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HAPPY THANKSGIVING! FROM YOUR COMMUNITY JOURNAL

COMMUNITY VOL. XXXVIII Number 18 November 27, 2013

The Milwaukee

JOURNAL www.communityjournal.net 25 Cents

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W I S C O N S I N ’ S L A R G E S T A F R I C A N A M E R I C A N N E W S PA P E R

THANKSGIVING MEMORIES W

By Patricia O’Flynn Pattillo

henever Thanksgiving approaches, it conjures wonderful memories at Grandma’s house in Collinsville, Illinois. You’re talking about six decades ago, but the memories are forever vivid.

In fact, I can almost smell the fresh rolls and homebaked bread and dressing. Some people call it stuffing, we called it dressing. Maybe that’s because it was never placed inside the bird. Rather it was baked in a large casserole dish; soft and smooth on the inside but always with a crispy top on which we placed the cranberries. Notice I said cranberries, not cranberry sauce. Everything at Grandma’s house was made from scratch. Always cooked on that hot kitchen stove, before the electric range arrived. And I can only remember one turkey that graced their table when we were much older. Before that turkey, there was a big hen from their chicken coop, typically fed to be a Thanksgiving bird or Christmas fare. Grandpa also sold homing pigeons, so a few pigeons, with rich, dark gravy, always made it to the Thanksgiving table. And if Grandpa had been hunting, rabbit or quail might substitute for the capon or hen. The table was always full with Grandma’s delicacies to which we all looked forward. Hand-picked green beans or collard greens or sweet peas and carrots often made it to the holiday table, along with mac and cheese or whipped potatoes and a sweet potato casserole. But ham from the smokehouse would be brought in if the number of guests began to exceed the projected slices from the holiday bird. Grandma often baked chocolate cakes, but her signature was her gingerbread cakes, always in a long metal cake pan with sweet, tasty white frosting, made by

hand. And on a good day there would be hand-cranked ice cream that everybody had to take turns in making. Lemonade that became lemon water as the pitcher emptied twice, three times or more, made the dinner complete! The house would always be full. Grandma and Grandpa, Auntie Al and Murph, and their four, our first cousins. Uncle Jim, who didn’t have children until I was married myself, would bring along a friend, if he journeyed from Milwaukee to Collinsville, to help him drive. Aunt Helen, had not had Audrey yet, and she always came late because her nursing schedule made her arrival an end of the evening affair. And, of course, there was my Mom, with all five of us. Forewarned on the ride to the house not to be “little pigs,” somehow we always forgot we had eaten before our arrival. The smells, the good food, we had “special memories!” At Grandma and Grandpa’s house there was al-

Posed by models ways love, food, family and advice. Expectations were re-visited every time we came together. Several great aunts and uncles usually graced the table, and the adults always had loads to discuss, while the children, at the children’s table, sat quietly, until it was time to go to the old piano and my Mom would get everyone singing. Hymns and songs of thanksgiving, and others suggested from the floor were sung with enthusiasm. Everybody thought they could sing, though no one really did it well. But the fellowship, the reunion of family, was the reason for Thanksgiving Day. There was always something to be thankful for, even in those years of segregation, racism and variable good or bad years on the farm. Unemployment and underemployment were part of the “adult conversations,” but everyone helped whoever was in most need. Funny, but no one felt impoverished. We certainly did not feel poor! Self-sufficiency? Whatever was harvested and represented abundance

Turkey giveaway helps families in need

was canned, or salted and put in the cellar as Grandma had seen many years when the crops were not so good. And, she always had extra food for her kids to carry home. Pickles and chow-chow relish, and beets, pickled and plain, corn and green beans. Canned sausage and chicken were stacked on Grandma’s shelves, as well. From other farmers, she bought pears or peaches and canned those too, so cling peaches were often a dessert, along with apple sauce, candied apples, blueberry preserves and raspberry and grape jams, that sometimes ended up in fried pies. Nothing was thrown away and leftovers were reboiled into mixed preserves that was perfect on homemade breakfast biscuits. In retrospect, these were heavy meals and no one was ever told to watch your portions, but we walked, miles sometimes from school or church, or other places as did my Grandpa, a sprite, petite man, who walked over six miles, one way to get to his farm every day. He lived to be 70 plus years and died with pneumonia. The snow and worn boots were not uncommon during his farming years, and Illinois snows were harsh, as they often are today. But he provided well for his family. All four of their children graduated from college. Education was the dream that would take their children off the farm, he often said. And it did, helped by World War II’s G.I. Bill, and the US nurses’ training program. So, “over the river and through the woods to Grandmother’s house we go. The horse knows the way to carry the sleigh through the white and drifted snow. Over the river and through the woods, oh how the wind does blow. It stings the nose and bites the toes as over the ground we go”. We sang! Mom is at the piano, by now, the kids are singing with bravado, and the adults are singing admiringly too. It’s Thanksgiving and the family is together! We are blessed to see another year. Vivid memories, warm remembrances, joys that always come to mind, this time of the year. May you have a “Family Thanksgiving,” filled with memories, whatever they may be. Wishing you A HAPPY THANKSGIVING...you and you and YOU!

PULSE OF THE COMMUNITY Photos and question by Yvonne Kemp

QUESTION OF THE WEEK:

Whatareyouthankful for this coming Thanksgiving Day?

Alderman Willie C. Wade (second from left) joined UW-Milwaukee Men’s Head Basketball Coach Rob Jeter (fourth from left) and Art Arnstein (far left), president of United Milwaukee Scrap in giving away turkeys at the Dominican Center for Women, 2470 W. Locust St. United Milwaukee Scrap provided the turkeys, UWM’s men’s basketball program donated the fixings, and Wisconsin Community Services provided $50 Pick n’ Save gift cards to each of the families who attended the event. (Photo by Yvonne Kemp)

FAITH & CONFIDENCE: Positioning our hearts and minds to

assure success in the lives of Black children By Carol Brunson Day, Ph.D.

Consultant--Brunson, Phillips & Day, Inc.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second exerpt the Community Journal is reprinting from the National Black Child Development Institute’s (NBCDI) report on Black children in America titled, “Being Black Is Not A Risk Factor: A Strengths-based Look At The State of The Black Child.” This week, we focus on how having and imparting faith and confidence in our Black children can secure their success.

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n a sense, the state of Black children is a direct reflection of adults’ values, beliefs, and perceptions of them—how we see them can essentially affect who and what they become. Knowing this should serve as a reminder to us to constantly reflect, examine and strengthen our perspectives in order to transform their lives.

Two important vital assumptions should serve as priorities to guide our actions. We must have: 1. Faith that our children can grow up strong 2. Confidence that our community’s cultural essence can be a contributor to children’s growth and development Take the state of Black children in the formal education domain as a case in point. While the current educational situation for Black children is embodied in the problem commonly referred to as the “achievement gap,” faith that our children can grow up strong would lead us to the following starting assumption: • Not only is it possible to eliminate the achievement gap—it is possible to prevent the gap from appearing in the first place. Moreover, confidence in our community’s cultural essence would lead to a second starting assumption: • Only by embracing a deep understanding of the role of cultural influences on development as we work as human development professionals3 and service providers, can we design and implement effective programs. Let’s examine and discuss each perspective. Faith that our children can grow up strong The news about the status of Black children is not good. Pick nearly any indicator of the quality of life for children and you find Black and Latino children today at the highest levels of distress. What’s happened to us? Surely we haven’t stopped caring, nor have we forgotten how to provide what children need. No, I think we are overcome with a deep and unconscious fear that this (continued on page 5)

JAMES W. NELSON, SR.: “I’m thankful everyday, but Thanksgiving Day means celebrating God and his gift of life in all its abundance. Meaning everything.”

MORRIS BRAZIL, III: “Being able to serve this community; seeing how Career Youth Development is still serving the community after 40 years. Thank God the doors are still open.”

DENISE LAMAR-EVERETT: “I’m thankful for the love and mercy my Heavenly Father has shown me. Also the love of my family and friends as we worship together.”

KATHERINE RHODES: “I’m thankful for life and my three daughters. I’m most thankful for the Lord being in my life.”

