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M AY 2014 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities®

Inspiring the Creative Economy p.9 Temecula’s Business Incubator Helps Startups p.15 Eureka’s Arts District Drives Local Economy p.19

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CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events 3 Executive Director’s Message

 Are City Governments the Last Bastion of Democracy? By Chris McKenzie Cities are not just the laboratories of democracy; they may well also be its salvation.

6 City Forum

 Upcoming Legislative Milestones: Take Note, Take Action By Eva Spiegel

15 Temecula’s Business

Incubator Helps Startups And More

By Cheryl Kitzerow
 The city provides resources to help local small businesses succeed.

16 Glendale’s Economic

Development Programs Revamp Its Image

By Scott Ochoa and Sharon Mann Garrett A decade of public-private development partnerships provided impetus for change.

Calls and letters to legislators from city officials expressing their positions on bills are a critical part of the League’s advocacy activities.

17 High Desert Cities

7 News from the Institute for Local

By Kim Summers

Government

 Sustainability Yields Fiscal and Economic Benefits  New resources offer practical tips to enhance cities’ economic prosperity and fiscal health.

Inspiring the Creative 9 

Economy: How Cities Increase Economic Activity Through Innovation and The Arts

Collaborate for Economic Development

Five cities took an innovative approach to attract business.

19 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 Eureka’s Arts District Drives Local Economy

20 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 ammoth Lakes Gateway M Brands the Destination

 unique collaboration helped realize A a dream.

By Craig Watson The arts can be an important economic engine for cities, no matter how large or small.

 he arts benefit the community in T many ways.

21 Job Opportunities 27 Professional Services Directory

 over Image: Bruce Rolff/ C Shutterstock.com

President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Second Vice President Katherine Miller Council Member Stockton

Immediate Past President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

may

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

7– 9

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, Indian Wells This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

June

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

19 – 20

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento Convention Center The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Contributors Dan Carrigg Melissa Kuehne Steve Sanders

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento Convention Center The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Jim Carnes Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

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17 – 18

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Board of Directors’ Meeting, Monterey The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

For photo credits, see page 22. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2014 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XC, No. 5.

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First Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

League of California Cities

SEPTEMBER 3– 5

League of California Cities 2014 Annual Conference & Expo, Los Angeles This conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities at the Annual Business Meeting.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

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Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

Are City Governments the

Last Bastion of Democracy? R

ecently I accompanied League staff and city officials on a trip to Washington, D.C., where we lobbied the California congressional delegation. We urged them to support much-needed legislation to: • End the sales-tax exemption that gives Internet retailers such an unfair advantage over Main Street retailers; • Adequately finance the federal Highway Trust Fund; and • Address critically important water issues. We were warmly received at each of our stops, and the California delegation and staff alike echoed the importance of our agenda.

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In each conversation, however, the urgent need for the proposed policies was quickly tempered with the political reality of getting bills passed by a deeply divided Congress. Our elected representatives in Washington frequently reminded us that, in such an environment, support for many of the bills could be misrepresented and mischaracterized in campaigns as being supportive of a “tax increase.” This dose of reality stands in sharp contrast to what I frequently see in city government. The joy I still feel in working with city officials is due in no small part to the fact that they “practice” government in a way that embodies the best of

the democratic ideals that underpin our system of government. They report to work every day and truly do the people’s business in the most public of ways — before their friends and neighbors. Their successes and failures are continually on public display, and there is no greater degree of direct accountability to citizens than at the local level.

Explaining an Apparent Paradox Over the past seven years as our economy slid into and then began emerging from the worst recession since the Great Depression, reporters have often called continued

Western City, May 2014

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Are City Governments the Last Bastion of Democracy?, continued

me to inquire about the reasons for what appeared to be an anomaly: Voters under extreme financial stress were voting to raise or extend local taxes in large numbers. When asked why, I typically reminded the reporters that voters often gave their city officials approval ratings of 50 to 60 percent, so it should be no surprise that they were approving local tax or bond proposals. Quite simply, voters trust their local elected officials to be good stewards of public funds and responsible representatives of the city. Another way to look at it is that they like the way their city officials run their local democracy. City leaders preside over what could be called the “stand and deliver” level of government. What you see is pretty much what you get.

Cities are not just the laboratories of democracy — they may well also be its salvation. The Prevalence of Dysfunction As partisanship and rancor have increased in recent years at the federal and state levels, a growing number of books point out that because city government (and regional groups of city governments) is the level of government that “works,” more and more decisions are effectively being made at the local level. Whether it is Bruce Katz’s Metropolitan Revolution or Benjamin Barber’s If Mayors Ruled

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League of California Cities

the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities, the message is the same: Dysfunctional federal and state governments need not impede getting things done if cities provide the leadership they are positioned to provide. Nowhere is this more evident than in the area of transportation finance in California. As federal and state transportation investments have lagged and the state has dismantled the important transportation and housing investments made through redevelopment agencies, city and county officials have championed a combination of countywide transportation sales taxes, which has allowed us to continue making important transportation investments. While new federal and state government contributions are desperately needed, local resourcefulness has remained the key to continued progress.

Challenging the Status Quo The obvious dysfunction in our national politics doesn’t mean, however, that we should write off or even tolerate the continuation of the level of rancor and sheer chaos that has come to characterize politics in Washington and even, at times, Sacramento. Michael Ignatieff, a former Harvard professor, Canadian elected official and author of Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics, believes democracy can work at the higher levels if elected leaders will look at each other as adversaries, not enemies. Ignatieff observes that adversaries believe compromise is honorable and today’s adversary can be your ally tomorrow. In contrast, between enemies compromise is unacceptable and a form of appeasement. Ignatieff captures the essence of what it

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takes to have a working democracy — all of which you have in most city governments today — in a New York Times column published Oct. 16, 2013: Between adversaries, trust is possible. They will beat you if they can, but they will accept the verdict of a fair fight. This, and a willingness to play by the rules, is what good-faith democracy demands. …

else in life, our most important learning experiences come through our failures. Knowing that the council member who opposes your position on a proposed ordinance today may very well be your ally on another issue tomorrow tempers your rhetoric. It also helps serve the long-

term interests of the city you and your colleagues love and want to protect. In this way, cities are not just the laboratories of democracy but, like the monks of the Middle Ages who saved the written history of our civilization, cities may well also be democracy’s salvation. ■

Between enemies, trust is impossible. They do not play by the rules (or if they do, only as a means to an end) and if they win, they will try to rewrite the rules, so that they can never be beaten again. Adversaries can easily turn into enemies. If majority parties never let minority parties come away with half a loaf, the losers are bound to conclude they can only win through the utter destruction of the majority. Once adversaries think of democracy as a zero-sum game, the next step is to conceive of politics as war: no quarter given, no prisoners taken, no mercy shown. … The problem is that politics is not war, but the only reliable alternative to it. Once we think of politics as war, battle cries drown out democratic persuasion. By slow degrees, belligerence and self-righteousness make cooperation impossible. … More civility and gentility — being nicer — will not cure this. What needs to change are the institutions themselves, and they will only change when the political class in Washington realizes that, just as in American football, there are some hits that are killing the game.

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City officials often have deeply divergent opinions about proposed policies, and they can be strong adversaries. The ones who are successful over the long run, however, learn these important lessons early in their career. As with everything www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2014

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Upcoming Legislative Milestones:

Take Note, Take Action by Eva Spiegel

City officials are actively involved with the League in a variety of advocacy efforts throughout the year. And while it might seem that things would slow down during the summer, in fact the opposite is true. Momentum builds in the Capitol from late spring through the summer, with the brief exception of the Legislature’s July recess. The legislative session officially ends Sept. 30, the final day Gov. Jerry Brown can sign or veto bills.

