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Washington Life

Miss D.C. Bindhu Pamarthi • Chance Mitchell • Max Major • Michael Haft Harrison Suarez • Patrick Dowd • Juan Coronado • Pari Bradlee and David Tafuri Celebs step out: Hugh Jackman, Amy Grant, Vince Gill, Peter Berg and Ed Asner David Rubenstein on mount vernon’s new library historic Patterson Mansion sells for $26 million

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44 contents

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n ov e m b e r 2 01 3

the style issue editor's letter................................. 10

fyidc INsider's guide......................................12 holiday gift guide. ............................14 who's next Leo and John Manzari...................18 social calendar November events...........20

point of view David Rubenstein on George Washington's presidential library.......................36 Mount Vernon Library Grand Opening.......................37

perfect pitch Bass-baritone Eric Owens......38 NHFA Noche de Gala...........................................39 J Street Gala........................................................40

book excerpt 'End of Days: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy'........................42 Woodrow Wilson Awards.........................................76

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NARAL Men for Choice........................................77

lifestyles

life of the party CharityWorks Dream Ball.......................................24 After Dark @ THEARC.......................................26 Harman Center Gala.............................................28 National Symphony Orchestra Season Opening.............28 PEN/Faulkner Foundation 25th Anniversary..............29 Wolf Trap Ball......................................................29

boulder crest 'Refuge for Heroes'..............78

FASHION editorial

'Midnight in Washington'.....................................44

men of substance and style & women of substance and style......52 that personal touch Personal shoppers.....60 runway to beltway Local stylists translate European fashion trends...............62

man up Spotlight on men's fashion........................64 globe-trotting attire Babette's travel-perfect pieces......................................66

pollywood

trend report 'Plaid Parade,'

Capital for Children Casino Night.............................79 Children's Law Center Benefit..................................80 James Beard Taste America........................................80 Leslie Cockburn Book Party.....................................81 Mercedes Benz CLA Launch...................................82 Caron Treatment Center's 'Recovery for Life'.................82 Periwinkle Anniversary Party....................................83 'Courage on Canvas' Exhibit Opening........................83

HOME Life

hollywood on the potomac

'Military March,' 'Stark Contrast"..........................68

inside homes John Leuders and Beth Larsons' modern McLean home.....................85

Children's Inn at NIH Congressional Gala..................33

Washington Social Diary

REAL ESTATE News

Congressional Coalition on Adoption Gala...................33

around town Love in the Air.......................74

embassy row 'Culture and Cricket'.................34

Friends in Time of War Gala....................................75

Common Sense Media Awards.................................35

EarthEcho Expeditions Launch.................................75

Defenders of Wildlife Conservation Awards...................35

DC Vote's 'Champions of Democracy'Awards...............76

'Hero Worship'......................................................32

Multimillion-Dollar Mansions...................................90

over the moon Historic Halls......................92 OPEN HOUSE Unique Finds.............................94 my Washington Under Armour Founder Kevin Plank..........................98

ON THE COVER: Miss DC 2013 Bindhu Pamarthi (photo by Tony Powell) TOP from LEFT: "Midnight in Washington" fashion editorial (Photo by Dustin Lilley, full crew credits inside). BURBERRY LONDON “Warborough” cashmere coat ($2,595), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA she wolf pump ($1,195), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St. NW, 202-342-0202, www.husonline.com; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Maria” gold link pearl earrings ($150), www. ibeautifulmiaelliott.com; H&M tights and belt, stylist’s own. Michael Haft and Harrison Suarez shot on location in Rock Creek Park (Photo by Joseph Allen). Hugh Jackman and Sen. Mary Landrieu at the 2013 Congressional Coalition Angels in Adoption Gala (Photo by Tony Powell). KATE SPADE NEW YORK terrace drive little nadine handbag ($398); Kate Spade, 3601 M St. NW, katespade.com

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WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| no v e m b e r

2013

| washingtonlife.com

T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Anne Kim-Dannibale MANAGINGEDITOR

Alison McLaughlin SENIOREDITOR

Kevin Chaffee ASSISTANTEDITOR

Laura Wainman CONTRIBUTINGWRITERS

David Rubenstein, James L. Swanson and Admiral William J. Fallon COLUMNISTS

Janet Donovan, Roland Flamini, Patrick D. McCoy,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor ART DIRECTOR

Matt Rippetoe CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Joseph Allen,Tony Brown, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores, Nick Ghobashi, Yassine El Mansouri,Tony Powell and Kyle Samperton

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

John H. Arundel ACCOUNTEXECUTIVES

Kaitlin Froelick and Sheila Menn BOOKKEEPER

Trina Hodges WEBTECHNOLOGIESDEVELOPMENT

Eddie Saleh,Triposs Mihail Iliev LEGAL

Mason Hammond Drake, Greenberg Traurig LLP INTERNS

Joanna Choe, Sofia Hassani and Natalie Lylo FOUNDER

Vicki Bagley CREATIVE DIRECTOR EMERITUS (*)

J.C. Suarès CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. *deceased

EDITOR’S LETTER

Substance and Style W

e constantly hear how we asked philanthropist David fashion in the nation’s Rubenstein to explain why capital will never compare to he supported construction of the “Big Apple” or L.A. Simply the outstanding new Fred W. put, we have a different style Smith National Library for the inside the beltway, but we Study of George Washington can no longer be considered at Mount Vernon. conservative and dowdy.We now News about social scene is feel the freedom to dress with always a Washington Life staple, edge, creativity and playfulness. and this month’s coverage After all, the First Lady herself i n c l u d e s C h a r i t y Wo r k s is often seen sporting cutting“Obsidian Obsession” Dream edge designers and sleeveless Ball, After Dark @THEARC, numbers. This month’s selection National Hispanic Foundation Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Nancy Bagley, Rep. Donna Edwards of men and women of substance for the Arts’ Noche de Gala and Mort Halperin at the 2013 J Street Gala (Photo by Tony Powell) and style ranges from a dashing and Capital for Children’s Patton Boggs partner to the dapper CEO of the National Gay & Casino Night. Next month be on the lookout for our Holiday Lesbian Chamber of Commerce. issue featuring the glitz and glamour of the Meridian Ball, the If you saw a red-headed model dashing around the District at National Italian American Foundation Gala, Washington Ballet’s 2 a.m. wearing Valentino and McQueen, you need not have been “Unmask the Night” Masquerade, Fight Night and many more. alarmed. Our intrepid fashion team led by photographer Yassine On a personal and more serious note, I was humbled to receive El Mansouri worked ‘round the clock, searching Washington to the Tzedek v’ Shalom (peace and justice) Award along with the discover hidden gems. Who knew that Metro entrances, alleys and great Mort Halperin last month at the fifth annual J Street Gala. church steps could be so photogenic? I was honored to be introduced by Rep. Donna Edwards and We didn’t forget the masculine in our exploration of Washington surprised that Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who had just been style. How could we, with menswear trends becoming increasingly inducted into the Women’s Hall of Fame, came to honor J Street, evident on the bustling 14th Street corridor, H Street NE and other Mort and me. I believe that a two-state resolution is not only an trendy neighborhoods around town? You’ll find new stores and ethical outcome, it’s the best strategy for Israel to achieve a lasting inspiring bloggers to discover along with the latest fashion must-haves and secure peace. Extremists on all sides are working to prevent in an expanded four-page trend report that will have you expanding this from happening and want the peace process to fail. We must your closet in no time.With the holidays just around the corner, you let our senators and representatives know we’re behind them and will also want to refer to our gift guide which is full of bright ideas that we support a two-state resolution. It’s a national security issue for everyone in your life. and the time to lead and make tough choices for peace is now. This month we also have an exclusive excerpt from James L. Swanson’s latest book, which is set to be released November 12, “End of Days: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy,” that includes a touching excerpt from a hitherto unpublished letter written by Jacqueline Kennedy when she lived in Georgetown just after Nancy R. Bagley her husband’s assassination. In other news of a presidential nature, Editor in Chief Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

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WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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FYIDC TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington

Catch Idina Menzel’s first return to the stage since her Tony Award-winning role in “Wicked,” in this pre-Broadway world premiere of “If/Then.” Opening November 5 at The National Theatre, Menzel portrays Elizabeth, a woman on the verge of turning 40 who is starting fresh in “the ultimate city of possibility: New York.”The romantic musical is written by the Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning “Next to Normal” writing team of Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey, and plays in Washington until December 8 before heading to Broadway in March 2014. 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, $53-$178, www.thenationaldc.com.

Capital Food Fight

BATTLEOFTHECHEFS Don’t get it twisted: this annual fundraiser, which has raised more than $2 million for D.C. Central Kitchen, is not an invitation to throw your food, but rather a chance to watch four top local chefs be judged by a panel of culinary celebrities. Celebrate the 10th year of Washington’s premier chef battle on Monday November 11 at 6 p.m. as chefs Erik Bruner-Yang (Toki Underground/Maketto), Bertrand Chemel (2941 Restaurant), Spike Gjerde (Woodberry Kitchen/Artifact Coffee) and Anthony Lombardo (1789 Restaurant) face off to prepare the best dishes using a secret ingredient. While the chefs battle on stage, guests can nosh on samples from 75 local restaurants, including Barmini, Blue Duck Tavern, Del Campo, Jaleo, Le Diplomate, The Source and many more. José Andrés and Carla Hall serve as this year’s hosts. 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, $250, www. capitalfoodfight.org

Anchorman: The Exhibit

HE’SKINDOFABIGDEAL Newsman Ron Burgandy’s apartment smelled of rich mahogany and contained many leather-bound books. He had a voice that could make a wolverine purr and suits so fine that he made Sinatra look like a bum. Starting November 14, local residents will be able to see those suits for themselves at the Newseum’s latest installation, “Anchorman: The Exhibit.” As part of a partnership with Paramount Pictures and with a nod to the December 20 release of the sequel, visitors can view a number of the original props from the movie and pose for photos behind a re-creation of the KVWN-TV anchor desk. The signature burgundy anchorman suit that Will Ferrell wore in the Ron Burgandy role and other key items from the movie will also be on display,. Burgandy’s mustache brush, jazz flute, his IM #1 vanity plate, and a bottle of “Sex Panther” cologne will ensure the Newseum “stays classy.” 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW; $12.95 for children, $17.95 for seniors and $21.95 for adults, www.newseum.org.

Jazz Nights at Loews Madison

HANGINGWITHSOMEHEPCATS Wind down after a long week with smooth jazz every Friday and Saturday night from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the Postscript lounge at the Loews Madison Hotel. Local jazz pianist Chris Grasso curates this new weekend series featuring different performers every weekend. November kicks off with vocalist Julian Hipkins on Friday and saxophonist Marshall Keys on Saturday. 1177 15th St. NW, free, www.loewshotels.com.

hope is in style at toka salon

STYLINGTOENDDIABETES Join Toka Salon for a day of giving on November 18 from 1 to 7 p.m. as 100% of the proceeds from select services will go towards diabetes research in honor of National Diabetes Month. Choose from a haircut, voluminous styling, conditioning/color protection treament or clear glossing services, each for a $30 donation. 3251 Prospect St., NW, 202-333-5133, www.tokasalon.com 12

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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I D I N A M E N Z E L P H OTO BY M AT T H E W M U R P H Y; C A P I TA L F O O D F I G H T P H OTO BY E Z RA G R EG G/ D C C E N T RA L K I TC H E N ; R O N B U RGANDY PHOTO COURTE SY PA RAMOUNT PICTURE S AND FLUTE PHOTO BY SA RAH MERCIER/NEWS EUM/COURTE SY DREAMWORKS STUDIOS; LO EWS MADISON PHOTO BY KEVIN BURNS.

‘If/Then’ ASTARRETURNS

FYIDC | GIFTGUIDE

`32)78347,34 ` With gi-giving season just around the corner, we rounded up a selection of gis for everyone, from tots to travel bugs. 2);0=;)(7 TIFFANY & CO. bar set (price available upon request), Fairfax Square, 8045 Leesburg Pike,Vienna,VA 22182, 703-893-7700

CAPRESSO stainless steel espresso and cappuccino maker ($150); Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, blommingdales.com

KATE SPADE top hat ice bucket ($80), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, katespade.com

GEORG JENSEN cobra candlesticks ($225), Keith Lipert Gallery, 2922 M St. NW, keithlipert.com

',-0(6)2 JONATHAN ADLER father and son necktie set ($150), Jonathan Adler Georgetown, 1267 Wisconsin Ave. NW, jonathanadler.com

HAPE detachable wooden discovery spaceship and liftoff rocket ($120), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, saksfifthavenue.com

DEXTON pedal-operated roadster ($335), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, saksfifthavenue.com

TIFFANY & CO. yellow duck baby bank (price available upon request), Fairfax Square, 8045 Leesburg Pike,Vienna,VA 22182, 703-893-7700

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WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

P H OTO S C O U RT E SY O F E AC H C O M PA N Y

DOLCE & GABBANA boy’s tuxedo ($195), boy’s shortall with onesie ($450) and matching velvet bow tie ($130), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, saksfifthavenue.com

*%7,-32*%2%8-'7

JORGE ADELER dangle earrings ($17,895 ), 772 Walker Road, Great Falls,VA 22066, adelerjewelers.com

DRYBAR travel-sized VIP hair essentials pack ($25), Drybar Georgetown, 1825 Wisconsin Ave. NW, thedrybar.com

LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD one-of-a-kind 2.20-ct. Rubellite (Nigeria) ring set in 18K white gold with pave diamonds ($7,200), Liljenquist & Beckstead Jewelry Boutique, 1780M Tysons Galleria, McLean,VA, landbjewelry.com

JUICY COUTURE oversize gemstone drama necklace ($178), juicycouture.com CHRISTIAN DIOR sunglasses ($460), available at select Dior boutiques nationwide, 1-800-929-3467

;360(86%:)00)67 BLOOMINGDALE’S overnight bag ($600),The Men’s Store at Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, blommingdales.com

ZILLI briefcase in crocodile nubuck ($35,000), Zilli Tyson’s Galleria, 1767 M International Dr., McLean,VA 22102, zilli.fr

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TIFFANY & CO. Atlas cocktail watch ($23,400), Fairfax Square, 8045 Leesburg Pike,Vienna,VA 22182, 703-893-7700

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P H OTO CA PT I O N H E R E

ZILLI princess calfskin zipper tie set ($3,800), Zilli Tyson’s Galleria, 1767 M International Dr., McLean,VA 22102, zilli.fr

MICHAEL KORS top-zip jewel satchel ($398), Michael Kors Georgetown, 3105 M St., NW, 202-342-3103

FYIDC | WHO’SNEXT

WHO’S NEXT Leo and John Manzari, tap-dancing auteurs

Tap-dancing brothers John Manzari, 21, and Leo Manzari, 18, were discovered in 2010 by legendary hoofer Maurice Hines, who cast the duo in “Sophisticated Ladies,” the show-stopping production he starred in 30 years ago with his brother Gregory. With the upcoming “Maurice Hines Is Tappin Thru Life” at Arena Stage (Nov. 15-Dec. 29), the Manzaris return to their old stomping grounds with the man who discovered them and ready to welcome a new generation of dancers. HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE BACK WITH MAURICE HINES? HOW HAVE THINGS CHANGED? Leo: Though we’ve worked on separate projects since “Sophisticated Ladies” in Washington, Maurice has always been excited for our work, but being on stage with him in a full production again just makes the excitement all the better. John: We’re a bit more seasoned. We’ve performed a lot since then and have also developed a deeper relationship with Mr. Hines. All this comes through when we’re on stage. F O R  YO U R  U P C O M I N G PERFORMANCE YOU ARE JOINING MR HINES IN FINDING NEW TALENT HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE ON THE OTHER SIDE? ANY ADVICE? John: It’s a bit strange especially so early in our career. However, I’m honored that we’re going to be involved in the process. Our role is finding someone who can be on stage and truly hold his own. My advice is to relax and let the dance speak for itself. Leo: I am very excited to explore the talent in the D.C. area. Whoever is selected for this production has a lot to learn about the industry and some great challenges ahead of them, but I am very happy that we can get another person in the spotlight to help carry on this art form. I am mainly going to help

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ing consistently, it’s necessary to develop new steps, different phrasing, more shading, more range of motion, etc. This constant drive for innovation is what has changed the most. Leo: I’ve definitely tried to highlight my ballet technique by elongating my lines whenever I extend my arm or leg. The hours spent alone hoofing a cappella in my basement have improved my musicality. I’ve allowed my playful personality to shine through as well. WHATISTHEFUTUREOFTAP? DO YOU SEE MORE PEOPLE PERFORMINGIT? John: Tap isn’t at the forefront of pop culture, like hip-hop or contemporary [dance] at the moment, but it is slowly finding its way. Away from a broader audience, the art form has been able to evolve without the pressure and constraint that sometimes can be thrust upon artists. The future will unveil Leo and John Manzari (Photo courtesy Arena Stage) these new artists and ideas and redeMaurice pick a younger kid who will take fine the phrase “tap dance.” part in our production. I’ll look for charac- Leo: The future of tap goes way beyond teristics that I personally like to see in a per- the dance itself. I envision the dance to be former: close floor work with good posture showcased in modern films. The dance will definitely be prominent in the worldwide presented in its most genuine form. spread of Internet/websites such as Youtube, HOW HAS YOUR STYLE AS DANCERS Vimeo, etc. EVOLVED OVER THE YEARS? John: When I rehearse/perform, I try to expand WHAT’S NEXT FOR BOTH OF YOU? my vocabulary. When you’re perfor m- John and Leo: You’ll just have to wait and see.