The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 Page 2

Women’s groups partners with health organization

The Links, Incorporated, Cream City-Wisconsin Chapter has partnered with Black Health Coalition of Wisconsin (BHCW) to support the agency with their Affordable Care Act (ACA) outreach. Links are pictured above assisting with the registration process during the ACA community forum and enrollment event that BHCW held on November 21, 2013. The photo includes Cathy Edwards, Cream City Links Health Committee Chair, Edwina Beanum, Clara Keal, Cream City Links President and Jenice Burrell. The event included a presentation by Dr. Patricia McManus, BHCW President & CEO, that focused on the core details of the ACA. Attendees were also able to get their pressing ACA questions answered. (Photo by Clarene Mitchell)

AARP Introduces Free Health Care Costs Calculator for Retirement Planning Only One Third of Americans Close to Retirement Age Have Taken Steps to Save for Major Expense

WASHINGTON, DC -On Monday, AARP launched a free online Health Care Costs Calculator, a major addition to their Ready for Retirement suite of planning tools. In a survey accompanying the release of the calculator, AARP found that just one third (36 percent) of older Americans have taken any steps to save for out-of-

pocket health care expenses, though multiple studies show that such costs often reach significantly more than $200,000 for a retired couple. The new tool is available to all at www.aarp.org/healthcostscalc. "The free Health Care Costs Calculator can play an important and often overlooked role as families and individuals plan for retirement," said AARP Vice President for Financial Security Jean Setzfand. "Health care costs can have a significant impact on retirement savings. With this calculator,

AARP aims to help more Americans confidently plan for and achieve retirement goals." The Health Care Costs Calculator estimates health costs in retirement by utilizing a database that includes $136 billion in costs from actual health care claims. Individuals can select from 82 medical conditions to estimate how much they may need to spend on out-of-pocket health care costs. The calculator also assumes that individuals will be eligible for and select Medicare Parts A, B and D. After estimating costs with the

4WTHANKSGIVING The who, what, where, when for the holdays

Youth Step Up to Aid Families

Youth involved in programs at the Social Development Commission (SDC) have made the Thanksgiving holiday a little better for some area families. Members of SDC’s Youth Advisory Board organized a Thanksgiving Food Drive at the agency. They and staff collected items of food that were used to create holiday food baskets for families participating in SDC’s Project GAIN and the Refugee Childcare Microenterprise Project. Employees at SDC sites joined the young people in gathering non-perishable food items that were sorted into baskets that were delivered to participating families in time for the holiday. To learn more about the Youth programs at SDC, visit www.cr-sdc.org/index/Programs--Services/Family-Strengthening/Youth-and-Family-Development-Program.htm.

calculator, users can create a customizable action plan to help save for health care in retirement and make impactful changes in their lives that include planning, saving, and making healthy changes. For example, if a person has "get to a healthier weight" as a goal, the tool will offer possible next steps for pursuing that goal. The Health Care Costs Calculator requires no registration and collects no personal data on any user. To learn more about the tool visit h t t p : / / w w w. a a r p . o rg / h e a l t h costscalc.

Where to apply for Health Insurance from the Affordable Care Act

Black Health Coalition of Wisconsin 3020 W. Vliet Street (414) 933-0064 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Central Library Computer Training Lab, second floor 814 W. Wisconsin Avenue (414) 286-8620 (City of Milwaukee Health Dept.) Wednesdays until March 26, 2014 3-5:30 p.m. Department of Health Services (DHS) Milwaukee Enrollment Services (MilES) 1220 W. Vliet Street 1-(888)-947-6583 Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Hillside Family Health Center 1452 N. 7th Street, second floor (414) 935-8000 Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. Keenan Health Center 3200 N. 36th Street (414) 286-8620 Mon., Wed., and Fri., 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. third Thursdays, 12 p.m.- 6 p.m. All other Thursdays, 12 p.m.- 4 p.m. Legal Action of

Wisconsin, Inc. 230 W. Wells Street, Room 800 (414) 2743455 Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Spanish language assistance available Lisbon Avenue Health Center 3522 W. Lisbon Avenue (414) 935-8000 Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Northwest Health Center 7630 W. Mill Road (414) 286-8620 Mon., Tues., third Thursdays and Fri., 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesday and all other Thursdays, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Outreach Community Health Centers Outpatient Clinic 210 W. Capitol Drive (414) 727-6320 Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Southside Health Center 1639 South 23rd Street (414) 286-8620 Monday, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tues., Wed., and Fri., 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Thursday, 8 a.m. - 5:45 p.m.

RE M EM B E R! Enrollment is now open for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplace Insurance. Open enrollment will end on March 31, 2014. If you enroll by December 15, you can pay premiums for coverage to begin in January of 2014. For enrollment assistance, contact Black Health Coalition of Wisconsin, 414-933-0064 or go to their offices at 3020 W. Vliet Street.

V100 FM hosts food drive for Salvation Army

HOLIDAY LITES RETURN TO MILLER VALLEY TO BRIGHTEN UP THE HOLIDAY SEASON Popular Holiday Tradition Returns for its 10th Year

MillerCoors will kick off its annual holiday celebration Friday, December 6, when Holiday Lites returns to Miller Valley at the MillerCoors Milwaukee Brewery. The popular light show is the largest display of its kind in the Midwest, with more than 300,000 LED lights synchronized to a spirited mix of holiday music. The Holiday Lites show takes place each Friday and Saturday during the holiday season, beginning on Friday, December 6, and running through Saturday, December 21. Shows run every 20 minutes, beginning at 4:40 p.m. until 9 p.m. While there, visitors will receive a free, mini brewery tour, which begins at the Visitor Center, located at 42nd and State. The tour includes the Lite Show, a visit to the one-of-a-kind Historic Miller Caves, and beer samples in the historic Milwaukee Brewery stables for those 21 and older. In addition, the Visitor Center will offer special discounts and giveaways to visitors, who also are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy to donate to ToysFor-Tots or a non-perishable food item for Hunger Task Force. More information can be found by visiting www.millercoors.com or by calling 414-931-BEER (2337) locally or 800-944-LITE. “Holiday Lites are a seasonal tradition that the Milwaukee community looks forward to each year,” said Tami Scully Garrison, community commerce and partnerships manager for MillerCoors. “We’re thrilled to bring back this familyfriendly show, and we encourage residents and visitors to brighten up their holiday by seeing the Lites in Miller Valley.” This year marks the tenth year that the Holiday Lites tradition has been reinstated. The show began in the 1950s and was revitalized as part of Miller Brewing Company’s 150th anniversary celebration in 2005. To learn more about MillerCoors commitment to its communities and other initiatives, visit www.millercoors.com.

The staff of radio station V100FM held a food drive recently in a food drive at the Sentry Food Store located at 7101 W. Lisbon Ave. The food drive was to help the Salvation Army replenish its food pantries. It was also part of the radio station’s on-going community support. The Salvation Army Milwaukee County food pantries serve on average 25,000 individuals annually. The Salvation Army reports that since January of 2013, requests for first time assistance has continued to increase 10%. Several times thorughout the year Salvation Army food pantries have been bare. “We appreciate the partnership with V100 and the annual food drive they host during the holday season,” said Dan Jennings, Salvation Army Divisional Commander. “We encourage corporations, businesses and civic groups to host food drives year round.” (Photo by Yvonne Kemp)

PERSPECTIVES

The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 Page 3

QUOTE OF THE WEEK:

“I think we have to own the fears that we have of each other, and then, in some practical way, some daily way, figure out how to see people differently than the way we were brought up to.”

--Author Alice Walker

The Obamacare success This Thanksgiving, reach out and help stories you have not those with little reason to be thankful been hearing about

MCJ EDITORIAL

Once again we are one day away from celebrating the first major observance of the holiday season, Thanksgiving. If you read our lead story on the front page, in which MCJ Publisher reminisced about her childhood and her family at this time of year, you probably allowed your mind to drift back in time to the days when--as a child-- your own family gathered to celebrate the bounties of the year. We hope you and your family can overcome the obstacles of distance, financial constraints, and bad weather to sit at grandmothers…and grandfathers, your mothers and fathers or other relatives table, join hands and give thanks for another year of peace and comfort within the family circle. As you express your thanks during

grace, remember those less fortunate than you and yours; who are struggling financially, physically, mentally and—alas—familywise. We must always remember that “there, but for the grace of God, goes I!” If you can, reach out and help those who are struggling to have a memorable Thanksgiving by donating to one of the many food pantries in our city and community. Better yet, invite someone you know who may be alone during this holiday to your home to share the warm atmosphere of family and togetherness that is synonymous with the special day. Our Community Journal family joins in wishing all of you, our readers, advertisers and supporters a “Happy Thanksgiving!”

REMEMBER WHEN...

Rosa Parks gave all of us a belated Thanksgiving gift

M

By Richard G. Carter

any mature Black Milwaukeeans remember the days when the city was far from a bastion of liberty and justice for all. The days when open housing was a myth, the South Side was lily-white and a largely Black section of town was known as “the inner core.”