The May Revise The governor’s revised budget proposal, commonly called the “May Revise,” has a May 15 constitutional deadline. This gives the Legislature exactly one month to debate the governor’s proposal and send its own version of the budget to him for review. Gov. Brown issued an initial budget proposal in January that shows the state on solid fiscal ground with billions in surplus revenues projected for the first time in a decade. His January proposal outlines a $155 billion budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 and includes a $106.8 billion General Fund spending plan. The governor’s January budget proposes to place a rainy day fund constitutional amendment on the November statewide ballot and projects a $6 billion surplus for the remainder of FY 2013–14 and FY 2014–15.

Make Your Voice Heard in The Capitol One of the most critical periods for legislative action occurs between now and

July 3 when the Legislature adjourns for a month. This is the second year of a two-year legislative cycle, so committees will hear newly introduced bills as well as legislation continued from 2013. The League publishes and regularly updates a comprehensive list of hot bills through CA Cities Advocate, its electronic newsletter, to keep members apprised of legislative developments and priorities.

The Take Action Center Makes It Easy The League’s advocacy efforts work in concert with its members. Calls and letters to legislators from city officials expressing their positions on bills are a critical part of this advocacy. To help cities take positions on bills, the League will be increasingly using its Take Action Center at www.cacities. org/takeaction. This is a one-stop shop for League members and partners to customize and send letters of support and opposition to legislators on bills that have tremendous impacts on city governments.

The Session’s Final Two Months: In High Gear The Legislature returns from recess on Aug. 4. The session culminates on Aug. 31, when the Legislature adjourns for the year. During August the League’s lobbyists, regional public affairs managers and other staff work around the clock in the Capitol halls advocating for city interests. League members will receive frequent action alerts calling for immediate help to ensure that cities’ voices are heard.

The League’s work doesn’t end when the Legislature adjourns. Gov. Brown will consider hundreds or perhaps thousands of bills during September. The League will be urging him to sign bills that help cities or veto those that harm local governments. League staff will be looking to city officials at this critical juncture to give the governor an understanding of real-life implications of legislation as he makes his decisions. ■

Major Dates Remaining in 2014 Legislative Session May 15: Governor’s “May Revise” deadline May 30: House of origin deadline for bills to cross houses June 15: Budget bill must go to the governor June 26: Last day for legislative measures to qualify for November statewide ballot July 3–Aug. 4: Legislature’s summer recess Aug. 31: Last day for Legislature to pass bills, adjourns for the year Sept. 30: Governor’s bill sign/veto deadline

Eva Spiegel is director of communications for the League and can be reached at espiegel@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org

News from the Institute for Local Government

Sustainability Yields Fiscal and Economic Benefits The dissolution of redevelopment agencies coupled with the lingering recession’s effects left many cities seeking new approaches to local economic development. Two new resources from the Institute for Local Government (ILG) provide practical tips on proven techniques that local leaders can use to enhance their communities’ economic prosperity and fiscal health.

Making Prosperity Sustainable How can local communities reap fiscal and economic benefits from sustainability programs such as energy efficiency, green infrastructure, water and wastewater management, well-designed communities and other best practices? In an era of sluggish job growth and tight fiscal constraints, local leaders may not realize the potential power of investing in sustainability. Communities that have implemented sustainability strategies offer mounting evidence that these approaches can help improve both the local area’s economic prosperity and the agency’s fiscal health.  A new issue brief, Prosperity That Lasts: Building Economically Sustainable Communities, is available online as a free download. It outlines a number of strategies and success stories from cities and counties that have boosted their local economy and bottom line with smart sustainability investments and practices. The issue brief includes links to resources that can help city leaders consider whether and how to make investments or launch similar programs in their own community. (To access this brief and the publication referenced below, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.)

Engaging the Public in Economic Development One essential economic development tool that may be overlooked is public engagement, which involves the whole community in charting a path to shared prosperity and an improved quality of life. Another new publication, Engaging the Public in Economic Development, describes practical ways that local leaders can help residents develop a shared knowledge and ownership of local economic development policies and programs, thus increasing their potential effectiveness and impact over time. Understanding the unique conditions within each jurisdiction and how they affect diverse people and various community sectors can help develop short- and long-term priorities that encourage economic competitiveness and increase fiscal health.

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Many residents may have a clear idea about what they want in their community, but as economic development professionals know, this is much easier said than done. Before considering a public engagement strategy, it’s important to conduct an internal assessment of your community. The assessment should include an analysis of business, education, transportation, communication, health and income opportunities and disparities. It’s also important to understand the leadership and development capacity, cultural practices and social capital. Much of this information may already exist as a consequence of local planning, redevelopment or regional planning projects. Understanding the current state of your community will help identify the process and resources that can — and should — be applied to a public participation effort. Because local challenges and opportunities are as varied as individual communities, engaging the public helps incorporate views from a variety of perspectives and offers new avenues for implementation best suited to local circumstances, conditions and priorities. ■

The Three Pillars of Community Prosperity Communities prosper when they simultaneously pursue and improve: 1.

Economic opportunity and fiscal stability;

2.

Environmental quality; and

3.

Community well-being.

Sustainability programs and investments can help local agencies put each of these three pillars of prosperity in place. This “triple bottom line” approach measures success through a combination of economic, environmental and community performance indicators rather than through a single lens. The triple bottom line offers a way for local agencies to ensure that their programs, practices and investments achieve multiple benefits concurrently, thus leading to a more prosperous community over the long term. Achieving multiple benefits from a suite of sustainability strategies helps local communities maximize the impact of limited fiscal, staff and other resources — and build greater support for their policies and programs.

Western City, May 2014

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Inspiring th Creative

The Actors’ Gang, directed by Tim Robbins, performs Shakespeare in downtown Culver City’s Media Park. Such events helped revitalize the area by drawing visitors who also patronize local restaurants and businesses.

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League of California Cities

he e Economy: How Cities Increase Economic Activity through Innovation and the Arts by Craig Watson

W

hen the concept of creativity is combined with “community,” it evokes images of vibrancy, activity and prosperity. In terms of economic development, how important is California’s creative economy?

(GO-Biz). They include more than the obvious arts jobs. Rajan explains, “The creative economy encompasses literally creative activities like art, film and entertainment. And from another perspective, it can include the software, innovation and technology industries that thrive here.”

Quite important, according to The Otis Report on the Creative Economy, released in late January 2014. The report notes that 7.8 percent of California’s gross state product is directly attributable to the creative industries, with an impact of more than $270 billion annually. The creative economy employs some 1.4 million people, either directly or indirectly. “Those are big numbers,” says Kish Rajan, director of the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development

California’s $100 billion tourism industry also benefits from the creative economy’s appeal. “People are attracted to the creativity and innovation that California is all about,” says Rajan.

Neighborhoods Come Alive Making investment in arts-related activity can help drive other local economic development. San Francisco’s “Invest in Neighborhoods” initiative led by the city’s Economic and Workforce

Development agency includes the arts, says Tom DeCaigny, director of cultural affairs. Festivals, temporary arts displays and other activities foster community interaction in San Francisco (pop. 812,538). “At our 3rd on Third Street event in the Bayview area, there’s a beekeeper who makes honey as a hobby, but never saw it as an economic opportunity,” says DeCaigny. Now he has found customers and created a business through the monthly arts and culture event. “This intersection of people exploring culture together is inspiring individuals to discover new entrepreneurial pathways. We see the value of the arts in helping people, and the interconnection between the arts is fostering growth in the entrepreneurial community,” says DeCaigny. continued

Craig Watson is director of the California Arts Council and can be reached at cwatson@cac.ca.gov.

