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• February 24, 2011 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Deschutes led state in population growth Governor, Redmond almost doubled since 2000, census data show By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Despite the economic crisis at the end of the decade, Deschutes County grew faster between 2000 and 2010 than any other Oregon county, according to data released Wednesday by the U.S. Census Bureau. Sisters and Redmond led the way, with some of the highest growth rates among Oregon cities, according to the data.

Tim Doran / The Bulletin

This sign on South Century Drive was likely an estimate, but the 2010 Census lists Bend’s population at 76,639. Among the state’s most populated cities, Redmond’s 94 percent growth rate ranked it No. 1. The near doubling of the Red-

mond’s population stretched the city’s infrastructure, said Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger, who served as Redmond mayor from 20012008, but the city also collected development charges to add road and sewer capacity, which will help in the future. “The challenge with growth like that is the impact it has on services, especially schools,” he said. Bend also reported strong growth during the decade, but its 2010 population, 76,639, surprised city officials. A sign on South Century Drive lists the population at 80,995. See Census / A4

Oregon’s fastest-growing counties 2000 2010 PERCENT POPULATION POPULATION CHANGE

COUNTY 1. Deschutes County 2. Polk County

115,367 62,380 3. Washington County 445,342 4. Yamhill County 84,992 5. Jefferson County 19,009 6. Columbia County 43,560 7. Linn County 103,069 8. Jackson County 181,269 9. Multnomah County 660,486 10. Clackamas County 338,391 14. Crook County

19,182

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

157,733 75,403 529,710 99,193 21,720 49,351 116,672 203,206 735,334 375,992

36.72 20.88 18.94 16.71 14.26 13.29 13.20 12.10 11.33 11.11

20,978

9.36

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

workers far apart on union contract

Proposals differ on PERS, raises By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

By diverting sewer line, Bend will fix a smelly situation

SNOW STRAIGHT AHEAD

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

If it wasn’t for the smell, summertime on northwest Marken Street in Bend’s Valhalla Heights neighborhood would be a lot more pleasant. Two to six times every day, large amounts of sewage roils below the quiet residential area, which is located across Mt. Washington Drive from Central Oregon Community College’s forested campus. When it’s hot out, this sewage carries an abusive — some would say nauseating — odor that seeps through manhole covers and sometimes percolates through home plumbing vents. Ken Roadman, who lives on Marken Street, said he can actually hear the odor coming. When the sewage flows underneath the road, he said, it sounds like a rushing stream. “Frankly, it smells like you-know-what around here,” he said. “It’s really offensive.” The problem, which the city is trying to fix, begins at a sewer pump station a few miles away from Vahalla Heights off Putnam Road near the Awbrey Glen golf course. See Sewer / A4

Moving a sewer

.W ashi ng

Sk yline Ra nch Rd .

Dr. ton

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Valhalla Heights Source: City of Bend

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ice skating Tuesday afternoon at Seventh Mountain Resort. A winter storm warning remains in effect until Friday evening, with up to 2 feet of snow possible in the

Cascades. In Bend, lows in the single digits are forecast. For today’s weather, see Page C6.

House’s money men face Commemorating freeing of serfs, identity crisis on earmarks Russia also venerates Lincoln A N A LY S I S

The Washington Post

Pump station

Mt

M

cKenzie Burkard, 9, of Seattle, stretches out her arms to keep her balance while

By David A. Fahrenthold and Philip Rucker

The city of Bend plans to move a sewage pipe from under the Valhalla Heights neighborhood to under Mt. Washington Drive.

Existing sewer line

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

ay Par k Rd .

BEND

SALEM — An initial contract proposal from Gov. John Kitzhaber to the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council 75 calls for an end to the state’s 6 percent pickup practice and has state workers taking seven furlough days per year, which equates to a pay cut of roughly 3 percent. Don Loving, with AFSCME, said this is just the beginning of the contract negotiation dance. “We tell our members, don’t overreact to our state’s proposal,” he said. “They have to throw everything out there, the same with us. Whatever gets settled on is not going to look like the state’s initial proposal or ours.” AFSCME represents about 6,000 state, county and city employees, according to Loving. The bargaining process that began Tuesday affects about 3,000 employees, including those who work for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. Corrections officers, who make up about half of the union’s membership, have a separate bargaining process. The state’s initial contract also proposes to cap government employers’ health insurance contributions at 2010 levels, requiring employees to pay for increases in the cost of coverage. The state now pays the full cost of employee health coverage. The state’s proposal also call for the elimination of step pay increases until June 30, 2013. Curtis Robinhold, the governor’s chief of staff, said in a statement that “I want to reiterate that Governor Kitzhaber is a strong believer in the right of workers to organize and bargain collectively.” Under the union’s initial proposal, meanwhile, public employees would receive a salary increase in line with the Consumer Price Index, plus 2 percent, on July 1 of this year and another such increase on July 2, 2012. Step increases would continue. Employers would keep covering employees’ health insurance premiums in full. The 6 percent pickup would be left alone. The day after Thanksgiving would become an additional holiday. See Contract / A5

WILLIAMSBURG, Ky. — Is Rep. Harold Rogers the right man to break Congress’ addiction to spending? One might ponder that question at the water park here, part of the Hal Rogers Family Entertainment Center. Or during a drive on Hal Rogers Boulevard. Or Hal Rogers Drive. Or Hal Rogers Parkway. Rogers, who chairs the House Appropriations Committee, is the point man for GOP budget slashing. But he didn’t get a water park for cutting budgets: It was a reward for directing federal spending to Kentucky. One of Rogers’ top committee deputies is Rep. Bill Young. In Florida, his name adorns a drawbridge, a marine science complex and a military depot.

By Will Englund

would eventually use to bring American slavery to an end. Here’s Abraham Lincoln on “We are here to celebrate two Bolshaya Pirogovskaya Street, remarkable men and their time,” larger than life, shaking hands said James Symington, the 83with Czar Alexander II. They year-old former congressman are the Emancipator and the after he had sung, in Russian, the Liberator, joined together in a line from an Alexander Pushkin new work by sculptor Alexan- An 1864 poem that goes, “I remember a der Burganov. They’re look- portrait of wonderful moment ...” ing jolly, these men who, half a Abraham Symington, whose greatworld apart, presided over the Lincoln. grandfather was John Hay, freeing of serfs and slaves. Lincoln’s personal secretary Behind them, in the build(and later secretary of state ing of the Russian federal archives, an under Theodore Roosevelt), said he first exhibit opened Tuesday that looks at came to Moscow in 1958 and picked up Lincoln’s life, and Alexander’s. In this songs while strumming his guitar in the season of sesquicentennials, Russia is park. He called the president from Illimarking the liberation of 20 million serfs nois and the emperor of all the Russians back on March 3, 1861. That was one “two friends who never personally met day before Lincoln was sworn in as the but were together in spirit.” 16th president, assuming powers that he See Lincoln / A4

The Washington Post

Their stories reveal the larger struggle behind the current spending debate in Washington. It’s not just about money. It’s about Congress’ DNA — and changing the definition of what a member of Congress is. Lawmakers have long seen themselves in part as human funnels whose primary job is to bring home federal money. Now, the GOP wants its members to define themselves by what they can reduce, defund or terminate. Thus, Rogers and Young, masters of the old culture, are key indicators of whether the new model will work. If they can turn against the system that built their monuments, anyone can. See Earmarks / A6

IN CONGRESS

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

MON-SAT

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LIBYA: Gadhafi calls on mercenaries to defend grip on Tripoli, Page A3

GAY RIGHTS: Marriage act is unconstitutional, Obama says, Page A3

A2 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Private foundation tries to aid public education in India

As listed by The Associated Press

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Some challenges

By Vikas Bajaj New York Times News Service

PANTNAGAR, India — The Nagla elementary school in this north Indian town looks like many other rundown government schools. Sweater-clad children sit on burlap sheets laid in rows on cold concrete floors. Lunch is prepared out back on a fire of burning twigs and branches. But the classrooms of Nagla are a laboratory for an educational approach unusual for an Indian public school. Rather than being drilled and tested on reproducing passages from textbooks, students write their own stories. And they pursue independent projects — as when fifth-grade students recently interviewed organizers of religious festivals and then made written and oral presentations. That might seem commonplace in U.S. or European schools. But such activities are revolutionary in India, where public school students have long been drilled on memorizing facts and regurgitating them in stressful year-end exams that many children fail. Nagla and 1,500 other schools in this Indian state, Uttarakhand, are part of a five-year-old project to improve Indian primary education that is being paid for by one of the country’s richest men, Azim Premji, chairman of the information technology giant Wipro. Education experts at his Premji Foundation are helping to train new teachers and guide current teachers and administrators in overhauling the way students are taught and tested at government schools.

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vate schools. But he argues that government schools need help more because they are often the last or only resort for India’s poorest and least educated families.

Technology mogul is funding a revolution in teaching, training

For Premji, 65, there can be no higher priority if India is to fulfill its potential as an emerging economic giant. Because the Indian population is so youthful — nearly 500 million people, or 45 percent of the country’s total, are 19 or younger — improving the education system is one of the country’s most pressing challenges. “The bright students rise to the top, which they do anywhere in any system,” Premji said over lunch at Wipro’s headquarters in Bangalore, 1,300 miles south of Uttarakhand. “The people who are underprivileged are not articulate, less self-confident, they slip further. They slip much further. You compound a problem of people who are handicapped socially.” Within India, there is widespread recognition that the coun-

Nikita, 7, makes a face during an interacting learning session at Nagla elementary school in Uttarakhand, India. Nagla and 1,500 other schools in Uttarakhand are part of a five-year-old project that is trying to change how students are taught and tested. try has not invested enough in education, especially at the primary and secondary levels. In the past five years, government spending on education has risen sharply — to $83 billion last year, up from less half that level before. Schools now offer free lunches, which has helped raise enrollments to more than 90 percent of children. Most Indian schools still perform poorly. Barely half of fifthgrade students can read simple texts in their language of study, according to a survey of 13,000 rural schools by Pratham, a nonprofit education group. Most students drop out before they reach the 10th grade.

Contrast with China Those statistics stand in stark contrast to China, where a government focus on education has achieved a literacy rate of 94 percent of the population, compared with 64 percent in India. Premji said he hoped his foundation would eventually make a difference for tens of millions of children by focusing on critical educational areas like exams, curricula and teacher training. He said he wanted to reach many more children than he could by opening private schools — the approach taken by many other wealthy Indians. Premji, whose total wealth Forbes magazine has put at $18 billion, recently gave the foundation $2 billion worth of shares in his company. And he said that he expected to give more in the future. Those newly donated shares are being used to start an education-focused university in Bangalore and to expand and spread programs like the one here in Uttarakhand and a handful of other places to reach 50 of India’s 626 school districts. The effort’s size and scope is unprecedented for a private initiative in India, philanthropy experts say. Even though India’s recent rapid growth has helped dozens

of tycoons acquire billions of dollars in wealth, few have pledged such a large sum to a social cause.

‘This has never been attempted before’ “This has never been attempted before, either by a foundation or a for-profit group,” said Jayant Sinha, who heads the Indian office of Omidyar Network, the philanthropic investment firm set up by the eBay founder Pierre Omidyar. Although the results in Uttarakhand are promising, they also suggest that progress will be slow. Average test scores in one of the two districts where the foundation operates climbed to 54 percent in 2008, up from 37.4 percent two years earlier. (A passing mark is 33 percent or higher.) Still, only 20 of the 1,500 schools that the foundation works with in Uttarakhand have managed to reach a basic standard of learning as determined by competence tests, enrollment and attendance. Nagla is not one of the 20. “We are working with the kids who were neglected before,” said D.N. Bhatt, a district education coordinator for the Uttarakhand state government. “You won’t see the impact right away.” The Premji Foundation helps schools in states where the government has invited its participation — a choice that some educational experts criticize because it seems to ignore fast-growing private schools that teach about a quarter of the country’s students, including many of India’s poor. Narayana Murthy, a friend of Premji and chairman of Infosys, a company that competes with Wipro, said he admired the Premji Foundation’s work but worried it would be undermined by the way India administers its schools. “While I salute Azim for what he is doing,” Murthy said, “in order to reap the dividends of that munificence and good work, we have to improve our governance.” Premji says his foundation would be willing to work with pri-

While the foundation has been welcomed by government officials in many places, the schools in Uttarakhand provide a glimpse of the challenges it faces. After visitors left a classroom at Nagla school, an instructor began leading more than 50 fifth-grade students in a purely rote English lesson, instructing the students to repeat simple phrases: Good morning. Good afternoon. Good evening. Good night. The children loudly chanted them back in unison. Another teacher later explained that the instructor was one of two “community teachers” — local women hired by a shopkeeper to help the understaffed school. Although under government rules Nagla should have nine trained teachers for its 340 students, it has only four. Underfunding is pervasive in the district. But so are glimmers of the educational benefits that might come through efforts like the Premji Foundation’s. Surjeet Chakrovarty, now a 15-year-old secondary school student, is a graduate of Nagla and still visits his old school regularly. The son of a widower who is a sweeper at a local university, Surjeet aspires to become a poet and songwriter — something he attributes to the encouragement of his former teachers at Nagla. “My teachers here gave me so much motivation to write,” he said. One of those Nagla teachers, Pradeep Pandey, shared credit with the Premji Foundation, and its assistance in developing new written and oral tests. “Before, we had a clear idea of the answers and the child had to repeat exactly what we had in mind,” Pandey said. “We can’t keep doing what we did in the past, and pass them without letting them learn anything.”

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Hundreds of teenagers packed Boston’s City Council chambers Tuesday with a simple message: “Sex Education Now.” Students held black-andwhite signs with that declaration during a hearing as they pressed the city to bolster sex education programs in public high schools, including making condoms more available. Many of the adults in the room, including Councilor Ayanna Pressley, who called the hearing, said it was a crucial step toward letting the students know that their concerns have not gone unheard and progress is being made to bring about change. “There is no controversy when it comes to the fundamental question at the heart of today’s hearing,” Pressley said. “Not taking action — now that would be controversial. It would also be cowardly.” But not everyone in the room agreed with the sentiment. Maggie McLean, a graduate student at Harvard, said she, too, is concerned with “the current hookup culture” of many high school students “but distributing condoms is not the solution.” McLean, also a member of Pure at Heart, a nonprofit of young Catholic adults, said students need a sex-education program that gives them “the tools to resist a culture of casual sexual activity presented in the media. Please make sure that sex-ed in Boston Public Schools is truly comprehensive. Don’t say, ‘Be safe. Here’s a condom.’”

Condom availability is not the main issue Students are asking to learn about more than sex and condom usage. Focusing on the controversy of their proposal distracts from the comprehensive nature of their demands, they say. Hung Nguyen, a senior at Snowden International School said his formal education about human reproduction came in the sixth grade, but “it was like: ‘This is a condom. This is what males use to prevent pregnancy.’ We didn’t really talk about sexually transmitted diseases.” That is one of the important components of a comprehensive sexual education class, as well as teaching students how to cultivate and maintain healthy relationships, how to spot unhealthy relationships, and discussing sexual identity for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students. Under Boston’s current policy, condoms are available at nine high schools with community health centers. Although Boston schools are supposed to teach sex education in the ninth grade, the delivery and quality of the programs vary greatly, say teenagers and advocacy groups.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 A3

T S Obama: marriage Gadhafi massing forces act blocks gay rights

MIDDLE EAST PROTESTS

By Kareem Fahim and David D. Kirkpatrick

New York Times News Service

BAIDA, Libya — As rebellion crept closer to the capital and defections of military officers multiplied, Col. Moammar Gadhafi called on thousands of mercenaries and irregular forces Wednesday to defend his bastion in Tripoli, in what residents said was a dangerous turn in the week-old uprising. Distrustful of even his own generals, Gadhafi has for years quietly built up this ruthless and loyal force. It is made up of special brigades headed by his sons, segments of the military loyal to his native tribe and its allies, and legions of African mercenaries he has helped train and equip. Witnesses said members of this irregular army were massing on roads to the capital, Tripoli, where one resident described scenes evocative of anarchic Somalia.

Some residents of Tripoli said they took the gathering army as a sign that the uprising might be entering a decisive stage, with Gadhafi fortifying his main stronghold in the capital and protesters there gearing up for their first organized demonstration after days of rioting and bloody crackdowns.

Rebels claim Misurata The fall of other cities to rebels Wednesday, including Misurata, 130 miles east of the capital, left Gadhafi more embattled — and his opponents emboldened. The death toll so far has been impossible to determine. Human rights groups say they have confirmed about 300 deaths, although witnesses suggested the number was far larger. On Wednesday, Franco Frattini, the foreign minister of Italy, said more than 1,000 people were probably dead across

the country. Egyptian officials said Wednesday that nearly 30,000 people — mostly Egyptians working in Libya — had fled across their border. People fleeing west into Tunisia said the rebellion was now taking off far from its origins just a week ago in the eastern city of Benghazi, Libya’s second-largest city. On Wednesday, protesters claimed victory in nearby Zawai, where local army units are said to have joined them. Some said there had been intense fighting in the past few nights in Sabratha, 50 miles west of Tripoli, where witnesses Wednesday reported a heavy deployment of machinegun toting foreign mercenaries and Gadhafi loyalists known as revolutionary committees. “The revolutionary committees are trying to kill everyone who is against Gadhafi,” said a doctor fleeing Sabratha.

THOUSANDS OF TURKS AMONG EVACUEES FROM LIBYA

By Charlie Savage and Sheryl Gay Stolberg New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama, in a striking legal and political shift, has determined that the Defense of Marriage Act — the 1996 law that bars federal recognition of same-sex marriages — is unconstitutional and has directed the Justice Department to stop defending the law in court, the administration said Wednesday. Attorney General Eric Holder announced the decision in a letter to members of Congress. In it, he said the administration was taking the extraordinary step of refusing to defend the law, despite having done so during Obama’s first two years

in the White House. “The president and I have concluded that classifications based on sexual orientation” should Barack be subjected Obama to a strict legal test intended to block unfair discrimination, Holder wrote. As a result, he said, a crucial provision of the Defense of Marriage Act “is unconstitutional.” Conservatives denounced the shift, gay rights advocates hailed it as a watershed, and legal scholars said it could have far-reaching implications beyond the marriage law. For Obama, who opposes same-sex marriage but has said repeated-

ly that his views are “evolving,” there are political implications as well. Coming on the heels of his push for Congress to repeal the “don’t ask, don’t tell” law barring the military from allowing gays to serve openly, the administration’s move seems likely to intensify the long-running cultural clash over samesex marriage as the 2012 political campaign is heating up. “This is a great step by the Obama administration and a tipping point for the gay rights movement that will have ripple effects in contexts beyond the Defense of Marriage Act,” said Anthony Romero, the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union. “It will reach into issues of employment discrimination, family recognition and full equality rights for lesbian and gay people.”

NEW ZEALAND

Quake toll at 76 dead, 238 missing The Associated Press CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand — Rescuers broadened their search of collapsed buildings in New Zealand’s quake-shattered city of Christchurch today, as hopes faded of finding any more survivors in the hardest-hit office blocks downtown. Police said today that up to 120 bodies may still lie trapped in the tangled concrete and steel that was the Canterbury Television building, where dozens of students from Japan, Thailand and other Asian countries were

believed buried when an English-language school collapsed along with other offices. The official death toll from Tuesday’s 6.3-magnitude temblor stood at 76 as of this morning, based on the number of bodies that have been recovered from throughout the city and brought to a special morgue. The missing were listed at 238 — though officials stressed that many of those may be safe but not yet accounted for. “We know there are more bodies yet to be recovered and we are in the process of doing that,” police Superintendent Dave Cliff

told a news conference today. Prime Minister John Key declared the quake a national disaster and analysts estimate its cost at up to $12 billion. The damaged buildings in and around Christchurch numbered in the thousands, including many of the older structures in Lyttelton, a port town just southeast of the city and closer to the quake’s epicenter. Residents there wandered through the dusty, brick and glass-covered streets, pausing to offer each other hugs and ask the ubiquitous question: “How’s your house?”

Burhan Ozbilici / The Associated Press

Turkish workers evacuated from Benghazi, Libya, arrive in a naval port in the Mediterranean resort of Marmaris, Turkey, early today. About 25,000 Turks work for construction firms in Libya. Two Turkish ships had evacuated about 3,000 Turkish nationals. The safety of U.S. citizens was a prime concern after failed attempts earlier this week to get them

out by plane. But hundreds of Americans safely boarded a 600-passenger ferry at Tripoli’s As-shahab port on Wednesday for the five-hour journey to Malta, a Mediterranean island south of Italy. Over a dozen countries — including Russia, China, Germany and Ukraine — sent planes in to help their citizens escape an increasingly unstable situation.

Bahraini king in Saudi Arabia to discuss unrest By Michael Slackman and Nadim Audi New York Times News Service

MANAMA, Bahrain — A day after one of the largest prodemocracy demonstrations this tiny Persian Gulf nation had ever seen, its king was in Saudi Arabia, a close ally and neighbor, to discuss the unrest engulfing the region. The visit of King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa on Wednesday

came just as the aging Saudi ruler, King Abdullah, returned to the country after three months of medical treatment in the United States and Morocco. Even before Abdullah landed in Riyadh, the capital, the Saudi government announced that it would pour billions of dollars into a fund to help its citizens marry, buy homes and start their own businesses, the government announced. Reuters said the pack-

age was estimated at $37 billion. Hamad had already tried his own payout — offering $2,650 to every Bahraini family in the days before large protests broke out more than a week ago — but the economic concession was not enough to stem the tide of opposition from the country’s Shiite majority. Sunnis, the majority in Saudi Arabia, also form the ruling class in Bahrain, where Sunnis are a minority.

More standoffs, plus House GOP wants a prank in Wisconsin cuts in exchange New York Times News Service MADISON, Wis. — An increasingly heated national debate about the rights of union workers was stuck in a standoff Wednesday, as Democratic lawmakers here and in Indiana stayed away from their capitols to frustrate Republican efforts to vote on legislation that would undercut collective bargaining and the ability to organize. As the fights in Wisconsin, Ohio and Indiana have garnered attention, more fights were expected soon — in Oklahoma, where the House is considering legislation that would ban collective bargaining with municipal unions, and in Tennessee, where Republicans work to prevent collective bargaining between teachers’ unions and school boards. In Wisconsin, Democratic lawmakers said the state’s Republican governor, Scott Walker, was out purely to bust the unions, noting that the unions had already agreed to the concessions on wages and benefits to balance the budget. Suspicions were increased after the revelation of comments Walker made during what turned out to be a prank phone call from a blogger posing as a conservative donor. The governor discussed tactics to trick Democrats back to the Capitol, and compared his efforts to President Ronald Reagan’s firing of the air traffic controllers in 1981. “This is our moment, this is our time to change history,” Walker said.

for spending bill New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — House Republicans told Senate Democrats on Wednesday that they would agree to a temporary spending bill to avert a government shutdown next week only if the measure began instituting House-passed cuts on a pro-rated basis. Officials familiar with talks between representatives of House and Senate leaders said the proposal, still being assembled for a possible vote next week, would call for $4 billion in reductions in exchange for an additional two weeks to allow the House and Senate to negotiate a spending plan to finance the government through Sept. 30. Democratic aides said the short-term proposal was likely to be deemed unacceptable since it simply reflected a staggered version of the $61 billion in cuts approved by the House on Saturday in a proposal Senate Democrats already oppose. Senate aides said they saw the initiative as a Republican attempt to win the support of moderate Democrats who could be persuaded that the $4 billion figure was acceptable even though the leadership saw it as a back-door way to enact the House cuts.

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A4 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

New round of Arizona immigration restrictions By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

PHOENIX — Arizona lawmakers are proposing a sweeping package of immigration restrictions that might make the controversial measures the state approved last year, which the Obama administration went to court to block from taking effect, look mild. Immigrants would be banned from enrolling in school, from driving anywhere in the state and from receiving most public benefits. The offspring of illegal immigrants would receive special birth certificates that would make clear that the state does not consider them Arizona citizens. Some of the bills, like those restricting immigrants’ access to schooling and right to state citizenship, flout current federal law and are being put forward to draw legal challenges in hopes that the Supreme Court might rule in the state’s favor. Arizona drew considerable scorn last year when it passed legislation compelling police officers to inquire about the immigration status of those they stopped whom they suspected were in the country illegally. Critics said the law would lead to racial profiling of Latinos, and a federal judge agreed that portions of the law were unconstitutional. Similar legal challenges are likely in response to the latest round of legislation, some of which cleared a key Senate committee Tuesday night after a long debate that drew hundreds of protesters. “This bill is miles beyond S.B. 1070 in terms of its potential to roll back the rights and fundamental freedoms of both citizens and noncitizens alike,” said Alessandra Soler Meetze, executive director of the ACLU of Arizona. She said that the measures would create “a ‘papers, please’ society” and that a new crime — “driving while undocumented” — would be added to the books.

Sewer Continued from A1 That station collects sewage from about 1,500 different customers in and around the area, many of whom are residential users. As toilets are flushed and bathtubs drained, the wastewater flows into a wet well at the pump station. It collects there until there is enough to send it flowing through a pipeline to a treatment plant on the east side of town. On its way there it takes a slight detour off Mt. Washington Drive and through the Valhalla Heights neighborhood. But in the summer, sweltering temperatures can turn the pump station’s storage well into a cauldron. The sewage heats up while it waits for transport, releasing its fragrance in the form of hydrogen sulfide. According to Bend Utility Operations and Maintenance Manager Paul Roy, that compound is what makes up “that rotten egg smell that you get” with stagnating sewage. What’s worse, he said, is that once it starts to move through the pipes, turbulence churns out more gas, which gets pushed through the system, exacerbating the problem. “That’s the most predominant of the stinky smell,” Roy said. “It’s pretty complicated system out there, but the basic premise is if you have time and you have heat, you’re going to have odorous compounds.” The city has tried to mask the odors in Valhalla Heights using various chemical agents, but the results have been mixed. At the urging of Roadman and other homeowners, the city is now planning to divert the sewage around Valhalla Heights and down Mt. Washington Drive instead.

$600K to $800K project Estimates for such a project range between $600,000 and $800,000, according to city engineers, and work is expected to take place as soon as this upcoming construction season.

Census Continued from A1 “That is a surprise,” said Mayor Jeff Eager, “that the census numbers are lower than we were expecting.” Both he and City Manager Eric King said population numbers on the signs come from estimates calculated by the state’s official demographic agency, the Population Research Center at Portland State University. The center estimated Bend’s population as of July 1, at 83,125. It bases estimates on birth and death records, state income tax returns, Medicare data, nonfarm payroll information, changes in housing numbers and other administrative records. But the official once-a-decade census is a count of the nation’s population, as required by the U.S. Constitution. It serves as the base for the estimates. It does not appear Bend lost population, said Paul Rheault, the city’s public works director. Drinking water and wastewater usage have generally increased, he said. A loss of about 4,300 people would be noticeable. “We’re not seeing anything go down significantly,” he said. If the population signs at the city limits need to change, Bend’s sign crews can handle the job, Rheault said. The population counts carry more than bragging rights.

Lincoln Continued from A1 And of the fanciful statue by Burganov, he said, “We can’t wait to put them up in Washington somewhere.” Sticklers for accuracy will notice, beyond the handshake, that although the Czar-Liberator was tall, he was still about three inches shorter than Lincoln, a discrepancy in height that’s not immediately apparent in Burganov’s work. A military band played Russian and American marches at the opening of the exhibit, while an honor guard in oldtimey uniforms stood at attention by large oil portraits of the two national leaders. A joint Russian-American venture, the exhibit includes busts, maps, letters, lithographs, a Smith & Wesson revolver, a bugle, some swords, the pens that each leader used to sign his respective proclamation and the tunic Alexander was wearing when he was

City officials say it’s unclear exactly why the sewer line that comes from the Awbrey pump station makes a slight jaunt into Valhalla Heights. From the pump station, a sewer line goes up Putnam Road to Mt. Washington. From there it follows that road for about two miles until taking a sharp turn into the Valhalla Heights and hooking into another pipe that runs down Marken Street. After it leaves Valhalla Heights, the sewer line connects to another line that runs down Shevlin Park Road, which eventually turns into Newport Avenue.

History is a mystery Bend Public Works Director Paul Rheault said many of his employees weren’t at the city when the pipe was buried in the ground, or when the connection from Mt. Washington Drive to Marken Street was approved. For that reason, he said, the history is somewhat lost on him. “I’m a little bewildered that when Mt. Washington was built why they didn’t separate the line and put it under Mt. Washington,” Rheault said. “That would have made sense to a lot of us.” Roadman still blames the city for the problem. He built his house in Valhalla Heights in 1988 and believes the city should have required the pump station sewer line to follow Mt. Washington when development later occurred around Awbrey Glenn. While he can laugh about the smell now — probably because it’s winter and he knows a fix is on the way — he said he definitely couldn’t live with aroma much longer. It’s just become too powerful, he said, enough so that it makes him joke about the need for a gas mask when he hears the sewage rumble down his street. “To me it was definitely an oversight and it should not have happened,” Roadman said. “I appreciate the work from the city, but, boy, it should never have happened.”

Terrebonne — which lost 212 residents, or more than 14 percent, from 2000 to 2010, and Tumalo, which did not have population figures from 2000. It had 488 people last year. In 2000, La Pine was a census designated place. It incorporated in 2006, however. That may have led to its swing in population, dropping nearly 72 percent from 2000 to 2010. Eight Eastern Oregon counties lost population between 2000 and 2010, the data show. Of the larger cities in the region, Burns lost 8.42 percent of its residents, a decline of about 250 people. Others to lose population in Eastern Oregon included Baker City, Hines, Halfway, Wallowa, Lostine and Prairie City. Enterprise, Joseph and La Grande, however, gained. Portland remained the state’s largest city, gaining about 10 percent in population between 2000 and 2010. Census figures list the 2010 population at 583,776. Eugene and Salem finished second and third, respectively, both growing about 13 percent between 2000 and 2010. Eugene’s population reached 156,185 last year, with Salem close behind, at 154,637. Tim Doran can be reached at 541383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin. com. Hillary Borrud and Devon Williams contributed to this report.

“This exhibit is another reminder that Russia and the U.S. can cooperate most efficiently when they have common agendas.” — Ivan Kurilla, head of the Center for American Studies at Volgograd State University blown up by a bomb in 1881. Letters from Alexander to Lincoln were signed, in French, “your very affectionate friend.” Another letter to Lincoln, from Nathaniel Hawthorne, endorses the appointment of Bayard Taylor, “one of the brotherhood of literature,” as minister to Russia. When he returned to the United States from Alexander’s court, Taylor lectured widely on the liberation of the serfs. Lincoln, said historian Ivan Kurilla, head of the Center for American Studies at Volgograd State University, once went to hear him. Alexander was intent on reforming the creaky Russian state, and the conservative owners of Russia’s vast land holdings passionately resisted him.

Liberals couldn’t help but notice the parallels with the slave-holding plantation owners in the American South, said Andrei Yanovsky, a co-curator of the archive exhibit. In the 1850s, in fact, when censorship made it impossible to criticize conditions in Russia, newspapers and magazines devoted large amounts of space to denunciations of American slavery — and, Kurilla said, readers understood that this was a stand-in for the actual target, Russian serfdom. His foreign minister said Alexander considered the outbreak of the Civil War to be “deplorable,” threatening the progress and prosperity that America had achieved in its 80 years of independence. The czar sent naval

Oregon’s fastest-growing cities and Census Designated Places 2000-10 CITY OR CDP 1. Grand Ronde (CDP)

2000 2010 PERCENT POPULATION POPULATION CHANGE

271 4,519 36 959 651 13,481 5,385 4,797 3,570 802

1,661 13,903 85 2,038 1,329 26,215 9,570 8,469 6,127 1,357

512.9 207.7 136.1 112.5 104.2 94.5 77.7 76.6 71.6 69.2

52,029 7,356 2,431 77. Warm Springs (CDP) 5,078 88. Madras (city) 635 140. Metolius (city) 150. Deschutes River Woods (CDP) 4,631 232. Camp Sherman (CDP) 285. Tumalo (CDP) 1,469 355. Terrebonne (CDP) 5,799 377. La Pine (city) *

76,639 9,253 2,945 6,046 710 5,077 233 488 1,257 1,653

47.3 25.8 21.1 19.1 11.8 9.6 0.00 0.00 -14.4 -71.5

2. Happy Valley (city) 3. Wamic (CDP) 4. Sisters (city) 5. Millersburg (city) 6. Redmond (city) 7. Sandy (city) 8. Eagle Point (city) 9. Sheridan (city) 10. Culver (city) 19. Bend (city) 51. Prineville (city)

*In 2000, La Pine was a Census Designated Place. It incorporated in 2006 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

squadrons to New York and San Francisco as a show of support for the Union. Russia at the time was wary of British designs and feared that a Confederate victory would play into British hands. On this point he got no argument from Lincoln. The president was under no illusions about Russian despotism - he once remarked, before going to the White House, that at least it was honest about its cruelty, compared with the hypocrisy that swirled around the American debate over slavery. For his part, Alexander seems to have been confident enough in the lasting power of the Russian royal family that he needn’t worry about befriending a republic that had cast off its king. The United States and Russia had better relations in the mid19th century than they did even during World War II, Kurilla said. “This exhibit is another reminder that Russia and the U.S. can cooperate most efficiently when they have common agendas.” Now it’s just a question of finding one.

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Hispanics lag in Web usage, survey finds By Cecilia Kang and Krissah Thompson The Washington Post

Hispanics are less connected to the Internet than whites and blacks, use websites less frequently, and express more discomfort with computers and technology in the workplace, according to a new survey. That could set back the nation’s fastest-growing ethnic group, experts say, as more employment, educational and health-care opportunities migrate online. According to a new Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation-Harvard University poll, 72 percent of Hispanics say they use the Internet, lower than the percentages of whites and African Americans.

If you have been living with back pain or neck pain, are you really living? If you think you’ve tried everything, you need to read this. Pills and shots temporarily mask pain, and often times do more harm to the body than good. Surgeries are invasive, cause new pains, require weeks of downtime, and still may not be successful at treating the cause of the pain. It’s time to look at an alternative that avoids all of these downfalls because it is fundamentally different. Redmond Wellness & Chiropractic offers such an alternative with our spinal decompression program

that is like no other in Central Oregon. We know our program works because we have already seen outstanding success with our patients. People suffering from excruciating, lifestyle-altering pain have entered our program. When they completed our spinal decompression program, they were able to return to work, get back to the activities they love, and cancel those shots and surgeries!

The x-rays showed that I had degenerative disc disease and arthritis in the spine. The pain started in my right buttock, radiated across my thigh, and into my kneecap. Traditional chiropractic care hadn’t helped. After three treatments on the SpineMed table about 70% of the pain was gone. Upon completion of treatment I am 85% pain free, I can stand up straight and don’t have to lean over the shopping cart, and can walk almost a mile. Best of all, Mr. Grumpy is gone! --Dave D., Redmond, November 2010

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A state’s population determines how many representatives it has in the U.S. House of Representatives, which is why Oregon has five congressional districts and California has 53. The census also determines how $400 billion in federal funding gets divvied up for road projects, job training, schools, emergency services and other programs, the bureau has said. In late December, the Census Bureau released state population totals, and on Wednesday it released the figures for counties, cities, school districts and smaller areas. It also included population counts by race and voting age, along with a count of housing for Oregon and two other states. These numbers allow Oregon officials to redraw state legislative districts, which can determine who controls the Legislature, potentially setting the agenda for public schools, crime and punishment and taxes for a decade. For example, because of population growth, the city of Bend and Deschutes River Woods became a single House district in 2001. Previously, House District 54 included La Pine, Sunriver, Gilchrist and Fort Klamath. Along with population counts for cities, the Census Bureau provides data for unincorporated areas, called census designated places. Deschutes County’s places include

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C OV ER S T ORY

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 A5

NEW MEXICO

Space tourism hits economic snag By Dan Frosch New York Times News Service

TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, N.M. — Somewhere off a dusty road in southern New Mexico sits a hulking, horseshoe-crab-shaped structure and a two-mile-long slab of concrete flanked by mesas and mountains. Welcome to Spaceport America, the country’s first facility built specifically for commercial space travel — an endeavor that the state envisioned as the epicenter of a fledgling industry where tourists would pay large sums to take suborbital flights into space. These days, though, after years of planning and debate, New Mexico’s grand ambitions for the spaceport have come down to earth, its future entwined with the state’s struggling economy. Although more than 400 people have put down deposits for flights, totaling more than $55 million, it is still not exactly clear when the first flight will launch. In her first two months in office, Gov. Susana Martinez removed the spaceport’s supervising board, pushed out its executive director and began a review of the project’s finances, saying the spaceport needed more robust private investment. Martinez, a Republican, was elected on a promise of paring down government, and the state’s revenue windfall is long gone. The governor has since made a point of stating her support for the project, and this month she appointed a new board, including three former members and Sid Gutierrez, a former astronaut. But she has also vowed to privatize the spaceport, saying taxpayers have already paid their fair share. “The spaceport is part of the plan for economic development in New Mexico, and the voters made it clear they support it,” Martinez said in a recent interview. “We want to be a leader in space exploration, but we want to do it within our budget.” The dream of a commercial spaceport has been around for years in New Mexico, which has long had a love affair with aerospace and aliens. In 2006, flush with oil and gas revenue, the Legislature, pushed by Gov. Bill Richardson, approved $132 mil-

By Marcia Dunn The Associated Press

Mark Holm / New York Times News Service

The terminal and hangar facility at Spaceport America, the country’s first facility built for commercial space travel, in Truth or Consequences, N.M. New Mexico’s new governor, Susana Martinez, is saying she still supports the spaceport after she removed the supervising board, demanded the resignation of its executive director and launched an ongoing review of the project’s finances.

“The spaceport is part of the plan for economic development in New Mexico, and the voters made it clear they support it. We want to be a leader in space exploration, but we want to do it within our budget.” — Gov. Susana Martinez, New Mexico lion to build the spaceport. Standing to reap the benefits if the project succeeds, voters in Dona Ana and Sierra counties passed a quarter-cent sales tax, which will provide the remaining money needed for construction. But New Mexico has since taken on a $450 million deficit. The ambitious project was budgeted at about $209 million, but a second runway could be needed to expand commercial operations. Martinez has made it clear she wants any additional financing

for the spaceport to come from private industry. “That’s going to be our big push right now,” she said. Supporters of the project say the spaceport could create hundreds of jobs and draw wealthy tourists. But some here question the new governor’s commitment to see it through. “Let’s face it — privatizing the spaceport means selling it off and trying to remove any risk to the state,” said Rick Homans, who was appointed by Richardson as the facility’s ex-

ecutive director until Martinez asked him to step down. “The message would be that the state is not committed long term, and the new industry will look at other states where they can find a fully engaged partner.” New Mexico is not the only entity heavily invested. Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic has signed on to be the facility’s anchor tenant for 20 years and has dedicated hundreds of millions of dollars toward developing the technology. In 2005, amid considerable fanfare, Virgin began taking reservations for spaceflights — a ticket costs $200,000. Construction of the 110,000-squarefoot hangar and terminal is nearing completion. Virgin Galactic’s chief executive and president, George Whitesides, said in a recent interview that the company expects to launch commercial flights within two years.

Contract Continued from A1 Bereavement leave would increase from 24 to 40 hours. Employees would receive vacation time increases earlier in their tenures. And the union would like its new contract to preserve pay for employees who choose to be demoted in order to avoid being laid off. Loving said he wasn’t surprised at the initial offer made by the governor’s bargaining team, and he expected something regarding the 6 percent pickup to be on the table. The pickup refers to the percentage of salary employees must pay toward retirement. Many government agencies pay — or “pick up” — that contribution instead. Loving attributes this practice to a decision by state employees years ago to take a wage cut in exchange for the 6 percent pickup. “If we hadn’t traded the wage increase, it would have been added wages that would have compounded over time,” he said. “Economically it’s a moot point.” Both the elimination of the 6 percent pickup and the requirement that state employees share the cost of their health insurance coverage were recommendations from former Gov. Ted Kulongoski’s “Reset Cabinet,” which was formed to examine the state’s financial picture and suggest ways to improve it. Nick Smith, spokesman for House Republicans, said members of his caucus have a proposed bill that would reduce the 6 percent pickup to 3 percent. “We’ve been clear that in order to bring our spending under control, the governor — and if not the governor, the Legislature — should take action to rein in PERS costs,” Smith said. Smith said if the governor can eliminate the PERS pickup entirely, it would help the state’s taxpayers. But, he said, many Republicans believe a 3 percent cap on the PERS pickup would be a good compromise. Loving said he’s urging his members not to overreact to the governor’s initial proposal and would like to remind the public this is just the beginning of the process. The next meeting between state negotiators and the union is scheduled for March 3. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Most-traveled space shuttle set for final launch

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — After 143 million miles and nearly a year all told in orbit, space shuttle Discovery is poised to blast off today, one last time. It promises to be a sentimental journey for the six astronauts assigned to the mission as well as the supporting cast of thousands who have painstakingly prepped the world’s mosttraveled rocketship. Once more, NASA’s fleet leader is paving a new road, one that leads to shuttle retirement and an uncertain future for America’s space program. When Discovery returns from the International Space Station, it will be the first of the three surviving shuttles to be decommissioned this year John Raoux / The Associated Press and shipped off Space shuttle Discovery to a museum. stands ready for launch The Smithsonian at Pad 39A as the rotatInstitution has ing service structure is first dibs on this moved back to expose one. the orbiter at the KenBut the end nedy Space Center in of the 30-year Cape Canaveral, Fla., shuttle program on Wednesday. is still months down the road. For now, NASA prefers to focus on Discovery’s last hurrah, an 11-day mission to deliver a bundle of space station supplies and an experimental humanoid robot that will become the first of its kind in space. “Discovery is the most-flown spacecraft in history,” NASA Administrator Charles Bolden told The Associated Press. “People don’t understand. They say it matter-of-factly. There is no other multi-flown spacecraft than the shuttle.”

C OV ER S T ORY

A6 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood Rep. Hal Rogers has brought millions in federal money home to his district in eastern Kentucky, where grateful officials have named public works in his honor.

Hal Rogers Boulevard A road in Whitley County that connects a high school with a U.S. route.

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A lecture hall at the school of business at the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg.

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Continued from A1 “I don’t think that they’ve had a road-to-Damascus moment” that produced a lasting conversion, said Steve Ellis, vice president of Taxpayers for Common Sense, a watchdog group that opposes earmarks. “It’s been forced upon them.” Rogers, 73, has been in Congress for 30 years. Young, 80, has been there for 40, and now chairs the defense appropriations subcommittee. In the past, overseeing congressional spending would have made them the Ed McMahons of Capitol Hill, passing out big checks to happy people. Now, it means supervising a historic spending reduction and a ban on millions in earmarks for folks back home. A Rogers spokeswoman said he is committed to sacrifice, “even if it affects his own back yard.” Young said that he, too, is on board. “I go by the rules,” he said in an interview. “Whether I agree with them or not.”

Freshmen demand cuts But so far, these two have been left behind by the Republican Party’s aggressive freshmen. Rogers had to redo this year’s budget proposal (called a “continuing resolution”) after the newcomers demanded deeper reductions. Young said Congress was likely to keep funding an alternative engine for a fighter plane. Then the freshmen helped kill the measure. In the end, Rogers seemed caught between the old ways and the new: He voted with Democrats to defeat a proposal from

the GOP’s conservative wing that would have cut $22 billion more from the budget. Then, when the House approved smaller but still severe cuts Saturday morning, he issued a statement trumpeting what “we” had done. The real spending debate is still to come: If the Senate passes a budget with smaller reductions, the House will have to compromise — or risk shutting down the government. Young and Rogers will help shape that debate. All this marks a sharp turn for both men, masters of the soft art of having things named after them. Congress’ all-time leader in this category is probably former senator Robert Byrd, D-W.Va., whose list runs more than 30, including a high school, a prison and two federal buildings. Rogers and Young both say they weren’t trying to follow Byrd’s example. “I never asked for any of those things to be named after me,” Young said in an interview. “And on occasion, when I knew they were planning it, I asked them not to.” But one doesn’t have to ask. Instead, the accepted custom is that a member of Congress directs federal spending to projects that local officials want. Those grateful officials slap the lawmaker’s name on a building or a bridge. When it works, voters reelect the name on the sign, giving the lawmaker precious seniority and the local officials a better advocate. Here in Kentucky, it works. “I don’t know what he’s done, but he’s done something right,” said Jewel Robinson, who owns a hair salon on Hal Rogers Parkway in Hazard, Ky. The parkway was named after Daniel Boone until the state renamed it for Rogers in 2003 because he se-

cured $13 million to end tolls on the road. Rogers, a former prosecutor, sponsored $175 million worth of earmarks from 2008 to 2010, placing him fourth out of 435 representatives, according to Taxpayers for Common Sense (Young was second, with $298 million). In an Appalachian region locked in poverty, Rogers made money the center of his political persona, saying that “a vision without funding is a hallucination.” Today, community college students sip coffee in the Harold Rogers Student Commons. Recruits fight fires at the Hal Rogers Fire Training Center. Every day in the summer, 1,100 people visit the water park — which the city named after Rogers in gratitude for $40 million he had sent to the area. And Rogers has won his past seven elections by an average of 62 percentage points. In a flower shop in downtown Williamsburg, florist Greg Prewitt said only one other man was as beloved — or as well known — in this region. “Everybody likes the colonel, because he brought the fried chicken,” Prewitt said. He was talking about Harland Sanders, a Kentucky icon who founded his fried-chicken empire a few miles up the road. “We look at Hal Rogers like we look at Colonel Sanders.”

‘Not a bridge to nowhere’ In Florida, Young also had built his career as a cash conduit. During campaigns, he ran newspaper ads mapping places he had helped with earmarks. And, where that money went, Young often saw his name appear.

5th Congressional District

New York Times News Service

MANAMA, Bahrain — The popular revolts shaking the Arab world have begun to shift the balance of power in the region, bolstering Iran’s position while weakening and unnerving its rival, Saudi Arabia, regional experts said. While it is far too soon to write the final chapter on the uprisings’ impact, Iran has already benefited from the ouster or undermining of Arab leaders who were its strong adversaries and has begun to project its growing influence, the analysts said. This week, Iran sent two warships through the Suez Canal for the first time since its revolution in 1979, and Egypt’s new military leaders allowed them to pass. Saudi Arabia, a U.S. ally and a Sunni nation that jousts with Shiite Iran for regional influence, has been shaken. King Abdullah on Wednesday signaled his concern by announcing a $10 billion increase in welfare spending to help young people marry, buy homes and open businesses, a gesture seen as trying to head off the kind of unrest that fueled protests around the region. Abdullah then met with the king of Bahrain, Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa, to discuss ways to contain the political uprising by the Shiite majority there. The Sunni leaders in Saudi Arabia

and Bahrain accuse their Shiite populations of loyalty to Iran, a charge rejected by Shiites who say it is intended to stoke sectarian tensions and justify opposition to democracy. The uprisings are driven by domestic concerns. But they have already shredded a regional paradigm in which a trio of states aligned with the West supported engaging Israel and containing Israel’s enemies, including Hamas and Hezbollah, experts said. The pro-engagement camp of Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia is now in tatters. Hosni Mubarak of Egypt has been forced to resign, King Abdullah of Jordan is struggling to control discontent in his kingdom and Saudi Arabia has been left alone to face a rising challenge to its regional role. “I think the Saudis are worried that they’re encircled — Iraq, Syria, Lebanon; Yemen is unstable; Bahrain is very uncertain,” said Alireza Nader, an expert in international affairs with the RAND Corp. “They worry that the region is ripe for Iranian exploitation. Iran has shown that it is very capable of taking advantage of regional instability.” “Iran is the big winner here,” said a regional adviser to the U.S. government who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

Iran’s circumstances could change, experts cautioned, if it overplayed its hand or if popular Arab movements came to resent Iranian interference in the region. And it is by no means assured that pro-Iranian groups would dominate politics in Egypt, Tunisia or elsewhere. For now, Iran and Syria are emboldened. Qatar and Oman are tilting toward Iran, and Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain and Yemen are in play. “If these ‘pro-American’ Arab political orders currently being challenged by significant protest movements become at all more representative of their populations, they will for sure become less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the United States,” Flynt Leverett and Hillary Mann Leverett, former National Security Council staff members, wrote in an email. They added that at the moment, Iran’s leaders saw that “the regional balance is shifting, in potentially decisive ways, against their American adversary and in favor of the Islamic Republic.” Iran’s standing is stronger in spite of its challenges at home, with a troubled economy, high unemployment and a determined political opposition. The United States may also face challenges in pressing its case against Iran’s nuclear programs, some experts asserted.

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The University of South Florida has received more than $340 million in earmarks through Young over the past decade. Using the money, engineers developed torpedo-like robotic “gliders” that last year detected BP oil plumes in the Gulf of Mexico. Now, the university’s marine science college is housed in the C.W. Bill Young Marine Science Complex in downtown St. Petersburg. Young also secured tens of millions in federal money to replace an aging bridge in the beach town of Treasure Island that city officials said the town of 7,500 could not afford on its own. When construction was finished, city officials opened the C.W. Bill Young Drawbridge. “I’m against earmarks, but I like my own,” said island resident John Kerry, 64, a wine consultant. On a recent day, he ate sushi on the island’s beach, listening to conservative host Dennis Prager on a portable radio. “There’s a difference between our earmark and others. It’s not a bridge to nowhere in Alaska.” If Rogers and Young follow

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David Fahrenthold / The Washington Post

through on their promises to cut spending, the real test could come in the next election cycle. Can they rebrand themselves after decades in Congress? And, if they aren’t funnels, what are they? “In this current environment, the citizens know this can’t continue. And if that means the Treasure Island Bridge doesn’t get the right retrofit, well, that’s what that means,” said Kris Gionet, who organizes the Pinellas Patriots, a tea party group in Young’s district. But, sitting in a customer-less furniture store in downtown Williamsburg, Ky., appliance repairman Herschel Roaden, 82, said he thought Rogers was being “double-faced.” The congressman, he said, can claim credit for cutting budgets while his name adorns government-financed projects.

Now, Roaden said, “they ought to name that stuff taxpayers’” water park, “because we’re paying.” The question was put to Rogers: Should we call it the American Taxpayers’ Family Entertainment Center? Rogers didn’t respond. Instead, his spokeswoman said in an e-mail that it isn’t Rogers’ call to make. After all, he didn’t ask for these honors in the first place. Said spokeswoman Jennifer Hing: “These decisions were always made — and will continue to be made — on a local level.”

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While the Arab world crumbles, Iran’s influence, confidence grows By Michael Slackman

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Hal Rogers Hall A meeting hall in the First Federal Center at Hazard Community and Technical College in Hazard that is a venue for weddings, proms and other Lexington events.

A 35,000-square-foot facility built in 2002 by the city of Hazard houses the Rural Law Enforcement Technology Center and the Forum, a multimedia presentation center.

Prestonsburg

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Hal Rogers Technology Center

Hal Rogers Center

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OTHER CAMPUS FACILITIES

Hal Rogers Fire Training Center

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“The name was chosen as a thank-you for all of the federal money he has brought back to Whitley County, the City of Williamsburg, and the other 40 counties he represents. His work has given us more than $40 million to our area in the form of flood relief, trash gate, the Pride Program, and updated roads. No, we have no federal money in our park. It was simply named for him because of the great job he is doing for us in Washington.”

A large building that houses a lawA facility for regional emergency enforcement innovation center, economic responders. development programs, and academic programs called “Rogers Scholars,” 64 the center is not formally named after Lexington Rogers. But federal funding played such a key role in its construction that locals call it the “Taj Ma ‘Hal.’ ” 75

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A road in Prestonsburg that is home to several motels.

The park’s Web site explains the decision to name it after Rogers:

Center for Rural Development

A 54,500-square-foot student center at Somerset Community College in Somerset.

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Hal Rogers Drive

This complex includes a water park with an 18,000-square-foot wave pool and a triple slide, an 18-hole miniature-golf course, and a lighted driving range.

Harold Rogers Student Commons

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OTHER ROADS

Hal Rogers Family Entertainment Center

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This road through southeastern Kentucky was originally named for Daniel Boone, the state's legendary frontiersman. Then, in 2003, it was renamed for Rogers, who had helped obtain $13 million in federal funding that allowed the state to eliminate tolls on the road.

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Hal Rogers Parkway

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311 SW Century Dr., Bend 541-389-6234

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Ford recall Company says F150s need an air bag fix, see Page B4.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,722.99 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -33.43 -1.21%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

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12,105.78 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -107.01 -.88%

Medford-based Lithia Motors Inc., whose 83 stores include Bend Honda and Chevrolet Cadillac of Bend, on Wednesday reported total revenues of $555.6 million in its fourth quarter that ended Dec. 31, with net income of $4.4 million, or 16 cents per share. That compares with total revenues of $424.8 million in fourth-quarter 2009 and a net loss of $1.6 million, or 6 cents per share. For all of 2010, total revenues were $2.1 billion and net income was $13.7 million, or 52 cents per share, compared with total revenues of $1.8 billion in 2009 and net income of $9.2 million, or 41 cents per share, in 2009. Lithia, which bought Bob Thomas Car Co. of Bend in July, also announced a dividend of 5 cents per share for the fourth quarter 2010, payable March 25 to shareholders of record on March 11.

1,307.40 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -8.04 -.61%

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Several sectors were trending upward, report shows The Bulletin

Lithia earnings rise

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.48 treasury CHANGE +.58%

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$1,413.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$12.90

Bend GDP declined in 2009 By Ed Merriman

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

The gross domestic product fell in 2009 nationwide, statewide and in the Bend metropolitan area, but despite the overall declines, several sectors of the Bend economy were on a growth trend heading into 2009, according to a Bureau of Economic Analysis report released Wednesday. “Real U.S. GDP by metropolitan area (at $12.6 trillion) declined 2.4 percent in 2009 after declining by 0.4 percent in 2008 (when U.S. real GDP was $12.8 trillion),” the BEA reported.

“The economic decline was widespread as real GDP declined in 239 of 366 metropolitan statistical areas, led by national declines in durable goods manufacturing, construction, and professional and business services,” according to the report, which said construction declines adversely affected metropolitan areas in the Rocky Mountain, Southwest, Southeast and Far West regions the most. Growth accelerated in 70 metropolitan areas where natural resource and mining industries are concentrated, including Oklahoma City, Okla., and Casper, Wyo., which

had the fastest real GDP growth in the nation at 22.4 percent, according to the BEA. Real GDP is based on earnings by industry in each of the nation’s metropolitan areas, reflecting the value of goods and services produced in each area, and the cumulative values by state and nationwide, according to the BEA. Oregon’s real GDP fell from nearly $170 billion in 2008 to $165 billion in 2009, according to the report. For the Bend metropolitan statistical area, which includes all of Deschutes County, the BEA reported the real GDP declined from nearly $6.3 billion in 2008 to about $6 billion in 2009. See GDP / B4

CLEAN ENERGY VS. THE ENVIRONMENT

Home Federal declares dividend Nampa, Idaho-based Home Federal Bancorp Inc. announced Wednesday a quarterly cash dividend of 5.5 cents per share on its common stock payable on March 22 to stockholders of record as of March 8. The bank acquired Eugene-based LibertyBank in 2010 and Prineville-based Community First Bank in 2009.

Oregon Bancorp earnings improve Oregon Bancorp Inc., parent company of Salem-based Willamette Valley Bank and the Bank of Oregon Home Loan Center in Bend, on Tuesday reported net income of $425,643 in its fourth quarter that ended Dec. 31 and fullyear net income of $435,560, or 48 cents per diluted share. The company reported a loss of $193,456 in 2009.