This was before Father John Groppi led open housing marches, before Attorney Lloyd Barbee Rosa Parks stood tall, before activist John Givens led sitsins to protest racism by inner-city merchant Fred Lins and before fiery Councilman Michael McGee Sr. called attention to the separate and unequal aspect of much of everyday life for minorities in Milwaukee. Of course, things were much worse down South. But it all began to change on Dec. 1, 1955, shortly after Thanksgiving Day. That’s when Rosa Parks -- a tiny, 43-year-old Black woman -- refused to move to the back of a city bus in Montgomery, Ala.. Fast forward 30 years to Nov. 26, 1985, in the Detroit office of U.S. Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.). The occasion was my remarkably candid, once-in-a-lifetime interview with the legendary Parks, one of his aides. And I will never forget it. I truly felt a face-to-face would be special with the “Mother of the Civil Rights Movement,” marking the historic 30th anniversary of her courageous act. USA TODAY agreed and my interview appeared in that major newspaper Dec. 17, 1985 -- and was the first piece nationally syndicated by the brand new Gannett News Service. For years, I’d wanted to sit down with Parks to commemorate in print this great lady’s recollections of her pivotal protest which changed America. Although she’d told her story many times, I was not deterred. I’d always found it meaningful to discuss important events with important people who did important things on, or near, important dates. Awaiting her arrival, I talked at length with the erudite Conyers, a founder of the Congressional Black Caucus. And I clearly remember we chuckled when Parks -- with a twinkle in her eye -- showed up, unflustered, a couple of hours late because of car trouble. Then nearing 73, I was amazed at the delicate, soft-spoken, yet energetic Parks, and that she stayed busy in civil rights causes. Among her activities was assisting Black inner-city youth in self-development and making occasional appearances to lend moral support in the name of human rights. One of these was to be at the 1995 Million Man March in Washington, D.C., which was not easy at her age -- 82 at that time. As everyone has come to know, Parks was a seamstress on her way home from

work when boarding a bus on that fateful day in 1955. With all seats in the rear “colored” section taken, she sat down in front -- defying a dastardly tradition in the segregated South. After she refused to move, the White driver called police and she was arrested. This led to a successful 381-day bus boycott that focused the nation’s attention on Montgomery and resulted in open seating on city buses. It also sparked the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s first foray into the nonviolent resistance that catapulted him to international prominence -and cost him his life 13 years later. Alone with Parks, I derived a special satisfaction when she eagerly opened up to me. She lost no time telling me what she did almost 30 years to the day earlier -- and why. “Two reasons, really,” she said. “I’d always felt that the Jim Crow laws in the South were designed as a form of slavery to replace the actual slavery of the past, and this was one day I just didn’t feel like going along. “Despite what you may have heard, I really was just plain tired,” she said. “I’d worked hard all day at the tailor shop and I didn’t feel it was right that I should have to stand in the colored section, which was the general practice, with empty seats up front.” “When I said I wasn’t moving,” she continued, “the driver stopped the bus, called two policemen, and they arrested me. What made it more significant was that other Black passengers got off so I’d have a place to sit if I wanted to. But I stayed put.” These shopworn practices, she added, were “humiliating and depressing.” She called the successful boycott “a victory in the truest sense of the word for right over wrong.” Asked her initial impressions of Dr. King, who had only recently been assigned as pastor of a Baptist church in Montgomery, Parks said, “I felt he was destined to do great things. Dr. King had an elegance about him and a speaking style that let you know where you stood and inspired you to do the best you could.” Tragically, Dr. King, whom I also was privileged to meet and interview on two occasions, was tragically taken from us. But Rosa Parks, charming and ladylike as can be, was still fighting the good fight for freedom and equality. “Our struggle will never go away,” she told me, “so I just have to keep on going on.” Rosa Parks understood the realities of life. And like precious few other Americans who selflessly dedicate themselves to a cause, she did something about it. Her single, unparalleled act of courage on Dec. 1, 1955 on a bus in Montgomery, Ala., proves it. By sitting down in the White section, she was standing up for Black people everywhere. When I heard of Parks’ passing on Oct. 24, 2005, at 92, memories of our morning together 20 years before, came rushing back. Without her, our country is a less dignified, less genteel place. Which is why I am thankful to her every Thanksgiving Day. Milwaukee native Richard G. Carter is a freelance columnist

By Michael Hiltzik--Courtesy of LA Times

Last summer Ellen Holzman and Meredith Vezina, a married gay couple in San Diego County, got kicked off their long-term Kaiser health plan, for which they'd been paying more than $1,300 a month. The cause wasn't theAffordable Care Act, as far as they knew. They'd been living outside Kaiser's service area, and the health plan had decided to tighten its rules. That's when they discovered the chilly hazards of dependence on the individual health insurance market. When they applied for a replacement policy with Anthem Blue Cross of California, Ellen, 59, disclosed that she might have carpal tunnel syndrome. She wasn't sure--her condition was still being diagnosed by Kaiser when her coverage ended. But the possibility was enough to scare Anthem. "They said, 'We will not insure you because you have a preexisting condition,'" Holzman recalls. But they were lucky, thanks to Obamacare. Through Covered California, the state's individual insurance marketplace, they've found a plan through Sharp Healthcare that will cover them both for a total premium of $142 a month, after a government subsidy based on their income. They'll have a higher deductible than Kaiser's but lower co-pays. But their possible savings will be impressive. More important than that was knowing that they couldn't be turned down for coverage come Jan. 1. "We felt we didn't have to panic, or worry," Holzman says. "If not for the Affordable Care Act, our ability to get insurance would be very limited, if we could get it at all." Holzman and Vezina are exactly the type of people Obamacare is designed to help--indeed, rescue from the cold, hard world of individual health insurance of the past. That was a world where even an undiagnosed condition might render you uninsurable. Where your insurance could be canceled after you got sick or had an accident. Where your financial health was at risk as much as your physical well-being. These are the stories you're not hearing amid the pumped-up panic over canceled individual policies and premium shocks--many of which stories are certainly true, but the noise being made about them leads people to think they're more common than they are. We've compiled several alternative examples for this post. They're anecdotes, sure, just like the anecdotes you've been seeing and reading about people learning they'll be paying more for coverage next year. The difference is that Americans learning that they'll be eligible for coverage perhaps for the first time, or at sharply lower cost, are far more typical of the individual insurance market. Two-thirds of the 30 million Americans who will be eligible for individual coverage next year are uninsured today, whether because they can't afford it now or because they're barred by pre-existing condition limitations, which will no longer be legal. And more than three-quarters will be eligible for subsidies that will cut their premium costs and even copays and deductibles substantially. Let's hear from a few more of them. David Shevlino, 51, is an artist in Delaware. Between the COBRA policy that extends the coverage his wife, Kathy, received at a former job and the bare-bones policy that covers himself and their 15-year-old son, they've been laying out $1,000 a month in premiums. Next year they'll pay $650 a month, after the government subsidy, for a plan through Blue Cross of Delaware that covers the entire family and provides many services that have been excluded up to now. That makes a big difference, especially for Kathy, who is still dealing with injuries she suffered in a cycling accident and that would have made her uninsurable once her COBRA ran out less than a year from now. "She had already been turned down by Aetna and Blue Cross, the very company that will now insure her," Shevlino says. "This is a really significant thing--to me, the fact that insurance companies could turn you down didn't make sense in terms of what healthcare is supposed to be for." And Judith Silverstein, 49, a Californian who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2007. Her family helps her pay the $750 monthly cost of her existing plan--which she only had because of federal law requiring that insurers who provide employer-based insurance continue to offer coverage if the employer goes out of business, as hers did. Next year she'll get a subsidy that will get her a good "silver" level plan for $50. For Silverstein that coverage is indispensable. Her case is relatively mild, but MS is a progressive condition that typically has made its sufferers pariahs of the individual insurance market in the past. "I researched the options," she says. "Nobody's going to sell you insurance in the individual market if you have MS." But these customers can't be excluded or saddled with big premium markups any more. (continued on page 5)

THE MILWAUKEE COMMUNITY JOURNAL Published twice weekly, Wednesday & Friday

3612 North Martin Luther King Drive, Milwaukee, WI 53212 Phone: 414-265-5300 (Advertising and Administration) • 414-265-6647 (Editorial) • Website: communityjournal.net • Email: Editorial@communityjournal.net/Advertising@communityjournal.net

MCJ STAFF: Classified Advertising Patricia O’Flynn -Pattillo Jimmy V. Johnson, Sales Rep. Publisher, CEO Joan Hollingsworth, Sales Rep. Robert J. Thomas CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Assoc. Publisher Taki S. Raton, Todd Thomas, Vice Pres. Rev. Roxanne Cardenas, Mikel Holt, Assoc. Publisher Troy A. Sparks, Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr., Editor Sports Editor Kia Marie Green, Mang. Editor PHOTOGRAPHER: Yvonne Kemp Teretha Martin, Technical Consultant/Billing Dept./ Publisher’s Admin. Assist. Colleen Newsom, Opinion and comments expressed on the Perspectives page do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or management of the MCJ. Letters and “other perspectives” are accepted but may be edited for content and length.

RELIGION

The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 page 4

A Letter to Milwaukee’s Black churches

Are Black churches creating job opportunities for their faithful flock and our community?

Advent: Preparing for the coming of Jesus

T

his coming weekend we will begin the "Advent" season of the church year. It is a season of preparation for the coming of Jesus into our world as a baby at Christmas time. The Readings for the first Sunday of Advent are: Isaiah 2: 1-5, Romans 13: 11-14, and Matthew 24: 37-44. The readings give a message of hope for all people. Isaiah says:"The Lord's house shall be established as the highest mountain and raised above the hills. All nations shall stream toward it."