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Western City, May 2014

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Inspiring the Creative Economy: How Cities Increase Economic Activity Through Innovation and the Arts, continued

The arts can be an important economic engine for cities, no matter how large or small.

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The City of San Jose (pop. 971,372) has taken a different tack: investing directly in creative businesses with the Creative Industries Incentive Fund, a partnership with the nonprofit Center for Cultural Innovation, which supports arts entrepreneurship statewide. The competitive program offers micro-grants of $2,000 to $5,000 to arts-based businesses, such as magazines, fashion designers, photographers and more. “It helps promote San Jose — from making an artistic product and selling it abroad to driving a better profile of San Jose locally,” says Kerry Adams Hapner, the city’s director of cultural affairs and deputy director of economic development. San Jose also works with local nonprofit ZERO1 to establish artists in residencies in unusual places: corporations. Hapner believes efforts like these are responsible for the 29 percent rise in the number of creative industries in San Jose since 2010.

Opportunities for Smaller Cities Arts organizations can also play a role in attracting companies to a city, according to Julie Baker, executive director of the Center for the Arts, an independent nonprofit performing arts complex in Grass Valley (pop. 12,638). “We do a lot with local employers,” says Baker. “When people come to this community and see what’s happening, they can’t believe what we’re doing in a small town. Then they say, ‘I guess I could leave the city and live in a small community.’” Grass Valley City Council Member Lisa Swarthout agrees with Baker. “When we’re working to bring jobs here, the arts and culture set us apart from other communities,” she says. “The arts play a vital role in our local economy. The Center for the Arts really helped put Grass Valley on the cultural map with artists of high caliber. Local businesses benefit directly. People travel here to see a show or performance at the center and stay for the weekend in local inns. They eat in our restaurants and shop in the stores and galleries.” The center also offers classes,

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workshops and a dance studio, creating synergy in the community. Musicians Wynton Marsalis and Ted Nash recently performed in Grass Valley at the center. Marsalis says, “We’ve played here several times, and we always have a great time.” Nash adds, “It’s one of our favorite places — a community of people who really appreciate music.” The City of Winters (pop. 6,839) experienced a similar phenomenon with a performing arts venue that consistently draws audiences who also patronize local restaurants and businesses. The Palms Playhouse had been located in an old barn in South Davis for decades but lost its site due to planned development. The City of Winters convinced the owner

that it was the best place to relocate. The Palms Playhouse opened in Winters in 2003. Winters City Manager John Donlevy Jr. says, “The economic impact was immediate. When you have between 70 and 200 people coming into town three to four nights a week, it creates almost instant vitality for downtown businesses. The local business community rose to the challenge of meeting the new demand created by the playhouse visitors. And then those visitors return to explore other aspects of Winters that they found appealing.” In a small city, one popular performing arts venue can draw tourists from throughout the region and beyond, benefiting the local economy without the need to use public resources.

Some of the most successful uses of the arts as an economic driver involve partnering with other local major industries. The Yolo County Arts Council (YoloArts) has the Art and Ag project that ties the arts to the county’s main economy. “We work directly with farms, food, wineries and downtown businesses,” says Dani Whitmore, executive director of YoloArts. YoloArts found the intersection of agriculture and arts to be a catalyst that gained the interest of major employers like biotech seed companies. “Their people are highly educated, have families and want to put down roots here and invest in the culture and the arts,” says Whitmore. continued

City of Davis residents build a bench with recycled materials and tiles made by community members; the Davis Solar Filling Station, funded in part with a grant from PG&E, combines art and sustainability in an antique gas pump reconfigured to allow people to charge mobile devices using solar power; a painter participates at YoloArts’ Art and Ag Project at Dumars Farm; a mural by Jennifer Pochinski is one of many enlivening the City of Davis. clockwise from top left

For more photos of the art described here, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

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Western City, May 2014

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Inspiring the Creative Economy: How Cities Increase Economic Activity Through Innovation and the Arts, continued

The arts can also help keep younger generations in Yolo County. “We have three and four generations of farm owners, and they’ve got kids who are leaving and not coming back,” says Whitmore. She contends that an effort to create robust local arts and arts education opportunities can help keep farmers’ families in Yolo, as well as bring in new talent. City Council Member Lucas Frerichs of Davis (pop. 65,052) concurs with Whitmore. Frerichs says, “YoloArts’ Art Farm program solicits farmers to volunteer their farms for monthly visits by local artists and the public. People come to work on different types of art — painters, photographers and more. Then typically in the fall, there’s an ‘Art Harvest’ fundraiser where you can ‘pick’ the art that was created. It’s immensely popular.”

Planning for the Creative Economy Strategic investment for the arts can positively impact cities within the entertainment hotspot of Los Angeles County. For years Culver City (pop. 38,000) was quiet after work hours. The few restaurants that catered to corporate employees for breakfast and lunch would be shuttered by the mid-afternoon, says Susan Obrow, performing arts and special events coordinator for Culver City. Once older facilities were converted and turned over to local performing arts nonprofits, things changed. “All of a sudden the restaurants were staying open at night,” says Obrow. Much of this arts-related growth benefited from redevelopment investment, from the facilities to parking structures. In the recent absence of redevelopment

funds, the city has changed its strategy. Serious thought is being given to which kinds of facilities may be repetitive, according to Obrow. The city adjusted its public art ordinance so if a developer has a 1 percent requirement of $75,000 or less for public art, he or she can contribute that amount to the city’s Art Fund for performing arts grants, temporary art programs, maintenance of existing public art or the city’s public art collection. The arts can promote a city’s brand, and San Jose uses this concept to its advantage. “We’ve been doing a lot of work related to thinking about San Jose as the epicenter of global innovation,” says Hapner. “We have an art-in-technology public art program at the San Jose International Airport demonstrating that this is the gateway to Silicon Valley.”

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Post-Redevelopment Strategies Many California communities received a significant amount of arts investment through their local redevelopment agencies and had to get creative after redevelopment was eliminated. San Francisco found one partnership with the Community Arts Stabilization Trust, launched with a $5 million seed grant from the Kenneth Rainin Foundation. The program aims to help long-time arts organizations acquire space and move out of the competitive rental market. For example, the trust supported the acquisition of a former porn theater for a performing arts group that will run a capital campaign and purchase the building back. The funds are then returned to the trust for the acquisition of another asset.

Other strategies include temporary arts. “We’ve seen great success in the idea of a ‘pop-up,’” says San Francisco’s DeCaigny, explaining that collective economic interaction in underutilized areas started with food trucks. “Now we’ve seen it evolve to parklets,” he adds, a concept where neighbors take over parking spaces and build a temporary mini-park with art provided by local residents. Most arts experts support centrally locating creative-economy businesses. Sometimes this happens organically, like the art galleries in Culver City attracted by cheap rents or the creative businesses in downtown San Jose and San Francisco neighborhoods, whose owners and staff like being part of an innovative community. Or consolidation occurs through planning, where artists participate in temporary displays in vacant storefronts during arts events. continued

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opposite page, top Bill Cosby shares humorous insights with a Grass Valley audience; bottom right Antsy McClain and the Trailer Park Troubadours perform at the Palms Playhouse in Winters; bottom left Allen Toussaint entertains at Grass Valley’s North Star House. this page, left Benoit Maubrey performs Audio Ballerinas at ZERO1 Biennial, an international showcase of art and technology in San Jose; above Valerie Troutt’s Moon Candy group sings at the 3rd on Third monthly arts celebration in San Francisco’s Bayview neighborhood.