U.S. accuses bankers in Swiss tax evasion Credit Suisse, the big Swiss bank, on Wednesday came under heightened scrutiny by authorities in the United States and Germany over its sale of private banking services that enable tax evasion. The United States Justice Department accused four private bankers on Wednesday of helping Americans evade taxes, widening its investigation of foreign financial institutions. Federal prosecutors in Alexandria, Va., accused the bankers — Marco Parenti Adami, Emanuel Agustoni, Michele Bergantino and Roger Schaerer — of conspiracy and fraud in connection with their banking duties. — From staff and wire reports

Home prices fall

$33.302 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.438

EPA rule changes clear way for biomass facilities By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Efforts to reduce domestic dependence on foreign oil advanced Monday under Environmental Protection Agency rule changes easing restrictions on operating biomass boilers that convert wood wastes from forest thinning projects, agricultural wastes and other biomass materials into renewable energy, according to government officials. The changes modify EPA boiler emission standards proposed by the agency in June that were so strict they appeared to doom biomass plants across the country, including one just completed in John Day with $4 million in federal stimulus funds. Biomass proponents and members of Oregon’s congressional delegation argued that the rules wrongly lumped biomass boilers that emit nontoxic emissions with large coal-burning boilers that emit hazardous pollutants and threatened to kill Oregon’s fledgling biomass industry before it got off the ground. “Forest product wastes, such as trimmings from door and window plants, would be considered biomass and not solid waste, and therefore would not be forced to meet the more stringent incinerator standards for solid waste-burning units,” Tom Towsley, Oregon director of communications for U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said Wednesday. See Biomass / B3

Solar projects green, but at what cost? Handful of lawsuits challenge companies on environmental grounds By Todd Woody New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Just weeks after regulators approved the last of nine multibillion-dollar solar thermal power plants to be built in the Southern California desert, a storm of lawsuits and the resurgence of an older solar technology are clouding the future of the nascent industry. The litigation, which seeks to block construction of five of the solar thermal projects, underscores the growing risks of building large-scale renewable energy plants in environmentally delicate areas. On Jan. 25, for instance, Solar Millennium withdrew its 16-month-old license application for a 250-megawatt solar station called Ridgecrest, citing regulators’ concerns over the project’s impact on the Mohave ground squirrel.

“There’s no good reason to go into these pristine wilderness areas and build huge solar farms, and less reason for the taxpayers to be subsidizing it.” — Cory Briggs, a lawyer representing an American Indian group that has sued the U.S. Interior Department and the Bureau of Land Management to stop five solar thermal plants At peak output, the five licensed solar thermal projects being challenged would power more than 2 million homes, create

thousands of construction jobs and help the state meet aggressive renewable energy mandates. The projects are backed by California’s biggest utilities, top state officials and the Obama administration. But conservation, labor and American Indian groups are challenging the projects on environmental grounds. The lawsuits, coupled with a broad plunge in prices for energy from competing power sources, threaten the ability of developers to secure expiring federal loan guarantees and private financing to establish the projects. Only one developer so far, BrightSource Energy, has obtained a loan guarantee and begun construction. Like so many of this state’s troubles, the industry’s problems are rooted in real estate. See Solar / B3

Airlines are raising fares as oil prices rise By Jad Mouawad New York Times News Service

Airline passengers are definitely going to feel sticker shock this year. As the carriers have tried to keep up with rapidly rising oil prices, they have already increased their fares four times since the start of the year, compared with only three increases for all of 2010. The airlines have also raised some of their fees, imposed summer peak-time surcharges and added hefty fuel surcharges on international flights. Even traditional low-cost carriers that have long undercut their rivals are joining in. Southwest Airlines, for example, which usually resists industrywide fare increases, participated in several rounds, including one this week. See Airfare / B3

Boring financial services? There’s an app for that

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New York Times News Service ile photo

Biologists scan vegetation for signs of a desert tortoise on the site of the BrightSource Ivanpah solar power plant in the Mojave Desert near Nipton, Calif., last year. BrightSource and four other solar thermal projects in California are being challenged in court by labor, environmental and American Indian groups.

The Standard & Poor’s/CaseShiller home 20-city housing index fell one percent in December. Composite 20-city index Non-seasonally adjusted* Jan. 2000=100

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By Susan Tompor

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Detroit Free Press

144 142 140 ’09 ’10 *Standard & Poor’s is temporarily using non-seasonally adjusted figures because the surge in foreclosures appears to have magnified the seasonal factors in S&P’s computer model, making them less reliable. Source: Standard & Poor’s AP

The cool factor for smart phone applications has been getting geekier — and cheekier. Chase kicked off a Super Bowl ad in most markets to highlight how easy it is to use a Chase app to deposit a check. The guy gets up from his easy chair, puts on a hat and coat, gets his phone and stops to take a picture of a check to deposit it. He never leaves the house. This year, the Internal Reve-

PERSONAL FINANCE nue Service decided to go for its own gizmo gimmick by rolling out an IRS tax app. Sure, there are apps to check the weather, calculate your carbon footprint and play Angry Birds. But now it’s cool to say there’s an app for dull financial services, too.

“I go on at least a couple times a day,” said Shane Brion, Chase bank branch manager in Ypsilanti, Mich. He has used the IRS app to check when his tax refund would arrive. He uses his bank’s app to track spending. “I always check it in the morning, to make sure checks have cleared, keep an eye on the balance,” Brion said. Everybody has some sort of application, including the Internal Revenue Service. See Apps / B3

Shane Brion, 30, a Chase bank branch manager in Ypsilanti, Mich., uses smart phone apps to bank and check the status of his tax refund. William Archie Detroit Free Press

B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATMI Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbdnChile AbingtnBcp AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh Accenture Accuray Accuride n AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom Adecaog n AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvPhot AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish rs AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlnylamP AlonUSA AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGlbDD AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Apricus rs AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Augusta g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg

5.44 -.17 0.48 23.59 -.05 1.30 64.29 -.55 12.25 -.09 1.20 57.57 -.39 52.93 -.72 1.80 37.69 -.72 0.20 15.75 -.13 1.12 35.00 -.04 7.22 -.03 6.56 -.46 21.08 -.08 0.54 42.90 -.51 1.72 28.03 -.17 17.85 -.19 17.73 -.39 8.72 -.14 1.92 -.04 0.22 15.66 -.33 8.36 -.36 0.05 23.18 +.10 2.06 -.13 1.92 46.47 -.50 0.70 55.01 -1.39 0.42 6.67 -.01 2.97 19.04 -.67 0.24 12.74 -.21 27.23 -.83 5.46 +.14 22.53 -1.38 1.53 -.04 0.90 51.26 -1.11 9.86 -.09 14.45 -.43 69.04 -.60 20.80 -.06 2.20 -.19 0.17 10.79 -.17 0.04 27.53 -1.14 0.52 55.90 -.75 16.67 -.48 12.25 -.19 33.38 -.36 0.36 43.70 -.86 0.25 5.41 -.36 0.24 60.70 -.73 3.73 -.03 15.51 -.13 8.55 -.30 2.34 -.07 0.06 5.73 -.05 7.67 +.05 24.75 +.34 27.75 -.36 0.04 8.63 +.09 7.42 -.02 14.00 -.26 25.31 -.73 1.79 +.10 0.60 37.05 -.22 104.30 -2.92 4.71 -.24 2.28 -.06 40.45 -2.04 0.64 71.50 +2.22 0.11 91.13 +.66 1.96 90.89 -.94 0.40 11.63 -.72 1.16 61.77 -1.02 7.32 -.02 0.18 39.80 -1.19 39.99 -.23 .53 5.20 -.31 57.33 -2.67 0.86 9.58 -.15 0.66 56.73 -.40 0.34 37.14 +.02 4.67 -.08 0.12 16.44 -.10 3.95 165.39 +.12 36.93 -.21 1.26 41.62 -.54 1.80 78.07 -1.09 8.04 -.23 92.35 -1.08 19.31 -.55 13.99 -.10 0.60 25.12 -.06 0.72 63.52 -1.74 0.75 39.97 -1.70 0.20 73.40 -.41 76.49 -.13 3.54 -.03 0.48 7.69 -.02 1.31 21.71 -.54 1.70 38.47 -.28 0.80 70.49 -1.01 3.21 -.59 29.28 +.17 6.55 -.27 3.20 -.07 20.32 +.07 0.84 31.50 -.24 11.36 +.19 0.16 10.77 +.31 53.32 +.73 2.67 -.16 0.72 7.58 -.34 0.66 5.98 -.10 0.25 16.31 0.24 39.89 -.34 0.48 20.97 -.51 1.52 24.71 -.03 0.99 26.39 -.54 8.07 -.40 176.68 -3.74 28.68 -.29 35.02 -2.07 1.54 27.15 -.52 56.86 -.25 0.52 55.34 -.76 1.06 -.06 13.13 -.29 1.35 32.08 -.30 5.60 29.08 -.02 9.11 +.04 0.44 15.18 -.20 1.84 35.38 -.23 0.10 13.25 -.18 0.72 43.44 -.85 0.65 33.97 -.16 0.56 21.01 -.50 13.04 -.37 40.00 -.07 21.68 -.26 2.26 -.02 8.05 -1.06 26.35 -.59 51.85 -1.13 0.88 27.40 -.08 0.72 63.31 +.18 0.40 36.84 -.56 0.42 16.61 -.32 0.24 41.39 -.30 51.07 -.81 7.21 -.03 0.06 56.44 -.13 22.11 -.69 15.17 -.56 0.36 79.67 +1.82 5.25 -.35 0.88 39.21 -.85 33.70 -.82 0.20 48.58 +.70 0.49 55.30 +.79 3.25 68.99 -1.18 23.55 -1.06 2.65 17.58 +.02 53.32 -.70 1.55 -.05 0.88 7.03 0.60 51.97 -.27 9.03 -.09 0.60 120.93 +3.86 0.48 24.10 -.14 44.56 -1.17 1.12 11.79 -.08 342.62 +4.01 0.68 31.80 -.66 0.28 15.64 -.02 9.98 -.43 5.22 +.23 0.62 22.75 -.49 .17 +.00 0.75 35.48 -.05 87.49 -.31 0.40 32.73 +.53 0.64 35.87 -1.11 1.60 1.40 17.06 -.22 5.80 +.02 29.39 -.92 0.09 27.47 -.41 1.44 7.14 -.08 13.74 43.19 -.74 12.99 -.22 39.07 -1.46 0.24 15.45 -.14 29.34 -.18 17.52 -.68 18.42 -.99 30.64 -.33 9.75 -.17 0.60 56.67 -1.89 18.83 -.75 0.60 29.20 -.11 15.18 -.33 0.04 14.39 -.22 0.68 16.00 0.64 40.40 -.47 0.18 15.32 -.17 0.52 14.11 -.04 2.41 48.23 -.15 44.78 -1.17 44.68 +.01 66.98 -2.38 0.28 14.80 -.10 1.48 28.05 +.36 14.27 -.60 1.36 33.37 -.36 44.73 +.82 6.46 -.19 4.81 -.34 7.29 +.02 3.47 -.26 32.23 -1.27 39.59 -2.51 1.72 71.34 -1.61 1.44 48.85 -.26 250.64 -1.95 21.63 -.06 0.07 31.34 -1.26 7.03 -.19 3.57 114.71 -.42 3.60 -.05 1.00 39.23 -.74 5.85 -.24 15.27 -.54

Nm Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods B2B Inet BB&T Cp BBVABFrn BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu BallCp wi BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfI BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h BankUtd n BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BrcIndiaTR BiPGrain BarcB prC Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo rs BioSante BioScrip BioTime BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCrAll4 BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BluDolp rs Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Bsquare BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CSG Sys CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotMic CabotO&G Cadence CalDive CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CaliperLSc Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapOne CapitlSrce CapFdF rs Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer Cardero g CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl

D 1.10 22.06 -.21 34.03 -1.39 0.92 27.94 -.19 2.56 -.22 0.92 36.00 -.45 0.84 13.98 -.17 1.14 0.60 27.69 -.04 0.68 10.78 -.53 1.97 35.89 -.10 34.13 -.98 0.56 9.03 +.24 1.74 92.36 +.25 1.74 76.75 -.04 48.06 -.88 48.04 -.97 0.42 47.58 +.55 8.80 113.96 -.05 6.04 -.01 1.50 45.59 +.01 0.18 17.55 -.37 32.61 +.10 115.90 -4.38 0.60 70.53 +1.65 0.28 35.89 +.07 1.98 -.03 38.03 -.51 1.34 55.11 +.69 0.55 12.07 0.82 18.92 +.17 0.78 12.03 -.01 0.45 11.89 0.44 15.50 -.19 0.04 14.17 -.01 1.66 23.07 -.07 2.68 +.01 1.80 47.20 -.25 1.04 2.17 -.07 2.80 61.18 -.31 0.36 30.39 -.52 1.96 59.13 -1.06 1.06 -.05 28.81 -.62 0.04 2.29 -.03 49.53 +.77 26.26 +.91 57.45 +.02 65.67 -.41 53.49 +1.31 1.94 25.80 +.03 0.35 20.63 +.13 34.01 +1.46 58.44 +1.09 0.72 96.00 -.98 14.70 -1.24 0.32 20.70 +.12 0.48 52.53 +1.01 18.69 +.07 1.24 51.72 -.58 .28 -.01 20.34 -.06 4.62 -.18 0.10 5.80 -.11 0.76 82.93 -.07 1.64 79.09 -.59 47.75 -1.23 0.20 35.06 -2.08 7.61 -.25 0.96 32.53 -.25 18.23 -.87 0.28 29.78 -.30 82.86 -.31 0.30 49.97 +1.63 0.60 32.72 -.41 40.08 -.93 38.76 +.46 3.95 -.06 2.01 +.04 .93 -.02 66.76 -.33 3.02 -.16 24.51 -1.48 0.68 17.31 -.38 .78 -.03 1.96 -.06 4.31 -.22 6.53 -.42 1.28 11.76 -.15 33.97 -1.34 4.00 195.13 -3.28 1.42 17.60 +.49 0.83 12.01 +.06 0.32 4.01 +.02 1.36 10.32 -.17 0.40 16.97 -.16 0.60 14.18 +.03 27.14 +.64 6.76 +3.02 1.68 70.23 -.70 0.40 8.79 -.37 1.44 -.33 75.97 -1.79 0.04 7.19 -.01 2.00 93.00 -1.00 7.04 -.24 10.37 -.51 0.72 34.95 -.74 0.60 11.92 -.11 0.02 23.39 +.20 1.65 22.07 +.23 18.84 -.55 0.44 19.70 -.36 33.86 +1.70 11.96 -.40 1.57 -.04 0.56 22.95 -.16 0.40 29.61 -.65 1.32 25.22 -.16 0.36 40.12 -.46 0.60 22.65 -.24 35.59 -3.12 1.55 -.22 6.14 -.18 23.45 -.41 0.52 32.21 +.28 1.24 22.60 -.51 0.56 17.00 -.18 0.34 10.40 -.20 12.27 -.29 0.32 25.80 -.42 0.28 14.59 -.41 18.41 -.24 0.05 22.28 -.95 11.54 -.29 0.20 24.46 -1.30 0.80 37.33 -1.54 0.10 90.96 -.08 0.46 46.17 +.77 52.25 -.92 0.92 70.59 -1.69 0.16 24.38 -.17 24.36 -.23 0.80 17.75 -.61 0.40 26.39 +.42 0.20 21.76 -.22 21.72 -1.29 0.40 134.44 +2.44 19.64 -.02 1.16 70.70 -1.01 0.04 41.89 -.31 43.35 +.66 1.00 31.24 -.40 4.60 301.40 +1.32 0.84 19.35 -.03 47.03 -2.17 6.88 +.52 18.95 -.56 1.04 71.54 -1.39 0.52 20.60 -.53 0.34 8.34 -.14 19.09 -.35 0.50 32.24 -.46 26.55 -.83 0.50 36.26 -.52 0.72 41.81 -1.83 48.35 -.02 0.12 44.78 +4.95 9.68 -.08 6.50 +.06 0.60 8.57 0.63 9.52 -.08 13.59 -.20 6.57 -.22 19.10 +.66 0.04 7.56 -.24 7.80 +.15 14.80 +.10 1.79 -.03 1.80 56.69 +.41 0.40 40.34 +.01 18.99 -1.53 58.36 +.66 1.16 33.87 +.45 3.48 80.64 -1.06 1.30 70.21 -1.29 0.30 48.71 +.52 1.08 65.75 -1.31 15.28 +.21 .38 +.04 47.80 -.15 0.20 50.34 -.39 0.04 7.58 -.10 0.30 12.14 -.03 0.26 5.18 -.21 1.51 12.76 -.03 1.35 -.09 0.80 115.85 -2.54 1.88 +.12 0.78 40.47 -.58 .38 -.00 18.59 -.25 27.09 -.29 22.77 -1.03 0.68 42.16 -.75 34.59 -1.10 1.00 42.04 -.05 0.72 40.31 -1.81 37.09 +.40 28.35 -.49 1.76 100.02 -1.99 0.04 17.65 -.37 40.91 -1.21 .67 -.02 0.20 40.61 -.65 6.22 -.09 11.36 +.07 52.71 -.18 .29 -.00 3.59 30.35 -.57 3.85 +.08 0.43 9.05 -.01 1.19 16.36 -.21 0.80 37.98 +.38 0.79 15.54 -.24 0.03 17.47 -.02 1.56 14.05 +.04 22.17 -.27 19.22 +1.26 0.01 21.42 +.22 8.83 -.17 15.90 -.22

Nm CntryLink Cephln Cepheid Ceradyne CeragonN Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChathLT n ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng ChesMid n Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaAgri ChinaAuto ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChinaDir ChiGengM ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinNEPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita ChoiceHtls Chubb ChungTel n ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp Citigp wtA Citigp wtB CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CocaCola CocaCE Coeur Cognex CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd CompssMn CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold Copart Copel Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane Cray Inc Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CrimsnExp Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec Cytokinet DCT Indl DDi Corp DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBr DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s

D 2.90 40.05 -.65 55.62 -1.37 25.34 +.63 34.20 -.51 11.67 -.41 96.44 -1.68 3.21 -.12 35.91 -.42 3.24 -.08 37.94 -1.39 0.70 17.06 -.25 48.88 -.82 21.17 -1.72 27.86 -.45 4.07 -.16 16.46 -.42 9.34 +.40 0.30 34.33 +2.32 1.35 25.96 -.65 2.88 102.27 +1.95 32.98 -.65 0.16 13.15 +1.09 45.42 -1.40 0.69 4.19 +.01 7.81 +.11 11.01 -.37 11.65 -.47 6.98 -.09 1.47 -.03 2.80 -.05 5.86 -.11 1.54 55.99 -.36 14.25 +.14 1.85 46.38 -.02 5.08 -.22 1.62 -.05 4.62 -.05 5.89 +.07 0.23 15.99 -.17 6.50 +.05 0.25 25.60 -1.15 244.19 -7.71 16.12 -.04 0.74 38.40 -1.32 1.48 60.39 -.09 29.21 -.23 1.36 73.78 +.08 4.34 -.04 25.56 -.59 0.32 114.09 +1.60 2.54 -.03 1.60 33.59 -.31 0.84 18.66 -.26 0.49 27.56 -.60 22.22 -1.12 18.40 -.19 2.13 26.60 4.70 +.01 .98 .24 -.01 .77 -.03 67.44 -1.96 0.80 59.32 -.90 13.77 +.60 1.40 21.46 -.11 4.90 -.39 0.56 92.00 -.73 30.95 -.26 2.20 67.43 -.53 21.07 -.68 0.60 54.18 -2.18 1.88 63.91 +.15 0.48 26.72 -.23 27.26 +.87 0.32 27.56 -1.26 73.91 -1.64 0.72 9.47 -.05 44.76 -.26 2.94 -.05 2.12 78.37 -.23 22.23 -.60 0.60 18.82 -.08 2.97 -.09 0.45 24.88 -.25 0.45 23.49 -.22 0.40 37.60 -.20 0.48 16.38 -.52 15.75 -1.36 2.00 27.69 -.48 37.96 +.46 34.02 -.90 0.36 36.72 -.08 1.36 15.53 -.83 1.80 91.08 -1.34 27.16 +.03 0.80 47.35 -.10 11.01 -.05 27.75 -.28 26.84 +1.75 1.00 26.65 -.87 0.40 30.96 -.68 0.92 22.73 +.19 14.15 -.71 108.20 +1.28 49.69 -1.86 2.34 -.18 2.64 78.57 +1.96 0.40 48.61 +3.12 2.40 49.21 +.32 28.16 -1.73 20.40 +.26 0.96 30.66 -.43 67.29 +2.12 13.83 -.33 .35 -.00 0.06 59.09 -1.76 1.16 63.20 -1.10 0.42 22.53 -.83 1.09 51.96 -.86 40.15 -.40 0.36 25.43 +.06 3.74 -.20 1.00 100.26 -.76 20.06 -.33 5.08 -.12 0.56 46.89 -2.00 0.20 22.38 -.22 1.65 34.52 -.34 24.42 -.24 13.19 +.37 0.82 72.84 -1.05 8.30 -.08 0.18 8.19 -.07 55.98 -1.50 1.50 16.57 -.14 29.74 0.80 50.38 -.17 4.32 +.02 0.88 49.19 -.69 0.92 45.71 -1.43 7.14 -.28 1.70 97.17 -1.28 50.76 +4.10 1.85 46.58 +.40 0.32 3.07 -.01 51.45 -1.02 4.20 +.22 17.15 -.46 2.20 +.13 41.85 -1.02 37.50 +.13 .17 -.02 37.31 -.99 21.41 -.29 1.80 58.67 -.84 1.05 100.69 -2.39 2.83 +.02 0.01 136.91 +.93 1.38 49.20 -1.50 20.71 -.39 2.40 12.13 -.14 .88 -.03 0.50 55.54 -.96 1.47 +.03 0.28 5.36 -.08 0.40 9.92 +.13 31.13 -1.19 0.40 4.74 -.10 0.78 9.61 -.16 1.33 25.72 -.35 0.15 11.88 -.19 39.32 -.67 2.24 46.56 +.11 0.10 11.07 -.81 17.80 +.11 0.08 49.59 -.88 12.31 -.46 1.28 47.22 -1.29 13.91 -.08 7.10 -.57 77.61 -.70 0.24 53.33 -1.17 10.18 +.04 87.20 -1.80 1.40 88.26 -2.74 .33 +.02 0.36 18.92 +.02 6.69 -.32 15.11 -.04 11.02 +.28 .77 +.04 1.00 24.53 -1.00 23.56 +.75 32.86 +.29 3.71 -.01 3.86 -.01 0.20 36.12 -.16 8.19 -.14 0.93 63.02 +.18 14.67 +.55 15.17 -.19 41.68 +.72 7.97 -.17 0.16 13.68 -.15 0.64 89.67 +2.21 6.20 -.21 14.17 -.18 2.46 76.58 -.53 0.50 76.03 +1.49 11.50 -.17 12.07 +.11 13.79 -.67 36.19 -.90 1.12 33.50 -1.21 2.72 56.09 -.80 33.57 -1.31 0.16 41.58 +1.13 27.84 -.84 45.03 +.80 0.51 50.19 -2.07 0.19 33.90 -.05 20.95 +.80 14.18 +.67 15.63 +.40 14.80 -.87 0.71 11.71 +.62 0.01 61.51 -3.49 23.45 -.08 8.16 +.15 30.94 -.51

Nm

D

Dir30TrBear DrMCBll3x s DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHill h DblEgl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DresserR drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuncanEn DuoyGWat Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

4.12 0.39 0.11 1.55 0.41 0.08

0.40 0.24

1.97 1.00 0.52 1.04

0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.44 1.82

Nm 46.08 -.60 52.30 -1.91 63.42 -1.79 75.85 -4.11 7.67 +.15 80.11 -1.57 85.29 +4.50 21.00 -.10 42.28 -.62 37.91 -.43 2.04 -.01 22.93 +.14 42.13 -.52 33.97 +.35 12.28 -1.02 51.13 -.24 14.40 -.18 27.97 -.51 52.57 -.37 48.58 -3.59 44.64 +.35 16.49 -.52 85.16 -1.03 55.03 -1.97 18.21 -.49 1.23 -.01 3.10 -.17 11.59 +1.64 18.13 -.28 63.50 -1.99 36.02 -1.14 35.55 -.25 28.03 +.04 46.59 -.06 1.97 4.85 +.06 53.71 -.67 23.51 -.20 17.90 -.08 13.27 -.14 81.17 -1.98 40.40 +7.84 9.03 -.32 15.67 -.40 2.95 -.01 5.70 -.19

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House ETrade rs eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETF Pall EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc EchelonC EchoStar Ecolab Ecopetrol eDiets.cm h EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts Embraer Emcore lf EMS EmersonEl Emulex Enbridge EnCana g EncoreEn EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EntGaming EntreeGold EntropCom EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FBR Cap FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FactsetR FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedMogul FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FieldPnt FifthStFin FifthThird Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcPR rs FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTDJInet FT ConDis FT Matls FT Tech FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstB rs FlamelT Flextrn Flotek h FlowInt FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA Fonar FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfcld ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredsInc FMCG s FresKabi rt FDelMnt FreshMkt n Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell

23.64 -.97 0.25 12.49 -.57 16.65 -.27 32.85 -.80 26.33 -.25 30.29 -.65 2.51 46.93 +.25 0.64 114.39 +6.07 0.88 48.36 +1.21 77.10 -2.85 4.09 +.01 0.40 30.44 -.25 0.20 8.19 -.07 0.04 22.39 -.36 1.88 89.61 -.90 3.57 -.04 2.72 105.52 -1.90 0.72 31.24 -1.70 1.39 15.84 -.22 1.28 12.83 -.09 1.29 17.39 -.05 1.16 10.87 -.12 1.14 10.33 -.07 1.56 12.21 +.01 24.13 +.53 8.63 +.34 31.47 -.69 0.70 47.99 -.16 0.97 41.68 +1.95 .59 -.10 1.28 36.04 -.43 0.20 7.99 -.03 85.14 -2.06 2.46 -.09 0.04 17.61 +.13 1.76 37.05 -.02 6.29 -.20 0.10 17.18 +.35 18.86 -.01 0.64 33.02 -1.11 2.40 +.12 63.10 +.01 1.38 59.46 -.97 10.87 -.27 1.96 57.84 +.06 0.80 32.01 +1.14 2.00 22.02 -.43 7.20 +.03 33.98 -.35 6.08 +.58 1.20 46.99 -.63 3.56 -.07 18.76 +.06 0.54 59.92 -.02 67.01 -1.39 3.90 -.01 3.58 53.47 +.17 33.46 +.85 6.42 -.09 2.16 32.39 +1.01 0.61 19.16 -.43 34.52 -1.46 38.83 -1.27 1.40 53.07 +1.22 8.30 -.46 3.32 71.09 -.37 2.36 42.97 -.73 .35 -.01 3.11 +.03 9.21 -.04 9.99 -.19 0.64 34.73 -.84 86.44 -1.96 0.88 18.77 -.24 1.47 53.32 -.63 0.35 12.19 -.01 4.16 117.50 -.22 0.75 90.40 -.46 33.37 +.46 1.92 86.96 -.91 3.53 -.26 2.09 -.08 4.97 -.21 5.04 +.03 0.16 20.42 +.13 11.52 +.97 2.10 41.34 -.43 11.46 -.49 0.28 20.32 -.04 0.40 48.41 -.63 17.67 -.18 53.71 -.88 23.15 -.02 0.40 18.63 -.39 3.65 -.10 1.76 87.07 +1.63 28.86 +.09 27.39 -.46 111.99 -3.12 3.70 -.09 31.71 -.65 0.24 31.47 -.25 0.60 75.83 -1.70 91.16 +.76 0.48 10.22 -.08 3.73 -.22 35.73 -.52 9.93 +.29 0.92 101.75 -3.53 17.46 -.71 0.72 50.32 -.73 1.00 60.96 -1.22 0.48 89.25 -4.04 19.88 +.21 2.68 81.67 +.16 0.24 6.25 -.30 0.96 26.83 -.51 7.24 -.27 15.14 -.37 14.25 -.25 0.48 13.67 -.34 0.20 30.91 -.55 4.50 +.47 1.28 13.47 -.12 0.04 14.45 -.05 38.83 -.38 0.20 16.82 -.38 0.24 15.61 -.37 4.46 -.27 0.12 6.52 -.01 0.04 11.29 -.12 11.22 -.06 15.35 +.75 0.04 11.97 -.07 0.64 14.56 -.22 163.02 -1.08 0.04 34.98 -.60 0.09 20.20 -.40 0.38 24.33 -.35 0.01 24.12 -.62 0.05 21.80 +.70 2.20 38.07 -.14 0.64 16.96 -.08 61.71 -.97 6.76 +.13 1.68 -.05 6.50 -.01 7.95 -.16 6.13 -.28 3.95 -.03 0.80 26.47 +.29 1.28 122.66 -3.06 0.50 68.39 -2.18 25.37 -.16 0.64 54.44 -.97 2.05 -.04 0.66 18.93 -.12 5.08 -.19 14.86 -.37 6.39 -.27 3.25 50.87 +.02 18.65 -.03 32.00 -.90 35.05 +.27 8.55 -.19 39.88 +.27 6.30 -.02 0.76 60.74 -.80 74.71 -2.86 34.77 -1.49 1.77 22.18 -.02 1.00 123.55 -1.42 0.16 13.56 -.26 1.00 51.01 +.63 .03 -.06 0.20 27.36 +.15 41.95 -2.94 14.49 +.04 0.75 8.52 -.68 0.24 26.60 -.37 2.00 26.66 +.89 28.01 +.01 1.63 -.07

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FuweiFlm GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GSI Tech GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenOn En Genoptix Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoPetro GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GloblInd GlobPay GlbShipLs GlbXSilvM GlbXCopM GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenbCos Greenhill Griffon Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugFront Gug BRIC GugSolar GulfMrkA GulfportE HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HMS Hld HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HampRB h HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg Healthwys HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HiSoft n Hoku Corp HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon

D 0.12 10.45 -.32 4.61 -.05 4.33 -.17 4.81 -1.45 1.16 34.45 -1.36 0.20 5.09 -.19 4.66 +.21 20.49 -.56 8.94 -.33 10.61 -.25 0.52 6.07 -.23 1.68 18.82 +.06 0.14 12.56 +.05 1.32 30.68 -.59 19.68 9.08 -.21 0.16 16.23 -.32 0.40 22.33 -.37 0.20 70.99 -1.73 1.50 32.36 +.22 37.29 -.76 .52 +.04 4.74 +.18 34.82 -.68 61.60 -.90 11.52 -.05 5.12 -.06 42.70 -.49 1.68 75.45 -.77 0.56 20.37 -.45 15.38 -.14 0.04 2.54 -.14 1.12 37.20 +.44 5.11 34.59 -1.18 2.38 51.80 -1.25 3.81 -.12 24.96 0.18 13.77 -.23 0.48 30.79 -.98 26.94 -.11 1.80 51.83 -.75 .44 -.01 13.10 -.22 75.35 +.01 24.67 -.10 .50 +.08 29.17 +.10 0.32 13.76 -.15 4.81 -.07 0.18 7.73 +.28 0.30 30.44 -.39 38.02 -.49 0.52 14.85 +.09 0.36 11.21 -.07 2.04 38.22 +.15 1.81 -.01 0.40 8.82 -.28 7.86 -.03 0.08 47.15 -1.48 7.43 +.35 0.25 25.94 +.43 0.10 18.42 -.20 0.15 21.63 -.08 4.23 +.08 0.40 13.03 -.60 0.16 17.64 +.35 0.36 46.18 +.97 3.92 -.04 1.40 163.09 +.15 1.16 86.18 -1.39 19.80 +.04 13.67 -.24 611.32 +1.11 37.30 -.24 0.84 39.90 -.94 22.43 -.87 17.05 +.53 2.16 130.53 -2.48 4.83 +.18 8.83 +.05 15.09 -1.85 0.52 27.21 -.64 4.98 -.02 2.67 -.03 0.07 7.68 -.11 3.47 +.28 0.83 19.59 -.11 40.57 -.53 23.74 -1.26 1.80 71.00 +.03 11.94 -.31 0.44 41.41 -.61 1.14 -.03 14.01 -.83 23.56 -.43 0.80 45.79 -1.27 0.13 21.59 -.07 0.86 44.88 +.19 0.03 8.47 -.18 41.25 -.37 28.64 +.42 0.58 30.99 -.47 1.92 36.79 +.04 0.81 148.36 +.37 73.39 -3.22 1.70 56.46 +.42 30.25 -.24 29.78 -.88 0.36 47.34 +.74 6.60 -.22 .86 +.07 0.96 33.88 -.17 24.88 -.12 1.30 2.14 +.05 55.86 +.17 8.67 -.16 0.40 40.79 -.17 0.10 46.87 -1.90 9.08 -.20 0.07 11.54 +.18 1.00 46.00 -1.47 0.82 33.81 -.88 0.40 29.22 -.26 12.97 +.35 1.20 44.10 -.92 4.40 28.92 -.07 1.24 24.00 -.30 6.60 -.40 4.95 -.12 2.76 49.76 -.38 9.23 +.03 1.20 21.97 -.13 29.76 -.73 22.38 -.19 36.75 -1.25 13.38 -.19 0.08 16.51 -.50 5.35 +.04 10.55 +.15 1.80 48.94 +1.23 13.73 -.09 0.24 63.03 +1.28 .47 -.01 67.16 +.24 1.00 76.90 +7.05 4.32 +.04 0.20 6.50 +.02 1.38 50.48 -.59 14.90 -.26 0.40 84.95 +4.19 0.32 43.59 -4.64 18.76 -.45 14.96 -1.34 29.99 -.92 1.70 33.62 -.22 0.41 37.12 -.73 25.77 -5.63 1.85 -.20 0.60 55.31 -.26 14.47 -.38 19.78 -.37 1.00 37.30 -.79 32.95 +.40 2.48 56.33 -.01 28.01 +.08 42.68 -.11 1.33 55.64 -.59 0.20 5.26 -.23 0.51 26.75 -.59 24.86 +.43 14.34 -.31 52.77 -.41 1.80 23.06 -.78 0.04 18.05 -.16 0.28 5.37 -.09 4.04 -.06 1.52 64.70 -1.40 0.60 11.20 -.02 25.01 -.14 62.92 -1.03 0.52 40.17 -1.04 0.04 6.83 -.03 0.40 16.82 -.37 28.91 +.10

Nm HutchT Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 3.11 44.74 9.68 5.36

-.15 -1.09 -.27 +.04

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IdexxLabs IDT Corp IESI-BFC g iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iPass iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSSPGth iSSPGlbEn iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOE iShDJOG iShEur350 iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed IconixBr Idacorp IDEX iGo Inc Ikanos ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Incyte IndBkMI rs IndiaGC IndoTel IndSvAm s Inergy Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm InsightEnt InsitTc Insmed h InspPhar Insulet IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InterOil g Intphse Interpublic Intersil IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvBncp IridiumCm IronMtn Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew j2Global JA Solar JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp

31.12 -.04 0.08 20.91 -.12 0.53 43.97 -.58 76.25 -1.25 0.88 23.90 -1.28 0.50 23.55 -.50 0.26 18.02 -.27 0.54 7.91 -.11 1.20 11.00 12.53 +.20 0.30 6.04 +.05 12.52 +.29 49.92 +.12 0.07 1.42 13.78 +.13 36.15 +.89 0.82 25.42 +.10 2.53 73.20 +.64 0.50 32.65 +.05 0.95 37.63 +.03 0.29 25.46 -.22 0.45 18.25 +.03 0.33 18.02 +.16 0.14 11.30 +.02 0.44 57.80 -.29 0.34 14.15 0.54 59.72 -.58 0.43 12.92 +.02 1.56 46.10 +.16 1.82 66.78 +.28 2.15 41.06 +.29 0.55 30.60 -.19 0.29 14.47 -.05 0.43 17.98 -.03 0.54 67.15 -1.25 1.28 59.66 -1.41 32.71 +.45 1.08 59.09 -.27 1.70 50.57 -.41 2.51 107.69 +.39 0.97 59.46 -.11 0.63 41.24 +.04 1.06 90.18 -1.88 2.36 131.52 -.83 3.93 105.15 +.08 0.64 44.87 +.04 5.23 108.30 -.13 1.16 67.57 -.50 0.72 43.45 +.68 0.58 45.68 +.76 1.18 51.38 +.30 1.24 62.90 -.25 3.85 91.16 +.33 3.29 92.87 -.23 0.84 83.83 -.02 1.42 60.23 +.08 0.86 46.69 -.40 0.57 58.72 -.87 1.48 105.47 -1.19 0.97 94.47 -1.39 7.77 91.69 +.09 0.51 92.80 -.78 1.90 69.20 -.45 1.29 67.58 -.28 0.57 104.55 -1.64 0.73 59.71 -.48 1.13 72.78 -.51 1.16 72.45 -1.05 2.96 104.60 -.01 0.58 89.33 -1.70 0.89 79.81 -1.40 2.89 39.31 -.02 1.20 77.94 -.61 0.70 22.69 -.40 1.97 58.62 -.47 0.07 13.20 -.21 0.59 59.54 -.38 0.49 44.70 +.85 0.74 69.51 -1.47 0.87 77.68 -.25 0.27 64.21 +.48 0.18 70.93 +1.71 0.98 41.31 -.04 8.94 +.55 1.00 57.32 -.92 71.80 -2.02 21.37 -.40 1.20 37.28 -.69 0.60 39.82 -1.07 3.66 -.17 1.22 +.01 1.36 53.02 -.32 67.12 -3.69 27.78 +.33 19.18 -.69 8.72 -.20 3.33 +.06 22.22 -.59 0.44 51.18 +1.00 13.46 -.27 3.95 +.09 .59 -.04 1.26 33.43 -.07 10.75 -2.11 2.82 40.53 -.49 7.69 -.17 45.38 -1.96 0.90 66.52 -.88 0.28 44.84 -1.27 19.66 -.30 0.57 9.09 -.12 1.16 -.06 17.62 +.08 24.89 -.69 .53 -.03 4.07 17.72 -.28 7.61 -.08 9.59 -.30 2.72 48.63 -.82 0.72 21.15 -.66 122.73 +.44 0.40 53.14 -2.68 0.08 16.16 -.55 10.68 -.39 36.03 +.29 6.56 -.40 2.60 160.18 -1.77 9.20 +.11 1.08 55.92 -.32 0.24 16.26 -.12 0.75 27.24 -.26 31.02 -.84 75.81 +2.28 5.55 +.15 11.52 -.38 0.48 12.28 -.30 25.54 -.35 35.69 -.83 52.00 -.84 327.14 -3.97 0.44 25.72 -.42 3.49 22.84 +.07 0.29 5.03 -.02 18.71 -.42 13.14 -.31 8.78 -.11 0.75 25.98 -.40 8.89 -.12 7.14 -.08 0.65 22.21 +.27 55.80 +.21 3.36 1.48 26.32 -.01 16.92 -.92 43.34 -.02 29.05 -.62 7.59 -.07 23.56 -.97 0.20 45.96 -.05 1.78 37.91 -.18 0.28 19.80 -1.26 0.42 31.14 -.46 23.31 -.06 1.13 -.05 48.47 -.62 5.30 +.02 2.30 -.06 21.07 +.13 0.04 13.15 -.46 0.33 33.16 -1.60 23.65 +.14 0.30 23.60 -.49 5.70 -.08 27.54 -.84 60.62 -.01 1.08 -.07 2.16 60.39 -.26 0.64 39.94 -1.70 0.20 13.27 -.15

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K Swiss KB Home KBR Inc KBW Inc KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KandiTech KC Southn KapStone Kellogg Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindredHlt KineticC KingldJ rs Kinross g KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Engy L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LECG LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeCroy LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStarzA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEl LincNat Lindsay LinearTch Linktone LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 1.31 -.04 45.49 -1.90 0.70 93.04 -3.48 41.44 -1.01 9.25 +.01 0.25 13.32 -.27 0.20 32.06 -1.45 0.20 25.26 -.39 0.23 16.37 +.19 0.60 9.58 -.15 1.00 47.11 -.46 20.09 +.40 7.45 -.94 3.48 -.22 52.62 -.75 15.75 -.61 1.62 53.46 +.27 12.90 -.66 0.48 37.79 -1.22 3.82 -.06 14.23 -.03 0.04 9.19 -.02 2.80 65.21 +.15 0.72 18.53 -.08 4.52 71.90 -.26 30.42 -.30 24.60 -.59 46.64 -1.17 2.75 -.09 0.10 15.88 +.34 53.36 -.85 13.82 -.43 0.24 18.23 -.23 0.24 19.54 -.41 6.85 +.45 52.02 -.21 4.12 12.60 +.11 1.16 31.68 +.21 31.98 -.31 6.27 -.13 0.42 23.11 -.09 9.18 -.35 7.16 -.33 11.90 -.02 1.80 79.45 +.17 0.62 25.87 -1.22 13.76 -.03 .66 -.01 16.04 -.14 3.83 -.24 24.95 -.74 6.24 -.28 8.82 -.38 10.02 -.83 88.66 +1.02 4.21 -.03 52.17 -1.94 36.48 -3.10 0.20 43.30 -.82 45.35 -.45 0.44 27.00 -.81 6.14 -.10 9.90 -.29 0.50 42.94 -.86 13.57 -1.03 12.22 -.94 4.23 +.06 1.00 104.83 -5.11 0.24 35.50 -.50 1.08 22.37 -.64 0.40 32.49 -.98 0.16 19.81 -.14 0.60 49.14 -.99 0.25 31.66 -.37 1.36 -.03 1.80 -.01 0.46 9.14 -.09 37.57 -.01 0.32 5.09 40.94 -.17 38.83 -.30 16.54 -.30 67.58 -1.39 69.83 -.26 1.90 33.38 -.46 52.55 -1.35 38.48 -2.29 36.11 +.23 1.96 34.04 -.39 7.36 -.20 0.80 31.77 -.76 0.80 28.94 -.38 1.24 69.26 -2.74 0.20 30.64 -.16 0.34 68.52 -1.76 0.96 33.91 -.90 1.45 2.64 38.77 -.21 3.58 -.09 5.88 -.13 0.20 14.37 -.42 10.39 -.37 9.72 -.37 4.86 -.26 4.22 4.02 +.01 3.00 80.14 -.04 0.25 42.88 +.01 18.55 -.42 36.50 -.42 30.34 -.90 2.25 -.05 5.20 79.96 +.84 9.81 -.41 0.44 25.73 -.26 1.44 107.24 -2.11 2.07 +.18 0.50 74.60 +.26 77.27 -1.85 24.44 -2.90 36.64 +.80

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MadCatz g MagelPt MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes Majesco MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MktV Steel MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVIndo s MktV Viet MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds

2.80 89.09 -.51 10.95 -.10 0.37 7.04 -.08 1.00 26.23 -.44 0.65 20.81 -.24 2.58 +.03 13.64 8.32 -.21 0.94 8.36 +.11 0.56 6.14 +.03 8.55 -.10 13.49 -.44 11.73 -.63 27.85 -.93 3.66 -.16 0.88 61.50 -1.33 35.96 -.43 2.00 47.75 -.78 1.80 33.29 -.20 23.96 -.33 0.20 23.21 -.25 1.63 -.05 2.73 +.07 7.01 -.74 6.19 -.09 0.72 55.73 -1.22 6.72 +.07 1.39 -.05 19.63 -.24 0.08 19.09 -.07 3.66 -.18 0.74 62.51 -3.11 0.52 18.13 -.17 1.00 49.18 +1.47 .70 -.00 0.40 59.61 +1.18 1.03 72.16 -.66 23.97 +.11 0.18 38.72 +.20 2.93 38.25 +.18 0.33 54.12 -.57 0.27 26.90 +.42 0.34 24.34 +.44 0.19 46.02 +.49 0.35 38.30 -.64 0.84 29.75 -.45 0.04 7.42 -.04 3.88 -.06 1.60 86.78 -1.61 17.97 -.26 0.30 12.72 -.34 2.75 29.88 -.18 0.24 62.64 +.76 15.97 -.30 0.60 244.12 -3.26 0.92 24.87 -.19 2.37 -.11 0.84 26.56 -.61 4.08 -.08 1.12 46.44 +.44 22.14 -.54 2.44 75.19 -.51

Nm McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith Meritage Metalico Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MexcoEn Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MdwGold g MillerHer MillerPet Millicom MincoG g Mind CTI MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolinaH MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys MonroMf s Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NIC Inc NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstr s NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Neoprobe NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NewConcEn NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource NielsenH n NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordson Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaMd rs NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OCZ Tech OGE Engy OReillyAu OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer Och-Ziff

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D

Oclaro rs 16.19 +.99 OcwenFn 10.70 -.25 OfficeDpt 5.47 -.02 OfficeMax 13.85 -.26 OilSvHT 2.40 161.67 +1.41 OilStates 71.61 -.82 Oilsands g .57 -.00 OldDomF s 30.44 -.81 OldNBcp 0.28 11.18 -.22 OldRepub 0.69 12.28 -.18 Olin 0.80 18.46 -.23 OmegaHlt 1.48 22.52 +.20 Omncre 0.13 25.91 -.54 Omnic pfB 2.00 42.35 +.10 Omnicom 1.00 48.14 -.57 OmniVisn 22.87 -2.61 Omnova 6.90 -.10 OnAssign 9.99 -.35 OnSmcnd 10.84 -.06 OnTrack 2.65 -.07 ONEOK 2.08 63.37 +.04 OnyxPh 34.43 -.97 OpenTxt 57.10 +.15 OpenTable 84.11 -2.09 OpnwvSy 2.15 -.08 OpkoHlth 4.41 -.01 OplinkC 26.10 -.27 Opnext 3.77 OptimerPh 11.73 -.17 optXprs 4.50 15.79 -.02 Oracle 0.20 32.18 -.35 OrbitalSci 17.42 -.64 Orbitz 3.69 Orexigen 3.15 -.08 OrientEH 12.45 -.46 OriginAg 8.89 -.98 OrmatTc 0.20 25.16 -2.79 OshkoshCp 35.75 -.72 OvShip 1.75 34.90 +.61 OwensM s 0.80 30.19 -.61 OwensCorn 35.86 -.69 OwensIll 30.00 -.11 PDL Bio 0.50 4.76 +.07 PF Chng 0.92 46.43 -1.07 PG&E Cp 1.82 45.48 +.27 PHH Corp 24.69 -.19 PMC Sra 7.79 -.14 PMI Grp 2.91 -.07 PNC 0.40 61.56 -.30 PNM Res 0.50 13.07 -.18 POSCO 1.43 103.12 +.63 PPG 2.20 86.55 -.51 PPL Corp 1.40 25.00 -.02 PSS Wrld 24.94 -.18 Paccar 0.48 49.84 -1.17 PacerIntl 5.09 -.21 PacEth h .72 -.01 PacSunwr 4.20 -.10 PackAmer 0.80 28.80 -.18 PaetecHld 3.96 +.09 PallCorp 0.70 52.66 -.96 PanASlv 0.10 38.18 +.08 PaneraBrd 115.65 -.45 ParagShip 0.20 3.07 +.01 ParamTch 22.76 -.86 ParaG&S 4.24 +.28 Parexel 22.10 -.74 ParkDrl 5.01 +.28 ParkerHan 1.28 87.23 -1.87 PartnerRe 2.20 78.07 -.65 PatriotCoal 22.92 +.16 Patterson 0.40 32.74 +.56 PattUTI 0.20 26.96 +.56 Paychex 1.24 32.49 -.44 PeabdyE 0.34 63.47 +.54 Pearson 0.55 16.67 +.03 Pengrth g 0.84 12.65 -.05 PnnNGm 34.55 -.27 PennVa 0.23 17.03 +.21 PennWst g 1.08 28.20 +.71 PennantPk 1.08 12.39 -.08 Penney 0.80 35.74 -.41 PenRE 0.60 14.01 -.68 PennyMac 1.68 18.25 -.03 Penske 20.12 -.50 Pentair 0.80 36.81 -.49 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.10 -.14 PepBoy 0.12 13.49 -.29 PepcoHold 1.08 18.75 -.13 PepsiCo 1.92 62.93 -.22 PeregrineP 2.17 -.10 PerfectWld 20.85 +.85 PerkElm 0.28 25.93 -.58 Prmian 1.37 22.21 +.45 Perrigo 0.28 73.17 -.98 PetChina 3.97 133.72 +.10 Petrohawk 20.57 +.79 PetrbrsA 1.20 35.00 +1.29 Petrobras 1.20 40.32 +2.02 PetroDev 46.45 -.38 PtroqstE 8.39 +.12 PetsMart 0.50 39.87 -.86 Pfizer 0.80 18.76 -.13 PhrmAth 3.07 -.12 PhmHTr 2.42 64.52 -.57 PharmPdt 0.60 27.27 -.39 Pharmacyc 4.99 -.07 Pharmerica 11.60 -.18 PhilipMor 2.56 61.98 +.44 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.50 -.12 PhlVH 0.15 58.86 -.40 PhnxCos 2.40 -.12 PhotrIn 8.29 -.29 PiedmOfc 1.26 19.50 -.01 Pier 1 9.11 -.44 PilgrimsP 7.72 -.11 PimCpOp 1.38 19.87 +.30 PimIncStr2 0.78 10.62 -.06 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.56 +.15 PinnclEnt 13.49 +.33 PinWst 2.10 41.65 +.26 PionDrill 11.14 -.03 PioNtrl 0.08 100.67 +1.95 PitnyBw 1.48 24.79 -.36 PlainsAA 3.83 63.77 -.02 PlainsEx 39.06 +.37 Plantron 0.20 34.06 -1.11 PlatGpMet 2.41 PlatUnd 0.32 42.08 -.90 Plexus 30.56 -1.44 PlugPwr h .75 -.02 PlumCrk 1.68 41.11 -.61 PluristemT 2.52 -.09 Polaris 1.80 73.30 -.51 Polo RL 0.80 122.10 -1.68 Polycom 45.50 -.43 PolyMet g 2.15 -.05 PolyOne 13.44 -.48 Polypore 49.53 -1.01 Poniard h .34 -.01 Pool Corp 0.52 24.80 -.43 Popular 3.19 +.01 PortGE 1.04 22.67 -.13 PostRock n 4.80 +.44 Potash 0.84 172.47 +2.34 Potlatch 2.04 37.00 -.77 Power-One 8.94 -.30 PSCrudeDS 50.21 -3.71 PwshDB 29.29 +.64 PS Agri 34.28 +.10 PS Oil 30.43 +1.03 PS BasMet 24.54 +.21 PS USDBull 22.23 -.13 PwSClnEn 10.61 -.20 PwSWtr 0.11 19.24 -.30 PSFinPf 1.27 17.87 +.02 PSETecLd 0.06 17.05 -.13 PShEMSov 1.56 26.01 -.03 PSIndia 0.24 21.95 -.19 PwShs QQQ 0.36 56.56 -.47 Powrwav 3.29 -.21 Praxair 2.00 97.00 -.84 PrecCastpt 0.12 141.57 -2.21 PrecDrill 11.35 +.22 PremGlbSv 5.83 -.44 PriceTR 1.24 66.25 -1.38 priceline 425.99 -7.79 PrideIntl 39.95 +.52 PrinFncl 0.55 33.14 -.41 PrivateB 0.04 14.53 -.54 ProShtDow 42.15 +.35 ProShtQQQ 33.23 +.26 ProShtS&P 41.98 +.25 PrUShS&P 21.78 +.25 ProUltDow 0.37 59.80 -1.05 PrUlShDow 18.72 +.30 ProUltMC 0.04 68.72 -2.00 PrUShMC 10.82 +.30 ProUltQQQ 87.41 -1.44 PrUShQQQ 10.65 +.16 ProUltSP 0.43 51.90 -.69 ProUShL20 38.67 -.31 ProShtEM 32.32 -.05 PrUShtSem 9.78 +.38 PrUSCh25 rs 32.04 -.05 ProUSEM rs 35.08 -.07 ProUSRE rs 16.35 +.29 ProUSOG rs 28.03 -1.08 ProUSBM rs 18.74 +.12 ProUltRE rs 0.41 55.25 -1.04 ProUShtFn 14.39 +.16 ProUFin rs 0.07 70.89 -.87 PrUPShQQQ 27.26 +.63 PrUPShR2K 20.93 +1.00 ProUltO&G 0.23 59.89 +2.11 ProUBasM 0.04 50.62 -.31 ProShtR2K 31.30 +.51 ProUltPQQQ 163.62 -4.14 ProUSR2K 11.83 +.38 ProUltR2K 0.01 44.29 -1.57 ProSht20Tr 45.02 -.20 ProUSSP500 16.99 +.29 ProUltSP500 0.38 230.51 -3.88 ProUltCrude 12.67 +.91 ProSUltGold 69.13 +1.18 ProUSGld rs 27.92 -.52 ProUSSlv rs 7.90 -.20 ProUShCrude 9.57 -.76 ProSUltSilv 182.54 +5.28 ProUltShYen 16.10 -.11 ProUShEuro 19.05 -.25 ProctGam 1.93 64.15 +.08 PrognicsPh 5.48 -.22 ProgrssEn 2.48 45.50 -.09 ProgrsSft s 29.08 -.67 ProgsvCp 1.40 20.16 +.07 ProLogis 0.45 15.68 +.01 ProspctCap 1.21 11.91 -.03 ProspBcsh 0.70 41.11 -.25 Protalix 9.61 +.13 ProtLife 0.56 27.47 -.44 ProvEn g 0.54 8.32 +.09 ProvidFS 0.44 14.49 -.15 Prudentl 1.15 63.88 -.89 PSEG 1.37 32.30 +.07 PubStrg 3.20 108.99 -1.87 PudaCoal 11.23 +.23 PulteGrp 7.10 -.10 PPrIT 0.71 6.45 +.01 PyramidOil 7.47 +1.57

Q-R-S-T

Nm QEP Res n QIAGEN QLT QR Eng n QiaoXing QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu rs Quepasa QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RF MicD RPC s RPM RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadOneD RadioShk Radware RailAmer Ralcorp RAM Engy Rambus Ramtrn Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed s ResoluteEn ResrceCap RetailHT RetailOpp Revlon RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynAm s Richmnt g RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid h Riverbed s RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaG h RosettaR RosettaStn RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld RoyaleEn Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick Rudolph RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SMF Engy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrBarcCv SpdrLehHY SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl SRS Lbs STEC STMicro STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SWS Grp SXC Hlth s Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina Sanofi Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer SchwUSMkt SchwUSLgC SchUSSmC Schwab SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeabGld g SeadrillLtd SeagateT vjSeahawk SealAir SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemGrp n SemiHTr SemiLeds n SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaGm ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens SierraWr SifyTech SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab SilicnMotn Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp SimpsnM Sina Sinclair SinoCoking SiriusXM SironaDent

