizzou Tigers quarterback James Franklin.

12

MARCH 2013 MARCH 2013

1. Josh Nickell, Hunter Witt, James Franklin, Cameron Witt, David Lee and Aaron Patton. 2. Walter and Karen Hamer. 3. Adriana Salas and Jeff Meredith. 4. Kaitlyn and Pam Schumacher. 5. Christy and Wade Hermansen. 6. Lauren Holland and Teresa Bouchard. 7. Chloe Ridgley, James Franklin and Nancy Ridgley. 8. Debbie Kelley, Shari Rhea and Stan Kelley. 9. Evelyn Burnett, Barb Huffman and Karen Hawkins. 10. Amy and Joel Wells. 11. Naty Apostol, James Franklin and Andres Apostol. 12. Terri and Mark Costley, James Franklin, Vicki and Mark Hutchings.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 63 CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 63

Ava Belle’s

VE WE HA ADE HOMEM ! FUDGE

FLEA MARKET

We Cater! 107 W. Mt. Vernon Blvd. Mt. Vernon, MO Mon. - Sat. 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sunday 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.

417-466-4650

Formerly Uncle Doc’s – different name, same great merchandise!

1 WEST OLIVE 417-678-2210

We have used appliances.

Now open Sundays 12 p.m. - 4 p.m. Monday – Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

DOWNTOWN AURORA Size doesn’t matter; big or small, we buy it all.

TO M B L I N W H E R E Q UA L I T Y I S T H E D I F F E R E N C E .

JEWELRY & GIFTS

New Location!

101 N. Hickory, On the Square

Mt. Vernon, MO

Wine and Beer Served Mon. - Fri. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Fri. and Sat. 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. Saturday 7 a.m. - 11 a.m. Sunday Brunch 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

64 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

CASSVILLE

417.847.2195 MARCH 2013

APRIL EVENTS

APRIL 2013 UPCOMING EVENTS The Stella Senior Citizens Center and the Aurora Senior Citizens Center hold weekly dances. The Stella dance is held every Friday night from 7 to 10 p.m. with music by the McDonald County Playboys and Frosty Garland and the Road Hogs on alternate Fridays. The Aurora dance is held the second, third and fourth Saturdays of the month from 7 to 10 p.m. featuring the Funtimers Band. APRIL 1 The Monett Senior Citizens Center will hold its monthly dance at the center from 7 to 10 p.m. The dance features the Roaring River Sounds Band. There is a $4 cover charge with all proceeds benefitting the center. APRIL 4 The Seligman Lions Club is hosting a community dance at the Seligman Community Center from 7 to 10 p.m. Frosty Garland and the Road Hogs is the featured band. There is a $4 cover charge with all proceeds benefitting the Seligman Lions Club. APRIL 5 First Friday Coffee will be held from 8 to 8:45 a.m. at Barry Electric in Cassville. For more information, call the Cassville Area Chamber of Commerce at 417-847-2814. APRIL 5 & 6 Cassville merchants will host a two-day spring sidewalk sale. For more information, call the Cassville Area Chamber of Commerce at 417-847-2814. MARCH 2013

APRIL 6 St. Lawrence Catholic School in Monett will host its annual dinner, dance and auction beginning at 5:30 p.m. This year’s theme is “Night in Tuscany.” For more information, call the school at 417-235-3721. Table Rock Lake will be the site of the annual shoreline clean-up. For more information, call Central Crossing Marine at 417-858-6002. APRIL 7 The Ozarks Festival Orchestra will present its Young Artists Concert at 3 p.m. at the Monett City Hall Auditorium. For more information, call Ken Meisinger, music director, at 417-626-8194 or email him at kemeisinger@sbcglobal.net. APRIL 13 The annual Pierce City city-wide garage sale will be held throughout the day. For more information, call 417-476-2323. APRIL 16 The Southern Beekeepers of Missouri will meet at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Monett. Anyone interested in bees is welcome to attend. For more information, call Leon Riggs at 417-2355053 or Kevin Young at 417-847-5464. APRIL 19 & 20 The Shell Knob Chamber of Commerce will host its 26th annual Home and Business Show at the Shell Knob Elementary School. The event will be held from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. For more information, call the Shell Knob Chamber at 417-858-3300.