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FYIDC | SOCIALCALENDAR

NOVEMBER

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S&RFOUNDATION’S ‘NIGHTNOUVEAU’ This inaugural event for young professionals to benefit the S&R Foundation begins with a murder mystery that will have guests putting their detective skills to work. Dancing follows. Evermay Mansion; 8 p.m.; blackand-white cocktail attire, or film noir chic; $200, $350 per couple; contact Kate Goodall, 202-298-6007, k.goodall@sandr.org.

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DCPUBLICEDUCATION FUND’SSTANDING OVATIONFORTEACHERS Applaud the District’s finest public school teachers at the annual “Standing Ovation for Teachers” with emcee Jim Vance and Gina Adams, Katherine Bradley, David Rubenstein and George Stevens Jr. sharing chairmen duties. The Kennedy Center; 6:30 p.m.; cocktail attire; $50$300; sponsorships start at $5,000; contact Lisa Jourdan, 202-636-8743, lisa@campbellpeachey.com.

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HEROINESIN TECHNOLOGY Enjoy cocktails, dinner and silent and live auctions at this benefit recognizing women philanthropists in the technology industry. Sabret Flocos and Rebecca CowenHirsch co-chair this year with winners across five categories chosen from the 2013 finalists. Hilton, Tysons Corner; 6 p.m.; black tie; $300; sponsorships start at $5,000; contact Marissa Nihill, 571-2572305, mnihill@marchofdimes.com.

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WINGS OF HOPE GALA Enjoy cocktails, dinner and dancing at this 5th annual gala, held in memory of Brenda MacDonald to raise funds for melanoma research. Trump National Golf Club; 6:30 p.m.; cocktail attire; $175; sponsorships start at $1,000; contact Chad MacDonald, cmacdonald@connectedservices.com.

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MARCHOFDIMES CHEF’SAUCTION More than 30 chefs, bartenders and vintners offer samples of their prized

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creations at this annual auction, which includes dining, entertainment, and travel and leisure packages. Expect appearances from chefs Robert Wiedmaier and Geoff Tracy as Chuck Kuhn, Raul Fernandez and Fred Schaufeld at the well as mixologists Frank 2012 Fight for Children’s Fight Night. (Photo by Tony Powell) Jones and Alex Bookless. The Ritz Carlton, 1150 22nd St. NW; 6:30 p.m.; business attire; ing dinner, dancing and auction bidding, with $200; sponsorships start at $5,000; contact Nicole Gina Adams serving as chairwoman. RitzVagnerini Dolan, 571-257-2307, ndolan@mar- Carlton, Washington D.C.; black tie or “Gatsby gowns”; $600; sponsorships start at $7,500; conchofdimes.com. tact Morgan Goodale, morgan@lindarothpr.com THELABSCHOOL CAPITALCITYBALL HONORS An open bar, live music, OUTSTANDING dinner and dancing are ACHIEVERSWITHLEARNING featured at this year’s ball benefiting CourtDISABILITIES Speaker of the House John Boehner will be ney’s House, Global Centurion and Urban present to honor those who have achieved ca- Light.These organizations help raise awareness reer success despite learning disabilities. This about the fight against human trafficking and year honors Connecticut Gov. Dannel Mal- modern day slavery. City Tavern Club; 8 p.m.; loy and marketing executive Tiffany Coletti black tie; $125; sponsorships start at $1,000; conTitolo. The National Building Museum; 5:30 tact Liz Sara, lsara@bestmarketing.net. p.m. reception, 7:30 p.m. dinner; black tie optional; STARLIGHT FOUNDATION’S $250; sponsorships start at $1,000; contact Tiffany TASTEOFTHESTARSBENEFIT Parry, events@labschool.org. Pay tribute to the late Curtin WinFIGHTFORCHILDREN’S sor III and the Starlight Children’s Foundation ‘FIGHTNIGHT’ MidAtlantic at this annual gala chaired by Mai About 2,000 government, and Jim Abdo featuring cocktails, dinner and business and entertainment leaders join sports The Red Baarat Band. Four Seasons Hotel; 6:30 legends to benefit Fight for Children at this p.m.; cocktail attire; $500; sponsorships start at annual event. Live professional boxing and $2,500; contact Whitney Gurner, 202-293-7827, other entertainment will be featured. Kevin whitney@starlight-midatlantic.org. Plank and Raul Fernandez serve as chairmen. Washington Hilton; 6 p.m.; black tie; $1,000; sponsorships start at $20,000; contact Jeff Travers, :/6321625('(9(176 202-772-0436, jeff.travers@fightforchildren.org.

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KNOCKOUTABUSEAGAINST WOMENBENEFIT Members of Congress join leaders in the philanthropic and business worlds to benefit victims of domestic violence. Andrea Roane emcees the 20th annual gala, featur-

DEC 8 KENNEDYCENTER HONORS DEC 15 THENUTCRACKERTEA PARTY DEC 16 CHORALARTSHOLIDAY CONCERTANDGALA

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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LIFE OF THE PARTY WL-sponsoredandExclusiveEvents|After Dark @ THEARC, PEN/Faulkner 25th Anniversary, Harman Center Gala and more!

Sara Schwartz and Leslie Hutchings at the CharityWorks “Obsidian Obsession” Dream Ball (Photo by Tony Powell)

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LIFE

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Jacques and Christine Gansler

Mark Lowham, Leah Gansler and Barry Dixon

Stan and Joey Sloter with Katherine and David Bradley

Jean-Marie and Raul Fernandez WL SPONSORED

Jeff and Christie Weiss with John and Monica Thompson

CHARITYWORKS DREAM BALL: ‘OBSIDIAN OBSESSIONS’ National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL SHOW STOPPER: Every CharityWorks Ball seems to outdo the previous one, and the 15th annual gli%ery evening of cocktails, dining and dancing was no exception with breathstoppers that included tightrope acrobats and models frozen in place. The high-end live auction featured such wallet-loosening items as golf with George W. Bush, a private tour of Jay Leno’s car collection, a VIP tour of Poland, helicopter rides over Manha%an, Jorge Adeler jewelry worn by race car driver Danika Patrick (for her) and pit access at NASCAR (for him). The creative brilliance of the 2013 “Obsidian Obsession” Dream ball was stewarded once again by chairmen Barry Dixon and Mark Lowham, who helped raise $2 million for Capital Partners in Education and Fisher House.

Steve and Keiko Kaplan with Annie Totah and Janet Barnett

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Scott and Patrice Brickman with Karen and Chris Donatelli

Will Thomas, Barbara Hawthorne and Joe Ruzzo

Joseph Podulso, Jeff Lockard, Andrew Smith and Adam Glickman

Gail West

Alex and Susan Mandl

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John and Elizabeth McGowan with Pat and Kim Harkin

Marilyn and George Pedersen WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Jack Davies and Kay Kendalls

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Jack Davies, Vadim Nikitin, Chairwoman Michelle Freeman and Kirstin Ehrgood

Raul and Jean-Marie Fernandez

THEARC Executive Director Edmund Fleet WL SPONSORED

AFTER DARK @ THEARC THEARC | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON

Lyn and Mark McFadden, Lizette Corro, Aaron Jackson and Kay Kendall

Bridgette Moussa-Adamo and Diplomatic Chairman Amb. of Gabon Michael Moussa-Adamo

BUILDING BRIDGES: The eighth anniversary of Aer Dark @THEARC was a huge success, grossing over $700,000 to benefit THEARC’s Building Bridges across the River programs, which help local disadvantaged children and teens. Chris and Lisa Smith served as presenting sponsors of this program, other sponsors include Kay Kendall, Jack Davies, Dalia and Hossein Fateh, event chairwoman Michelle Freeman, Paula and Robert Hisaoka, Anna Parisi-Trone and Robert Trone, as well as The Embassy of Gabon, with Amb. Michael Moussa-Adamo serving as this year’s diplomatic chairman. The over-500 a%endees were on hand to cheer for Dr. Rhonique Harris who was presented with the 2013 Bridge Builder Award for her accomplishments at the Children’s Health Center, an important program for THEARC.

Renee Esfandiary Crupi and Eric Crupi

Ellen Bennett, Mayor Vincent Gray, Bob Bennett and Rhona Friedman

Yolanda Caraway and Wendall Philips

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Virginia Shore, Elizabeth Lamott, Tom Hardart and Ross Lamont

Bob Hisaoka, Sylvia Taylor and Coutney and Abraham Strauss

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Bitsy Folger and Pandit Wright

Gene and Gina Adams Jennifer and Dave Whipp

Robyn and Andre Wells

Sarah and Ted Stettinius WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Barbara and Robert Liotta

Lori and Ben Soto

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Martha Ann Alito and Justice Samuel Alito

Michael Kahn, Elizabeth McGovern and Grace Curtis

Sen. Patrick Leahy and Marcelle Leahy

Rep. John Dingell and Beth Viehmeyer

Jane Harman, British Amb. Peter Westmacott and Lady Westmacott

Victor Shargai, Craig Pascal, Rep. Jim Moran and Conrad Cafritz

HARMAN CENTER FOR THE ARTS GALA Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton

Sidney Harman Hall and National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL ALL THINGS BRITISH: Gala guests enjoyed multi-disciplinary performances at Sidney Harman Hall, including a scene-stealing cello concerto from 12-year-old Sujari Bri , the “Aer the Rain” pas de deux by the Joffrey Ballet’s Fabrice Calmels and Victoria Jalani (which gave everyone goose bumps) and a hilarious musical comedy tribute to actress Elizabeth McGovern, recipient of the William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theatre. McGovern could be heard cracking up in the audience, and gave special commendations to the man portraying her husband, who she said was “spot on,” before benefactors headed across the street to a seated dinner at the National Building Museum where a Beatles cover band rocked the house.

Nora Pouillon, Kay Kendall and Eden Rafshoon

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Gala Chairmen Jay and Sydney Johnson with Kennedy Center Chairman David Rubenstein

Jane Roberts and Chief Justice John Roberts

Andrea Mitchell, Vicki Sant and Maestro Christoph Eschenbach

Yo Yo Ma and Thomas Friedman

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA GALA The Kennedy Center | PHOTOSBYMARGOTSHULMANANDYASSINEEL-MANSOURI

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NOCTURNAL HIGH NOTES: Symphony supporters gathered on the eve of the federal government shutdown to hear Maestro Christoph Eschenbach conduct an NSO program that included selections from Bizet’s “Carmen,” Tchaikovsky’s “Romeo and Juliet” and a wondrous performance by keyboard wünderkind Cameron Carpenter of the finale from Saint Saens’ “Organ Symphony” on the Kennedy Center Concert Hall’s new Rubenstein Family Organ. “Music can be beautiful. It can soothe people and make them feel be%er,” Kennedy Center Chairman David Rubenstein told the black-tie crowd, adding that all 535 members of Congress were invited to come for a concert — hopefully aerward something good can come of it.” WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Harrison Suarez with Read and Mary Wall

George and Emily Pelecanos, Lisa Page, Mary Haft and Debbie Dingell WL SPONSORED

Wendy Benchley, John Jeppson and Roxanne Roberts

Molly Elkin and Katharine Weymouth

PEN/FAULKNER FOUNDATION 25TH ANNIVERSARY Folger Shakespeare Library | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES LIVING LANDMARKS: Calvin Trillin and Susan Shreve entertained a rapt audience with stories about the leading literary lights who have been associated with PEN/Faulkner over the past quarter-century, including George Plimpton and Eudora Welty. Later, the 11 authors selected to give readings on the topic of “Renewal” — of vows, faith, friendships, contracts and even library books — took to the stage before joining guests for a feast in the Folger Library’s sumptuous reading rooms.

Sen. Patrick Leahy and Marcelle Leahy

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Irish Amb. Anne Anderson

Kyle and Roger Mody

Jeremy Bernard and Willee Lewis (Photo by James R. Brantley)

Sara Jaffe with Fred and Kim Humphries

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John Lee

Filene Center Stage | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL BIENVENUE À ARVIND MANOCHA: Considering that more than $1 million was raised, you’d never know it was only Arvind Manocha’s first Wolf Trap Ball, but the annual gala was indeed a celebration both of the performing arts center’s arts and education programs as well as its new president and CEO. The French-themed fête honored the accomplishments of the standout summer season, including 40-plus new artist debuts, a 12 percent increase in ticket sales and a moving performance of “Julie%e’s Waltz” from WT Opera Company alumna Mireille Asselin. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPolitics﹐Hollywood﹐MediaandDiplomacy|NHFA’s Noche de Gala, J Street Gala and more!

Hugh Jackman, Deborra-Lee Furness, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi at the Congressional Coalition Angels in Adoption Gala (Photo by Tony Powell)

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HEROWORSHIP The Daily Beast’s Tina Brown and stars of ‘Lone Survivor’ toast our men and women in uniform

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e’ve come more and more to see the honor of friendship and courage and grace under pressure,” Tina Brown said at the Washington screening of “Lone Survivor” after being asked why the military is getting so much respect in recent years — quite unlike what the “Haunted Generation” who served in Vietnam experienced. “Perhaps it’s because those qualities have fled out of every other part of our public sphere,” Brown said. “People have become more and more impressed by how the military is one section of American society right now that still seems to live by its code of country first and that’s very, very appealing. It’s almost like the only thing right now that works — the mission of these amazing men and women.” One of those missions was the failed June 28, 2005 “Operation Red Wing” upon which “Lone Survivor” is based. According to director Peter Berg, who was in attendance, the movie is about four members of SEAL Team 10 who were tasked with the mission to capture or kill notorious Taliban leader Ahmad Shahd. Marcus Luttrell, also in attendance, was the only member of his team to survive. He is brilliantly played by actor Mark Wahlberg. The film screening was the culmination of a days-long event at the Newseum billed as the second annual “Hero Summit: An Exploration of Courage, Character & Our National Security” that began with a morning coffee kick off by the engaging Sen. John McCain. We wondered if the timing of the summit was coincidental since the “shutdown” occurred almost simultaneously. Questions soon arose about how the shutdown and ongoing sequestration would impact military readiness, defense contractors, soldiers and

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Peter Berg, Tina Brown, Taylor Kitsch and Olivier Francois. (Photo by Janet Donovan)

their families. “We planned it for many months actually — for a year,” Brown added. “We did it last year as well. I did add a lot of interesting content in at the very last moment because as a journalist I love the response, so we actually moved in quite a lot of people in the last six days who also could address some of the more topical issues — a contrast in a sense between the military, what they do and how they step up and frankly how Congress doesn’t. That was kind of the underpinning of some of the panels.” The highlight panel was on “What Makes a Hero” with Gen. John Allen, New York Times columnist David Brooks, Chinese author Angie Ming and Wole Soyinka, the great Nigerian Nobel laureate. “It was an incredible mix of people,” Brown reiterated, all discussing how we define heroism in the 21st century? This closing discussion

examined courage in many realms — physical, moral, political, even intellectual — and asks, who are our modern heroes? As for the inclusion of the “Lone Survivor” screening into the program, Brown told us that she went to Peter Berg directly because she had heard great things about the movie and asked if she could have a screening. It was something she thought would be a great way to end the summit. The fact that Marcus Luttrell, the “lone survivor,” participated in the question-andanswer section following the screening was the highlight of both events. “I was blown away by the movie,” said Brown. “This movie, that no one has actually heard about yet since it is scheduled for a December release, is absolutely in the Oscar line up. Whether it wins or not, it has a very good chance.”

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Debbie Dingell and Rep. John Dingell Rep. Chris Van Hollen

Cokie Roberts, Carmala Walgren and Connie Morella

NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins and Jan Smith

THE CHILDREN’S INN AT NIH CONGRESSIONAL GALA Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL CELEBRATING 25 YEARS: The year 2013 marked the 25th anniversary of this gala, which celebrates “public and private sectors joining forces to build a community of love, care and support.” That community is The Children’s Inn at NIH, where young patients receiving cancer treatments can live with their families and have as close to a normal life as possible. This year’s event was co-chaired by Reps. Chris Van Hollen and Paul Ryan with congressional spouses Abigail Blunt and Debbie Dingell serving as dinner commi%ee chairwomen.

Abigail Blunt, Janet Waxman, Dr. Susan Blumenthal and Martha Ann Alito

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Ken Frazier and Sen. Pat Toomey

Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Sen. Mary Landrieu and Willie and Korie Robertson of “Duck Dynasty” WL SPONSORED

CONGRESSIONAL COALITION ON ADOPTION GALA

Deborra-Lee Furness and Hugh Jackman

Ronald Reagan Building | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL BIPARTISAN SUPPORT: There may be a major political divide in Congress these days, but one issue both sides can agree on is the importance of adoption, both for parents and children who need a loving home. Award-winning actor Hugh Jackman lent star power to the evening, spearheaded by Sen. Mary Landrieu and a%ended by many members of Congress. Also in a%endance were Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy, who adopted NFL offensive lineman Michael Oher when he was a teenager in need of a home — a story made famous by the Oscar-winning film “The Blind Side,” which highlighted the importance of adoption for children of all ages.