"And they shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks; one nation shall not raise the sword against another, nor shall they train for war again." And Paul says to the Romans: "Let us throw off the works of darkness and put on the armor of

BREAD IN THE

WILDERNESS

by Fr. Carl Diederichs, All Saints Catholic Church light; let us conduct ourselves properly as in the day. But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the desires of the flesh." The Gospel lets us know that we do not know the time when the Son of Man will come, so we must stay awake and keep focused on being the kind of Christian that cares and shares. And the best way we can prepare for the Lord's coming is to realize that he is here right now, working through us and with us to make God's Kingdom of Peace and Justice, Love and Concern real, especially for the folks who have lost heart and hope. We have four weeks of Advent. Four weeks to

concentrate on the Coming of Jesus into this world as a human being destined to turn our world upside down. From the time of His birth until His death on a Cross, He will show us by word and deed how we are to live as God's children now--in peace with each other, loving each other, making sure all of God's children are blessed with all they need to become all they are meant to be. God has become part of our history. God is with us as we work for peace and justice. Take a moment and review the news of the past few weeks. In spite of awful things happening because of human nature, still peace is breaking through, in some places there are now people helping others who need food and water, there are places where medical teams are reaching out to the poorest and sickest, there are places where people are sharing their financial resources to help their brothers and sisters. Wherever good is being done, wherever violence is being overcome with forgiveness and peace, and wherever we seek forgiveness for hurting others, God is real. Come, Lord Jesus!

Black churches are sending monies out of our communities and extending job opportunities to others outside of our neighborhoods; rather than to those who support and attend the inner city temples of worship. Money spent outside of the community is not being reciprocated back into the community. The white “good old boy” system is tide in with black churches has helped to contribute to the despair and unemployment problems in our neighborhoods. By looking over the small black owned companies that are trying to build capacity and job creation, the church has failed to give support to its own. The black enterprise, small business companies do not get the support it needs from the inner city black churches that would help encourage growth and create inner city job for our own. The churches that we attend, are promoting others outside of our communities. They talk about missionary work; the mission field is right outside of the door of each church in the community. The inner city black churches, which we attend every Sunday morning, evenings, and week days; where we give our tithes and offerings too, are supporting others outside of the community. They say no good thing can come out of the inner city but just like Jesus came out of Nazareth with God’s hand so can black businesses grow out of our communities with the helping hands of the black churches. The board members of the black churches have failed our community neighborhoods and families. But in wisdom, love and understanding the black church can correct this wrong thinking by putting a stop to shipping funds out of our communities and start giving opportunities to the small black companies. In order for small black companies to help build growth and job creation, not only do we need the black churches as a place of worship; but as a place where job opportunities present themselves to the people around them. Please support black owned small businesses and help us build capacity and job creation in our neighborhoods.

Sincerely, A Concerned Unemployed Inner City Citizen

EDITORS NOTE: This reader submitted letter was sent to the MCJ. The views expressed do not necessarily represent the views of the newspaper, but represent a voice that deserves to be heard.

Minute Meditation: Prayer For Honesty

How many times have we wanted someone to be honest with us? The first step in honesty is being truthful with the first person in your life. The person that you look in the mirror at everyday deserves the value of honesty. It is only when we practice honesty do our words actually become our bonds. Let that be our prayer today. Your Words are carved for eternity! You have commanded the virtue of honesty, It is the power against all deceptions. Direct Your Spirit of honesty upon me, That by soul may always remain stainless. Guide my daily thoughts, words and actions, To join those living by the Spirit of truth. For honesty yields harmony and loyalty, Enriching all human relationships. By the power of Your Spirit that flourishes, Honesty will prevail in this world! Amen Like anything else in the world it takes time. Let today be the start of you becoming the person you want to be.

Zion Hill to hold information forum on ACA The Family Life Ministry of Zion Hill Missionary Baptist Church will hold an informational forum on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Monday, Dec. 9, at 6:30 p.m. at Zion Hill, located at 1825 W. Hampton Ave. Dr. Patricia McManus, President of the Black Health Coalition of Wisconsin (BHCW). Dr. McManus will answer questions regarding ACA. BHCW is at the forefront in Milwaukee’s Black community in sharing information about ACA. The Coalition is now offering free enrollment assistance.

For more information, call 414263-1777.

In Loving Memory Quality Service... a tenured tradition sincere concern at your time of need.

50th Anniversary of Jubilee Showcase airing on PBS in Dec.

The weekly gospel TV show “Jubilee Showcase” premiered in 1963 during a tim when gospel music had no national television outlet, Jubilee Showcase gave Chicagoans the biggest names and best performers in the genre. The half hour program ran on ABC’s Chicago affiliate television station, WLS, from 1963-1984. Now, these rare performances of gospel legends ranging from Albertina Walker’s Caravans and The Soul Stirrers to Rock and Roll Hall of Famers, The Staple Singers can be seen once again. PBS will air a 50th anniversary commemorative TV special on JUBILEE SHOWCASE on PBS stations beginning November 30, 2013 (check local listings) and running throughout the month of December. The Jubilee Showcase archive is the largest collection of historic gospel music television footage in the world, consisting of 100 half-hour programs that have never been seen by a national audience. Sid Ordower, who was a civil rights activist from Chicago, launched the series fifty years ago. The weekly Sunday morning program, which won a National Emmy Award for a “Pioneering Project in Television,” provided spiritual nourishment for thousands of churchgoers, during the 60s, 70s, and early 80s. For people who grew up with this music it will be a joyous experience to not only hear these amazing artists perform but to see them perform as well. And those who are not familiar with this musical genre will be captivated by the intensely passionate, genuine expression of spirit these artists exude. Host Clifton Davis, star of the vintage TV sitcoms “Amen" and "That’s My Mama" and composer of “Never Can Say Goodbye” by The Jackson 5, grew up listening to many of the artists on Jubilee Showcase. The program presents full performance clips and interview segments from some of the greats who appeared on the show, including Albertina Walker, Otis Clay, Willie Rogers of The Soul Stirrers and Mavis Staples who talks about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s favorite Staple Singers’ recording, “Why Am I Treated So Bad.” Her interview dissolves into the rendition her family performed on Jubilee Showcase. GOSPEL’S JUBILEE SHOWCASE features Albertina Walker singing “Amazing Grace” in her first solo appearance on television, and Inez Andrews with The Caravans performing “Oh, Mary Don’t You Weep.” Other songs include: “Oh, What a Meeting” and “Looking Back” from The Soul Stirrers, “Searching,” by Dorothy Norwood and The Dorothy Norwood Singers, The Staple Singers with “Why Am I Treated So Bad,” and “Willing to Wait” sung by The Caravans. PBS special programming invites viewers to experience the worlds of science, history, nature and public affairs; hear diverse viewpoints; and take frontrow seats to world-class drama and performances. Viewer contributions are an important source of funding, making PBS programs possible. PBS and public television stations offer all Americans from every walk of life the opportunity to explore new ideas and new worlds through television and online content.

Ernestine O’Bee 1907-2007

Offering pre-need, at need and after-care services to families in Milwaukee, Racine, Kenosha and other communities throughout our state.

J.C. Frazier Funeral Director

Services scheduled for November 25 - 30, 2013 Harris, Jonathan Sr.

Age 57 yrs. November 15, 2013. Funeral services will be held on Monday 11AM at Sharon Seventh Day Adventist Church 2389 N. Teutonia Ave. Visitation Monday 10AM at the CHURCH until time of services.

Person, Joseph

Age 84 yrs. November 19, 2013. Funeral services will be held on Saturday 1PM. Visitation Saturday 12 Noon until time of services at: Northwest Funeral Chapel O'Bee, Ford & Frazier, 6630 W. Hampton Ave.

Johnson, Cynthia D.

Age 66 yrs. November 19, 2013. Funeral services will be held on Tuesday 11AM. Visitation Tuesday 10AM until time of services at:Northwest Funeral Chapel O'Bee, Ford & Frazier, 6630 W. Hampton Ave.

Craven, Rosie L.

Metesh, Richard J.

Age 100 yrs. November 18, 2013. Funeral services will be held on Friday 11AM. Visitation Friday 10AM until time of services at:Northwest Funeral Chapel O'Bee, Ford & Frazier, 6630 W. Hampton Ave.