D 0.08 38.82 -.07 20.50 +.10 6.53 -.24 1.65 22.36 -.08 2.39 +.03 24.14 -1.02 17.51 -.46 0.76 57.01 -1.05 0.16 18.59 -.20 22.63 2.67 -.04 4.81 -.20 9.86 +.09 0.40 56.66 +.47 25.99 -.49 0.61 17.63 -.19 13.42 -.61 4.96 -.15 15.30 +.26 12.80 +.09 4.30 -.14 0.32 6.60 -.12 0.03 3.20 -.11 7.46 -.30 0.28 18.30 -.22 0.84 22.90 -.60 12.82 -.44 26.52 -.99 35.87 -1.00 0.01 6.85 -.16 17.16 -.37 .65 -.08 1.86 +.04 0.25 14.88 -.43 36.93 -.62 13.35 -.30 65.26 +.21 1.68 +.12 20.27 -.53 2.19 -.36 0.17 80.85 +.09 0.16 52.25 +3.59 12.22 -.05 0.52 36.86 -.81 2.16 60.05 -1.27 1.50 50.83 -.56 23.41 -.35 3.82 -.07 1.73 35.25 -.22 40.58 -2.45 22.55 -.93 5.82 -.46 1.00 16.71 +.09 0.84 14.25 -.11 1.85 43.78 -.12 1.78 27.01 -.06 34.78 -1.83 0.59 87.74 -.31 0.04 7.38 0.24 17.47 -.27 36.91 -.29 0.48 58.49 -1.25 0.48 54.43 -1.30 1.00 67.05 -1.48 11.67 -.09 0.24 32.22 -1.04 1.24 -.02 1.20 32.37 +.30 6.12 -.22 0.80 28.86 -.72 65.17 -2.25 31.48 -.51 17.74 -.06 1.00 7.07 -.05 1.95 105.61 -1.54 0.32 10.65 +.21 13.85 -.83 11.88 +.43 1.48 -.07 2.12 34.22 -.21 5.27 +.07 0.90 68.53 -.85 0.42 26.43 -.01 1.31 -.06 38.20 -1.49 0.18 39.68 -.24 0.56 31.18 -.82 0.80 66.98 -.75 1.40 85.75 -1.20 0.96 63.55 -1.03 45.00 -.81 1.42 34.62 -.12 0.44 82.94 -.55 .54 +.02 42.93 +1.18 16.39 +.37 0.88 70.26 -.45 54.35 -1.29 39.70 +.11 2.00 56.76 -.30 15.10 -.14 43.27 -1.62 3.36 70.75 +.36 3.36 70.92 +.52 0.44 49.11 +.95 3.57 +1.47 0.72 14.88 -.23 5.16 +.06 23.23 +.38 12.86 -.61 0.52 36.16 -.47 11.39 -.13 4.78 -.02 2.29 28.89 -.66 1.08 46.87 -.98 0.63 49.30 -.45 0.12 17.23 -.30 15.95 -.18 0.67 59.11 -.13 42.18 -.55 1.94 40.16 -.13 0.20 22.56 -.50 12.99 -.26 17.17 +.34 0.40 71.86 -1.35 14.07 -.43 0.10 66.85 +2.09 1.79 +.12 2.96 120.85 -1.04 137.51 +1.22 1.51 171.77 -2.44 2.37 131.02 -.81 1.74 53.09 -.47 0.33 17.60 -.30 0.13 26.42 -.05 0.67 44.81 -.42 1.82 41.80 -.42 4.58 40.45 +.04 45.86 +.01 0.35 26.36 -.28 0.49 48.36 -.84 0.20 60.31 +1.58 0.38 70.14 +.35 1.00 78.70 -1.25 26.14 -.42 8.84 -.86 19.38 -2.11 0.28 12.37 17.61 -.69 53.34 -1.22 0.04 5.27 -.17 46.51 -2.79 0.48 22.05 -.23 27.53 -.36 46.76 -.86 11.86 -.31 133.37 -3.38 41.45 -1.24 12.96 -.53 2.85 +.10 0.68 43.86 +.55 48.14 -.71 9.05 +.44 7.58 -.02 15.00 -.72 1.63 33.87 +.29 0.35 11.58 -.36 0.46 17.00 1.46 52.90 +1.50 3.54 -1.29 9.38 -.25 31.82 -.80 1.00 92.90 -.01 0.07 61.23 -1.16 0.44 31.63 -.22 0.46 31.17 -.23 0.33 35.43 -.58 0.24 18.75 -.10 8.98 -.15 1.00 52.21 +.17 0.30 51.57 -1.32 35.05 +2.21 2.41 37.41 +1.03 12.72 -.53 4.11 -.01 0.52 27.73 -.02 87.23 -2.93 0.50 15.65 -.11 14.67 -.19 10.90 -.26 31.15 +.42 0.56 34.98 -.52 15.96 -1.39 1.92 52.83 -.49 22.62 -.74 1.48 22.88 +.11 33.05 -.15 0.84 33.05 -.09 6.12 -.07 0.20 10.50 -.24 5.70 -.12 39.83 +.47 1.46 82.65 -1.03 1.44 20.14 0.34 80.98 -1.09 9.19 -.41 40.94 -.46 0.58 16.29 -.09 3.72 126.81 -2.84 10.48 -.23 2.57 -.13 13.10 -.48 13.20 -.94 0.72 62.28 -.29 43.82 -.14 0.44 35.95 -1.15 14.88 -.07 7.75 -.26 43.55 -.56 7.80 -.47 0.41 6.56 -.02 26.91 +.32 40.92 +1.90 0.08 13.05 +.17 3.20 106.98 -.90 0.50 28.35 -1.12 75.64 -2.48 0.48 12.34 -.43 9.85 -.64 1.68 -.04 48.00 -1.06

Nm Skechers SkilldHcre Sky-mobi n SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartT gn SmithWes SmithAO s SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SnapOn SnydLance SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm SolarWinds Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SpectraEn SpectrmB n SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGld n SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdMic StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stereotaxis Stericycle SterlBcsh Sterlite SMadden s StewEnt StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StoneMor StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SumitMitsu SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP rs Sunoco SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupcndTch SupEnrgy SuperMda Supvalu SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrns n SwisherH n SykesEnt Symantec SymetraF Synaptics Syngenta Synopsys Synovus Synovus pf Sysco TAL Ed n TAL Intl TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TICC Cap TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisBio Taleo A TalismE g Tanger s TanzRy g TargaRsLP Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TlcmArg TelcmNZ TelItalia Teleflex TelefEsp s TelMexL TeleNav n TelData Tellabs TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tengsco Tengion n Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium Terremk TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTech TevaPhrm TexInst TexRdhse Textron Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Tii NtwkT THorton g Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Tollgrde Trchmrk Toro Co TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerSemi TowersWat Towerstm Toyota TractSup s TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPet TransDigm TransGlb TransitnT g Transocn TravelCtrs Travelers Travelzoo TriValley TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSolar Trinity TriQuint Triumph TrueRelig TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell

D

0.16

0.56 1.76 1.28 0.64 0.73

0.30 0.10 1.12 0.28 0.20 1.82 1.83 0.60 0.02 1.04

1.17 0.57 0.78 0.49 0.99 0.16 0.60 0.32 1.27 1.64 0.36 0.20 0.52 0.30 1.60 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16

0.06 0.08 0.12

2.30 0.72

1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04

0.35 0.04

0.20 1.13 0.04 2.06 1.04 1.80 0.80 0.20 0.20 0.82 0.96 0.71 0.60

0.47

0.25 0.78 2.19 1.00 0.32 1.75 0.60 1.27 1.28 1.65 1.05 0.72 0.68 1.36 1.75 0.77 0.45 0.08 0.52 0.54 0.68

0.50

0.78 0.52 0.32 0.08

1.24 0.40 2.20 1.00 1.00 0.68 1.92 0.94 0.72 0.02

0.64 0.20 2.44 3.13 0.28 0.30 1.05 0.28 1.68 0.84

1.44

0.32 0.16 1.20 0.66

Nm 20.12 -.38 12.67 +.35 9.98 +.88 15.87 +.62 33.41 -.90 4.18 -.08 6.78 -.03 8.95 -.20 3.87 +.01 39.63 -1.53 8.58 -.34 22.10 -.48 67.44 +.02 37.93 -.37 56.60 -2.28 17.32 +.03 51.69 +.03 39.50 -2.39 79.55 -.45 21.17 -.53 49.87 -3.11 23.13 -.41 3.03 +.09 14.39 -.47 9.06 +.04 35.10 -.29 3.05 -.11 35.83 -.33 46.28 -1.04 22.70 -1.97 37.80 -.09 41.70 +.69 27.26 -.11 11.69 -.19 37.99 +1.63 26.09 +.17 27.22 -.64 6.58 -.13 24.95 +.10 19.61 -1.43 4.20 -.12 15.04 +.29 12.51 +.04 38.67 -.29 32.00 -.31 29.52 -.07 38.48 -.57 77.82 +1.55 16.58 -.07 36.29 -.65 26.03 -.31 31.70 -.07 24.00 +.61 3.96 -.14 72.55 -1.60 20.92 -.28 2.58 +.13 1.68 -.04 31.91 -.86 60.45 -1.48 22.56 -.16 44.23 -.29 25.79 +.90 18.53 -.46 9.77 -.33 .89 -.04 3.87 +.06 84.66 -1.65 8.71 -.09 14.66 +.20 41.75 -1.39 7.38 -.07 70.00 -2.00 22.41 -.13 26.31 +.31 28.39 -.53 6.32 -.08 61.76 -.16 34.08 -1.30 .14 -.00 7.27 -.01 32.32 -.26 46.59 +1.08 2.11 +.12 43.02 +.11 17.87 +.05 17.42 -.07 8.89 +.05 10.30 -.15 9.75 -.30 30.62 +.05 2.75 -.07 38.01 +.37 8.08 8.35 -.15 9.76 -.17 11.25 +.23 9.80 +.20 47.32 +.32 14.13 -.35 6.17 -.11 18.95 -.41 17.70 -.23 14.09 +.10 29.87 -.36 64.10 +.29 27.34 -.66 2.55 -.10 23.75 -.75 28.01 -.26 11.17 -.35 33.62 -1.12 20.27 -.88 16.27 -.21 20.97 -.11 17.71 -.08 10.26 -.06 5.55 -.08 12.19 -.05 37.47 +.19 48.81 -.91 55.31 -2.34 16.63 -.83 18.07 -.20 12.28 -.13 15.53 -.39 5.75 -.31 25.31 -.24 31.66 -.55 24.49 +.28 26.06 -.61 7.11 33.52 -.06 50.26 -.81 6.26 +.05 3.96 -.21 24.68 -.49 52.72 -.78 48.72 -1.34 52.74 +.23 35.19 +.02 11.01 -.02 7.49 -.33 4.32 -.08 15.94 -.13 23.67 -1.25 7.94 -.03 14.32 +.21 59.72 -.50 24.47 -.10 17.75 -.07 10.14 -.47 32.65 -1.04 5.28 -.03 23.15 -.91 10.47 +.10 45.36 -1.32 46.44 -.41 6.90 -.03 .90 +.11 2.54 -.25 40.08 -1.66 46.69 -1.14 17.87 -.21 34.16 -1.26 35.83 +.62 18.94 +.01 21.83 -.04 24.31 +.67 17.01 -.33 12.63 -.02 50.57 -.54 35.40 -.35 17.09 -.65 26.57 -.69 21.20 -.14 54.97 -1.18 53.83 -1.18 13.49 +.02 38.76 -.39 31.53 -1.68 27.03 -.96 90.26 -1.74 2.41 +.18 23.29 -.89 62.20 +1.11 59.96 -2.74 3.19 +.36 42.33 +.50 35.48 -.90 1.29 +.21 69.38 -.49 37.51 -.19 48.22 -2.30 20.09 -.92 19.07 -.18 10.02 -.13 21.20 +.44 10.00 +.02 63.58 -.67 59.11 -1.70 79.45 -.73 59.17 +.88 17.22 -.15 1.36 -.03 58.03 -.53 4.36 +.10 90.17 -.52 50.29 -1.20 6.78 +.24 38.89 +.11 50.18 -.93 3.16 +.06 79.32 -1.38 13.72 -.05 4.14 -.16 82.03 +.41 8.30 -.47 60.42 -.11 37.70 -2.51 .42 +.02 1.32 47.14 -1.63 28.91 -1.20 29.71 -.64 13.74 -.47 83.45 -2.15 20.65 -1.02 4.35 -.01 53.28 -.47 15.75 -.11

D

TwoHrbInv TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

1.48 0.64 0.86 0.16

10.85 35.22 44.65 18.48

+.07 -.88 -1.51 -.21

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UFP Tch UGI Corp UIL Hold URS US Airwy US Geoth US Gold USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys Unit UtdCBksGa UtdContl UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US12MoOil US Bancrp US GasFd US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp Unitrin UnivDisp UnivHlthS UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UranmRs UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh

N m

G M m G M & R D W m

D M m D G

m

m m M m G m Mw

M W& O WM W W O W W R W M W W W W W M W R W WR W W M W W W W W W W m W W WW W R W W W W W W W W W WD W G W R W U W m W W W W W W H W W Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W m W D W W W W W D W W W W w W W W M W W m W G OM

M R Ww m G m

mm m M m w

0.28

9.92 -.12 19.66 +.14 0.74 23.49 -.23 17.64 -.66 1.00 31.67 -.51 1.73 30.44 -.55 45.00 -.82 8.49 -.68 .97 -.03 7.07 -.03 1.78 -.06 5.23 -.38 16.42 -.48 0.06 19.93 -1.59 2.12 -.11 41.03 -1.52 45.72 +1.62 .09 0.20 11.35 -.19 64.25 -1.90 1.12 29.89 +.12 1.12 29.37 -.03 1.52 92.54 -1.78 35.85 -1.58 57.77 +3.01 1.46 -.16 22.78 -1.66 0.08 2.87 41.46 -.95 0.40 6.76 -.07 2.08 73.47 -1.14 30.42 -.87 45.63 +1.31 0.20 27.52 -.17 46.88 +1.94 5.26 +.07 39.80 +1.31 0.20 56.99 -.59 1.70 82.79 -.77 66.80 +.30 0.50 42.91 -.05 0.96 28.08 -.81 37.76 -2.08 0.20 43.57 +1.31 0.37 26.10 -.19 2.68 -.08 4.50 -.09 5.62 -.16 2.72 -.12 36.79 -.76 24.90 -.30 2.52 95.13 -1.39 7.71 +.25 28.98 -.53 0.76 33.94 +.50 0.76 29.61 +.51 0.38 38.71 -1.31

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Apps

Security, of course, is a worry. Chase stresses that it has robust encryption technology and that check images would not remain

on the mobile phone. “It’ll be posted to the account, but the app itself will automatically log you out, typically after five minutes of inactivity,” Brion said. Will you be able to send clear photos of checks or W-2 forms (as would be needed with TurboTax SnapTax)? The quality could depend on the model of your phone or how you take the picture. “It’ll prompt you if you can’t get a clear reading of a check,” Brion said. “I’ve never run into this issue.” Ben Woolsey, director of marketing and consumer research for CreditCards.com, said that, in general, financial apps are “very safe and secure.” Consumers, though, should be cautious, particularly if they receive e-mails. Do not click on attachments promoting free, potentially bogus apps. “I wouldn’t respond to any apps that come to you — and say ‘Please download me,’” Woolsey said. Ondrej Krehel, information security officer for Identity Theft 911, said consumers should figure out how much they want to do when it comes to financial services from their phone or PC. “Good security comes in layers,” Krehel said. “We would say that data on smart phones is less secure than on a PC, because there is just not enough awareness about smart phone security.” Some apps can give away your phone’s locations to outside companies, too. Would the IRS app be used to give out any personal details to others? Track your location? “Absolutely not,” said Luis Garcia, IRS spokesman. Ah, but will that app do your taxes for you? I guess we all know the answer to that one.

extended their losses on Wednesday, after Tuesday’s steep declines. Airline stocks are down 11 percent just this week. The airlines have few options to deal with their rising costs. Most carriers were already hedging some of their fuel purchases to protect against sudden price increases. They can also look for more fuel-efficient planes, but that requires billions of dollars in investments and takes years. So far, thanks to growing demand from both business and leisure passengers, the airlines have not had any trouble selling seats. Because they have not added much new capacity as the economy

has picked up, their planes are still flying full, especially during peak hours. And as airlines continue to find customers for their most expensive fares, analysts said, they are reducing the number of their cheapest seats — and even those are not so cheap anymore. “Airlines are raising their fares because, right now, they think they can,” said Jeff Streabler, a strategist at RBS. “People will actually buy the tickets at those fares.” In January, the cheapest round-trip fare from any of the top 50 airports in the country averaged $367 — 10 percent higher

more apps for the iPad, too. Offering financial services via a mobile device isn’t new. Back in 2000 and 2001, some brokerages offered access via the old Palm Pilots and PDAs. But old hardware had green screens, not full color, and the older mobile devices were clunkers to use. And many people weren’t eager to pick up a mobile phone to check stock prices during the bear market from 2000 through 2002. The popularity of the iPhone sparked interest in mobile applications in the financial services industry in 2010, according to Corporate Insight. Morningstar.com, which tracks mutual fund performance, has free mobile apps for the iPhone, BlackBerry and Android platforms. H&R Block brags that its free Tax Central App was the top finance app for more than a week last tax season on iTunes. Now, the IRS has an app for that, too. Taxpayers who file electronically can use that app within 72 hours after the IRS acknowledges receipt of their tax return. If you file a paper return, you’d have to wait three to four weeks. The same time frame applies if you go online to www.irs .gov and click on “Where’s My Refund?” You’re going to need to enter a Social Security number. The IRS says the Social Security number is masked and encrypted. You’re not filing tax returns using that IRS app. But the TurboTax SnapTax app does allow you to file taxes by smart phone.

Continued from B1 The IRS allows smart phone app users to get updates on their income tax refunds — and enter their e-mail address so that they can receive daily advice. Apple users can download the free IRS2Go application at the Apple App Store; Android users can go to the Android Marketplace. Brion, who is studying for an MBA in finance at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, does his own taxes. And he likes using that IRS app for free daily tips, including advice on education credits and other assorted tax tips. His wife, Mirya, has a child care business. The picturetaking feature with his Chase app comes in handy to deposit checks from her customers.

More to come Chase came out with its QuickDeposit feature for checks in 2010. USAA — which serves the military community — launched the industry’s first mobile check deposit app in August 2009. Other big-name banks likely will offer picture-taking deposits for checks this year, said James McGovern, vice president of consulting services for Corporate Insight, which tracks Web usage for banks, brokers and other financial service companies. Everybody isn’t going to be taking pictures of their checks. Many of us do not even own smart phones. But banking customers who travel or aren’t able to get to a bank branch can take advantage of the convenience. In 2011, McGovern expects more financial firms to offer apps for Android smart phones. Some brokerages may offer

Security concerns

Airfare Continued from B1 While the rising ticket prices have matched the steady increase in fuel costs in recent months, the turmoil in the Middle East has sent oil prices sharply higher. That surge now threatens to derail the airline industry’s fragile recovery and may lead to even more surcharges. At today’s prices, fuel accounts for about 40 percent of the industry’s costs, up from about 30 percent just last year. As a result of the uncertainty in the oil markets, airline stocks

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 B3

Solar

Smart phone security

Continued from B1 After President George W. Bush ordered public lands to be opened to renewable energy development and California passed a law in 2006 to reduce carbon emissions, scores of developers staked lease claims on nearly a million acres of Mojave Desert land. The government-owned land offered affordable, wide-open spaces and the abundant sunshine needed by solar thermal plants, which use huge arrays of mirrors to heat liquids to create steam that drives electricity-generating turbines. But many of the areas planned for solar development — including the five projects being challenged — are in fragile landscapes and are home to desert tortoises, bighorn sheep and other protected flora and fauna. The government sped through some of the

Smart phone users pay less attention to the security of their phones than they do to their PCs. Ondrej Krehel, of Identity Theft 911, said consumers too often do not protect the phone with a password; they do not encrypt the data on their phones; and they store personal information such as bank account numbers, e-mails, Social Security numbers, including those of their family members, and other confidential information. • Be sure to password-protect a smart phone. • Users should make it a practice to delete their private information from the cache of the smart phone. Many do not even know that such settings exist, Krehel said. Criminals can then use data-recovery techniques to obtain sensitive data from the smart phone, if stolen. • A hacking incident also can take place when a malicious SMS message can compromise a vulnerable iPhone. See this report: http://news. cnet.com/8301-27080_310299378-245.html. • Avoid using applications that provide direct access to bank accounts or even socialnetworking accounts and/or store your login credentials. • Avoid using unsecured wireless connections (rather than the phone network connection) to access sensitive sites like banking or other sites. While you may be saving minutes on your data plan, Krehel said, you are also potentially exposing your transactions to piracy. • Read your statements to monitor any odd activity.

Biomass Continued from B1 “Biomass plants would not be required to control for mercury or other pollutants not normally present.” Towsley said the rule changes announced Monday would allow biomass to be burned in a variety of boilers, such as the one in the plant completed in December in John Day by Prineville-based Ochoco Lumber Co. That would allow the plant to operate and produce energy. Under the rule changes, small residential and commercial biomass boilers that generate heat or energy for homes, schools, businesses or government office buildings, airports and other similar uses “would essentially be allowed without requiring any additional pollution controls,” Towsley said. Larger units, such as the biomass plants built to generate energy from wood wastes at paper mills, “would still be required to have some additional pollution devices,” Towsley said. In a letter to Wyden dated Feb. 23, the EPA administrator, Lisa Jackson, said the rule changes reflect “a clear technical distinction between boilers that burn coal and boilers that burn biomass.” Jackson’s letter says the rule changes provide “additional flexibility for existing biomass boilers” by increasing carbon monoxide limits for biomass boilers and other measures designed to reduce compliance costs, while maintaining restrictions on lead, hydrogen sulfide, mercury and other emissions that pose a danger to human health.

that the average of $333 for the same time last year, according to FareCompare.com, a consumer airline research website. Rick Seaney, FareCompare’s chief executive, said each increase in the last three months had averaged $5 to $12 for the least expensive tickets. But the rise in fuel prices once again hangs over the industry’s profits. Oil prices jumped more than $13 a barrel this week, rising above $99 a barrel in New York on Wednesday, after the violent uprising in Libya, a major oil producer. In London, Brent crude futures rose to $111 a barrel.

required environmental reviews, and opponents are challenging those reviews as inadequate. “There’s no good reason to go into these pristine wilderness areas and build huge solar farms, and less reason for the taxpayers to be subsidizing it,” said Cory Briggs, a lawyer representing an American Indian group that has sued the U.S. Interior Department and the Bureau of Land Management to stop five of the solar thermal plants. “The impacts to Native American culture and the environment are extraordinary.” Solar thermal developers never expected to run into such difficulties. But federal law requires projects proposed for public lands to undergo extensive environmental review and allows citizens to sue to enforce those laws. Three of the four solar thermal power plants that have escaped legal challenge are planned for private land.

“Changes such as those listed above render the issued standards about half as costly to meet as the proposed (June rules) would have been. The issued standards nonetheless will protect enormous numbers of American adults and children from harm by reducing their exposure to air toxics such as mercury and lead, which have adverse effects on IQ, learning and memory,” according to an excerpt from Jackson’s letter. The EPA estimates that even with the easing of rules governing biomass boilers, manufacturing and installing pollution-control equipment required under the new standards will create around 2,200 new jobs nationwide. “I am proud of the work that the EPA has done to craft protective, sensible standards for controlling hazardous air pollution from boilers and process heaters,” Jackson wrote. “The standards reflect what industry has told the agency about the practical reality of operating these units.” Because the revised rules are substantially different from those the public had an opportunity to comment on last year, Jackson said the EPA will seek comments “from members of the public who would like the agency to reconsider aspects of the standards that have changed significantly.” Towsley said existing plants will not have to comply with the rule for at least three years, “so if there are further changes in the rule, they will not be required to spend money for compliance measures for several years.” Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.10f .04 .36 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... .24 .32 .22 .72f .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

8 13 21 20 16 ... ... 27 24 55 20 11 ... 11 20 14 13 ... 15 ... 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 57.33 22.06 14.17 14.53 70.23 9.14 45.14 61.76 72.84 7.66 31.47 43.59 10.80 21.15 9.19 23.11 6.14 9.81 20.81 15.48 26.59

Name

-2.67 +1.1 -.21 -2.0 -.01 +6.2 -.21 -6.6 -.70 +7.6 -.30 +8.2 -1.60 -4.5 -1.49 +2.4 -1.05 +.9 -.22 +3.7 -.25 +5.8 -4.64 +3.5 +.05 -12.0 -.66 +.6 -.02 +3.8 -.09 +3.4 -.10 +1.3 -.41 +3.7 -.24 +2.7 +.01 +29.0 ... -4.7

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1410.00 $1413.40 $33.302

Pvs Day $1399.00 $1400.50 $32.864

Div

PE

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46f .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

21 16 16 18 40 ... 33 21 ... 18 19 10 23 12 76 18 15 14 82 ...

Market recap 86.19 44.59 45.74 13.85 49.84 2.69 41.11 141.57 22.05 61.23 82.65 44.86 31.91 13.74 11.35 27.52 17.72 31.50 3.28 23.57

-1.04 -1.06 -.59 -.26 -1.17 -.03 -.61 -2.21 -.23 -1.16 -1.03 -.15 -.86 -.47 -.19 -.17 -.34 +.12 -.02 -.47

+.9 +5.2 -1.6 -21.8 -13.1 +30.0 +9.8 +1.7 -2.0 -7.8 -1.3 -.6 -.7 +17.5 -6.8 +2.0 +4.7 +1.6 +16.3 +24.5

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm FordM SPDR Fncl

7937081 2105940 1916205 1573114 1135690

Last Chg 4.70 131.02 14.17 14.86 16.58

+.01 -.81 -.01 -.37 -.07

Gainers ($2 or more) Name DuncanEn Goldcp wt CabotO&G Herbalife Chicos

Last 40.40 3.10 44.78 76.90 13.15

Chg %Chg +7.84 +.51 +4.95 +7.05 +1.09

+24.1 +19.7 +12.4 +10.1 +9.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

AldIrish rs KV PhB lf Solutia wt AmRepro VlyNB wt18

3.21 -.59 -15.5 7.43 -1.09 -12.8 2.52 -.34 -11.9 8.05 -1.06 -11.6 2.15 -.27 -11.2

Chg %Chg

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

KodiakO g NovaGld g BarcGSOil DenisnM g GoldStr g

Last Chg

72816 6.85 +.45 55605 13.78 -.34 55015 26.26 +.91 43819 3.71 -.01 38959 3.92 -.04

MexcoEn PyramidOil FieldPnt Barnwell LucasEngy

Last

Last

DblEgl VertxPh ChiCera un Nordson TandyBr

1,087 1,973 100 3,160 60 27

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

2.29 6.11 2.24 4.81 11.79

-.33 -12.6 -.65 -9.6 -.16 -6.7 -.34 -6.6 -.77 -6.1

FuweiFlm HiSoft n GeoMet pf Ramtrn FFBcArk

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 56.56 18.40 21.15 1.68 10.55

-.47 -.19 -.66 -.04 -.37

Chg %Chg

11.59 +1.64 43.97 +5.75 10.30 +1.30 108.46 +11.96 3.00 +.30

+16.5 +15.0 +14.4 +12.4 +11.1

Losers ($2 or more) Last

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

926805 883175 817273 770247 568954

Name

Losers ($2 or more) Accelr8 NewConcEn ChIntLtg n Augusta g VirnetX

Vol (00)

PwShs QQQ Cisco Intel SiriusXM MicronT

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

12.74 +3.49 +37.7 7.47 +1.57 +26.6 4.50 +.47 +11.7 7.68 +.68 +9.7 2.07 +.18 +9.5

Name

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

4.81 -1.45 -23.2 25.77 -5.63 -17.9 10.00 -1.75 -14.9 2.19 -.36 -14.1 2.66 -.39 -12.8

Diary 227 240 37 504 12 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

634 2,009 116 2,759 44 47

12,391.29 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,306.65 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 416.47 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 8,520.27 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,361.02 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,840.51 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,344.07 1,010.91 S&P 500 14,276.94 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 838.00 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,105.78 4,986.21 409.37 8,292.92 2,337.82 2,722.99 1,307.40 13,838.11 799.65

-107.01 -107.02 -.97 -32.94 +12.56 -33.43 -8.04 -108.62 -13.31

YTD %Chg %Chg -.88 -2.10 -.24 -.40 +.54 -1.21 -.61 -.78 -1.64

52-wk %Chg

+4.56 -2.36 +1.08 +4.13 +5.86 +2.64 +3.96 +3.58 +2.04

+16.69 +21.74 +10.13 +17.95 +26.17 +21.78 +18.29 +20.21 +26.84

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

365.24 2,679.26 4,013.12 5,923.53 7,194.60 22,906.90 36,464.07 21,929.79 3,372.07 10,579.10 1,961.63 3,001.85 4,935.60 5,921.66

-.97 t -.89 t -.92 t -1.22 t -1.69 t -.36 t -.86 t -.29 t +.40 s -.80 t -.42 t -.57 t -.24 t -.29 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0016 1.6200 1.0098 .002100 .1521 1.3744 .1283 .012118 .082096 .0343 .000886 .1560 1.0711 .0338

.9979 1.6145 1.0095 .002120 .1519 1.3662 .1283 .012090 .082499 .0341 .000886 .1553 1.0658 .0338

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.32 -0.15 +4.2 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.30 -0.15 +4.2 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.39 -0.03 +2.5 GrowthI 26.90 -0.26 +4.1 Ultra 23.46 -0.18 +3.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.47 -0.17 +3.4 AMutlA p 26.05 -0.17 +2.9 BalA p 18.49 -0.07 +3.1 BondA p 12.15 -0.01 +0.1 CapIBA p 50.32 -0.06 +0.8 CapWGA p 36.31 -0.11 +1.7 CapWA p 20.52 +0.02 +0.5 EupacA p 41.83 -0.10 +1.1 FdInvA p 38.26 -0.18 +4.3 GovtA p 13.80 -0.01 -0.6 GwthA p 31.48 -0.14 +3.4 HI TrA p 11.55 -0.01 +3.3 IncoA p 17.02 -0.06 +2.8 IntBdA p 13.38 -0.01 ICAA p 29.06 -0.20 +3.2 NEcoA p 25.95 -0.22 +2.4 N PerA p 29.29 -0.14 +2.3 NwWrldA 52.79 -0.20 -3.3 SmCpA p 38.29 -0.38 -1.5 TxExA p 11.77 +0.02 +0.2 WshA p 28.22 -0.15 +3.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.92 -0.13 -0.7 IntEqII I r 12.31 -0.06 -1.2 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.97 -0.14 +1.2 MidCap 34.32 -0.67 +2.1 MidCapVal 21.34 -0.11 +6.3 Baron Funds: Growth 53.17 -0.64 +3.8 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.71 -0.02 +0.5 DivMu 14.25 +0.01 +0.4 TxMgdIntl 16.05 -0.01 +2.0

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.19 -0.09 GlAlA r 19.81 -0.01 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.48 -0.01 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.23 -0.09 GlbAlloc r 19.90 -0.01 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 54.77 -0.72 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.54 -0.36 DivEqInc 10.40 -0.07 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.51 -0.38 AcornIntZ 40.24 -0.14 ValRestr 51.04 -0.09 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.47 +0.11 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.69 -0.01 USCorEq2 11.44 -0.12 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.16 -0.13 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.53 -0.13 NYVen C 33.96 -0.13 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.22 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 20.85 -0.05 EmMktV 34.03 -0.07 IntSmVa 17.72 -0.02 LargeCo 10.32 -0.07 USLgVa 21.48 -0.10 US Small 21.92 -0.41 US SmVa 26.46 -0.43 IntlSmCo 17.59 -0.01 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 19.41 -0.01 Glb5FxInc 10.86 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.15 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 73.08 -0.74 Income 13.33 -0.01

+3.8 +2.0 +1.9 +3.9 +2.1 +2.6 +1.0 +3.0 +1.1 -1.7 +1.0 +1.4 +3.8 +4.3 +2.4 +2.4 +2.3 +0.8 -5.9 -5.9 +3.0 +4.2 +6.8 +2.6 +3.5 +2.4 +0.1 +5.6 -0.2 +4.1 +0.8

IntlStk 36.27 Stock 113.19 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.60 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.10 GblMacAbR 10.21 LgCapVal 18.65 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.09 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.90 FPACres 27.37 Fairholme 35.48 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.39 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.38 StrInA 12.46 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.58 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.85 FF2015 11.57 FF2020 14.09 FF2020K 13.48 FF2025 11.80 FF2030 14.12 FF2030K 13.95 FF2035 11.78 FF2040 8.24 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.15 AMgr50 15.70 Balanc 18.70 BalancedK 18.70 BlueChGr 46.84 Canada 60.75 CapAp 25.90 CpInc r 9.77 Contra 69.26 ContraK 69.24 DisEq 23.41 DivIntl 30.87 DivrsIntK r 30.84

-0.18 +1.6 -1.50 +5.0 -0.05 +2.1 +2.1 -0.01 +0.1 -0.06 +2.1 -0.15 +3.1 +0.5 -0.09 +2.2 -0.11 -0.3 -0.07 -2.0 -0.16 +2.3 -0.01 +1.7 -0.16 +2.4 -0.03 -0.03 -0.05 -0.05 -0.04 -0.05 -0.05 -0.05 -0.03 -0.09 -0.06 -0.09 -0.09 -0.51 -0.07 -0.43 -0.03 -0.54 -0.54 -0.25 -0.05 -0.06

+1.9 +2.0 +2.2 +2.2 +2.4 +2.5 +2.6 +2.7 +2.9 +3.8 +1.8 +2.6 +2.6 +3.3 +4.5 +2.2 +4.4 +2.4 +2.4 +3.9 +2.4 +2.4

DivGth 29.46 EmrMk 24.99 Eq Inc 46.25 EQII 19.09 Fidel 33.64 FltRateHi r 9.90 GNMA 11.42 GovtInc 10.36 GroCo 86.52 GroInc 18.96 GrowthCoK 86.48 HighInc r 9.17 Indepn 24.84 IntBd 10.55 IntmMu 10.00 IntlDisc 33.47 InvGrBd 11.37 InvGB 7.39 LgCapVal 12.28 LatAm 55.64 LevCoStk 29.80 LowP r 39.56 LowPriK r 39.55 Magelln 74.04 MidCap 29.48 MuniInc 12.23 NwMkt r 15.36 OTC 58.14 100Index 9.11 Ovrsea 33.06 Puritn 18.46 SCmdtyStrt 12.73 SrsIntGrw 11.25 SrsIntVal 10.56 SrInvGrdF 11.37 STBF 8.46 SmllCpS r 20.41 StratInc 11.16 StrReRt r 9.75 TotalBd 10.74 USBI 11.28 Value 71.61 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 51.25

-0.27 -0.04 -0.26 -0.09 -0.19

+3.6 -5.2 +4.5 +4.6 +4.6 +1.5

-0.01 -0.4 +4.1 +3.6 +4.1 +3.5 +2.0 +0.5 +0.4 +1.3 +0.1 +0.4 +3.8 -5.7 +4.9 +3.1 +3.1 +3.3 +2.2 +0.3 -1.0 +5.8 +4.2 +1.8 +3.1 +0.7 -0.4 +6.2 +0.2 +0.2 -0.40 +4.1 +1.8 +0.02 +1.8 +0.7 -0.01 -0.67 +4.3

-0.88 -0.11 -0.89 -0.01 -0.33 -0.01 +0.01 -0.13 -0.01 -0.01 -0.08 +0.03 -0.27 -0.31 -0.30 -0.54 -0.30 +0.01 -0.01 -0.82 -0.05 -0.14 -0.10 +0.14 -0.02 +0.01 -0.01

+0.67 -3.5

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 39.33 -0.57 500IdxInv 46.36 -0.29 IntlInxInv 36.59 -0.02 TotMktInv 37.89 -0.29 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.37 -0.28 TotMktAd r 37.89 -0.29 First Eagle: GlblA 47.33 -0.08 OverseasA 22.89 +0.04 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.34 +0.01 FoundAl p 10.89 -0.04 HYTFA p 9.57 +0.01 IncomA p 2.25 -0.01 USGovA p 6.71 -0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.24 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.27 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.42 -0.15 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.40 -0.01 GlBd A p 13.54 GrwthA p 18.53 -0.10 WorldA p 15.47 -0.06 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.56 -0.01 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 41.88 -0.26 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.58 -0.04 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.17 +0.01 Quality 20.58 -0.05 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.08 -0.34 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.44 -0.02 MidCapV 37.36 -0.34 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.13 -0.01

+3.0 +4.2 +4.0 +4.0 +4.2 +4.0 +2.1 +1.0 +0.5 +4.1 +4.3 -0.1 +0.3 +4.4 +4.2 +3.8 +6.0 +0.4 +4.2 +4.2 +0.2 +4.1 +2.3 -2.9 +2.3 +3.3 +3.1 +3.3 +0.2

CapApInst 37.61 -0.57 IntlInv t 60.96 +0.04 Intl r 61.55 +0.04 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.17 -0.27 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.19 -0.27 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 43.60 -0.31 Div&Gr 20.39 -0.10 TotRetBd 10.96 -0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.01 -0.06 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.09 -0.06 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.77 -0.13 CmstkA 16.47 -0.12 EqIncA 8.93 -0.06 GrIncA p 20.21 -0.14 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.89 -0.14 AssetStA p 24.60 -0.15 AssetStrI r 24.82 -0.15 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.46 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.45 -0.01 HighYld 8.40 -0.01 IntmTFBd 10.79 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.97 USLCCrPls 21.35 -0.11 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 51.31 -0.22 PrkMCVal T 23.29 -0.15 Twenty T 66.51 -0.33 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.19 -0.05 LSGrwth 13.14 -0.08 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 20.43 -0.06 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 20.80 -0.06 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.56 +0.06

+2.4 +1.6 +1.7 +1.6 +1.6 +2.9 +4.6 +0.6 -2.3 +2.2 +3.7 +4.7 +4.0 +5.2 +0.7 +0.8 +0.9 +0.2 +0.2 +3.7 +0.5 +0.1 +3.3 +1.3 +3.2 +1.2 +2.2 +2.3 -6.2 -6.3 +8.1

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.45 -0.02 StrInc C 15.08 -0.02 LSBondR 14.40 -0.01 StrIncA 15.00 -0.01 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.22 -0.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.07 -0.04 BdDebA p 8.01 -0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.61 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.42 -0.04 ValueA 23.74 -0.10 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.85 -0.10 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.95 -0.03 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 21.65 -0.05 MergerFd 15.96 -0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.41 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.41 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 37.90 -0.63 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.10 -0.23 GlbDiscZ 30.47 -0.23 QuestZ 18.18 -0.11 SharesZ 21.59 -0.15 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 47.57 -0.41 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 49.28 -0.43 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.47 -0.01 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.38 -0.08 Intl I r 20.35 +0.01 Oakmark r 43.23 -0.34 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.93 -0.03

+2.2 +2.2 +2.1 +2.4 +1.2 +4.2 +3.4 +0.9 +0.5 +2.5 +4.1 +4.1 +3.9 -7.6 +1.1 +0.9 +1.0 +1.5 +3.1 +3.2 +2.8 +3.8 +3.5 +3.4 +3.4 +2.3 +4.8 +4.7 +2.9

GlbSMdCap 15.59 -0.11 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 44.93 -0.33 DvMktA p 33.96 -0.07 GlobA p 62.87 -0.45 GblStrIncA 4.31 IntBdA p 6.45 +0.02 MnStFdA 32.91 -0.19 RisingDivA 16.15 -0.10 S&MdCpVl 33.03 -0.32 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.64 -0.09 S&MdCpVl 28.30 -0.28 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.59 -0.09 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.53 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 33.61 -0.06 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.83 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.63 +0.01 AllAsset 12.19 -0.01 ComodRR 9.48 +0.10 HiYld 9.49 -0.02 InvGrCp 10.53 -0.02 LowDu 10.40 -0.01 RealRtnI 11.37 +0.01 ShortT 9.88 TotRt 10.83 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.37 +0.01 TotRtA 10.83 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.83 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.83 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.83 -0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 46.61 +0.03 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.98 -0.39 Price Funds:

+0.8 +3.1 -6.9 +4.1 +1.4 -1.1 +1.6 +4.1 +3.1 +4.0 +2.9 +4.0 -0.7 -6.8 +0.3 +0.6 +1.2 +2.0 +3.1 +1.3 +0.5 +0.4 +0.4 +0.3 +0.3 +0.3 +0.1 +0.3 +0.3 +1.7 +2.5

BlChip 39.72 CapApp 21.01 EmMktS 33.29 EqInc 24.71 EqIndex 35.29 Growth 33.22 HlthSci 31.56 HiYield 6.94 IntlBond 9.97 IntlStk 14.26 MidCap 61.40 MCapVal 24.58 N Asia 17.72 New Era 55.34 N Horiz 34.59 N Inc 9.45 R2010 15.68 R2015 12.19 R2020 16.89 R2025 12.40 R2030 17.82 R2035 12.63 R2040 17.99 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 35.45 SmCapVal 36.85 SpecIn 12.46 Value 24.55 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.16 VoyA p 24.50 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.10 PremierI r 21.38 TotRetI r 13.46 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.72 S&P Sel 20.39 Scout Funds: Intl 32.94 Selected Funds: AmShD 42.38 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.85 Third Avenue Fds:

-0.37 -0.11 -0.10 -0.16 -0.21 -0.37 -0.34 -0.01 +0.05 -0.02 -0.74 -0.19 -0.08 +0.49 -0.56 -0.05 -0.05 -0.07 -0.06 -0.10 -0.08 -0.10 -0.56 -0.47 -0.01 -0.10

+4.2 +3.4 -5.6 +4.3 +4.2 +3.3 +4.2 +3.4 +0.6 +0.2 +4.9 +3.7 -7.6 +6.1 +3.3 +0.1 +2.2 +2.5 +2.7 +3.0 +3.1 +3.3 +3.3 +0.2 +3.0 +2.0 +1.4 +5.2

-0.08 +4.6 -0.29 +3.3 -0.17 +3.9 -0.29 +5.1 -0.17 +2.2 -0.27 +4.1 -0.13 +4.2 -0.03 +1.7 -0.14 +2.3 -0.04 +4.0

ValueInst 51.11 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.60 IntValue I 29.24 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.05 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.90 CAITAdm 10.72 CpOpAdl 79.40 EMAdmr r 37.83 Energy 135.60 ExtdAdm 42.71 500Adml 120.73 GNMA Ad 10.69 GrwAdm 32.51 HlthCr 53.20 HiYldCp 5.81 InfProAd 25.64 ITBdAdml 11.14 ITsryAdml 11.23 IntGrAdm 61.66 ITAdml 13.26 ITGrAdm 9.91 LtdTrAd 10.98 LTGrAdml 9.22 LT Adml 10.63 MCpAdml 95.90 MuHYAdm 10.03 PrmCap r 70.49 ReitAdm r 81.75 STsyAdml 10.66 STBdAdml 10.52 ShtTrAd 15.85 STIGrAd 10.77 SmCAdm 35.96 TtlBAdml 10.54 TStkAdm 32.85 WellslAdm 53.46 WelltnAdm 55.41 Windsor 47.71 WdsrIIAd 47.74 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.22

-0.22 -1.3 -0.19 +2.0 -0.19 +2.1 -0.12 +1.0 -0.11 +2.4 +0.02 +0.7 -1.21 +3.4 -0.06 -5.1 +2.58 +11.3 -0.63 +3.5 -0.74 +4.2 -0.27 -0.30 -0.01 +0.07 -0.02 -0.02 -0.23 +0.02 -0.02

+2.9 +3.0 +3.0 +0.4

-0.5 +0.2 +0.5 +0.7 +0.2 +0.01 -0.4 +0.02 +0.2 -1.09 +4.0 +0.01 -0.64 +3.3 -0.71 +4.2 -0.1 -0.01 +0.1 -0.01 +0.5 -0.58 +3.4 -0.1 -0.26 +4.1 -0.12 +1.7 -0.20 +3.2 -0.32 +4.7 -0.32 +4.8 -0.13 +3.1

CapOpp 34.37 DivdGro 14.83 Energy 72.21 EqInc 21.26 Explr 75.61 GNMA 10.69 GlobEq 18.29 HYCorp 5.81 HlthCre 126.07 InflaPro 13.05 IntlGr 19.38 IntlVal 32.94 ITIGrade 9.91 LifeCon 16.61 LifeGro 22.66 LifeMod 19.98 LTIGrade 9.22 Morg 18.60 MuInt 13.26 PrecMtls r 25.47 PrmcpCor 14.22 Prmcp r 67.94 SelValu r 19.48 STAR 19.48 STIGrade 10.77 StratEq 19.12 TgtRetInc 11.39 TgRe2010 22.66 TgtRe2015 12.66 TgRe2020 22.58 TgtRe2025 12.92 TgRe2030 22.26 TgtRe2035 13.47 TgtRe2040 22.13 TgtRe2045 13.90 USGro 18.97 Wellsly 22.07 Welltn 32.08 Wndsr 14.14 WndsII 26.90 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 26.73 TotIntlInst r 106.91 500 120.70

-0.52 +3.4 -0.06 +3.1 +1.37 +11.3 -0.10 +4.3 -1.31 +3.7

Growth

32.50 -0.27 +2.8

MidCap

21.13 -0.23 +4.0

SmCap

35.92 -0.59 +3.4

SmlCpGth

22.83 -0.39 +4.2

-0.11 -0.01 -0.72 +0.03 -0.07 +0.01 -0.02 -0.04 -0.10 -0.07 +0.01 -0.22 +0.02 -0.14 -0.11 -0.61 -0.15 -0.08 -0.01 -0.30 -0.02 -0.06 -0.04 -0.09 -0.06 -0.10 -0.07 -0.11 -0.07 -0.19 -0.04 -0.11 -0.09 -0.17

SmlCpVl

16.42 -0.26 +2.6

+2.4 +3.0 +3.0 +0.4 +0.2 +2.4 +0.7 +1.5 +2.7 +2.1 -0.5 +3.2 +0.5 -4.8 +3.3 +3.3 +3.8 +2.1 +0.4 +4.4 +1.0 +1.6 +1.9 +2.2 +2.4 +2.7 +2.9 +2.9 +3.0 +3.9 +1.7 +3.2 +4.7 +4.8

+1.4 -0.03 +1.4 -0.74 +4.2

STBnd

10.52 -0.01

TotBnd

10.54

-0.1

TotlIntl

15.98

+1.4

TotStk

32.84 -0.26 +4.1

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.34

ExtIn

42.71 -0.62 +3.5

+3.6

FTAllWldI r

95.18

GrwthIst

32.51 -0.27 +2.9

InfProInst

+1.4

10.44 +0.02 +0.4

InstIdx

119.88 -0.73 +4.2

InsPl

119.88 -0.74 +4.2

InsTStPlus

29.70 -0.24 +4.1

MidCpIst

21.18 -0.24 +4.0

SCInst

35.95 -0.59 +3.4

TBIst

10.54

TSInst

32.86 -0.25 +4.1

-0.1

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

99.73 -0.61 +4.2

STBdIdx

10.52 -0.01

TotBdSgl

10.54

TotStkSgl

31.71 -0.25 +4.1

-0.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.81 -0.01 +0.9

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.26 -0.11 +4.4

B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY EMPLOYEE MONITORING VS. PRIVACY IN THE WORKPLACE: Registration required; $50 per person; 7:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-6024 or denise.a.pollock@ state.or.us. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133, or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325, or visit www. aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz. soutomaior@schwab.com or www .schwab.com. LINKING ADOBE SUITE SOFTWARE: Registration required for this threeevening class, Feb. 17, 24 and March 3; $99; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PERS, TIER ONE/TIER TWO: A workshop to better understand the Public Employees Retirement System. Registration requested; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; OnPoint Community Credit Union, 950 N. W. Bond St., Bend; 541-749-2248 or nik.powell@ onpointcu.com.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Free for chamber members.; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Proficiency Academy, 657 S.W. Glacier Ave.; 541-526-0882. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861. FLASH ANIMATION, BEGINNING: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-536-6237, or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133, or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325, or visit www. aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. 2011 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE MARKET: Learn about the real estate market from Realtor Kathy Hovermale, mortgage banker Brad Towzer, and escrow officer Mark Green; free; 2-6 p.m.; Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty, 650 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-419-6778. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish translators will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389, or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541447-3260, or visit www.yourmoney back.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-447-3119.

MONDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-536-6237, or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133, or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325, or visit www .aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148, or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541-553-3243. OREGON SOLAR INCENTIVE PROGRAM INFORMATION SESSION: Learn about Oregon’s Solar Incentive Program. Registration requested; free; 5:30-6 p.m.; E2 Solar, 63063 Layton Ave., Bend; 541-388-1151 or sales@e2solarenergy.com.

TUESDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133, or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325, or visit www .aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148, or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL INSIGHT SEMINAR: Presented by Jake Paltzer, a certified financial planner, this seminar will look at investment markets and economic indicators to aid in making investment decisions. RSVP by Feb. 25; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-389-3624. INTEGRATING COLORS AND TYPOGRAPHY: Registration required; $99; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

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MARKET ON YOUTUBE FOR PROFIT: Learn how to use the free tools on YouTube to create marketing videos that drive traffic to you or your business. Registration required; $59; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. BUSINESS TO BUSINESS: Visit www.exitrealtybend.com and select the yellow show icon to view real estate agent Jim Mazziotti’s real estate program for business owners and real estate agents; free; 7 p.m.

WEDNESDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133, or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325, or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish translators will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389, or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148, or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. LEARNING TO BE LIVING: LESSONS IN BUILDING COMMUNITY BY BUILDING ON LEARNING: Cascadia Green Building Council presents a lecture by Dale Mikkelson, planning and sustainability manager for Simon Fraser University in British Columbia and manager of UniverCity, a model sustainable community in Burnaby, B.C. Mikkelson’s lecture will focus on using education to promote sustainability principles in tangible ways; Cascadia members free; general public $10; 5 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 503-348-9612 or http:// tls2011dmbend.eventbrite.com/. ACCESS 2007, BEGINNING: Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. LEED EXAM PREP & GREEN BUILDING STRATEGIES: Introduction to green building and the implementation of LEED on new construction projects. Wednesday evenings, March 2 - April 6. Registration required; $295; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu/LEED. SOCIAL MEDIA : MANAGING YOUR SITES: Part of the Online Marketing Series. Class continues March 2. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY March 3 LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700 or www.cocc.edu.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Apple expected to unveil new, lighter iPad at event By David Sarno and Jessica Guynn Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Apple Inc. will probably unveil a new iPad that could keep its name carved firmly at the top of the tablet computer market. The company is holding an event next week in San Francisco at which it is widely expected to show off a lighter and sleeker iPad that could maintain its massive lead in the multibillion-dollar tablet industry it pioneered. The media invitation for the possible iPad 2 rollout was sent as Apple shareholders met at

GDP Continued from B1 Figures for GDP by industry released Wednesday only show some data for 2009, with most sectors down, but a few showed signs of improvement heading into 2009. The BEA reports show several sectors of the Bend economy continued to trend upward despite the recession that gripped the country during all of 2008 and the first half of 2009. These sectors included forestry, fishing and related industries, which rose from $27 million real GDP in 2007 to nearly $29 million in 2008 and were continuing upward in 2009; electrical equipment and appliance manufacturing, which rose from $22.5 million in 2007 to $30 million in 2008 (with no figures for 2009); and broadcasting and telecommunications, which grew from $150 million in 2007 to nearly $181 million in 2008 (with no figures for 2009). Among the biggest gainers were government, which grew from $550 million in 2007 to $585 million in 2008 and up to $615 million in 2009; education services, which dipped in 2007 but rose from $32.5 million in 2008 to $34 million in 2009; and health care and social services, which rose from $622 million in 2007 to $651 million in 2008 and continued rising to nearly $685 million in 2009. Several other sectors showed slight gains in real GDP from 2007 to 2008 before flattening out in 2009, including banking, finance, insurance and professional and business services, according to the BEA reports. Private industry GDP for the Bend area peaked at around $5.8 billion in 2007 and fell below $5.7 billion in 2008, and continued to fall to $5.4 billion in 2009. Total Bend-area GDP for all industries, public and private, topped out at about $6.45 billion in 2007, dropped to $6.35 billion in 2008 and continued falling to just over $6 billion in 2009, according to the BEA.

the company’s Cupertino, Calif., headquarters amid calls for Apple to disclose a succession plan in the wake of Chief Executive Steve Jobs’ recent medical leave. Jobs was not present, missing only his second shareholder meeting in a decade. Apple shareholders rejected the proposal for the company to disclose its plans for Jobs’ replacement. Investors are wrestling with the uncertainty stemming from Jobs’ sudden announcement last month that he would take his second medical leave in two years. Apple said it already engages

Ford recalling 150,000 F-150s to fix air bags

The Associated Press ile photo

A man wipes down one of the pickups in a long row of 2006 Ford F-150s sitting on the lot of a Ford dealership in the south Denver suburb of Centennial, Colo., in 2006.

By Ken Thomas The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Under government pressure, Ford Motor Co. said Wednesday it will recall nearly 150,000 F-150 pickup trucks to fix air bags that could deploy without warning, a fraction of the vehicles the government contends should be called back and repaired. The recall covers trucks from the 2005- 06 model years in the United States and Canada for what the Dearborn, Mich., company calls a “relatively low risk” of the air bag deploying inadvertently. The government, however, has urged Ford to recall 1.3 million F-150s from the 200406 model years, citing 77 injuries from air bags deploying accidentally. The recall is being closely watched because Ford’s F-Series pickup truck is the best-selling vehicle in America. Ford’s leaders have made

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

Find Your Dream Home In

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in succession planning but that requiring disclosure would divulge confidential information and potentially harm the company’s ability to recruit and retain executives. The shareholder meeting came a week before the March 2 event at which Apple is expected to launch the next version of its iPad Since it launched the first iPad last April, Apple has sold more than 15 million units, and analysts expect the company to sell 30 million this year — or about two-thirds of all tablets projected to be sold globally.

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

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safety a cornerstone of the company’s revitalization, but the truck recall represents the latest safety issue to confront the automaker. Ford has recalled more than 600,000 Windstar minivans in the U.S. and Canada since August to fix rear axles that can corrode and break, an issue still under investigation by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. During the past decade, Ford recalled more than 10 million vehicles. A Transportation Department spokeswoman said the agency was reviewing Ford’s response to see if the F-150 recall was adequate. If the government determines that the recall is too limited, it could seek a rare public hearing to decide whether Ford should widen its safety action.

L

Inside

THE WEST Friends, family mourn yachters killed by pirates, see Page C2. OREGON Ashland company designs gear for special ops forces, see Page C3. Former camper says church knew of sexual abuse, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011

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REDMOND — Ridgeview High School will be the name of the Redmond School District’s second high school when it opens in time for the 2012-13 academic year. In a 3-2 vote, the Redmond School Board selected the name from a list of three finalists during its Wednesday meeting. A volunteer committee picked through about 150 suggestions from the public, trimming the list down to three finalists. In order of the committee’s preference, the finalists were: Ridgeview, South Redmond and Grandview. Soon after the district announced the finalists, comments from the public began arriving at the district. Eventually, more than 200 arrived, with about half rejecting all of the names and the rest showing a preference for one of the finalists. Little of the negative comments were apparent during Wednesday’s meeting, though. Three people spoke about the names, each picking a different one as a favorite. Ed Boero, a Redmond city councilor, said the name mattered little in the end. “I think the most important part is not what we name the school, it’s that we built the school,� Boero said. “(The school) is an asset to community. We can be proud of it. Kids are going to get a great education there.� See Ridgeview / C5

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mation of Oregon’s approach to public education. Geisen, who in 2008 received the National Teacher of the Year award, told The Bulletin on Wednesday that he was surprised by the honor. So was Juba, who also serves on the advisory council for The Chalkboard Project, a nonprofit created in 2004 to improve the state’s public school system. See Panel / C5

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MADRAS — Jefferson County Treasurer Deena Goss has been issued a public apology by the Jefferson County Board of Commissioners, which declared itself satisfied that she committed no criminal violations against the county. Released on Wednesday, the commissioners’ statement says that Goss was in violation of state law regarding investment thresholds, but corrected the problem on her own. “After careful consideration and extensive investigation, the Board of County Commissioners find that no criminal violations against Jefferson County were committed by Deena Goss,� reads the statement, which all three commissioners signed. “Deena acknowledges the investment portfolio was more heavily invested in corporate bonds than statute allows. Deena corrected the investment ratio as soon as that issue became apparent to her. The Board of County Commissioners regrets and apologizes for the impact this issue has had on Deena, her family and the community.� After the meeting, Goss called the outcome “a huge win.� “I’m very pleased with the public statement,� Goss said. “I’m exhausted but I’m looking forward to a new, refreshing starting point. This was a victory, a big day today.� Commission Chair Mike Ahern said he was simply ready to move on from the issues the board had been addressing with Goss’ office. “We will move on and we will make improvements,� Ahern said. “I stand by the decision to have this enter public discourse. But of course we are sorry about the hardships on her and her family. Still, we needed to get through this.� See Treasurer / C5

Panel whittles down boundary options

Bend-La Pine Schools’ boundary advisory committee narrowed possible scenarios for 2011-12 middle-school boundaries to three at its meeting Wednesday. Several alternatives for each scenario still exist.