Paul Pelosi and Ben Barnes WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Rep. Suzanne Bonamici

Sen. Amy Klobuchar and New Orleans Saints owner Rita Benson LeBlanc

Rep. Tim Huelskamp and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director Alejandro Mayorkas

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POLLYWOOD | EMBASSYROW

Culture and Cricket Art collection revealed, shutdown blues and a summer sport BY ROLAND FLAMINI

have many more works in “reserve” than they do on show. Navia also wants to increase the storage space and introduce modern museum protective technology such as climate control and proper lighting. The estimated cost is $12 million, but the OAS doesn’t have the money to pay for it. “What we’re looking for is a partner,” says Navia, “an institution with which we could build a permanent relationship, and which would fund the museum’s renovation in return for access to the collection.”

“La Ultima Serenata” (The Last Serenade) by Argentine artist Emilio

OAS SHOW AND TELL: The Organization of American States is looking for funding for a new home for its dazzling, but little known collection of paintings, sculptures and other art works by Latin American and Caribbean contemporary artists.The OAS started buying art in 1957 as a form of cultural diplomacy to show off the rich diversity of artistic expression across its 35 member nations. Jesus Soto, Fernando Botero, Alejandro Obregon and Candido Portinari are among the leading artists represented in its permanent collection, which has grown from 250 works in the mid-1970s to more than 2,000 today and is now valued at $25 million. But there’s only enough space to display two percent of the works in the building currently designated as the OAS museum, says its director Andres Navia. So, the museum has commissioned architectural drawings for an all-glass extension that would increase the available exhibition area threefold to 6,700 square feet and would enlarge the works on permanent display to more than 10 percent of the total.That, incidentally, is a good average since most museums

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DIPLOMATIC CASUALTIES: The National Gallery of Art, like the Smithsonian, receives federal funds, and earlier in October had to close its doors on Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, culture minister Panos Panaglotopoulos, and a number of museum officials and art experts from Greece who had arrived to attend the Byzantine art exhibition official opening, which was canceled. “Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections” consists of around 180 ancient icons and artifacts on loan from Greek museums and other institutions, but the Greek visitors went home without even being allowed a private viewing. “I will not tell you that the shutdown has been pleasant or exciting,” Panaglotopoulos emailed from Athens. “The truth is that it caused problems for us.” In the larger scheme of things, the incident was marginal, but it was a long distance to come for no purpose! A BANGLADESH WIN: The distinctive slap of willow hitting leather in a game of cricket is hardly familiar in

the United States, but is one of the sounds of an English summer.Yet for one glorious Saturday in September it echoed across South Germantown Recreation Park in Maryland as the embassies of the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, India, South Africa, Sri Lanka, the West Indies and Bangladesh competed in the first ever Ambassador’s Cup Cricket Tournament. (Cricket bats are fashioned from willow, and the ball is polished red leather.) Cricket matches can last for up to five days, but in this tournament the teams were split into two groups and each game was limited to an hour. “Cricket is a force of unity in the world, it’s played on every continent, and is one of England’s greatest gifts to the whole world,” says New Zealand Amb. Mike Moore, whose embassy organized the tournament. The embassy of Bangladesh won the cup after beating in succession New Zealand, Sri Lanka in their group, and then Australia in the final. Australia scored 76 for 6 wickets in the 10 overs, and Bangladesh 77 runs for the loss of only one wicket. Puzzled? An ”over” consists of six balls bowled against a batsman who “defends” a wicket … Oh, never mind.

The victorious Bangladesh Cricket Team, winners of the first Ambassadors Cup Cricket Tournament (Courtesy Embassy of New Zealand)

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April Delaney, LeVar Burton, Karen Donnatelli and Anna Trone

Laurie Kusch, Rep. John Delaney and Katherine Bradley

Jim Steyer and David Bradley

Jean-Marie Fernandez and Jennifer Whipp

COMMON SENSE MEDIA AWARDS The Kennedy Center | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON SENSIBLE MEDIA: Nearly 400 guests a%ended this year’s invitation-only dinner to honor the visionary leaders helping kids succeed with new media and technology. LeVar Burton walked away with the Children’s Media Award, while Mark Edwards secured the Educator of the Year award and issued a call to action to parents to aid educator’s efforts in including technology in the classroom. ABC’s “Modern Family” was given the Best Family Media Award, and although the show’s stars, Julie Bowen and Ty Burrell, could not a%end, guests enjoyed their comedic video acceptance of the award. Sens. Edward Markey and Jay Rockefeller and Rep. Joe Barton were also honored for their public service. The evening ended on an inspiring note with a performance wri%en just for the night called “Tech: No Logic” dedicated to the art of the spoken word.

Jessica Rosenworcel and Linda Burch

Cory Garfin, Susan Crown, Kristen Kunkler and Fred Rucker

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David Wilcove Tomer Hasson, Tim Male and Dan Schory

Jamie Rappaport Clark and Ed Asner Caroline Gabel

Ruth Musgrave

DEFENDERS OF WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AWARDS Capital Hilton | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Holly Doremus and John Leshy

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Loretta Stadler and Mark Caylor

A WILD TIME: Two hundred and fiy Washingtonians helped raise $300,000 in the fight to protect gray wolves, sea turtles, panthers and other endangered species at this annual celebration of nature led by co-chairmen Ed Asner and Caroline Gabel with Animal Planet’s Jeff Corwin serving as master of ceremonies. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Nick Wiley, advocate Nathaniel Reed, Princeton professor David S. Wilcove and former Interior Department official John Leshy were given awards for their leadership in conservation causes. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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APRESIDENTIALLIBRARYFOR AMERICA’SINDISPENSABLEMAN The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington opens at Mount Vernon

David Rubenstein

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n 1787, shortly after retiring from the presidency, in a letter to a friend, James McHenry, his former secretary of war, George Washington expressed a desire to build a library. “I have not houses yet to build, except one,” he wrote, “which I must erect for the accommodation and security of my military, civil and private papers, which are voluminous and may be interesting.” More than 200 years have passed and Washington finally has his wish. On September 27, I traveled out to Mount Vernon for the opening of The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington. I supported this library because it places the first president in the spotlight in a powerful new way. In addition to safeguarding his original books and manuscripts, the library is also taking innovative approaches to educational outreach and leadership training; in this domain, Washington is an endless source of new material and a time-honored case study. After all, there is no American president who provides us a better example of selfless leadership and decisive action than our first president, who again and again put his own interests aside in order to answer the call of his country.

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Just as Washington’s life is inspiring, so considering what they read. An examination too is the story behind his library. Unlike of Washington’s books hints at his broad most presidential libraries, Mount Vernon’s approach to learning and reveals his wide new facility is funded entirely by more than range of interests, from gardening to military $106 million in private contributions from tactics to the classics. He was a man of the more than 7,000 individuals, foundations and enlightenment, and he believed that human corporations. This money was raised through beings could improve the world around them, the tireless work of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ in all spheres of life. He was never satisfied Association. Formed in the 1850s when the with the status quo. mansion had fallen into complete disrepair There is so much we can learn from and the government refused to act, the Washington — the single man most responsible Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association appealed for creating our country. But perhaps this to the American people to save the estate. commitment to improvement — of himself Throughout its 150-year history, and without and of his world — will point us to some of any government funding, the association has the most powerful lessons. He lived through a proudly carried out its mission to preserve complicated age of revolution but nevertheless Washington’s home and advance his legacy. worked for improvement for the public good. The association has been remarkably successful, I believe that every American citizen should welcoming more than one million visitors a know the story of the father of our country. year and cementing Mount Vernon’s position True to Washington’s words, the lessons he as the most visited historic home in America. learned, the notes he took, the books he With the opening of this library, George read, and the letters he wrote were no doubt Washington’s Mount Vernon begins a new “voluminous.” Through this library, we will chapter as a center for the creation and soon discover just how “interesting” and dissemination of new knowledge about timeless they can be. Washington and the era in which he lived. I am proud and honored to be a supporter of We can look forward to an impressive slate of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association and this symposia, lectures, conferences, and publications new library. I encourage all Americans, and all that shed new light on our nation’s founding. freedom-loving people, to visit Mount Vernon. We can also anticipate innovative programs that Their lives will be enriched by doing so. bring business, military and political leaders together to draw inspiration from Washington’s life. Those who access the library’s resources — either in person or digitally — will develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of the larger-than-life man on the dollar bill. After all, you can The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington tell a lot about a person by

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Amy Grant and Vince Gill (Photo by Alexander Morosov)

The New Library (Photo by Alexander Morosov) WL EXCLUSIVE

Melody Sawyer

GEORGE WASHINGTON LIBRARY GRAND OPENING Mount Vernon Estate | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON

Jon and Mary Kaye Huntsman with Jon Hunstman Sr.

FINAL WISH: George Washington had cities, monuments and museums erected in his honor, but history’s “Indispensable Man” had no presidential library until last month. His wri%en desire in 1797 for a home for his military, civil and private papers, “which are voluminous and may be interesting,” is now fulfilled, 216 years later. Donors coalesced to raise $106 million for the project, led by $70 million in gis from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, FedEx Founder Fred W. Smith and the Carlyle Group’s David Rubenstein and the 45,000-square-foot Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington is now open to scholars. On the eve of its dedication, 1,000 major donors were invited by the Mount Vernon Ladies Association and President/CEO Curt Viebranz to dine and dance under the stars, enjoy fireworks and hear a keynote speech by David McCullough. “His autobiography is not on paper,“ the noted biographer of America’s first president told the crowd. “His autobiography is in this place.”

Ross and Margot Perot

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Curtis Viebranz and Cokie Roberts

Hunt and Molly Burke

Alpha Blackburn and Gay Gaines

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Major and Pamela Reynolds

David McCullough

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CLASS ACT G BY PAT R I C K D. M C C OY

rammy Award-winning bass-baritone Eric Owens takes a break from rehearsing Bach’s “St. Matthew Passion” in Berlin to speak about his upcoming master class during the Renée Fleming-curated American Voices symposium at The Kennedy Center, his love of teaching and a possible new role in his career.

WASHINGTON LIFE: How does the American Voices symposium speak to you in addressing the current decline of the arts in our society? ERICOWENS You are catching me at a good time because I am all about arts education right now. Arts education in schools is not an extracurricular activity. When you read what the ancient philosophers and intellectuals had to say about music and how it informed everything that they did and that without it, they would be [less successful] in their other endeavors, you just want to grab people who don’t get that! A recent article in The New York Times listed several people who credited music for their success. It also talked about the importance of cooperation and creating harmony through a common good. You can see the effects of a decline in arts education in the way that we conduct ourselves with one another. People are unwilling to come together for a greater good. So when Renée asked me to do this, I jumped at the chance because doing master classes and working with young people is not work. That feeds me more so than actually performing. WL: Talk about that defining moment when you knew you wanted to be an opera singer. EO I was an opera fan long before I knew that it was a possibility that I could be a singer. I listened to the Met on the radio when I was 9 or 10 years old. I had this wonderful orchestra/ band director named Eleanor Alter. She lent me a recording of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” and I wore that record out. Then she gave me a recording of Weber’s “Der Freischütz” and I wore that out, too. In high school I sang in the choir and started taking voice lessons as a senior. I did both for a while, but then singing grabbed me and I thought there was more potential to being an opera singer, oddly

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enough, than auditioning to get into an orchestra. It’s hard because those jobs are very few and there are many people who want them that are very good and don’t even make the finals. You just have to go with your gut and know what it is you want. There is always room at the top even if it is crowded.

Eric Owens (Photo by Dario Acosta)

WL: As one of opera’s foremost singers, your voice has put you on some of the world’s greatest stages, but you’ve been exploring other aspects of your talent. EOAs an oboe player growing up, I played in a lot of orchestras and professionally freelanced with some performing chamber music. Ricardo Morales, the principal clarinetist of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and I met when we were kids. We played in this woodwind quintet together at Eastern Music festival in Greensboro, N.C. for a few summers. That connection to the orchestra gave rise to this interest in conducting. To this day, whenever I sing with an orchestra on stage, it feels like I am a member of it again. My interest developed more and I started delving into scores, trying to find out what certain instruments could tell me about my character that the opera libretto couldn’t. Then I thought it might be cool to conduct, but never with the intention of doing it professionally. About nine years ago, I took the conducting seminar at the Oregon Bach Festival with Helmuth Rilling. I was singing there, so I asked to apply to be one of the conducting fellows. It was a huge learning experience and I got the “bug” really hard again. There are some conducting engagements on the horizon, so I will be doing some conducting professionally. WL: In recent years, you have established yourself as a leading interpreter of

contemporary operas such as Elliott Goldenthal’s “Grendel” or John Adams’ “Dr. Atomic.” How do you navigate musical diversity without being pigeonholed into one musical genre or stereotype? EOIt was a good effort involving my saying “no” a few times. There was a season in which I sang three world premieres. I kept saying to my manager that people will want to put a label on me as the guy that does “new music.” I didn’t want to be that guy. We have to be very selective about when and how things come about as far as my engagement schedule. Any time I do a new piece, right after I do something standard. Some of it happened by chance. My Metropolitan Opera debut was in “Dr. Atomic,” but a month after that I was Sarastro in Mozart’s “The Magic Flute,” putting out there that, hey, I can do this, too! WL: Lastly, for something a little more fun. What’s on your iPod? EOIf you hit shuffle, chances are Bach is going to come up because that takes up threequarters of the darn thing. Eric Owens leads a master class on Friday, November 22 followed by a panel discussion moderated by soprano Renée Fleming at The Kennedy Center as part of American Voices, a festival celebrating the past, present and future of American singing.

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Rita Moreno Felix Sanchez and Rafael Fantauzzi

Esai Morales and Katelyn Gimbel

Jimmy Smits WL SPONSORED

NHFA’S ‘NOCHE DE GALA’ Renaissance Mayflower Hotel | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON SPANISH NIGHTS: Washington’s Hispanic community came out to toast legendary “West Side Story” star Rita Moreno, who accepted the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts’ Raul Julia Award. The colorful evening also featured moving tributes from younger Latinos crediting trailblazers like Moreno for paving the way, and rousing entertainment by Los Angeles-based MexicanAmerican band La Santa Cecilia singing their immigration-themed “El Hielo.”

Joe Avila

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Nicholas Gonzalez

Reem Sadik, Mignon Clyburn and Lyndon Boozer

Miss D.C. Bindhu Pamarthi WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Ruben Marinbach and Vivian Graubard

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Steve Clemons and Sen. Mark Udall

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Nicole Elkon and Philip Deutch

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Sen. Al Franken Trish Vradenburg

John and JoAnn Mason

OUR TIME TO LEAD: For its fih anniversary celebration, J Street hosted more than 2,800 pro-peace advocates, including Vice President Joe Biden, leading Israeli lawmakers from seven parties and 900 students for a four-day national conference culminating in a gala dinner honoring foreign policy expert Mort Halperin and Washington Life Editor Nancy Bagley with the Tzedek v’Shalom Award. Rep. Nancy Pelosi made a surprise appearance to congratulate the honorees and praise J Street’s work. More than 75 members of Congress a%ended the dinner, at which U.S. Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian negotiations Martin Indyk answered the question, “Why is this time different” in his optimistic keynote address. J Street President Jeremy Ben-Ami announced the launch of the 2 Campaign — a $1 million initiative to grow the constituency for peace and educate the pro-Israel community regarding tough decisions Israeli and Palestinian leaders will have to make in order to reach lasting peace. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Irene and Alan Wurtzel

Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse and Sherrod Brown Rep. John Conyers

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Emilie and Zbigniew Brzezninski

Sen. Martin Heinrich

Ami Aronson

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com Reps. Terri Sewell and Lloyd Doggett

Rep. Lois Capps

Rep. Charles Rangel

Rep. Jared Polis, Sarah Kovner and Rep. Paul Tonko

QUOTABLE NOTABLES FROM THE CONFERENCE AND DINNER “As far as Israel is concerned, our great constituency for peace must continue to stand behind a clear vision: two states for two peoples. A secure Israel living side by side with an independent state for the Palestinian people.” — House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi Mariella Trager

Rep. Patrick Murphy

Sen. Maria Cantwell

“We set out five years ago to ensure that our political leaders here in Washington would hear loudly and clearly a new voice speaking on behalf of pro-Israel Americans. And I am proud to say that today, that voice is being heard.” — J Street President Jeremy Ben-Ami “Now is the time to stand up and tell your elected leaders that peacemaking has your Jeremy Ben-Ami support. That peace is vital both for America’s and Alexandra Stanton interest and for Israeli security … We are looking at a very short timeframe. By the time you convene again in Washington next year, the leaders will have had to decide whether they are going to go for a final peace deal or not. So what you do today and tomorrow and in the coming weeks and months is critical.” – U.S. Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations Martin Indyk “I believe this very moment may offer the best opportunity for peace … For the first time, both sides are talking directly and both sides have taken some risk to get where it is today.” — Vice President Joe Biden “We can love Israel and at the same time fight for peace. More than that, those who love Israel must search for peace … [The two-state solution is] not a favor to the Palestinians, to the Arab world, to President Obama… It’s in our interest.” — Chief Israeli Negotiator Tzipi Livni

Dr. Ahmad and Judy Esfandiary Annie Totah

“This time it’s different because everybody involved knows that we have a very limited window.”— Senior Fatah Official Husam Zumlot “The two-state solution is the only viable solution for us … it is in our strategic economic interest and moral interest” — Knesset Opposition Leader Shelly Yachimovich “From day one, I’ve told Prime Minister Netanyahu personally and privately, you have a mandate to reach a historic compromise.” — Meretz Leader MK Zehava Galon “We know the two-state solution is the only relevant solution.” — Likud MK Tzachi Hanegbi

| N O V E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com Reps. Bill Foster, Annie Kuster, Jan Schakowsky, Robin Kelly, Rush Holt and Carol Shea-Porter

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EXCLUSIVEEXCERPT

TRAGICHOMECOMING Jacqueline Kennedy tried to re-start her life when she and her children moved to Georgetown after her husband’s assassination B Y J A M E S L . S WA N S O N

James L. Swanson’s “Manhunt:The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer” was a New York Times bestseller and became mandatory reading for official Washington. Its fans included President George W. Bush, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Speaker of the House John Boehner. Now, for the 50th anniversary of the death of President John F. Kennedy, Swanson returns with “End of Days:The Assassination of John F. Kennedy,” a gripping account of the murder and its aftermath. In the style of a true crime thriller, the author covers not only the death of the president but also the saga of Jackie Kennedy. Here, in an exclusive excerpt that includes a hitherto unknown and previously unpublished Jackie letter, Swanson recounts her heartbreaking return to Georgetown.