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Western City, May 2014

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Inspiring the Creative Economy: How Cities Increase Economic Activity Through Innovation and the Arts, continued

“I’ve seen cultural areas thrive in response to real organic growth, but they can’t grow at the same rate without some type of strategic investment,” says San Jose’s Hapner, who supports a state-sanctioned cultural district program that could put a spotlight on these unique communities and drive tourism. In the absence of redevelopment, Frerichs explains that Davis, like many other cities, is moving away from publicly funded art programs toward a more hybrid model that engages businesses,

nonprofits and others in a collaborative effort to weave the arts into the fabric of the community and enhance tourism and the local economy. The Davis Cultural Arts and Entertainment Committee, the Davis Mural Team and the Yolo County Visitors Bureau recently launched an effort to transform the gray walls of the Regal Cinemas’ parking garage with murals painted by dozens of residents and artists. The murals depict 60 years of Davis history and highlight cultural events such as Oktoberfest, the Whole Earth Festival and Picnic Day.

Making investment in artsrelated activity can help drive other local economic development.

GO-Biz’s Rajan notes that California is home to a collection of distinct regional economies, each with its own assets and attributes. “We’re quite aware at GO-Biz of the importance of the creative economy and its impact on a number of economic sectors in California’s overall brand,” he says. Policy-makers will be able to obtain more detail about the creative economy’s composition in 2015, when the Otis Report will present state data broken out by regions.

Putting It All Together The arts can be an important economic engine for cities, no matter how large or small. The key elements for successfully using the arts to enhance the local economy include identifying unique local assets, embracing a communitywide collaborative approach and harnessing the unlimited power of creative imagination. ■

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“Space Observer” by artist Bjorn Schulke intrigues travelers in Mineta San Jose International Airport.

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www.cacities.org

Software entrepreneur Mark Adams has office space in Temecula’s incubator; and local businesses benefit from workshops, right.

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Temecula’s

Business Incubator Helps Startups by Cheryl Kitzerow


When many communities were looking for ways to recover from the Great Recession and the loss of redevelopment, the City of Temecula launched a plan to repurpose its former city hall building with a program to support economic vitality. City council members wanted to provide opportunities and resources to foster the entrepreneurial spirit, stimulate job creation and promote economic growth for years to come. So Temecula set out to build a city-sponsored business incubator focused on creating an atmosphere that would nurture innovative businesses in the high-tech field and provide these new businesses with resources to help them grow and mature. The repurposed facility serves as a regional business resource center and provides educational workshops and consultations for the business community.

Temecula Launches Business Incubator Business incubators help entrepreneurs turn their ideas into sustainable businesses and reduce the risk of failure. According to the National Business Incubation Association (NBIA), in 2011 alone North American incubators assisted more than 49,000 start-up companies that provided full-time employment for nearly 200,000 workers and generated annual revenue of more than $15 billion. And NBIA members report that 87 percent of the firms that have graduated from their incubators are still in business after five years.

and More

Temecula launched its incubator, the Temecula Valley Entrepreneur’s Exchange (TVE2), in November 2012. The incubator aims to give young startups the tools necessary to succeed and become employers. City Manager Aaron Adams says, “The hope is that they reach the point where they move out of the incubator and hire some new employees.” Improving the success rate of newly created businesses should in turn help the city create jobs and generate sales tax revenue. TVE2 also performs double duty as a regional business resource center. It provides educational seminars and confidential oneon-one consultations for the general business community. Recent studies show that 50 percent of small businesses fail within the first year and 95 percent will close their doors before their fifth year. The city saw a need to provide resources to its local small businesses to help them succeed.

Partnerships Are Essential To the Effort Temecula developed strategic partnerships with local universities, local businesses and entrepreneurs and nonprofit organizations to provide educational opportunities, hold networking events and foster collaboration. Specialized training, free professional consultation and mentoring are offered to help startups and other local businesses develop a strong foundation. Temecula’s partners include Mt. San Jacinto College; California State University,

San Marcos; the Inland Empire Small Business Development Center; Tri-Tech Small Business Development Center; Temecula Valley Chamber of Commerce; Inland Empire SCORE; Economic Development Corporation of Southwest California; and other local businesses. Because TVE2 is part of the NBIA, it enjoys a strong support system that offers the tools and information the incubator needs to improve its effectiveness and efficiency.

Winning Results Much of TVE2’s success can be attributed to the best practices that were adopted early in its development. Incorporating the regional resource center with the incubator program provides a comprehensive approach to services to the business community — from tech startup to home businesses to corporations — a win for all. According to the NBIA, one essential component for success is integrating the incubator program and activities into the fabric of the community and its broader economic development goals and strategies. By focusing on creating local jobs and supporting local business growth, Temecula’s leaders strive to improve the overall quality of life for its residents. Although the incubator is still in its early stages, it has achieved positive results. In its first year, the TVE2 resource center helped local businesses create 34 jobs, provided more than 275 consultations and held hundreds of workshops with 1,300-plus attendees at these events. The incubator includes seven tech companies, which have raised more than $600,000 of investment capital. Of these companies’ 11 founders, two have relocated from outside the area to make Temecula their home. For more information visit www.tve2.org. ■

Cheryl Kitzerow is an economic development analyst
for the City of Temecula. She can be reached at
cheryl.kitzerow@cityoftemecula.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2014

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Glendale’s Economic Development Programs

Revamp its Image by Scott Ochoa and Sharon Mann Garrett The City of Glendale (pop. 192,654) in Los Angeles County has transformed itself from a sleepy suburban community to a bustling regional destination. City leaders credit two key elements. First, the city council implemented businessfriendly economic development programming, whereby every city department supports the business community and has economic development priorities woven into its performance goals. Staff has streamlined internal systems to eliminate red tape and inefficiencies. Even in the wake of severe budget and staffing cuts related to redevelopment dissolution, the city council directed management to forge ahead.

Second, a decade of public-private partnerships in development has provided the impetus for change. A super-regional shopping center opened downtown in 2008 and spurred a wave of new private investment in Glendale’s downtown retail and Class A office core. An adjacent center completed a major renovation in 2013, adding a wing of new luxury retail stores. As retail shaped up, the city approved more than 3,000 housing units for development in the downtown area. The allure of new luxury apartments is also driving up interest in surrounding older and historic properties.

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Another recently completed development, Disney’s Grand Central Creative Campus in Glendale’s industrial corridor, is prompting high demand for nearby industrial and creative office space. A burgeoning cluster of employment in digital entertainment, production and other creative industries has resulted. In concert with development, city leaders spearheaded projects to enhance the quality of life for residents and visitors to Glendale. Recognizing that arts and culture can attract a vibrant population, the city council approved renovations to the Alex Theatre, rehabbed the Brand Library and art galleries and committed funding to reinvent the city’s Central Library. The Museum of Neon Art is being constructed along a new pedestrian paseo that will enhance circulation between the shopping areas, civic areas, and arts and cultural venues. Although Glendale was once considered painfully unhip, now numerous mentions of its restaurants and amenities appear in the lifestyle press. Glendale was named one of Los Angeles’ best neighborhoods by the popular Curbed LA lifestyle e-zine in January 2014. continued on page 23

Scott Ochoa is city manager for Glendale and can be reached at sochoa@ci.glendale.ca.us. Sharon Mann Garrett is principal economic development officer for Glendale and can be reached at sgarrett@ci.glendale.ca.us.

www.cacities.org

left to right Victorville

City Manager Doug Robertson, Hesperia City Manager Mike Podegracz, Adelanto City Manager James Hart, Barstow City Manager Curt Mitchell and Apple Valley Town Manager Frank Robinson share San Bernardino County’s “Vision in Action” award for Opportunity High Desert.