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he Bend-La Pine Schools’ boundary advisory committee on Wednesday cut down to three the middle-school boundary change options it will take to the public next week. Two of the options focus primarily on westside students who attend High Lakes or Miller elementaries, while one option is focused on students who currently attend Pine Ridge Elementary. In all three of the scenarios, students from Ensworth Elementary are affected, and two of the scenarios affect a small portion of Buckingham students. The boundary committee was formed in December to solve overcrowding at Cascade Middle School, which has more than 900 students enrolled this year. If left alone, the school is projected to grow to 975 students in coming years. At last week’s meeting, the group came up with six possible scenarios for shifting students to even out middle-school enrollment. On Wednesday, the group whittled it down to three options, which the district will take to three public forums next week. “We’re painting with a broad brush here to try to get the right orders Forums set of magnitude in those Bend-La Pine schools while hopefully Schools will host still giving parents and three public forums students lots of options next week on the to take advantage of proposed changes area change requests,â€? to middle-school Deputy Superintendent boundaries. John Rexford said. • 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. After much debate Tuesday at Pine and a few tweaks of Ridge Elementary, each map, the com19840 Hollygrape mittee settled on three St., Bend options. In all of these, • 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. some students from Wednesday at High Ensworth and BuckLakes Elementary, ingham elementaries 2500 N.W. High will move to Sky View Lakes Loop, Bend Middle School. The first option would • 4 p.m. to 5:30 take a large chunk of p.m. Thursday at Pine Ridge students and Ensworth Elementary, send them to Pilot Butte 2150 N.E. Daggett Middle School. Lane, Bend The second would take a large swath of High Lakes and Miller elementaries’ enrollments and send them to Pilot Butte Middle School. And the third option would take all High Lakes students who live north of Portland Avenue and send them to Pilot Butte. The next step will be public forums held at High Lakes, Pine Ridge and Ensworth elementaries next week. At those, the public is invited to share thoughts and opinions on the three options. “We will just collect as much input as we can,â€? Rexford said. Once the forums are complete, the committee will select an option and make recommendations on allowing students to stay in their current schools, called grandfathering. The committee will also determine whether any high-school boundary changes are necessary in conjunction with the changes to the middle-school boundaries.

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

La Pine may absorb service districts By Hillary Borrud

If you go What: Public hearing to consider whether the city of La Pine should consolidate water and sewer district services provided within the La Pine city boundary into the city government When: 6 p.m. March 8 Where: La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way, La Pine

The Bulletin

LA PINE — Officials in Oregon’s youngest city, La Pine, said Wednesday they will launch an effort to annex two special districts that have provided water and sewer services since before the city incorporated in 2006. The La Pine City Council decided Wednesday night to schedule a hearing March 8 on plans to take over the La Pine Water District and the La Pine Special Sewer District. Folding

the districts into the city government will increase efficiency because the entities will be able to share workers and coordinate the replacement of infrastructure to avoid tearing up cuts multiple times, City Manager Rick Allen said. “The benefit is, when the sewer and water folks aren’t putting in water and sewer lines because it’s a cold, snowy morning, we’re a public works department, and they can plow snow,� Allen said.

Mayor Ken Mulenex said consolidating water and sewer services with other city services would also make La Pine friendlier for businesses, because business people could find all the information they need at one place. “The way it’s set up now, it’s not business-friendly,� Mulenex said. “They have to go to water, find out what’s going on; go to sewer, find out what’s going on. Then, they have to come to the city.� See La Pine / C2

C OV ER S T ORY

C2 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

La Pine Continued from C1 The La Pine Industrial Group has written a letter in favor of the city providing water and sewer services, citing the “economies of scale� the city could realize through consolidated services. Councilor Don Greiner said taking over the districts will cut down on duplicate expenses, such as attorney fees. “We’re both fighting each other, but the same people are paying both sides,� Greiner said, referring to La Pine residents who pay the city tax rate and water and sewer rates. “I think it will be beneficial to all involved, which is the citizens of this city.� The districts’ board members initially opposed the city’s proposal to take them over, but they are now ready to gradually relinquish control, said Donna Zigler, operations manager for the water district, earlier Wednesday. A facilitator, Outside Insights, of Bend, is now working with the city and two districts to help move the process forward. The three agencies are splitting the cost of the $1,725 contract, Zigler said. A meeting with the facilitator is scheduled for 5 p.m. Monday. When residents voted in 2006 to incorporate La Pine as a city, the measure they approved stated: “The existing sewer and the water special districts located almost entirely within the boundary are likely to be dissolved with the City taking over those issues.� In mid-January, the La Pine City Council sent a letter to the districts stating the city’s intent to annex them and asking district board members to cooperate. Sewer and water district board members responded in a Feb. 2 letter that said, in part, “The districts do not at this time wish to grant such consent.� On Wednesday, Zigler said the districts probably should have said they simply weren’t ready to hand over control “at this time.� “No one’s ever said it won’t happen,� Zigler said. “The boards said it will happen. It’s a matter of timing. The City Council’s got a pretty full plate at this time. The board feels it should be done in a timely fashion, over a long period of time, so we have all the i’s dotted and t’s are crossed and the (City) Council is at a point where they can take it on.� Asked when board members want the city to take over, Zigler said they have discussed a transfer date of June 30, 2012. That is six months later than the city’s deadline set out in its January letter. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

SEATTLE

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Results of traffic safety push released Traffic patrols from the Three Flags Traffic Safety Campaign resulted in several citations and arrests on Deschutes County roadways this month. Traffic patrols throughout the month of February resulted in one DUII arrest, two suspended driving citations, four MIP citations and 33 other cita-

tions. In addition, patrols focusing on seat belts resulted in 70 citations and warnings for seat belt violations, nine speeding citations and warnings, and 138 citations or warnings for driving infractions. The purpose of the campaign is to reduce the number of traffic fatalities and accidents by raising awareness of traffic laws that contribute to road safety.

N  R Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:03 a.m. Feb. 22, in the 20600 block of Foxborough Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and GPS stolen at 9:38 a.m. Feb. 22, in the 1400 block of Northwest City View Drive. Theft — Hubcaps were reported stolen at 11:39 a.m. Feb. 22, in the 61000 block of Honkers Lane. Burglary — A dog was reported stolen at 12:21 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 1500 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and CD player and DVD stolen at 2:19 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 61400 block of Rock Bluff Circle. Theft — Stereo equipment was reported stolen from a vehicle at 6:03 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 19500 block of Greatwood Loop. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 10:11 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 900 block of Southeast Bridgeford Boulevard. DUII — Alex Michael Bear, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:56 a.m. Feb. 23, in the 2600 block of Northwest Recency Street. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 3:26 p.m. Feb. 18, in the area of Southeast First Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:27 a.m. Feb. 19, in the area of Northwest Second Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:16 p.m. Feb. 20, in the area of Southeast Combs Flat Road.

Don Jordan, executive director of the Seattle Animal Shelter, stands in the shelter’s operating room where Bob Riggle, who was shot and killed by Somali pirates Tuesday, worked as a replacement vet. Workers at the shelter remembered Riggle as a man who chose his words carefully and who was a thoughtful and methodical vet.

DUII — Ronald Doyle, 67, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:51 p.m. Feb. 20, in the area of Davis Loop.

Yachters killed by pirates mourned

Redmond Police Department

Theft — A gas stove was reported stolen at 12:51 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 600 block of Southwest Eighth Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 12:43 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way.

By Christina Hoag and George Tibbits The Associated Press

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 6:05 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 15700 block of Sunrise Boulevard in La Pine. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 1:44 p.m. Feb. 22, in the 53200 block of Day Road in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 19 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www .humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane. org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic medium-haired cat — Young male, gray tabby; found near State Highway 126. Domestic medium-haired cat — Young male, orange tabby; found near State Highway 126.

SANTA MONICA, Calif. — Four American yachters killed by Somali pirates early Tuesday were longtime sailors whose passion for the high seas outweighed any fear of the risks, friends said. The yacht’s owners, Jean and Scott Adam, of Marina del Rey, near Los Angeles, along with Bob Riggle and Phyllis Macay, of Seattle, were shot to death after pirates boarded their yacht Friday and took them hostage several hundred miles south of Oman. The pirates shot the four after firing a rocket-propelled grenade at a U.S. warship, one of several vessels tracking the hijacked boat over the weekend. Fifteen men were captured. Friends, family and fellow sailors remembered the four as adventurous, with a zest for life, but also as meticulous planners who were well aware of the dangers of the open seas. The Adams had been sailing full-time on their 58-foot yacht, the Quest, since December 2004 after retiring. They often travelled with friends, and on this trip were joined by Riggle and Macay. Macay and Riggle had left Seattle on Riggle’s sailboat for a world voyage in September 2007, but in recent years had

been crewing on separate boats, said Macay’s friend Cynthia Kirkham, of Seattle. The two periodically returned home on visits, she said, adding that Macay had stayed with her last June. Mariners were warned about traveling around the Horn of Africa because of the risk of pirate attacks. The four sailors had traveled with a large flotilla to stay safe from pirates earlier in the trip, but they had left the group when the attack occurred, Macay’s niece, Nina Crossland, told reporters in South San Francisco.

Singles yacht club “My aunt is a very smart and avid sailor,� said Crossland, visibly shaken and holding back tears as she spoke to reporters Tuesday morning. “I think she was smart enough and planned ahead and prepared to not be in this type of situation.� Macay, 59, was wounded but alive when Navy SEALs boarded the Quest after the shooting, but she died later, her niece said. Riggle “would never do anything to jeopardize Phyllis,� said Hank Curci, a friend and fellow member of the Seattle Singles Yacht Club. Joe Grande, another member, said the deaths were like losing family to those who knew the pair.

“Great sailors, good people. They were doing what they wanted to do, but that’s small comfort in the face of this,� Grande said.

Seattle veterinarian Riggle was a relief veterinarian for the Seattle Animal Shelter for the past eight years or so, spaying and neutering adopted animals, said director Don Jordan. “He wasn’t a man of many words but he was a kind-hearted individual with a great passion for animals and animal welfare,� Jordan said. Riggle once took a colleague’s family sailing when their daughter was diagnosed with cancer to get their mind off their troubles. “That was just a small indicator about how he treated people,� he said. Macay was vice president for training and development for Profitability Consulting Group, an adviser to retail furniture stores based in Hillsborough, N.C. Macay, who never married, took a sabbatical about three years ago.

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House impeaches Andrew Johnson in 1868 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, Feb. 24, the 55th day of 2011. There are 310 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Feb. 24, 1761, Boston lawyer James Otis Jr. went to court to argue against “writs of assistance� that allowed British customs officers to arbitrarily search people’s premises; citing English common law, Otis declared: “A man’s house is his castle.� (Although Otis lost the case, his statement provided a source of inspiration for American independence.) ON THIS DATE In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII issued a papal bull, or edict, outlining his calendar reforms. (The Gregorian Calendar is the calendar in general use today.) In 1711, the opera “Rinaldo� by George Frideric Handel premiered in London. In 1803, in its Marbury v. Madison decision, the Supreme Court established judicial review of the constitutionality of statutes. In 1821, Mexican rebels proclaimed the “Plan de Iguala,� their declaration of independence from Spain. In 1863, Arizona was organized as a territory. In 1868, the House of Representatives impeached President Andrew Johnson following his

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y attempted dismissal of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton; Johnson was later acquitted by the Senate. In 1920, the German Workers Party, which later became the Nazi Party, met in Munich to adopt its platform. In 1942, the Voice of America went on the air for the first time. In 1961, the Federal Communications Commission authorized the nation’s first full-scale trial of pay television in Hartford, Conn. In 1981, Buckingham Palace announced the engagement of Britain’s Prince Charles to Lady Diana Spencer. A jury in White Plains, N.Y., found Jean Harris guilty of second-degree murder in the fatal shooting of “Scarsdale Diet� author Dr. Herman Tarnower. (Sentenced to 15 years to life in prison, Harris was granted clemency by New York Gov. Mario Cuomo in Dec. 1992.) TEN YEARS AGO In an amicable first meeting held in Jerusalem, Secretary of State Colin Powell and Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov pledged a constructive approach to dealing with Iraq, missile defenses and other points of policy discord. Mathematician and computer scientist Claude Shannon, whose theories about binary code became the basis

for modern mass communications networks, died in Medford, Mass., at age 84. FIVE YEARS AGO Suicide bombers attempted to drive explosive-packed cars into the world’s largest oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia, but were foiled by guards who opened fire, detonating both vehicles; al-Qaida claimed responsibility. Julia Mancuso won gold in the women’s giant slalom at the Turin Olympics. Death claimed actors Don Knotts in Los Angeles and Dennis Weaver in Ridgway, Colo.; both were 81. ONE YEAR AGO Testifying before Congress, Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda apologized personally and repeatedly to the United States and millions of American Toyota owners for safety lapses that had led to deaths and widespread recalls. Trainer Dawn Brancheau was dragged to her death by a killer whale, Tilikum, at SeaWorld in Orlando, Fla.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Abe Vigoda is 90. Actor Steven Hill is 89. Actor-singer Dominic Chianese is 80. Movie composer Michel Legrand is 79. Actor James Farentino is 73. Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Conn., is 69. Actor Barry Bostwick is 66. Actor Edward James Olmos is 64. Singer-writer-producer Rupert Holmes is 64. Rock singermusician George Thorogood is 61. Actress Debra Jo Rupp is 60. Actress Helen Shaver is 60. Apple CEO Steve Jobs is 56. News anchor Paula Zahn is 55. Country singer Sammy Kershaw is 53. Singer Michelle Shocked is 49. Movie director Todd Field is 47. Actor Billy Zane is 45. Actress Bonnie Somerville is 37. Rhythm-and-blues singer Brandon Brown (Mista) is 28. Rock musician Matt McGinley (Gym Class Heroes) is 28. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The house of every one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defence against injury and violence as for his repose.� — Sir Edward Coke, English jurist (1552-1634)

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 C3

O Ashland company is designing extreme Former camper cold-weather gear for special ops forces says Adventists knew of abuse

By Hannah Guzik Ashland Daily Tidings

ASHLAND — In a building on Oak Street, Jim Trombly is designing protective clothing that will allow U.S. special operations forces to survive in temperatures reaching 50 below zero. The product line director for Massif Mountain Gear traveled to northern Minnesota during a storm last month to test the gear alongside troops. “Unfortunately it wasn’t that cold — it got down to zero degrees, but that wasn’t quite cold enough,” he said. “So they’ve extended the testing to Kodiak, Alaska.” Last year, Massif was awarded a military contract to create a set of pants, a vest and a jacket that will allow special operations forces to survive in extremely cold weather, said executive vice president Chris Wasgatt. The company began designing fire-resistant clothing for the military in 2006, but this is the first time Massif has been asked by the Department of Defense to create nonfire-resistant clothing, he said. “Jim comes from the outdoor industry and he’s applying those principles to military garments, which hadn’t really been done before,” Wasgatt said. “He showed them and they’re like, ‘We love you.’ So now the head of all special operations command calls Jim on his cell phone and asks him, ‘What do you think we should do here?’”

Positive tests The Layer 7 Protective Clothing Uniform Puffy looks like a lightweight camouflage snowsuit, but it also compacts into a small ball that can easily fit in a soldier’s pack. “The testing has gone exceptionally well so far,” Trombly said. “These garments are 30 percent lighter and 25 percent more packable than what the guys have today.” The company began working on the project last summer and is finalizing designs now. Massif expects the Department of Defense to approve the final design in May or June, so the gear can be manufactured this summer and be in soldiers’ packs next winter, Trombly said. The Special Operations Delta Force will wear the Massif garments, as will U.S. Navy SEALs, U.S. Air Force Pararescue Jump-

By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

Julia Moore / (Medford) Mail Tribune

Jim Trombly, product line director, holds Massif Mountain Gear garments on Monday in Ashland.

“What I tell people is, ‘Regardless of your politics, we all want our troops safe and there wasn’t anything that was safe out there before.’” — Chris Wasgatt, executive vice president, Massif Mountain Gear ers and U.S. Army Rangers, Wasgatt said. The company’s headquarters are at 498 Oak St. A team of 15 developers and designers creates each garment in-house. “We’re a think tank from fabric to garment,” Wasgatt said. Then the prototypes are put together by sewing professionals who work behind one of more than a dozen sewing machines in the building. The company is always looking to hire more sewing professionals, because there appears to be a shortage in the Rogue Valley, Wasgatt said. Next, the prototypes undergo a first round of testing in Ashland. “We take them up to Mount Ashland and beat them up, and

then throw them in our killer washing machine,” Wasgatt said. The washing machine runs continuously, so the company can see what a garment looks like after 300 washes, he said. Massif works with the military to do more testing in other locations, such as Alaska or Afghanistan, and makes any modifications necessary. When the final designs are approved, they are manufactured off-site in a variety of locations, including Portland, New York, North Carolina and Puerto Rico, Wasgatt said. The Layer 7 gear will be manufactured in Kentucky through the government’s National Institute for the Severely Handicapped, which creates jobs for people with disabilities, Wasgatt said.

Other contracts Massif, founded in 2001 in Ashland, also has contracts with the Bureau of Land Management and other groups to design protective clothing, particularly for firefighters, he said. Between 2000 and 2009, Massif secured $13.8 million in military contracts. The company has designed a number of fire-

O  B Judge: Raise power bills to fund dam removal GRANTS PASS — An administrative law judge has recommended granting PacifiCorp a temporary 2-percent rate increase for its 45,000 electric customers in California to help pay the costs of removing dams on the Klamath River. The proposed ruling filed Tuesday will be taken up by the California Public Utilities Commission after a month of public comment. The $13.8 million raised by the surcharge over nine years would go into trust funds against the day federal authorities approve removing the Portland-based utility’s four hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River in Oregon and California. Projected to begin in 2020, removing the dams is part of a landmark agreement to help salmon, give farmers better assurances of irrigation and restore the ecology of the Klamath basin. Oregon authorities have approved a similar surcharge.

biphenyls — a carcinogen and suspected neurotoxin widely used for decades as an insulator in machinery and electrical equipment. A Pacific Recycling official denied his company had any liability for the allegations in the federal lawsuit. Separately, Pacific Recycling has been fined by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality for PCB contamination at its waste metal yard at another site in the Eugene area.

Bus driver cited for speeding in Portland PORTLAND — TriMet has suspended a bus driver who was stopped by police for going 57 mph in a 45-mph zone. Police say the 48-year-old driver was cited for speeding, careless driving, failure to maintain the lane, tailgating and driving a commercial vehicle without a valid license. His license had expired. The Oregonian reports there were no passengers on the bus at the time Monday night, and the driver was returning to the garage.

Waste oil storage firm sues recycler over PCBs Salem weighs closing EUGENE — The operator of a schools, firing teachers waste oil storage facility near Eugene has sued a metal recycling yard over toxic PCB contamination that has shut down the storage site for months. The (Eugene) Register-Guard reports that Oil Re-Refining Co. of Portland is seeking $5 million plus cleanup costs from Pacific Recycling because of contamination by PCBs — polychlorinated

SALEM — The Salem-Keizer School District is considering closing some small schools and cutting 400 teaching positions next year to offset a $55 million budget shortfall. Superintendent Sandy Husk presented options Tuesday night to a budget committee. The (Salem) Statesman Jour-

nal reports the cuts could be worse. The budget plans assume the Legislature will adopt a school fund higher than the one proposed by the governor. It also assumes employee unions will agree to reduce pay and benefits by at least $11 million.

Funeral slated for 26-year-old Marine PORTLAND — The funeral for an Oregon Marine killed in Afghanistan will be held Saturday in Medford. Twenty-sixyear-old Matthew DeYoung, of Talent, died last week supporting combat operations. His mother, Teddi DeYoung, told The Oregonian her son was born a Marine because she had served in the Navy and her husband Bruce served in the Marines. Matthew DeYoung was assigned to a unit based at Camp Lejeune. He was deployed to Iraq in 2006 and 2007 and was sent to Afghanistan late last year.

14 pounds of pot seized in I-5 stop SALEM — Oregon State Police say a trooper found more than 14 pounds of marijuana in the vehicle of a Covington, Wash., man stopped for speeding on Interstate 5 near Salem. Lt. Gregg Hastings says the seized marijuana was worth about $35,000. Hastings says 51-year-old Kelly Dean Scannell was arrested Monday for unlawful possession and distribution of a controlled substance. — From wire reports

resistant soft-shell jackets and long-sleeve shirts, which are used by thousands of troops, including those in Iraq and Afghanistan, Wasgatt said. The clothing, made of a lightweight, fire-resistant fabric Massif developed, has saved lives by protecting troops from being burned in explosions from improvised explosive devices, or roadside bombs, he said. The company has photos of soldiers whose skin has been spared burns in the places covered by the Massif clothing. “What I tell people is, ‘Regardless of your politics, we all want our troops safe and there wasn’t anything that was safe out there before,”’ Wasgatt said.

PORTLAND — A former member of a youth camping group run by the Seventh-day Adventist Church is suing the church, claiming he continued to suffer sexual abuse by a youth leader after informing church authorities. The man, who was not identified in a complaint filed Wednesday in Multnomah County Circuit Court, is seeking $5.25 million. According to the lawsuit, the plaintiff, then a teenager, was part of the church’s Pathfinder Club program in Junction City in 1975 when counselor Les Bovee sexually assaulted him. The plaintiff says he informed church authorities but stayed in the program. On a camping trip after informing church authorities, the plaintiff said in the lawsuit that Bovee assaulted him again. “(Bovee) told him after he reported it, ‘They don’t believe you,’” said Steve Crew, one of the plaintiff’s attorneys. “Our client thought that was right, that Bovee was allowed to abuse him.”

‘We are shocked and saddened’ The church’s Marylandbased headquarters referred calls about the case to local offices. The Oregon Conference of Seventh-day Adventists did not return calls from The Associated Press on Wednesday, but Steve Vistaunet of the church’s regional headquarters in Ridgefield, Wash., said the church was rocked by the allegation. “We are shocked and sad-

dened any time the abuse of a child occurs in our communities and especially within the circle of our church’s influence,” Vistaunet said in a statement emailed to the AP. “The Seventhday Adventist Church takes the safety of children seriously who come to our churches or engage in church-related functions. Although we can’t comment yet on the specifics of this case, we will do all we can to resolve this appropriately.”

Convicted in 1979 There was no answer Wednesday at a phone number listed for Bovee’s last known address in Myrtle Creek. According to public records, Bovee was convicted in 1979 in Lane County of second-degree sodomy and served a 10-year sentence. Crew said he had determined with which church officials the plaintiff spoke and was prepared to call them as witnesses if the case were to go to trial. The lawsuit alleges that the defendants knew Bovee was a risk to children, but they allowed him to continue to serve in his position as a youth leader. The lawsuit says that the church should be held accountable for failing to report the alleged assault to police, for failing to exclude Bovee from contact with children or the Pathfinders group, and for failing to tell parents of other children that Bovee was a risk. The suit also alleges the church failed to enforce “commonsense policies” that could prevent child abuse and didn’t train Pathfinder leaders in how to recognize and prevent abuse.

C4 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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What is ‘awful’ in union battles

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egotiators from the state and one of Oregon’s largest state employee unions sat down at the bargaining table on Tuesday and exchanged initial proposals. AFSCME,

which represents about 6,000 public employees, called the state’s offer “in a word — awful.” What was so awful? The state put on the table a menu of options: • No step increases from July 2011 to the end of June 2013. That saves the state about $54 million in the general fund budget over the biennium. • Employees must pick up any health insurance premium increases over what the state paid for 2010. That would save the state about $46 million in the general fund budget over the biennium. • Ending the 6 percent pickup that the state makes for the employee’s contribution to the state retirement system as of July 1. That would save the state about $117 million over the same two-year period. • There are other options, too, including one for seven more furlough days, which saves the state about $62 million for the biennium. According to the union, the state indicated there was room for overall growth in employee compensation in the state budget by 6 percent. So the union could, presumably, pick among the options and just not go over 6 percent. The union countered with its own proposals. It’s a smorgasbord of more. If the state takes the 6 percent pickup, the union wants a 6 percent increase in salary. The union asked

for a wage increase in 2011 and in 2012 of 2 percent plus the increase in the consumer price index. Employees who are demoted rather than taking a layoff would get to keep their current salary. There’s also an increase in vacation time, and the day after Thanksgiving would become a paid holiday. The governor’s team is apparently not commenting during the negotiations. Don Loving, a spokesman for AFSCME, said the negotiations are a dance at this point and neither side expects to get exactly what it is asking for. Back to what is “awful.” The union is right. If you are a state employee, these cuts might feel awful. But do you know what else is awful? The economy. The state’s unemployment rate. The state’s $3.5 billion general fund budget shortfall. Oregonians seeing their incomes and home values decline. State employees and how they are compensated are the building blocks of state government. When the state is lurching through awful, a correction is bound to come. How many other Oregonians look out over the next two years and can say they will see 6-percent growth in compensation? Most Oregonians wouldn’t refuse to swallow that as awful. They’d take it in a heartbeat.

Appoint superintendents

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regon’s least well-known — judges aside — elected public official is no doubt Susan Castillo, superintendent of public instruction. The office draws so little attention, in fact, that almost 150,000 of Oregonians casting ballots in the May primary election failed to vote in Castillo’s race against Ron Maurer. It’s not entirely Castillo’s fault that so few people seem to care. Oregon’s superintendent of public instruction has an administrative job of running a state department. The superintendent oversees such activities as gathering statistics and other record-keeping tasks. Policy is generally set by the state Board of Education. And while the superintendent appears before the Legislature on funding and education issues, other state department heads do that, as well. Still, every four years Oregonians vote to fill the position. Sometimes they’ve been lucky, and a person with real education experience or exceptionally good relations with lawmakers has been elected. Other times, as

now, not so much. Even when highly qualified people hold the job, however, the question remains: Why is this administrator an elected position in the first place? It is because the state constitution makes it that way, of course. Now, at least some Oregon lawmakers want to change that, and they’ve introduced a handful of bills. Gov. John Kitzhaber backs the idea, as well, no doubt in part because the change would allow the governor to appoint the head of the education agency. Creating the change is no slam dunk, however. Oregonians have voted on and rejected the idea in the past, for one thing. Too, there’s disagreement about whether the state constitution allows the Legislature to make the change without a public vote, and it seems likely that unless it can, the idea will be difficult to put into effect. Ultimately the state superintendent is a department head. Oregonians don’t need to elect department heads.

Time to stop our oil addiction By Thomas L. Friedman New York Times News Service

THOMAS FRIEDMAN

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hat’s unfolding in the Arab world today is the mother of all wake-up calls. And what the voice on the other end of the line is telling us is clear as a bell: “America, you have built your house at the foot of a volcano. That volcano is now spewing lava from different cracks and is rumbling like it’s going to blow. Move your house!” In this case “move your house” means “end your addiction to oil.” No one is rooting harder for the democracy movements in the Arab world to succeed than I am. But even if things go well, this will be a long and rocky road. The smart thing for us to do right now is to impose a $1-a-gallon gasoline tax, to be phased in at 5 cents a month beginning in 2012, with all the money going to pay down the deficit. Legislating a higher energy price today that takes effect in the future, notes the Princeton economist Alan Blinder, would trigger a shift in buying and investment well before the tax kicks in. With one little gasoline tax we can make ourselves more economically and strategically secure, help sell more Chevy Volts and free ourselves to openly push for democratic values in the Middle East without worrying anymore that it will harm our oil interests. Yes, it will mean higher gas prices, but prices are going up anyway, folks. Let’s capture some it for ourselves. It is about time. For the past 50 years, America (and Europe and Asia) have treated the Middle East as if it were just a collection of big gas stations: Saudi station, Iran station, Kuwait station,

Bahrain station, Egypt station, Libya station, Iraq station, United Arab Emirates station, etc. Our message to the region has been very consistent: “Guys (it was only guys we spoke with), here’s the deal. Keep your pumps open, your oil prices low, don’t bother the Israelis too much and, as far as we’re concerned, you can do whatever you want out back. You can deprive your people of whatever civil rights you like. You can engage in however much corruption you like. You can preach whatever intolerance from your mosques that you like. You can print whatever conspiracy theories about us in your newspapers that you like. You can keep your women as illiterate as you like. You can create whatever vast welfare-state economies, without any innovative capacity, that you like. You can under-educate your youth as much as you like. Just keep your pumps open, your oil prices low, don’t hassle the Jews too much — and you can do whatever you want out back.” It was that attitude that enabled the Arab world to be insulated from history for the past 50 years — to be ruled for decades by the same kings and dictators. Well, history is back. The combination of rising food prices, huge bulges of unemployed youth and social networks that are enabling those youths to orga-

nize against their leaders is breaking down all the barriers of fear that kept these kleptocracies in power. But fasten your seat belts. This is not going to be a joy ride because the lid is being blown off an entire region with frail institutions, scant civil society and virtually no democratic traditions or culture of innovation. The United Nations’ Arab Human Development Report 2002 warned us about all of this, but the Arab League made sure that that report was ignored in the Arab world and the West turned a blind eye. But that report — compiled by a group of Arab intellectuals led by Nader Fergany, an Egyptian statistician — was prophetic. It merits re-reading today to appreciate just how hard this democratic transition will be. The report stated that the Arab world is suffering from three huge deficits — a deficit of education, a deficit of freedom and a deficit of women’s empowerment. A summary of the report in Middle East Quarterly in the fall of 2002 detailed the key evidence: the gross domestic product of the entire Arab world combined was less than that of Spain. Seeing the Arab democracy movements in Egypt and elsewhere succeed in modernizing their countries would be hugely beneficial to them and to the world. We must do whatever we can to help. But no one should have any illusions about how difficult and convulsive the Arabs’ return to history is going to be. Let’s root for it, without being in the middle of it. Tom Friedman is a columnist for The New York Times.

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Can the Windy City put up with it’s ‘Tiny Dancer’ mayor? By Maureen Dowd New York Times News Service

CHICAGO — an Tiny Dancer lift up the City of Big Shoulders? He thinks so. Even coiled with nervous anticipation and bundled in Patagonia on a snowy election day, Rahm Emanuel retained his Black Swan panache. He was 10 minutes early, as usual, for an 8 a.m. campaign stop at the 65th Street El on the South Side. Commuters streaming through were already calling Emanuel “Mr. Mayor,” or simply Rahm, explaining which parking meters on the Lakefront they wanted fixed or what predatory lending on the South Side they needed stopped. “You can do it!” yelled Lynetta Spears, 38, a tall, African-American woman. Surrounded by his three adorable — and adoring — children, Emanuel pointed at Spears intensely, Jerry Maguire-style. “Barack Obama trusts him,” Spears told me. “Rahm’s a good guy.” She shrugged off the caricature of the 51-year-old Emanuel as The En-

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forcer who stabs steak knives into tables swearing vengeance and sends dead fish to those who cross him. “Everyone has a temper,” she said breezily. Chicago is a city, as H.L. Mencken wrote, that is “alive from snout to tail.” Which is a pretty good description of the electrified Emanuel as well; even his handshake feels hot. His campaign spots allude to that profane Rahmbo style that Andy Samberg parodies on “Saturday Night Live.” “He’s not gonna take any guff,” a bluecollar guy vows in one ad. The wiry and buff former White House chief of staff, who was known around the West Wing as “Tiny Dancer,” was falsely accused of being a carpetbagger for the years he spent in Washington as a Clinton and Obama aide and Illinois congressman. Now he’s such a celebrity here, he goes by only one name — on his yard signs, in his ads and even in his opponent’s attack ad. Rahm sometimes refers to himself as Rahm. “If their strategy was to get Rahm to explode,” he said of his motley crew of foes, “they’ve built a strategy based on

MAUREEN DOWD something I control.” Emanuel ran a disciplined and genial campaign, even showing patience during a ridiculous 12-hour hearing on whether he was really a resident of Chicago and qualified to run for mayor — a dust-up caused when the odd tenant renting Rahm’s North Side house refused to vacate and stirred up political trouble. Rahm rebutted that he and his wife, Amy Rule, still had stuff stored at his house, including Amy’s wedding dress. “I said as a joke that if the hearing went into 13 hours, I was going to put the wedding dress on,” he said with a grin, as he hopscotched around the city scooping up last-minute votes. When I asked what revenge he is plotting against his scheming tenant, Emanuel looked mischievous, but bit his

tongue. Of course, as Jon Stewart notes, the only thing scarier than Rahm Emanuel angry “is Rahm Emanuel smiling through his anger.” Can a city famous for its beefy pols, mobsters and steakhouse politicking handle a Sarah Lawrence College graduate who wore tights, eats organic, swims and does yoga, a lithe spirit who has more facility with Martha Graham’s version of “Apollo” than the Bulls’ place in their division? “I’ll eat grass-fed steaks,” he smiles. “Hey, I love steak, though I’ve cut down. My grandfather was a truck driver for Scandinavian Meats. I’m not interested in changing the culture of this city. I’m interested in changing how we do business.” He knows it took a while for Chicagoans to warm up to him. “The members that represented my district before me were Dan Rostenkowski, Roman Pucinski, Frank Annunzio, Mike Flanagan and Rod Blagojevich,” he said. “And along comes a guy named Rahm Israel Emanuel. I don’t know if I was loved, but they knew whose side I was on.” He had hoped to become the first Jew-

ish Speaker of the House, but now he is destined to become the first Jewish mayor of Chicago. “For me, as Rahm Emanuel, the grandson of Herman Smulivitz who came to this city in 1917 from the Russian-Romanian border as a 13-year-old to leave the pogroms, and son of Benjamin Emanuel, who came here in 1959 from Israel to start a medical practice, there’s a personal sense of accomplishment,” he said, after polishing off a half-corned-beef, half-pastrami sandwich at the legendary Manny’s deli. The other two members of the most competitive sibling trio on Earth — his brothers Zeke, the oncologist, and Ari, the Hollywood agent — flew to Chicago to come to their brother’s victory party. David Axelrod, who has moved back here to help organize the president’s re-election run, was also on hand, even though it was his birthday. “My birthday present,” Axelrod said, “will be a nine-and-a-half fingered mayor.” Maureen Dowd is a columnist for The New York Times.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 C5

O Harold Dean Gaylor

D N   Cana Anthony Ivy, of Portland June 2, 1972 - Feb. 20, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Traditional Service Thursday, February 24, 2011, 2:00 P.M., First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond. Burial Pilot Butte Cemetery, Bend, Oregon. Memorial Service Saturday, February 26, 2011, Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend, Oregon 97701.

Charles "Charlie" H. Kelso, of Bend Sept. 21, 1919 - Feb. 19, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No Formal Services will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701; www.partnersbend.org

Neva Kathleen Durfee, of Boswell, Oklahoma Nov. 17, 1937 - Feb. 16, 2011 Arrangements: Coles Tribute Center, 1-541-523-4300 Services: Funeral Service will be Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 2:00 p.m., at Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Baker City, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Boys Scouts of America, c/o Coles Tribute Center, 1950 Place St., Baker City, OR 97814.

Daniel Russell Carter, of Bend Oct. 24, 1973 - Sept. 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Memorial Service, Sunday, February 27, 2011, 11:00 a.m., Bend Seventh Day Adventist Church, 21610 Butler Market Road, Bend, Oregon.

John Victor Taylor, of Prineville June 15, 1940 - Feb. 20, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A Circle of Life Remembrance will be held in the spring.

Judy Howell, of Bend July 10, 1946 - Feb. 18, 2011 Arrangements: Dudley Hoffman Mortuary, 805-922-8463 www.dudleyhoffman.com Services: Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011, at 2:00 pm, at Westside Church, Bend, OR.

Daniel Kenneth Smith, Sr., of Redmond July 15, 1948 - Feb. 11, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: 3 p.m., Saturday, March 5th, Christian Church of Redmond, 536 SW 10th Ave., Redmond.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Vivian Jean Houck Jan. 1, 1923 - Feb. 20, 2011 Vivian Jean died peacefully, February 20, 2011. She was 88 years old. Jean was born January 1, 1923, in Rose Lake, Idaho to Joseph and Rose Huber. On October 29, 1942, she married the love of her life, John Houck. She is survived by their children; Nancy Dardis, Janice (and Chuck) Mills, Christine (and Sam) Dollenmeier, John (and Janice) Houck, Bruce (and Jeanette) Houck, Paula (and Eric) Staples, and Lisa Houck; 10 grandchildren, and 24 great-grandchildren; and her brothers, Wes and Richard Huber of Bend, Oregon, and Bill Huber of San Francisco, CA. She was preceded in death by her husband of 67 years, John Houck, her half-sister, Susan Thibeau, her granddaughter, Erin (Houck) Dellahoussaye, and son-in-law, Alan Dardis. Jean was a devoted wife and mother who inspired her family with her generous and gentle nature. Her generosity knew no bounds. She was a gift to the Madras community and wherever she lived as a testament to her faith. She loved birds and blue, and was admired by her daughters as being a tasteful decorator with an eye for the chic. Her gift was the love she showered upon her husband, her children, her friends, especially those in need, and her grandchildren. She will be sorely missed and grieved by all her children. A Mass of Christian burial will be held at 11 a.m., Friday, February 25th, St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, Madras.

Doris Marie ‘Dode’ (Moore) Woolley March 10, 1939 - Feb. 9, 2011 Doris Marie (Moore) Woolley, (known to friends and family as Dode), born on March 10, 1939, passed away on February 9, 2011, after a very long battle with cancer. The love and laughter she brought to this earth will never be ‘Dode’ Woolley forgotten. She always had a smile, a positive attitude and she was certain that is what kept her going for so many years. She had a unique sense of humor that could make you laugh even when you knew she was very sick. She is survived by her daughter, Tanya Woolley; her son, Trampas Woolley; her younger brother, Buck Moore; loving nieces and nephews, and many cherished friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, Carl and Lucille Moore; her brother, Ron Moore; and her sisters, Joyce Breadon and Linda Hanger. Services will be held at Redmond VWF Hall on Saturday, February 26, at 3:00 p.m.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Jan. 19, 1941 - Feb. 18, 2011 Harold Dean Gaylor of Prineville was born on January 19, 1941, to Clifford and Samantha Gaylor in Claremore, Oklahoma. He went to be with the Lord on February 18, 2011. His family moved to Oregon and he attended school in Glide, near Roseburg. He met his wife of 50 years, Sharon Claassen, in Coburg, OrHarold Gaylor egon, and they were married on September 3, 1960. Together they raised three children. They moved to Redmond in 1973 and then to Prineville in 2003. Harold was a member of the Operating Engineers Union for 50 years and worked in heavy construction until his retirement in 2001. During that time, he operated heavy equipment, was a field rep, and organizer, and an apprenticeship training instructor. He attended higher education classes in California and West Virginia. He also was an owner/operator of his own construction company and worked on Forest Service contract jobs during the 1980’s. He spent much time providing for his family and still made time to take them camping, fishing, hiking and berry picking on weekends and vacations. He had a great love of the outdoors and was an avid hunter and fisherman. He was involved in Cub Scouts with his son and always attended his children’s sports events. He attended Prineville Nazarene Church and during his illness, he spent many hours a day reading his bible and building his relationship with God. He shared his faith with everyone he came in contact with. He was a member of the Prineville Eagles and since moving to Prineville, he bought a motorcycle and enjoyed taking road trips with his friends. Survivors include his mother, Samantha Gaylor of Salem; wife, Sharon; son, Kimbal (and Carla) Gaylor of Prineville; daughter, Patricia (and Paul) Olmstead of Baker City; daughter, Lana Erikson of Bend; sister, Beverly Hilburn of Salem; sister, Barbara (and Jack) Sulffridge of Glide; sister, Jeannette (and JC) Morton of Salem; seven grandchildren and one-greatgrandchild. He was preceded in death by his father. Private interment will be at Deschutes Memorial Gardens. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, March 5th at 1:00 p.m. at Prineville Nazarene Church, 708 E. First St. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, Prineville Hospice, or Prineville Nazarene Church.

Treasurer Continued from C1 Commissioners intend to sit down with Goss at a work session to discuss ways to improve the operation of the treasurer’s office. That work session has not yet been scheduled, but Goss would like the commissioners to agree upon a reporting template and timetable for accounts, an update to the county’s investment policy and, perhaps, buy investment software for her department. The meeting began at 9 a.m. Wednesday with a public comment session at which many people spoke in Goss’ defense. The board requested the meeting on Feb. 9 so they could discuss a number of possible violations they had documented in a letter and potential discipline that could be applied. The disciplinary actions mentioned in the letter range from public reprimand to removing Goss, an elected official, from office.

Ridgeview Continued from C1 The school is being paid for with money from the $110 million bond district voters passed in 2008. Johnny Corbin, who lives in the district and is active in military veteran affairs, told the board that he still preferred his own submission for Robert Maxwell, who was awarded a Medal of Honor. Of the three finalists, Corbin preferred South Redmond. “That’s the best of the three choices, and I don’t think that’s a good choice,” Corbin said. Another Redmond resident who spoke at the meeting said he preferred Ridgeview. Board member Cathy Miller, who voted against Ridgeview, wondered about the district’s two high schools sharing the same initials of RHS would cause confusion. The existing high school is Redmond High School. Board member Ric Little also voted against Ridgeview.

Panel Continued from C1 “All of those reform initiatives are things I’m interested in,” said Juba, including a shift in school funding to reward district performance, the consolidation of school districts in order to do more with less, and generally encouraging schools “to be innovative and think about outcomes” rather than “just screaming for dollars.” The governor, who will serve as chair, has given the Oregon Education Invest-

Dwayne McDuffie, comic and animation writer, dies at 49 The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA — Dwayne McDuffie, who wrote comic books for Marvel and DC and founded his own publishing company before crossing over to television and animation, has died. He was 49. The Detroit native died Monday, a day after his birthday, DC Comics said. His cause and place of death weren’t immediately known. McDuffie wrote comics for the New York-based DC and Marvel, including runs on Batman: Legends of the Dark

Knight, the Fantastic Four and the Justice League of America. He also penned several animated television shows and features, including the just-released “All-Star Superman” as well as “Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths” and the animated TV series “Static Shock” and “Ben 10: Alien Force.” In 1992, McDuffie formed the comic book company Milestone Media Inc., which focused on creator-owned multicultural superheroes including “Hardware,” “Icon,” “Blood Syndicate,” “Xombi” and “Static.”

After hearing from the public and from Goss, the board came to the conclusion that there was no need to punish her for the mistakes made in the handling of an account from the county jail or for breaking a state threshold for investments in corporate debt. Commissioner Wayne Fording went so far as to offer a public apology to Goss. Fording said he was sorry for the way in which the inquiry into her office had taken place, saying he wished the draft letter that outlined the possible violations and potential discipline had never been written and released into public record. The bulk of the discussion during the public meeting centered on the investments in corporate debt. At one point, Ahern asked Goss if she had violated the state law regarding an investment threshold in corporate debt. “Obviously I did,” said Goss, who then asked commissioners to consider how she responded to the discovery of her mistake. “When it was brought to my attention, I sold (the investments in question). I found we were out of

compliance, (and) I sold the corporate notes. I made a mistake. There was no harm done to the county. Bottom line.” Meanwhile, the commission quickly dismissed questions about Goss’ oversight of a separate account from which $8,000 had disappeared over the course of three years. That issue was a moot point, they decided, as a Department of Justice found there was not enough evidence to support charging Goss with a crime. A discussion of Goss’ handling of a delinquent Transient Occupancy Tax account was also quickly resolved as both parties agreed that any future problems could be resolved with more frequent reports. Ahern said in the end he believed that Goss had made none of the errors on purpose. “I think it is bad,” Ahern told Goss before signing the public statement, “but I’m giving you the benefit of the doubt by saying it wasn’t purposeful.” Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

For a brief time during the meeting, board members discussed whether the new school’s name should be “Ridgeview” or “Ridge View.” The board eventually settled on the one-word version. The committee selected Ridgeview because of the view from the school’s property and because some of the most popular submissions included either “ridge” or “view” in the name. After touring the school, which is under construction, board member A.J. Losoya came to understand why the committee picked that name. “Taking a look at the views from that school, they’re phenomenal,” Losoya said. “I think, in time, it will create its own distinction and people will know where it’s at.” After the board voted, a round of applause broke out. Once the room was quiet again, Toni Duff, who chaired the name committee, said even people who did not like the name now would grow used to it. “It’s like naming a baby,” Duff said. “You’ll grow to love it.” In other business, the district will not place a local option levy

on the next ballot. After a teacher pitched the idea, the district researched the possibility of returning some of the $16 million of bond savings in return for voter approval of a local option levy. That move would have exchanged bond dollars, which are restricted for capital spending, for more flexible levy money. But because of declining property values, the district would be limited in how much it could raise through a levy. According to district projections, the levy would have raised about $650,000 per year, significantly less than the $10 million budget shortfall it currently faces. Bond savings, instead, will pay for renovations at four district schools. Redmond School Board Chairman Jim Erickson praised the idea’s creativity, but said it would not fix the district’s budget problems. “It’s a horrific situation we’re all in,” he said. “I don’t think this feels like the fix to the board.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

ment Team a number of tasks. It must develop a plan to make the state’s schools more effective and a budget model that rewards performance rather than divvying up state education dollars strictly by enrollment, as is now the case. Kitzhaber also wants Juba, Geisen and their fellow

Investment Team members to figure out how to set up another powerful panel — the Oregon Education Investment Board — to oversee school funding. The Investment Team must wrap up all of its recommendations in a written report by May 31, 2011.

Douglas Aden Deeks May 28, 1925 – Feb. 20, 2011 A memorial Service will be held at 11 a.m., February 26, 2011, at Grace First Lutheran Church in Bend for Douglas “Doug” Deeks who died Sunday, February 20, 2011. Doug died with family by his side. He was born on May 28, 1925, in Portland, Oregon, to Kenneth and Gladys (Pichette) Deeks. He married Mary Sue Koski on September 11, 1965. He was raised in Portland and attended Rose City Park Elementary School and graduated from Grant High School in 1943. After graduating from high school, he and his twin brother, Bill, served in the Navy during World War II in the Pacific. He attended the University of Portland. He worked for the State Parks on the Oregon Coast; in the restaurant business with his brother, Don; for the Union Pacific Railroad in Portland, Oregon; and the Neilsen Motor Co. in Redding, California. From 1960-1985 he worked for the U.S. Forest Service, Bend Ranger District, including 17 years at Lava Lands Visitor Center. He retired from the U.S. Forest Service in 1985, and worked as a Security Guard until 1990. He was a member of Grace First Lutheran Church. He enjoyed friends and family, telling stories, cooking, hunting, hiking, crosscountry skiing, bird watching and trips to the beach. Survivors include his wife; daughter, Heather Renee (Deeks) Saucedo, a Counselor in Bend; son, Christopher Douglas Deeks, Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy stationed at Port Hueneme, California, (wife, Michelle); five grandchildren, Cruz, Savanna, Colten, Taylor and Brad; brother, Charles Kenneth Deeks and sisterin-law, Mary Jane Deeks; sister-in-law, Helen Deeks; sister-in-law, Margaret Wanner and husband, Charles Wanner; brother-in-law, Mathew Koski and wife, Jacqueline Koski; and several beloved nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; his brother, Don and sister-in-law, Eleanor; twin brother, Bill; and nephew, Tim. Memorial contributions may be made to Grace First Lutheran Church Building Fund.

W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, FEBRUARY 24

HIGH Ben Burkel

32

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western



Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

31/14

31/10

36/14

19/6

Willowdale 

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

36/13

28/3

Mitchell

Madras

30/8

34/11

Camp Sherman 30/3 Redmond Prineville 32/6 Cascadia 30/7 31/7 Sisters 32/5 Bend Post 32/6

Oakridge Elk Lake 29/5

29/2

27/4

23/-4

26/1



Vancouver 29/17

Seattle Missoula

Redding

Elko

38/31

Christmas Valley



28/13

36/19

28/5

Silver Lake

26/0



32/19 12/-4

Reno

24/16

38/29

San Francisco Cloudy and cold with 50/43 snow showers likely today and tonight. 

Crater Lake 13/10

Salt Lake City



Moon phases

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:51 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:47 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:49 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:48 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:04 a.m. Moonset today . . . 10:12 a.m.

Last

New

Feb. 24

Mar. 4

43/31

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

LOW

First

Full

Mar. 12 Mar. 19

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 41/33/0.27 . . . . . 38/24/sn. . . . . . 38/22/pc Baker City . . . . . . 36/15/0.04 . . . . . 32/12/sn. . . . . . . 24/6/sn Brookings . . . . . . 46/37/0.04 . . . . . 38/32/sn. . . . . . 38/27/rs Burns. . . . . . . . . . 30/12/0.01 . . . . . 30/11/sn. . . . . . . 25/6/sn Eugene . . . . . . . . 44/31/0.04 . . . . . 37/23/sn. . . . . . 37/13/pc Klamath Falls . . . 32/20/0.00 . . . . . 28/14/sn. . . . . . . 24/9/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 32/16/0.00 . . . . . 25/13/sn. . . . . . . 25/1/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 34/23/0.00 . . . . . . 29/2/sn. . . . . . . 28/0/sn Medford . . . . . . .47/31/trace . . . . . 35/25/sn. . . . . . 36/20/sn Newport . . . . . . . 43/36/0.10 . . . . . 40/28/sh. . . . . . 41/25/pc North Bend . . . . . 46/36/0.29 . . . . . 40/28/sh. . . . . . 42/25/rs Ontario . . . . . . . . 38/25/0.00 . . . . . 41/23/sn. . . . . . . 33/17/c Pendleton . . . . . . 41/31/0.01 . . . . . 33/14/sn. . . . . . . 24/0/sn Portland . . . . . . . 42/35/0.08 . . . . . 36/21/sn. . . . . . 34/17/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 34/24/0.00 . . . . . . 30/7/sn. . . . . . . 30/0/sn Redmond. . . . . . . 36/24/0.01 . . . . . . 34/8/sn. . . . . . 24/-5/sn Roseburg. . . . . . . 44/35/0.05 . . . . . 35/24/sn. . . . . . 39/19/sn Salem . . . . . . . . . 43/32/0.13 . . . . . 37/22/sn. . . . . . 37/16/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 36/27/0.00 . . . . . . 32/5/sn. . . . . . . 28/1/sn The Dalles . . . . . . 46/34/0.03 . . . . . 38/18/sn. . . . . . . . 31/8/c

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34/18 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 in 1995 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.92” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 in 1960 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.97” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.40” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 2.73” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.79 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.69 in 2001 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:01 a.m. . . . . . .5:46 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:50 a.m. . . . . . .2:12 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .6:46 a.m. . . . . . .5:19 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .8:02 a.m. . . . . . .8:21 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .8:59 p.m. . . . . . .8:37 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:43 a.m. . . . . . .7:40 p.m.

2

LOW

44 27

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy.

HIGH

43 23

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary -3/-21

31/4

Chemult



BEND ALMANAC

MONDAY Partly cloudy and significantly warmer.

32 14

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 47° Medford • 12° Burns

SUNDAY

Mostly sunny start, mostly cloudy finish, LOW chilly.

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Idaho Falls

27/3

Fort Rock

Clouds and snow early, clearing late, dangerously LOW cold.

There will be some rain at the immediate coast; otherwise, snow will fall across most of the region.

Helena Eugene Cloudy and cold with 1/-14 37/23 Bend snow showers likely today Boise 32/6 Grants Pass 38/22 and tonight. 35/23     Eastern

Hampton

Crescent

HIGH

SATURDAY

22 -7

36/21

Burns

29/2

Crescent Lake

6

Portland



La Pine

Tonight: Mainly cloudy, snow showers dissipating overnight, very cold.

LOW

24/3

Brothers

28/3

Today: Mainly cloudy, moderate snowfall, chilly.

Paulina

28/4

Sunriver

20/-6

Snow, except for rain at the immediate coast today. Snow tonight. Central

34/12

FRIDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 36-68 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 38-67 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 66-112 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . . . . 114-132 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . 92 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . 43-54 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . 120 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 22-34 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 37-76

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . Chains > 10,000 lbs. Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . . . . 52-54 . . . . 150-240 . . . . . . . 106 . . . . . . . 156 . . . . . . 43-60 . . . . . . 49-55 . . . . . . 69-71

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 29/17

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Boise 38/22

• 90° San Francisco 50/43

• 0.94” Navy Whidbey, Wash.

Las Vegas 60/44

Salt Lake City 43/31

Denver 48/22 Albuquerque 53/32

Phoenix 67/46 Tijuana 62/45 Chihuahua 77/35

Anchorage 30/17

La Paz 71/48 Juneau 27/17

S

Mazatlan 76/48

S

S

St. Paul 26/7

Green Bay 36/18

S

S S

Quebec 29/23

Thunder Bay 21/-5

Rapid City 14/-4

Los Angeles 58/49 Honolulu 81/66

S

Winnipeg 1/-19

Cheyenne 33/12

Falfurrias, Texas Saranac Lake, N.Y.