Age 54 yrs. November 18, 2013. Beloved mother of Iman Johnson. Loving daughter of Mattie Johnson. Sister of Gloria Zolicoffer, Connie Sanders, Ryck(Darlene)Johnson, Ron Johnson and Rodney Johnson. Also survived by a host of other loving relatives and friends. Funeral services will be held on Monday 11AM at Holy Cathedral COGIC 2677 N. 40th St. Visitation Monday 10AM at the CHURCH

Families served by:

Northwest Funeral Chapel O’Bee, Ford & Frazier

Milwaukee 6630 W. Hampton Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53218 Telephone: (414) 462-6020 Fax: (414) 462-9937

Racine 800 Barker St. Racine, WI 53402 Telephone: (262) 637-6400 Fax: (262) 637-6416

FAITH & CONFIDENCE

(continued from page 1) country’s social ills are unfixable. Each time we read the tragic stories about of children’s lives, it feeds this sense of hopelessness. I remember many years ago reading a front page article in the Los Angeles Times about an elaborate 8th grade graduation party given by some Hollywood stars for a class of low income Black youngsters in Watts. The article empathized with and praised the motivation of the party sponsors, because they said “it was probably the last graduation these kids would ever have.” I remember thinking how subtly the message reinforced for readers the low expectation for these children’s futures. Examples like this are far too many, and occur as well within our professional literature. For example, Dr. Walter Gilliam from the Yale University Child Study Center completed a study about three and four year old children who were expelled from publicly funded prekindergarten programs (Gilliam, 2005). The report indicated that a higher percentage of children being put out were African-American; and that among the African Americans put out of preschool, 91% were boys. This study was followed by a subsequent summary report including recommendations designed to correct the situation (Gilliam, 2005), yet among the four main findings and the eight recommendations, not a single mention was made of this alarming statistic, nor was addressing it conveyed as a priority. Again, a subtle, albeit unintentional, sense that nothing much could be done to change things for these boys. Expectations like these influence how we behave. If we expect nothing to change, then nothing will. They generate a mindset of hopelessness and hopelessness can create an atmosphere where fixable problems become unfixable ones. We must work to resist this erosion in our belief in the potential of our ownbehavior and actions to change things, and make a conscious effort to have faith in our children as the geniuses that they are. We must also know that maintaining this state of mind will take constant work because we are being fed information every day that “they just bad kids;” “they momma don’t care;” and “these children are at risk.” Being labeled “at risk” is like being voted least likely to succeed. For where there is no faith in your future success, there is no real effort to prepare you for it. We should know better than to fall victim to this helplessness/hopelessness syndrome. For we know that our children come into this world as bright, capable human beings—geniuses until proven otherwise. We know that it is possible to keep children from quitting school; that it is possible to fill children’s lives with health and wholeness; and that it is pos-

“Being labeled ‘at risk’ is like being voted least likely to succeed. For where there is no faith in your future success, there is no real effort to prepare you for it.”

sible to provide the needy young in our communities with the kind of help that can eventually transform their lives and ours. Confidence that our community’s cultural ess ence can be a contributor to children’s growth and development Public school education through the years has evolved to the belief that multicultural education (as a remedy for monocultural education ) could “fix” whatever it was that Black children’s culture has done to them to reduce their educability. While some researchers, educators and organizations have made While a strong case for the importance of cultural competency as a key element of high-quality early care and education, there remain limited tools available to infuse culture as a vehicle for learning. Despite this, however, we must remain confident in the enormous potential this approach has for our children’s success in education and in life. The task is an enormous one, for any approach with cultural integrity will require at a minimum changing the way we see culture and its influence on development. In many attempts thus far, superficial aspects of culture have been treated and found insufficient to contribute to academic gains. Going forward, then, we will need to focus more on the deep structure of culture—deeply held values and beliefs—using those to empower human development professionals to create their own sound and effective strategies for working with Black children and families. How do we do this? First, we must look to voices from within the cultural community itself as sources of expertise. Reading what has been written about the development of children and families by researchers, theorists and writers from an African American cultural perspective and processing the information are must-dos. To mediate the process of ensuring reliability and validity, ideas should not necessarily be taken

FAITHFUL DANCERS!

“The Descendants of Miriam” dance ministry group of St. Martin de Porres Cathoic Parrish (pictured above) recently performed at a Christian Dance Concert titled, “Faith Check,” which addressed--through dance-challenges that many people face in life: fatherless/motherless children, importance abstinence, unhealthy marriages, and teen suicides through the expression of prayer. The membes of The Descendants of Miriam are: Bottom Row L to R: Makini Jones Faith Williamson Nevaehzia JonesHubbard Logan Pittman Zyeria McClinton Top Row L to R: La'Nethia Howard Mikayla Spicer Mikyia Jones Danielle Fancher Mikeela Jones The artistic director for The Descendants of Miriam is Jai K. Words Mones. (Photo by Yvonne Kemp)

The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 Page 5

at face value, but should be subjected to analyses, in discussions with colleagues, parents, community members and others who have experience in the culture. Are the descriptions and ideas valid in their experiences? How can the information best be used in work with families and children? We must stay open to new insights and evolving ideas as the discussions continue and be aggressive in seeking out new ideas from diverse sources. It is not always easy to find materials that are not written from a mainstream perspective but they do exist; book exhibitors at conferences and alternative magazines can be good sources, as can elders within cultural communities. Second, we want to become proficient in understanding how negative responses to culture and race contribute to the underdevelopment of our children. As part of our responsibility to position ourselves in our work to remove obstacles to children’s development, we must learn to identify ethnocentrism in the theories and practice to which we have traditionally subscribed, and race bias in the institutions with which we interface. If there is racial and/or cultural bias in the society surrounding our schools, then it is very likely to be also reflected somewhere within the school policy and practices, rendering judgments of superiority and inferiority on children. As we look for and discuss the ways these value judgments are embodied within institutions that are assumed to be universal, we are able to be increasingly reflective and articulate about the cultural lens through which we view the world. We want to get to a place where we can discuss race and cultural issues in conversations and meetings just as easily as we talk about making puppets or play dough. Third, we need to shift from an emphasis on multiculturalism, where the melting pot theme prevails, to an emphasis on pluralism where the preservation of home culture is an important developmental goal for children and families. As cultural communities evolve, we must continue to examine and assess the choices we are able to offer to our children in terms of relationships to other cultural communities and to mainstream culture. Being constantly aware of the tensions between views on cultural assimilation, and exploring ways to exercise pluralism without it being a threat to maintaining common societal norms are important processes to maintain. In a time of growing cultural diversity, we must engage in practical and concrete ways to honor various cultural values and styles of doing things while maintaining unity and allegiance to a common society. Our jobs on behalf of children demand us to work on ourselves as adults . We need to ensure we st ay sharp, making continuous efforts to improve ourselves, our hearts and our minds to ass ure success in the lives of Black children.

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MCJ I N F O R M AT I O N E D U C AT I O N I N S P I R AT I O N

Milwaukee Urban League’s Equal Opportunity Day Luncheon

Paula Williams-Madison, chairman and ceo of Madison Media Management LLC and the owner of the WNBA LA Sparks (second from left) was the keynote speaker for the Milwaukee Urban League’s 54th annual Equal Opportunity Day Luncheon held recently at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, 333 W. Kilbourn Ave., downtown. Pictured with Williams-Madison are (left to right): UWM Vice Chancellor Joan Prince, MUL President/CEO Ralph Hollmon, and Chantel Byrd, MUL Board Treasurer. (Photo by Yvonne Kemp)

Obamacare success stories you haven’t heard

(continued from page 3) It's not only recipients of subsidies who are benefiting. Jason Noble, 44, who has his own property management firm in Southern California, found a gold plan that will cover his wife and their three children--a daughter, 9, and 5-year-old twins--for a little less than $1,300 a month. That's slightly more than they'd be paying next year for their existing Blue Shield plan, but the benefits are much greater, including pediatric dental coverage. Their family deductible will fall from $3,400 to zero. Last year, the family had a health scare that ran them $1,800 in out-of-pocket expenses; a similar event next year would cost them nothing. "It's definitely a good deal," Noble says. it's fair to observe that not all these people are enamored with their enrollment experience. Ellen Holzman found Covered California's website "definitely clunky," and she and Vezina are still awaiting enrollment documents from Sharp that they say are well overdue. Brian Sheppard, 58, a self-employed Southern California attorney, says he spent five to seven hours on the website before determining that he could upgrade from the existing Kaiser plan covering him and his wife for an additional $100 a month, but with lower deductibles and prescription costs. He's still waiting to hear whether he'll be eligible for a subsidy that would slash his expenses significantly. "I'm persistent, I'm a lawyer, and I found it very difficult to work through that system," he says. But for him it was worth the effort. "In 2010, when people were being canceled because they got sick, there was all this outrage," he observes. "People have forgotten that." The difficulties of the federal government's healthcare.gov and some state enrollment websites are real, and have kept hundreds of thousands of Americans, even millions, from enrolling. But many of those who understand the benefits of the Affordable Care Act know that obsessing about the technical glitches is like mistaking the scoreboard for the game. Political opportunists (like House Speaker John Boehner), exploit nearterm difficulties to obscure the tangible benefits the Affordable Care Act will bring to tens of millions of their constituents. When they say "this law has to go," as Boehner's spokesman did this weekend, they're talking about returning people to the era of exclusions for pre-existing conditions. To people learning they're uninsurable because of injuries from accidents, or chronic diseases, or the sheer bloody-mindedness of insurance company bureaucrats. Let's hear Boehner and his people explain to Holzman and Vezina, the Shevlinos, the Nobles, the Sheppards, and Silverstein--and to 20-30 million other Americans like them who might be locked out of the individual insurance market without the law they ridicule as "Obamacare"--how they'd be better off that way.