High Desert Cities Collaborate For Economic Development by Kim Summers Proposals with mysterious code names, clandestine meetings with real estate developers looking to relocate businesses, and fierce competition for every retail outlet, restaurant, office building, industrial facility and warehouse characterized the dynamic among five neighboring municipalities — until recently. “That was the typical description of economic development efforts in the High Desert region in Southern California prior to the dissolution of redevelopment,” says Adelanto City Manager Jim Hart. “But no more.” With the loss of redevelopment, the city and town managers of the High Desert region — the Town of Apple Valley and the cities of Adelanto, Barstow, Hesperia and Victorville — realized the future of development for the entire area depended on letting go of deeply entrenched habits, forging stronger relationships and cooperating at the staff level. The result was the creation of a new entity for economic development marketing, known as Opportunity High Desert. The region saw revenues falling dramatically as the result of plummeting property

values, one of the highest foreclosure rates in the nation and unemployment that peaked at 16 percent. The combined population of 393,449 was hungry for services and impatient with infighting between neighboring communities for needed jobs and development. Located in the High Desert of San Bernardino County, between Rancho Cucamonga and Las Vegas, the 321-square-mile area saw more than half of its residents leave daily to travel 30, 60 or even 90 miles to work, often taking their purchasing power with them. The five government entities share the same demographics, transportation system, water and sewer issues, use the same landfill and have plenty of affordable land available. What wasn’t plentiful was funding. “With revenues being cut at every turn and businesses leaving California for less expensive locales, the future of commercial development in the region was looking grim,” says Hesperia Mayor Thurston Smith. “The idea for Opportunity High Desert came about due primarily to the loss of critical funding used to let business owners and developers know that there

was still a highly affordable area left in Southern California and an available employment base,” says Hesperia City Manager Mike Podegracz. “We knew that the only way we could continue to get that message out and have a presence in what was already a highly competitive market was to put the past behind us and join efforts.” The impetus came at the monthly city managers’ breakfast during a discussion about the expense of funding each entity’s booth at the annual International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) RECon Conference held each May in Las Vegas. The tough economy was forcing some to drop out. All were questioning the expense despite the positive returns in jobs and new businesses. The managers discussed combining forces. “Instead of five separate and expensive booth spaces, one booth could be converted to feature the logos and information of all five cities,” explains Barstow City Manager Curt Mitchell. “We agreed to take it back to our councils and staff for discussion.” continued

Kim Summers is deputy city manager of Hesperia and can be reached at ksummers@cityofhesperia.us.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2014

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High Desert Cities Collaborate for Economic Development, continued

The future of development for the entire area depended on letting go of deeply entrenched habits, forging stronger relationships and cooperating. With the endorsement of all five managers, staff members joined together under the coordination of Hesperia Economic Development Director Steven Lantsberger to create a new identity, Opportunity High Desert, with a logo depicting the strengths of the combined communities. Using seed money from the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors, a new display booth was born. When the ICSC convention opened, the managers and staff stood ready in matching shirts displaying the new Opportunity High Desert logo and handing out newly printed marketing materials. “Politics aside, we are really lucky that the

city managers get along — creating a cohesive campaign, working the booth side by side, taking meetings with developers and even referring some visitors to a neighboring city when appropriate,” says Adelanto Mayor Cari Thomas. The success of Opportunity High Desert has grown exponentially, with developers excited to meet with an entire region that is business friendly and works to make sure they find the right fit. It is the residents, however, who are the big winners as new businesses in the High Desert mean much-needed jobs. “This area was badly hit by the recession and has one of the highest unemployment rates,” says Apple Valley Town Manager Frank Robinson. “Wherever a company locates, if they bring jobs to our citizens, we all benefit.” This collaboration has expanded into other areas of daily governing with a one-day,

The cost of hosting a tradeshow booth served as the catalyst for the five cities to join forces.

five-city leadership seminar held for top executives to learn and get to know each other better and a monthly lunch meeting aimed at mentoring aspiring future leaders. The five cities are now exploring joint public safety options and other cost-sharing measures. “We all have the same opportunities and challenges. If we can place the effort we put into competing against each other into collaborating, who knows what we can accomplish?” says Victorville City Manager Doug Robertson. ■

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League of California Cities

• City managers must drive the effort. They have the ability to pull staff together and get elected officials’ support.

• Agree to a budget and stick to it. Cities with funding constraints can contribute existing staff resources or materials to make up the difference.

• Elected officials need to publicly approve — if not actively support — the idea.

• Determine the amount of staff time that will be required and divide it equally if possible. Provide opportunities, such as informal lunch meetings, for team members to get acquainted.

• Create a team of people from each city’s economic development staff who coordinate the details of the campaign under the direction of the managers. • Create a new identity that equally represents all of the participating cities. The new marketing campaign should include highlights of the area’s overall benefits and key benefits for each city. • Ask for help. The five High Desert municipalities received $25,000 from San Bernardino County for funding to develop the logo and convert the booth and marketing materials.

• Expand into other areas. Encourage joint leadership training for executive management staff to get to know each other. Pool resources to host a regional training for all cities in specialized areas such as information technology, human resources or planning. • Fully commit to the endeavor, and have fun. The alternative is to continue on the current path alone and limit opportunities.

www.cacities.org

Eureka’s Arts District

Drives Local Economy The City of Eureka (pop. 26,960) is a historic community nestled between redwood forests and California’s rugged North Coast. It also serves as Humboldt County’s seat. The city experienced economic problems in the early 1990s and tackled these issues by embracing arts and culture solutions. Faced with empty storefronts, underused upper floor space and a vacancy rate of almost 18 percent in the Eureka Business Improvement District, the city’s redevelopment agency and the district successfully applied to become a California Main Street Designation City in 1992. The challenge was finding a way to unify 49 blocks and several unique identities, including Old Town, a registered National Historic District, downtown, a 20th century shopping hub, and Auto Row, a commercial area dominated by car dealerships. “Humboldt County has one of the highest populations of artists per capita in the state, concentrated in Eureka,” says Libby Maynard, executive director of the Ink People Center for the Arts, a local nonprofit. “Many artists were struggling to make a living and lacked business skills to market their craft. Arts uses — working, showing, selling — stimulate property improvements and attract local traffic and cultural tourism.” The city’s redevelopment agency partnered with the Eureka Art and Culture Commission, Humboldt Arts Council, Ink People Center for the Arts and Eureka Main Street to form a Cultural Arts Resource District.