S

Bismarck 6/-7

Billings 1/-11

(in the 48 Portland contiguous states): 36/21

• -21°

S

Saskatoon -6/-24

Calgary -3/-21

Seattle 32/19

S

To ronto 36/26

Halifax 33/23 Portland 35/29 Boston 38/33 Buffalo 39/28 New York 43/38 Philadelphia 46/37 Washington, D. C. 49/42

Detroit 38/31 Des Moines 35/20 Chicago Columbus 39/29 44/34 Omaha 31/17 St. Louis 51/32 Kansas City Louisville 39/25 56/40 Charlotte 62/54 Oklahoma City Nashville 50/30 64/48 Atlanta 66/57 Little Rock Birmingham 66/44 74/59 Dallas 75/40 New Orleans Orlando Houston 80/62 80/59 77/58

Miami 80/67 Monterrey 90/60

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .80/51/0.00 . 72/36/pc . . . 71/47/s Akron . . . . . . . . .33/11/0.00 . .42/31/sh . . 33/19/sn Albany. . . . . . . . . .31/1/0.00 . . 37/29/rs . . 35/16/sn Albuquerque. . . .58/30/0.00 . . .53/32/s . . . 57/38/s Anchorage . . . . . 16/-4/0.00 . . .30/17/s . . .18/-2/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . .65/45/0.00 . . .66/57/c . . 70/41/sh Atlantic City . . . .45/16/0.04 . . .45/40/c . . 49/31/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.01 . . .76/39/t . . . 77/44/s Baltimore . . . . . .45/18/0.00 . . .47/40/c . . 50/30/sh Billings. . . . . . . . . .27/9/0.04 . . 1/-11/sn . . -1/-16/sn Birmingham . . . .72/39/0.00 . .74/59/sh . . 69/46/pc Bismarck . . . . . . . .18/5/0.03 . . . 6/-7/sn . . . -1/-12/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .37/27/0.00 . . 38/22/rs . . 33/13/sn Boston. . . . . . . . .41/22/0.00 . . .38/33/c . . 43/25/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .42/15/0.00 . . .40/34/c . . 40/26/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .38/9/0.00 . .39/28/sh . . 34/15/sn Burlington, VT. . . 28/-3/0.00 . .34/29/sn . . . 35/9/sn Caribou, ME . . . . .19/6/0.00 . 28/17/pc . . .30/-2/sn Charleston, SC . .60/44/0.00 . 68/55/pc . . 74/52/sh Charlotte. . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . . .62/54/c . . 70/35/sh Chattanooga. . . .67/35/0.00 . . .66/55/t . . . 63/37/c Cheyenne . . . . . .43/18/0.00 . .33/12/sn . . 24/12/sn Chicago. . . . . . . .34/24/0.00 . 39/29/pc . . . 34/23/c Cincinnati . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . . .49/35/r . . 41/24/sh Cleveland . . . . . . .32/9/0.00 . .39/29/sh . . 32/19/sn Colorado Springs 50/32/0.00 . 41/21/pc . . . 41/18/c Columbia, MO . .49/29/0.05 . . .47/28/t . . . 39/26/c Columbia, SC . . .64/41/0.00 . . .68/56/c . . 74/46/sh Columbus, GA. . .73/43/0.00 . . .70/59/c . . . .75/43/t Columbus, OH. . .33/24/0.00 . . .44/34/r . . .37/20/rs Concord, NH . . . .35/13/0.00 . . .35/26/c . . .40/15/rs Corpus Christi. . .81/66/0.00 . . .80/54/c . . . 79/61/s Dallas Ft Worth. .70/59/0.00 . . .75/40/t . . . 62/50/s Dayton . . . . . . . .32/21/0.00 . . .44/31/r . . 36/20/sn Denver. . . . . . . . .50/22/0.00 . 48/22/pc . . . 38/20/c Des Moines. . . . .45/23/0.00 . . .35/20/c . . . 31/13/c Detroit. . . . . . . . . .25/3/0.00 . . 38/31/rs . . . 34/19/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .30/21/0.01 . . .20/5/pc . . . .10/-5/c El Paso. . . . . . . . .70/38/0.00 . . .64/39/s . . . 70/41/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 9/-28/0.00 . 33/11/pc . .33/-10/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . .23/16/0.03 . . . 8/-6/pc . . . .4/-12/c Flagstaff . . . . . . . .37/5/0.00 . 40/19/pc . . 42/25/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .28/5/0.00 . . .38/24/c . . 32/15/sn Green Bay. . . . . .27/22/0.00 . 36/18/pc . . 22/12/sn Greensboro. . . . .52/33/0.00 . . .56/49/c . . 68/33/sh Harrisburg. . . . . . .38/8/0.00 . . .42/36/c . . .44/23/rs Hartford, CT . . . .42/11/0.00 . . .42/32/c . . 40/21/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .16/3/0.11 . . 1/-14/sn . . . .8/-11/c Honolulu . . . . . . .81/71/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . 81/66/pc Houston . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .77/58/t . . 74/55/pc Huntsville . . . . . .69/33/0.00 . . .68/55/t . . . 62/36/c Indianapolis . . . .36/25/0.00 . . .46/29/r . . 38/25/sn Jackson, MS . . . .82/49/0.00 . . .77/59/t . . 68/45/pc Madison, WI . . . .30/24/0.00 . 35/22/pc . . . 29/15/c Jacksonville. . . . .66/54/0.00 . 74/55/pc . . 80/54/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .19/6/0.00 . 27/17/pc . . 34/28/pc Kansas City. . . . .60/33/0.00 . . 39/25/rs . . . 37/23/c Lansing . . . . . . . . .28/3/0.00 . . .38/25/c . . 31/15/sn Las Vegas . . . . . .61/38/0.00 . 60/44/pc . . 60/42/pc Lexington . . . . . .49/28/0.00 . .54/41/sh . . 45/32/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . .52/23/0.00 . .31/17/sn . . 28/14/sn Little Rock. . . . . .58/39/0.01 . . .66/44/t . . 56/40/pc Los Angeles. . . . .60/46/0.00 . 58/49/pc . . 58/46/sh Louisville . . . . . . .52/29/0.00 . .56/40/sh . . . 45/34/c Memphis. . . . . . .60/38/0.04 . . .69/47/t . . . 55/41/c Miami . . . . . . . . .83/67/0.00 . . .80/67/s . . . 82/65/s Milwaukee . . . . .31/25/0.00 . 38/27/pc . . . 30/20/c Minneapolis . . . .34/25/0.00 . . .26/7/pc . . . .16/-1/c Nashville . . . . . . .52/31/0.00 . . .64/48/t . . . 51/34/c New Orleans. . . .79/60/0.00 . . .80/62/c . . 72/53/pc New York . . . . . .40/21/0.00 . . .43/38/c . . 46/27/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .45/19/0.00 . . .44/39/c . . 46/28/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .44/33/0.00 . . .58/50/c . . 70/36/sh Oklahoma City . .76/53/0.00 . . .50/30/t . . 52/40/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .49/25/0.00 . .31/17/sn . . 28/13/sn Orlando. . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . . .80/59/s . . 83/59/pc Palm Springs. . . .66/43/0.00 . 65/49/pc . . 64/44/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .39/29/0.01 . .44/29/sh . . 38/23/pc Philadelphia . . . .43/22/0.00 . . .46/37/c . . 49/28/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . 67/46/pc . . . 71/49/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .36/26/0.00 . .45/34/sh . . .39/24/rs Portland, ME. . . .38/12/0.00 . 35/29/pc . . .40/17/rs Providence . . . . .43/18/0.00 . . .39/33/c . . 44/25/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .53/29/0.00 . . .60/50/c . . 72/35/sh

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .26/11/0.00 . . 14/-4/sn . . -1/-15/sn Savannah . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . 71/55/pc . . 76/54/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . .44/21/0.00 . .38/29/sn . . 32/16/sn Seattle. . . . . . . . .37/32/0.03 . .32/19/sn . . 33/23/pc Richmond . . . . . .50/27/0.00 . . .56/46/c . . 67/34/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .33/21/0.00 . 21/10/pc . . .16/-1/sn Rochester, NY . . . .35/2/0.00 . .39/28/sh . . 35/15/sn Spokane . . . . . . .30/23/0.14 . . 15/-3/sn . . . .12/-5/s Sacramento. . . . .57/33/0.00 . .46/36/sh . . 44/33/sh Springfield, MO. .60/34/0.02 . . .51/31/t . . . 42/32/c St. Louis. . . . . . . .45/28/0.08 . . .51/32/t . . . 41/29/c Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . .78/61/s . . . 76/60/s Salt Lake City . . .42/25/0.00 . .43/31/sn . . 42/27/sn Tucson. . . . . . . . .66/36/0.00 . . .64/38/s . . . 71/40/s San Antonio . . . .78/64/0.01 . . .82/43/c . . . 79/51/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .75/41/0.00 . . .53/32/t . . 48/37/pc San Diego . . . . . .61/51/0.00 . 57/51/pc . . 59/46/sh Washington, DC .46/25/0.00 . . .49/42/c . . 52/31/sh San Francisco . . .53/41/0.00 . .50/42/sh . . 45/35/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . . 38/26/rs . . . 37/26/c San Jose . . . . . . .56/37/0.00 . .53/40/sh . . 45/33/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .47/23/0.00 . . .28/7/sn . . . 24/4/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .55/18/0.00 . 46/25/pc . . 51/30/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .67/45/0.00 . 69/46/pc . . . 70/47/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .37/27/0.03 . .47/41/sh . . 51/43/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .57/50/0.04 . . .54/45/r . . 52/41/sh Auckland. . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . .74/64/sh . . 75/63/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .80/55/s . . . 81/55/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .90/76/t . . . .91/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .48/25/0.00 . . .45/23/s . . 42/23/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .70/55/s . . 71/54/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .25/7/0.00 . . .30/17/s . . . 32/19/s Bogota . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .66/50/sh . . 66/48/sh Budapest. . . . . . .30/19/0.00 . . .30/19/s . . . 32/24/c Buenos Aires. . . .77/70/0.00 . . .81/66/t . . . .81/65/t Cabo San Lucas .72/61/0.00 . . .74/55/s . . . 78/57/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 71/53/s Calgary . . . . . . . . . 5/-2/0.04 . .-3/-21/sf . . . . 16/7/s Cancun . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . 83/69/pc . . 83/70/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .55/50/0.06 . 56/45/pc . . 51/39/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .54/43/0.00 . .55/40/sh . . 53/41/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . .47/41/sh . . . 45/37/c Harare . . . . . . . . .79/61/1.65 . . .80/61/t . . . .80/59/t Hong Kong . . . . .70/61/0.00 . 69/59/pc . . 66/58/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . .50/45/0.32 . .43/38/sh . . 43/37/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .63/47/0.00 . . .70/47/s . . . 68/45/s Johannesburg . . .77/57/0.59 . . .79/58/t . . . .79/59/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . 81/69/pc . . 80/69/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . . .66/53/s . . . 69/53/s London . . . . . . . .52/43/0.21 . 55/45/pc . . 56/46/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . 62/42/pc . . . 65/41/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .89/73/s . . 88/74/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . 94/72/pc . . . 98/73/s Mexico City. . . . .79/50/0.00 . 81/51/pc . . 80/50/pc Montreal. . . . . . . .25/3/0.00 . . 34/24/sf . . . 27/6/pc Moscow . . . . . . . . .9/0/0.00 . . . .15/7/s . . . . 18/5/s Nairobi . . . . . . .79/61/35.43 . 83/59/pc . . 83/58/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . 79/68/pc . . 81/67/pc New Delhi. . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . 73/54/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . .61/41/sh . . 58/40/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . 18/-2/0.02 . . 27/25/sf . . .34/29/sf Ottawa . . . . . . . . .30/7/0.00 . . 35/25/sf . . . 27/7/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .43/32/0.07 . .53/45/sh . . . 54/43/s Rio de Janeiro. . .93/79/0.00 . . .90/76/t . . . .90/75/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .52/37/0.00 . . .53/35/s . . . 52/35/s Santiago . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .79/53/sh . . 79/51/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . .81/68/t . . . .83/67/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .39/33/0.00 . .44/34/sh . . .34/19/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . .52/27/0.00 . . .54/30/s . . . 50/25/s Shanghai. . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . . .60/45/s . . 56/42/pc Singapore . . . . . .91/79/0.01 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/77/t Stockholm. . . . . . 19/-5/0.00 . 21/11/pc . . .29/21/sf Sydney. . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . .82/64/s . . 81/64/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . 72/59/pc . . 73/61/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .72/53/s . . . 71/55/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .52/41/0.00 . .57/48/sh . . 62/48/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .32/10/0.00 . . 36/26/sf . . 29/15/pc Vancouver. . . . . .37/30/0.00 . 29/17/pc . . . 28/20/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .27/16/0.00 . . .28/18/s . . . 31/19/s Warsaw. . . . . . . . .16/3/0.00 . . 19/-1/pc . . . 23/3/pc

SUN SETS OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST

WALL TO WALL CLEARANCE SALE! NOW THRU FEBRUARY 28TH

Kobbi R. Blair / (Salem) Statesman Journal

The sun sets on the Oregon State Hospital’s restored cupola of the Kirkbride U building and the last crumbling wall of the J Building in Salem on Monday evening. The J Building was a fortress-like 126-year-old brick complex that gained a niche in cinematic history when it was used in filming of the 1975 Oscar-winning movie “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Snow may be lighter, later as Tribes fight against cold air slows fishing restrictions CALIFORNIA

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The Associated Press PORTLAND — Arctic air pushing snow into Oregon may arrive a little later and bring less snow than expected. The National Weather Service said Wednesday afternoon the cold air has stalled north of the Columbia River in Washington state, delaying the start of snow in the Portland metropolitan area and the Willamette Valley. But a winter storm warning was in effect for all of Western Oregon and Southwest Washington state, with 1 to 3 inches expected overnight and temperatures to plummet into the teens. The Oregon Department of Transportation and city agencies, including TriMet in Portland, were equipping buses and plows to handle the snow if it accumulates. The weather service said 6 to 12 inches of snow could fall in the Cascade foothills, and up to 2 feet in the mountains.

By Sudhin Thanawala The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Northern California Native American tribes are clashing with state wildlife regulators over plans to restrict fishing off parts of the rugged coastline from the Oregon border south to Point Arena in Mendocino County. The tribes, including the Yurok, the state’s largest, say proposals for marine protection areas along the North Coast infringe on their fishing rights. Those proposals — currently before the state fish and game commission — were crafted under California’s 1999 Marine Life Protection Act, which was aimed in part at preventing overfishing and restoring depleted fisheries. Although the state has created marine protected areas along other parts of its coastline, opposition until now has mostly been from commercial

fishermen concerned about their livelihoods. On the North Coast, tribes have been the effort’s main critics. At stake for them, tribal representatives say, are cultural practices dating back thousands of years and their sovereign rights. “We are part of this ecosystem,” said Yurok Chairman Thomas O’Rourke, Sr. “We have never stopped gathering. We have never stopped harvesting, and we will continue to gather, hunt and harvest from the waters of the ocean.” State wildlife officials and advisors say they can’t carve out an exception that would allow tribes to harvest marine life from coastal waters while maintaining restrictions for other users. That would be illegal under laws guaranteeing equal access, said Ken Wiseman, executive director of the Marine Life Protection Act initiative.

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NBA Inside Blazers fall to Lakers in overtime, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011

WINTER SPORTS Locals place high in Sun Cup ski race MOUNT BACHELOR — Two Bend skiers finished among the top three in a women’s super-G race Wednesday during the Sun Cup alpine ski event at Mt. Bachelor ski area. Jordan Schweitzer of the Bend-based Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation finished second in Wednesday’s race with a time of 1 minute, 16.01 seconds. Schweitzer won the first women’s super-G race of the Sun Cup on Tuesday. Anna Rischitelli, also of MBSEF, finished third in the women’s super-G Wednesday with a time of 1:17.61. Ali Gunesch of Mt. Hood Academy won the race in 1:15.90. In the men’s super-G event Wednesday, Austin Dean of Mt. Hood Academy won in a time of 1:14.32. Wednesday’s races were staged on the Cliffhanger run near the Skyliner chairlift. The Sun Cup typically attracts top skiers of ages 13 to 19 from around the Pacific Northwest. Training for Sun Cup downhill races is scheduled for today and Friday. Downhill races are set for Saturday and Sunday, starting at 10 a.m. each day. Top-10 results from Wednesday’s competitions are listed in Scoreboard on Page D2. — Bulletin staff report

PREP SPORTS

Next up

State nordic meets on horizon Bulletin staff report High school nordic skiers end their season this weekend with Oregon state championship races being staged at two sites. The Oregon High School Nordic Organization — which includes teams from Bend High, Summit, Sisters and Redmond, among others — will hold its two-day 2011 state races Friday and Saturday at the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center. The meet starts Friday at 1 p.m. with the boys 7.1-kilometer skate

race. The Summit boys and girls teams will each be going for its fifth consecutive OHSNO state title. Keelin Moehl returns for the Storm after taking second in the combined point total at the OHSNO state meet last season. Ryan St. Clair, who placed fifth overall in 2010, is Summit’s highest-finishing male skier from 2010. Also this weekend is the Oregon Interscholastic Ski Racing Association’s nordic state meet. Held at the Mt. Shas-

ta (Calif.) Nordic Center, the OISRA nordic championships begin Friday at 2 p.m. with a 5K skate race. Mountain View, the only Central Oregon school that fields a full boys team and a full girls team in the OISRA nordic division, won both the boys and girls state titles in 2010. Cougar senior Chase Nachtmann is the reigning OISRA nordic boys champion. Individual skiers from Summit, Bend and Trinity Lutheran of Bend also compete in the OISRA nordic division.

PREP WRESTLING

2011 Oregon High School Nordic Organization state championships When: Friday, 1 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Where: Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center Central Oregon teams: Summit, Bend, Sisters and Redmond Website: www.ohsno.com 2011 Oregon Interscholastic Ski Racing Association nordic state championships When: Friday, 2 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Where: Mt. Shasta (Calif.) Nordic Center Central Oregon team: Mountain View Website: www.oisra.org

PREP GIRLS BASKETBALL

Bend girls roll past Marshfield in 5A play-in game, 69-19 Bulletin staff report

GOLF Woods knocked out in Match Play MARANA, Ariz. — One minute he looked like the Tiger Woods of old, burying a clutch birdie putt when he was down to his last shot. One swing later, Woods looked lost in the desert. With the pressure at a peak, Woods hit a 3-wood into a desert bush on the first extra hole Wednesday and was eliminated in the first round of the Match Play Championship by Thomas Bjorn. “I blew it,” Woods said. When his 18-foot bogey putt rolled past the cup, Woods removed his cap and conceded the match to Bjorn. Top-ranked Lee Westwood never trailed in his 3-and-2 victory over Henrik Stenson, while PGA champion Martin Kaymer had the shortest match of the opening round, a 7-and-6 win over 19-year-old Seung-yul Noh of South Korea. Phil Mickelson, who only decided to play this World Golf Championship two weeks ago, won 6-and-5 over Brendan Jones. Still, Woods had some company in going home early. The Americans had four of the top 10 seeds at Dove Mountain, and Mickelson is the only one left. Matteo Manassero, the 17-year-old Italian, became the youngest winner in this tournament with a victory over eighth-seeded Steve Stricker, while Jim Furyk continued his struggles in losing to Ryan Palmer, who was making his Match Play debut. Of the 32 players remaining, 13 are Americans, 13 are Europeans and two each are from Australia, South Africa and Asia. — The Associated Press

D

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Crook County wrestlers, from left, Bryson Martin, Trevor Wilson and Trevor Ough lead the Cowboys into the Class 4A state championships this weekend in Portland.

Cowboy glory? Crook County will try to win its first state title since 1975, while other Central Oregon teams and wrestlers will seek championships at the state meet in Portland as well By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Historically, Crook County has always wrestled well at the state tournament. Last year at the Class 5A state championships, four wrestlers for the Cowboys placed, including McKennan Buckner, who won the title at 103 pounds. In 2008, Crook County finished third at the 5A state tourney. And in 2007, the Cowboys placed second. But the wrestling-mad town of Prineville has not celebrated a team state championship in wrestling since 1975, when Crook County claimed Oregon’s Class AA title. That may be about to change. Wrestling at the Class 4A Special District 2 regional in Ontario — the tournament boasted four of the Oregon Wrestling Forum’s top seven ranked 4A teams — the Cowboys advanced 17 wrestlers to the 2011 4A state championships,

which will be held this Friday and Saturday at Portland’s Memorial Coliseum. Crook County is tied with Henley of Klamath Falls for the most participants at this year’s 4A state meet, an edge that should put the Cowboys in title contention. “When we get to the state tournament, we’re always placing six of seven guys or seven of eight guys,” Jake Huffman, the Cowboys’ thirdyear coach, said this week. “The problem’s always been for us coming out of the (Intermountain Conference).” Competing in the old IMC with traditional wrestling powers Hermiston and Pendleton, Crook County usually advanced a healthy number of wrestlers to state, but not enough to challenge for a state title. That changed this school year when the Cowboys moved down to Class 4A because of declining student enrollment. See Wrestling / D2

If you go What: 2011 OSAA state wrestling championships When: Friday, 8:30 a.m. (quarterfinals at 4:54 p.m.); Saturday, 8:30 a.m. (semifinals at 10 a.m., finals at 6:30 p.m.) Where: Memorial Coliseum, Portland Cost: Friday, $15 for adults, $10 for students; Saturday’s first session, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., $10 for adults, $8 for students; Saturday’s second session, 6:30 to 10 p.m., $10 for adults, $8 for students Website: www.osaa.org

Inside A look at the Central Oregon wrestlers competing at the state championships this weekend, Page D2

Bend High had no problem handling Marshfield of Coos Bay on Wednesday, blowing out the Pirates 69-19 in the first round of the Class 5A girls play-in action. Mekayla Isaak scored a gamehigh 13 points at Bend High to lead the Lava Bears, who finished the season as the Intermountain Conference’s No. 3 seed. Ally McConnell added 12 and Katelyn Tolentino contributed eight points for Bend, which had eight players score six or more points Wednesday. The Lava Bears (16-6 overall) controlled the game from the opening tipoff, leading 18-4 at the end of the first quarter and 32-7 at halftime. “I liked our defensive energy,” Bend coach Todd Ervin said, “and what kids did coming off the bench.” See Bend / D3

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL

Summit awarded forfeit win Bulletin staff report Summit High’s boys basketball team will play a second round Class 5A play-in contest after earning a forfeit victory over Springfield High on Wednesday in the first round of play-in action. Springfield Public Schools refused to let the Springfield High boys basketball team travel through the Cascades on Tuesday and Wednesday because of safety concerns. See Summit / D3

A passion for tying Fly-tying instructor from Sisters tackles a busy schedule By Mark Morical

sition currently is as the chairwoman for the 2011 Northwest Ten years ago, Sherry Steele Fly Tyer & Fly Fishing Expo, didn’t know the first thing set for March 11-12 in Albany. about fly-fishing. The expo, which is expected Now, the 65-year-old Sisters to host 2,000 fly-fishing enHUNTING thusiasts over two days, will resident wears so many hats in the fly-fishing world that it’s & FISHING include 186 fly tiers, 54 vendor difficult to keep track of which booths and 90 classes. one she has on from one day to Steele is overseeing all of it. the next. Now an expert fly tier, Steele Steele is president of the Oregon walked into the Fly Fishers Place in SisCouncil of the Federation of Fly Fishers ters 10 years ago and was intrigued and and serves on the board of directors for confused at the same time. the federation’s national organization. “I looked at all the flies and bins, and She is also the founder of the Central said, ‘What’s this?’ Steele recalls. “I Oregon Fly Tyers Guild and is a busy loved to fish, but I didn’t know anything fly-tying instructor in Central Oregon. about fly-fishing.” Perhaps Steele’s most demanding poSee Tying / D4 The Bulletin

Tiger Woods lines up on Wednesday.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Basketball ..................................D3 Hunting & fishing ..................... D4

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Sherry Steele, a fly-tying instructor who is organizing the 2011 Fly Tying & Fly Fishing Expo, works on a new fly design in her home studio in Sisters Wednesday afternoon.

D2 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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GOLF

Friday Girls basketball: Class 6A play-in, Roseburg at Redmond, 6 p.m.; Class 5A play-in, South Albany at Summit, 5:15 p.m.; Class 5A play-in, Dallas at Mountain View, 5:30 p.m.; Class 4A play-in, Douglas at Crook County, 5:45 p.m. Boys basketball: Class 6A play-in, Redmond at West Linn, 7 p.m.; Class 5A play-in, South Albany at Bend, 7 p.m.; Class 5A play-in, Silverton at Mountain View, 7:30 p.m.; Class 5A play-in, Summit at Corvallis, 6 p.m.; Class 4A play-in, La Grande at Crook County, 7:30 p.m.; Class 4A play-in, Astoria/Scappoose at Madras, TBA; Class 4A play-in, Stayton at Sisters, 7 p.m. Nordic skiing: OHSNO state meet at Mt. Bachelor, 1 p.m.; OISRA state meet at Mt. Shasta (Calif.), 2 p.m. Wrestling: Class 6A, 5A, 4A, 3A, 2A/1A state wrestling in Portland, 8:30 a.m.

8 a.m. — LPGA Tour, HSBC Women’s Championship, first round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m. — WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — PGA Tour, Mayakoba Golf Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Georgia at Florida, ESPN. 5 p.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls, TNT. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Penn State at Northwestern, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Stanford at Oregon State, FSNW. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Denver Nuggets, TNT. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Gonzaga at St. Mary’s, ESPN2. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Arizona State at UCLA, FSNW.

FRIDAY GOLF 8 a.m. — LPGA Tour, HSBC Women’s Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m. — WGC, Accenture Match Play Championship, third round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — PGA Tour, Mayakoba Golf Classic, second round, Golf Channel.

BOWLING 3 p.m. — PBA, Lumber Liquidators U.S. Open, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Siena at Fairfield, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder at Orlando Magic, ESPN. 7 p.m. — High school boys, Class 5A play-in game teams TBA, COTV. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Denver Nuggets at Portland Trail Blazers, ESPN, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

BOXING 6 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, featherweights, Juan Carlos Burgos vs. Cristobal Cruz, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 7:30 p.m. — Western Hockey League, Portland Winter Hawks at Everett Silvertips, FSNW.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — Men’s college, California at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Stanford at Oregon State, KRCO-AM 690.

FRIDAY BASEBALL Noon — Men’s college, Oregon State vs. Connecticut, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Denver Nuggets at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Basketball • Caltech ends 310-game losing streak: The end of Caltech’s 310-game conference losing streak spanning 26 years was so big, even school president Jean-Lou Chameau rushed the court to celebrate. A day later, the two old-time scoreboards in tiny Braun Gym remained lit up with the result: Home 46, Visitor 45. The Division III Beavers beat Occidental College in their season finale Tuesday night, giving Caltech its first Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference victory since Jan. 23, 1985, when the Beavers defeated LaVerne 48-47. • Nets acquire Williams in trade: The New Jersey Nets finally landed a big-name All-Star in a blockbuster trade that gives them point guard Deron Williams and sends rookie Derrick Favors and point guard Devin Harris to the Utah Jazz. The Jazz also will receive the Nets’ firstround pick in 2011, which could be a lottery pick, cash, and Golden State’s 2012 first-round draft pick. The Nets now hope Williams will sign a contract extension with them, which they can offer this summer. If so, he would become the face of their franchise when they move into their new arena in Brooklyn for the 2012-13 season. The 6-foot-3 Williams is in his sixth NBA season and holds career averages of 17.3 points, 3.2 rebounds and 9.1 assists.

Football • Arizona State QB Threet ends career: Arizona State quarterback Steven Threet says he’s quitting football after suffering four concussions in the past five years, including two last fall. Threet had a concussion Oct. 23 at California and another Nov. 26 against UCLA that ended his junior season. He told The Arizona Republic on Wednesday that he’s still experiencing symptoms from the last concussion and still has headaches and has trouble sleeping. Threet also suffered concussions his senior year at Adrian (Mich.) High School and in 2008 while playing at Michigan. Threet threw for 2,534 yards and 18 touchdowns with 16 interceptions for the Sun Devils last season. Threet’s decision likely makes Brock Osweiler the starting quarterback entering spring practice.

Colleges • NCAA accuses Tennessee of rules violations: The NCAA has charged Tennessee with at least a dozen rules violations committed by the university’s basketball and football programs. Included in the allegations after the NCAA’s 22-month investigation are charges that coach Bruce Pearl acted unethically and failed to monitor compliance activities by his basketball staff. Former Volunteers football coach Lane Kiffin is also charged with failing to monitor his staff. Kiffin is now at Southern California. Tennessee has until May 21 to respond to the NCAA’s allegations and is expected to appear at a June 10-11 meeting of the Committee on Infractions.

Baseball • Cardinals’ Wainwright injures elbow: St. Louis Cardinals ace Adam Wainwright is getting a second opinion on his injured right elbow, which the team fears will require reconstructive surgery. Team spokesman Brian Bartow said Wednesday night that results of MRIs and other tests were being examined by Dr. Lewis Yocum in Los Angeles. The team anticipated a news conference this afternoon to disclose findings. Wainwright, a 20-game winner and runner-up for the NL Cy Young Award last year, was sent back to St. Louis on Wednesday for tests and consultation with team physician George Paletta. — From wire reports

SOUTH Ark.-Little Rock 75, South Alabama 66 Cent. Arkansas 68, Nicholls St. 53 Duquesne 76, Charlotte 63 Fla. International 75, W. Kentucky 62 Florida Atlantic 66, Troy 59 Gardner-Webb 68, Longwood 50 Louisville 68, DePaul 55 McNeese St. 60, Texas-Arlington 51 Northwestern St. 71, Sam Houston St. 68 SE Louisiana 69, Texas St. 66 EAST Army 58, Lafayette 36 Binghamton 59, Boston U. 53 Buffalo 77, Miami (Ohio) 74 Dayton 63, Rhode Island 43 Fordham 61, Massachusetts 52 Georgetown 67, Pittsburgh 57 Hartford 67, Stony Brook 63 Holy Cross 74, Colgate 59 Lehigh 72, Bucknell 39 Navy 63, American U. 56 New Hampshire 57, Maine 40 Richmond 69, La Salle 65 Rutgers 52, South Florida 46 Temple 52, Saint Joseph’s 49 UMBC 62, Albany, N.Y. 55

IN THE BLEACHERS

Saturday Girls basketball: Class 5A play-in, Bend at West Albany, 5 p.m.; Class 4A play-in, Philomath at Sisters, 5 p.m.; Class 4A play-in, La Pine at Central, TBA; Class 4A play-in, Seaside at Madras, TBA Nordic skiing: OHSNO state meet at Mt. Bachelor, 10 a.m.; OISRA state meet at Mt. Shasta (Calif.), 10 a.m. Wrestling: Class 6A, 5A, 4A, 3A, 2A/1A state wrestling in Portland, 8:30 a.m. State finals scheduled for 6:30 p.m.

ALPINE SKIING 2011 SUN CUP At Mt. Bachelor Wednesday’s Results Women’s super-G (top 10) 1, Ali Gunesch, Mt. Hood Academy, 1:15.90. 2, Jordan Schweitzer, MBSEF, 1:16.01. 3, Anna Rischitelli, MBSEF, 1:17.61. 4, Haley Hanseler, Mt. Hood Academy, 1:17.71. 5, Lily Eriksen, Crystal Mountain Alpine Club (Wash.), 1:17.71. 6, Jenna Lou Jansky, Multnomah Athletic Club, 1:18.72. 7, Monica Eik, Team Lyon (Wash.), 1:18.76. 8, Lindsay Ahmann, Mission Ridge Ski Team (Wash.), 1:19.14. 9, Hannah Young, Multnomah Athletic Club, 1:19.14. 10, Kyla Miller, Mt. Hood Academy, 1:19.32. Men’s super-G (top 10) 1, Austin Dean, Mt. Hood Academy, 1:14.32. 2, Grant Hamlin, MHSE, 1:14.43. 3, Colin Boit, Stevens Pass Alpine Club (Wash.), 1:14.66. 4, Avarell Rennie, White Pass Ski Club (Wash.), 1:14.66. 5, Stephan Splitstoser, Mt. Hood Academy, 1:15.25. 6, Blake Jarvis, Crystal Mountain Alpine Club, 1:15.72. 7, Charles LeCuyer, Crystal Mountain, 1:16.09. 8, Ritch Carr, White Pass, 1:16.09. 9, Travis Ulvestad, Stevens Pass, 1:16.34. 10, George Albrecht, Crystal Mountain, 1:16.39.

GOLF WGC WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS ——— Match Play Championship Wednesday At The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club at Dove Mountain Marana, Ariz. Purse: $8.5 million Yardage: 7,791; Par 72 First Round Seeds in Parentheses Stewart Cink (53), United States, def. Ian Poulter (12), England, 19 holes. Y.E. Yang (44), South Korea, def. Alvaro Quiros (21), Spain, 20 holes. Ernie Els (11), South Africa, def. Jeff Overton (54), United States, 19 holes. J.B. Holmes (22), United States, def. Camilo Villegas (43), Colombia, 4 and 2. Luke Donald (9), England, def. Charley Hoffman (56), United States, 6 and 5. Edoardo Molinari (24), Italy, def. Martin Larid (41), Scotland, 3 and 2. Ryan Palmer (55), United States, def. Jim Furyk (10), United States, 2 up. Miguel Angel Jimenez (23), Spain, def. Yuta Ikeda (42), Japan, 2 and 1. Graeme McDowell (5), Northern Ireland, def. Heath Slocum (60), United States, 4 and 3. Ross Fisher (37), England, def. Robert Allenby (28), Australia, 4 and 3. Paul Casey (6), England, def. Richard Green (59), Australia, 19 holes. Jason Day (38), Australia, def. K.T. Kim (27), South Korea, 3 and 2. Matteo Manassero (57), Italy, def. Steve Stricker (8), United States, 2 and 1. Charl Schwartzel (25), South Africa, def. Ryo Ishikawa (40), Japan, 20 holes. Rory McIlroy (7), Northern Ireland, def. Jonathan Byrd (58), United States, 4 and 2. Ben Crane (39), United States, def. Adam Scott (26), Australia, 4 and 2. Matt Kuchar (13), United States, def. Anders Hansen (52), Denmark, 22 holes. Bo Van Pelt (45), United States, def. Louis Oosthuizen (20), South Africa, 2 up. Mark Wilson (51), United States, def. Dustin Johnson (14), United States, 19 holes. Bubba Watson (19), United States, def. Bill Haas (46),

ATP

HOCKEY NHL

PREP SPORTS Girls basketball Wednesday’s results ——— CLASS 5A First play-in round ——— MARSHFIELD (19) — Kara Young 8, Beasley 5, Stephens 4, Barrey 2, Moe, T. Scott, J. Scot, Mayer, Carocci, Mosier, Pettett. Totals 7 5-9 19. BEND (69) — Mekayla Isaak 13, McConnell 12, Torentino 8, Maloney 7, Froelich 7, Mattox 7, Jones 7, Rhine 6, Boehme 2, Lundy, Reeser. Totals 27 12-14 69 Marshfield 4 3 2 10 — 19 Bend 18 14 16 21 — 69 Three-point goals — Marshfield: none; Bend: Mattox, Jones, Froelich.

Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, def. Julia Goerges (1), Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (6). Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def. Pauline Parmentier, France, 6-1, 6-1. Arantxa Parra Santonja (6), Spain, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-3, 1-0 retired. Carla Suarez Navarro (7), Spain, def. Madalina Gojnea, Romania, 6-4, 6-3. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. Mathllde Johansson, France, 2-6, 6-2, 6-3.

United States, 3 and 2. K.J. Choi (49), South Korea, def. Retief Goosen (16), South Africa, 1 up. Ryan Moore (48), United States, def. Francesco Molinari (17), Italy, 3 and 1. Robert Karlsson (15), Sweden, def. Hiroyuki Fujita (50), Japan, 5 and 3. Hunter Mahan (18), United States, def. Sean O’Hair (47), United States, 4 and 3. Phil Mickelson (4), United States, def. Brendan Jones (61), Australia, 6 and 5. Rickie Fowler (29), United States, def. Peter Hanson (36), Sweden, 1 up. Thomas Bjorn (62), Denmark, def. Tiger Woods (3), United States, 19 holes. Geoff Ogilvy (30), Australia, def. Padraig Harrington (35), Ireland, 4 and 3. Lee Westwood (1), England, def. Henrik Stenson (64), Sweden, 3 and 2. Nick Watney (32), United States, def. Anthony Kim (33), United States, 5 and 4. Martin Kaymer (2), Germany, def. Seung-yul Noh (63), South Korea, 7 and 6. Justin Rose (34), England, def. Zach Johnson (31), United States, 2 and 1. Tee times Today All Times PST Seeds in Parentheses 8:10 a.m. — Graeme McDowell (5), Northern Ireland, vs. Ross Fisher (37), England. 8:22 a.m. — Stewart Cink (53), United States, vs. Y.E. Yang (44), South Korea. 8:34 a.m. — Paul Casey (6), England, vs. Jason Day (38), Australia. 8:46 a.m. — Ernie Els (11), South Africa, vs. J.B. Holmes (22), United States. 8:58 a.m. — Matteo Manassero (57), Italy, vs. Charl Swartzel (25), South Africa. 9:10 a.m. — Luke Donald (9), England, vs. Edoardo Molinari (24), Italy. 9:22 a.m. — Rory McIlroy (7), Northern Ireland, vs. Ben Crane (39), United States. 9:34 a.m. — Ryan Palmer (55), United States, vs. Miguel Angel Jimenez (23), Spain. 9:46 a.m. — Phil Mickelson (4), United States, vs. Rickie Fowler (29), United States. 9:58 a.m. — Matt Kuchar (13), United States, vs. Bo Van Pelt (45), United States. 10:10 a.m. — Thomas Bjorn (62), Denmark, vs. Geoff Ogilvy (30), Australia. 10:22 a.m. — Mark Wilson (51), United States, vs. Bubba Watson (19), United States. 10:34 a.m. — Lee Westwood (1), England, vs. Nick Watney (32), United States. 10:46 a.m. — K.J. Choi (49), South Korea, vs. Ryan Moore (48), United States. 10:58 a.m. — Martin Kaymer (2), Germany, vs. Justin Rose (34), England. 11:10 a.m. — Robert Karlsson (15), Sweden, vs. Hunter Mahan (18), United States.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST BYU 84, Colorado St. 76 UNLV 77, New Mexico 74, OT Wyoming 63, Air Force 61 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 77, Kentucky 76, OT Colorado 71, Texas Tech 68 McNeese St. 81, Texas-Arlington 72 Nicholls St. 70, Cent. Arkansas 48 Northwestern St. 64, Sam Houston St. 63 SMU 76, Rice 66, OT Stephen F.Austin 60, Lamar 55 Texas A&M 61, Oklahoma 47 Texas St. 82, SE Louisiana 69 UTSA 71, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 62 MIDWEST Akron 72, Miami (Ohio) 55

Wrestling Continued from D1 “Looking at (the brackets), we thought to have a chance to make a run at state we’d have to qualify at least 15 kids,” Huffman said. “And we’d have to do really good to do that. We’re pleased with 17.” While Trevor Wilson (No. 3 at 152 pounds) and Trevor Ough (No. 2, 171) are Crook County’s only seeded wrestlers this weekend, the Cowboys roll into state with four district champions in Erik Martin (103 pounds), Grayson Munn (112), Ough and Bryson Martin (189). Maybe just as impressive, of 11 Crook County wrestlers who found themselves in the consolation bracket at last weekend’s regional tournament, eight battled back to advance to state. In Class 4A, as in 6A and 5A, the top four wrestlers in each regional weight class qualify for state. “Our best round of the tournament was the consolation semifinals, the blood round, where it was make-or-break for state,” Huffman said. “We’ve got no dead weight. Even the guys that finished fourth at districts can compete and win some matches at state.” While Crook County chases its first state title in more than three decades, Culver will be looking for its fifth championship in five years. The Bulldogs will have 12 wrestlers at the 2A/1A state champion-

Ball St. 64, E. Michigan 49 Cent. Michigan 64, N. Illinois 58 Drake 87, Evansville 69 Kansas St. 61, Nebraska 57 Missouri 77, Baylor 59 Missouri St. 76, S. Illinois 58 Ohio 70, Bowling Green 60 Purdue 72, Indiana 61 W. Michigan 68, Toledo 56 Wichita St. 67, Creighton 65 Wisconsin 53, Michigan 52 SOUTH Alabama 51, Auburn 49 Duke 78, Temple 61 East Carolina 83, UTEP 76 Hofstra 71, UNC Wilmington 64 LSU 84, Mississippi St. 82 Marshall 79, Tulsa 61 Maryland 78, Florida St. 62 Morgan St. 42, Delaware St. 39 North Carolina 75, N.C. State 63 Virginia 62, Georgia Tech 56 William & Mary 69, Georgia St. 65 Wofford 97, Chattanooga 58 EAST Albany, N.Y. 83, UMBC 67 American U. 69, Navy 58 Bucknell 72, Lehigh 55 Cincinnati 58, Georgetown 46 Delaware 80, Towson 70 Drexel 64, Va. Commonwealth 60 George Washington 74, Charlotte 57 Holy Cross 77, Colgate 75 Lafayette 67, Army 46 Massachusetts 69, Saint Joseph’s 51 Miami 73, Boston College 64 Notre Dame 94, Providence 93 Rhode Island 77, Duquesne 76 St. Bonaventure 82, Fordham 63 St. John’s 76, DePaul 51 Stony Brook 79, Hartford 73, OT PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Arizona 12 2 .857 23 4 .851 UCLA 10 4 .714 19 8 .703 Washington 10 5 .666 19 8 .703 Southern Cal 7 7 .500 15 12 .555 Oregon 7 7 .500 14 12 .538 Washington St. 7 8 .466 17 10 .629 California 7 8 .466 14 13 .518 Stanford 6 9 .400 13 13 .500 Oregon St. 4 10 .285 9 16 .346 Arizona St. 2 12 .142 10 16 .384 ——— Today’s Games Stanford at Oregon State, 6 p.m. California at Oregon, 6 p.m. Arizona at USC, 7:30 p.m. Arizona State at UCLA, 8 p.m.

Women’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST BYU 64, Colorado St. 55 CS Bakersfield 71, CS Northridge 46 Colorado 73, Oklahoma 68 New Mexico 68, UNLV 60 Wyoming 81, Air Force 57 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 71, North Texas 50 Baylor 75, Kansas St. 48 Kansas 73, Oklahoma St. 66 Lamar 79, Stephen F.Austin 63 Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 93, UTSA 62 MIDWEST Cent. Michigan 81, Ball St. 66 Kent St. 68, Ohio 62 St. Bonaventure 60, Saint Louis 55 Toledo 65, E. Michigan 64 Wisconsin 65, Indiana 57 Xavier 67, George Washington 41

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 60 39 15 6 84 198 152 Pittsburgh 62 36 20 6 78 180 150 N.Y. Rangers 62 32 26 4 68 172 155 New Jersey 60 26 30 4 56 129 161 N.Y. Islanders 61 23 31 7 53 167 198 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 60 34 19 7 75 188 145 Montreal 61 32 22 7 71 157 156 Buffalo 59 28 25 6 62 170 172 Toronto 60 26 27 7 59 152 180 Ottawa 60 20 31 9 49 137 195 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 60 35 18 7 77 187 188 Washington 61 32 19 10 74 165 153 Carolina 61 28 24 9 65 177 188 Atlanta 61 25 26 10 60 174 201 Florida 60 25 28 7 57 156 168 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 60 37 17 6 80 202 173 Nashville 60 31 21 8 70 156 143 Chicago 60 31 23 6 68 191 168 Columbus 59 30 23 6 66 163 175 St. Louis 59 27 23 9 63 166 176 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 61 38 14 9 85 204 145 Minnesota 60 32 22 6 70 158 156 Calgary 62 31 23 8 70 186 178 Colorado 61 26 28 7 59 178 210 Edmonton 61 20 33 8 48 156 203 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 62 35 21 6 76 174 159 Phoenix 62 33 20 9 75 178 177 Los Angeles 60 33 23 4 70 166 144 Dallas 60 31 23 6 68 164 172 Anaheim 61 32 25 4 68 171 181 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Buffalo 4, Atlanta 1 Ottawa 5, Florida 1 San Jose 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT Tampa Bay 8, Phoenix 3 Edmonton 5, Colorado 1 Los Angeles 3, Anaheim 2 Today’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Dallas at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Nashville, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Qatar Ladies Open Wednesday Doha, Qatar Singles Second Round Peng Shuai, China, def. Francesca Schiavone (3), Italy, 7-5, 6-3. Marion Bartoli, France, def. Shahar Peer (8), Israel, 6-1, 6-0. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def. Vera Dushevina, Russia, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4. Jelena Jankovic (5), Serbia, def. Sania Mirza, India, 6-0, 6-1. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, def. Li Na (4), China, 6-2, 6-1. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Nadia Petrova, Russia, 6-3, 6-2. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, 6-1, 6-2. Mexican Open Wednesday Acapulco, Mexico Singles Second Round Gisela Dulko (4), Argentina, def. Silvia Soler Espinosa, Spain, 6-1, 6-1. Laura Pous-Tio, Spain, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-2, 6-1.

Central Oregon state wrestling participants CLASS 6A Redmond — Brandon Short, so., 103 pounds; Ty George, so., 112; Ryan Haney, jr., 119; Chance Lindquist, so., 119; Levi Brinkley, sr., 125; David Peebles, jr., 135; Colby Fultz, sr., 140; Boomer Fleming, fr., 140

CLASS 5A Bend — Isaac Simar, fr., 140 pounds; Jason Vinton, so., 145; Gunner Crawford, so., 152; Gavin Gerdes, jr., 171; Kenny Dailey, jr., 189; Shane Buck, jr., 215 Mountain View — Keelin Crew, sr., 119 pounds; Forrest Samples, jr., 140; Conner Wiese, sr., 189 Summit — Gabe Thompson, so., 125 pounds; Kaden Olson, jr., 215

CLASS 4A Crook County — Erik Martin, jr., 103 pounds; Grayson Munn, fr., 112; Dawson Barber, so., 125; Andy Katzenberger, sr., 130; Cody Pfau, jr., 140; Brandon, Woodbury, sr., 145; Jared George, sr., 145; Dean Smith, so., 152; Trevor Wilson, sr., 152; Tyler Rockwood, jr., 160; Jake Zeigler, sr., 160; Lucas Smith, jr., 171; Trevor Ough, sr., 171; Bryson Martin, jr., 189; Rhett Smith, jr, 189; Mason Harris, so., 215; Alex Pierce, sr., 285 La Pine — Garrett Searcy, jr., 189 Madras — Kole Willis, so., 103 pounds; Robert Ozuna, fr., 119; Lane McDonald, so., 125; Miguel Vasquez, so., 125; Travis Williams, jr., 215; Adrian Phillips, sr., 285

CLASS 2A/1A Culver — Noe Gonzalez, fr., 103 pounds; Jared Kasch, so., 112; Kyle Bender, fr., 112; Josue Gonzalez, jr., 119; Bolt Anglen, fr., 119; Ryan Kasch, jr, 130; Miguel Gutierrez, jr., 140; Cody Clugston, jr., 145; Jesus Retano, jr., 152; Mitch Nelson, jr., 160; Austin Barany, sr., 171; Justin Hendrix, jr., 215

ships this year, a mark all the more impressive considering that, at the 2A/1A level, only the top two wrestlers from each of the 14 weight classes advance to state.

Defending state champions Jared Kasch (112 pounds) and Josue Gonzalez (119) return to lead Culver. Ryan Kasch (130) and Mitch Nelson (160) are also back at state this sea-

ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Dubai Duty Free Championships Wednesday Dubai, United Arab Emirates Singles Second Round Richard Gasquet, France, def. Sergei Bubka, Ukraine, 6-2, 7-5. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-4. Sergiy Stakhovsky Ukraine, def. Ernests Gulbis (8), Latvia, 6-3, 5-7, 6-1. Tomas Berdych (3), Czech Republic, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (5). Philipp Petzschner, Germany, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 6-0, 4-6, 6-2. Gilles Simon, France, def. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-3. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 6-3, 6-4. Mexican Open Wednesday Acapulco, Mexico Singles Second Round Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Albert Montanes (5), Spain, 6-3, 6-4. Stanislas Wawrinka (4), Switzerland, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 5-7, 6-3, 7-5. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, def. Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, 6-7 (8), 6-4, 6-4. Nicolas Almagro (3), Spain, def. Filippo Volandri, Italy, 6-2, 6-2. Alexandr Dolgopolov (6), Ukraine, def. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 6-1, 6-4. Juan Monaco (7), Argentina, def. Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, 6-3, 6-4. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Ivan Navarro, Spain, 1-6, 6-4, 6-3. David Ferrer (1), Spain, def. Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, 6-2, 6-2. Delray Beach Championships Wednesday Delray Beach, Fla. Singles First Round Adrian Mannarino (8), France, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 1-6, 7-6 (3), 6-4. Second Round Ryan Sweeting, United States, def. Sam Querrey (3), United States, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Dudi Sela, Israel, 2-6, 63, 6-2. Kei Nishikori, Japan, def. James Blake, United States, 6-3, 6-4. Janko Tipsarevic (6), Serbia, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-7 (8), 6-3.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL — Announced the retirements of umpires Jerry Crawford, Mike Reilly and Chuck Meriwether. National League HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP Cesar Carrillo, INF Matt Downs and RHP Lance Pendleton on one-year contracts. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SACRAMENTO KINGS — Traded F Carl Landry to New Orleans for G Marcus Thornton and cash considerations. UTAH JAZZ — Traded G Deron Williams to New Jersey for G Devin Harris, F Derrick Favors and first-round draft picks in 2011 and 2012. FOOTBALL National Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed DE Paul Spicer to a one-day contract and announced his retirement. Designated TE Marcedes Lewis their franchise player. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Signed LB LaMarr Woodley to a one-year franchise tender offer. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Named Michael Christianson coordinator of football information technology/ offensive quality control coach. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Signed RB Chris Henry to a one-year contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Phoenix LW Scottie Upshall two games for an illegal hit on Philadelphia D Oskars Bartulis during Tuesday’s game. NHLPA — Named Mathieu Schneider special assistant to the executive director. ANAHEIM DUCKS — Recalled G Ray Emery from Syracuse (AHL). ATLANTA THRASHERS — Reassigned LW Michael Forney from Gwinnett (ECHL) to Chicago (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled RW Jan Mursak from Grand Rapids (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Recalled F Jim O’Brien from Binghamton (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Signed F Matt Hendricks to a two-year contract extension. MOTORSPORTS NASCAR — Fined Michael Waltrip’s Truck Series crew chief Doug Howe $25,000 and placed him on probation until the end of the year and docked team owner Billy Ballew 25 championship owner points for a broken spoiler on Waltrip’s car during Friday’s race. RODEO PROFESSIONAL BULL RIDERS — Named Jim Haworth chief executive officer.

son following runner-up state finishes a year ago. Another Central Oregon wrestling power, Redmond High, looks to be competitive at the Class 6A tourney. Ryan Haney, who won a state title at 103 pounds for the Panthers in 2010, is one of eight Redmond wrestlers to qualify for this year’s state championships. Haney, the No. 2 seed at 119 pounds, is one of four seeded wrestlers for the Panthers at the 2011 state tourney. In the 5A tournament, Bend High will have six wrestlers competing for state titles. Lava Bear junior Shane Buck rolls into the 5A championships after winning the 215-pound bracket at the Class 5A Special District 4 tournament on Feb. 12. Individually, Madras may have as many wrestlers advance to the state finals as any Central Oregon team. Junior Travis Williams (215 pounds) and senior Adrian Phillips (285) are the No. 2 and No. 1 seeds in their respective brackets for the White Buffaloes. While lacking the number of qualifiers to make them contenders in the team competition, Central Oregon’s Mountain View, Summit and La Pine high schools all have wrestlers who will battle for individual honors at the 2011 state championships. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 D3

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

Duke tops Temple in return to No. 1

Spurs 109, Thunder 105 OKLAHOMA CITY (105) Durant 9-19 11-13 30, Green 5-15 2-2 14, Krstic 2-2 0-0 4, Westbrook 9-24 7-8 25, Sefolosha 0-2 0-0 0, Ibaka 5-10 0-0 10, Harden 5-9 4-4 16, Cook 2-7 0-0 6, Maynor 0-2 0-0 0, Collison 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-91 24-27 105. SAN ANTONIO (109) Jefferson 4-5 0-0 12, Duncan 7-15 3-6 17, Blair 2-6 0-1 4, Parker 6-14 8-10 20, Ginobili 2-13 6-6 11, Hill 3-8 0-0 8, Bonner 5-9 0-0 12, Neal 6-9 3-3 19, McDyess 2-4 2-2 6. Totals 3783 22-28 109. Oklahoma City 37 16 27 25 — 105 San Antonio 31 33 24 21 — 109 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 7-24 (Harden 2-5, Cook 2-6, Green 2-7, Durant 1-3, Sefolosha 0-1, Westbrook 0-2), San Antonio 13-21 (Neal 45, Jefferson 4-5, Hill 2-3, Bonner 2-3, Ginobili 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 61 (Ibaka 15), San Antonio 48 (Duncan 10). Assists—Oklahoma City 15 (Westbrook 7), San Antonio 24 (Ginobili 9). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 23, San Antonio 18. Technicals—Durant, Duncan, San Antonio Coach Popovich, San Antonio defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Collison. A—18,581 (18,797).

The Associated Press DURHAM, N.C. — Things are getting back to normal at Duke: The Blue Devils are ranked No. 1 again, and points came in bunches for Kyle Singler. Singler broke out of a slump by scoring 28 points, and Duke marked its return to the top spot in the national rankings by beating No. 24 Temple 78-61 on Wednesday night. “He was just not to be denied,” Temple coach Fran Dunphy said of Singler. Nolan Smith finished with 15 points and Mason Plumlee added 13 rebounds to help the ACC-leading Blue Devils (26-2) dodge a late-season nonconference letdown. Duke used a huge run that bridged the halves to win its eighth straight overall and extend a pair of notable winning streaks at Cameron Indoor Stadium. Singler equaled a career high for field goals while going 10 of 19 in his most productive game since matching a career high with 30 points at Oregon on Nov. 27. This time, he helped Duke win its 35th straight game at Cameron and its 86th in a row there against nonconference teams — both NCAA bests. Also on Wednesday: No. 7 BYU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Colorado St. . . . . . . . . . . . .76 PROVO, Utah — Jimmer Fredette scored 34 points and Brandon Davies added 14 points and 15 rebounds to lead BYU over Colorado State. No. 8 Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — JaJuan Johnson had 20 points and nine rebounds to help Purdue win its fifth straight game. No. 9 Notre Dame . . . . . . . .94 Providence . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Ben Hansbrough scored a career-high 32 points as Notre Dame hung on for a win over struggling Providence. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 No. 11 Georgetown . . . . . . .46 WASHINGTON — Cincinnati beat a Top 25 team on the road for the first time in seven years in a win over the Hoyas. No. 12 Wisconsin . . . . . . . .53 Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Josh Gasser banked in a desperation three-pointer at the buzzer to deal a blow to Michigan’s NCAA tournament hopes. No. 19 North Carolina . . . . .75 N.C. State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 RALEIGH, N.C. — Harrison Barnes scored 14 of his 16 points in the second half to help North Carolina pull away late to beat North Carolina State. No. 20 Missouri . . . . . . . . . .77 Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 COLUMBIA, Mo. — Laurence Bowers scored 18 of his 20 points in the second half to lead Missouri to a victory over Baylor. No. 21 Texas A&M . . . . . . . .61 Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Khris Middleton scored 13 points to help Texas A&M win its fifth straight game. Arkansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 No. 22 Kentucky . . . . . . . . .76 FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Marcus Britt hit a layup in the final minute of overtime to give the Razorbacks a win over Kentucky. No. 23 St. John’s . . . . . . . . .76 DePaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 NEW YORK — Dwight Hardy continued his scoring streak with 21 points and the Red Storm won their first game as a ranked team in more than 10 years.

Summit Continued from D1 The mountain passes were not completely unnavigable, though, as Redmond’s boys team played at South Eugene on Tuesday, and its girls team competed at Thurston in Springfield the same day. Also, Marshfield High of Coos

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Wednesday’s Games

Raptors 118, Bulls 113 Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, right, defends Portland Trail Blazers guard Rudy Fernandez, during the first half of Wednesday night’s game in Portland.

Lakers take down Blazers in overtime The Associated Press PORTLAND— Kobe Bryant had 37 points and the Los Angeles Lakers overcame a 10point deficit late in the fourth quarter to beat Portland 106-101 in overtime Wednesday night, snapping the Trail Blazers’ seasonbest six-game winning streak. LaMarcus Aldridge had 29 points and 14 rebounds for the Blazers, but didn’t hit a shot in the fourth quarter and missed two key free throws in the extra period. Lamar Odom and Ron Artest each hit a three-pointer to help Los Angeles to a 95-92 lead in overtime. Rudy Fernandez responded with a tying three and Andre Miller’s jumper gave the Blazers the lead, but Pau Gasol hit a turnaround hook shot and added a free throw before Bryant’s jumper with 27.9 seconds left gave Los Angeles a 100-97 advantage. Gasol fouled Aldridge, who missed both free throws to all but seal it for the Lakers. The two-time defending NBA champions beat Atlanta 104-80 on Tuesday night in Los Angeles, snapping a three-game losing streak. Portland went up 85-75 on Wesley Matthews’ short jumper with 5:49 left in regulation. But the Lakers slowly chipped away at the lead. Artest hit a three-pointer with 1:29 left that narrowed the gap to four. Bryant’s fadeaway jumper made it 87-85, and after Aldridge missed on the other end, Bryant scored again with 4.7 seconds left. Aldridge missed another layup as time ran out, sending the game to overtime. The dramatic loss ruined an uplifting night for Portland, which put three-time All-Star Brandon Roy on the floor for the first time since December. Roy entered with 2:21 left in the first quarter and received a standing ovation from the sellout crowd at the Rose Garden. Roy hadn’t played since Dec. 15 because of soreness in both knees, which he says is caused by too little cartilage. He underwent arthroscopic surgery on Jan. 17. Coach Nate McMillan says Roy will be limited to 15 minutes per game initially, coming off the bench. He will not play in back-toback games. Also on Wednesday: Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 NEW YORK — Carmelo Anthony had 27 points and 10 rebounds, hitting a pair of clutch buckets down the stretch in front of a crowd that cheered his every move as New

York beat Milwaukee in his Knicks debut. Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 ORLANDO, Fla. — Jermaine Taylor had 21 points, Beno Udrih added 18 and Sacramento beat Orlando, snapping a five-game losing streak. Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 SAN ANTONIO — Tony Parker scored the last of his 20 points on a 16-footer with 26.1 seconds left to help San Antonio hold off Oklahoma City. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 PHILADELPHIA — Jrue Holiday scored 20 points, Thaddeus Young had 18 points and 10 rebounds and Philadelphia won. Pacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 INDIANAPOLIS — Brandon Rush’s dunk with 5.4 seconds remaining gave surging Indiana a victory over Detroit. Raptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 TORONTO — Andrea Bargnani and DeMar DeRozan each scored 24 points, Jose Calderon had 17 assists and Toronto beat the Bulls, snapping Chicago’s four-game winning streak. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119 CLEVELAND — Reserve Chase Budinger scored a career-high 30 points, including 11 straight in the fourth quarter, and Kevin Martin added 30 more to lead Houston. Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 MINNEAPOLIS — Zach Randolph scored 24 points and grabbed 10 rebounds while Mike Conley added 22 points to help Memphis cruise to a victory over Minnesota. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 DALLAS — Dirk Nowitzki scored 23 points and Dallas cruised to victory over the reeling Jazz, just a few hours after Utah traded away leading scorer Deron Williams. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 PHOENIX — Channing Frye scored six of his 20 points in the final four minutes and Phoenix pulled away from Atlanta. Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 NEW ORLEANS — Chris Paul had 19 points and 10 assists, and New Orleans beat Los Angeles.