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ven before the funeral, Jacqueline Kennedy decided that she did want to remain living in the White House for long. Her memories of happier times haunted her. She wanted distance from them. Despite President Johnson’s gracious invitation to remain as long as she wished, Jackie wanted to be out of the White House within two weeks of the assassination. But she had nowhere to go. She longed to return to her old neighborhood in Georgetown, but she and the president had sold their house at 3307 N. Street NW after the election. On the night of the assassination, on November 22, 1963, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara had offered to get it for her. “That first night [he] said he’d buy back our old house in Georgetown. That was the first thing I thought that night – where will I go? I wanted my old house back.” But she chose not to take advantage of McNamara’s heartfelt gesture. “I thought – how can I go back to that bedroom? I said to myself – you must never forget Jack, but you musn’t be morbid.” W. Averell Harriman, the famous American diplomat and elder statesman who had held several posts in the Kennedy administration, offered Jackie the use of his elegant residence at 3038 N Street NW, a few blocks from the old Kennedy place. She accepted the offer. At the White House, Jackie packed Caroline and John Jr.’s toys, books and clothing into cardboard boxes that she labeled herself

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with marking pens. She instructed artisans to mount a plaque to the marble mantle in the president’s bedroom: “In this room lived John Fitzgerald Kennedy with his wife Jacqueline during the two years, ten months and two days he was President of the United States.” Then she handwrote thank you notes to members of the White House staff. Jackie’s self-imposed two-week deadline for moving out fell on Friday, December 6. On the day she left the presidential mansion, she left a note and flowers for Lady Bird Johnson, the new First Lady. She and John Jr. paid a farewell call on White House usher B.C.

West. They posed with him in his office for a photograph. The boy sat on the desk while Jackie, putting on a brave face for the camera, smiled. But she wore a black dress. In other photos taken of her that day, she did not smile. Then Jacqueline Kennedy left the White House, returning to her beloved Georgetown, where her life with Jack had begun. She vowed never to set foot in the presidential mansion again. Now she was back on familiar ground and took comfort in it. In her first few days in the Harriman house, she enjoyed private visits from intimate friends, including Attorney General Robert Kennedy. On December 11, the McNamaras sent over a gift to Jackie at the Harriman place. It was an oil painting of President Kennedy by the artist Charles Fox. When Jackie unwrapped it, she was shocked. She was not expecting it. And she did not want it. It was not an issue of whether she liked it. She could not bear to look at it. It was too painful. She sent a handwritten letter asking forgiveness for declining a gift “from the man in his cabinet who gave the most (as much as Jack’s own brother Bobby gave)” to JFK. Jackie explained: “I am in strange locking of horns with where I am sure the Secretary of Defense and his wife can outwit me. PLEASE I don’t want you to give anything more for Jack – you gave him all – and my consolation is that he will be remembered as great – because of Bob McNamara.”

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The widow confided that she could not even bear to display photos of her late husband. “The only photograph I have here of Jack is where his back is turned.” She did not hang the oil painting. The picture stayed on the floor, “propped up against the wall at the little study outside my bedroom.” But the president’s three-year-old son could not take his eyes off the portrait. “Tonight,” Jackie wrote, “John came out of my bedroom with a lollipop in his mouth. The picture … was right in his way – and he took the lollipop out and kissed the picture and said Goodnight Daddy.” That broke her heart. Jackie warned McNamara “Mr. Fox may find sugary imprints he never painted in, on that picture, but you see why we could never bear to have it near us – it brings to the surface too many things.” Jackie suggested that the McNamaras take back the painting and donate it to the Kennedy Library several years down the road, after the institution was built. “So if you wish to give it to the Library and keep it till then, it would be such an honor – but what I would love most of all – is if both of you who have given so much would give nothing more – except your friendship always.” Jackie decided to make Georgetown her permanent home, so in February 1964 she bought a house at 3017 N Street NW. She wanted to live a quiet life. She wanted to stroll the streets of Georgetown, visiting her favorite bookshops, florists, antique shops, and corner groceries as she did in the old days when Jack was a senator. But her home became a tourist attraction. Gaping passersby hoped to get a glimpse of Jackie through a window, or encounter her on the sidewalk. Photographers staked out the house day and night, hoping to snap a saleable picture of the widow and he children. She had become an American heroine and a public obsession. She was a prisoner in her own home, unable to step outside without taking the risk that intrusive – and possibly dangerous – strangers might accost her in the street. She hoped that public fascination with her might die down, but every month the harassment got worse. In July 1964 Jacqueline Kennedy announced that she was selling her Georgetown home. She had moved in less than five months ago. Not only that – she was abandoning Washington. Her decision shocked the political and social elites of the nation’s capital. Less than a year after the assassination, in an attempt to reclaim her private life, she said goodbye to her Washington days and moved to New York City, where she had spent many happy times before her marriage. But that did not end the obsession. For the rest of her life, Jacqueline Kennedy remained an icon, forever an unwilling star in the spotlight on the American stage. From “End of Days:The Assassination of John F. Kennedy” Copyright 2013 by James L. Swanson.

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President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy arrive on Air Force One at Love Field in Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963.

President Kennedy in the Oval Office of the White House with his children Caroline and John Jr.

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LIFESTYLES | FASHIONEDITORIAL

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KATE SPADE “Briella” fur collar coat ($798) and FRENCH CONNECTION beaded floral dress ($398), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240-744-3700; BOTTEGA VENETA suede collar pumps, Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202, www.husonline.com; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Flora” rhinestone button earrings ($150), Soliloquy Bridal Boutique, 745 Elden St., #103, Herndon, VA 20170, 571449-2580; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Frya” gold chain necklace with onyx pendant ($265), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240-744-3700; H&M tights, stylist’s own. Photographed at the Farragut North Metro Station.

TORY BURCH navy fur capelet ($1,795), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240-744-3700; ALEXANDER MCQUEEN silk Victorian blouse ($2,385) and BURBERRY LONDON “Taverham” cigarette leg pants ($395), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301657-9000; PIERRE HARDY suede elastic peep toe booties ($1,295), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202342-0202, www.husonline.com; TIFFANY’S black onyx, diamond and platinum ring ($20,000), 8045 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, VA 22182, 703-893-7700; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Holland” vintageinspired bangles ($200), Soliloquy Bridal Boutique, 745 Elden St., #103, Herndon, VA 20170, 571-449-2580; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Cocoa” 9-strand pearl and rhinestone necklace ($475), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250. Photographed at National City Christian Church

BOTTEGA VENETA double cashmere belted coat ($6,890), Hu’s Wear, 2906 M St., NW, 202-342-2020, www.husonline. com; GIVENCHY shark lock calf booties ($1,395), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202, www.husonline.com; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Bennie Bib” silver rhinestones and Swarovski crystal necklace ($270), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240-744-3700; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Celia” ceramic and onyx necklace ($345) and IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Livia” rhinestone pave earrings ($275), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250; H&M tights, stylist’s own. Photographed in front of the former National Bank of Washington

YIGAL AZROUEL shearling leather jacket ($2,890) and RED VALENTINO embroidered ribbons dress ($795), Hu’s Wear, 2906 M St., NW, 202-342-2020, www.husonline. com; VALENTINO rockstud rouge slingbacks ($1,195) and VALENTINO rockstud rogue flap purse ($2,995), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202, www.husonline.com; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Bennie Bib” silver rhinestones and Swarovski crystal necklace ($270), Bloomingdale’s, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 240744-3700; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Celia” ceramic and onyx necklace ($345) and IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Livia” rhinestone pave earrings ($275), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Trese” brass filigree cuff ($275), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250, www.ibeautifulmiaelliott.com; H&M tights, stylist’s own. Photographed at the Federal Triangle Metro Station

HELMUT LANG wool and leather blazer ($695) and ALICE+OLIVIA “Arthur” sequin pants ($484), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; FENDI polifonia tstrap sandals ($890) and CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA deco pandora clutch ($895), Hu’s Shoes, 3005 M St., NW, 202-342-0202, www. husonline.com; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Tia” textured gold link earrings ($125), IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Beat” gold textured link chain ($225) and IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Elizabeth” vintage-inspired rhinestone cuff ($225), www.ibeautifulmiaelliott. com; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Angel” black onyx multi-strand necklace ($525) and IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT “Trese” brass filigree cuff ($275), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250, www. ibeautifulmiaelliott.com. Photographed in front of the National Gallery of Art

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WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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lifestyles | women of substance & style

style mavens From a law student turned pageant queen to entrepreneurial Marines, our men and women of Substance and Style span all walks of life.

Bindhu Pamarthi

2013 Miss D.C. and second year Georgetown Law student Describe your personal style. I believe that what you wear should reflect how you feel, not mask it. Then, style becomes a way of communicating, rather than a way of covering. That said, I tend toward timeless, classy pieces as well as fun and eccentric items. What does style mean to you? It is the art form of taking something cast away, forgotten, or ignored and wearing it in a way that turns heads and leaves a lasting impression. What is something you’d never wear again? A nude pump with a black trouser. I don’t know if there is a rule against that but there should be.

PHOTO BY TONY POWELL Bindhu wears a Stephen Yearick Privata dress. Photographed at Georgetown University, Healy Hall

‘I wouldn’t be happy under a stylistically oppressive regime.’ Tell us a fashion rule you don’t regret breaking. The rule I regret breaking the least is wearing a dress to a conservative firm interview. The employer’s website advised applicants to wear a suit. I could tell that as soon as I walked into the interview that I wasn’t going to be considered, but if conformity is their idea of communicating competence, I’d rather take my individuality. I wouldn’t be happy under a stylistically oppressive regime! A current trend you could do without? Fur. I don’t think fashion justifies animal suffering. What is the most eccentric item in your closet? A Christian Lacroix orange, black and white cropped vest in plaid with polka dot piping. I wore it in a photo shoot and have no idea if and where I would ever wear it again! What never goes out of style? A great sense of humor and a sassy shoe!

wardrobe provided by saks jandel, 301-652-2250

Who is your style icon? I don’t know that I have one. I like what I like and I try not to let the media tell me who or what is attractive.

PHOTOBYTONYPOWELL

Chance Mitchell CEO and co-founder, National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC) DESCRIBEYOURPERSONALSTYLE I would say modern and classic. I tend to avoid trendy fashions. Instead, I focus on clothing and shoes that are adaptable, structured and tailored to have a shelf life beyond a season or two. I prefer quality over quantity so I am willing to invest more in the 20 percent of clothing I will frequently wear and not the 80 percent that will gather dust in my closet. WHATDOESSTYLEMEANTOYOU? Personal style is an expression of who you are and, often times, how you feel. It is a snapshot of how you view the world, what you believe in, and how you live your life. For the most part, I believe if you look good, you feel good. It’s up to each individual to decide what makes him or her feel good. SOMETHINGYOU’DNEVERWEARAGAIN? Acid washed jeans or denim shorts. I will leave those to the ’80s. No promises though if parachute pants make a resurgence! WHICHCURRENTTRENDAREYOU ITCHINGTOTRYANDWHICHONE AREYOUREADYTOSEEDIE? I have often thought about getting a tattoo. I think, when tastefully done, it can add a nice edge to anyone’s look, but I have not decided what is right for me. A trend that I can do without is men wearing suit pants that are too short so they can show off their colored socks. It’s hard to tell if the look is by design or just poor tailoring.’

‘Nothing tanks a fashion statement quicker than a lack of confidence in the look.’ FAVORITEITEMINYOURCLOSET? My John Varvatos leather jacket. WHATSTYLEADVICEDOYOUHAVE? If you wear it, you better “own it.” Nothing tanks a fashion statement quicker than a lack of confidence in the look.

Chance wears Hugo Boss shirt, tie and pants along with a Banana Republic sweater, John Varvatos leather jacket and Donald J. Pliner loafers. Photographed in the W Hotel lobby.

lifestyles | women of substance & style

Pari Bradlee

Fitness and yoga instructor Describe your personal style. It is difficult to describe, but I’d say eclectic and unexpected. It’s anywhere from Alice in Wonderland to Little Eddie to Catholic School refinement to Motley Crue to thug, given the day. What does style mean to you? It is a way of expressing yourself fully, and I see it as an art form. I dress according to my mood; if I’m feeling feminine, I’ll wear a frilly dress and if I’m feeling more dark and masculine, you’ll see me in a knit skull cap and low suede boots. No matter what I’m wearing, I’m always wearing beautiful lingerie underneath. It’s my obsession, as I believe it gives a woman more confidence and makes her clothes fit better.

“I’m always wearing beautiful lingerie. It’s my obsession, as it gives a woman more confidence and makes her clothes fit better.” a fashion trend you’re itching to try and one you’d like to see die? I love the new Oscar de la Renta look with the dark velvets and hoods; it’s very witchy and mysterious. But gladiator shoes of any kind do not look flattering on anyone. What never goes out of style? Very well-made, fitted motorcycle jackets.

PHOTO BY TONY POWELL

Pari wears a Burberry jacket, a House of the Gods top, J Brand jeans and Prada boots.. Photographed at Tudor Place.

your favorite item in your closet? A heather grey, cashmere poncho that a dear friend sent me from her boutique in Paris. It’s like wearing a blanket and is just so easy to throw on with sunglasses to create instant sophistication and elegance. Who is your fashion icon? Macklemore! My dream is for him to take me to the thrift shop!

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WASHINGTON LIFE

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David Tafuri Partner at Patton Boggs LLP WHATDOESSTYLEMEANTOYOU? Being comfortable enough with yourself to wear what you want to wear, rather than what you think you should wear. AFASHIONRULEYOUDON’T REGRETBREAKING? White pants after Labor Day. I’m in whites well into Autumn. ACURRENTTRENDYOU’REDYINGTOTRY? I’d really like to have a Mohawk someday. I have no clue if they are in now, I just always wanted to try it. WHATNEVERGOESOUTOFSTYLE? Baseball caps

“I’d really like to have a Mohawk someday. I have no clue if they are in now, I just always wanted to try it.” YOURFAVORITEITEMINYOURCLOSET? A Converse by John Varvatos jacket. I travel a lot, and it’s lightweight and doubles as a blazer. THEMOSTECCENTRICITEMINYOURCLOSET? I bought a full-length faux fur coat with a huge collar for Halloween at a thrift store one year. My friends named it “bunny.” I have no good reason to wear it anymore, but I can’t bring myself to throw it away. WHOISYOURSTYLEICON? The Clash.

PHOTOBYJOSEPHALLEN David wears a Brimble & Clark jacket and pants, Ralph Lauren shirt and tie and Gucci shoes. Photographed in his Georgetown residence.

lifestyles | men of substance & style

Max Major Magician

Describe your personal style. Fashion forward, young Hollywood, invites attention. It is sometimes loud, but never conservative. What does style mean to you? A consistent image that communicates who you are. It demonstrates personality and individuality. Despite the rule, people do judge a book by its cover. First impressions count! a trend you are dying to try? Colored trousers. I love the bold pop of color. What is something you’d never wear again? The official uniform of cubicle nation: A blue dress shirt. When I was 21, I walked into a performance at a corporate event and one person commented “who

‘Despite the rule, people do judge a book by its cover. First impressions count.’ invited the accountant.” It will never happen again

the most eccentric item in your closet? A white tuxedo jacket with tails. I’m still waiting for the right time to break it out. What never goes out of style? Confidence, because if you love what you’re wearing you’re comfortable in your own skin. And a nice watch. What is the best style advice you ever received? I had a mentor early in my magic career named Denny Haney who told me to always dress like you’re going somewhere better later. Who inspires you, stylistically? Locally my fashion inspiration comes from James Cornwell of Cornwell Styling. Nationally, I think Justin Timberlake is an icon. He’s the prince of pop and fashion.