Building on a Vision An early step in creating the Cultural Arts Resource District involved developing the Phantom Galleries project, which allowed artists to display their work in empty storefronts. Eureka Main Street

contacted property owners about the project. As a result of working with the redevelopment agency and Humboldt Arts Council and receiving a grant from Pacific Telesis, empty storefronts served as Phantom Galleries in 1993–94. Property owners were responsible for providing power and access for the artist, Humboldt Arts Council provided the lighting and Eureka Main Street secured insurance coverage. Formerly blighted, boarded-up, dark spaces came alive with art in window displays. The program ran for about a year, until success in marketing the empty storefronts meant there was no longer a need for Phantom Galleries. The city adopted a live-work ordinance in 1995 that allowed upper floors to be converted from empty space to residences and businesses for artists. This helped create a 24/7 community, which in turn attracted amenities such as grocery stores, coffee houses and more. The city and its partners dovetailed efforts to enhance the Cultural Arts Resource District with a monthly art walk, First Saturday Night Arts Alive!, throughout the area. It features art shows, live music, dance and theater performances and even appearances and book-signings by authors. Launched in 1994, the event is still going strong and consistently engages the community in the arts. The district also features more than a dozen sculptures. C Street Market Square, the city’s most recent waterfront development, includes a rotating sculpture exhibition, where six pieces of a sculptor’s work are featured for a year. In addition, the district is home to a 10-week summer concert series, and a countywide arts festival is planned. continued on page 24

The City of Eureka won a 2013 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in the Economic Development Through the Arts category for this project. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2014

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Mammoth Lakes Gateway Brands the Destination

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he “Mammoth experience” holds a special place in the hearts of both locals and visitors, especially those who came here as children with their families to ski and build snowmen or fish and hike. Located in Mono County’s Eastern Sierra, the Town of Mammoth Lakes offers dramatic scenery, crisp mountain air, abundant wildlife and recreation opportunities. But this community lacked a gateway worthy of its spectacular natural surroundings and its unique location at “the top of California” — 8,000 feet above sea level. The town’s 2007 General Plan identified the need to create an impressive entrance as a means of reinforcing the community’s identity. But following through with action during the economic recession presented a challenge. Tourism, Mammoth’s primary economic driver, was in

decline, resulting in substantial decreases to the town’s General Fund and the local economy. Development was stalled, and real estate values were dropping. Community leader and three-term Planning and Economic Development Commissioner Elizabeth Tenney and long-time local artist and designer Larry Walker discussed the need for a landmark entrance and noted that vacation photos taken at national park entrances are some of the most popular “wish you were here” images posted around the world. They concluded that monumental gateway signs with the town’s name in giant letters would be excellent advertising for the town. Placing the signs on each side of State Highway 203, which is also Main Street, would send a signal that Mammoth Lakes was thriving and investing in its future.

A community workshop in January 2011 gave residents an opportunity to discuss Mammoth’s sense of place and the characteristics of a suitable entrance gateway. Large-scale rugged mountain architecture and heavy, enduring natural materials were recurring themes discussed at the workshop. These concepts inspired the design, which Larry Walker created and donated. “The Mammoth Gateway’s material selection of granite, raw rusted steel and rough-sawn timbers evokes the rugged mountain vernacular,” says Walker. “Its shape and form needed to be timeless, strong and formidable and able to withstand Mammoth’s harsh winters.” Residents submitted more than 200 entries in a contest to develop the messages that would appear on each of the continued on page 26

The Town of Mammoth Lakes won a 2013 Helen Putnam League Partner Award for Excellence in City-Business Relations for this project. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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Designer Larry Walker stands with Planning and Economic Development Commissioner Elizabeth Tenney and local architect Bruce Woodward beside the gateway monument. Walker and Woodward donated their services to the project. League of California Cities

www.cacities.org

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

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Display Advertising Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

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Finance Director, City of Fairfield, CA The City of Fairfield (population 108,000) is located midway between San Francisco and Sacramento in Northern California. The City is now seeking a Finance Director to oversee a staff of 36; the Finance Department has a FY2013/2014 General Fund budget of $2.4 million. This is an excellent opportunity for a hands-on Finance Director with a breadth of financial services experience and skill in strategic planning. The ideal candidate will have a broad knowledge base in the areas of financial planning and analysis, revenue projection and budgeting, accounting and financial reporting, public debt, and fund accounting. Candidates for this position must possess at least five years of increasingly responsible experience in public - or private - sector administration with responsibility for finance, accounting, or other related administrative functions. A Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Public Administration, or a closely related field is required; a Master’s Degree is desirable. The salary range for the Finance Director is $160,000-$180,000 annually; placement within the range is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 23, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2014

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Assistant Director

of Community Development

City of Camarillo, California Camarillo is located on the Pacific coastal plain, halfway between Santa Barbara and Los Angeles in western Ventura County. Only 15 minutes from the ocean, it has a mild year-round climate and is surrounded by scenic mountains and hills and highly productive agricultural land. The City of Camarillo possesses all the benefits of a suburban-rural community with a small town quality. The Assistant Director of Community Development reports to the Director of Community Development and will directly manage some of the Division’s more technically demanding projects. The Assistant Director will work closely with the Director, and is expected to bring a new level of land use planning expertise and experience to the Planning Division that can be used to guide and educate the planning staff and free the Director to focus more on policy and program development, developer relations, and community engagement. The new Assistant Director will possess a combination of education and experience with a concentration in urban, regional or environmental planning, public/business administration or related field equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree. The ideal candidate will also have a minimum six years of increasingly responsible experience in urban planning, community development or related experience including three years of program management and supervisory experience. To apply, submit your cover letter, resume, current salary and five work-related references (email preferred) to Bill Avery by May 23, 2014. A job announcement is available at www.averyassoc.net/jobs. William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 • Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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Assistant City Manager City of Pacifica, CA

Located just south of San Francisco, Pacifica (pop. 37,234) feels worlds away. Offering charming, small town ambiance, six miles of shoreline, beaches, vistas, and open space, Pacifica is a full-service city (158 FTE/150 PT) with an overall budget of $49M. Appointed by the City Manager, this position will oversee the finance, human resources, and information technology departments in an organization that encourages creativity, collaboration, and transparency. Experience with municipal finance and budgeting is required; tourism, economic development, community visioning, and labor negotiations, will be beneficial. Bachelor’s degree in public/business administration or related field is required; Master’s degree desired. Salary range is $160,000 $182,520; 2.5% @ 55 CalPERS (classic).

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is May 23, 2014.

AVERY ASSOCIATES Upcoming Recruitments: City of Camarillo – Assistant Director of Community Development City of Half Moon Bay – City Manager City of San Ramon – Assistant City Manager City of Santa Clarita – City Clerk City of Santa Clarita – Human Resources Manager William Avery & Associates Management Consultants

Recent Appointments: City of Albany – Finance & Administrative Services Director City of Hollister – City Manager Marin County – Public Works Director City of San Mateo – City Manager City of South San Francisco – City Manager

31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

Please check our website at http://www.averyassoc.net/jobs for formal position announcements.

Photo/art credits Cover Image: Bruce Rolff/Shutterstock.com Pages 3 to 5: Trekandshoot/Shutterstock.com

Page 13: left, courtesy of Patrick Lydon; right, J.A. Brinkmann, courtesy of the San Francisco Arts Commission

Page 6: Brandon Bourdages/Shutterstock.com

Page 14: Courtesy of California Arts Council

Page 7: Tarasov/Shutterstock.com

Page 15: Courtesy of City of Temecula

Page 8: Actors’ Gang photos, Jaime Azre

Page 16: Courtesy of City of Glendale

Page 11: top left and right, courtesy of City of Davis; bottom right, courtesy of City of Davis; bottom left, courtesy of John Natsoulas

Pages 17, 18: Courtesy of City of Hesperia

Page 12: top, John Taber; bottom left, courtesy of the Center for the Arts; bottom right, courtesy of Trailer Park Troubadours

Pages 20, 26, 27: Courtesy of Town of Mammoth Lakes and League of California Cities

Pages 19, 24, 25: Courtesy of City of Eureka and League of California Cities

www.cacities.org

Glendale’s Economic Development Programs Revamp Its Image, continued from page 16