Lightning strike for eight goals, beat Coyotes The Associated Press TAMPA, Fla. — Teddy Purcell had his first career hat trick, Vincent Lecavalier added a goal and four assists and the Tampa Bay Lightning ended Phoenix’s eight-game winning streak with an 8-3 victory over the Coyotes on Wednesday night. Purcell had one of the five opening-period goals, and added a pair during the second. Steven Stamkos scored his NHL-leading 41st goal this season, and Martin St. Louis also had two goals and an assist for the Lightning, who are 6-3-2 during a 12game homestand. St. Louis (22 goals, 50 assists) has five straight sea-

NHL ROUNDUP sons of at least 20 goals and 50 assists. Adam Hall had the other Tampa Bay goal. Also on Wednesday: Sabres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Thrashers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Tyler Myers had a goal and assist, and Ryan Miller made 40 saves to lift Buffalo to a win over Atlanta. Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 OTTAWA — Bobby Butler scored twice, Craig Anderson made 23 saves, and Ottawa ended a 10-game home losing streak with a victory over Florida.

Bay played at Bend High on Wednesday in a Class 5A girls basketball play-in game. Representatives for 5A’s seven leagues voted 7-0 to award Summit a forfeit win if Springfield was unwilling to come to Bend on Wednesday after postponing the game originally scheduled for Tuesday. “It makes me sick to my stom-

Sharks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PITTSBURGH — Patrick Marleau scored his second goal of the game at 4:56 of overtime to extend San Jose’s winning streak to five games. Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Willie Mitchell scored the go-ahead goal in the third period, giving Los Angeles a victory over Anaheim in the 99th meeting between the rivals. Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DENVER — Rookie Taylor Hall had a goal and an assist and goalie Devan Dubnyk made 38 saves, leading Edmonton past Colorado.

ach my (four) seniors aren’t going to get a last game,” Springfield coach Grant McHill said Wednesday afternoon. “It’s very frustrating. We’ve had a disappointing season as it is and were hoping to make some noise in the playoffs.” McHill said he exhausted every option to try and play the play-in contest, none of which

CHICAGO (113) Deng 7-16 3-3 19, Boozer 9-20 6-8 24, Noah 3-7 1-2 7, Rose 8-22 14-16 32, Bogans 1-2 0-0 3, Brewer 4-5 3-4 11, Thomas 1-2 0-0 2, Gibson 2-8 2-2 6, Watson 2-3 1-2 6, Korver 1-2 0-0 3, Asik 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-87 30-37 113. TORONTO (118) J.Johnson 2-4 5-6 9, A.Johnson 8-8 1-1 17, Bargnani 7-19 10-11 24, Calderon 3-5 0-0 6, DeRozan 8-17 8-8 24, Weems 4-5 4-4 12, Davis 3-4 3-3 9, Barbosa 6-8 1-1 13, Bayless 0-1 0-0 0, Ajinca 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 43-74 32-34 118. Chicago 29 29 23 32 — 113 Toronto 25 30 30 33 — 118 3-Point Goals—Chicago 7-15 (Deng 2-6, Rose 2-6, Korver 1-1, Bogans 1-1, Watson 1-1), Toronto 0-5 (Calderon 0-1, J.Johnson 0-1, Bargnani 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 50 (Noah 16), Toronto 39 (Bargnani 8). Assists—Chicago 19 (Rose 10), Toronto 29 (Calderon 17). Total Fouls—Chicago 22, Toronto 26. Technicals—Chicago defensive three second. A—18,105 (19,800).

Kings 111, Magic 105 SACRAMENTO (111) Casspi 5-7 1-1 13, Thompson 6-12 5-7 17, Cousins 2-7 5-6 9, Udrih 7-13 3-3 18, Taylor 912 2-2 21, Dalembert 6-13 5-8 17, Head 3-7 0-0 8, Greene 0-4 0-0 0, Jackson 3-3 0-0 6, Jeter 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 42-80 21-27 111. ORLANDO (105) Turkoglu 7-10 1-1 19, Bass 2-6 1-2 5, Howard 10-17 11-12 31, Nelson 6-13 2-2 15, J.Richardson 4-12 0-0 8, Arenas 3-11 0-0 6, Anderson 3-10 2-3 9, Redick 5-10 0-0 12, Duhon 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-89 17-20 105. Sacramento 31 27 21 32 — 111 Orlando 25 36 23 21 — 105 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 6-12 (Head 2-3, Casspi 2-4, Taylor 1-1, Udrih 1-3, Greene 0-1), Orlando 8-28 (Turkoglu 4-7, Redick 2-4, Nelson 1-4, Anderson 1-6, J.Richardson 0-3, Arenas 04). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Sacramento 50 (Dalembert 9), Orlando 46 (Howard 17). Assists—Sacramento 30 (Udrih 10), Orlando 21 (Turkoglu 8). Total Fouls—Sacramento 20, Orlando 22. Technicals—Orlando defensive three second. A—19,146 (18,500).

Pacers 102, Pistons 101 DETROIT (101) Prince 0-3 0-2 0, Monroe 11-17 5-7 27, Wallace 3-4 0-0 6, Stuckey 8-14 2-2 21, McGrady 6-15 4-6 16, Daye 2-4 0-0 4, Wilcox 3-6 0-0 6, Bynum 2-6 3-4 9, Villanueva 0-2 0-0 0, Gordon 5-10 0-0 12, Maxiell 0-1 0-0 0, Summers 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-82 14-21 101. INDIANA (102) Granger 5-11 6-6 18, McRoberts 4-5 2-2 10, Hibbert 2-3 3-5 7, Collison 4-11 3-3 11, Rush 48 0-0 9, D.Jones 4-7 0-0 8, George 5-11 0-0 10, Hansbrough 8-17 5-6 21, Foster 2-5 0-0 4, Price 0-8 4-4 4. Totals 38-86 23-26 102. Detroit 19 24 30 28 — 101 Indiana 26 25 27 24 — 102 3-Point Goals—Detroit 7-14 (Stuckey 3-4, Gordon 2-3, Bynum 2-4, Villanueva 0-1, McGrady 0-2), Indiana 3-17 (Granger 2-5, Rush 1-2, Collison 0-1, McRoberts 0-1, D.Jones 0-2, George 0-2, Price 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 50 (Monroe 12), Indiana 50 (Hansbrough 12). Assists—Detroit 21 (McGrady 12), Indiana 17 (Collison 6). Total Fouls—Detroit 19, Indiana 21. Technicals—Stuckey. A—12,214 (18,165).

76ers 117, Wizards 94 WASHINGTON (94) Howard 2-5 2-5 6, Blatche 6-16 4-4 16, McGee 0-4 0-0 0, Wall 8-19 4-5 21, N.Young 6-15 1-1 15, Yi 0-1 1-2 1, Lewis 0-2 1-2 1, Martin 3-10 0-0 7, Thornton 3-6 0-0 6, Booker 9-10 3-3 21, Seraphin 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-88 16-22 94. PHILADELPHIA (117) Iguodala 3-7 1-2 10, Brand 5-9 5-6 15, Hawes 3-5 1-1 7, Holiday 8-12 2-2 20, Meeks 3-8 4-4 12, T.Young 5-7 8-8 18, Turner 6-11 34 15, Williams 2-7 2-2 6, Speights 5-9 3-4 14, Songaila 0-1 0-0 0, Nocioni 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 40-78 29-33 117. Washington 31 18 15 30 — 94 Philadelphia 24 30 34 29 — 117 3-Point Goals—Washington 4-9 (N.Young 2-3, Wall 1-2, Martin 1-4), Philadelphia 8-17 (Iguodala 3-5, Holiday 2-4, Meeks 2-6, Speights 1-1, Williams 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 41 (Howard 6), Philadelphia 58 (T.Young 10). Assists—Washington 20 (Wall 12), Philadelphia 25 (Williams 7). Total Fouls—Washington 23, Philadelphia 21. Technicals—Washington defensive three second 2. A—12,704 (20,318).

Rockets 124, Cavs 119 HOUSTON (124) Battier 3-5 1-2 9, Hayes 6-8 0-2 12, Scola 7-14 2-2 16, Lowry 1-10 0-2 2, Martin 10-18 9-11 30, Brooks 2-12 0-0 5, Patterson 1-1 0-0 2, Budinger 9-18 8-9 30, Lee 7-10 0-0 16, Miller 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 47-100 20-28 124. CLEVELAND (119) Eyenga 3-8 0-0 6, Jamison 8-15 8-9 26, Hickson 2-9 0-0 4, Sessions 8-14 3-5 20, Parker 7-10 1-1 19, Harris 9-16 0-0 21, Moon 4-7 0-0 11, Hollins 0-4 0-0 0, Samuels 6-8 0-0 12. Totals 47-91 12-15 119. Houston 28 33 30 33 — 124 Cleveland 27 38 23 31 — 119 3-Point Goals—Houston 10-27 (Budinger 4-8, Lee 2-3, Battier 2-3, Brooks 1-3, Martin 1-4, Miller 0-1, Lowry 0-5), Cleveland 13-22 (Parker 4-5, Harris 3-4, Moon 3-5, Jamison 2-6, Sessions 1-1, Eyenga 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 67 (Hayes 17), Cleveland 41 (Harris 9). Assists—Houston 28 (Miller 5), Cleveland 27 (Sessions 12). Total Fouls—Houston 14, Cleveland 25. Technicals—Brooks, Lowry. A—18,027 (20,562).

Mavericks 118, Jazz 99 UTAH (99) Kirilenko 7-10 1-3 17, Millsap 8-17 2-3 18, Jefferson 11-14 8-10 30, Watson 3-11 0-0 7, Bell 1-7 3-3 5, Miles 2-9 11-12 16, Elson 2-2 0-0 4,

his school district accepted. “They won’t let us travel over the pass in any shape or form,” McHill said. “Our only other option was to play the game at a neutral site, which Summit declined.” With the forfeit victory, Summit (7-16) will play at Corvallis (22-1) on Friday for a spot in the Class 5A state postseason.

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 41 29 28 17 16

L 14 26 29 40 42

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 42 36 34 25 15

L 15 22 23 32 41

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 38 26 22 21 10

L 17 30 35 38 47

Pct .745 .527 .491 .298 .276

GB — 12 14 25 26½

L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 3-7 3-7

Str W-3 W-3 W-2 L-3 W-1

Home 25-5 16-12 18-9 13-15 11-18

Away 16-9 13-14 10-20 4-25 5-24

Conf 29-7 19-11 17-20 9-25 10-27

Away 21-10 15-13 17-14 10-18 1-27

Conf 28-8 24-11 24-12 15-21 10-26

Away 13-13 10-18 8-22 7-22 3-27

Conf 21-10 18-18 14-16 14-20 7-27

Southeast Division Pct .737 .621 .596 .439 .268

GB — 6½ 8 17 26½

L10 9-1 5-5 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str W-3 L-1 L-3 W-1 L-3

Home 21-5 21-9 17-9 15-14 14-14

Central Division Pct .691 .464 .386 .356 .175

GB — 12½ 17 19 29

L10 7-3 7-3 3-7 4-6 2-8

Str L-1 W-2 L-1 L-2 L-1

Home 25-4 16-12 14-13 14-16 7-20

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 47 41 34 32 28

L 10 16 25 27 31

Oklahoma City Denver Portland Utah Minnesota

W 36 33 32 31 13

L 20 25 25 27 45

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 40 28 26 21 14

L 19 27 30 37 41

Pct .825 .719 .576 .542 .475

GB — 6 14 16 20

L10 7-3 9-1 3-7 7-3 6-4

Str W-1 W-4 W-1 W-1 W-2

Home 26-2 22-8 21-8 19-8 15-13

Away 21-8 19-8 13-17 13-19 13-18

Conf 30-5 24-8 17-18 18-17 16-21

Away 16-12 10-18 13-17 14-14 4-25

Conf 22-15 20-17 20-16 16-20 5-31

Away 20-11 11-14 7-18 5-23 7-19

Conf 22-11 16-17 16-20 14-23 8-25

Northwest Division Pct .643 .569 .561 .534 .224

GB — 4 4½ 6 24

L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 3-7 2-8

Str L-1 W-2 L-1 L-5 L-6

Home 20-8 23-7 19-8 17-13 9-20

Paciic Division Pct .678 .509 .464 .362 .255

GB — 10 12½ 18½ 24

L10 Str 6-4 W-2 7-3 W-1 7-3 L-1 2-8 L-2 2-8 W-1 ——— Wednesday’s Games

San Antonio 109, Oklahoma City 105 Indiana 102, Detroit 101 Philadelphia 117, Washington 94 New York 114, Milwaukee 108 Dallas 118, Utah 99 New Orleans 98, L.A. Clippers 87

Home 20-8 17-13 19-12 16-14 7-22

Houston 124, Cleveland 119 Sacramento 111, Orlando 105 Toronto 118, Chicago 113 Memphis 104, Minnesota 95 Phoenix 105, Atlanta 97 L.A. Lakers 106, Portland 101, OT Today’s Games

Miami at Chicago, 5 p.m.

Boston at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games

Sacramento at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. New York at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. New Orleans at Minnesota, 5 p.m. New Jersey at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Utah at Indiana, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Toronto, 4 p.m. Washington at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Orlando, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Portland, 7:30 p.m. All Times PST

Hayward 1-6 0-0 2, Fesenko 0-1 0-0 0, Evans 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-77 25-31 99. DALLAS (118) Stojakovic 7-9 0-0 18, Nowitzki 9-15 4-5 23, Chandler 3-7 1-2 7, Kidd 2-3 0-0 5, Beaubois 46 0-0 10, Marion 6-9 4-4 16, Terry 4-9 4-4 13, Stevenson 0-2 0-0 0, Haywood 4-7 4-9 12, Barea 5-8 2-2 13, Cardinal 0-0 0-0 0, Mahinmi 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 44-76 20-28 118. Utah 26 29 22 22 — 99 Dallas 23 36 29 30 — 118 3-Point Goals—Utah 4-16 (Kirilenko 2-3, Miles 1-4, Watson 1-5, Bell 0-4), Dallas 1020 (Stojakovic 4-5, Beaubois 2-4, Barea 1-1, Kidd 1-2, Terry 1-3, Nowitzki 1-4, Haywood 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Utah 41 (Millsap 9), Dallas 47 (Haywood, Chandler 10). Assists—Utah 18 (Kirilenko, Watson 5), Dallas 30 (Kidd 12). Total Fouls—Utah 22, Dallas 25. Technicals—Jefferson, Terry, Dallas defensive three second. A—20,379 (19,200).

Grizzlies 104, Timberwolves 95 MEMPHIS (104) Young 6-14 3-3 16, Z.Randolph 10-16 4-7 24, Gasol 4-9 1-2 9, Conley 5-15 9-12 22, Allen 6-11 4-4 16, Mayo 4-12 0-0 9, Thabeet 0-0 2-2 2, Arthur 2-5 0-0 4, Williams 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 38-84 23-30 104. MINNESOTA (95) Beasley 5-17 4-5 14, Love 4-11 7-8 15, Milicic 4-10 0-0 8, Ridnour 5-12 3-4 15, Johnson 2-7 0-1 4, Hayward 3-6 2-2 8, Pekovic 1-4 0-0 2, Ellington 5-11 3-4 16, Telfair 1-6 3-3 5, Tolliver 4-8 0-0 8. Totals 34-92 22-27 95. Memphis 26 28 22 28 — 104 Minnesota 18 24 26 27 — 95 3-Point Goals—Memphis 5-16 (Conley 3-6, Young 1-1, Mayo 1-7, Williams 0-1, Z.Randolph 0-1), Minnesota 5-17 (Ellington 3-4, Ridnour 2-3, Hayward 0-1, Beasley 0-1, Love 0-2, Telfair 0-2, Tolliver 0-2, Johnson 0-2). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Memphis 56 (Z.Randolph 10), Minnesota 60 (Love 11). Assists—Memphis 27 (Conley 9), Minnesota 20 (Ridnour 5). Total Fouls—Memphis 22, Minnesota 27. Technicals—Memphis defensive three second, Minnesota defensive three second 2. A—11,497 (19,356).

Knicks 114, Bucks 108 MILWAUKEE (108) Delfino 5-14 1-2 14, Mbah a Moute 1-5 56 7, Bogut 5-12 4-6 14, Jennings 4-11 2-2 12, Salmons 7-14 11-13 27, Ilyasova 4-7 0-0 8, Dooling 5-10 0-1 13, Maggette 5-9 2-2 13, Brockman 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-82 25-32 108. NEW YORK (114) Anthony 10-25 6-7 27, Stoudemire 6-13 7-7 19, Turiaf 3-3 0-0 6, Billups 4-12 12-12 21, Fields 3-6 0-0 7, Sha.Williams 3-5 1-2 8, Douglas 10-12 0-0 23, Walker 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 40-80 26-28 114. Milwaukee 24 33 22 29 — 108 New York 33 26 27 28 — 114 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 11-23 (Dooling 3-6, Delfino 3-7, Salmons 2-3, Jennings 2-4, Maggette 1-2, Ilyasova 0-1), New York 8-22 (Douglas 3-5, Anthony 1-2, Walker 1-3, Sha. Williams 1-3, Fields 1-3, Billups 1-6). Fouled Out—Salmons, Stoudemire. Rebounds—Milwaukee 46 (Bogut 12), New York 49 (Anthony 10). Assists—Milwaukee 18 (Salmons 7), New York 20 (Billups 8). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 25, New York 26. Technicals—Stoudemire. A—19,763 (19,763).

Suns 105, Hawks 97 ATLANTA (97) Williams 1-7 0-1 2, Smith 10-18 5-5 26, Horford 7-15 3-4 17, Teague 3-6 3-3 10, Johnson 513 1-2 12, Crawford 8-14 0-0 19, Wilkins 4-6 0-0 9, Collins 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 39-81 12-15 97. PHOENIX (105) Hill 3-7 0-0 7, Frye 8-14 0-0 20, Lopez 4-6 0-1 8, Nash 5-9 2-2 13, Carter 2-5 2-2 6, Gortat 5-10 3-3 13, Dudley 6-9 1-2 17, Dragic 0-2 0-0 0, Warrick 4-4 1-2 10, Pietrus 3-10 3-4 11. Totals 40-76 12-16 105. Atlanta 31 16 24 26 — 97 Phoenix 33 28 19 25 — 105 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 7-14 (Crawford 3-5, Wilkins 1-1, Teague 1-1, Smith 1-3, Johnson 1-3, Williams 0-1), Phoenix 13-26 (Dudley 4-5, Frye 4-8, Pietrus 2-5, Warrick 1-1, Hill 1-1, Nash 1-3, Carter 0-1, Dragic 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 42 (Horford 9), Phoenix 43 (Gortat 12). Assists—Atlanta 18 (Smith, Horford 4), Phoenix 25 (Nash 10). Total Fouls—Atlanta

Bend Continued from D1 Kara Young paced the Pirates (2-22) with eight points. Marshfield, which had not won a game since defeating Class 3A Myrtle Point on Dec. 27, finished the season on a 15-game losing streak.

20, Phoenix 15. A—18,254 (18,422).

Hornets 98, Clippers 87 L.A. CLIPPERS (87) Gomes 3-6 0-0 7, Griffin 8-17 5-8 21, Jordan 1-1 1-2 3, Bledsoe 3-5 0-0 7, Foye 5-13 2-2 15, Cook 0-2 0-0 0, Butler 2-6 0-1 5, C.Smith 2-3 00 4, Kaman 6-11 2-4 14, Aminu 2-5 4-4 8, Warren 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 33-70 14-21 87. NEW ORLEANS (98) Ariza 3-8 0-2 6, West 9-18 4-6 22, J.Smith 2-4 2-2 6, Paul 8-17 3-4 19, Green 7-11 1-2 17, Jack 3-7 4-4 10, Gray 3-5 0-0 6, Andersen 0-1 0-0 0, Belinelli 5-7 1-1 12, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-78 15-21 98. L.A. Clippers 16 22 24 25 — 87 New Orleans 23 22 28 25 — 98 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 7-15 (Foye 3-4, Butler 1-1, Warren 1-1, Gomes 1-2, Bledsoe 1-3, Griffin 0-1, Cook 0-1, Aminu 0-2), New Orleans 3-11 (Green 2-3, Belinelli 1-2, Ariza 0-2, Jack 02, Paul 0-2). Fouled Out—Gray. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 43 (Griffin 13), New Orleans 45 (West 8). Assists—L.A. Clippers 23 (Foye 9), New Orleans 26 (Paul 10). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 16, New Orleans 23. Technicals—Griffin. A—17,537 (17,188).

Lakers 106, Blazers 101 L.A. LAKERS (106) Artest 8-13 3-4 24, Gasol 8-15 2-2 18, Bynum 3-6 0-0 6, Fisher 2-4 0-0 6, Bryant 14-31 6-7 37, Brown 1-5 0-0 2, Blake 0-1 0-0 0, Odom 5-8 2-2 13, Walton 0-0 0-0 0, Caracter 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-83 13-15 106. PORTLAND (101) Batum 7-16 4-6 22, Aldridge 12-18 5-8 29, Przybilla 1-1 2-4 4, Miller 3-10 1-2 7, Matthews 9-18 2-2 22, Fernandez 2-7 1-1 7, Roy 2-5 0-0 5, Cunningham 1-3 1-2 3, Johnson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 38-79 16-25 101. L.A. 23 18 26 20 19 — 106 Portland 29 18 22 18 14 — 101 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 11-18 (Artest 56, Bryant 3-6, Fisher 2-4, Odom 1-1, Blake 0-1), Portland 9-24 (Batum 4-9, Matthews 2-6, Fernandez 2-7, Roy 1-2). Fouled Out—Gasol, Matthews. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 47 (Gasol 14), Portland 47 (Aldridge 14). Assists—L.A. Lakers 22 (Bryant 6), Portland 22 (Miller 8). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 24, Portland 15. Technicals—Gasol, Odom, Aldridge. A—20,643 (19,980).

LEADERS Through Tuesday’s games SCORING G FG FT PTS Durant, OKC 51 486 401 1465 James, MIA 55 503 362 1439 Stoudemire, NYK 53 521 333 1384 Wade, MIA 53 477 344 1343 Anthony, DEN 50 437 343 1259 Ellis, GOL 56 530 258 1409 Bryant, LAL 58 516 344 1452 Rose, CHI 53 481 275 1318 Gordon, LAC 41 333 242 988 Griffin, LAC 57 497 303 1304 Martin, HOU 56 368 421 1279 Howard, ORL 55 445 365 1255 Nowitzki, DAL 47 388 242 1067 Aldridge, POR 56 492 263 1250 Westbrook, OKC 55 408 378 1213 Bargnani, TOR 51 422 210 1115 Williams, UTA 53 369 302 1129 Granger, IND 54 387 250 1138 Love, MIN 57 393 337 1199 Randolph, MEM 53 424 205 1058 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF TOT Love, MIN 57 269 615 884 Howard, ORL 55 217 543 760 Randolph, MEM 53 250 446 696 Griffin, LAC 57 211 504 715 Gasol, LAL 58 198 407 605 Horford, ATL 52 134 373 507 Chandler, DAL 53 146 353 499 Humphries, NJN 57 156 376 532 Duncan, SAN 56 138 378 516 Odom, LAL 58 135 395 530 FG PERCENTAGE FG FGA Hilario, DEN 287 453 Okafor, NOR 219 369 Howard, ORL 445 752 A. Johnson, TOR 226 393 Horford, ATL 362 636 ASSISTS G AST Rondo, BOS 44 539 Nash, PHX 52 589 Williams, UTA 53 514 Paul, NOR 58 557 Felton, NYK 54 488

AVG 28.7 26.2 26.1 25.3 25.2 25.2 25.0 24.9 24.1 22.9 22.8 22.8 22.7 22.3 22.1 21.9 21.3 21.1 21.0 20.0 AVG 15.5 13.8 13.1 12.5 10.4 9.8 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1

PCT .634 .593 .592 .575 .569 AVG 12.3 11.3 9.7 9.6 9.0

With the win, the Bears move on to the second play-in round. Bend High is scheduled to play at West Albany, which finished the season 19-4 and atop the Mid-Willamette Conference standings, on Saturday. The winner between the Lava Bears and the Bulldogs advances to the Class 5A state playoffs.

H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

D4 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Tying Continued from D1 Fly Fishers Place owner Jeff Perrin taught Steele how to fly-fish and tie flies, and she developed a deep passion for the hobby. A retired computer technician, Steele says tying flies fit her need for something technical. “It’s very technical,” she says of fly tying. “You have to learn biology. I really enjoy digging around in streams, looking for bugs. Then you go home and tie something that looks like that bug. This area is a mecca for that.” Now Steele and Perrin are in the process of co-authoring a book on fly patterns that hook fish in Central Oregon and how to tie them. Steele says she is also working on a book about women in fly-fishing. “As a woman coming up in a man’s world, with technology, the analogies (between a technology career and fly-fishing) are just amazing,” she says. Steele created the Central Oregon Flyfishers Winter Fly Tying Series, which is held every Tuesday night at the Bend Senior Center. The series, now in its third year, features an expert fly-tying instructor for each session. Steele instructed the class this week. “Everybody gets their flies tied all winter, the latest and the greatest,” Steele says of the class. Many fly anglers like to stockpile their flies during the winter, so come the prime fishing seasons of spring and summer they will have a full arsenal. Steele, who also teaches flytying classes at the Fly Fishers Place on Thursday nights, says the ultimate reward for fly tiers is catching a fish with a fly they tied themselves. “The fact that you can tie a fly, something you created, and then go catch a fish with it … it’s really exciting when that first happens,” she says. But Steele also enjoys tying flies for the pure art of it. She learned to tie Classic Atlantic Salmon Flies with a group in Salem, then eventually started her own such club in Sisters: the Central Oregon Fly Tyers Guild. The club of 18 members ties classic flies, frames them, then gives them away to other nonprofits for fundraisers. Steele, who has been married for 27 years and has an adult son, ties many of her flies in a 600square-foot room in her Sisters home. Her husband, Eric, designed and built the room. “The room houses my passion,” Sherry Steele says. Like many other fly anglers, Steele likes to promote the message of conservation. She can do this through her positions with the Federation of Fly Fishers, a 43year-old international nonprofit organization. According to its website, the Federation of Fly Fishers is “dedicated to the betterment of the sport of fly-fishing through conservation, restoration and education.” Or, as Steele puts it: “Teach the kids how to take care of these rivers. That’s what it’s all about.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

Fly fishing events NORTHWEST FLY TYER & FLY FISHING EXPO What: Programs and workshops in fly tying and fly casting, youth programs, vendor booths, raffles, auctions Where: Linn County Expo Center in Albany When: Friday, March 11, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, March 12, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Cost: $5; free for Federation of Fly Fishers members and youth 18 and younger Contact: www.nwflytyerexpo.com

A fishing trip on horseback GARY LEWIS

CENTRAL ZONE CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Flows are highly variable; check flows before venturing out. Fishing should improve as the week continues. According to recent angler reports, the trout seem to be larger this year than in recent past years. Anglers are reminded that angling methods are restricted to artificial flies and lures through May 28.

Photo courtesy Coyhaique River Lodge

On the Coyhaique River in Chile, Gary Lewis caught this rainbow trout from the back of his horse, Colorin with a little help from Heather Barklow, of Glide. Atlas. Picture North America. Locate my home of Bend, then go east to Salt Lake City, then southeast to Atlanta. From Atlanta, find your way down a narrow strip of land called Central America thence southerly to South America. Go down, down, down, where it is summertime during our winter and the land becomes a narrow finger pointed at Antarctica. This, mi amigo, is Patagonia, land of the pampa, the Andes, verdant mountain valleys and fjords. The horse, of course, came from Spain. The trout are the spawn of pioneers from Europe — German browns — and from Los Estados Unidos — our own rainbows, brought to Chile and Argentina in the early 1900s. Two hours after I arrived at the Coyhaique River Lodge, I walked out, with a Cabela’s HDT 6-weight rod in hand. I didn’t know what HDT stood for, but I imagined it meant “Horse Duty for Trout.” There stood Barklow and Norman. They had taken a trial run to see which of their horses would permit an angler on its back.

FLY-TYING CLASSES AT THE FLY FISHERS PLACE Where: 151 West Main, Sisters When: Thursdays from 6 to 9 p.m., through March 31 Cost: $15 per class Contact: Sherry Steele at 541549-2072 or 541-420-5532

My steed, Heather told me, was Colorin, a Criollo. The ride was less than a mile to the river down a narrow switchbacked track. Gaston Urrejola, the owner of the lodge, suggested a dry/dropper combination. I knotted a Schroeder’s Hopper to my tippet and added a beadhead Pheasant Tail tied off the bend of the hook on a 15-inch leader. Out into the river, Heather and I coaxed the gelding. Midstream, I shook line out of the rod tip and questioned my sanity and my vanity. It worked best to sit the horse mid-current and cast upstream. Right away, I missed a grab and moments later, hooked and lost a fish that took the nymph. The gelding, I imagined, asked himself what he was doing there in a sort of disinterested 2-yearold way. Upstream, we found another hole, with trout in the tailout. Like their counterparts in North America, they split for deep water when they saw el caballo and the humans. I made longer casts, taking care to keep from wrapping line around the horse’s knees. Gaston pointed to where the

trees hung over the water. When my hopper splashed down, a trout swirled. The fish turned; I lifted the rod. The rainbow came out of the water time and again; its spotted flanks flashed silver and crimson. After the second run, I brought it close to the horse and then dipped the long-handled net. The trout didn’t like the look of the horse and the horse didn’t like the look of the fish. They each tried to get away from the other, but my 4x tippet brought them back together. With the fish at the horse’s heels again, I had it almost in the net and then thought better of it. There was a good chance that with a rainbow-striped torpedo aboard, mi caballo might try to push the eject button for both of us. I handed the net to Heather and steered the fish into it. Heather wanted me to tell you not to try this at home. Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the northern boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): Summer steelhead can still be found in good numbers from the Columbia upstream to the reservation boundary for the persistent angler. Winter trout fishing can also be good in the Deschutes, though fish are generally less responsive in very cool temperatures. Whitefish, however, seem to be more responsive in cool water temperatures. HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: Fishing has been slow, but should pick up in the coming weeks. HOOD RIVER: Anglers are reporting good success on bright winter steelhead in the lower river. Steelhead anglers should expect fish numbers to increase throughout the month with a peak in March and April. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer opportunities for good dryfly fishing. TAYLOR LAKE: Taylor Lake should offer anglers a good opportunity to catch trout this winter. The lake was stocked with legal and trophy trout in the fall.

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DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the Environmental Center in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org.

Rifle Raffle, Les Schwab Rifle Raffle, Oregon State Wide Elk Tag, dozens of guns, archery packages, and more; cost is $75, which includes dinner and annual membership; contact 541-383-8518 or www.rmef.org. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St; contact 541-447-5029.

HUNTING

SHOOTING

ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION BANQUET: The Central Oregon Chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will celebrate its 25th anniversary with the annual banquet on April 9, from 4 to 10 p.m., at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond; highlights include the John Nosler Memorial

BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com.

FISHING

FLY-TYING CORNER

FLY-TYING CLASSES WITH CENTRAL OREGON FLY FISHERS Where: Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road When: Tuesdays from 6 to 9 p.m., through March 29 Cost: $5 for Central Oregon Fly Fishers members; membership is $36 annually and can be purchased at the class Contact: Jerry Criss at 541536-3581 or tlflyy44@msn. com

Anglers have success for Hood River steelhead Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

S

ometimes the horse is willing and sometimes the trout is willing, but not often at the same time. Both the horse and trout were willing in 1997 on the Minam River in northeast Oregon. But the line was weak. When the trout made his second leap, my tippet broke. Perhaps it was for the best. That horse didn’t mind that I carried a long stick and waved it around, but it might have had a change of heart when it saw a jumping, splashing rainbow at its heels. A horse has the mental capacity of a 1,500-pound 2-year old. With a brain, good eyes and experience with things like snakes and dogs that nip at heels, it can tolerate a lot, but it might just throw a tantrum, which becomes what folks around here call a rodeo. In 1999, on a pack trip to Ice Lake in Oregon’s Wallowa Mountains, I tried again. Barry Cox, of Enterprise, was the outfitter. When he returned to pack us out, I waited until he wasn’t looking and rode my bay into the water. The plan was to turn him around, make a long cast and troll the fly back. I laid the fly on the surface. A brook trout charged, but turned away when he saw my steed. Over the years, the goal became specific: to catch a wild trout on a dry fly from the back of a horse. To Kevin and Therese Friedmann, and Heather Barklow, whom I met at the Fly Spur Ranch in Tumalo, where the logo is a trout fly entwined with a riding spur, the idea resonated. When I met Joyce Norman, through our mutual friend, Brian Davis, she said she thought I could find a willing horse and willing trout in Patagonia. If you’re asking, “Where is Patagonia?” let me save you the trouble of digging out the

FISHING REPORT

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Peacock Caddis, courtesy Fly and Field.

AND A WEEKEND AT THE * COAST IT’S EASY TO ENTER

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

July through October, dry caddis patterns are an indispensable part of the trout fisherman’s arsenal. In mid to late winter, however, a Peacock Caddis tied on a No. 12-14 dry-fly hook can double for a little black stonefly. If the conditions are right on a winter afternoon, an angler can tempt a dozen trout to the surface. Employ the Peacock Caddis on a long, light tippet when feeding trout are finicky. Dead drift is easiest, but during a caddis hatch a fly skittered along the surface can imitate egg-laying females and entice a strike. Tie the Peacock Caddis with black thread on a No. 10-14 dryfly hook. Build the body with peacock herl. For the wing, use elk hair. For the bushy collar, pair a brown and a grizzly hackle.

COMPLETE THE LOCAL SHOPPING SURVEY AT

www.pulseresearch.com/thebulletin Please see web site for all contest rules. *2 night stay at a luxury hotel on the Oregon Coast. Must be 18 years or older to partcipate.

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS ‘Great Performances’ See Harry Connick Jr. perform on Broadway during PBS special, Page E2

OUTING

Inside

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011

Go tap into ‘epic’ winter recreation, but it’s going to be chilly By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

After spending part of Central Oregon’s springlike January tending to his garden, Deschutes National Forest’s trails specialist Chris Sabo described conditions at local winter recreation areas as “epic” Wednesday. “We had an awesome week last week,” Sabo said. “That storm system brought plenty of snow to the forest, and pretty decent snow at some of the lower elevations, even in town.” With another storm expected late this week, plus cold temperatures, Sabo expects “nothing but light, fluffy, dry powder” on area trails. Of course, light, fluffy, dry powder can hide hazards at lower elevations, especially for people riding heavy snowmobiles. Riders should be vigilant for rocks, stumps and so on when playing in those areas. See Trails / E3

TRAIL UPDATE

Under the

Rainbow

SPOTLIGHT Annual Eagle Watch set for this weekend

Have a little patience and enjoy your own piece of Mt. Bachelor By David Jasper

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An array of events is slated around the 16th annual Eagle Watch to be held Saturday and Sunday at Cove Palisades State Park, west of Culver. The weekend will feature presentations and tours that explore the natural and cultural significance of eagles and other birds of prey in the area. Most activities will be at PGE Round Butte Overlook Park visitor center. There are 10 pairs of bald eagles and 10 pairs of golden eagles that stay year-round in the Lake Billy Chinook area. This year’s weekend will focus more than in the past on golden eagles. New this year are guided “Walkabout Discovery Tours” designed for kids and families. More information is available on the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department website listed below. For a detailed schedule of events, click on “Your Parks’ Go Guide,” shown in red under the headline “See eagles at Lake Billy Chinook.” Then scroll toward the bottom of the page and click on “Schedule of Events,” shown in blue. Contact: www.oregonstateparks .org or 800-551-6949.

West Village Day Lodge Greg Cross / The Bulletin

ext time you’re at Mt. Bachelor, consider the merits of the Rainbow Chair. On any given day, fewer than 7 percent of those skiing or snowboarding at Bachelor are using Rainbow to get up the mountain’s east face, according to Andy Goggins, director of marketing and communications for the ski area. With seven express quads to choose from, and access to some of the most popular parts of the mountain, it’s little wonder that so few would opt for the merits of Rainbow. “Fewer than 7 percent” means there could

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ABOVE: Skiers make their way down Flying Dutchman shortly after riding the Rainbow Chair on Saturday at Mt. Bachelor. Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Wanderlust to host dessert, snowshoe tour Wanderlust Tours will offer a “Bonfire on the Snow” dessert snowshoe tour from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday. Participants will take a short snowshoe tour through the snowy forest with a Wanderlust naturalist to a bonfire in an amphitheater carved from deep snow. Participants can enjoy locally baked desserts and hot drinks while guides discuss facts about the forest, animal life and the night sky. Cost is $75 per person, which includes guides, snowshoes, instruction, transportation, hot drinks and desserts. Children 8 years and older are welcome. No experience necessary. Contact: www.wanderlusttours .com or 541-389-8359. — From staff reports

be a line worthy of a new ride at Disney a snowball’s throw away at the Sunrise Express Quad, yet at Rainbow, there’s almost no one there — just you, your iPod, maybe a cell phone for making calls during the long ride up. If you’re partial to snacks, Rainbow affords an opportunity to break out the eats and refuel for your next descent. “Fewer than 7 percent” also means, depending on the day and conditions, it’s still possible to put down fresh tracks around Rainbow’s runs — Wanoga Way, Flying Dutchman, I-5 and Carnival, while other parts of the mountain start to look like the sandbox after recess. See Outing / E6

If you go What: Rainbow Chair at Mt. Bachelor Cost: Daily lift ticket priced on a sliding scale based on conditions. Adults, $50$70; teens and seniors, $40-$60; youth 6-12, $29-$43; 5 and under, free Difficulty: Moderate to difficult Contact: www.mt bachelor.com

Skiers make their way onto the Rainbow Chair Saturday at Mt. Bachelor.

T EL EV ISIO N

E2 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Tale of generosity inspires others to help kids in need

Connick to give ‘Great Performance’ on PBS By Luaine Lee

‘Great Performances’

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Dear Abby: Thank you for printing the letter from the woman who paid for her neighbor’s children’s school lunch bill. “Lending a Hand in the Midwest” (Jan. 10) was angry to discover they didn’t qualify for free lunches because “their parents were just a couple of dollars over the limit.” To top it off, the children’s father is doing his second tour in Afghanistan. Because you encouraged your readers to contact local schools to give a few dollars to a child in need of a meal, it inspired me to speak to the principal in our district. Not only did the principal like my fundraising idea, he has allowed me time on campus to promote the fundraiser. Twenty-seven students will be joining me after school in making lollipops to sell at an upcoming event. Local businesses and individuals have donated most of the supplies necessary to make this a successful drive to help the children in need. Our goal is to raise $1,000 for this cause. I want to extend a heartfelt thank you to “Lending” for sharing a great idea. — Happily Paying it Forward in Hawaii Dear Happily: Thank you for spreading the message. “Lending’s” generous act of kindness elicited many interesting and thought-provoking responses. Read on: Dear Abby: I am a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Vietnam Veterans of America, the American Legion and the American Legion Riders Association. One of the main functions of our organizations is to help our veterans and their families in any way we can. You would be amazed at the monies and help expended to our veterans, soldiers and their families that doesn’t make the news because being “needy” is perceived as some kind of fault. To respond to a need, we must KNOW about it. Abby, please tell your readers if there is a prob-

DEAR ABBY lem, contact your local VFW, American Legion, AmVets, etc. and we will respond. — Frank in Burlington, Wis. Dear Abby: I am currently serving in the military and have never thought to donate to school lunches. I’m happy knowing people are watching out for the troops’ kids. As soon as I return home from Iraq, I will make the call to see where I can help. — Airman Who Has Been There Dear Abby: A lot of families are in the same situation. We have three kids and are $8 over the “allowed financial amount.” What’s not taken into consideration is the $100 my husband pays for Internet each month he’s serving in Afghanistan so our 8-year-old son with Asperger’s can “see” his daddy. This lessens the anxiety, compounded by his dad’s deployment, that is associated with his autism. God bless “Lending a Hand” for her gift to that family. — Abbie in Rineyville, Ky. Dear Abby: I work in a public school. The administrators and the school nurse have daily contact with “kids in need” who could benefit enormously from small donations. I encourage people to contact their local schools and inquire about donating new clothes and/or toiletries to a child in need. The child’s identity will not be revealed, but sizes and current clothing trends can be provided, and the donor will have the satisfaction of knowing the donation is helping a child “fit in” and will make a huge difference in that child’s self-esteem. — Marcia in West Virginia

PASADENA, Calif. — New Orleans singer and piano man Harry Connick Jr. always wanted to be in the limelight. He got his wish. At 9 years old he was playing with the New Orleans Philharmonic. At 19 he cut his first CD. It wasn’t because of some extraordinary talent, he thinks. “I had incredible opportunity. I had very supportive parents, and when they said, ‘Practice,’ you know you practiced.” All that practice paid off as Connick has gone on to record 24 albums, sold 25 million copies and is ranked among the top best-selling male artists in the U.S. by the Recording Industry Association of America. He’s also costarred in movies like “Hope Floats” and “Independence Day,” and written soundtracks, the most famous of which is his luscious mix for “When Harry Met Sally.” For a taste of his talent, PBS’ “Great Performances” on March 2 will present “Harry Connick Jr. in Concert on Broadway.” The show features Connick’s big band and a 12-piece string section, with the keyboardist on both a grand piano and upright honky-tonk. “I’m one of those personalities who had to be at the center of attention all the time,” he said. “My dad tells a story of when I was in the fifth grade. He came to kind of check up on me in school because he had heard that there was some disciplinary issues. And he kind of peeked in the door, and the class was in session, and I was in the

When: 10 p.m. March 10 Where: OPB

Courtesy PBS via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Harry Connick Jr. performs on “Great Performances” on PBS in “Harry Connick Jr. in Concert on Broadway” on March 2. back of the class at a table with about three other kids. And after the class was over, my dad went to the teacher and said, ‘What’s going on? Why is Harry Jr. in the back of the class?’ And she says, ‘Well, he won’t listen to me, so I’ve just decided to let him do his own thing back there.’” Eventually he learned that attention wasn’t everything. “But the thing is, when you have the kind of tutelage that I had, like Ellis Marsalis and James Booker and those kinds of people, they don’t care about being the center of attention,” he said. “All they care about is that you’re the best at your craft. So the problem occurs when you are the center of attention and you don’t know what you’re doing.” He knows the feeling. “I felt like I always belonged on the stage. I never felt like I didn’t belong on stage. I mean, I feel like I’m a natural performer. But at times, you get your behind kicked as a jazz musician. I could tell you a

couple of stories of playing with people who just mop the floor with you. I mean, that’s part of growing up, playing that kind of music. It’s really, really, really hard. You know, that’s why there’s not a lot of famous teenage jazz bands,” he said. Connick says he doesn’t worry about pleasing everyone when he’s performing. “It doesn’t matter what arena you play in, whether the Super Bowl or whatever, you just got to play the game,” he says. “I don’t know why people continue to come to my shows, to be honest with you. And I’m not saying that to be facetious. I’m not fishing. I’m being really serious. Because some people think of me as a guy who sings. Like,

one of my daughter’s friends said that I sing vintage pop. And some people think of me as a jazz musician. And they want to ignore the singing part of it. Some people, very few people, don’t care about the singing at all and kind of acknowledge the orchestrations and things like that, which is as much a part of what I do as the singing. “So, man, I can’t even think about satisfying anybody. That happens when I’m on stage ... I just go out and try ... to build a relationship. It’s like being on a date or something. You know, you gotta ask a lot of questions, and you gotta be considerate and polite. And as the evening goes on, you kind of reveal a little bit more of yourself. That’s why, when a lot of people see me play, they say, ‘You’re a real stiff at the beginning of your shows.’ And I probably am, because you don’t want to come into that date, with your shirt unbuttoned all the way down.”

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Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Hidden China Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Travels-Edge Steves Europe

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Community ‘PG’ Perfect Couples The Office ’ ‘14’ Parks/Recreat Big Bang Theory Engagement CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Å American Idol Top 24 Chosen The judges reveal 24 semifinalists. (N) ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Without a Trace ’ ‘PG’ Å Out in America ‘PG’ Out in America ‘PG’ Community ‘PG’ Perfect Couples The Office ’ ‘14’ Parks/Recreat The Vampire Diaries (N) ’ Å Nikita Echoes (N) ’ Å Woodsmith Shop The Winemakers Art Workshop Joy/Painting Out in America ‘PG’ Out in America ‘PG’

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(10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ Outsourced ‘PG’ The Mentalist Red Queen (N) ’ ‘14’ (10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Without a Trace Trials ’ ‘PG’ Å 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ Married... With Gourmet’s Adven

Outsourced ‘PG’ Married... With Julia/Jacques

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Pioneers of Television Sitcoms ‘G’ News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Hidden China Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Pioneers of Television Sitcoms ‘G’

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Last Wish ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘PG’ Å The First 48 ‘PG’ Å Beyond Scared Straight (N) ‘14’ Beyond Scared Straight Lieber ‘14’ 130 28 18 32 Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å (3:30) ›››› “The Godfather, Part II” (1974, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton. Michael Corleone moves his ››› “The Godfather, Part III” (1990, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire. A dignified don joins his wild nephew in a Sicilian vendetta. 102 40 39 father’s crime family to Las Vegas. Last American Cowboy ’ ‘14’ World’s Deadliest Towns ’ ‘14’ Natural World ’ ‘PG’ Å Moose Attack! ’ ‘PG’ Killer Aliens ’ ‘PG’ Å Natural World ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 Last American Cowboy ’ ‘14’ Top Chef Lock Down ‘14’ Å Top Chef For the Gulf ‘14’ Å The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Million Dollar Listing Sparks Fly ‘14’ Million Dollar Listing Sparks Fly ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Miami ‘14’ 137 44 Red. Wedding Red. Wedding The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘G’ Å ››› “Airplane!” (1980, Comedy) Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty. ’ Å ››› “Airplane!” (1980) ’ Å 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Made-Millions Made-Millions CNBC Titans Ted Turner Mad Money Made-Millions Made-Millions CNBC Titans Ted Turner Sexier-90 Days! Shark Vacuum 51 36 40 52 Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ COTV Blazer Profiles PM Edition Cooking Oregon City Club of Central Oregon The Buzz Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ COTV Blazer Profiles Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Good-Charlie Hannah Montana Forever Å Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Fish Hooks ‘G’ Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie Destroy-Second Cash Cab ‘PG’ Cash-Chicago Man vs. Wild South Dakota ’ ‘PG’ Man vs. Wild ’ ‘PG’ Å Man vs. Wild (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Out of the Wild: Venezuela (N) ‘PG’ Man vs. Wild ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Destroy-Second College Basketball West Virginia at Pittsburgh (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL Live (N) Basketball Final SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Basketball College Basketball Penn State at Northwestern (Live) College Basketball Gonzaga at St. Mary’s (Live) Å SportsNation Å NASCAR Now World Poker 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Year of the Quarterback (N) 30 for 30 Å AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball 1995 SEC Championship -- Arkansas vs. Kentucky 23 25 123 25 College Football Played 9/19/87. Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ ›› “Bruce Almighty” (2003, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Morgan Freeman. ›› “Liar Liar” (1997) Jim Carrey. A fast-talking lawyer cannot tell a lie. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls The UnGraduate ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Bobby Flay Best Thing Ate Iron Chef America Iron Chef America Flay vs. Burke Ace of Cakes Unwrapped Chopped Against the Tide 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa College Basketball Stanford at Oregon State (Live) College Basketball Arizona State at UCLA (Live) Cougars Access College Basketball Stanford at Oregon State 20 45 28* 26 Runnin’ With PAC Beavers (4:00) ›› “White Chicks” (2004) ›› “Hancock” (2008, Action) Will Smith, Charlize Theron. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer (N) ‘MA’ (10:31) Archer (11:01) Archer White Chicks 131 House Hunters House Hunters My First Place Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l Modern Marvels ’60s Tech ‘PG’ Brad Meltzer’s Decoded ‘PG’ Å Ax Men Fallout Zone ‘PG’ Å Swamp People Family Feuds ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Hooked: Illegal Drugs 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Hippies ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å ›› “Sydney White” (2007, Comedy) Amanda Bynes, Sara Paxton. Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show I Used to Be Fat Kelly ’ ‘PG’ Jersey Shore Cabs Are Here ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Kissing Cousins ‘14’ Jersey Shore Kissing Cousins ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å House of Anubis SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob (5:24) Gangland Blood River ’ ‘14’ (6:36) Gangland Hustle or Die ’ ‘14’ Å (7:48) Gangland Gangsta Killers ‘14’ TNA Wrestling (N) ’ Å UFC 127 Countdown (N) ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 (4:12) Gangland Star Trek: Enterprise ’ ‘PG’ Å “Wrong Turn 2: Dead End” (2007) Erica Leerhsen, Henry Rollins. Å ››› “Dawn of the Dead” (2004) Sarah Polley. Milwaukee residents fight zombies in a mall. Dead Men Wlk. 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 Shades of Grey ‘PG’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land Best of Praise Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens ›› “Last Holiday” (2006) Queen Latifah, Gérard Depardieu. Å Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›››› “Friendly Persuasion” (1956, ›››› “Dodsworth” (1936, Drama) Walter Huston, Ruth Chatterton. A European voy- ›››› “Ben-Hur” (1959, Historical Drama) Charlton Heston, Jack Hawkins, Stephen Boyd. Friends become bitter enemies during the time of Christ. 101 44 101 29 age brings change to a retiree and his wife. Å Drama) Gary Cooper. Å Kitchen Boss (N) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Wreck Chasers Wreck Chasers Police Women of Cincinnati ’ ‘14’ Police Women of Cincinnati (N) ‘14’ Babies Behind Bars (N) ‘14’ Å Police Women of Cincinnati ’ ‘14’ 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Denver Nuggets From the Pepsi Center in Denver. Å Inside the NBA (Live) Å Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Chicago Bulls From the United Center in Chicago. (Live) Å ›› “Looney Tunes: Back in Action” (2003, Comedy) Brendan Fraser. Adventure Time Adventure Time Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Carnivore Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Tastiest Places Tastiest Places 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (11:06) Roseanne (11:40) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS A blogger turns up dead. ‘14’ NCIS A Marine’s body surfaces. ‘14’ NCIS Probie ’ ‘14’ Å Royal Pains Listen to the Music ‘PG’ Fairly Legal Believers (N) ‘PG’ Å White Collar Payback ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 House Wilson’s Heart ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live Best of Jimmy Fallon ’ ‘14’ Å 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:50) › “Jack” 1996 ‘PG-13’ Å (5:50) ›› “Nothing to Lose” 1997 Martin Lawrence. In the House ›› “Dumb & Dumber” 1994, Comedy Jim Carrey. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:50) ›› “All About the Benjamins” 2002 Ice Cube. ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å ›› “Without a Trace” 1983, Drama Judd Hirsch, Kate Nelligan. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Broadcast News” 1987, Romance-Comedy William Hurt, Albert Brooks. ‘R’ Å Bubba’s World Bubba’s World Bubba’s World The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf WGC Accenture Match Play Championship, Day Two From the Ritz-Carlton Golf Club at Dove Mountain in Marana, Ariz. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Mayakoba Classic, First Round From Mexico. Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Touched by an Angel Trust ’ ‘G’ Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel Reunion ‘G’ The Golden Girls (4:30) ››› “Taken” 2008, Action Liam (6:15) “Reagan” 2011, Documentary The life and legacy of President Ronald Reagan. Big Love D.I.V.O.R.C.E. Barb hopes to “Thurgood” 2011 Laurence Fishburne. Premiere. Justice Thur- Cedar Rapids: HBO Real Sex Eroticism. HBO 425 501 425 10 Neeson. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ’ ‘NR’ Å attain the priesthood. ‘14’ Å good Marshall fights for civil rights. ’ Å First Look ‘MA’ Å ›› “The Hearse” 1980, Horror Trish Van Devere, Joseph Cotten. ‘PG’ (7:15) ››› “Reservoir Dogs” 1992, Crime Drama Harvey Keitel. ‘R’ (9:15) ››› “28 Days Later” 2002, Horror Cillian Murphy, Noah Huntley, Naomie Harris. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) ›› “Trapped” (5:45) ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” 2009, Science Fiction Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox. Sam (8:15) › “Our Family Wedding” 2010 America Ferrera. Two overbearing men wreak ››› “I Love You, Man” 2009 Paul Rudd. A man’s new friendMAX 400 508 7 2002 Witwicky holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. ‘PG-13’ havoc with their children’s wedding plans. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ship threatens his upcoming wedding. ’ ‘R’ King Tut and the Lost Dynasty ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Dodge Viper ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories (N) ‘G’ King Tut and the Lost Dynasty ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Dodge Viper ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories ‘G’ Naked Science ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents Power Rangers Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents Power Rangers OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Fantastic Four NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt Whitetail Nation Magnum TV Wardens Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Wild and Raw Whitetail Pro Lethal Beyond the Hunt Wild Outdoors Outdoors Speargun Hunter OUTD 37 307 43 › “The Spirit” 2008 Gabriel Macht. A rookie cop, believed to be (7:45) ›› “Soul Men” 2008, Comedy Samuel L. Jackson, Bernie Mac, Sharon Leal. Shaquille O’Neal Presents: All Star Comedy Jam, Live From Laugh Out Loud (4:30) “Good Time Max” 2007 James SHO 500 500 Franco. iTV. ’ ‘NR’ Å dead, fights crime in Central City. ‘PG-13’ iTV. Estranged singers reunite for a tribute concert. ’ ‘R’ South Beach (iTV) ’ ‘MA’ Å Comedy Festival Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Speedmakers Drag Racing (N) American Trucker American Trucker Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Speedmakers Drag Racing American Trucker American Trucker NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Starz Studios ‘14’ ›› “Surrogates” 2009 Bruce Willis. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time” 2010 Jake Gyllenhaal. ‘PG-13’ ››› “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” 2001, Fantasy Elijah Wood. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 ››› “World’s Greatest Dad” 2009, Comedy-Drama Robin Wil- (6:40) ›› “Bickford Schmeckler’s Cool Ideas” 2006, Comedy ›› “Control” 2004, Suspense Ray Liotta, Willem Dafoe, Michelle Rodriguez. A convict › “Avenging Angelo” 2002 Sylvester Stallone. A dead mobster’s TMC 525 525 liams, Alexie Gilmore. ’ ‘R’ Å Patrick Fugit, Matthew Lillard, John Cho. ’ ‘R’ undergoes behavior modification. ’ ‘R’ daughter and bodyguard launch a vendetta. Countdown to UFC (N) UFC Live: Jones vs. Matyushenko NHL Overtime NBA D-League Basketball 2011 All-Star Game NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera Girl Meets Gown ‘G’ Å Girl Meets Gown ‘G’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Plat. Weddings WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33

Showd. Tokyo ›› Ordeal 1973 The Daily Habit The Golden Girls The Adjustment Bureau: First ›› The Hearse (11:45) “Online Crush” 2010 ‘NR’ Fantastic Four Driven TV Laugh Out Loud Comedy Festival

(11:45) “Fatal Secrets” 2009 ‘R’ Plat. Weddings

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Biscuits ‘n’ Butter”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. “DEAD MAN WALKING — THE JOURNEY CONTINUES”: Sister Helen Prejean talks about her experiences with death-row inmates and her role in national deathpenalty dialogue; donations accepted; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7412 or http://multicultural.cocc.edu/events. “DEAD MAN WALKING — THE JOURNEY CONTINUES”: Sister Helen Prejean talks about her experiences with death-row inmates and her role in national death-penalty dialogue; donations accepted; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412 or http://multicultural .cocc.edu/events. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jeremy Evans talks about his book “In Search of Powder: A Story of America’s Disappearing Ski Bum”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766. “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. LONG BEACH REHAB: The California-based reggae-ska act performs, with Audiolized and Medium Troy; $15 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440 or www.brownpapertickets.com. “THE STORY”: A screening of the film about ski heroes sharing their experiences; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit Oregon Adaptive Sports; $15; 8:30 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-848-9390 or http:// oregonadaptivesports.org.

FRIDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Biscuits ‘n’ Butter”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. VFW DINNER: A beef stew dinner; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. PUSH: A skate deck art show and auction, with a raffle and refreshments; proceeds benefit the Division Street Skatepark Project; free; 6-10 p.m.; old Boomtown location, 910 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; www.divisionstreetskatepark.org.

AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Julian Smith talks about his book “Crossing the Heart of Africa: An Odyssey of Love and Adventure”; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. POLAR PLUNGE: Plunge into the icy Deschutes River in a costume; proceeds benefit Special Olympics Oregon; $50 minimum donation, free for spectators; 6:30 p.m., 6 p.m. costume contest; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 503248-0600 or www .plungeoregon.com. “THE ORPHAN TRAIN”: A presentation of the play about eight orphans taken to the Midwest in hopes that they would be adopted; $5.50; 7 p.m.; Cascade Middle School, 19619 S.W. Mountaineer Way, Bend; 541-383-6232 or www .beattickets.org. DIVISI: The University of Oregon women’s a cappella group performs; a portion of proceeds benefits Common Table; $6; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-388-0765 or www .uodivisi.com. FINN MILES: The Des Moines, Iowabased folk group performs; free; 7-9 p.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, 436 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-516-1128 or www .greenplowcoffee.com. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by Moira Smiley & VOCO; $15, $10 students in advance (plus fees), $20, $12 students at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. TELLURIDE MOUNTAINFILM ON TOUR: Screening of films that celebrate mountain people, culture, adventure and conservation; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $17.50 in advance, $20 at the door, $12.50 students, $30 in advance for both nights; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. GALLAGHER: The wacky comedian performs; ages 21 and older; $15-$25; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http:// kahneeta.com. BRIGHT FACES: The Sacramento, Calif.-based power-pop group performs, with Beyond Veronica; free; 9 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-3000. THE WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock troubadour performs, with Third Seven; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SATURDAY REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; proceeds benefit Redrock Squares; $5, $3 ages 11 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, IPHIGENIE EN TAURIDE”: Starring Susan Graham, Plácido Domingo and Paul Groves in a presentation of Gluck’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. EAGLE WATCH 2011: Includes rotating presentations, tours, demonstrations that explore the natural and cultural significance of eagles and raptors, and more; follow the signs to the Round Butte Overlook Park; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Round Butte Overlook Park, Southwest Mountain View Drive, Madras; 800-551-6949 or www .oregonstateparks.org. FREE FAMILY SATURDAY: The High Desert Museum offers complimentary admission for the whole family; overflow parking and shuttle service available at Morning Star Christian School; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. PRESCHOOL & CHILD CARE FAIR: Explore preschool and child care options in Deschutes County; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-385-7988. SCARS ON 45: The English indie-pop band performs; free; noon-2 p.m.; Hoodoo Mountain Resort, summit of Santiam Pass on U.S. Highway 20, west of Sisters; 541-822-3799. “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. ALL THINGS ROMAN: John Nicols talks about why Rome is such a powerful model for political and cultural integration; free; 3 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-3121032 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Julian Smith talks about his book “Crossing the Heart of Africa: An Odyssey of Love and Adventure”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. CELEBRATION OF HOPE: A food and beer pairing, with live music by Mark Ransom; registration highly recommended; proceeds benefit Court Appointed Special Advocates; $25; 5-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-389-1618 or www.casaofcentraloregon.org. TEXAS HOLD ‘EM TOURNAMENT AND CASINO NIGHT: Wear Western attire and play poker; players must register by Feb. 15; proceeds benefit Family Kitchen; $15-$115; 5:15 p.m., 4 p.m. check-in; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-5978, gwend@ bendbroadband.com or www.mt bachelorrotary.org. HOLLYWOOD PARTY: With food, live music, a silent auction and socialization activities; proceeds benefit Family Access Network; $75, $125 per couple; 5:30 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; www.familyaccessnetwork.org. SPAGHETTI FEED: With a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Madras High School JROTC; $6; 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 262 S.W. Second St., Madras; 541-410-2087. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller William Watson and music by Cascade Crossing; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. DIVISI AND ON THE ROCKS: The University of Oregon a cappella groups perform; proceeds benefit choral programs at Bend High

School; $5; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6309. TELLURIDE MOUNTAINFILM ON TOUR: Screening of films that celebrate mountain people, culture, adventure and conservation; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $17.50 in advance, $20 at the door, $30 in advance for both nights; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring live music by Eric Tollefson and the World’s Greatest Lovers, and Leroy Newport and His Sidekicks; proceeds benefit Jim Bull, who is battling cancer; $5 requested donation; 8-10 p.m.; Three Creeks Brewing, 721 Desperado Court, Sisters; 541-549-1963. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700 or www .mountain997.com. 80S VIDEO DANCE ATTACK: The ‘80s dance act performs, with VJ Kittyrox; ages 21 and older; $5; 9 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com. THE WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock troubadour performs, with Josh Hart; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY EAGLE WATCH 2011: Includes rotating presentations, tours, demonstrations that explore the natural and cultural significance of eagles and raptors, and more; follow the signs to the Round Butte Overlook Park; free; 10 a.m.3 p.m.; Round Butte Overlook Park, Southwest Mountain View Drive, Madras; 800-551-6949 or www .oregonstateparks.org. “OLIVER!”: Final performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreet theater.com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

127 HOURS (R) 2:25, 4:50, 7:30 BIUTIFUL (R) 2:30, 7 BLACK SWAN (R) 2:15, 4:35, 7:25 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2, 4:40, 7:20 RABBIT HOLE (PG-13) 2:05, 4:45, 7:05 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 2:10, 4:30, 7:10

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON (PG-13) 1:45, 4:35, 7:40, 10:25 THE EAGLE (PG-13) 12:40, 4:55, 7:50, 10:30 THE FIGHTER (R) 12:05, 7:55 GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 12:50, 3:35, 6:50, 9:40

GNOMEO & JULIET 3-D (G) 12:20, 3, 6:15, 9:10 THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 1:40, 4:40, 7:25, 10:05 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 1:25, 4:15, 6:55, 9:45 I AM NUMBER FOUR (DP — PG13) 12:35, 3:10, 6:25, 9:15 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) Noon, 3:20, 6:20, 9:25 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G) 12:55, 4:05, 7:05, 9:50 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER 3-D (G) 12:25, 3:25, 6:35, 9:20 THE MECHANIC (R) 8, 10:20 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 4:50, 10:35 SANCTUM 3-D (R) 1:05, 3:45, 7:20, 10:15 TANGLED (PG) 12:10, 3:05 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 1:35, 5, 7:35, 10:10 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 1:20, 3:55, 6:40, 9:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold

are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 4:30, 6:30 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G) 4:15, 6:45 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 4, 6:30

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 5:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Ski Channel Films presents “The Story,” a film featuring stars of skiing, snowboarding, speed flying, paragliding, river surfing and kite skiing. The film screens at 8:30 p.m. tonight (doors open at 8 p.m.).

Judge tells Lohan day of reckoning coming soon the case. The potential evidence will now be reviewed by Lohan LOS ANGELES — A judge on and Holley, who must decide how Wednesday gave Lindsay Lohan to proceed before the actress reroughly two weeks to decide if turns to court March 10. she will fight or take a plea deal Lohan has lived with the nearin a felony grand theft case, but constant prospect of returning to either decision could send the jail since May, when she missed a troubled starlet back behind bars. court hearing in the DUI case and Superior Court Judge Keith a judge revoked her probation. Schwartz told Lohan he would She was sentenced to jail twice sentence her to jail if she accept- and rehab twice last year alone, ed a plea deal involving the theft but her incarcerations have been of a $2,500 necklace from an up- shortened by jail overcrowding. scale jewelry store. Lohan’s father, Mi“If you plead in front chael Lohan, agreed of me, if this case is with the judge’s assessresolved in front of ment after the hearing, me, you are going to saying his divorce from jail,” Schwartz said. his wife had created “Period.” many of their daughLohan, 24, has pleadter’s problems. ed not guilty to the Michael Lohan becharge. Lindsay Lohan lieves his daughter Rejecting the deal arrives at Los should fight the theft would trigger a hearing Angeles Supe- case. during which prosecu- rior Court on “I don’t see Lindsay tors would present some Wednesday, as a criminal,” he said. of their evidence to an- where a judge “This is all a result of other judge. Schwartz could decide her addiction.” said that judge would whether an The theft case is not sentence Lohan for a allegation that the former star’s only probation violation if the actress legal concern. On Monshe determined Lohan stole a $2,500 day, she was cited for should stand trial. necklace can driving 59 mph in a That could mean Lo- be resolved 35-mph zone in West han is sentenced to jail without going Hollywood, sheriff’s even before the theft to trial. spokesman Steve Whitcase is tried. more said. Schwartz has said Prosecutors in Riverhe thinks the actress violated side County are also considering her probation in a 2007 drunken whether to charge Lohan with driving case, and two other judg- misdemeanor battery for an ales have warned Lohan she faced tercation with a rehab worker a return to jail if she got into at a Betty Ford Center facility in trouble again. December. She received three That was before police began months of treatment at the facilinvestigating the “Mean Girls” ity after failing a drug test last star last month after the necklace year. was reported missing from the The constant cycle of court store in the Venice area of Los appearances has kept Lohan’s Angeles. The necklace was given career stalled. She lost her part to detectives by an unidentified in a biopic of porn star Linda Lohan associate before police Lovelace during her recent recould serve a search warrant. hab stint and has not appeared Prosecutors gave Lohan’s at- in any major projects since 2007, torney Shawn Holley a copy of when she was arrested twice and surveillance video from the jew- charged with drunken driving elry store and police reports in and cocaine possession.

By Anthony McCartney The Associated Press

Trails

M T For Thursday, Feb. 24

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

THE EAGLE (PG-13) 6:45 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 7 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) 6:30 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 3, 7 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 5

Continued from E1 Also, with the big dump of snow comes increased avalanche potential in the backcountry. Sabo said the snow base “looked like it was setting up” last week, but that he didn’t get a chance to test it and he had reports of a couple of slides intentionally tripped by users. He cautioned folks who recreate in the backcountry to watch for unstable snow. “The thing to be aware of is those interfaces of (snow) layers,” he said. “Are they well bonded or not?” With the new snow, people who find the Ten Mile Sno-park in Newberry Crater full should consider the Six Mile Sno-park, which is nearby and should be a “decent option” for snowmobilers, Sabo said. The same can be said of the Three Creeks Lake area near Sisters; if the upper park is full, try the lower park. The Skyliner Sno-park near Tumalo Falls should also provide an additional option for winter recreation enthusiasts, thanks to

the recent storms. Sabo was unsure what kind of crowds would show up to play in the snow this weekend, in part because of the forecasted low temperatures. No matter how many people are out there, though, he reminded users to be careful, be smart and be respectful of one another. “The options are getting better for every winter user,” he said. “As for the hikers and bikers and other summer trail users, sorry, but you’re mostly out of luck. We’re pretty much snow-covered across the forest.” One other note: On Saturday and Sunday, the Special Olympics will hold events that begin on the Mt. Bachelor nordic trails and travel over to Dutchman Flat. Sabo said he does not expect a big impact for skiers, snowmobilers and snowshoers, but there may be some traffic control and other unusual things happening in that area, including a snowmobile crossing on Trail 5 in the Dutchman system. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

E4 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011: This year, you need to harness your talents in order to deliver in a more substantial way at work or within your community. You can only gain through this ability. You learn to deal with those in charge in a more direct manner. If you are single, you have a lot to offer, but you might not want to settle down yet. If you are attached, as a couple you become more visible and instrumental in the community. You’ll become closer as a result. SAGITTARIUS knows how to push your buttons. A baby born Feb. 11, 2011, before 4:46 a.m. Pacific Time is Sun in Pisces, Moon in Scorpio. After that time, a Sun in Pisces, Moon in Sagittarius. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Reach out for new ideas. No one can be an expert in all matters. Finding an expert in various areas when you need one demonstrates your intelligence. Others could be touchy and challenging. You’ll make peace anyway. Tonight: Be impulsive. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A key professional partner points to a new direction. Don’t worry; this person picks up wherever there is a lack or where you might let a detail drop. Listen to your instincts, and you’ll be on top of your game. Tonight: Indulge a loved one. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

HHHHH Others carry out your ideas, but they also add their own flair. If you want something done 100 percent as you want it, you’d better count on doing it yourself. A meeting opens up options and helps bring more peace to your daily life. Tonight: Where the action is. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Throw yourself into a project, and you will accomplish a lot, and quite quickly at that. A boss, parent or someone you answer to challenges you. Show what you are capable of. This action could have long-term implications. Tonight: A late dinner. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Let your spontaneity come out. No matter what amount of flak is in between the action and the end result, you’ll land well. Your actions will determine the end result. Someone at a distance adds to the quality of your day. Tonight: Consider your weekend plans. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Pressure builds about a domestic or personal matter (at least in your head). A partner’s unexpected actions could force you to rethink an association. A boss makes demands. Do what is necessary, and the long-term results will be worthwhile. Tonight: Head home. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Your words flow and hopefully are well received. You have a way of saying even difficult matters in a way that people will accept. Several people come forward. When they offer their help, they mean what they say. Tonight: Hanging out with a co-worker. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

HHH Be aware of your finances, but also understand that you have a lot more to offer than just that. You have innate gifts and talents that add to nearly any situation. Don’t hesitate to speak your mind and ask for what you need. Tonight: Be open to another treating. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Your high energy easily could start a conflict with someone who generally is enthusiastic. Look at it this way -- at least you got this person moving. At the end of the day, your ability to achieve is all that counts. Tonight: Add a little romance. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Let others demonstrate what they mean. You don’t always have to perform to the max. Let a family member take the lead and do what he or she wants. Only the long-run results can reveal if this person is capable of what he or she thinks. Tonight: Take some personal time. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH A meeting could reunite friends, even if it is a business meeting. Realize what is happening behind the scenes with you and a key person. Do you think it is time to mend your bridges? All you need to do is make an effort. Tonight: Where the action is. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You seem to catch the fallout when others walk away from a project. Complete it, and add the finishing touches. In the long run, don’t even think your work isn’t noticed. You will gain from your efforts. Your innate gifts will pay off. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate

C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY ASSOCIATION OF NAVAL AVIATION: 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-815-9932. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat.org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES TROUT UNLIMITED: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; webmaster@deschutestu.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-9453. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-

Outing

SATURDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat.org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363.

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. PINOCHLE: The Vintage of Bend; 541-388-4286.

99ER BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0069. A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 2693 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-390-5373. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE

CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-382-5376. LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. NEWCOMERS QUILT GROUP: 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; QuiltWorks, Bend; 541-728-0527. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-848-7523. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY: 10 a.m. beginning genealogy, 11:45 a.m. research methods; Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa, Bend; 541-317-8978, 317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs.

BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON SHRINE CLUB: 6 p.m. social, 7 p.m. dinner; Chloe at North Redmond Station; 541-318-8647. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. MODERN QUILT GUILD INTEREST GROUP: 5-8 p.m.; QuiltWorks, Bend; kayla.traver@vandals.uidaho.edu. OREGON EQUESTRIAN TRAILS: 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes County Posse Building, Bend; 541-420-9398 or www.oregonequestriantrails.org. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133.

WEDNESDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 5:30 p.m.

study group; 2693 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 6-8 p.m.; Timbers East, Bend; 541-383-3502. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541383-0396 or 541-410-1758. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 8 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

One tweaked ankle later, I’m still waiting go get in a ride at Rainbow. Meanwhile, Youngstrom and others in on the Rainbow secret are getting in their turns beneath the underappreciated chair. “It just might take a few more minutes to make it to the top,” Youngstrom says. “And, when it does, I have access to fresh powder stashes that not too many people know about!” Come on and heal, ankle. Please don’t pull a Rainbow on me.

Lefty Barber, 18, of Redmond, carves a turn in fresh powder while skiing down the I-5 run on Mt. Bachelor on Saturday. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

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Face, a wide open area that leads toward Wanoga Way, is open. “That’s my own little playground over there. It’s awesome.” Goggins says his favorite part of the mountain is around Northwest, with its west bowls and tree skiing opportunities. However, he adds that, “traversing to the east bowls on storm days when Summit is down is tough to beat.” That was the approach my friend Jeremy Dickman and I took earlier this month when headed up to the mountain and, after the requisite wrestling-on of layers and gear, proceeded directly to Rainbow Chair, located just down a short hill from the Sunrise Lodge. As we rode side by side down the short hill to the get-on point, I chirped, over a chorus of nearby sled dogs and their desperate let’s-get-going yelps, something along the lines of, “Aren’t people dumb?” as we left behind the horde of people waiting for a seat on Sunrise Express. But when we got to the bottom of the hill, I learned that I was the actual dumb one (not a first): During our short descent to the chair, we’d failed to notice the fact that it wasn’t moving. The Mt. Bachelor employees cited high winds, which were causing the chairs to swing on their cables and clang against the giant posts stretching up the mountain. It was, for both of us, our first time boarding this winter. Given our rusty skills, we declined an offer to have an employee on a snowmobile tow us, via tow rope. Instead, we hoofed it back to the Sunrise Express Quad to humbly wait with our fellow cattle. The line was so long that it took at least 12.5 minutes just to get on. Once seated, we were whisked up the hill at a velocity somewhere short of the speed barrier, yet far faster than Rainbow. We then headed to the more reasonable lines by Skyliner Express, which offered great riding at tree level. Above there, however, the wind howled, and staying atop our boards as we left was something like trying to stay upright in a wind tunnel with marbles and banana peels lining its floor. With last week’s huge dump of new snow, I was all set to go on Friday, just prior to Presidents Day weekend, which Chris Sabo, Deschutes National Forest trails specialist, says is the busiest holiday weekend of all winter holidays in this neck of the woods. According to conditions posted on its website, www.mtbachelor. com, the mountain had gotten three more inches overnight. But something happened on the way to snowboarding nirvana. I hurt myself skateboarding Thursday night.

SUNDAY

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Continued from E1 Given its longevity, Rainbow’s chairs, which seat three — to varying degrees of comfort — have definitely seen better days. Nevertheless, it’s the kind of contraption that you may appreciate even more with time. When I moved from the Florida coast to Bend nearly 10 years ago, Mt. Bachelor was one of the main draws for me. I was a skateboarder who’d dabbled in surfing, skimboarding and wakeboarding, so I figured snowboarding would be easy for me. I rode alone, mostly, and stuck around Sunrise Lodge and rode Marshmallow, an easy green run with lots of “slow” signs, which appealed to a beginner. After teaching myself more about falling than riding my first season on the mountain, I began exploring farther afield: namely, a run named Rooster Tail, which, depending on the turns you take, can land you right at Rainbow. One day I found myself braving a chair that took me higher up the mountain than I’d previously been, and surviving the steep drop of the I-5 run, I headed back for more. I’ve seen a lot of falls, so to speak, in the seasons that have passed, and I have friends I board with now. But for some reason, especially if I’m riding solo that day, I usually prefer Rainbow, while most powder hounds are headed off to Northwest. Tashina Youngstrom tells The Bulletin via e-mail that “On a windy, blustery day as the chair slowly creeps along above the tree line I can find myself chanting to the chair not to break down. It hasn’t left me stranded yet. “In an age of high-speed technology and ‘get there quicker’ mentality, I use the Rainbow Chair for my sanity and my therapy,” adds the Bend snowboarder, telemark skier and Rainbow aficionado. She started riding the Rainbow lift more than 15 years ago, and says, “The 14-minute or so lift time gives me a chance to tune in and slow down.” The ride actually takes 12½ minutes to the top, according to Goggins, but Youngstrom’s right in that it sure seems longer when you’re eager to get off and ride. Once you reach the top, the rewards for your patience are plenty. Youngstrom says she heads to Rainbow when the Summit is open. “I’ll follow the sun,” she says. “When it’s a sunny day, I’ll head over to Rainbow because I know Northwest and Outback are still in the shade.” Specifically, she likes Rainbow when Cow’s

419-1889 or www .redmondoregonrotary.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

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IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

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Nutrition A new study suggests that cutting breakfast can help cut calorie intake, but there are doubters, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2011

MEDICINE

MONEY

Helping those with hearing loss

Are medical credit cards bad for your health?

get in the loop By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

f people with hearing loss can hear better in Bend restaurants this spring, credit a sandwich. It was several months ago that Dave Merrifield, president of the Central Oregon chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America, stepped into Letzer’s Deli for one of its famously overstuffed meat sandwiches. When he told the cashier of his affiliation, the cashier pointed to the owner, Sheridan Letzer, working in the kitchen. “You ought to take him because he’s hard of hearing and he won’t admit it,” Merrifield recalls the cashier saying. “That’s no problem,” Merrifield replied. “Because seven years is the average for people to admit that they’re hard of hearing. I went 10 years before I finally copped out to it.” It turned out the two had much in com-

I

mon beyond their hearing loss. Merrifield had owned a restaurant in Bend for 11 years, and he knew what challenges Letzer faced on a daily basis. Acoustics in the deli are challenging at best. The overhead fan required by building codes is noisy, and the hum of the ice maker makes it difficult for even his younger workers to hear. “Because I had hearing loss, I just stayed in the back,” Letzer said. Merrifield invited Letzer to a meeting of his group and eventually donated a pair of his old hearing aids to the deli owner. As they got to talking, Merrifield told Letzer of his plan to install an induction loop system in area restaurants to help those with hearing aids. Letzer was in. “Why wouldn’t I do it?” Letzer said. “I know what it’s like to have severe hearing loss.” See Loop / F6

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

When the doctor hands you a big bill, what’s the first thing you do? For many people, it’s whip out the plastic. Americans put at least $45 billion in medical costs on their credit cards, according to a report by the consulting firm McKinsey & Company. Many people put the charge on a regular card, but increasingly, people are turning to special credit cards for medical expenses. Credit cards for medical care work much like credit cards

for other types of purchases. A consumer applies, establishes a credit limit based on credit score and income, and is able to use the card anywhere it is accepted. The cards are offered by many of the same companies including JPMorgan Chase & Co., CitiBank and GE Money. GE Money’s CareCredit is particularly popular in Central Oregon. But, unlike regular cards, medical credit cards are marketed through health care providers, who often use the cards as a way for patients to spread payments for a large bill. See Cards / F5

Know your options, know the terms CareCredit and CarePayment are medical cards commonly used to finance medical bills in Central Oregon. Medical credit cards can help people pay bills, but consumers need to be aware of the terms.

How the induction loop system works The induction loop system provides a high-quality, amplified reproduction of the original speech signal, which can be clearly heard above background environmental noise. Audio loop amplifier

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

FITNESS

Cycle track dilemma Study says defined paths are safer

1 The system consists of a thin wire that is placed around a listening area and connected to an audio loop amplifier and microphone. 2 Speech is amplified and circulated through the audio loop wire, creating a magnetic energy field.

By Anne Aurand Audio loop wire

ir e

The Bulletin

loop w

Microphone

Audio

Microphone

3 Sound picked up by the microphone, regardless of table, will be transmitted through the loop to any hearing aids within the loop. Only one conversation can be going on within the room.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Cars stream by the cycle track along Reed Market Road next to Farewell Bend Park.

Bicyclists are safer riding on cycle tracks than on streets, according to a new study. Cycle tracks are bike-exclusive paths, parallel to a street but separated from traffic by some kind of barrier. While the study’s conclusion might seem obvious at first, there is debate about the safety of cycle tracks because of the ways cars and cyclists could conflict, especially at intersections or road crossings. But it’s not a big issue here in Bend, or across most of the United States, where cycle tracks are still fairly rare. See Bike safety / F4

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Following the sound TELECOIL The field is detected and amplified by the telecoil (t-coil), circuitry built into many hearing aids and cochlear implants to make them compatible with telephones.

LISTENING HEARING AID Most modern hearing aids have built in t-coils, but audiologists may have to activate them in order to pick up sounds from the loop.

Source: OvalWindowAudio.com

The t-coil converts the magnetic field into an electrical signal, which the hearing aid then amplifies into the ear.

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Is liquid aminos a healthier alternative to soy sauce? Page F3

The rocking horse exercise from barre3 targets the back, spine and core, Page F4

Women physicians earn lower salaries then men in nearly all specialties, Page F5

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F2 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H D 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747 WOMEN’S SELF-ESTEEM GROUP: 541-389-7960. WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR ANGER, ANXIETY, OR DEPRESSION: 541-389-7960. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. WOMEN WITH HIDDEN DISABILITIES PEER GROUP: 541-388-8103, ext. 207. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

SUPPORT GROUPS SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: Speak with others who have faced suicide loss; free; 6 p.m. Thursdays, today through April 14; Redmond-Sisters Hospice, 732 S.W. 23rd St., Redmond; 541-548-7483 to register. AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243 BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREAST-FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541-3828274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-382-7504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY GROUP: 541-420-2759 CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-330-0301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500.

CLASSES Submitted photo

Jen Geisen, left, and Sonja Newton will offer information and more at Central Oregon Community College’s Health Fair. See the Classes section for details. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030 FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133 HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MADRAS NICOTINE ANONYMOUS GROUP: 541-993-0609. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MEN WITH HIDDEN DISABILITIES SUPPORT GROUP: 541388-8103, ext. 203.

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXAHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 541-595-8780. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541388-5634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext.

A GRACEFUL AND GRACE-FILLED JOURNEY: Maggie Watson leads a seminar on preparing for the death of a loved one; free; 3-4:30 p.m. March 3; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-382-4401. ALCOHOL AND DRUG AWARENESS: Teens in grades 7-12 learn refusal skills and communication techniques for situations involving alcohol, drugs or tobacco; $25; 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday; Cascade Swim Center, 465 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www.raprd.org or 541-548-7275. FATHER TO FATHER: Dads with children ages 0-8 talk about balancing work and home, with tools for positive discipline and more; registration required; $25; 6 p.m. Tuesdays, March 1-May 17; Family Resource Center, 1130 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; 541-389-5468. HEALTH FAIR: Learn about lowincome health care resources and more, with booths, games and activities; free; 9 a.m.2:30 p.m. Wednesday; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-617-0706. INCH BY INCH HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PROGRAM KICKOFF: Learn about the program to improve your health, learn sound nutrition and make significant changes; free ($240 for eight-week program); 5:30 p.m. Tuesday; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-389-7665. NUTRITIONAL THERAPY INFORMATION SESSION: Learn about a nine-month course that prepares students to conduct nutrition evaluations, balance body chemistry and more; registration requested; free; 4 p.m. March 3; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit. cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. THE VANCE STANCE: Learn perfect posture and flexibility to eliminate pain; $100 for 10 classes; 6-8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, noon-2 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays, Feb. 28-April 21; register for east Bend location; 541-330-9070. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

• BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HABITS YOGA STUDIO OF REDMOND: www.facebook. com/healthyhabitsredmond or 541-526-1097. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Health Systems; smoking cessation, parenting preparation; 541-706-6390 or www.stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com.

• JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA: 541-420-2204. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • PLAY OUTDOORS: Kids yoga; 541-678-5398. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-585-1500 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: dedwards@bendbroadband.com. • SALLY’S HATHA YOGA: 541-3900927 or www.sallyshathayoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994.

MARCH 2011 FOOT CARE CLINICS

For just $30 per visit, receive a comprehensive foot exam; relaxing foot cleanse; nail trimming and filing; massage; and foot care instructions. Date and locations are listed below. Please call Dawn for an appointment time.

Bend Senior Center -March 1 Bend First Presbyterian Church - March 2 La Pine Senior Center - March 7 and March 21 Redmond Senior Center - March 14 and March 28

Open House - La Pine New Office Tuesday, March 15th - 10 am to 2 pm 56100 Huntington Rd., La Pine, Oregon The community is invited to drop in and meet Partners In Care team members to hear more about our home health and hospice services, special events, on-going support groups and foot care clinics.

My Friend’s House For children and families who have experienced a death loss. Contact Eileen for current group dates.

Monday, February 28th

Get to the Bottom of Foot Pain Winter fun can be hard on your feet, don’t Ignore Foot Pain, we can help!

Dr. Ambrose Su* Dr. Patrick Evoy* Dr. Jeremy Dahlenburg* Dr. Kristy Six *Board Certified/ Board Qualified

Our podiatric physicians & surgeons can diagnose and treat a variety of foot problems. Most insurances accepted Bend, Redmond, Prineville & Madras appointments available

CASCADE FOOT CLINIC , LLC

(541) 388-2861 2408 NE Division, Bend (541) 923-3970 1228 N. Canal, Redmond

Grief Relief Support Group 8 week sessions begin in April. Please call for dates and times. Requires preregistration.

Traumatic Loss Support Group 8 week session begins in April. Thursdays, 5:30 - 7:00 pm. Requires preregistration.

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions Serving Central Oregon 24 Hours Everyday

www.partnersbend.org 541.382.5882 | 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 F3

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Next week Some helpful tips on understanding the new nutritional guidelines.

To skip or not to skip breakfast? Local dietitians say new study forgets some crucial points By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

A new study suggests that skipping breakfast is a good way for overweight people to reduce their caloric intake. The study does not conclude that skipping breakfast will result in weight loss, nor does it address the weight-loss tool of metabolism, but its implications nonetheless contradict prevailing wisdom on the topic of weight loss. The study, published in January’s Nutrition Journal, concluded: “Overweight and obese subjects should consider the reduction of breakfast calories as a simple option to improve their daily energy (calorie) balance.” Volker Schusdziarra of the Else-Kröner-Fresenius Center of Nutritional Medicine in Munich, Germany, conducted a study on 100 normal weight and 280 obese people who kept journals recording when and what they ate. Breakfasts ranged from large to small to skipped altogether. “The results of the study showed that people ate the same at lunch and dinner, regardless of what they had for breakfast,” Schusdziarra said in a news release. The study’s overarching point is that people who eat a big breakfast eat about 400 more calories during the course of a day, posing the question, why not eliminate calories wherever possible in the treatment of obesity? But a couple of local dietitians are not persuaded. “I wouldn’t put a lot of emphasis on it,” said Frankie Mauti, a registered dietitian at St. Charles Bend. First, the study was small, she said. And it doesn’t prove a correlation between skipping breakfast and losing weight. In fact, to the contrary, she has seen powerful evidence that people who eat some breakfast can lose or maintain their weight, she said. Another local registered dietitian, Lori Brizee, agrees with Mauti. “I have more people who start losing weight when they start eating breakfast,” Brizee said. “People who don’t eat breakfast end up snacking all night.” Brizee clarified, however, that eating a 1,000-calorie pancake breakfast with butter and syrup will not help a person lose weight. Breakfast should be 300 to 400 calories and should include protein and fiber (see “Healthy breakfast options”). The new study in the Nutrition Journal challenges the common thought that if you eat breakfast you’re less likely to eat more throughout the day. But Mauti said it doesn’t discuss one important part of losing weight: metabolism. She explained: Whenever people eat, it boosts their metabolism. Eating small meals throughout the day periodically charges up the metabolism. Skipping breakfast eliminates that burst of metabolism that would help burn calories over a couple of hours, even while sitting still, she said. Many of her clients tell Mauti that when they eat breakfast they feel more hungry a short time later, and that discourages them. But, she said, “if you feel hungry, it’s a good sign that your metabolism is working.” Lacking the sen-

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Although a new study suggests cutting calories by cutting breakfast, dietitians say a healthy breakfast, such as low-fat yogurt, grains and fruit, can help with weight loss.

Healthy breakfast options Courtesy of local registered dietitian Lori Brizee YOGURT AND OATS ⁄3 C dry old fashioned oats 1 C plain, nonfat yogurt 1 C blueberries 13 whole almonds 1 TBS ground flax seed Preparation: Mix all ingredients. Nutritional information: Calories: 410; Protein: 19 g; Carbohydrates: 60 g; Fat: 11.4 g; Saturated Fat: 1 g; Sodium 152 mg; Fiber: 8.7 g Alternative: Use ½ cup leftover cooked rice, quinoa, or other grain in place of oats. 1

FANCY OATMEAL ⁄3 C old fashioned oats, dry 2 ⁄3 C water pinch salt (optional) ½ lg apple, diced 1

1 slice 100% whole grain bread, toasted 1 TBS natural peanut butter (the kind you have to stir to mix in the oil) 2 tsp jam or 1 tsp honey Nutritional information: Calories: 200; Protein: 8 g; Carbohydrate: 28 g; Fat: 9 g; Saturated Fat 1 g; Sodium: 210 mg; Dietary Fiber: 4 gm. (Eat with a piece of fruit and a glass of milk for a complete, quick meal.)

sation of hunger might mean your metabolism is slow, she said. She has many clients who say they’re just not hungry in the morning, Mauti explained. But she said people can retrain their bodies to become hungry when they wake. If someone skips breakfast and then consumes a lot of food late at night, they might not wake up hungry. Also, she said, a load of food eaten all

Preparation: Bring water to a boil in a medium-sized saucepan. Add oats, salt, apple, walnuts and raisins. Cook for 5 to 8 minutes, then cover and let sit for 3 to 4 minutes and serve. Top with ¼ C warm milk and 1 TBS brown sugar. Nutritional information: Calories: 375; Protein: 8.5 g; Carbohydrates: 55 g; Fat: 13 g; Saturated fat: 1.7 g; Cholesterol: 3 mg; Sodium: 180 mg; Fiber: 7 g. Alternative: Use any hot cereal (multigrain, Roman Meal, Zoom) or cooked grain (brown rice, quinoa, wheat bulgur, spelt) in place of oats.

Servings: 1 or 2 2 lg eggs 2 TBS 1% milk 1 TBS olive oil 1 ⁄8 med onion, finely chopped ¼ med green or red bell pepper, finely chopped 4 med mushrooms, sliced ¼ C broccoli, finely chopped

and/or 1 C spinach, raw Optional seasonings: chili powder, Tabasco sauce, cumin, cayenne pepper, salt and black pepper to taste. Optional: 2 to 4 TBS grated cheese.

Preparation: Heat heavy frying pan. Add olive oil and vegetables. Sauté until vegetables are soft. Mix eggs with milk in small bowl and beat with a fork until mixed well; add optional seasonings as desired. Pour egg mixture into pan with vegetables and scramble until eggs are solid. Nutritional information: For whole recipe with cheese: Calories: 395; Protein: 21g; Carbohydrates: 10g; Fat 32 g: Saturated Fat: 10g; Cholesterol: 460 mg; Sodium 402 mg; Fiber: 1 g. Without Cheese: Calories: 285; Protein: 14 g, Carbohydrates: 7 g; Fat: 23 g; Saturated Fat 5 g; Cholesterol: 430 mg; Sodium: 212 mg; Dietary Fiber 1 g. If you want to decrease the calories and fat but keep the same volume: mix 1 egg with 3 egg whites. Spray pan with cooking spray, rather than using olive oil, skip the cheese and keep the veggies: Source: Lori Brizee

at once in the evening will not metabolize as well as smaller meals eaten throughout the day. Shifting to an earlier start on eating can be challenging, but it’s something she recommends to her clients. The new study’s German authors do note that their study contradicts previous ones about

breakfast and weight loss, and they also acknowledge that the National Weight Control Registry has shown that breakfast eaters have had successful weight loss. Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@bendbulletin.com.

Get Back to Your Life

Every Friday In

SERVICE YOU CAN DEPEND ON! ✓ Carpet Cleaning ✓ Upholstery Cleaning ✓ Safe, Non-Toxic Chemicals

✓ We move furniture! ✓ Pet Odor Control ✓ IICRC Master Cleaning Technician on staff

CALL NOW! OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN CLEANING AND RESTORATION www.cleaningclinicinc.com • 541-382-9498

S A C R O I L L I A C PA I N H E R N I AT E D D I S C S C I AT I C A N E U R O PAT H Y ARTHRITIS B A C K PA I N FA I L E D B A C K S U R G E RY TRIGGER POINT R A D I C U L O PAT H Y D E G E N E R AT I V E D I S C D I S E A S E N E C K PA I N D A I LY H E A D A C H E M U S C L E S PA S M R E F L E X S Y M PAT H E T I C D Y S T R O P H Y SPINE ARTHRITIS

Bend Spine & Pain Specialists

have much in the way of calories. Neither has fat or cholesterol. Bragg has a few milligrams less of sodium content. The company website says its salty taste comes from the soybeans themselves. The soybeans are also the source of amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins, according to the company. “I don’t think that there is really any benefit to the liquid aminos,” said Williamson, despite the eight essential and eight nonessential amino acids it contains. “The nonessentials do not need to be supplemented in our diet because our bodies make them naturally,” she said, and “the essential amino acids do need to be supplied by food. However, these amino acids are found in foods such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy, nuts, seeds and whole grains. On average, Americans consume sufficient amounts of these foods, making it unnecessary to supplement.” — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Bragg Liquid Aminos is marketed as a healthy alternative to soy sauce. Their sodium contents are not significantly different. Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

High-fiber diet may help you live longer By Kelly Brewington

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Ask your Neighbors ...

Bragg Liquid Aminos is marketed as a healthy substitute for soy sauce. Should you switch? Bragg Liquid Aminos, according to www.bragg.com, “has a small amount of naturally occurring sodium. No table salt is added.” When nutritional labels are analyzed, it turns out Bragg doesn’t have much less sodium than soy sauce. It’s the serving sizes listed on the bottle that are different. Bragg uses half a teaspoon, and soy sauces use a tablespoon. On first glance, sodium content appears lower for Bragg. “One tablespoon of regular soy sauce contains almost a half of a day’s worth of sodium, and low sodium soy sauce contains a quarter of a day’s worth,” said Annie Williamson, a registered dietitian with Bend Memorial Clinic. “Same would be true for the liquid aminos. Both can be difficult to work into your diet if you are trying to limit your sodium intake.” Neither Bragg Liquid Aminos nor soy sauce

⁄8 C walnuts, chopped 1 ⁄8 C packed seedless raisins ¼ C 1% milk, warmed 1 TBS brown sugar

VEGGIE AND EGG SCRAMBLE

WHOLE GRAIN TOAST WITH PEANUT BUTTER AND JAM OR HONEY

Liquid aminos may not be the right alternative to soy sauce

1

CHEERIOS MIX 1½ C Plain Cheerios ¼ C Honey Nut Cheerios 1 peach, fresh or frozen, sliced ½ C nonfat or 1% milk Nutritional information: Calories: 275; Protein: 11 g; Fat: 2 g; Carbohydrate 44 g; Cholesterol 3 mg; Sodium: 400 mg; Fiber 5 g.

BET TER CHOICE S

The Baltimore Sun

Eating a diet rich in fiber has long been known to help keep your digestive tract working properly. It’s also thought to lower the risk of heart disease, some cancers and diabetes. Now, a new study suggests it could reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious and respiratory diseases. People who ate a high-fiber diet decreased their risk of dying over a nine year period compared to those who ate less fiber, according to a new study in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The findings are based on a diet study from the National Institutes of Health and AARP, which included 219,123 men and 168,999 women ages 50 to 71 when the study began. Researchers from the National Cancer Institute examined food surveys completed by the participants in 1995 or 1996. After nine years about 11,000 people died and researchers used national records to determine the cause. People who ate at least 26 grams per day were 22 percent less likely to die than those

who consumed the least amount of fiber — about 13 grams per day or less. Men and women who consumed diets higher in fiber also had a reduced risk of cardiovascular, infectious and respiratory diseases, the study found. Getting fiber from grains seemed to have the biggest impact, the authors write. The study has some limitations — mainly, people who ate highfiber diets might also have been more likely to eat healthier diets overall, attributing to their longevity. Still, the study offers more evidence that fiber is certainly good for you. So where can you find fiber? Food such as raspberries, lentils, peas and barley and oat bran are packed with fiber.

Scott Diamond MD, FACS Advanced Specialty Care is pleased to welcome Dr. Scott Diamond to our practice. Dr. Diamond will offer the full spectrum of general surgery services in addition to bringing his expertise in bariatric surgery. Dr. Diamond joins us from Eureka, CA where he practiced for six years providing general, thoracic and vascular surgical services, and where he started a bariatric services program to serve the residents of the northern California coast. Dr. Diamond is very excited to move to Bend and enjoys a multitude of outdoor activities including camping, hiking, skiing and biking.

Theodore Ford, MD Board Certified Anesthesiologist Board Certified Pain Specialist Non-surgical Pain Management

(541) 647 - 1646 2041 NE Williamson Court, Suite B • Bend

www.BendSpineandPain.com

2084 NE Professional Ct. • Bend • 541-322-5753 236 NW Kingwood Ave, Suite A • Redmond • 541-548-7743 www.advancedspecialtycare.com

F4 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Next week Kids and exercise: How much? What kind?

Bike safety

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Landon Clark, 27, rides his bike up Newport Avenue on his way to class at Central Oregon Community College earlier this month. Wil son

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A cycle track is a barrier-protected, bicycle-exclusive path separate from the road and beside the sidewalk. Sometimes cycle tracks have parallel parked cars between the cycle track and the road. In other instances, cycle tracks have a raised curb, delineator posts, or grass between the road and the cycle track.

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Darcy Davidson, owner of barre3 exercise studio on Century Drive, demonstrates barre3 poses you can do at home. Barre3 is a unique fusion of ballet, yoga and Pilates, intended to balance, strengthen and lengthen the body. This is the fourth in a series of five exercises to run in The Bulletin on Thursdays. Target area: Hamstrings, back, gluteus maximus, spine, core. How to do it: Press hands into the back of a chair or kitchen counter in front of you. Take a big step back with the right foot, both legs bent (1). With left knee directly above left ankle, lean forward and shift onto the left leg. Raise the right leg by engaging the glutes (2). Keep your hips level and your spine long while you straighten legs. Step back into bent legs and repeat 10 to 15 times. Then switch legs and do the other side. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Sidewalk Cycle track

Bike-travel options Anne Lusk, from the Harvard School of Public Health, described four primary options for bike transportation. Sidewalk 1. In the road with cars, when the biker behaves like Cycle track the driver of a car. Delineator posts 2. Within a painted line that delineates a bike lane, often right beside the car lane. These are common on major roads in Bend. 3. On a shared-use path that is also for pedestrians, dog walkers and joggers. An example of this in Bend is Greg Cross / The Bulletin Source: www.portlandize.com parallel to Skyliners Road, west of Northwest 17th Street. 4. On a cycle track, a barrier-protected, bicycleexclusive path parallel to a road and beside a sidewalk. The closest thing Bend has is along Reed Market Road, between the Bill Healy Bridge and Brookswood Boulevard. A study published in the journal Injury Prevention compared bike-vehicle accidents between #1 and #4.

On the local side The Reed Market cycle track is separated from traffic by being raised above the street level, but the curb is slanted and flows into the road. It doesn’t have a distinct buffer between the cars and the bike path, so it might not be ideal for children who could accidentally roll into the road. But it’s a good start, she said. “Better to have a start and make improvements” than to shun cycle tracks all together. Many towns in this country don’t have any. Portland, known as a bike-friendly community, is developing and studying them. Bend city officials are also in conceptual stages of planning a new buffered bike lane system for Riverside Boulevard and Franklin Avenue. It’s worth noting that Bend has roughly 96 miles of bike lanes along major roadways, called arterials and collectors. This includes some areas outside city limits, according to Rick Root with the city of Bend. He also added that in addition to the cycle track on Reed Market Road, a bike path along Colorado Avenue and Century Drive between Simpson Avenue and Mt. Washington Drive resembles a cycle track. Even if many studies prove that cycle tracks encourage more cyclists and are safe for riders, there are other obstacles to building them. In many places around Bend, the city doesn’t have enough room within its rights of way to build a cycle track next to a road, said Robin Lewis, a city transportation engineer. Steve Jorgensen, a planner for 25 years for various agencies in California and Oregon who has a particular interest in transportation issues and cycling, added that the cost and effort of

2

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

How to buy home fitness equipment By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

adding that perhaps cycle tracks would entice more families with children, or seniors or anyone intimidated by riding in traffic. Lusk is already working on another study about cycle tracks’ safety in the United States, and it includes Bend’s cycle track on Reed Market Road between the Bill Healy Bridge and Brookswood Boulevard. But she’s not saying anything about her results yet.

1

Cycle track

Thi

Cycle track

Be

Bill Healy Memorial Bridge

d Blvd

A major obstacle to building cycle tracks in the United States has been the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials development guide for bicycle facilities. It cautions against building physically separated two-way paths near a parallel road, citing safety concerns associated with two-way bike traffic. However, cycle tracks are not specifically named in the guidelines. Jeff Monson, executive director of Commute Options in Bend and a regular bike commuter, said he shares some of the concern. Drivers might not be aware of cycle track riders when they cross intersections or driveways. Or, drivers approaching an intersection might not look in the direction that cyclists are coming from on a two-way cycle track alongside a road. Monson prefers the idea of separate trails for bikers to use, something akin to the shared path parallel to Skyliners Road, which doesn’t really intersect roads. However, he also says bike commuters need interconnected bike lanes along the busy streets that get to the same places that cars are going. Bend is just beginning to explore ways to turn streets into more friendly bike-transportation routes. Lusk said there are design solutions to improve cycle track safety at intersections, which have worked in the Netherlands and Denmark where cycle tracks are prevalent. Signals on the cycle tracks, for example, can allow cyclists to proceed only with a green light that indicates it’s safe to go. And cars can be prohibited from right turns on red lights to avoid crossing a cycle track. Because of the prevalence of cycle tracks, according to the study, 27 percent of Dutch trips are made by bicycle and 55 percent of the riders are women. In the United States, 0.5 percent of commuters bike to work, and 24 percent of adult cyclists are women. “We’re comparing two slightly different things,” Lusk said. Each country has different kinds of data that Lusk used for the study. In the U.S., she said, the numbers include only adults 16 and older who bike to work. That’s going to count fewer people than the data from the Netherlands, which also counts bike trips to the grocery store, the park, or just for fun. “Still, it’s quite a big difference,” she said. Also, the injury rate per distance biked is at least 26 times greater in the United States than in the Netherlands. The national transportation development guide for bike facilities says that bicyclists in the United States prefer riding in the roadway instead of on a shareduse path because they are better maintained or more convenient. Lusk wonders who those bicyclists are, because it takes a confident and aggressive rider to join car traffic. She believes the American guidelines have been based predominantly on the perceptions of male riders. The rider has to pedal, steer and look over the left shoulder while navigating traffic, she said,

Rocking horse

swoo

Obstacles

BARRE3

Brook

Continued from F1 The leader of the study, Anne Lusk, who has a doctorate in architecture, is a research associate at the Harvard School of Public Health. She hopes the new information will inspire further examination of cycle track safety and will encourage their development. The availability of cycle tracks entices people to bike commute, and bike riding is great for health and weight management, Lusk said. The study, conducted in Montreal, Canada, which has a longstanding network of cycle tracks, compared data for vehicle/bicycle crashes on six cycle tracks and comparable streets. The overall risk rate of injury was 28 percent lower on cycle tracks. And 2.5 times as many cyclists used the cycle tracks than alternate streets, according to the study, recently published in the journal Injury Prevention. Cycle tracks are not to be confused with bike lanes, which are separated from car lanes by only a paint stripe on the road. And bike-exclusive cycle tracks differ from multiuse paths, which bikers share with joggers or dog walkers.

EXERCISE TIPS

building and maintaining cycle tracks can be more than bike lanes. A lot of the obstacles come from public sentiment. Some people think bikes should be for recreation, not transportation. It’s also a tough political decision to shift urban design

standards, he said, and often, “traditional traffic engineers are more concerned with maximizing traffic volume and flow than overall livability issues.” Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@bendbulletin.com.

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Shopping for workout gear can be, well, a workout. Some tips: Determine your goals. Certain machines (treadmills, stairsteppers) are ideal for burning calories and losing weight. Other equipment (weight benches, squat machines) is better for gaining muscle and strength. Think about what you enjoy. If you hate climbing stairs, you’ll probably dread getting on a stair-stepper. If you love brisk walks, you’re more likely

to embrace your treadmill. Take measurements at home. Make sure equipment will fit well into available space. That space also should have needed electrical outlets, a good ventilation system and possibly noise buffers such as rubber floor mats. Take a test drive. Wear workout clothes when you shop and see how equipment feels. You also may be able to arrange a limited trial period at home, with an option to return equipment for a refund or store credit.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 F5

M Gender gap in physician salaries For nearly all physician specialties, women make less than men, at least in the beginning of their careers, according to a recent study. The study, published in the journal Health Affairs, examined the salaries of physicians leaving residency programs in New York state and concluded that, overall, women make about 15 percent less than their male counterparts. The authors theorized that the disparity reflects different job preferences of women, such as more flexible hours, that offset their lower pay. Mean starting salary

Specialty

Men

Women

Men

Women

All physicians

100%

100%

$187,385

$158,727

Pediatrics (general)

5.0

13.9

$125,343

$116,950

Geriatrics

1.8

2.5

$147,881

$137,221

Family practice

6.4

8.5

$147,874

$139,504

Psychiatry

3.3

4.4

$156,668

$141,852

18.2

16.0

$154,900

$142,526

Pediatrics (subspecialty)

1.7

3.5

$161,119

$143,675

Nephrology

2.0

0.8

$162,190

$146,668

Pulmonary disease

2.3

0.9

$197,398

$153,078

Otolaryngology

1.4

0.4

$207,329

$175,122

Urology

2.1

0.3

$199,314

$175,407

Obstetrics and gynecology (general)

2.5

10.5

$203,789

$182,047

Dermatology

1.0

2.2

$217,799

$194,818

Surgery (general)

1.4

0.7

$185,881

$196,721

Cardiology

4.1

1.3

$228,188

$204,671

Emergency medicine

9.1

6.6

$218,767

$206,114

Gastroenterology

2.7

1.0

$206,158

$209,392

Cardiothoracic surgery

0.9

0.1

$241,371

$214,268

Anesthesiology (general)

5.0

2.6

$229,915

$220,576

Radiology (diagnostic)

3.4

1.8

$250,709

$233,532

Orthopedic surgery

3.7

0.5

$248,288

$242,052

Internal medicine (general)

Source: Health Affairs, February 2011 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Martha Bewley has been appointed the chief financial officer of Mountain View Hospital. Bewley is the hospital’s former finance director and interim CFO. She is a former employee of Grant Thornton in Oklahoma City, and of Greer, Mahr & Associates in Bend. She has worked at the hospital for four years. Jill Sansom has been appointed the director of ancillary and support services at Mountain View Hospital. Sansom is a former director of radiology at Rose Medical Center in Denver. She has been the hospital’s manager of imaging for five years. Will Bean has been appointed the director of critical care at Mountain View Hospital. Bean will oversee the emergency room, intensive care unit, surgery, anesthesia and respiratory therapy. He served in the U.S. Navy as a nuclear power machinist mate. He has worked at the hospital for 20 years. Sandra Hahn has been appointed the acute care director at Mountain View Hospital. Hahn is a former employee of Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in Newport. Scott Loxley has joined the staff of Mountain View Hospital as the manager of Mountain View Medical and Surgical Associates. Loxley will also oversee the patient access services department. He served in the U.S. Army for 20 years. Zeyla Brandt, a physical thera-

Pharmaceutical companies offer discount cards for copays.

Cards

VITAL STATS

Percentage of physicians

Next week

Sandra Hahn

Will Bean

Jill Sansom

Scott Loxley

pist at Healing Bridge Physical Therapy, has attended a class titled “Going Deeper with CranioMartha sacral Work: Bewley Helping Clients with Depression.” The course covered depression treatment techniques that do not use medication. Physical therapist Daniel Hodgson has joined the staff of Peak Performance Physical Therapy. Hodgson is a graduate of Arkansas Tech University and the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Continued from F1 In Central Oregon, providers ranging from specialists’ offices to dental practices to veterinary clinics use CareCredit plans. “We do get quite a few (patients) that use this card,” said Abby Heller, who works in the billing department at Bend Urology, which uses CareCredit. Heller said she thinks the cards are a good idea for many people. “A lot of places won’t accept small payments, like $50,” she said. So, for consumers who can’t pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for one medical bill, this offers a way to make payments over time.

Proceed with caution The big advantage with medical credit cards is that they often offer a period of time during which there is no interest. Depending on the health care provider and the card, patients may be able to go six to 24 months without paying interest on their balance. There are, however, some caveats, and consumers need to be vigilant in how they use them. Attorneys general in at least two states, Minnesota and New York, initiated investigations into the marketing practices of medical credit cards. New York specifically targeted CareCredit. Both offices expressed concerns that consumers were getting hit with high bills and interest rates that weren’t fully explained. “This is not easy to follow if you don’t watch it carefully,” said Terri Rahmsdorff, a board member at Central Oregon Low Income Kooperative, often known as COLINK, which helps advise people on how to deal with medical bills. For example, people with CareCredit get a specific period of time to pay off their balance. However, according to the CareCredit terms on its website, if people miss a payment or do not pay the full balance within a specified period, they will be responsible for all the interest accrued from the purchase date. That could be substantial. Right now, the annual percentage rate for the card is 26.99 percent. Also, even if people pay the minimum balance listed on their statement, they may not pay the bill off within the zerointerest period. “Like any other debt obligation, you must know what you’re getting into before you get into it,” said Rahmsdorff, who has worked in the financial industry for more than 40 years. “It’s set up so that if I don’t meet the expectations, there are some pretty heavyduty penalties.” Rahmsdorff said people need to make sure, before they sign up for the card, that they know what they’ll need to pay each month, and that they can afford it. “After you get into it, it’s really hard to get things changed.”