PHOTO BY TONY POWELL

Max wears Diesel jeans, jacket and shoes paired with an American Apparel shirt, Michael Kors watch and a Minion neck chain that he made himself. Photographed at The Huxley.

PHOTOBYJOSEPHALLEN Michael wears APC jeans, an American Apparel T-shirt, Tod’s loafers and his father’s vintage leather jacket from Bloomingdale’s. Harrison wears Tellason jeans, Read Wall shirt, Rag & Bone jacket and Sperry shoes. Photgraphed at Rock Creek Park.

Michael Haft

Harrison Suarez

Co-author of ‘Perfect Coffee at Home”’ and former Marine Corps officer

Co-author of ‘Perfect Coffee at Home’ and former Marine Corps officer

DESCRIBEYOURPERSONALSTYLE I try to balance form and function with clothes that look great and fit well. I prefer things on the slightly preppier side.

DESCRIBEYOURPERSONALSTYLE I’d say it’s a modern take on classic all-American. I tend to go for more athletic cuts, but otherwise fairly timeless.

WHATDOESSTYLEMEANTOYOU? Good style is all about being authentic. It’s about being true to who you are.

WHATDOESSTYLEMEANTOYOU? Style is an extension of personality. The specifics change based on the situation, but the principles stay the same.

SOMETHINGYOU’DNEVERWEARAGAIN? A buzz cut. I spent four years in the Marines getting a haircut every Sunday, so I’ve really enjoyed growing it out these past few months. YOURFAVORITEITEMINYOURCLOSET? A scrimshaw belt handmade on Nantucket. THEMOSTECCENTRICITEMINYOURCLOSET? A red, dragon-print jacket I had made when I lived in Hong Kong. I can’t say I wear it very much, but it always makes me laugh. WHOISYOURSTYLEICON? James Dean. Enough said.

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ACURRENTTRENDYOUCOULDDOWITHOUT? I avoid all things hipster. About a year ago, back when I was in the Marines, I was in Baltimore at a trunk show. This guy came up to me and said, “hey man, I love your haircut, where’d you get it?” His expression when I explained was priceless. “Oh, so it’s real?” The conversation ended shortly thereafter. WHATNEVERGOESOUTOFSTYLE? A trusty pair of jeans. They’re comfortable, they fit right and they’re versatile. YOURFAVORITEITEMINYOURCLOSET? I have this blue-and-white gingham shirt that my friend Read Wall designed. It’s just perfect. I probably wear it too much, but I absolutely love it.

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lifestyles | men of substance & style

Patrick Dowd

Founder, Millennial Trains Project Describe your personal style. Eclectic and versatile — a collection of things that remind me of places I’ve lived and enjoyed visiting. What does style mean to you? It’s a form of expression, an opportunity for individuals to remix things in interesting ways and communicate with others.

“[My grandfather] taught me a good suit was a democratic thing. It gives any man the opportunity to be taken seriously.” A fashion rule you don’t regret breaking? Hiking boots with a suit. Looks awesome. Is awesome. What never goes out of style? Good manners and gardening clothes. your favorite item in your closet? A sturdy, flannel olive off-duty military shirt that belonged to my grandfather when he was stationed with the U.S. Army in Calcutta during World War II.

PHOTO BY JOSEPH ALLEN

Patrick wears a Band of Outsiders shirt, Theory pants and John Varvatos shoes, all from Lost Boys. Photgraphed at Union Station. .

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the most eccentric item in your closet? At the moment, a Technicolor cowboy shirt I recently picked up at the District Flea. Who is your style icon? My grandfather. Born in Brooklyn, my grandfather started with nothing and built himself up through sports, education and military service to become the long-time CFO of Van Heusen [the shirt company]. He taught me a good suit was a democratic thing because it gives any man the opportunity to be taken seriously, earn a living and provide for his family. I love that.

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Juan Coronado Cocktail innovator for ThinkFoodGroup WHATDOESSTYLEMEANTOYOU? Style is how a person expresses who they are through their approach to fashion. It is not just the clothes a person wears but a lifestyle that they embody, which reflects the delicate balance between who a person is now and who they will be in the future. It is a constant evolution. AFASHIONRULEYOUDON’T REGRETBREAKING? Wearing jewelry and not matching shoes and belts. WHATNEVERGOESOUTOFSTYLE? Black leather jacket, three-piece suit and smelling good. THEMOSTECCENTRICITEMINYOURCLOSET A mohair cardigan with Asian print lining as well as a double-breasted zipper jacket from the ’80s. WHAT’STHEBESTSTYLEADVICE YOUHAVEEVERRECEIVED? Always get your suits tailored. WHOORWHATINSPIRESYOUSTYLISTICALLY? Modern dandies.

PARIBRADLEE HAIRBYMARKFRAZERAND MAKEUPBYERWINGOMEZ}BOTH OFKARMABEAUTYLOUNGE CHANCEMITCHELL~ HAIRBYCHRISPAVLOUNIS} TRESSESSALONDC MAKEUPBYCOLLEENLEO MAXMAJOR HAIRBYEVOLVESALON WARDROBEBYJAMESCORNWELL} CORNWELLSTYLINGANDWILL LAWRY}CAPITALIMAGE TONYPOWELLWASASSISTED BYCOURTNEYEVANSCAROL PEARSONSNICHOLASAUTIELLO ANDMARCUSGOODMAN

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PHOTOBYJOSEPHALLEN Juan wears a Goorin Brothers hat, Tailorbyrd shirt, Rag & Bone sweater, Top Men tie and pants, Zara blazer and W. Gibbs brogue boots. Photographed at Barmini.

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LIFESTYLES | PERSONALSHOPPERS

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Online shopping may be convenient for busy Washingtonians, but Katie Jaggers, assistant general merchandising manager for Saks Fifth Avenue Chevy Chase, has been helping generations of politicians, philanthropists, socialites and everyone in between build wardrobes since 1984, proving that one-on-one service has its place in today’s retail landscape. DOPERSONALSHOPPERSHAVEAROLE INTHISONLINE-SHOPPINGAGE?

Absolutely! The digital era has opened up a world of deeper inventory and visibility for our consultants to access and “virtually pull” for. Some appointments take place entirely through an iPad with a followup fit appointment when the merchandise arrives in the store. It has been an incredibly valuable tool in presenting options beyond our four walls. Another amazing phenomenon has been the “virtual trunk show.” If a client is traveling and cannot physically come to the store when we are hosting a designer trunk show, we use iPads to host face time viewings of the collections. WHATARETHEMISPERCEPTIONS ABOUTYOURJOBANDHOWDOYOU OVERCOMETHEM?

Sometimes there is a misguided sense that personal shoppers are an expensive, elitist luxury that requires a minimum spend level

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or a fee to access a shopper. Another is that personal shoppers only service clients who shop designer collections. Nothing could be further from the truth. We are here to help inspire confidence and style for every client across all wardrobe needs from special occasion dressing to a complete wardrobe. DESCRIBEAPARTICULARLYINSPIRING ASSIGNMENT

What inspires me most is when we work with a client for a special event such as a wedding. These typically involve more than just the wedding day itself, with all of the excitement leading up to it: engagement parties, showers, bridal luncheons. We have even hosted a few of those in the store. Because these include the entire family you become an integral part of the experience and are able to see the happiness, confidence and joy of the occasion and that’s a wonderful moment.

TELLUSABOUTATIMEWHENYOU WENTABOVEANDBEYONDFORA CLIENT

We have packed up a full two weeks of wardrobe options for a client who had a last-minute trip abroad and could not get to the store. We presented everything in their home, had all garments fit, altered, pressed and packed and were off to the airport inside of 48 hours. HOWHASSTYLEEVOLVEDIN WASHINGTON?

Washington has gone from a very conservative, neutral and one-dimensional look to a much more adventurous, fun and risk-taking point of view. The mixing of designer brands is much more prevalent. Clients are also much more knowledgeable and savvy about the world of fashion. She attends shows, she watches and purchases online, she reads magazines and knows all of the latest trends, styles and pieces. And that is a lot of fun.

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Outside of flagship department stores, Washington is full of stylists making over the District one skirt and suit at a time. Here, a snapshot of a few favorites.

TO N I G L I C K M A N , F I L E . L A U R E N R OT H M A N B Y R A S H M I PA P P U . A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y.

TONIGLICKMAN Burberry Private Clients, By appt., 347-404-4073, toni.glickman@burberry.com

MELISSABROWN Lockstitch Style, Lockstitchstyle.com, mbrown@lockstitchstyle.com

ALISONBESHAI Alison Beshai Styling, 571-225-1288, info@alisonbeshai.com

LAURENROTHMAN Styleauteur.com, 202-631-8878, info@styleauteur.com

Tony Glickman grew up styling and shopping for friends and family. At the tender age of 14, “I specifically remember putting outfits together for my friends in my boarding school dorm and reading fashion magazines instead of studying,” she says. Since then, she has gone on to work with a wide range of clients from royal figures, celebrities and diplomats to stay-at-home moms handling virtually any kind of fashion emergency. As a consultant for Burberry’s complimentary Private Clients service, Glickman continues to work with Washington heavyweights looking for unique pieces from the legendary fashion house.

After earning her styling chops as a top personal stylist for Nordstrom’s Designer Apparel, Melissa Brown went on to open Lockstitch Style in 2011 where she caters to a wide range of clients from journalists to athletes and CEOs. Brown views fashion as art and works with each client to enhance his or her own personal style. “My favorite part of being a personal stylist is that moment when my clients look in the mirror and finally recognize that this stylish confident person looking back at them was always there,” she says.

This Northern Virginia native started styling professionally four years ago and has since been named to several local “best” lists. Two years ago, she opened her eponymous styling shop where she helps men and women update their seasonal wardrobes or find that perfect piece for special events, whether it be at department stores, local boutiques or showrooms around the world. “There aren’t specific designers I work with for all of my clients,” she notes. “I base the places I shop and the designers I work with on the client’s personal style, lifestyle, budget, etc.”

As a familiar expert on television, radio and in print, Lauren Rothman is well known in style circles. Though her clients run the gamut, most tend to be attorneys and politicians who look to her keen eye to dress them for the office. “First impressions are important for everyone and I work one-on-one with men and women to help them identify the right clothes and accessories for their lifestyle,” she says. Oftentimes, this has Rothman mining department stores or working directly with designers to find that right piece.

BESTPRACTICES MAKETHEMOSTOFYOURTIMEWITHTHESETIPS LAURENROTHMAN Block out time on your calendar and put your phone on vibrate. It may sound fun to bring friends or family but too many opinions can make the “personal” part of the experience challenging.

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MELISSABROWN Separate your wardrobe into piles: love, might need alterations, doesn’t fit anymore, and “I’m not strong enough to part with it so I hired a stylist to help me ditch it!”

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ALISONBESHAI Don’t lose yourself. Your stylist should be refining your style. Your stylist should be refining your style not completing changing it. Make sure you still feel like yourself in the end.

TONIGLICKMAN Find out what sort of clients the shopper caters to. There’s nothing worse than being styled like Ozzy Osbourne when you want to look like Queen Elizabeth.

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LIFESTYLES | RUNWAYSTYLISTS

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Sure, the European runways are chock full of beautiful, awe-inspiring garments. But can they be translated to everyday Washington wear? We turned to veteran stylists Stara Pezeshkian and Will and Shani Lawry to show us how to turn runway exotique into Washington chic. Here are their takes on six outfits for women across the board, from K Street attorneys to arts executives and Capitol Hill staffers. STARAPEZESHKIAN FORTHEARTISTAGENCY KSTREETATTORNEY This look radiates power, sophistication and intelligence — all the attributes necessary in a courtroom wrapped up in a stylish package. The top part features sharp straight lines, exposing just enough skin to add a touch of sex appeal. The lack of a plunging neckline ensures it stays office appropriate. Though it has the feel of a suit jacket, the sideways buckle adds a twist, and the flowing bottom keeps the look sophisticated. Keep in mind that the shoes will change the mood, so be sure to keep pointed-toe pumps on hand. My favorite Manolo Blahnik pumps exude power with a comfortable heel.

CAPITOLHILLSTAFFER This is a strong piece with a lot of personality, yet it maintains Capitol Hill sophistication. The stylish jacket has two hidden cutouts on either side that can easily be disguised altogether with a lowcut, form-fitting camisole underneath. The skirt’s vibrant colors are perfect for stressful jobs. And since we know Capitol Hill staffers play as hard as they work, this little number transitions well from desk to barstool. ARTSEXECUTIVE I chose this Dior look simply because of the design work, and the shape and flow of the garment. It is unique and interesting, as many in the arts world are, while being appropriate for business thanks to a high neckline and full silhouette.

Christian Dior Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear Look 1

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Christian Dior Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear Look 41

Christian Dior Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear Look 12

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R U N WAY P H OTO S C O U R T E SY O F E AC H C O M PA N Y; S TA R A’ S H E A D S H OT BY M O N I C A T R U E ; W I L L A N D S H A N I L AW R Y H E A D S H OT S BY T I M C O B U R N

Burberry Prorsum Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear Look 5

WILLANDSHANILAWRY FORCAPITALIMAGE KSTREETATTORNEY This look gives Washington women the opportunity to bring a fresh approach to summer pastels by introducing texture. The slim silhouette with a high-waisted belt could easily be replicated with a belted trench coat or shirtdress. The K Street attorney may tone down the texture, maintain the silhouette and substitute the colored

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Christian Dior Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear Look 4

sandal for a nude peep-toe pump to create a monochromatic look. Incorporate the lace feature with a lace-trim camisole in the same pastel shade in addition to a pencil skirt in a similar shade. Adding a colorful tote for those legal files would be a great way to show personality when entering the courtroom.

ARTSEXECUTIVE Here we remix a classic print in silk with an open knit texture. The black bodice grounds the bold print and adds contrast. The bold colors in the subtle print show confidence, and a willingness to think outside the box. The uneven hemline adds whimsy, which appeals to our arts executive. In Washington, she could even up it a

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Burberry Prorsum Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear Look 14

bit by adding a layer of tulle to make this look a fit-and-flare ensemble.

CAPITOLHILLSTAFFER The neutral tone represents an understated sophistication that can work for everyone, but the only way the Kelly green hue will make its way into our Washington ensemble is via a Venti Starbucks cup. This look has a buttoned-up feel without being structured, and makes opposing parties willing to listen to what you have to say. The sheer blouse is soft and feminine while the hemline keeps things serious with a modest slit that says “treat me like a lady.” Of course, a camisole in a neutral color is necessary lest you want to end up at the center of the next Capitol Hill scandal.

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LIFESTYLES| THEURBANMAN

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Whether dressing for a casual work meeting or the weekend, boost your style with these runway hits EDITOR: ANNE KIM-DANNIBALE P H O T O G R A P H Y & G R O O M I N G : D U S T I N C . L I L L E Y, W W W. D C L I M A G E R Y. C O M WA R D R O B E S T Y L I N G : W I L L L AW R Y F O R C A P I TA L I M A G E MODEL: GEORGE PIERSON FOR T H E ARTIST AGENCY P H O T O G R A P H E D AT K A B I N L O U N G E I N WA S H I N G T O N , D . C .

INABLUEMOOD Mix different shades of this fashion week hue to add interest. Here, a navy peacoat brightened by turquoise pants strikes the right balance.

CAMOCAMEO Can’t go all the way? Reference this catwalk staple with a washed denim shirt or with accents like statement boots in olive and tan.

GOSKINS Leather backpacks may be one of the hottest trends of the season, but a portfolio gets down to business.

SHOPPING CREDITS: Sodera denim shirt, $328; Wede jacket, $528; Safado trousers, $198; all Diesel Tysons Corner Center, 703-485-4755. Alexander McQueen/Puma boots, $440; Giorgio Armani leather briefcase, $700; all Neiman Marcus Mazza Gallerie, 202-966-9700.

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-8¸7%1%2¸7;360( Washington is experiencing a menswear revival. Here’s where to shop online and off: :-689%0-274-6%8-32

STREETWEAR

EDITORIAL

Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs’ Street Etiquette (streetetiquette. com) takes a nostalgic look at everyday fashion, painting a lyrically elegant picture of “regular” folks here and afar. The artwork “Slumflower” is not to be missed.

Lougè Delcy’s stint at Essence and various fashion houses has imbued a distinctly editorial feel to his personal style blog (dapperlou.com). Stunning photography and global locations provide plenty of sartorial richness to mine.

FORLAUGHS

NUTS&BOLTS Baltimore-based Brian Sacawa (hespokestyle.com) may look like he stepped right out of the ’50s but his style sense is decidedly modern. Half tutorial, half wardrobe diary, this is a blog for those who want visual inspiration as well as the ABC’s of putting together an ensemble.

With entries that rebuild outfits worn by such “geek chic” icons as The Muppets’ Waldorf and Statler, Nerd Boyfriend (nerdboyfriend.tumblr. com) reminds us that fashion isn’t all runway pouts and struts.