APRIL 19 Shell Knob’s community-wide garage sale will be held at the Shell Knob VFW building on Highway 39 beginning at 8 a.m. APRIL 20 Roaring River State Park will host its annual Earth Day Celebration with special activities planned throughout the day. For more information, call the Ozark Chinquapin Nature Center at 417-847-3742. APRIL 25 The Pierce City Senior Citizens will host a dance from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Pierce City Senior Center. APRIL 26, 27 & 28 The annual Shriner’s Open Bass Tournament will be held on Table Rock Lake in Shell Knob. For more information, call the Shell Knob Chamber of Commerce at 417-858-3300. APRIL 27 Healthy Kids Day will be held at the YMCA in Cassville and Monett with special activities planned for the whole family. For more information, visit www.monettymca.org.

If you have an event you would like featured in our monthly events listing, please email the event information to Lisa Craft at community@monetttimes.com. CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 65

STAYCONNECTED

stay connected

ADVERTISINGINDEX

Acambaro Mexican Restaurant

43

Edward Jones

48

Ozark Healthy Herb Shop

20

All Points Recycling

26

EFCO

10

Peppers and Company

37

Ava Belle’s Flea Market

64

Farm Bureau Insurance

62

Pettit & Pettit

Feed and More

10

Pierce City Medical Clinic

43

Barry Electric Cooperative

4

6

Baywash Car Wash

50

First State Bank of Purdy

42

Pitiful to Posh

14

Bennett-Wormington Funeral Home

32

Fohn Funeral Home

47

Preferred Pet Supply

49

Bookmarks

50

Four Seasons Realty

50

Race Brothers

26

Brownsberger’s

48

Four States Dental Care

32

Red Barn Antiques

10

Buzz Stop

55

Freedom Bank

14

Red Barn Cafe

64

Carolyn Hunter, DMD, PC

16

Herb Depot

14

Sater/Old Town Pharmacy

47

Carey’s Cassville Florist

48

Hospice Compassus

28

Scott Regional Technology Center

50

Cassville Health and Rehab

66

Ila Bohm’s Home Décor

66

Security Bank

Century 21, Monett

20

Journagan True Value

20

Smile Designers Dentistry

Christine’s House of Style

54

Ken’s Collision

32

Snootie Flea

Community National Bank

3

4 28 3

Lackey Body Works

54

Spiritual Streams Fellowship

Country Dodge

37

Les Jacobs Ford

10

Starla K Fashion Jewelry

CoxHealth

68

Lowe’s Auto Glass

54

The Trunk

16

Crane Family Dentistry

54

Lucky Hammer Auction Co.

Tomblin’s Jewelry & Gifts

64

Denali Dreams

64

Making Memories Tours

Trogdon Agency, Inc.

66

Walt’s Tractor

14 54

Diet Center

7

Mercy

4 28 2

Doug’s Pro Lube

43

Mocha Jo’s Coffee Café

42

Whitley Pharmacy

Eastside Church of Christ

42

Monett Family Rental

16

Willis Insurance, Inc.

Ed’s Flea Market

37

Morton Buildings

26

Standing Strong to Care for Your Loved One

47 3

6

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Cassville Health Care & Rehab 1300 County Farm Road Cassville, Missouri 65625 Ph: 417-847-3386 Fax: 417-847-5449 bhowell@platinumhc.net 66 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

417-678-4462

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MARCH 2013

PARTINGSHOT

parting shot PHOTO BY JEFF TERRY

All of the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today.” - Indian proverb MARCH MARCH 2013 2013

CONNECTION CONNECTIONMAGAZINE MAGAZINE | | 67 67

68 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

MARCH 2013


Connection March