YOUTH/EDUCATION The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 page 6

State school nurses: holiday breaks offer easy opportunity for student to get flu vaccinations MADISON – The Wisconsin Association of School Nurses (WASN), representing more than 250 members statewide, today encouraged parents planning holiday break activities for their vacationing school- and college-age children to spend a few minutes getting them immunized against the flu. “In the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, it is often easy to forget that it only takes a quick trip to the family healthcare provider, pharmacy or local health department to protect your kids by getting them vaccinated against influenza,” said Louise Wilson, president of the Wisconsin Association of School Nurses and Health Services Supervisor in the Beaver Dam Unified School District. “Wisconsin families often travel for the holidays and can find themselves in contact with people from other communities or states that may have already been exposed to the flu. Being vaccinated beforehand helps provide the best method of protection. This also helps protect elderly family members, infants and those with auto-immune diseases, who are most susceptible to the illness, from contracting it

from you.” A typical flu season extends from October through April, according to Wilson, but the state health department has reported flu cases peaking as late as February and has already recorded flu cases statewide this year. “Tight budgets have greatly reduced the number of vaccination clinics at schools statewide and while many parents have had their children’s’ immunizations updated prior to the school year, holiday breaks provide another window of opportunity to get whatever they might need, including booster shots for

meningitis for those who are college-age,” said Wilson. “Many families may have also been waiting to reach their insurance deductibles or find themselves with existing flex dollars that must be spent, both which aid in easing these types of healthcare costs.” Earlier this year, WASN reminded parents of federal funding changes that require those with private immunization insurance coverage to take their children to private healthcare providers for vaccinations rather than public health departments. WASN indicates those six months and older are encouraged to get a flu vaccination. For more information on flu vaccinations visit www.flu.gov or go to http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines to see additional facts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The mission of WASN is to support and advance the practice of professional school nurses in Wisconsin in order to enhance the health and educational success of students. For more information please visit http://wischoolnurses.org/ or on Facebook.

Leader at MPS’ Pulaski High wins national ‘Principal of the Year’ honors from NABSE And Pulaski business educator Mauricio Garzon honored by national group

Dr. Darrell Williams, principal of Milwaukee Public Schools’ Casimir Pulaski High School, has been named national “Principal of the Year” by the National Alliance of Black School Educators. Members of NABSE from across the country are asked to nominate principals “who have demonstrated outstanding leadership skills that have led to a greater sense of student, teaching staff and parental community support.” Dr. Williams, who has led Pulaski since 2011, topped the field and received the national honor. “It’s great to see that the work that you’ve done over the years is recognized by such a prestigious national

organization,” he said. “Aside from being humbling, it validates our efforts to move kids in a positive direction. We’ve been able to change the culture and climate at the school while increasing student achievement, which is our mission at the school.” During Dr. Willams’ time at Pulaski, reading and math proficiency have improved. He also implemented a student leadership initiative that encourages students to take pride in their school community and serve as role models to younger students. “We’re always pleased when the spotlight shines on the hard work of our school leaders,” MPS Superintendent Gregory Thornton said. “I am especially proud of Dr. Williams receiving this prestigious honor.” The Pulaski principal was nominated by retired longtime MPS principal Rogers Onick, who won the award

Dr. Darrell Wlliams in 2006. The honor was bestowed the same month that the High School of Business (HSOB) national organization honored Pulaski business teacher Mauricio Garzon for his dedication to building the HSOB program at Pulaski. Now in its second year, the

The African Children’s Choir to perform Dec. 5 The African Children’s Choir is headed to Wisconsin performances in Madison and Milwaukee. On Dec. 3 the choir will perform at Overture Hall in Madison, 201 State Street. Two days later on Dec. 5, the choir will be featured at Helen Bader Concert Hall, 2149 E. Kenwood Blvd. at 7 p.m. The African Children's Choir melts the hearts of audiences with their charming smiles, beautiful voices and lively African songs and dances. The program features well-loved children's songs, traditional Spirituals and Gospel favorites. The Choir raises money to combat poverty and hunger in Africa through humanitarian and educational outreach. Concerts are free and open to all. A free-will offering is taken at the performance to support African Children's Choir programs, such as education, care and relief and development programs. Music for Life (The parent organization for The African Children's Choir) works in seven African countries such as, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Nigeria, Ghana and South Africa. MFL has educated over 52,000 children and impacted the lives of over 100,000 people

through its relief and development programs during its history. MFL purpose is to help create new leadership for tomorrow's Africa, by focusing on education. The African Children's Choir has had the privilege to perform before presidents, heads of state and most recently the Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth II, for her diamond jubilee. The Choir has also had the honor of singing alongside artists such as Paul McCartney, Annie Lennox, Keith Urban, Mariah Carey, Michael W. Smith, and other inspirational performers! Most recently, the African Children's Choir accompanied South African opera singer, Pumeza Matshikiza, on some tracks for her debut album which was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London. The African Children's Choir is a nonprofit humanitarian and relief organization dedicated to helping Africa's most vulnerable children today so they can help Africa tomorrow.

www.communityjournal.net

HSOB program is for students who want to study business in college, and particularly those who plan on pursuing an MBA or their own business. “Our goal is that students who graduate from the HSOB program are well-prepared with the skills and knowledge to enter either college business administration programs, other post-secondary education, or the workforce,” MPS Career and Technical Education Coordinator Eric Radomski said. “We rely on Mr. Garzon’s leadership efforts to make that goal a reality.” In addition to the business program, Pulaski has a Career and Technical Education program of study in transportation, which includes automotive coursework and hybrid-electric vehicle curriculum. Pulaski’s auto shop is home to two hybrid-electric vehicles donated by Johnson Controls.

A father enjoys a trip to the dance floor with his daughter. (Inset photo) A dad enjoys a special moment with his little girl during the 2013 Daddy Daughter Dance. (SDC photos)

Registration underway for 2014 Daddy Daughter Dance Milwaukee area fathers have begun signing up for an annual celebration of the relationship between a dad and his daughter. Registrations are being taken for the 11th Annual Daddy Daughter Dance. The celebration will be held Saturday, February 15th from 5:00 to 8:00pm at North Division Community Center at 1011 W. Center Street. The fun-filled evening will feature dancing, food and prizes. A live DJ will play the best dance hits from every era, culminating in an annual tradition, the Cupid Dennis Walton enjoys the 2013 Daddy Daughter Dance Shuffle. On-line registration has begun for with his daughter. (SDC the popular dance at the Milwaukee photo) Recreation website http://milwaukeerecreation.net/daddy/. Dinner at the dance is limited to only those who preregister before February 10th. A limited number of walk-up registrations which do not include dinner will be taken after 5:45pm on the evening of the dance. The Daddy Daughter Dance is a project of the Milwaukee Recreation Department in partnership with the Social Development Commission (SDC) and the Milwaukee Fatherhood Initiative. To get for information on the evening plus view a video of a previous Daddy Daughter Dance, visit the Milwaukee Recreation website or SDC’s site at www.cr-sdc.org.

KALEIDOSCOPE Sista Speak...Speak Lord!

The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 Page 7

the MCJ lifestyle & entertainment section

THANKFUL! Sonya Marie Bowman

PEACE OF MIND

Zelda Corona

This is the Season where every year we reflect on our lives We fast forward this year’s positives and negatives that have occurred Loved Ones we have lost, Old Friends, New Friends, past and present relationships, etc……… The One Thing You Need TO FOCUS ON is what gives you a PEACE OF MIND Being able to see, walk, talk, smell, hear, etc……can give you that PEACE OF MIND

THANKSGIVING IS COMING AND THIS IS THE TIME TO REFLECT ON WHAT WE ARE THANKFUL FOR

Tara R. Pulley

I am Pleased to share my testimony I am Delighted by God’s humor I am Comfortable to disclose I am Quenched by faith I am Relaxed enough to slow down I am…BLESSED! Zelda Corona

BEHOLDEN

The end of 2013 is fast approaching and though this year has been filled with valleys, I still have so much to be thankful for. Although some friendships ended and maybe for the best, I am grateful that I can still pray for them, I think this is my test.

AND SPEND TIME WITH LOVED ONES AND GIVE THE GIFT OF YOURSELF TO OTHERS IN NEED

I am indebted to the true friends that are still in my life…Relieved to know that we chose love, over pettiness and strife.

HAVE A SAFE AND PEACEFUL THANKSGIVING

We may have all lost loved ones that have gone on home to glory, let us be pleased with who they were and continue to tell their story.