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SCOTCH & SO DA PHOTO BY ANNE KIM-DANNIBALE . ALL OTHERS COURTE SY

CRÈMEDELACRÈME Zilli, 1767 International Dr., McLean, VA 22102, 703-883-1166 The French clothier started in 1970 by Alain Schimel and family tailor Teofilo Zilli recently SOUTHERNELEGANCE opened its second U.S. outpost Billy Reid, 3211 M St. NW, in Tysons Galleria offering a 202-499-6765 rarified shopping experience with leather outerwear made There’s plenty to covet at Billy from exotic skins like crocodile Reid’s jewel-box Washington and pecari (a South American outpost. Nubby sweaters, wild boar), luxurious sportswear rustically elegant shirts and a and tailored suits made in Italy. made-to-measure suit salon Attention to detail is key, from make Southern style feel casually platinum-plated hardware to glamorous, just like the bands mother-of-pearl buttons and silk Alabama Shakes and Mumford & linings. Should that one-of-a-kind Sons the lifestyle company has piece require a bit more attention, dressed. Fittingly, look for intimate representatives will come to you in-store performances to come. to ensure a perfect fit.

“NEW”PREP Read Wall, Georgetown opening slated for holiday 2013 Read Wall’s eponymous online shop may only be three years old but it has already caught the eye of the mainstream fashion press with what Wall likes to call his “clean prep” aesthetic. No critter “QUIRKY”EUROPEAN pants here. “It’s a little more toned down,” the Washington native Scotch & Soda, 3029 M St. NW, says. “We keep it straightforward, 202-450-1636 distilling everything down to its basic principles.” It’s a philosophy Amsterdam’s Scotch & Soda that his key demo of late 20shas been around for decades, to-early 40-somethings can get but a relaunch in 2001 has behind. Look for customization landed this witty line squarely and tailoring at his first brick-andon the fashion-forward radar. mortar flagship — a 2,000-squareGents looking for more playful elements to punch up their style foot space near Georgetown’s Key Bridge — later this year. will likely find it here.

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LIFESTYLES | BABETTE

+03&)86388-2+%88-6) Babette Pinsky’s eponymously named clothing line is getting buzz for chic and classic pieces that naturally refuse to wrinkle — making Babette a go-to brand for today’s traveling, stylish woman

Babee Pinsky Babee Pinsky

Babee’s Georgetown store, located at 3307 Cady’s Alley NW

&

abette is a unique line that Babette Pinsky founded in 1968 in San Fransisco. In 1991, her husband, Steven Pinsky, came on as CEO. Made for the modern-day woman-on-the-go, the clothing features timeless designs and intricate detailing, including pieces that are hand-pleated. With a recently opened shop in Cady’s Alley in Georgetown and all the manufacturing done in Oakland, Calif., Babette is truly an American brand. The store is quickly becoming a haven for Washington women, especially those who might be packing for a trip. Wrinklefree fabrics allow Babette items to be thrown into a suitcase, pulled out and put on without resorting to hotel room irons. Babette talked recently with Washington Life about her brand, vision and style.

Fabric influences design. Use the design to bring out the beauty of the fabric.

“Wow you look great “is the compliment our ladies get when they wear Babette.

WHOISBABETTEDESIGNEDFOR?DO YOUHAVEAN“IDEAL”CUSTOMER?

SOMANYDESIGNERSANDCLOTHING LINESTODAYUSEFACTORIESIN THEDEVELOPINGWORLDANDPAY SUBSTANDARDWAGESWHYKEEP PRODUCTIONINTHEUSWHENIT WOULDBECHEAPERTOHAVEFACTORIES INDEVELOPINGCOUNTRIESOVERSEAS?

HOWDIDBABETTECOMETOBE?

ISTHEREANYTHINGWASHINGTONAREAWOMENSHOULDKNOWABOUT BABETTE?

I always wanted to be a fashion designer with my own line. I struck out on my own in 1968. WHATWASTHEINSPIRATIONBEHIND THELINE?

Function dictates form. Simplicity. Every seam has a reason. Each trim has a function.

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Our customer is educated, works in the arts or in another professional field. She frequently goes to restaurants, movies, art galleries and museums. She reads and is politically savvy. Above all she travels for business and pleasure. WHATBROUGHTYOUTOTHE WASHINGTONAREA?

We felt our customer was definitely in Washington because Washingtonians are professionals and often travel for work and therefore need attractive, versatile clothes in high-quality fabrics that do not wrinkle.

My impression is that Washington women travel a lot and have many events that fill their calendars. We are a perfect resource for their needs. Creating a wardrobe around this type of lifestyle is what we do beautifully.

Believe it or not, for small companies like ourselves it was always cheaper to produce our products here in the U.S. By the time you factor in the extra cost of hiring agents or flying staff to the factories, the extra lead time to ship the finished products and the monetary costs associated with offshore production, we determined that we were better off making our products here. Companies that produce offshore also have to project their inventory before they’ve begun the sales process. Producing here allows us to pre-sell our goods and produce only what we have orders for. Having our own factory also gives us much greater quality control over our production. We have always provided health insurance for our staff and have a 401(k) profit sharing program as well.

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&%&)88) ;MRXIV 8VERWMXMSR0MRI Perfect for holiday parties, Babette’s Winter line boasts of unique textures and elegant design.

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LIFESTYLES | TRENDREPORT

BURBERRY BRIT Plaid wool-blend coat ($1,095); Burberry, 1155 Conn. Ave. NW, us.burberry.com

STELLA MCCARTNEY Plaid crew neck sweater ($1,200); saksfifthavenue.com

JOIE Kariana top in Cherry Blossom ($268); joie.com

SUNO Plaid wool hooded jacket ($1,050); saksfifthavenue.com

STELLA MCCARTNEY Falabella tartan tote ($1755); saksfifthavenue.com

 KARL LAGERFELD Punk tartan cotton mini dress ($370); karl.com

MCQ ALEXANDER MCQUEEN Zipped tartan wool blazer ($1,120); neimanmarcus.com

Sometimes preppy, sometimes punk, achieve a polished-grunge look by showing your stripes BY ALISON MCLAUGHLIN

COMME DES GARÇONS VINTAGE Plaid clutch ($425); farfetch.com

CURRENT/ELLIOT The Soho zip stiletto in red plaid ($248); currentelliot.com

MARC BY MARC JACOBS Plaid show group clover satchel ($528); saksfifthavenue.com

CHARLES PHILIP SHANGHAI Tasseled tartan slippers ($168); saksfifthavenue.com 68

MARC BY MARC JACOBS Aimee trompe l'oeil plaid merino wool sweater ($280); shop. nordstrom.com

MARC BY MARC JACOBS Maya plaid long sleeve dress ($566); shop.nordstrom.com MCQ ALEXANDER MCQUEEN Tartan wool dress ($1,180); neimanmarcus.com

MOSCHINO Plaid wool-twill kilt ($1,050); moschino.com WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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GIANVITO ROSSI Camouflageprint pony hair pumps ($880); neimanmarcus.com

CURRENT/ELLIOT The lone soldier jacket with ombre coated sleeves ($328); currentelliot.com

J.CREW Camo tee ($49); jcrew.com

BURBERRY PRORSUM Mid-length cottongabardine trench coat ($2,095); Burberry, 1155 Conn. Ave. NW, us.burberry.com



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CHRISTOPHER KANE Camouflage woven silk skirt ($860); saksfifthavenue.com

Camouflage prints, Army greens and dress khakis are all the rage for fall

PROENZA SCHOULER The PS11 Classic camouflage-print leather shoulder bag ($2,245); saksfifthavenue.com

BY ALISON MCLAUGHLIN

C. WONDER Signature calf hair belt strap ($48); cwonder.com

REBECCA TAYLOR Iggy trouser in olive ($350); rebeccataylor.com

A.P.C. Camouflage-print cotton-canvas jacket ($415); saksfifthavenue.com

GIVENCHY Black doublebreasted wool coat with gold bars ($3,220); barneys.com

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BELSTAFF Langham leatherpaneled wool-blend cardigan ($1,295); barneys.com

MICHAEL KORS Camouflage top ($951); michaelkors.com

C. WONDER Calf hair continental zip wallet ($88); cwonder.com

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MSGM Camouflage print sweater ($390); shop. nordstrom.com

J.CREW Skinny utility chino in camo ($98); jcrew.com

DIOR Black satin open-toe lace-up ankle boot (price upon request); Available at Dior boutiques nationwide 1-800-929-DIOR

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LIFESTYLES | TRENDREPORT

CHINTI AND PARKER + Patternity triangle cashmere sweater ($595); chintiandparker.com

DIOR Glazed leather pump ($780); Available at Dior boutiques nationwide, 1-800 929-DIOR

DIOR “Diorling” medium smooth calfskin bag ($3,800); Available at Dior boutiques nationwide, 1-800 929-DIOR

78%6/ '3286%78 Stay chic this winter with a color-block twist on classic black and white BY ALISON MCLAUGHLIN

REBECCA TAYLOR Cap sleeve demi peplum top with lace insets in black/white ($250); rebeccataylor.com

REBECCA TAYLOR Flutter dress in black/white ($395); rebeccataylor.com

KATE SPADE NEW YORK Terrace drive little nadine handbag ($398); Kate Spade, 3601 M St. NW, katespade.com

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VERSACE Two-tone stretch-cady shift dress ($1,325); us.versace.com

DIOR "Dior Bar" long gloves in black leather (price upon request); 1-800 929-DIOR

DEREK LAM Colorblock sweater ($590); saksfifthavenue.com

KATE SPADE NEW YORK All that glitters Jackie pant ($268); Kate Spade, 3601 M St. NW, katespade.com

CHAN LUU Leather and silver five wrap bracelet ($220); chanluu.com

GIVENCHY Large Shark earring in stone and plexiglas ($710); shop.nordstrom.com WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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THIERRY LARSY Two-tone acetate cat eye sunglasses ($485); barneys.com

SAINT LAURENT Two-tone leather ankle boots ($995); saksfifthavenue.com

KATE SPADE NEW YORK Mixer embellished low heel ($378); Kate Spade, 3601 M St. NW, katespade.com

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI Feather-trimmed matelasse and cashmere coat ($4,895); neimanmarcus.com

ROBERTO CAVALLI Stretch-wool tuxedo blazer ($2,575); robertocavalli.com

JASON WU Mixed media pleated dress ($3,350); saksfifthavenue.com

MICHAEL BY MICHAEL KORS Stretch-cotton twill skinny cargo pants ($150); michaelkors.com

JOSEPH North South leather tote ($795); joseph-fashion.com

STELLA MCCARTNEY Wooden wedge faux leather loafers ($955); saksfifthavenue.com

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MOSCHINO Two-tone crepe de chine and silkcrepe dress ($2,250); moschino.com

STELLA MCCARTNEY Bicolor faux leather shoulder bag ($1,050); saksfifthavenue.com

MIU MIU Color-blocked leather belt ($395); saksfifthavenue.com

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WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y AroundTown﹐Children’sLawCenterBenefit﹐CapitalforChildrenCasinoNightandMore!

Phillipe Cousteau, Jr. and Ashlan Gorse at the Earth Echo Expeditions Launch (Photo by Tony Powell)

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AROUNDTOWN

Love in the Air Appreciation and affection mark recent Washington affairs BY DONNA SHOR

Climis and Carol Lascaris at the dinner honoring Dr. Nicholas Patronas (Photo by Andreas Chrysostomou)

MEDICALMIRACLEWORKER Climis and Carole Lascaris honored Dr. Nicholas Patronas with a dinner for 130 of his friends, family and grateful patients at the Cosmos Club. Well-known for his warm-hearted friendship and prestigious medical discoveries that have changed and saved lives, Dr. Patronas’ pioneering work in diagnostic radiology resulted in the creation of a neuroradiology section at the National Institutes of Health; his further complex medical discoveries gained him global recognition. Carol Lascaris brought in silken tablecloths that matched the bowls of American Beauty roses to stunning effect in the club’s newly renovated white-and-gold ballroom. Andrew Manatos emceed the musical program and a stream of Patronas aficionados reminisced with anecdotes both humorous and emotional. Seen: Mary Mochary and Dr. Philip Wine, Wilhelmina Holladay, Leah and Ted Pedas, Dr. Milton Corn and Gilan Tocco Corn, Dr. Roger and Nancy Stevenson and Diane Tachmindji. AWARMFAREWELL A dozen ambassadors

and their wives were among the 70 diplomats and friends gathered at Shahin Mafi’s handsome Potomac estate to honor former

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Mezzo soprano Denyce Graves, radiologist Dr. Etta D. Pisano, actress Phylicia Rashad and Joan Wages at the De Pizan Gala (Photo by Larry French)

chief of protocol Capricia Penevic Marshall. Hosts were Mafi, who chaired the 2013 Embassy Chef Challenge and Tim Cox, chairman of Cultural Tourism DC. Both Cox and Steve Shulman, Cultural Tourism’s new executive director, told how much Marshall’s support of Passport DC and the Embassy Chef Challenge have meant to their efforts. Amb. Claudia Fritsche of Liechtenstein, the event’s senior diplomatic representative, explained that Marshall was the direct liaison with the diplomatic corps and had been invaluable to them. Envoys from Mexico and Mauritius spoke along with Tebelelo Seretse, ambassador of Botswana, who explained that her country was famous for its diamonds but she “couldn’t get any out.” Marshall got a Botswana basket instead. ÀLARUSSEThe Russian Embassy housed

two recent programs that had several guests attending both events. Vera Danchenko-Stern, a renowned musician, presented an evening of “Russian Art Songs,” a genre of heavily romantic and dramatic works popular among the 19th-century Russian nobility. Glinka brought it to the fore, and Rimsky-Korsakoff, Moussorsky and Tchaikovsky all composed songs in this style. Coloratura soprano Katherine Keem and

tenor Yuri Gorodetski sang and paired for a unexpected finale: a sing-along (and clapalong) to the rousing folk song “Kalinka” that delighted the crowd. Lawyer and former congressman James Symington has long supported the American Russian Cultural Foundation and at this year’s 20th anniversary gala (chaired by Susan Carmel Lehrman) he presented the award established in his name to a student who wrote the winning essay on the topic of how to increase friendship between the two countries. Symington was once a popular country and folk singer and his wife Sylvia has sung with him on several records. LADYPIONEER Christine de Pizan wrote in support of women’s rights and proclaimed their abilities equal to those of men in the 15th century. Her name was invoked by the backers of the planned National Museum of Women’s History at their De Pizan gala when some of today’s very able women were granted awards dubbed after their namesakes in achievement. Honorees were Metropolitan opera star Denyce Graves, Tony Award-winning stage and television actress Phylicia Rashad, and Dr. Etta Pisano, a pioneer in mammography.

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Valery Gergiev

Eberhard von Loehneysen and Veronika Loehneysen

Capricia Marshall

Igor Butman, Susan Carmel Lehrman, Wynton Marsalis and Russian Amb. Sergey Kislyak

Eugene Lawson and Susan Eisenhower Mercedes Ellington and Murray Horwitz

WL EXCLUSIVE

‘FRIENDS IN TIME OF WAR’ GALA Embassy of the Russian Federation | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL RUSSIAN NIGHTS: Bilateral relations felt a bit more connected aer the American-Russian Cultural Cooperation Foundation’s annual gala celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Russian Navy’s goodwill visit to New York and San Francisco. Honorees Wynton Marsalis and Igor Butman shared the stage for a virtuoso performance that turned the gargantuan Russian Embassy into a jazz hotspot. ARCCF chairman James W. Symington entertained as emcee (even singing a bit) recognizing event chairman Susan Carmel Lehrman, Mariinski Theatre Maestro Valerie Gergiev and student Rebecca Darnell, who received a scholarship to study in Russia. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and Jerzy Sapieyevski

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse

Wolcott Henry and Angel Braestrup

Jan Cousteau with Red. Ed Royce and Marie Royce

Nina Snow, Phillipe Cousteau and Amanda Polk

Pamela Sorenson, David Vennett and Sharon Dougherty

Robbie Cox and Rep. David Price

EARTH ECHO EXPEDITIONS LAUNCH Newseum | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL ADVENTURE TOURS: Local environmentalists joined Philippe Cousteau Jr. for the launch of EarthEcho Expeditions, an initiative that leverages his legendary family’s legacy of exploration and discovery by promoting science education to a new generation of learners. Middle and high school students will soon be exploring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, tackling the causes of dead zones and acquiring new tools to protect natural resources. “It’s the next step in our journey to empower a new generation to build a be%er world,” Cousteau said aer taking time to introduce the glamorous Ashlan Gorse, a correspondent for E!News whom he married in Paris in late September.