CarePayment Another popular card in Central Oregon is CarePay-

Anita Henderson, MD BEND - DOWNTOWN 18 NW OREGON AVENUE

541.389.7741 BEND - EAST SIDE 1247 NE MEDICAL CENTER DRIVE

541.318.4249 SISTERS 354 W ADAMS STREET

541.549.9609 www.highlakeshealthcare.com

Dr. Anita Henderson graduated from Oregon Health Sciences University. She is board certified in Family Medicine. Dr. Henderson’s interests include wellness care, women’s health, mental health, and management of chronic disease. She enjoys working with patients of all ages. Dr. Henderson practices at our downtown Bend clinic. Dr. Henderson enjoys her life in Bend, having followed her sister’s family here from her native Portland, Oregon. She relishes time spent with her young niece and nephew. Other interests are reading and writing, listening to music, playing guitar, snowboarding, yoga and jogging. High Lakes Health Care is a preferred provider for most major insurance plans. New patients are now being accepted at all locations. We are now open to new Medicare patients.

ment, issued through St. Charles Health System. Patients can put a charge between $250 and $10,000 onto the CarePayment card and pay it off over 25 months with no interest. Though CarePayment looks like a credit card, it is not, said Garth Massey, head of client services for the company. The purpose of the card, he said, is to give people a way to pay large charges over time, not to allow them to pay for multiple purchases in one place. “You can’t rack up charges.” The cards can be used only at the hospital through which they are issued, and there is no credit or income qualification as there is with credit cards. In addition, Massey said, CarePayment does not guarantee the funds to the hospital. If patients default on their terms, CarePayment will make some attempt to collect the money but will ultimately turn the account back over to the hospital rather than go through a formal collections process. “The basic idea is we’re funding the hospital’s loans.” But, Massey said, “if you choose not to make your payment, the hospital has underwritten the loans.” The card does not charge interest, instead requiring cardholders to pay off the full balance within 25 months or risk default. CarePayment makes money, Massey said, by taking a percentage of the total bill in return for managing the account. For example, for a hospital bill of $1,000 put on CarePayment, the hospital may get $800 and CarePayment would take $200. The cards can help patients spread payments over time but can become the source of excess debt if not handled well. “I need to know what the payments are going to be so I know if I can make those payments,” said Rahmsdorff. “If I don’t make my payments, I’m going to end up in collections. And that doesn’t help anybody.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Why don’t people pay? A 2009 survey of health care consumers revealed reasons why people say they do not pay their medical bills. Lack of financing options

I just got my statement

19% I forgot to pay or was confused about what I owe

37%

17% 8%

19%

Health care is a right; I shouldn't have to pay my bill

Other *Answers in "other," which each garnered less than 5 percent of responses, included "I don't pay my bills until the provider or collection agency calls me" and "My provider doesn't accept my preferred method of payment." Source: McKinsey & Company, 2010

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

SEEKING VOLUNTEERS The American Cancer Society Cancer Resource Centers of Central Oregon located in Bend Memorial Clinic & St. Charles Cancer Centers in Bend & Redmond are now accepting volunteer applications. Our mission is to provide patients and families experiencing cancer with information, emotional support and resources to promote the highest possible quality of life.

Introductory Training March 4th 9:30 to 2:00PM at the St. Charles Cancer Center, Bend “This is the most rewarding volunteer job I can imagine. My husband and I had no such help during our battle with his cancer, so it is a great pleasure for us to be able to make the journey easier for others.“ (quote by current volunteer)

For information call Glenda Leutwyler at 541.788.4858 by February 28th* *We are looking for a commitment of one 4 hour shift per week (Mon-Fri.) for a year.

F6 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M

Next week Is your child at risk for nursemaid’s elbow?

Loop

CELEBRITY M EDICINE Those diagnosed with sarcoidosis usually don’t need treatment

Continued from F1 Now Letzer’s Deli will be among the first four restaurants in Bend, along with Chan’s, The Phoenix and Carino’s Italian Restaurant, to implement the system. “Seventeen percent of the population is hard of hearing, and there’s a great deal more coming online because of the baby boomers becoming 65,” Merrifield said. “Finally we’ve got something for us.”

Magnetic field Induction loop systems are rather simple in design. A wire is looped around the perimeter of the room, then connected to an amplifier along with a microphone. When sound travels through the wire loop, it creates a magnetic field that can be picked up by hearing aids equipped with a special coil of wire, known as a t-coil. Inside the loop, anyone with a t-coil can hear the sound transmitted through the system loud and clear, free from the background noise that can dominate a public setting. Most newer hearing aids have a built-in t-coil, although not all audiologists activate the coil unless the patient has a particular need for it. Induction loops are commonplace in restaurants in Europe but have been used in the U.S. primarily to accommodate large groups in churches, classrooms or conference rooms. The hearing-loss group is asking restaurants that want to install a loop system to dedicate a separate room or a small area of their restaurant for the hearing impaired and to make changes to the decor to make it more hearing-friendly. This area would have microphones on each table, but the loop systems can accommodate only one hearing impaired party at a time. Three families could not have three separate conversations within a single loop. According to Emilie Hart-Hutter, an audiologist with Central Oregon Ear, Nose and Throat, restaurant settings are notoriously difficult for those with impaired hearing for a number of reasons. “One is the acoustics of restaurants, especially what’s popular right now — the factory-type loft restaurants with high ceilings and open booths and music going,” she said. “Sound just reverberates everywhere so it’s difficult even for someone with normal hearing.” Most hearing aids, she said, pick up low-frequency sounds better than high-frequency sounds. In noisy environments like restaurants there can be too much of that low-frequency noise. “You’re going to hear the vowel sounds which carry the sounds in speech, but you’re not going to hear the consonants,” she explained. “You’re not going to get the clarity, just the vowel guttural sounds.” Restaurants with low ceilings, curtains and carpeting tend to absorb more of the ambient noise, but even the softest decor can present a challenge. Many people with hearing impairment learn to read lips to fill in the gaps in their hearing. But servers often aren’t looking at the individual with hearing loss when they present the specials or take an order. “Universally, people with hearing loss and restaurants are a bad mix,” Hart-Hutter said. Induction loop systems, she said, are effective but can require a lot of ongoing maintenance and support to keep them working. “It’s going to be tough, and there are going to be stumbling blocks,” she said. “But somebody really had to take the first step, and I think others will eventually follow.”

Funding challenge Although the four Bend restaurants have agreed to install the systems, it’s still unclear who will pay for them. According to Steve Berhar, owner of Stereo Planet who will install the systems locally, each setup will cost about $700 to $1,000. The Hearing Loss Association may try to raise funds to pay for the sys-

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Sheridan Letzer, owner of Letzer’s Deli, is installing an induction loop system in his Bend restaurant to help people with hearing aids hear better.

“One is having a complete barrier that is keeping you literally from getting up the steps and into a building, versus someone’s ability to get into a building but they can’t enjoy the environment. It’s a quality-of-life issue.” — Susan Duncan, accessibility manager for Bend

tems, or restaurant owners may foot the bill themselves. Merrifield said two additional restaurants in Bend are also considering installing loop systems. Merrifield had hoped that the city of Bend would fund the systems for restaurants or waive building permit fees to offset the costs of installation as part of its efforts to promote accessibility under the Americans with Disability Act. The city, he complained, has focused solely on access for those with physical disabilities, requiring curb cuts and access ramps of restaurants. “We’re the invisible disability,” he said. “We hide ourselves. The audiologists always make a big deal about hiding the hearing aids. They need to be bigger, and they should have flashing lights.” But Susan Duncan, accessibility manager for the city, said while she supports improving conditions for the hearing impaired, no such funds are available. “Our support will be whatever we can do to continue to increase awareness, support in education or anything that we can do that would be non-monetary,” she said. While Duncan is sympathetic to the difficulties faced by hearing-impaired patrons — her husband is hearing impaired and avoids noisy restaurants — she sees a fundamental difference between handicapped access and the ability to hear when dining out. “One is having a complete barrier that is keeping you literally from getting up the steps and into a building, versus someone’s ability to get into a building but they can’t enjoy the environment,” she said. “It’s a quality-oflife issue.”

Attracting customers While Merrifield would like to see more accommodation for patrons with hearing loss, he doesn’t want it to become another mandate for restaurants or other businesses. “I would like to see things be totally voluntary. If you want to have a noisy place, go ahead, please do. We don’t want you to have to provide something,” Merrifield said. “But the ones that do provide it will get my business.” The hearing-loss group is planning to distribute signs to restaurants that implement the system to let patrons know, and are considering measuring decibel levels in area restaurants to recognize those that are “hearing-friendly.” Chan’s owner Lap Chan said he decided to install the new system in an effort to better serve his customers. “I don’t see that much demand for it, but some people have let us know they had trouble hearing when they come to eat in our

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

place,” he said. “So we thought, ‘Why don’t we do it and give our customers extra service?’” Chan is completing a restoration of his restaurant after an August fire and expects to reopen in late March with the hearing loop system in place. Many people believe that restaurants that cater to those with hearing impairment or other disabilities may soon gain a competitive advantage. As baby boomers age, businesses are likely to see more and more people with

physical, sensory and even cognitive challenges, and will have to consider new ways to accommodate such patrons. “The graying of America is going to touch us like we’ve never been touched before,” Duncan said. “We’re going to see such an impact, but people don’t know what to do yet.” If restaurateurs and hearingloss advocates can work out the kinks and successfully implement systems in a number of restaurants, Duncan believes Bend could be a trailblazer in improving access. “I think we become the role model and everybody will desire to be like us,” Duncan said. “We’ll show them that it works and then others will want to build it in their communities.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

While it can affect almost any organ Actress Tisha Campbell-Martin, of the body, sarcoidosis most who starred in the television commonly affects the lungs, and sitcoms “My Wife and Kids” almost all patients have and “Rita Rocks,” lung or chest symptoms, recently told People such as dry cough, magazine she has shortness of breath, been living with discomfort behind the sarcoidosis for 10 breast bone or abnormal years. According breathing sounds. It to the National is often diagnosed in Institutes of Health, asymptomatic patients sarcoidosis is a after an abnormal chest disease that causes Tisha X-ray. clumps of abnormal Campbelltissue, called Martin Sarcoidosis symptoms granulomas, to form often get better gradually in certain organs of on their own without the body. The cause of the disease treatment. Severely affected is unknown. The condition patients may need treatment with is more common in Africancorticosteroids, especially if their Americans than Caucasians, and eyes, heart or nervous system are females are usually affected more involved. The overall death rate often than males. The disease from sarcoidosis is less than 5 typically begins between the ages percent. of 20 and 40. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Take the pain out of shoveling McClatchy-Tribune News Service Make no mistake, shoveling snow in the winter provides a tremendous workout. It works all sorts of muscles and burns calories. If you’re not careful, though, shoveling can also result in severe back injury or, even worse, a heart attack. Clearing a driveway or sidewalk of snow requires preparation and proper body mechanics. Allow yourself plenty of time to shovel. The activity should not be rushed. Dress warmly in layered clothing. But don’t bundle up to the point that your clothes restrict movement. Keep your field of vision clear and unobstructed by objects, such as a scarf. Limber up. Do some light

stretching (10 minutes or so) before shoveling. Find a shovel that suits your body size. A shovel that is heavy or longer than necessary can lead to muscle strain. Hit the fresh stuff. Newly fallen snow is easier to shovel than older, packed snow. And keep an eye out for ice patches. Not only can ice cause you to slip and fall, it also can cause you to strain a muscle. Push, don’t lift. Keep your shoveling motion steady with few twists and turns. Push snow forward or to the side, not over your back. Heed the signs. If you experience chest pain or shortness of breath, stop shoveling immediately.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 G1

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Chihuahua, absolutely tiniest teacups, rare colors, vet checked, $250, 541-977-4686

Half Maltese / Half Shih Tzu female, 6 mos, 8 lbs, shots, $250 cash. 541-610-4414

Companion cats free to seniors! Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. costume Jewelry. Top dollar 541-389-8420 • craftcats.org paid for Gold & Silver. I buy CZECH. MALINOIS, 3 years old, by the Estate, Honest Artist. over $10k in training, inElizabeth, 541-633-7006 credible guard dog/family dog, $3500 or negotiate 205 something. 541-728-1036.

Min-Pin, AKC, Red, 1 yr. old, docked & cropped, all accessories, $400 OBO, 541-306-8371

Want to Buy or Rent

Items for Free

Earth Fill Material, suitable to build privacy berm or mound, free, you haul, 541-383-2253 Recliner, Leather, cream color, good condition FREE, you haul, 541-815-7367.

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC VIZSLA Puppies. Visit www.huntingvizslapups.com or call to reserve yours. Available March 1. 541-548-7271 Aussie Shepherd (3), 1st shots, wormed, $150, 541-771-2606

Dachshund Mini Chocolate and Tan, $300. Avail 3/2. For Pics & info highdesertdogs@live.com 541-416-2530. English Bulldog 10 mo male, non-reg purebred, brindle, microchipped, health cert, full shots. Handsome, loving. Asking $950. 541-571-6378

Norwich Terriers, AKC,Rare, del. avail,$2500,541-487-4511. sharonm@peak.org

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265

269

Misc. Items

Building Materials

SP Base Girls Snowboard boots, size 7, black/grey, new $40/obo. 541-382-6806

25% off Select Signature Window treatments. PLUS order 10 window coverings or more and get an additional 10% off! *Not valid with any other offers. Good thru 2/28/11 only. See ad in February issue of Picture Your Home magazine. *Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Budget Blinds 541-788-8444. www.BudgetBlinds.com BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Armoire, 2 curios with lights, lower storage cabinets, $500 for all 4 pieces, or will sell separately. 541-419-2244 Bed, Full size, medium firm, $50, please call 503-933-0814, local. Bed, Select Comfort, water bed frame, $500, call 541-504-2148. Fridge, top freezer, Kemnore, ice maker, good cond., $300, call 541-504-2148. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Love Seat/Hide-a-bed, never used, $100, 503-933-0814, local. Pole Lamp, antique, solid glass, local, $35, 503-933-0814, Local. Range, 2004 White Roper, Gas, never hooked up, all manuals, $150, 541-815-4483.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call Thomasville American Oak dining set, 2 leaves, 6 chairs (2 captain’s) stable pedestal base, good cond, asking $350. 541-419-2056 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

212

Antiques & Collectibles Furniture

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Free Basset Hound, purebred, family needed for 11 wk old male, to good home, call 541-788-9786 after 4 p.m.

POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Black/white, chocolate & other colors, so loving! 541-475-3889

Life Magazines, Old, $50, please call 503-933-0814, local.

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/

Marbles, antique, large jar, variety, $200, 503-933-0814, local.

Golden Retriever pups, 1 male left! Born Jan. 25th. Call Kristi, 541-280-3278.

Kittens & cats for adoption thru rescue group. 65480 78th St. Bend, Sat/Sun 1-4 PM, other Black Lab AKC Puppies, 4 days by appt., call 541-647 Males, 4 Females, Registered, 2181 to arrange. Kittens in Dew Claws removed, 1st foster home, call 541-815 Shots. $300, 541-647-8840. 7278 to visit. All are altered, vaccinated, have ID chip & Border Collie (3), 1st shots, more. We still have many wormed, $150, call needing homes, so adoption 541-977-0034 fees remain low for now. See BOSTON TERRIER AKC female www.craftcats.org for pho2½ yrs old, 15 lb#, $250. tos, directions, etc. Call 541Shots, papers, family-raised. 389-8420 for further details. 541-610-8525 Labradoodles, Australian Boxer, AKC, 4-month old male. Imports - 541-504-2662 Potty trained, great with www.alpen-ridge.com small children and other Male Beagle Free to good pets. $500. 541-678-3425 home. You must have a fenced yard. Four year old, Boxer-Bulldog/yellow lab pups. sweet, house broken, Dad is reg. boxer-bulldog, non-neutered beagle. His mother reg. yellow lab, for name is Buford. Please call or sale $300 ea. Has all 3 shots, email if interested rabies shots, and dog license. 541-325-9994, fortheloveofHerbert Miller, Terrebonne, connie@yahoo.com Oregon. 541-504-1330.

SP Snowboard Bindings (girls) Black/Pink. Size M-L. $35. Never used! 541-382-6806

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing 22LR B.H. single-action cowboy-style 6-shot revolver & holster, $200. 541-647-8931 22LR Remington semi-auto rifle rare synthetic stock, tubefed, $200. 541-647-8931 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

CLEANING & REPAIRS of Guns - all kinds Bend, 541-678-5957 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

GUN

SHOW

Feb. 26 & 27 Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 $8 Admission, 12 under free. OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120 HUNTERS: Everything Incl. Antelope Hunts In Wyoming. Bow or Rifle, easy area to draw license. Hunt Success Rate 100%. 307-464-0315. Mossberg 500 12g 18” barrel, home defense, $275. Glock 45ACP pistol, $525. Mossberg 835 12g camo, p-grip, 18” barrel, $325. 541-647-8931

Ruger 77-17 wood stock Leupold vari X-II 3x9 scope and 1000 rounds ammo. like new under 300 rounds fired. $750 NEF Handi-rifle 45-70 w/3X9 scope. $200 541-480-3018 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

Picnic Table & Bench, antique, Boy Scout camp-out kit, rare, $200, 503-933-0814, local. The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

215 TEDDI BEAR PUPPIES (ZUCHONS), 4 Males, CKC Reg., non-shedding, hypoallergenic, dewclaws rem., 1st shots/wormed, ready 3/3. $350. 541-460-1277 Toy/Mini Aussie pups, $450 +. High quality. Shots, vet, tails, etc. Call 541-475-1166

Columbia 2-person tent, “Lost Lake,” never used, extra stakes/poles, $90. Portable sling hammock, $45. Call 541-771-9551

Coins & Stamps Private collector buying postage stamp albums & collections, world-wide and U.S. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #)

Snow Shoes, Atlas, never used, women’s, $60, 503-933-0814, local.

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Art, Jewelry and Furs

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Playstation3, New, 2010, BluRay, DVD, wireless remotes, charging station, 2 controllers, 4 games, $295 firm. 541-317-9061.

Laptop, Compaq Presario, 1 yr old? $200, 503-933-0814, local.

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210

Exercise Equipment

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Sears Treadmill, $300, please call 541-504-2148. TREADMILL - Precor 9.1 Treadmill, in excellent cond., $400. Call 541-416-1007

10 Year Finish Guarantee

Free Design Consultation Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 CCB#191758

Sink, Freestanding, hard faucet composite, w/plumbing kit, $75, 503-933-0814, local.

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Have Gravel Will Travel! Cinders, topsoil, fill material, etc. Excavation & septic systems. Call Abbas Construction CCB#78840, 541-548-6812.

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Kitchen utensils, box full, assorted, also incl. fax machine, $175. OBO, 541-317-3974 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Tools

266

Heating and Stoves

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

10" Table Saw-Router Craftsman Pro 1.75HP Prem Hybrid 10" Table Saw with built-in ProMax router ext, ProLift Adj Sys. and PorterCable 7518 router. $995 OBO. Call Jack, 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

Riding Garden Tractor, Scott’s (made by John Deere), 20hp, 48” cut, $900/best offer. Call 541-604-1808

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Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Tina, Bay Quarter horse, 8 yrs. old, broke to ride, 541-382-7995

WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or NOTICE TO ADVERTISER purchase. KMR Trailer SUPER TOP SOIL Since September 29, 1991, Sales, 541-389-7857 advertising for used wood- www.hersheysoilandbark.com www.kigers.com stoves has been limited to Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High models which have been humus level, exc. for flower certified by the Oregon De358 beds, lawns, gardens, partment of Environmental Farmers Column straight screened top soil. Quality (DEQ) and the fedBark. Clean fill. Deliver/you eral Environmental Protec10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS haul. 541-548-3949. tion Agency (EPA) as having for protecting hay, firewood, met smoke emission stanlivestock etc. $1461 Installed. 270 dards. A certified woodstove 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. can be identified by its certiLost and Found kfjbuilders@ykwc.net fication label, which is permanently attached to the Found Jewelry, Bend Wal-Mart 375 stove. The Bulletin will not Parking lot, a.m. of 2/22, call knowingly accept advertising to ID, 541-388-1004, 4-8 p.m. Meat & Animal Processing for the sale of uncertified REMEMBER: If you have lost an woodstoves. animal don't forget to check Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain-fed, no hormones 267 The Humane Society in Bend, $3.10/lb., hanging weight, 382-3537 or Redmond, Fuel and Wood cut & wrap included. Please 923-0882 or Prineville, call 541-383-2523. 447-7178

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193 DRY SEASONED RED FIR OR TAMARACK, $185 per cord, split & delivered. Please Call 541-977-2040.

Gameboy Advance, w/ 6 games & case, $50, 503-933-0814, local.

Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Ad must include price of item

Table Saw, Craftsman, w/50T & Carbide blade, $250 OBO, 541-546-7661.

Yorkie Pups, 10 wks, 2 females, 1 male, vet check, will deliver to Central OR, $600, 541-792-0375, Mt. Vernon.

Furniture & Appliances Bowflex Extreme Gym II, $700;

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

325 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

The Bulletin Classiieds

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Farm Market

Hay, Grain and Feed

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

TV, Stereo and Video

255

D ry ers

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

2010 55” Sony Bravia EX5LCD TV, full HD, 1080p, $895 firm. 541-317-9061

Computers

W a s h ers &

541-389-6655

Sump Pump, Flood/water, Hyrdomatic, commercial/residential, $125, 503-933-0814.

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Crafts and Hobbies

A-1

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

9 7 7 0 2

300 All Birdfood Now On Sale!!

Pendant, Judith Ripka Sterling Stud Gun, concrete, gun powder ejection, w/case, $40, Collection, large Sun stone, 503-933-0814, local. w/chain, $100, 503-933-0814

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!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Fly Rod, Cortland, 9’, 6 lb. fiberglass, ceramic eyes, w/case $65, 503-933-0814, local.

English Bulldogs AKC excellent quality, big & beautiful males (3) $1300. 541-290-0026

SCHNOODLE! Beautiful black female, well socialized, sweet temperament, $395 541-410-7701.

O r e g o n

244

POMA-POO PUPS, Tiny teacup toys, 7 weeks old. 541-639-6189.

Golden Retriever AKC Pups health & intelligence, reduced to $1000, 541-756-3688. www.goldenpondkennels.net

B e n d

Snowboards

Sporting Goods - Misc. Pet miniature Zebu calf, female, 10 mos old, 70 lbs, 28” tall. Adults are popular for petting zoos & Peewee rodeos. $500. 541-389-2636

A v e . ,

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English Bulldog, CKC reg, 5 yr old stud. Red & white, nice markings, no health problems, needs loving home. $500/obo. 541-419-2056

German Shepherd pups, 8 weeks, parents on site, $325. 541-390-8875

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

541-598-4643.

200 202

S . W .

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $1100; La Pine $1100; Sisters & Prineville $1150. 541-815-4177 SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

WINTER SPECIAL - Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine, guaranteed cords. Split and delivered, PROMPT DELIVERY! $175/cord. 541-350-3393 Wood Racks, oak w/metal frame, front, sides & back, $100, 541-815-4698.

G2 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Due to new equipment line our company has a massive growth & expansion openings. Various positions for full time & long term employment. $300 Week paid training provided. Call 541-617-6109 ask for Jason. Auto collision repair shop seeks top-notch Collision Tech. Min. 15-20 years exp. $20/hr commission. Drug- free. Fax resume to: 541-549-4736 Auto Parts Positions available In Central Oregon. Inside and Outside sales professionals wanted. Great opportunities with benefits. Please send resumes to P.O. Box 6346, Bend, Oregon 97708

290

Sales Northwest Bend

Sales Redmond Area

NOTICE

Moving Sale - Antiques, kitchen table, couch, recliners, Harley Davidson parts, RC plane, functioning hospital bed, & more! 157 SW Cascade Mountain Ct., Fri-Sat, 9-5.

292

Sales Other Areas www.bendbulletin.com

286

Sales Northeast Bend

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809 LYNN LOOMIS

ESTATE

SALE

ALICE LOOMIS

MOVING

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

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Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

20-30 Individuals Wanted Immediately

SALE

62083 TORKELSON RD. FRIDAY Feb.25 • SATURDAY Feb. 26 9:00 to 5:00 Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 am on Friday.

(Take Hwy 20 east 2 MILES from 27th--TURN RIGHT (SOUTH) on Torkelson and follow to first lane on right then follow paved lane to second house on left. Park in field) Antique 1700s tall case clock; Oil painting by Toledo; two empire style shavings mirrors; Leather sofa; King Bed; Queen bed; Black Cherry wood coffee table--headboard--two nightstands; unique clothes wardrobe; Camel saddle; Kirby vacuum; Air purifier; Denby stoneware; Bernina 1001 sewing machine and cabinet; Wood bench; Patio table and chair; Small refrigerator; Lawn swing; Antique copper pieces; Large TV,DVD, and amp units; Thorsen turntable; records; Office chair; older Dell computer set with XP; Books on antiques; Dresser; lots of Corning ware, kitchen items and pots and pans; Foley brand sharpening tools include: Belt sander; chain saw grinder; automatic saw filer; automatic power setter; knife serrator; hone; scissor sharpener; hand saw retoother; grinder. Rockwell 14" band saw; two Gorilla racks; Compressor; Floor jack; three work benches; chainsaw 16"; Large Norris safe--was in Bend Garage; linens; clothing; lots of other items! Handled by: Deedy's Estate Sales Co. LLC 541-419-2242 days 541-382-5950 eves www.deedysestatesales.com

Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

CAUTION

476

Employment Opportunities

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

GROCERY STORE PERSONNEL NEEDED! Cashiers, freight crew, liquor store clerk, deli clerk, Backroom personnel, produce clerk - hours vary, open 7 days per week. Applications are available at either of the Sunriver Grocery Stores or resumes can be faxed to 541-598-8263! HVAC established Oregon Company seeking a DDC Controls Technician to perform start-up functions on controls systems and provide analysis of building controls. Must have knowledge of DDC Control Theory and Applications and HVAC equipment. FT, hourly. Email resumes to jobs@eccportland.com.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

541-617-7825

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Finance & Business

Rentals

507

616

500 600 Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

3 or 2 Bdrm, 1 or 2 Bath, rural setting preferred. Can give refs; non-smoking adults, well-behaved pets. Need by April 1st. Call 505-455-7917

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

630

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Call about our $99 Special! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575. • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735

!! Snowball of a Deal !! $300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Rooms for Rent

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Awbrey Heights, furn., no smoking/drugs/pets. $350 +$100 dep. (541) 388-2710.

1015 Roanoke Ave. - $575/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, 541-389-1448; & Royal Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D incl. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. Visit us at www.sonberg.biz New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885 A CLEAN 1 bdrm. in 4-plex next to Park, 2 decks, storage, laundry on site, great loca631 tion, W/S/G paid, no dogs, Condo / Townhomes $550/mo. 541-318-1973

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at

HOSPITAL AREA, NE BEND Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2½ baths, all kitchen appliances. Washer/dryer hookup, garage with opener, gas heat and A/C. $645 per mo. + deposit. S/W/G paid. NO DOGS. 541-382-2033.

Beautiful 1 bdrm, 2 bath fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep., near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 verandas, no pets/smoking, all amenities, pics avail. by request. W/S/G/elec./A/C & cable included, Available now. call 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

www.oregonfreshstart.com

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

541-382-3402 Trucking Currently hiring for CDL A & CDL B Drivers, Maintenance Mechanics & Operators. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For app. call John Davis Trucking, Battle Mountain, NV, 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or www.jdt3d.net

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

For Rent

541-383-0386

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Want To Rent

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

The Bulletin

$99 MOVE-IN SPECIAL! 1 & 2 bdrm apts. avail. starting at $575.

573

Alpine Meadows

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

476

Employment Opportunities

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

640 PARKS AT BROKEN TOP. Nice studio above garage, sep. entry, views! No smoking/ pets. $550/mo. + dep., incl. all util. + TV! 541-610-5242.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 4-plea SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, all appls, W/D hkup, garage, fenced, w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep; pet neg. 541-480-7806 ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Managed by

GSL Properties

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Yardley Estates 3Bdrm, 2 bath, + bonus room, slate & hardwood floors, granite, 9’ ceilings, 2-car garage. $1200, 1st/last + $500 security. No pets. 541-749-0967

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of February 21, 2011

Employment DRIVER-COMPANY drivers up to 40k first year. New team pay up! Up to .48 cents/ mile CDL Training available. Regional locations! (877) 369-7104. www.centraldrivingjobs.net. DRIVER-DAILY or weekly pay. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Safety bonuses paid quarterly. CDL-A, 3 months recent OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com. TRUCK/ DRIVER local/ regional class A, ft, work year round & have clean MVR. Minimum two yrs experience. Apply in person: 2900 Pringle Rd SE #100 Salem, Oregon.

Miscellaneous HIP REPLACEMENT surgery: If you had hip replacement surgery between 2005-present and suffered problems requiring a second revision surgery you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

650

659

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Real Estate For Sale

A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

700

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Prestigious, fully furnished, 6 bdrm., 3 bath, NW Skyliner, 6 mo. minimum, incl. some utils., $2600/mo, please call 541-944-8638.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

Houses for Rent Redmond

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

1 Bdrm., 1 bath, charming cottage, large yard, quiet neighborhood, 4 minutes to airport, 2881 SW 32nd St., $650/mo, 541-350-8338.

Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, pantry, fenced, sprinklers. No smoking/pets. $875+deposits. 541-548-5684.

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

658

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545 or 541-350-1660.

693

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

705

Real Estate Services

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

713

748

870

880

882

Real Estate Wanted

Northeast Bend Homes

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981 motorhome, 2-tone brown, perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. engine perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape. See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Lane off Day Rd in La Pine. Asking $8000. 541-876-5106.

Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

Easily. The Classified Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every category is indexed on the section’s front page.

Beautiful Spacious Home. Looking for a home with elbow room? Beautiful custom home, lots of light, large open rooms and office space. Woodstove in living room that keeps the house cozy. $199,900. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 *** Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

SUNRIVER BEAUTY! Fully furnished vacation rental or move right in yourself. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1815 sq. ft. $479,900. CJ & Lisa Realtors Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty Lisa 541-610-9697 CJ 541-410-3710

763

Recreational Homes and Property Creekside Village TownhomeEagle Crest 3 bdrm, 2.5 baths, 1871 sq. ft. Great room. Master on main. Eagle Crest amenities. $315,000 MLS#2910584 www.liveincentraloregon.com Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 COLDWELL BANKER Morris Real Estate.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

REDMOND 5. Local writer seeks info from anyone connected to R5 case. 541-480-2571

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

Vacation home on .9 acre! $189,900 Ad#2472. Team Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.TheSoldDoctors.com

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

771

Lots

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $69,500 OBO. 541-923-3510

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $107,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

875

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 Yamaha 125 4 stroke, off road, exc. cond., paid $2800, 2 years ago, asking $1500. 541-504-1330.

865

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

881

Travel Trailers

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

880

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Appliances & gas lines installed. Appl. removed + Handyman services. Since 1969. Call CJ! 541-318-6041 or 408-3535. CBC#49072.

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services Dawn’s Cleaning: “Morning Fresh Clean!” Residential Cleaning, Senior Discounts Has openings now, CALL TODAY! 541-410-8222

Electrical Services BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care V Spring Clean Up! V

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Mark’s Handyman Service • Fix • Replace • Install • Haul Free Est. - Reasonable Rates Mark Haidet•541-977-2780 License #11-00008985

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Masonry More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Snow Removal

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof Tops • De-Icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Landscape Management •Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

MASONRY

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC

541-815-2888

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD, 4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5,000. Call 541-680-8975, and leave message.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $99,900, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

773 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

20145 RED SKY LN - Bend. Beautiful 2.5ý acre cul-de-sac lot in gated golf community of Sunset View Estates. Mt. Views. $359,000. Ken Renner, Principal Broker, 541-280-5352 krenner@SunriverRealty.com 36+ Acre Estate - Bend Cascade Nursery! $850,000. Ad #8452 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.TheSoldDoctors.com

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes FULLY REFURBED 5 Bdrm, 3 bath, delivered & set-up to your site, $49,900. 541-548-5511 www.JAndMHomes.com Your land paid off? $500 down only. Pick your new home! Several to choose. 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Rooing Affordable Roof Repair by licensed, bonded and insured specialist. 36 years’ experience. CCB #94309 Call Cary at 541-948-0865

Tile, Ceramic

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$54,000! 541-317-9185

885

Canopies and Campers

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Remodeling, Carpentry

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

(Private Party ads only) NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

ATVs

Acreages Appliance Sales/Repair

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

ALPENLITE 1984. A Beauty! Extras, 5th wheel hitch, A/C, microwave, tires are good, large fridge, radio, propane tanks have been certified. Spare tire & wheels. $3000. 923-4174.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Motorhomes

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

755

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

19.5’ Gruman Aluminum Freight Cedar Creek 2006, Canoe, 36” Beam,square stern, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, Yamaha 5.5 HP outboard, call Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, eves, 541-382-7995 $1995, 5500W gen., fireplace, CoPilgrim Camper 1981, Self rian countertops, skylight 19’ Blue Water Execushower, central vac, much contained, Cab-over, needs tive Overnighter 1988, more, like new, $39,900, TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or very low hours, been in dry please call 541-330-9149. 503-585-3240. storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser Merc engine, all new tires 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 on trailer, $7995 OBO, hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 541-447-8664. in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, amp. propane gen & more! 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 2 roof air, built-in vac, pris$55,000. 541-948-2310. Run About, 220 HP, V8, tine, reduced to $34,000 OBO open bow, exc. cond., very 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351 fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Everest 32’ 2004, 3 Bimini & custom trailer, slides, island kitchen, air, $19,500. 541-389-1413 surround sound, micro., full Houseboat 38x10, triple axle oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trailer, incl. private moorage trips on it, 1 owner, like w/24/7 security at Prineville new, REDUCED NOW resort. PRICE REDUCED, $26,000. 541-228-5944 $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

541-385-5809

Large luxury family home 3/2.5 3200 sq. ft., W/D, fridge, daylight basement, large lot, views, no pets. $1350. 503-720-7268.

personals

800

looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

CHECK YOUR AD

Where buyers meet sellers.

Boats & RV’s

1537 NE 4th St. - Bend 1968ý sf., two floors plus basement, kitchen. Commercial. $250,000. Call Ken Renner, Principal Broker, 541-280-5352 krenner@SunriverRealty.com 732 Commercial/Investment WOW! 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1238 sq. 850 ft., vaulted ceilings, 2 skyProperties for Sale Snowmobiles lights, big yard, RV parking, new granite countertops, NEW ON MARKET! new tile backsplash, new Yamaha Snowmo2 Homes on large. C-2 lot used carpet, vinyl & paint. as rentals currently, but use biles & Trailer, 1997 $124,900. Randy Schoning, your imagination. Homes sit 700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt Princ. Broker. John L. Scott, on .33 acre close the to Hwy Trailer, front off-load, covwith great access. Additional 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354 ers for snowmobiles, clean tax lot also Markuson Dr. & exc. cond., package price, 749 with the purchase of these $3800, 541-420-1772. Southeast Bend Homes homes for free! this gives you a bunch to work with and run 860 a business because this is in Custom Home in Mtn. High, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2850 sq.ft., Motorcycles And Accessories excess of an acre all tospacious rooms, pantry, butgether. Agent-owned might lers pantry, service porch, do some trading. Asking triple garage, incredible cabiHARLEY Davidson $199,900! net storage, A/C, 1 level, famHeather Hockett, PC, Broker, Fat Boy - LO 2010 ily room, formal dining, 541-420-9151 Black on black, detachable breakfast area, built in desk, Century 21 Gold Country Realty windshield, backrest, and shelves, 2 fireplaces, new Sileluggage rack. 2200 miles. stone kitchen counters, deck, 745 $13,900. Please call Jack, gated community w/pool, 541-549-4949, or Homes for Sale tennis court, gazebo, 619-203-4707 $419,500, 541-389-9966 PUBLISHER'S 750 NOTICE All real estate advertising in Redmond Homes this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which Eagle Crest House - Desert makes it illegal to advertise Sky neighborhood, 1908 sq ft "any preference, limitation or 2 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, Harley Davidson Heritage Soft discrimination based on race, Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras mountain views from Bachcolor, religion, sex, handicap, incl. pipes, lowering kit, elor to Hood, $279,900; 3% familial status, marital status chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. Courtesy to agents. or national origin, or an in541-944-9753 541-215-0112 tention to make any such preference, limitation or disFind exactly what crimination." Familial status you are looking for in the includes children under the age of 18 living with parents Harley Davidson Police Bike CLASSIFIEDS or legal custodians, pregnant 2001, low mi., custom bike women, and people securing very nice.Stage 1, new tires custody of children under 18. Looking for your next & brakes, too much to list! This newspaper will not employee? A Must See Bike $10,500 knowingly accept any adverPlace a Bulletin help OBO. 541-383-1782 tising for real estate which is wanted ad today and in violation of the law. Our reach over 60,000 readers are hereby informed readers each week. that all dwellings advertised Your classified ad will in this newspaper are availalso appear on Harley Davidson Ultra able on an equal opportunity bendbulletin.com which Classic 2008, clean, lots basis. To complain of discurrently receives over of upgrades, custom exhaust, crimination call HUD toll-free 1.5 million page views dual control heated gloves & at 1-800-877-0246. The toll every month at vest, luggage access. 15K, free telephone number for no extra cost. $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975. the hearing impaired is Bulletin Classifieds 1-800-927-9275. Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com What are you

To advertise, call 541-385-5809

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

G4 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

931

932

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Antique and Classic Autos

Snow Tire Chains, Les Schwab Quick connects, $40, 503-933-0814, local. Tires, Studded, 14”, used 1 month, $200, 503-933-0814, local. We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, up to $500, and scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Wheels, new 3/4-ton 16” Chevy Pickup Alloys, w/center caps, (4), $300. 541-382-6151 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

932

Antique and Classic Autos C-10

Pickup

1969,

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

932

933

933

935

935

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

What? $6,000 Below Blue Book!!

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $3850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

933 CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new Chevy Wagon 1957, parts and maintenance 4-dr., complete, $15,000 records. New tires, underOBO, trades, please call dash air, electronic ignition 541-420-5453. and much more. Original Need help ixing stuff paint, truck used very little. around the house? $5700, 541-575-3649 Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Ford F250 Crewcab XLT 2006 63K Miles! Diesel, 4X4, and Warranty! Vin #B52917

Now Only $24,577

541-389-1178 • DLR

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $12,000, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Ford Ranger Super Cab 2008

366

Jeep Cherokee Limited, 2003, like new, low miles. Divorce forces sale, $10,500. Call 541-923-0718

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-CD, new tires, 107K miles, $11,500 firm. 541-420-8107

4 Cyl., Auto XLT, 20K Miles! Warranty! Vin #A22444

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford F250 Super Duty, Crew Cab, 2005, diesel, 4WD, long bed, auto trans, AC, 124K miles, $18,500 OBO, (541) 480-6631

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $12,900. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford 2 Door 1949,

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2000. 541-322-6261 Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

99% Complete, $14,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Sport Utility Vehicles Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Smolich Auto Mall

Cadillac Escalade AWD 2007 Sale Price $34,997

HYUNDAI

Sale Price $21,887

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

HYUNDAI

Special Offer

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings.

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Smolich Auto Mall Special offer

Ford F450 Crewcab Lariat 2006 117K Miles! Diesel, Leather, and Loaded! Vin #B62415

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Now Only $21,000

Nissan Armada 4X4 2004

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

88K Miles! Vin #705275

smolichmotors.com 366

Best Value $17,345

Dodge Nitro AWD 2007

Get your business

43K Miles! Warranty! Vin #664645 FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Sale Price $14,775

NISSAN

GRO W

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Chevy El Camino 1979, Mercedes 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

FORD F150 4X4 1996

46K Miles! Gas Miser with a Warranty! VIN #295800

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

ING

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Chrysler PT Cruiser 2009 40K Miles!, Warranty! VIN #567013

Now Only $9,999

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

The Bulletin's

366

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

With an ad in

HYUNDAI

541-749-4025 • DLR Eddie Bauer pkg., auto. 5.8L, Super Cab, green, power everything, 156,000 miles. Fair condition. Only $3500 OBO. 541-408-7807.

Chevy Cobalt 2008

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

366

smolichmotors.com Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Special Offer

30K Miles! Warranty! Vin #768219

541-389-1178 • DLR

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $12,900 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Smolich Auto Mall

975

Automobiles

Jeep Wrangler UNLIMITED 2009

NISSAN

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

2004,

Now Only $9,999

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

Special Offer

41K Miles! Loaded, Leather, and DVD. Warranty! Vin #140992

LeSabre

white, 115k, cloth interior, 80% tires, all factory conveniences okay, luxury ride, 30 mpg hwy, 3.8 litre V6 motor, used but not abused. Very dependable. and excellent buy at $5,400. Call Bob 541-318-9999 or Sam at 541-815-3639.

Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, 5-spd., exc. cond., consider trade, $7950, please call 541-593-4437.

935

Special Offer

Buick

Vans

366

Smolich Auto Mall

mi, $1800 obo 541-318-6919

940

Now Only $11,350

NISSAN

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007, 10K miles, running boards, many options, tow package, $18,500 OBO. 541-815-5000

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

control, heated seats, Premium audio, rubber floor mats, 2 sets wheels, (1 winter), 108,000 miles, all records. Good condition. $9,500. Call Bruce 541-516-1165.

Honda Pilot 2010 Like new, under 11K, goes great in all conditions. Blue Bk $30,680; asking $28,680. 541-350-3502

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

SUBARU FORESTER 2003 Buick LeSabre, 1985, exclnt shape, always garaged, 93K XS leather, auto climate

Pickups

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Utility Trailer, mini 4X4 for garden or ?, $100, 503-933-0814, local. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

"Call A Service Professional"

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Directory

Cute as a Bug! Black 1965 VW BUG in Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, February 24, 2011 G5

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

MERCEDES C300 2008

Dodge Charger 2010 1K Miles! HOLY COW! VIN #153773

And Only $18,345

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007 All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $18,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT- Perfect, garaged, factory super charged, just 1623 miles $20,000. 541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Nissan Altima 2009 42K Miles! Warranty! VIN #409030 Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Now Only $13,799

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Nissan Cube 2009 24K Miles!, Warranty! VIN #105716

Now Only $12,998

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Smolich Auto Mall

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Special Offer

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Lexus IS250 2007 25K Miles! Warranty! Vin #023074

Sale Price $22,720

Saturn Aura 2007 HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

43K Miles! Warranty! Vin #277013

Now Only $10,450

Lincoln MKZ 2010 4800 miles, AWD, loaded incl Nav, must sell. 541-610-3083

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

SUBARUS!!!

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Smolich Auto Mall 541-322-7253

Special Offer

Mazda Miata 1999 39K Miles! Warranty! Vin #128198

Sale Price $8,999

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Sell an Item

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Toyota Tercel 1997 exc. cond, one owner, 136,300 miles, $2700, Please Call 541-815-3281.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE PROJECT: Renovations to the Sherman County Courthouse. BIDS DUE: March 22, 2011, 1:30 pm PST, County Clerk's Office, Room 103, Sherman County Courthouse at which time bids will be opened and read aloud in Circuit Court Room 203. ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: Sealed bids will be received by Ron McDermid, Sherman County Courthouse Facilities Committee Member. Bids shall be per Construction Documents prepared by Daryl Sieker Architect, LLC. Construction Documents may be examined on or after February 22,2011 at the Sherman County Clerk's Office, Room 103, and selected plan centers. Sets of Construction Documents may be obtained by prime bidders for the cost of reproduction and shipping from Clackamas Blueprint, 10788 SE Hwy 212, Clackamas, OR 97015, 503-657-0353, on or after February 22,2011. Bidders are strongly advised to attend a pre-bid conference at the Sherman County Courthouse, February 25,2011 at 1:30 pm PST, Circuit Court Room 203. Bid Package No. 1 with Alternative lA pertains to HVAC systems and associated work and involves federal funds from American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) as administrated by the Oregon Department of Energy (O.D.O.E.). Bid Package No. 2 with Alternative 2A pertains to removal and replacement of windows, installation of telecommunication cabling, installation of an emergency generator, and all work associated with these items. Work for both packages will be paid at prevailing rate of wage. No bid will be considered unless accompanied by a certified check, cashier's check, or a satisfactory Bid Bond made out to Sherman County in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the total of all Bid Packages and Alternates. The successful bidder will be required to obtain a one hundred percent (100%) Performance and Payment Bond. No bidder may withdraw his bid after the time set for opening thereof, unless the awarding of the Contract is delayed exceeding thirty (30) days. The Owner reserves the right to waive any formalities and to reject any or all bids, and the right to negotiate contract terms with the low bidder. Provisions required by ORS Chapter 279 shall be included in the Contract. The Owner will award the Contract within thirty (30) days of the bid opening.

given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 9, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 10, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3911364 02/17/2011, 02/24/2011, 03/03/2011, 03/10/2011

LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE BEND CITY COUNCIL PROJECT NUMBER: 10-244. APPLICANT: City of Bend. NATURE OF THE APPLICATION: Text amendments to the Bend Development Code to regulate wireless and broadcast communication facilities (e.g., cell towers, radio & t.v towers). APPLICABLE CRITERIA: Bend Development Code Section 4.6.200(B). PROPERTY LOCATION: Citywide. DATE, TIME, PLACE AND LOCATION OF THE HEARING: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. at 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR, in City Hall Council Chambers. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: The application, all documents and evidence submitted by or on behalf of the applicant and the application criteria are available for inspection at City Hall at no cost and will be provided at a reasonable cost. Seven days prior to the hearing a copy of the staff report will be similarly available. CONTACT PERSON: Aaron Henson at (541) 383-4885, ahenson@ci.bend.or.us. Send written testimony to the Bend City Council c/o CDD, 710 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701, or attend the public hearing and state your views. The hearing will be conducted in accordance with BDC Section 4.1.500. Any party may request a continuance, or to have the record held open. Failure to raise an issue at the hearing, in person or by letter, or failure to provide statements or evidence sufficient to afford the decision maker an opportunity to respond precludes appeal to LUBA on that issue.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031122922 T.S. No.: 11-00035-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TIMOTHY J. BOOHER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR NORTHWEST MORTGAGE GROUP, INC, as Beneficiary, recorded on May 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-33508 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 241218 LOT FOURTEEN (14), NORTHPOINTE PHASE I, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 18, IN CABINET G, PAGE 41, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20691 BEAUMONT DRIVE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$6,581.94 By this reason of said default

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031338916 T.S. No.: 10-10817-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JAYNE I HEYNE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR NORTHWEST MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-60824 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 248357 LOT TWENTY-THREE (23), ASPEN WINDS, PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 145 S 147 SW 25TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$8,852.67 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $310,520.74 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.66200% per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust Whereof, notice hereby is

the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $284,105.62 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 13, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 10, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3911178 02/17/2011, 02/24/2011, 03/03/2011, 03/10/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7849 T.S. No.: 1310671-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by David Mackenzie, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Co. Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of National City Bank of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated March 10, 2006, recorded March 21, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-19347 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 7 of Sunpointe, Phase III,

Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 21355 Puffin Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,372.34 Monthly Late Charge $57.15. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $223,932.23 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 19, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 12, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-365046 02/17/11, 02/24, 03/03, 3/10

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F519554 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999510076/WELTMANN Investor No: 175010739 AP #1: 165514 Title #: 100707860 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JAMES JOHN WELTMANN, TAMARA G. WELTMANN as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated April 13, 2005, Recorded May 2, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-26703 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: LOT SIX, BLOCK ONE, LOVESTONE ACRES, FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 3 PYMTS FROM 08/20/10 TO 10/20/10 @ 179.97 $539.91 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$539.91 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 64340 CROSSWINDS RD., BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $49,975.13, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 07/20/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on March 29, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/19/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 927277 PUB: 02/10/11, 02/17/11, 02/24/11, 03/03/11

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105172 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Steven R. Carter and Martha J. Carter, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 31, 2007, recorded February 8, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 08237, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirty-Four (34), Westbrook Village, Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61641 Kaci Lane, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,336.54, from December 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,416.77, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and

payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $301,349.19, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.982% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee appeared on January 20, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continued the trustee's sale to February 22, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon; on February 22, 2011, the undersigned trustee will appear and continue the trustee's sale to March 23, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or

had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee"

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L519436 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017568/BRYAN AP #1: 197266 Title #: 100698719 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RACHEL J. BRYAN as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TTILE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated August 29, 2006, Recorded September 7, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-61238 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 30, OF ALPENVIEW ESTATES, PHASE II, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 12 PYMTS FROM 12/01/09 TO 11/01/10 @ 1,442.54 $17,310.48 12 L/C FROM 12/16/09 TO 11/16/10 @ 58.37 $700.44 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $66.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$18,076.92 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 448 NE ALPENVIEW LANE, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $172,956.65, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 11/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 4, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/24/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 927842 PUB: 02/17/11, 02/24/11, 03/03/11, 03/10/11

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L519449 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018798/EARWICKER Investor No: 4005114642 AP #1: 183215 Title #: 100698723 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by BRENT M EARWICKER, VIRGINIA E EARWICKER as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated November 7, 2006, Recorded November 14, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-75412 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,071.56 $5,357.80 5 L/C FROM 05/16/10 TO 09/16/10 @ 44.33 $221.65 2 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 11/01/10 @ 1,071.56 $2,143.12 2 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 11/16/10 @ 44.33 $88.66 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $132.99 IMPOUND/ESCROW DEFICIT $690.88 PLUS RECOVERABLE BALANCE $52.50 $52.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$8,687.60 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1283 NE PURCELL BLVD #2, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $136,657.31, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 4, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/24/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 927841 PUB: 02/17/11, 02/24/11, 03/03/11, 03/10/11

G6 Thursday, February 24, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: - By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105172 ASAP# 3901238 02/10/2011, 02/17/2011, 02/24/2011, 03/03/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105163 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Jessica Knight and Joseph McMahon, not as tenants in common but with rights of survivorship, as grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for American Brokers Conduit, as Beneficiary, dated April 1, 2006, recorded April 13, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 25154, beneficial interest having been assigned to Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT Series 2006-6 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot 33, Hayden Ranch Estates, Phases 2 and 3, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1265 N.E. 3rd Street, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,305.16, from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $162,023.28, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will appear on February 10, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continue the trustee's

sale to March 23, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: - By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105163 ASAP# 3901279 02/10/2011, 02/17/2011, 02/24/2011, 03/03/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6986 T.S. No.: 1290541-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jennifer Shea, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Wealthbridge Mortgage Corp., as Beneficiary, dated April 17, 2007, recorded April 26, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-23954 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A TRACT OF LAND LYING IN THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (W1/2 SE1/4) OF SECTION EIGHT (8), TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12) EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTH QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 8; THENCE NORTH 89°52'48" EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 8, 1025.40 FEET; THENCE NORTH 25°08' WEST ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF THE BEND-TUMALO STATE HIGHWAY NO. 20, 1982.84 FEET (SOMETIMES SHOWN AS 1,974.85 FEET) TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAME BEING THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF THE NANCY HOEFLING TRACT DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED NOVEMBER 2, 1989, IN BOOK 195, PAGE 2320, DESCHUTES COUNTY, RECORDS; THENCE CONTINUING NORTH 25°08' WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, 255.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF THE JAMES N. SAUL, ETUX TRACT, DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED MARCH 17, 1989, IN BOOK 180, PAGE 1509, DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS; THENCE NORTH 83°10' EAST, 558.76 FEET ALONG THE SAUL SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER THEREOF; THENCE SOUTH 04°09' WEST, 99.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 42°06' EAST, 105.23 FEET TO THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF THE AFOREMENTIONED HOEFLING TRACT; THENCE SOUTH 76°37'20" WEST ALONG HOEFLING'S NORTHERLY BOUNDARY, 524.14 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION CONVEYED IN INSTRUMENT RECORDED MAY 03, 1977, IN BOOK 249, PAGE 657, DEED RECORDS. NOTE: This legal description was created prior to January 1, 2008. Tax Parcel Number: 113086 Commonly known as: 63743 Scenic Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,918.17 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $273,278.94 together with interest thereon at 6.125%

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L519426 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018862/PLEASANT Investor No: 4005807999 AP #1: 246124 Title #: 100698724 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JOSHUA A PLEASANT, SUEANN P PLEASANT as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated February 13, 2008, Recorded February 21, 2008 as Instr. No. 2008-07742 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWENTY-TWO (22), SOUTH VILLAGE, RECORDED OCTOBER 13, 2004,IN CABINET G, PAGE469, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 06/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,214.08 $4,856.32 4 L/C FROM 06/16/10 TO 09/16/10 @ 52.67 $210.68 2 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 11/01/10 @ 1,211.49 $2,422.98 2 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 11/16/10 @ 52.67 $105.34 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $158.01 PLUS RECOVERABLE BALANCE $25.50 $25.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$7,778.83 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 61012 BORDEN DRIVE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $177,602.92, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 05/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 4, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/24/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 927844 PUB: 02/17/11, 02/24/11, 03/03/11, 03/10/11

per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 12, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than

such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 04, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-363173 02/03, 02/10, 02/17, 02/24

Public Notice Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Public Notice and Comment: As required by federal law, the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) is opening its annual applications for IDEA funds for public review for sixty days, beginning Friday, February 25, 2011, and ending Monday, April 25, 2011. ODE will accept public comment on these applications for thirty days, beginning Sunday, March 27, 2011, and ending Monday, April 25, 2011. Find copies of these applications and directions for submitting comments at http://www.ode.state.or.u s/search/results/?id=260 or by calling Rae Ann Ray at (503) 947-5722, or Alan Garland at (503) 947-5759. IDEA is a federal law governing special education services and federal funding for eligible infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities across the country. In the 2009-2010 school year these funds helped support special education or early intervention services for almost 83,000 Oregon children with disabilities.

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L519445 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017572/RUSSELL Investor No: 4001834115 AP #1: 127257 Title #: 100698720 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by KIM A. RUSSELL, KATHARINE J. RUSSELL as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES as Beneficiary. Dated August 23, 2001, Recorded August 29, 2001 as Instr. No. 2001-42481 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: PARCEL NO. 1 OF PARITION PLAT NO. 1993-7 FILED JANUARY 28, 1993 AND BEING LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST ONE QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 11 PYMTS FROM 01/01/10 TO 11/01/10 @ 1,806.55 $19,872.05 11 L/C FROM 01/16/10 TO 11/16/10 @ 90.33 $993.63 IMPOUND/ESCROW DEFICIT $12,945.81 RECOVERABLE BALANCE DUE IN THE AMOUNT OF $66.00 $66.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$33,877.49 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 16570 SERPENTINE DRIVE, LAPINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $244,334.84, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 12/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 4, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/24/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 927843 PUB: 02/17/11, 02/24/11, 03/03/11, 03/10/11

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L519360 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017570/BENTLEY Investor No: 4002617277 AP #1: 166355 Title #: 100695739 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by HAROLD E. BENTLEY JR. as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE CO. as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated November 21, 2002, Recorded November 22, 2002 as Instr. No. 2002-65696 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SE1/4 NE1/4) OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A 5/8" IRON ROD MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL 2 OF PARTITION PLAT RMP-82-3 ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, SAID POINT OF BEGINNING BEARS SOUTH 26ø54'05" WEST, 2,154.69 FEET FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13, E.W.M; THENCE FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING, NORTH 00ø24'51" WEST, 54.50 FEET ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID PARCEL 2 TO A 5/8" IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 89ø42'25" EAST, 137.94 FEET TO A 5/8" IRON ROD LOCATED ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID PARCEL 2; THENCE SOUTH 00ø24'42" EAST, 54.25 FEET ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY TO A 5/8" ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 2; THENCE SOUTH 89ø36'18" WEST, 137.93 FEET ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID PARCEL 2 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 10 PYMTS FROM 12/01/09 TO 09/01/10 @ 766.04 $7,660.40 10 L/C FROM 12/16/09 TO 09/16/10 @ 29.30 $293.00 2 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 11/01/10 @ 778.70 $1,557.40 2 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 11/16/10 @ 29.30 $58.60 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $66.00 $66.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$9,635.40 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 2038 SW 22ND STREET, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $87,774.26, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 11/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 4, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/23/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 927845 PUB: 02/17/11, 02/24/11, 03/03/11, 03/10/11

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-104222 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Herb H. Davidson and Beverly K. Davidson, husband and wife, as grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated September 15, 2006, recorded September 29, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 65873, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for WAMU Mortgage Pass Through Certificates Series 2006-PR6, as covering the following described real property: Parcel 2 of PARTITION PLAT NO. 2001-9, being a Partitioning of Lots 11 and 12, and a portion of Lot 10, Block 17, DAVIDSON ADDITION TO SISTERS, situated in n the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4) of Section 9, Township 15 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, City of Sisters, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 596 E. Jefferson Avenue, Sisters, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,152.71, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $372,465.23, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.381% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee appeared on January 10, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continued the trustee's sale to February 9, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon; on February 9, 2011, the undersigned trustee appeared and continued the trustee's sale to March 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon; on March 11, 2011, the undersigned trustee will appear and continue the trustee's sale to March 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: February 10, 2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104222 ASAP# 3910684 02/17/2011, 02/24/2011, 03/03/2011, 03/10/2011

Published 2-17-11

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Bulletin Daily Paper 02/24/11