I ALWAYS SAY A PEACE OF MIND IS PRICELESS

As Always Keeping it Real Tara R. Pulley

…And Highly Favored

I am Grateful to be me I am Appreciative of those who left their legacy I am Gratified by my accomplishments I am Relieved that I don’t have to carry my burdens alone I am Happy with my life I am Enchanted with what my future will bring I am Indulged with grace

I am much obliged for the many blessings that grace makes a way for me to live, allowing me to also bless others, for this reason alone do I give. And just when I was about to throw up my hands and GIVE UP!!!...Real love stepped in. I am overwhelmed, ohhh sooo satisfied to the point that I feel golden! I am beyond praise and worship…To you GOD I am BEHOLDEN! “Sonya Marie”

Noted Black community women to be featured speakers at Black Men’s group event

The Black Men’s Monday Night Meeting group will present, “Black Women: Building Our Community and Watching Our Backs,” on Friday, Nov. 29, at the Wisconsin African American Women’s Center, 3020 W. Vliet Street, starting at 4 p.m. (doors will open at 3:30 p.m.). Black women from the community who are involved in everything from education, entrepreneurship to healthcare will be on hand to share their insight on what needs to take place in the community to solve its problems. Among the confirmed women who will be in atte-

nance are:Josephine Hill, Bonnie Kemet, Jasmine Washington, Janette Herrera, Shanyeil McCloud, Ifama Jackson, Redonna Rogers, Stephanie Finley, Carmen Ray, Basimah Abdullah, Dr. Patricia McManus and Zakiya Courtney. “Innerattainment” will be provided by Melissa Blue and Ori. They will present Ajagun Arts. Audience participation will be welcomed. Escort Service to your car will be available and food will be served. Vendors providing free information to the public are welcomed. Call 414-374-2364 for more information.

Health&Wellness

Columbia St. Mary’s is first state health system to launch online access to doctor’s notes

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ecalling precisely what a doctor said or prescribed during an office visit can be a challenge for some patients. To address this issue, Columbia St. Mary’s is pleased to announce that its new “OpenNotes” initiative is now available to its patients through its secure online patient portal, CSM Connect.

The health care provider is the first in Wisconsin to launch the convenient, round-the-clock access to doctor’s notes – opinions, instructions, next steps, prescriptions and test orders. “Patients are familiar with going online to access their medical record for general medical information such as confirming an upcoming appointment or viewing lab results,” said Dr. Bruce McCarthy, president of Columbia St. Mary’s Physician Division. “But doctor’s notes are the thread that ties together many pieces of information in the medical record. OpenNotes could profoundly change the way people engage with their doctor and manage their care.” Dr. McCarthy heard of the OpenNotes concept in theory years ago. “I became more intrigued as my own mom aged and started to develop signs of dementia,” he said. “She would go to her doctor and when I asked how the visit was, she would always say ‘the doctor says everything is fine’ while I knew that wasn’t the case.” “It’s great to see Columbia St. Mary’s take this step and offer physician’s notes to their patients,” said Steve Downs, chief technology and information officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “It’s crucial at this state to have a set of early adopters whose experience will help pave the way for others.” A national study in 2010 funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nation’s largest philanthropy organization devoted exclusively to health and health care, tested the OpenNotes concept with 105 primary care physicians and more than 13,000 patients during a year-long voluntary program. Patients reported: • Having better recall after visits • Feeling more in control of their care • Better communication and collaboration with their doctor • Feeling better educated • Taking medications more effectively • Preventing important mistakes • Sharing their notes with family, friends and health professionals The findings were published in the Oct. 2 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. “When this study began it was a fascinating idea in theory,” says Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “Now it has been tested and proven. The evidence is in: Patients support, use and benefit from open medical notes.

The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 Page 8

UW-Milwaukee Grads Credit Their Experiences at the School for Making Them Excellent MPS Teachers

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arko Radmanovic, assistant principal at Escuela Vieau, looks astounded when asked if he’s ever considered leaving teaching or Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS).

“The idea has never crossed my mind. It’s such an exciting environment. Every day is interesting, with new successes and challenges. I love the diversity of MPS, the students, the parents and the wonderful colleagues who inspire me and who are so dedicated.”

Marko Radmanovic, assistant principal at Escuela Vieau, looks astounded when asked if he’s ever considered leaving teaching or Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS). “The idea has never crossed my mind. It’s such an

exciting environment. Every day is interesting, with new successes and challenges. I love the diversity of MPS, the students, the parents and the wonderful colleagues who inspire me and who are so dedicated.” Katerina Jones, a second grade teacher at Samuel

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Bucks Guard O.J. Mayo goes up for two during the Bucks game against The Dallas Mavericks at the BMO Bradley Center. (Photo by Bill Tennessen)

Clemens School in Milwaukee, says she simply ignores those who criticize teachers or public schools. “I know I’m doing good work here, and I know all my colleagues come here every day and do good work so I don’t let it bother me.” Radmanovic and Jones, both University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Education (SOE) alumni, were among teachers receiving Advanced Career awards at the Oct. 17 Celebration of Teachers and Teaching event, sponsored by the Education Deans of Greater Milwaukee (EDGM). Education Deans of Greater Milwaukee is a collaboration involving the deans of nine area higher education institutions, including UWM. Proceeds of the October awards event benefit a fund to promote professional development for teachers and to advance the reputation of teaching. “This event gives us the opportunity to spotlight the work that teachers do,” says Barbara Daley, interim SOE dean. “It is a way of honoring all teachers for the energy and enthusiasm and skills they bring to their work.” An indirect path to the profession Radmanovic got into teaching in a roundabout way. He’d earned his undergraduate degrees in criminology and history from Marquette University and was working in the safety department in Milwaukee Public Schools when he became interested in the challenges special education students face. He began volunteering on his lunch hours to work with students with behavioral and emotional issues. He then entered a special education post-baccalaureate partnership program between MPS and UWM, which allowed him to work as a special education teacher while earning his certification in the field. Later, he earned his regular education and history certifications. He has taught in MPS since 1990. “I liked to focus

on a student’s strengths, as a way to help them reach their potential.” The parent of a student who made “huge gains” in math skills wrote in a nomination letter: “Children have an innate sense of when someone truly believes in them, and (our child) knew that Mr. R. did.” Partnerships, programs key to developing educators Jones, a second-grade teacher at Samuel Clemens Elementary School in MPS, has 10 years teaching experience. She was part of the 2002-03 cohort of UWM’s former Metropolitan Multicultural Teacher Education Pre-service Program, which prepared paraprofessionals to become certified teachers. “Ms. Jones demonstrates an uncommon commitment to providing quality instruction based on each student’s developmental level and learning style,” Clemens principal Jacqueline Richardson wrote in her nomination letter. Both teachers credit their experiences at UWM with helping them become excellent teachers. Both Radmanovic and Jones talk about the importance of helping students begin to see the relationships among the materials they’re encountering. Students need to not only see those relationships, but the relevance to their own lives, these teachers agree. Every success builds confidence for the next steps in learning. That, says Jones, is a key reason she is a teacher. “I really love those ‘ah-ha’ moments, and I’m getting to see quite a few of them.” Other honorees at this year’s event included educators from Milwaukee College Prep, Walker Elementary School, Carmen High School of Science & Technology, Rufus King International-Middle Years Campus, Young Leaders Academy, St. Adalbert School, and Seeds of Health-Windlake Elementary.

The Milwaukee Bucks and the Green Bay Packers have found the going tough the last few weeks.

Packer Quarterback Matt Flynn gave the team a spark in its tie with the Minnesota Vikings Sunday, while Running Back Eddie Lacy hammered the Vikes defense on the ground, gaining over 100 yards. (Kim Robinson photos)

Turkey Time: Bucks coach and players give back to those in need in Milwaukee and Racine for Thanksgiving In preparation for Thursday’s Thanksgiving holiday, Bucks head coach Larry Drew and players O.J. Mayo and Larry Sanders distributed turkey dinners to 150 pre-registered Milwaukee area families at the House of Peace, a Capuchin ministry, Tuesday afternoon. Drew, Mayo and Sanders are responsible for donating all the food, as well as Bucks knit caps and scarves. The distribution is part of the House of Peace Holiday Food Basket Program, which includes com-

munity partners such as Roundy’s, area businesses and organizations, and participating parishes and schools of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee. In addition to the turkey, the Thanksgiving dinners will include stuffing, mashed potatoes, vegetables, cranberry sauce and more. BUTLER GIVES BACK TO HOMETOWN FAMILIES – On Tuesday at the John Bryant Community Center (601 21st St.) in Racine, Bucks forward Caron Butler gave away 200 Thanksgiving

meals to pre-selected families from his hometown. Butler will provide turkeys and all the trimmings in advance of the Thanksgiving holiday. “Giving back to my hometown means a great deal to my family and me,” said Butler. “We are thankful and blessed to be in this position to help others and make sure that as many people as possible can enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday. I encourage others to do the same this holiday season.”