Greg Hall and Wendy Adeler Hall

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Diane Rehm with George and Trish Vradenberg

Vinoda Basmayake and Joe Perta

Mary Ann Stein, Barbara Schriefer and Gideon Stein WL SPONSORED

Pete Ross and Bruce Spiva

DC VOTE’S ‘CHAMPIONS OF DEMOCRACY’ GALA

Ilir Zherka, Jon Bouker and Walter Smith

Mayflower Hotel | PHOTOSBYNICKGHOBASHI

Donald Sherman, Rep. Jose Serrano and Phillip Shmidt

CAN’T STOP, WON’T STOP: Held in the middle of the government shutdown, this annual gala was more spirited and fiery than ever before. The evening highlighted the accomplishments of DC Vote, including the passage of the Budget Autonomy Referendum which would protect D.C. from future shutdowns and the fact that in January President Obama placed the “No Taxation Without Representation” license plate on the presidential limousine for the first time. Rep. Jose Serrano, Mary Ann Stein and a group of D.C. veterans were also honored for their work in the fight for voting rights.

Kimberly Perry and Nelson Rimensnyder

Phil Mendelson and Paris Perrault VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Sen. Mark Udall, Jill Udall and Sen. Patrick Leahy with Vicki and Roger Sant David and Katherine Bradley ,House Minority Leader Steny Hoyer and Rep. John Delaney

WOODROW WILSON AWARDS Willard InterContinental Hotel | PHOTOSBYMINISTERSOFDESIGN

Anthony Williams and Vernon Jordan

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STAR DONORS: Congressional guests had to duck out aer cocktails due to late-night budget talks, but that wasn’t a problem for former California Rep. Jane Harman, who retired in 2011 aer 17 years of service to become president, director and CEO of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Harman was free to join other A-listers who wouldn’t have missed the opportunity to honor philanthropists Roger and Vicki Sant and David and Katherine Bradley. “No two couples have done more to enhance the cultural life of this city,” dinner chairman David Rubenstein told the crowd. “Everywhere you look they have given back enormous amounts of their time, concern and wealth.”

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John and JoAnn Mason with Marc Ein

Fred Malek and Jane Harman

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Sachin Chhede

Brett Abrams, Angelo Carusone and Matt Buther

Darryl Washington

Giovanna Gray and Joe Lockhart WL EXCLUSIVE

NARAL MEN FOR CHOICE Look, 1909 K St. NW | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON CHEERS TO CHOICE: More than 250 pro-choice men stopped by the new LOOK Supper Club for the annual “Men for Choice” happy hour and enjoyed three specialty tipples to support the cause: Roe Rum Punch, Pro-Choice Tini and Not So Old Fashioned. The highlights of the evening were the numerous unexpected guests who wandered by the event, heard about the cause and decided to donate and join in celebrating men for choice and the women who love them.

Reilly O’Connor and Joshua Cohen

Tiernan Sittenfeld and Tom Manatos

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Will Robinson, Allison Speaker and Chuck Rocha

Bruce Kieloch and Jimmy Williams Bharat Krishnan and Colin Rogero

Josh Peck and Aniello Alioto

Karen Finney and Donna Crane

Ilyse Hogue and Sandra Fluke

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Julia Cohen, David Mercer, John Neffinger and Neil Barrett

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Emily Bitner and Nathan Daschle

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| BOULDERCREST

Refuge for Heroes A newly opened Virginia retreat caters specially to the needs of U.S. military and veteran personnel B Y A D M I R A L W I L L I A M J . F A L L O N , U . S . N AV Y ( R E T. )

Boulder Crest Retreat

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stimates of the long-term effects of injuries sustained by U.S. personnel who fought in Afghanistan and Iraq show the need for unprecedented resources in the coming decades. As treatment programs shift from critical injuries to long-term treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress, much of the rehabilitation process will focus on healing warriors’ minds and addressing their physical injuries. Meeting this challenge will require a serious commitment from government, business and community leaders, as well as individuals and non-profits. Funded entirely by private donations, Boulder Crest Retreat for Military and Veteran Wellness facility, a 501(c)3, is a shining example of a nonprofit organization leading the way. Located in an idyllic setting at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Bluemont, Va., just one hour west of Washington, D.C., the retreat opened its doors September 6 and is the first of its kind in the United States. The facility serves our wounded warriors

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and their families and is open to active duty, experience with wounded personnel and their reserve, National Guard and veteran personnel families the benefits of getting the families out suffering from combat wounds and related to the country from the city. stress. The primary function of Boulder Crest Our wounded deserve a place and is to provide peaceful space for families to rest, programs like Boulder Crest Retreat to propel recover, reconnect and participate in outdoor their recoveries. We hope you will consider recreational and other therapeutic activities. supporting this organization dedicated to give In addition to walking, archery, kayaking and back to courageous American wounded men fishing, the facility offers non-traditional healing and women who have sacrificed so much. modalities such as meditation, acupuncture, Visit www.bouldercrestretreat.org, or on Facebook at accupressure, massage therapy and yoga. A secondary mission allows other military and Boulder Crest Retreat for Military and Veteran Wellness, veteran nonprofits a space to deliver their for more information. services free of charge. Boulder Crest Retreat was founded by U.S. Navy veteran and entrepreneur Ken Falke and his wife Julia, who donated 40 acres of their private estate to house the retreat. Ken and Julia realized that most of our wounded warriors are medically evacuated to the Washington, D.C. area for treatment and that many Admiral James A. Winnefeld Jr., the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs require long-term assistance and support. of Sta, speaking at the opening ceremony of Boulder Crest Retreat They also discovered through direct

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CAPITAL FOR CHILDREN’S CASINO NIGHT Long View Gallery | PHOTOSBYBENDROZ GOOD GAMING: Nearly 250 of the area’s top private equity industry professionals gathered at trendy Long View Gallery for a night of spirited gambling for a worthy cause. Vegas-style Black Jack and Texas Hold ‘Em tables ringed the room, creating an enthralling atmosphere whether players won or lost. All proceeds were donated to help local children in need serviced by Beacon House, Higher Achievement, Horton’s Kids and the Sitar Arts Center.

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Ben Danner and Hollie Freemand with Jennifer and David Valdeck

Keith and Julie Moellering

Frank Mellon and Christine Came

Carl MacCartee, Tina Grassi, Rex Alexander, Brian Kirschbaum and Raz Liborian

Amanda Goblesky, Cicely Fox and Meredith Jones

Eric and Sandy Christiansen with Bruce Schulman

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Kate Murphy, Jeremy Hand and Saunte Nicole Furnace

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Judith Owens and Betty Washington

Benefit Co-chairmen Page Smith and Shayna Smith

Phil Malet and Jim Rocap Nancy Sidamon Eristoff

Michael and Alexis DeBernards

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CHILDRENS LAW CENTER BENEFIT Kennedy Center Roof Terrace | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Jackie Zamarripa, Peter Edelman, Judith Sandalow and Ally Zamora

NEW HEIGHTS: Washington’s Children’s Law Center works tirelessly to help local youth living in poverty, struggling with disabilities or navigating the foster care system and CLC’s supporters were out in full force to continue efforts in their behalf this year. Guests also enjoyed unparalleled city views, cocktails and hors d’oeuvres while supporting CLC’s extremely important mission.

Hilary and Paul Perkins

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Chef Scott Drewno

James Beard Foundation President Susan Ungaro, Chef Sean Brock and Capricia P. Marshall

Philip Dufour

Occasions Catering’s Eric Michaels Lauren DeSantis and Corey Then

JAMES BEARD’S TASTE AMERICA Italian Embassy | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

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UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE: A year aer the State Department and the James Beard Foundation joined together to bridge international cultural gaps using the universal language of food, supporters turned out to celebrate Amici e Cucina (“Friends in the Kitchen”) and honor its architect, former Chief of Protocol Capricia P. Marshall, for her leadership of the Culinary Diplomacy Program. Veteran political strategist Donna Brazile emceed the festivities co-hosted by Italian Amb. Claudio Bisogniero, David Adler, Ken Crerar, Eric Kessler and Eric Michael.

Antonella and Carlo Romeo

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Andrew and Leslie Cockburn

Anita and David Ensor

Rula Awwad, Petra Barth and Janet Bruce

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LESLIE COCKBURN BOOK PARTY A-Bar at Avenue Suites | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

Tamara Buchwald

Virginia Shore and Bonnie Nelson Schwartz

POLITICAL THRILLER: Even longtime friends of author, filmmaker and former “60 Minutes” producer Leslie Cockburn didn’t know she had wri%en her first novel until the invitation for the party arrived in the mail from pals Conrad and Ludmila Cafritz, Joel and Tamara Buchwald and Bob and Sarah Nixon. Set in post-Saddam Hussein Iraq, “Baghdad Solitaire” has been described as a haunting novel of intrigue and romance set in a world of deception. Cockburn, who was the only Western journalist to interview both of the Iraqi dictator’s sons, Uday and Qusay Hussein, and who also scored a rare interview with Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi, says 30 years of journalism was “a great way to gather material for fiction.”

Angus Yates and Michael Cantor

Joel McCleary, Cayley Tullman and Matthew Hoh

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Mark Zetlin and Zsuzsi Zetlin Mark Guenther and Ernesto Santalla WL EXCLUSIVE

Katelyn Gimbel and Jana Sedlakova

MERCEDES-BENZ CLA CLASS BASH

Washington Redskins Wide Receiver Josh Morgan

Mercedes-Benz of Arlington | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

AFFORDABLE SOPHISTICATION: What be%er way to launch the first-ever vehicle by Mercedes-Benz geared to the under-35 set than a high-wa%age party that converted the showroom of Mercedes-Benz of Arlington into a disco for well-heeled scenesters and socialites? Hosted by GM Mark Zetlan and orchestrated by Red Peg Marketing, the festivities included Redskins players, thumping DJs, plentiful pla%ers of hors’ d’oeuvres and an open bar. Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week photographer Walter Grio made the scene by taking fashion shots of the 600 guests, six of whom drove home in newly purchased luxury coupes. NAME BRAND BARGAIN: The CLA Class model is Mercedes-Benz’s first car priced under $30,000 in recent memory and the company’s first front-wheel drive vehicle available in North America. “The CLA is a car that does not confuse mid-range with mediocrity,” said Dieter Zetsche, president and head of Mercedes-Benz Cars. “Its powerful design underscores the sporty side of the Mercedes-Benz brand.”

Garrett O’Shea, Brad Nierenberg and William Brower

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Bob Beckel and Juan Williams

Greg Williams

Curt and Piper Moffat

Doug Tieman

Dr. Anita Gadhia Smith and Dr. Ron Smith

Tara Handron and Hilary Phelps

CARON TREATMENT CENTER’S ‘RECOVERY FOR LIFE’ GALA National Museum of Women in the Arts | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Philippe Cousteau Jr. and Ashley Gorse Cousteau Lyn and Mark McFadden

SOBER APPLAUSE: Nothing is more difficult than standing in front of a room of 200 of your peers and openly sharing your flawed past. But for Bob Beckel, USA Today columnist and co-host of “The Five” it was all in a night’s work. His inspiring speech about his own experiences brought the crowd to its feet. The Caron Treatment Center, which as of October has given $12.5 million in care to those who can’t afford the full cost of treatment, honored Beckel with a Caron alumni Award and Greg Williams, creator of the documentary “The Anonymouse People,” with the Caron Advocacy Excellencey Award. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Erin Perkins, Zachary Johnson and Amanda Gunderson

Owner Elizabeth Mason and Alexander Firestone

Laura Biederman wl exclusive

Kelly Eaton

Chris French and Josh Mathis

Periwinkle’s Anniversary Party Periwinkle Potomac Greens | PHOTOS BY Kyle Samperton

Kristin Butler and Erika Baum

PERFECTLY PREP: Periwinkle, a haven for locals seeking seersucker, bright patterns and boat shoes, celebrated its Alexandria location’s eighth anniversary as well as the completion of a recent renovation. The fashion-conscious crowd sampled hors d’oeuvres and signature cocktails by DC Taste while enjoying a 10 percent discount off their preppy purchases.

Megan Marton and Stephanie Mikos

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Debbi Jarvis, Mary Brown, Kaya Henderson, Judith Terra and Sonya Ali

Chris and Carole Kerns

Mohini Malhotra and Cynthia Robbins

Nick Vilelle, Danielle Reyes and Kathy Freshly

Life Pieces to Masterpieces ‘Courage on Canvas’ Exhibit Opening Pepco Edison Place Gallery | PHOTOS BY TONY POWELL FROM BLANK TO BEAUTY: More than 150 art lovers gathered to celebrate 17 years of “homegrown art” created by young African American men in Wards 7 and 8. Before the end of the evening, six paintings were sold. Guests also participated in the creation of the arworks, each adding a brush stroke to help turn a blank canvas into a masterpiece. That’s what Life Pieces to Masterpieces hopes to do with each of their apprentices.

Rod Palmer, Candice Mitchell and Chip Ellis

Joyce Brayboy, Maria Gomez and Kim Watson

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HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandMyWashington RealEstateNewsandOpenHouse|To come

&YPPHS^MRKE 4EXLXS,ETTMRIWW In a rundown rambler, John Lueders saw an opportunity to fulfill a lifelong dream. BY LAURA WAINMAN PHOTOS BY TONY BROWN

HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

hen John Lueders first saw the site of his future home in 1990, it was not love at first sight. The scenery and McLean location were ideal, but the dilapidated 1949 rambler on the lot was far from perfect. Lueders made do for years as a bachelor, but when he married Beth Larson in 1997 he knew it was time for an upgrade. Having had a lifelong dream of designing his own house, he took matters into his own hands. “We redecorated with a bulldozer,” he says. Lueders and Larson met with architect Mark McInturff to begin designing a new house from scratch in 2000 and it was completed in 2003. Lueders came to the table with a clear idea of what he wanted: a lot of stone, wood and glass to show off the greenery of the site, a pinwheel shape and a modern, “humanist contemporary” style. “John wanted a stone house, but it was Mark’s vision to reverse the plan, making the exterior walls stucco and bringing the stone inside,” Larson says. While the stone and wood dictated the muted color palette of the interior, Lueders and Larson preferred the airy and clean vibe that materialized due to the lack of vibrant colors. The couple, who recently spent two months on a cruise from Hong Kong to Venice, are very influenced by the simplicity of Japanese style and modeled the house after a Japanese Minka- a traditional rural home with the dwelling level raised above the ground, much like a Swiss chalet. To them, it was both an efficient design in terms of circulation as well as an aesthetically pleasing style. “The Japanese have a very elegant way of expressing beauty in a way that relates to nature without being sterile,” Lueders says. When Lueders and Larson aren’t traveling, which they usually do at least once a week every month, the retired pair, a former Booz Allen Hamilton senior vice president and a former congressional staffer, respectively, split their time pursuing hobbies, entertaining and dining out. For Lueders, constructing a 1964 Shelby Cobra USRRC

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PREVIOUS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Eight years after the house was completed, Lueders and Larson added a pool, patio and pool house to their property and Larson estimates that they use their outdoor spaces as much, if not more, than the interior of their house. Nearly all the furniture in the house, the bedroom included, was custom-made by John Reed Fox, whom they met at the Baltimore Craft Show 20 years ago. Lueders had the original 1964 Shelby Cobra USRRC roadster flown to his house so that he could get the details exactly right on his replica. The painting in the dining room is one of the few places where color can be seen in the house, as the couple felt a muted color scheme fit the stone and woodwork of their house much better than vibrant tones. THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: Larson spends much of her day in the kitchen experimenting with complex dishes to serve at her next dinner party. As an avid fan of architecture, Lueders’ ofifce is filled with hundreds of books on the works of his favorite architects from Frank Lloyd Wright to Mark McInturff (who built their house). The wood enclosed stairwell in the entryway immediately sets the tone of the house.

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roadster replica occupy many of his days and he can often be found in his luxurious workspace, complete with a mounted flat-screen TV, inside the three-car garage that contains his many sports cars. The replica was intended to be his retirement project, but he began accumulating rare parts in 2010, three years before he retired. While Lueders tinkers in his garage, Larson is busy whipping up gourmet meals. Whether in her stone-and-cherry-wood kitchen or at her outdoor wood-burning pizza oven, she finds great pleasure in executing more complex dishes. Even when she is serving pizza, don’t expect a hum-drum pie that you could find at any casusal eatery. “I use the same ingredients, the same methods as in Naples,” Larson says. Food is a central part of the couple’s home life because they ate most meals out during their working years. They are now considered regulars at many local establishments, including Restaurant Eve where they eat every Friday (“date night”); their 100th dinner was on the house, and they are now well over 500 meals at the restaurant. “We love the people just as much as the food,” Lueders says. “When we are there we are eating with family. We have hosted three or four baby showers for employees of the restaurant, and have had [chef] Cathal and Meshelle [Armstrong] over for dinner many times.” “Last week,” Larson chimed in,“Chef even made a special meal-to-go for our dog!” Though the two couples have dined together many times, Larson admits that the first time she prepared a meal for Cathal Armstrong, who has cooked for President Obama, was quite intimidating. “It is actually kind of a funny story,” Lueders says. “Chef is Irish and Beth was making one of her signature dishes, cinnamon beef filet. It’s cooked in several spices but with a very distinctive cinnamon taste. After dinner Chef and Todd [Thrasher, Restaurant Eve’s general manager and sommelier] were clearly amused by something. Thrasher finally explained that Armstrong thinks Americans use far too much cinnamon, and they use it as a flavoring rather than a spice. ‘But to your credit,’ he added, ‘you actually used it as a spice and this was exquisite.’” “It’s funny now,” Larson says with a chuckle.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Multimillion-Dollar Mansions The former residence of Federal Reserve Chairman William McChesney Martin sells for nearly $8 million; billionaire Eric Hotung and biotech guru Bill Haseltine sell in the $7 million-$10 million range BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

A garden view of biotech guru Bill Haseltine’s residence at 3053 P Street NW, which recetly sold for $7 million.