A decade of public-private partnerships has provided the impetus for change. Challenges of Infill Development: Parking Demand and More Still, the city faces economic development challenges. The downtown core comprises Class A office towers that were hard hit when financial, real estate and insurance companies contracted during the recession. Landlords still struggle in a buyers’ market for long-term tenancies. New trends in office use are compounding the office vacancy issue. Prospective companies are squeezing more employees into less space than their predecessors. They demand state-of-the-art offices with new features like collaboration spaces, varied ceiling heights, outdoor rooms and theaterstyle conference rooms. As a result of higher employee density, parking demand is increasing. In a city that’s already built out, accommodating the need for additional parking is a tough problem to solve. Understanding that the Class A office community is critical to the success of retail and service merchants in the downtown area, the city is responding with an aggressive campaign to improve occupancy. The economic development team hosts frequent meetings with property representatives, service providers and hoteliers to help craft sales approaches and encourage resource sharing. Recent successes include several new Fortune 500 tenants. Contact: Phil Lanzafame, director of economic development, City of Glendale; phone: (818) 548-2005; email: planzafame@glendaleCA.gov. ■ More Information Online For more about Glendale’s specific economic development programs and best practices, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

www.westerncity.com

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Police Chief, City of Vallejo, CA The City of Vallejo is seeking a decisive, performance-driven individual to serve as its new Police Chief. This position is one which should be of interest to individuals with strong leadership skills who seek an opportunity to apply their experience in a highly dynamic and often challenging environment. This is an ideal opportunity for someone who has previously served as a Police Chief and who is now interested in joining an organization where their contributions will receive high visibility and recognition from a supportive City Council, executive team, and community. Any combination of education and experience providing the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities would be qualifying; a typical candidate will possess ten years of broad and extensive municipal law enforcement experience (with a minimum of 3 years at the rank of Police Captain/Commander or above). A Bachelor’s Degree with major coursework in police science, public administration, business administration, or a related field is required. A Master’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, or Police Administration is desirable. Candidates must possess or be able to obtain a valid CA Driver’s License and a POST Advanced Certificate. Annual salary is up to $225,000. Apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Regan Williams at (916)784-9080 with questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 30, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

City of Pacific Grove, CA Located on the very tip of the breathtakingly scenic, tree-shrouded Monterey Peninsula, Pacific Grove (pop. 15,522) boasts sandy beaches and rocky shores along 3.5 miles of accessible coastline; over 1,300 registered historic homes and other structures; an abundance of recreational and cultural activities; and small-town hospitality and friendliness. A charter city, “P.G.” has a 2013/14 overall budget of $34.3 M and 68 FTE’s. We invite you to join a collaborative team that provides the best in quality customer service and attention to this exquisite community. (Salary range is $117,036 to $135,732 DOQ.) Finance Director – Leading a staff of 7, the desired candidate will bring knowledge or experience in financial modeling, budgeting, auditing, risk management, and investments; development of CAFRs; financial software system operations; and administration of ACA and CalPERS retirement and medical programs. Bachelor’s degree in finance, accounting, public or business administration, or closely related field required; Master’s and CPA or CGFM is desirable. Community & Economic Development Director – Seeking a proven manager to lead a staff of 7 with a $1.6 M department budget. Local government planning experience, CEQA, Coastal Commission, historic preservation, economic development, and tourism experience is strongly desired. Bachelor’s degree in planning, public or business administration, or closely related field required; Master’s and AICP is desirable. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information or to request a detailed brochure. The brochure is also available on our web site: www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to: apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Filing deadline is May 12, 2014.

Western City, May 2014

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Eureka’s Arts District Drives Local Economy, continued from page 19

Changing Vandals Into Artists

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City of Ketchum, Idaho City Administrator

Ketchum with its 2,700 residents is located at the north end of the Wood River Valley alongside Sun Valley in Central Idaho and is at a cross road to its future. Residents see the placement of a new City Administrator after the recent election of Ketchum’s first female Mayor as an opportunity to reassess the City’s current situation and future direction. Ultimately responsible for managing the City, the City Administrator works under the general direction of the Mayor and the corporate direction of the City Council. Bachelor’s Degree and five years of executive management experience required, MPA or MBA preferred along with a desire to live, work and recreate in an incredibly beautiful setting. Salary range is $129,898 to $166,534 DOQ with excellent benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is May 12, 2014.

Current and upcoming recruitments . . . Public Works Director City of Lomita

Public Works Director City of San Mateo

Finance Director Public Works Director City of Goleta

Visit the TB&Co. website for the latest information. Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

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The redevelopment agency, Eureka Main Street and Ink People Center for the Arts created the Rural Burl Mural Bureau to divert vandals into the arts. By working with youth who had been defacing buildings and interrupting the flow of business by loitering, this beautification program redirected the vandalism into creative expressions of art: murals on walls in alleys, on boarded-up buildings, and the backs and sides of buildings that face Highway 101, which passes through the arts district. Recognizing the value of public art, city staff worked with the partner organizations to waive permit fees. Through the Rural Burl Mural Bureau, more than 40 murals now grace the walls of buildings. Those buildings remain graffiti free. Youth 15 to 20 years of age have helped with this project since 1994. Many of those involved have gone on to become independent artists.

Growing Numbers Reflect Success “When the First Saturday program began, there were 10 businesses participating, including three art galleries,” explains Charlotte McDonald, executive director of Eureka Main Street. “Today there are more than 60 venues, including 10 galleries, four arts organizations, two museums, and more than 50 restaurants, retailers and professional and service-based businesses — along with one dance company, two repertory theaters and two performing arts sites.” Artists sell their wares, and a number of artists have been commissioned to create works for individuals and companies. Musicians are paid and booked a year in advance for many of the venues, and theaters hold opening nights to coincide with the event. The success

Formerly blighted, boarded-up, dark spaces came alive with art in window displays. www.cacities.org

of First Saturday Night Arts Alive! has spread to five other cities in Humboldt County, and the arts are now recognized as part of the county’s prosperity plan for economic development.

California Main Street City is $22.92 to $1. Creating a Cultural Arts Resource District to revitalize downtown and Old Town has been very successful in countering the decline of the fishing and timber industries.”

“Today the vacancy rate in Eureka’s core commercial district is about 3 percent. Using the live-work ordinance, upper floors converted into lofts now house approximately 50 artists. Many more people now choose to reside downtown and in Old Town because of the area’s vibrancy and affordable rents,” says Cindy Trobitz-Thomas, retired redevelopment director. The North Coast Co-op, a local grocery store and bakery, relocated into the arts district, renovating an empty warehouse that had been used for almost 100 years as a bread manufacturing facility. The co-op provides a fresh alternative to large grocery chains and is within walking distance for residents, which helps conserve gas and promote healthy lifestyles.

It is one of the reasons that culture guru John Villani, author of The 100 Best

“In downtown and Old Town, 40 percent of the businesses have an arts connection, directly or indirectly,” says Mike Knight, interim city manager. “The district’s sales tax revenue remains steady, in spite of the drastic downturn in the economy the past few years. The reinvestment ratio for a

Artist and musician John King performs at his studio during Eureka’s First Saturday Night Arts Alive! event.

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Small Art Towns in America, named Eureka the nation’s Best Small Art Town. Contact: Judy Harrison, economic development coordinator, City of Eureka; phone: (707) 268-1830; email: jharrison@ci.eureka.ca.gov. ■

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Human Services Director City of Claremont, California

Annual Salary Range $126,624 – $152,976 (38 hour work week)

Additional information about job duties and qualifications are available on the City website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or from the Personnel Office at (909) 3995450. Completed application required position is Open until filled. EOE

The City of Claremont is a charming, historic community of 37,780 people located 30 miles east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains. The Human Services Department has been recognized at the state and national level for the excellent programs and services it provides to the community. The City Manager is seeking a dynamic, creative and experienced Director to manage the Human Services department, which includes two divisions (Seniors/Social Services and Special Events; Recreation and Youth Services). Qualified applicants will have six years of experience in community services, parks and recreation or human services fields, including two years in a supervisory capacity and a Bachelor’s Degree in public or business administration, recreation, social services, or a related field. A Master’s Degree is highly desirable.