The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 page 9

CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES

SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY !OTICE A!D ORDER FOR !AME CHA!GE HEARI!G Case !o. 13CV009369 In the matter of the name change of: DAMIEN DREAMS LEE OSTEEN By (Petitioner)MEGAN MARIE BURKHAMMER

NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From:DAMIEN DREAMS LEE OSTEENTo: DAMIEN DREAMS LEE BURKHAMMER Birth Certificate: DAMIEN DREAMS LEE OSTEEN IT IS ORDERED This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Judge’s Name:HON. DAVID A HANSHER ROOM 412 PLACE: 901 N. 9th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53233 DATE: December 5,2013, TIME 1:30 P.M. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Milwaukee Community Journal, a newspaper published in Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Dated: 10-17-2013 BY THE COURT: HON. DAVID A HANSHER Circuit Court Judge 013-190/11-13-20-27-2013 SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY !OTICE A!D ORDER FOR !AME CHA!GE HEARI!G Case !o. 13CV009778 In the matter of the name change of: DINA ZANA HAMARAHIM By (Petitioner)JWAN K HASAN By (Co-Petitioner) KARDO UMIT ABDULLAH NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From:DINA ZANA HAMARAHIMTo: DINA UMIT KARDO IT IS ORDERED This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Judge’s Name:HON. DAVID A HANSHER ROOM 412 PLACE: 901 N. 9th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53233 DATE: December 62013, TIME 10:30 A.M. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Milwaukee Community Journal, a newspaper published in Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Dated: 10-23-2013 BY THE COURT: HON. DAVID A HANSHER Circuit Court Judge 013-189/11-13-20-27-2013 SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY Case !o. 13FA006803 Divorce-40101 In Re: The marriage of:ERIC ANTHONY MEDLOCK, Petitionerand Respondent: CAROL F BONNER MEDLOCK THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first day of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court, Milwaukee County Courthouse 901 N 9thStMilwaukee WI 53233 and toERIC ANTHONY MEDLOCK 6508 W SPOKANE STMILWAUKEE WI 53223 It is recommended, but not required that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything

that is or may be incorrect in the Petition.

A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of 948.31 Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and/or imprisonment: If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under 49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under 767.511 (1m). Wis Stats. are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in 767.105 WIs.Stats. 767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. Date: 10-1-2013 BY:ERIC A MEDLOCK 013-188/11-13-20-27-2013 SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY DIVORCE-40101 Case !o. 13FA2237 In Re: The marriage of SHAVONNE L MITCHELL, Petitionerand LEONIDAS D HOWARD, Respondent THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 40 days from the day after the first date of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at:Clerk of CourtMilwaukee County Courthouse 901 N. 9th St.ROOM 104 Milwaukee WI 53233and to SHAVONNE MITCHELL 3916 N 12thSt Milwaukee WI 53206 It is recommended, but not required, that you haveattorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition and you may lose your right to object anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under 49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under 767.511(1m), Wis. Stats., are available

upon your request from the Clerk of Court. You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in 767.105,Wis. Stats.

767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2) Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a) The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b) The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. Date: 11-13-2013 By: SHAVONNE MITCHELL 013-191/11-20-27/12-4-2013 SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY !OTICE A!D ORDER FOR !AME CHA!GE HEARI!G Case !o. 13CV009779 In the matter of the name change of: RUSSELL DESHON BELL NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: RUSSELL DESHON BELL To: NOMI MALIYAH BELL Birth Certificate:RUSSELL DESHON BELL IT IS ORDERED This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Judge’s Name:HON.KEVIN E MARTENS BRANCH 27 ROOM 415 PLACE: 901 N. 9th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53233 DATE: December 19, 2013, TIME 2:00 P.M. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Milwaukee Community Journal, a newspaper published in Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Dated: 10-23-2013 BY THE COURT: HON. KEVIN E MARTENS Circuit Court Judge 013-192/11-20-27/12-4-2013 SUMMO!S PUBLICATIO! STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY FAMILY COURT BRA!CH FAMILY: B CASE !O. 13FA006589 In re the Marriage of: WANDA IVETTE CENTENO, 2814 S 15thApt 6 Street Milwaukee Wisconsin 53215, Petitioner and GILBERT CENTENO, 1583 W Plainfield Ave Milwaukee, WI 53221 Respondent THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To the person named above as respondent: You are hereby notified that the petitioner named above has filed a petition for divorce against you. Within 45 days after the 4thday of November, 2013 exclusive of the date just stated, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the petition. The demand must be sent or delivered to this Court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court, Milwaukee County Courthouse901 N. 9th St., Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Centro Legal the petitioner’s attorney, whose address is 614 W. National Ave., Floor 2, MilwaukeeWI 53204. You may have an attorney represent you. If you do not demand a copy within 45 days, the Court may grant a judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. Judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment of wages

or seizure of property.

You are further hereby notified that if you or the petitioner has minor children, violation of the following criminal statute is punishable by a fine or imprisonment, or both: 948.31 Interference with custody by parent or others. If you and the petitioner have minor children, a document setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department of Workforce Development under Wis. Stat. 49.22(9) and listing the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under Wis. Stat. 767.511(1m) is available upon your request form the clerk of court. You are further hereby notified of the availability of information set forth in Wis. Stat. 767.105 from the office of family court commissioner. Dated: October 30, 2013 Centro Legal Attorneys for the Petitioner By: JESSICA MARQUEZ MURPHY State bar No. 1064363 013-193/11-20-27/12-4-2013 SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY Case !o. 13FA5859 Divorce-40101 In Re: The marriage of:ANTONIO M FORE, Petitionerand Respondent: TABITHA M FORE THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first day of publication. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court, Milwaukee County Courthouse 901 N 9thStMilwaukee WI 53233 and toANTONIO FORE 7034 W MEDFORD AVEMILWAUKEE WI 53218 It is recommended, but not required that you have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of 948.31 Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and/or imprisonment:

If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under 49.22(9), Wis. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under 767.511 (1m). Wis Stats. are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court.

You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in 767.105 WIs.Stats. 767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner. (2)Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge, provide the party with written information on the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order in the action 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting, modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b)The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase, with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. Date:9-23-2013 BY:ANTONIO FORE 013-194/11-20-27/12-4-2013 SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI!: CIRCUIT COURT: FAMILY COURT BRA!CH MILWAUKEE COU!TY CASE !O. 2013FA006949 In re the marriage of: JOSE R ALVARADO, 2015 MILLER PARKWAY, Milwaukee WI 53219 Petitioner and MARIA M RAFAELRODRIGUEZ, ADDRESS UNKNOWN Respondent THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To the person named above as respondent: You are hereby notified that the petitioner named above has filed a petition for divorce against you. Within forty days after the 18th day of November, 2013 exclusive of the date just stated, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the petition. The demand must be sent or delivered to this Court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court Milwaukee County Courthouse 901 N 9th St. Milwaukee WI 53233 and to JOSE R ALVARADO whose address is 2015 MILLER PARKWAY Milwaukee WI 53219 You may have an attorney represent you.

Klemm Tank Lines, a highway subsidiary of the Kenan Advantage Group, is now seeking Class A CDL Drivers out of Milwaukee, WI. The hiring schedule will belocal, home daily! Apply and immediately see the advantages of joining our driving team: Company Drivers Local / home daily And Regional positions, Competitive pay,Excellent benefits including: Medical, Dental, & Vision plans, Paid vacations & holidays, 401K with company match, Paid training on safe driving & product handling,Well-maintained equipment, Driver referral incentive pay And so much more! Owner-Operators Local / home daily and Regional positions, Competitive pay-percentage Contracts, Health I nsurance plans available, 100% of Fuel Surcharge paid to Owner-Operator 100% of Billable Pump or Compressor Charge paid to Owner-Operator, Discounts on new truck purchases, Discounted fuel, No Forced Dispatch, Paid weekly, Driver referral incentive pay And so much more! We require Class A CDL, 2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record. 800-871-4581 for more information or apply online at TheKAG.com

www.communityjournal.net

If you do not demand a copy within forty (40) days, the Court may grant a judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. Ajudgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment of wages or seizure of property. You are hereby further notified that the parties to this action are entitled to notification of the availability of the information set forth in sec. 767.081, Stats. The information is available from the family court commissioner. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children violation of the following criminal statutes is punishable by a fine not to exceed $10,000 or imprisonment not to exceed two years or both. 948.31 Interference with custody by parent or others. If you and the petitioner have minor children, a document setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the Department of Health and Social Services under sec. 46.25(9)(a), Stats, and the listing the factors that a court may consider for modification for that standard under sec. 767.25(1m). Stats, is available upon your request from the clerk of court. Dated this 18th day of November 2013 By: JOSE R ALVARADO 013-196/11-20-27/12-4-2013 SUMMO!S (PUBLICATIO!) STATE OF WISCO!SI! CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COU!TY !OTICE A!D ORDER FOR !AME CHA!GE HEARI!G Case !o. 13CV009981 In the matter of the name change of: BOBBIE RANDELL BRYANT By (Petitioner) BOBBIE RANDELL WEBBER JR NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: BOBBIE RANDELL BRYANT To:BOBBIE RANDELL WEBBER JR Birth Certificate:BOBBIE RANDELL BRYANT IT IS ORDERED This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Judge’s Name:HON.KEVIN E MARTENS BRANCH 27 ROOM 415 PLACE: 901 N. 9th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53233 DATE: December 17, 2013, TIME 9:00 A.M. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Milwaukee Community Journal, a newspaper published in Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. Dated: 11-19-2013 BY THE COURT: HON. KEVIN E MARTENS Circuit Court Judge 013-195/11-20-27/12-4-2013

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The Milwaukee Community Journal November 27, 2013 Page 10


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