THE DISTRICT The 112-year-old Patterson mansion, the sole remaining example of the grand houses that once graced Dupont Circle, is under contract with French Quarter Hospitality, an Atlanta-based company. The buyer plants to convert the property, which The Washington Club listed this summer for a cool $26 million, into a boutique hotel. DUPONT CIRCLENW, once owned by Eleanor “Cissy� Patterson, was the center of social life for a who’s who of Washington during the first half of the 20th century. The 36,000-square-foot, four-story white marble and brick residence was designed by architect Stanford White in 1901. TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Jonathan Taylor is the listing agent. Biotech pioneer Bill Haseltine sold   PSTREETNW for $7 million (original price $12 million) to Argentine billionaire Carlos

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Bulgheroni and his wife Natalia. Along with

his brother Alejandro, Bulgheroni runs one of the largest oil and gas exploration companies in South America. The 10,000-square-foot Victorian mansion, a true Georgetown grande dame, occupies a private corner lot in the East Village. Built in 1875, the nine-bedroom house (plus a staff apartment) has been meticulously renovated and features soaring ceilings, grand public rooms, a 40-foot lap pool, private terraced garden and onsite parking for six cars. Washington Fine Properties’ Mark McFadden represented both parties in the transaction. The former residence of the late William McChesney Martin Jr. and his wife, Cynthia Davis, fetched $7,950,000 in a sale brokered by Ellen Morrell, Matthew McCormick and Ben Roth of Washington Fine Properties. Martin was the ninth and longest-serving chairman of the United States Federal Reserve

Bank, serving from 1951 to 1970 under five presidents. Located in Massachusetts Avenue Heights, the extraordinary 1929 residence at   WOODLAND DRIVE NW is a perfect example of true Georgian architecture with a meticulous renovation. It features intricately detailed crown moldings, magnificent millwork, 10-foot ceilings and seven bedrooms. The extremely private 12,865square-foot lot includes a front security gate, flagstone terrace, professional landscaping and a deep garden with patios and walkways. Matt Frei sold  TILDENSTREETNW to Nancy Tobin and Neal Cohen for $1.6 million. Mr. Frei is a German-born British TV news journalist and former Washington correspondent for Britain’s Channel 4 News. The stylish whitewashed six-bedroom brick Cleveland Park house is tucked away on a quiet cul de sac and features a lower-level recreation room, au pair suite and attached garage. Washington Fine Properties’ Marylyn Paige was the listing agent; TTR Sotheby’s Katherine Buckley was the buyer’s agent. A four-bedroom Georgetown residence at RSTREETNW was sold for $2,170,000. Chris Sower was the buyer while Harry Abel was the seller. Michael Ranking of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty represented both parties. The Federal townhouse, built in 1972, boasts a gourmet kitchen, top-floor family room, flagstone terrace with outdoor living space and a heated pool. Arts patron Patricia Sagon bought   ELLICOTTSTREETNW from Byron Auguste and Emily Bloomfield for $3,150,000. Mr. Auguste is a senior economic advisor for the Obama administration. Ms. Bloomfield currently leads a startup initiative to address the educational needs of pre-teens and teens in foster care. She also serves on the board of the D.C. College Success Foundation. The six-bedroom house sits amid mature

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James and Lark Wallwork sold   WISCONSINAVENUE  in Chevy Chase’s

Parc Somerset luxury condominium building for $3.5 million to Bruce Lane and Leslie Barron. Mr. Wallwork served in both houses of the New Jersey Legislature and ran for governor in that state twice. The swank two-bedroom apartment features a gourmet kitchen, stellar city views, and access to indoor and outdoor swimming pools, a health club and tennis and racquetball courts. TTR Sotheby’s Zelda Heller represented both the buyer and the seller.

VIRGINIA The former residence of Hong Kong business tycoon Eric Hotung and his wife, Patricia Shea Hotung at   CHAIN BRIDGE ROAD in MARYLAND William and Laura Kappaz purchased McLean sold for $9.5 million to Eagle Crest   DRUMMOND AVENUE in Chevy LLC. Mr. Hotung’s grandfather founded the Chase for $4.1 million from Thomas and Hong Kong gold and silver exchange and was Patricia Rainwater. Mr. Kappaz is CEO of once said to be the wealthiest man in China. Mr. K&M Group, an engineering and consulting Hotung became a billionaire in his own right firm. The farmhouse-style 8,000-square-foot in the mid-1990s after working in international Colonial was built in 2009 and includes six real estate investment. He purchased the 6.5bedrooms and six bathrooms. Top-of-the-line acre property, formerly owned by Sen. Ted amenities abound in this pristine property. Kennedy, for $5,880,000. The 10-bedroom, TTR Sotheby’s David DeSantis was the listing eight-bath house was built in 1968. Long & agent while Michael Rankin, also of Sotheby’s, Foster’s Fouad Talout was the listing agent; represented the buyers. Pascale Karam was the buyer’s agent.

The Woodland Drive NW mansion once owned by Federal Reserve Chairman William McChesney Martin recently sold for $7.95 million.

trees and lush gardens in a beautiful section of Forest Hills. Interior amenities of the custom-built 1999 Colonial include a milled cherry paneled office with wet bar plus a library, wine cellar, sound-proofed music studio and master suite with solarium. The exterior features a demi-lune covered loggia overlooking the manicured walled garden, pool and patio. The listing agents were TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Christie Weiss and Christopher Ritzert. The buyer’s agent was Patricia Lore of Evers & Company Real Estate.

PROPERTYLINES KOPPEL’S MANOR: Former “Nightline� anchor and American news icon Ted Koppel has listed his historic Maryland estate, “The Cross Manor,� for $3,945,000.   CROSS MANOR ROAD rests on 110 acres along the shores of the Saint Inigoes Creek in Maryland. Many say the main house may be the oldest in Maryland. The property features a four-bedroom residence which dates back to at least 1765, two guesthouses, a boathouse, pool, and tennis courts. “Cross Manor� was originally a King’s Land Grant of 2,000 acres bestowed upon Thomas Cornwallis in 1639. The original building is once believed to have been pillaged and burned by pirates. TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s David DeSantis is the listing agent.

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LIVE LIKE AN AMBASSADOR: The former Bulgarian Embassy at VANBURENSTREETNW in Brightwood is now listed for $1,275,000 with Michael Hines of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty. The current owner, Jeffrey Haggray, is a former pastor of the 210-year-old First Baptist Church in Washington. The Beaux Arts residence in Rock Creek Park was originally built as a church in 1928 and now features seven bedrooms and five baths. The former church sanctuary was transformed into a dazzling great room. RIVERFRONT DREAMING: Chain Bridge Bank director Paul Shiffman listed  CREST

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LANE in McLean for $7,750,000. Mr. Shiffman is also a senior partner and president of Shiffman & Ricci. The spectacular fourbedroom house overlooking the Potomac sits on more than three acres in McLean’s swanky Gold Coast. Among the property’s shining features are its great walls of windows, soaring cathedral ceilings, a twostory stone fireplace, impressive indoor heated pool and ample guest parking for over 35 cars. Washington Fine Properties’ Mark McFadden is the listing agent. K A LO R A M A G E M : Pa u l Murtagh and Erin Cleary listed  BELMONT ROAD NW for $5,995,000. Ms. Cleary is an

associate at Cleary & Oxford Associates, a healthcare advisory firm. Mr. Murtagh works in private equity at Carraig Capital. The nine-bedroom, eight-bath 1920sera residence sits on two oversized lots and has been completely renovated to include substantial additions. The property boasts gracious public rooms, exquisite finishes, a lower level au-pair suite, oversize terraces, formal gardens, a two-car garage and gated motor court for eight to 10 vehicles. The 84-year-old estate is listed by Mark McFadden of Washington Fine Properties. Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@ washingtonlife.com.

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HOME LIFE | OVERTHEMOON

Historic Halls “Lockesly” and “Carter Hall” host top-notch affairs; “Marley Grange” goes on the market BY VICKY MOON

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cross the Shenandoah River (pronounced “rivah” in these parts) nestled on 212 stunning acres in Millwood, historic “Carter Hall” recently hosted a reunion of the Carter Society, a nonprofit family genealogical association. Members date their lineage to Robert “King” Carter, the richest man in colonial America in the late 17th century whose original holdings in Virginia spanned 50,212 acres. Around 50 people gathered at the elegant 18th-century estate built by Carter’s great grandson Nathaniel Burwell between 1789 and 1797 on 8,000 inherited acres. Now down to 200 acres, it’s the Clarke County home base of Project HOPE (Health Opportunities for People Everywhere). Founded in 1958, the organization offers solutions to health problems around the world. Joseph Farland, a former U.S. ambassador to Pakistan and Iraq and a Project HOPE board member, donated the estate to the nonprofit group in 1978. Meanwhile, the Carters gathered at this annual event to learn more about the life of their influential ancestors and fascinating descendants. Once such distant cousin of the Burwells was Gerard B. Lambert Sr., who purchased “Carter Hall” in 1929 to “keep it in the family.” His father, Jordon Lambert, had made a fortune with the antiseptic mouthwash Listerine and no expense was spared in the renovations. In 1932, Gerard Lambert’s daughter Rachel (“Bunny”) Lambert, married Stacy Lloyd Jr. and for the first few years of their marriage, the couple lived on the property. (She divorced Lloyd in 1946 and married oil and banking heir Paul Mellon in May of 1948.) A fascinating side note here is that soon after the outbreak of World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Lambert if “Carter Hall” could serve as the Summer White House. The Secret Service spent several

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A panoramic view of historic “Carter Hall,” once the home of Robert “King” Carter, the richest man in colonial America (Courtesy of Project Hope)

days examining every inch of the property. will be Carole King. Raffle items included a Roosevelt later informed Lambert that case of local wine and date night packages to another estate, “Shangri La,” in the Catoctin the Middleburg Film Festival. Among those Mountains of Maryland, had been chosen who helped to raise a record $70,000 for the instead. That property was renamed “Camp animals: Stuart Himelfarb, Mike Smith (the new president of the Upperville Horse Show), David” by President Dwight D. Eisenhower Today, “Carter Hall” also serves as a Donald Glickman, Dave Mullins, Allen Richards, conference center for Save the Children, the Manley Johnson and Zohar Ben-Dov. For anyone wanting to join in the social American Bird Conservancy and the Sorensen swirl in Millwood,Tom Cammack of SheridanInstitute of the University of Virginia. Just around the corner at Danielle and Ron MacMahon Ltd. Realtors in Middleburg is Bradley’s “Lockesly,” the Fourth Annual Animal offering “Marley Grange,” an elegantly appointed Night stag event took place recently. This 70- 5,600-square-foot house on 75 acres with a tenacre property, at one time part of the massive stall barn, riding ring and trails. Asking price: “Carter Hall” estate, was listed at $4.9 million $2.6 million. and purchased by the Bradleys in 2012. Ron Bradley introduced guests Suzanne Clark , founder and CEO of the Potomac Research Group, and Tim Swift, an Emmy-nominated TV producer who spoke to the men gathered for an Animal Rescue Fund benefit. The evening of conversation, great food, wine, cognac and cigars, cocktails and dinner was followed by a live auction of tickets to the “2014 Music Cares” “Marley Grange” in Millwood, Va. is on the market for $2.6 concert held annually in Los Angeles million. (Courtesy of Sheridan MacMahon Ltd.) during Grammy week. The honoree

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HOME LIFE | OPENHOUSE

Unique Finds One-of-a-kind properties currently on the real estate market

LYONVILLAGE  NHERNDONSTREET ARLINGTON}VA

ASKING PRICE $2,825,000

Built by BCN Homes in 2007, this stately Colonial LISTING AGENT: brings the best of today to this historic community. With John Eric, 703789-0097; TTR approximately 6,400-square-feet of living space, the house Sotheby’s Internafeatures six bedrooms and five full baths in addition to a tional Realty luxurious master suite with sitting and dressing rooms, a marble fireplace and oversized spa-like bath. The gourmet kitchen is outfitted with Sub-Zero, Wolf and Miele appliances while an outdoor kitchen and stone-walled patio offers an additional space to cook and entertain. The fully finished lower level includes an au pair suite, billiard room and home theater with HD projection. From the Crestron full home audio/video system spanning 14 rooms to the custom wainscoting and built-ins to the hand-selected tiles and multiple marble fireplaces, the residence offers top-of-the-line finishes at every turn.

GREATFALLS JEFFERSONRUNROAD GREATFALLS}VA

ASKING PRICE $2,100,000

LISTING AGENT Located in a private community, the property Karen Washburn, 703is bordered by acres of conservation land with 759-2199; Long & Foster protected views. Designed to sit lightly on the Real Estate land and to take advantage of lovely waterfront vistas, the house provides a year-round window on nature. This custom home features an 18½-foot-tall great room with two floor-to-ceiling walls of glass, an exposed beam ceiling and interior balconies trimmed with hand-carved Kerala teak panels. Hardwood floors, window walls, open beam ceilings, clerestory windows, and skylights are among the architectural details of this contemporary residence.

GEORGETOWN

PROSPECTSTREET}NW WASHINGTON}DC

ASKING PRICE $4,395,000 LISTING AGENT: Mary Grover Ehrgood, 202-2744694; Washington Fine Properties, LLC

This end-unit Georgetown property is one of the last six Wormley Row townhomes available, with 4,900 square feet of unfinished interior space allowing the buyer to choose the floor plan and finishes ranging from traditionally classic moldings and millwork to European-style contemporary appointments. Only brand new materials of the finest quality coupled with expert craftsmanship and timeless design will be used. Also included are two underground garage parking spaces and an elevator servicing all four main floors.

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MYWASHINGTON Kevin Plank, Under Armour founder & Fight Night co-chairman

YOU STARTED UNDER ARMOR IN YOUR GRANDMOTHER’S GEORGETOWN HOUSE. WHAT WAS THE TURNING POINT? During our company’s earliest days, we relied heavily on word of mouth. We felt confident that we had come up with the right T-shirt design, and I had maxed out all of our credit cards. At that point, we decided to go all-in and spend our remaining money on an ad in ESPN the Magazine. Simultaneously, a friend recommended our apparel to a production team that was shooting a football movie with Al Pacino and Jamie Foxx called “Any Given Sunday.” We outfitted every actor in our gear and they loved it. The movie was a box-office smash, and our logo was prominently displayed all over the country.

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AS A FORBES BILLIONAIRE LISTEE, HOW DO YOU GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY? One of the initiatives I’m most proud of is our “WIN” platform, which is dedicated to creating new sports and education facilities in communities where Under Armour has a presence. Baltimore’s Dunbar High School served as the pilot for this program. We partnered with the wonderful people in that community to build a brand new football stadium, locker room and computer labs. We look to local pride by increasing young people’s access to meaningful sports experiences and creating new learning

opportunities for them. We’re very excited to take the WIN program into Washington, D.C. and across the globe in 2014. HOW DOES FIGHT FOR CHILDREN FIT WITH YOUR GIVING GOALS? I made a promise to Joe Robert that I would help keep his mission alive after he passed. This event has always been one of my favorites, not just because of the cigars and networking but also because of the major impact it made immediately in the community. Under Armour committed to chair Fight Night 2013 because we felt we could get behind the Fight For Children engine and raise a great deal of money for the efforts already underway in D.C. In addition, we will be able to fund initiatives under our WIN Baltimore platform to do great things for the children in our region. WHAT DID YOU DO DIFFERENTLY? We took the foundation of a solid event and built from there including entertainment from Grammy Award-winning musician John Legend, adding the Golden Gloves Lounge for all of the highest contributors, improving the dining experience and providing guests the opportunity to bet on the boxing matches, with all of the money raised going back to support our next generation.

MY TOP SPOTS 1. I started Under Armor in Georgetown in my grandma’s basement. 2. I enjoy running by all of the monuments. My run route is Towpath to Rock Creek Park back down past the Watergate and the Kennedy Center, by the Lincoln Memorial, up past the World War II Memorial around the Washington Monument back down the Reflecting Pool and back to Georgetown. 3. My favorite restaurant is Filomena owned by Mac Bastidas.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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K E V I N P L A N K P H OTO C O U R T E S Y. A L L OT H E R S F L I C K R .

AS THE SON OF A MAYOR (KENSINGTON, MD.) WHAT LED YOU TO BECOME AN ENTREPRENEUR? At its core, politics is designed to solve problems and find new solutions, which is very similar to how entrepreneurial concepts evolve. In particular, that’s how Under Armour was founded. As a football player, I hated the way my heavy, sweat-soaked T-shirt felt when I was practicing in 90-degree heat. I knew there had to be a solution, and I felt empowered to chase that passion for creating something better.


Washington Life Magazine - November 2013 - FULL ISSUE