City Manager, City of Sterling, CO The City of Sterling, CO (approximate population 14,777), known as the Queen City of the Plains is located in Logan County in the Northeastern corner of Colorado. Sterling is seeking a City Manager. The City Manager is accountable to the City Council for the proper administration of all affairs of the City, exercising supervision and control over all executive and administrative departments. Sterling will value a candidate who works collaboratively with the Council, department heads, and staff to foster a positive working environment that teaches and encourages individuals to excel in their areas of professional responsibility and to be accountable for the results of their work. The ideal candidate will be an innovative and businessminded individual with a history of effective leadership and a solid background in economic development, budget management, personnel management, and project management. A typical candidate will possess a Bachelor’s Degree with a Master’s in Public Administration (MPA) or related field strongly preferred, together with at least five (5) years in a governmental administration position with a strong record of progressively successful experience and responsibilities. The salary for the City Manager is open, DOQ. Apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Brochure available. Closing date May 23, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Mammoth Lakes Gateway Brands the Destination, continued from page 20

monuments. Two quotes by wilderness preservationist John Muir were chosen for the final design: “The mountains are calling …” and “Going to the mountains is going home.” Walker says, “The John Muir quotes are a ‘welcome home’ for many and a ‘welcome back’ for many more.” J

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City Manager | City of Arcata The City of Arcata (pop. 17,726), is located on the Northern California coast, approximately 275 miles north of San Francisco. Arcata’s mild climate and beautiful scenery make it an enviable place to live. Arcata enjoys a desirable quality of life with a small town atmosphere. As home to Humboldt State University, the community is known for innovative efforts in sustainability. Forests, rivers, and beaches provide a wealth of outdoor activities and recreation, including fishing, hiking, biking, surfing and river rafting. The community is also rich in theatre and arts, and home to many successful business startups that have become regionally and nationally recognized. The City Manager oversees the departments of Community Development, Environmental Services, Finance, Police, and Public Works, with 130 FTE’s and $31M annual budget. Salary will be competitive DOQ. Current base salary range is $125,000-$145,000. APPLY IMMEDIATELY: Open until filled, with first review of applications the week of June 2, 2014. Application materials are available at City of Arcata, City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, CA 95521; by calling (707) 822-5953; or at www.cityofarcata.org.

partnership was needed. Town leaders identified potential partners and funding sources and launched the project, which included a land donation from Mono County and permits from the U.S. Forest Service and Caltrans. Local companies joined the effort in a big way. An engineering firm donated its services for the project. A ski resort operator pledged to fabricate and install all the steel for the monuments. A developer made its project management team available at no cost. Mammoth Community Water District offered to install a water-efficient demonstration garden at the project site, and the adjacent South County Branch Court agreed to supply free water for the landscaping. Community partners donated a total of approximately $200,000 in materials and labor. Tenney helped raise an additional $90,000 in cash by selling personalized brick pavers and bronze plaques and organizing fundraising parties through local service organizations such as the Mammoth Lakes Women’s Club. The Mammoth Lakes Police and Fire departments held a chili cook-off fundraiser. The Mammoth Lakes Chamber of Commerce collected and processed all the donations. Residents also

Public Works Director City of Benicia, CA

Benicia, with 27,000 residents, is a beautiful waterfront community with true small town charm encompassing 14 square miles along the East Bay Shoreline. This full-service city’s residents have a high level of pride and concern for preserving the high quality of life found there. The Public Works Director is responsible for the largest department of the city which provides engineering, street maintenance, corporation yard/fleet maintenance, water, wastewater and administration. Bachelor’s degree and seven years of appropriate experience required, Master’s degree/ PE preferred. Salary range is $122,028 to $148,332 DOQ (+5% for PE) with comprehensive benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is May 27, 2014.

Pops in the Park is one of Mammoth Lakes’ many popular events.

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sought support from the Mammoth Lakes Town Council, which voted to provide nearly $350,000 in public art funds to close the funding gap.

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www.bobmurrayassoc.com

west coast headquarters 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202 Roseville, CA 95661 phone 916•784•9080

east coast 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway D4-242 Tallahassee, FL 32309 phone 850•391•0000

www.westerncity.com

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Under the direction of the City Manager, the Senior Management Analyst will perform highly responsible, complex, and varied administrative and analytical work in the development, implementation, and administration of programs and projects; conduct organizational and complex studies and analyses; coordinate activities of the City Manager’s Department with other Divisions and outside agencies; and serve as a liaison with the City Council, Boards and Commissions, Division Heads, community organizations, and other public and private sector individuals. The Senior Management Analyst also performs a variety of confidential and complex administrative, technical, programmatic duties in support of the daily operations and administration of the City Clerk; organizes City elections and coordinates elections with the County; oversees the preparation of the City Council meeting agendas and packets; provides information to the public, City staff, and City officials related to the function, policies, and procedures of the City Clerk. The Senior Management Analyst also manages the City’s Senior Van Program. The successful candidate will have a background equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a closely related field and at least four years of full-time, increasingly responsible, professional-level experience in a public agency setting. Apply by May 23, 2014 @ 1:00 pm. A City employment application, writing sample, and a comprehensive resume are required. For application information, visit the City of Pleasant Hill’s website at www.ci.pleasant-hill.ca.us/jobs or contact the Human Resources Division at (925) 671-5277.

County Manager Douglas County, NV

On Nevada’s western border, reaching up to Lake Tahoe, Douglas County unfolds. Covering 751 square miles, with 48,000 residents, 462 County employees, and a budget of $128 million, Douglas County includes the unincorporated towns of Minden (County seat), Gardnerville, and Genoa. This is a high performing organization – the first County in the US to implement Priority Based Budgeting. Reporting to a five member Board of Commissioners, the new County Manager will team with them, the other elected officials and staff in taking Douglas County to the next level. Bachelor’s degree required, Master’s strongly preferred with at least eight years of professional experience preferably in a governmental or public agency. Salary range is $135,000 to $185,000 DOQ with competitive benefits.

Contact: Sandra Moberly, planning manager, Community and Economic Development Department; phone: (760) 934-8989, ext. 251; email: smoberly@townof mammothlakes.ca.gov. ■

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Since its completion, visitors have been seen taking pictures in front of the gateway monuments, just as expected. The project has become a source of pride for the community and a catalyst for other improvements. During the first week of April 2013, town staff held a series of workshops dedicated to “Shaping the Future of Main Street.” At the workshops, local business owners expressed serious interest in upgrading and rehabilitating their properties, referencing the impressive new entrance to town. The gateways reinforce the importance of making a positive first impression and set the tone for future efforts.

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With a unique collaboration of local, state and federal agencies working with private businesses and volunteers, the community of Mammoth Lakes realized its dream of creating an inviting gateway. “Bringing together six government agencies, multiple private in-kind donors and hundreds of volunteers was a monumental task of organization,” says Tenney. “No wonder it took two and a half years to complete!”

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is June 2, 2014.

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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney “All About Fit” www.peckhamandmckenney.com Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

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Western City, May 2014

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Thank you to all of the 2014 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

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Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 American Forest & Paper Association American Red Cross Atkins Best Way Disposal2 CMTC CalPortland2 Carpenter/Robbins Commercial Real Estate Inc. Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin2 CORE Public Affairs2

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1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


Western City May Issue