Issuu on Google+

SCHOOLS DOES SUSPENSION WORK? 13 DRINKING SPOKANE’S NEW CIDERS 38 MUSIC ALICE IN CHAINS RETURNS! 49

SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2013 | BOREDOM’S CURE

2 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

inside

Invest in Your Local gifts,Co-Op local food

A FULL SERVICE GROCERY STORE & SO MUCH MORE!

SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2013 | Vol. 20, No. 47

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 THE WORK ISSUE 20 CULTURE 31 FOOD 38 FILM 44

MUSIC 49 EVENTS 54 bulletin board 58 WELLNESS 59 I SAW YOU 60 LAST WORD 62

Be part of the movement JoinDowntown’s now and recieve 10% full time fulloff service grocery store your purchase.

A Value Driven Decision

• Democratically owned by 2000 local members

• Locally made soap • Great gifts for foodies • Over 800 local products wood earrings Fair trade wool clothing ••A Sustainable MISSION to put local community over profit and goods Sustainable kitchenware •• COMMITMENT to ingredient integrity Local greenery keep 100% profits andsupplies jobs in Spokane •• We Gluten freeofbaking can shop, anyone can join! Poinsettias and bouquets •• Everyone Local, vegetarian, and gluten free your meal Locally made jewelry scan with your phone andfoods “Likefor us” onholiday Facebook! • Not for profit

• • • •

44 W. Main Ave 509-458-2667 www.MainMarket.coop Mon~Sat 8am – 8pm Sun 10am – 6pm Free Parking

ON THE COVER | CHRIS BOVEY DESIGN

COLLEGE LIFE

How 10 strangers and I learned to live an environmentally friendly life

ORLISONBREWING.COM

page 31 CLEM’S GOLD | IPL | LIZZY’S RED | BRÜNETTE | HAVANÜTHER SUDS & CINEMA

Animal House taught us that college is the best excuse to be an idiot you’ll ever have

FREE Teeth Whitening

$500 value with New Patient Exam, Xrays & Cleaning

& Botox Cosmetic Monday’s

page 47

20 units only $180

inlander the pacific northwest

1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, Spokane, WA 99201 Phone: 509-325-0634 | Email: info@inlander.com Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, RSS, Tumblr and at Inlander.com

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email trevorr@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2013, Inland Publications, Inc.

Spok ane | E a s tern Wa shington | North Idaho

Collins Family Dentistry

Call for your appointment today!

(509) 487.9000 15 E. Central Ave, Spokane (509) 235.8451 1841 First St, Cheney

Now THATʼS the reflection I LOVE to see in the mirror. Say goodbye to your problem areas in 3 to 5 short treatments with VASERShape!™ A non-invasive body contouring using ultrasound and massage to reduce those stubborn areas. As seen on Dr. Oz.

50 OFF %

YOUR FIRST TREATMENT

EXTENDING SPECIAL. OFFER EXPIRES 9/30/13.

Now Accepting Care Credit

Introducing: Debbie Migliore Licensed Esthetician

Melissa Sousley, MD | Spokane Enhanced Health | (509) 466-1188

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 3

COME EXPERIENCE THE BEAUTIFUL

SOUTH perry neighbOrhOOd Local Shopping • Unique Restaurants • Farmer’s Market • Community Resources and Events

Florist and Greenhouse, Inc.

E. 8th Ave

SPOKANE BUDDHIST TEMPLE

E. 9th Ave

south perry

yoga

South Perry

South Perry Street

E. 10th Ave

E. 11th Ave

Lorien Over 1,000 Herbs & More!

b o u t i q u e

Liberty Park

FAMILY DENTISTRY

E. 12th Ave

The Perry District is just minutes south of Downtown Spokane!

him & her Vintage furniture 111O S. PERRY ST.

Easily accesible via Southeast Blvd., off of 3rd Ave and Arthur St., or the Altamont St. exit #283

/SouthPerry

Events Schedule Join us! Always plenty of free on-street parking! Thursday Farmer’s Market • Every Thursday • 3-7pm Tomato Festival • September 5th • Shop Parking Lot

4 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Lantern Tap House • Live Music • September 12th • W/ Mama Doll & Hannah Reader • 9pm

COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Mike Bookey (x279) CULTURE EDITOR

WHAT WAS YOUR WORST JOB EVER? MILES BUCHANAN

I was a heating and air conditioning guy for a summer in Pennsylvania. It’s 120 degrees in those roofs and all the fiberglass sticks to you. After a summer, I was pretty over it.

Back To School Specials LASER HAIR REMOVAL

Lip, Chin, Underarms, or Bikini Line ONLY for a package of 8 treatments! Reg. $600

$149

1/2 Legs $599 reg. $1,400 Full Legs $999 reg. $2,200

Remove all the sun damage from your face! Laser Pigment removal and a microdermabrasion for only $199 ! *call the office for details.

Laser Tattoo Removal starting at $99 Professional Teeth Whitening $99 reg. $149 Specials must be booked by 9/30/13

Chris Bovey (x248) ART DIRECTOR Lisa Waananen (x239) WEB EDITOR

Laura Johnson (x250) MUSIC EDITOR

Chey Scott (x225) LISTINGS EDITOR Michael Mahoney COPY EDITOR

Heidi Groover (x249) Jacob Jones (x237), Deanna Pan (x282), Daniel Walters (x263) STAFF WRITERS

JILL DICKISON

I worked at Pizza Perfection for a year — it was horrible. I was the only girl there working with a bunch of college guys, so it wasn’t really that great of a working environment. And it was just really dirty.

Young Kwak

PHOTOGRAPHER

Amy Alkon, Andy Borowitz, Robert Herold, Jim Hightower, Scott Renshaw, Stephen Schlange, Carrie Scozzaro, Leah Sottile, Howie Stalwick, David Teller

Botox, Juvederm, Radiesse, Collagen Rejuvenation/Skin Tightening, Brown Spot/Sun Damage Removal, Microdermabrasions, Spa Facials/Chemical Peels, Laser Hair Removal for all skin types, Spider Vein Removal, Pigment Removal, Photo facials, Tattoo Removal.

CONTRIBUTORS

Anna Clausen, Mychaela Nickoloff, Beth Notturno, Kara Stermer INTERNS

ADVERTISING Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Bruce Deming (x217), Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

C.W. GILLEY

I worked at a furniture factory in the south. It was an assembly line, and I had to grab chairs off the line, assemble them and box them. No air conditioning, and it was hot and humid. … And to get paid you had to wait in line for your cash.

Autumn Adrian (x251), Jamie Albertini (x247), Bonnie Amstutz (x212), Gail Golden (x236), Emily Walden (x260) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Elverum (x223) DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Raevyn West (x222)

MARKETING COORDINATOR

Rebecca Rison (x216) ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Eric Norman

SALES & MARKETING INTERN

BOB BEAUMIER

As a little kid, I was an actor in a play and I had a lot of energy. The director and I didn’t get along, and he sent me home. Said I couldn’t be in the play. ... He told me, “You are very stupid,” and even called my mom to tell her I wasn’t cut out for it.

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Angela Rendall (x213)

OPERATIONS ASSISTANT

Trevor Rendall (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

PRODUCTION Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x238), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Spaccia (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

JUNE SAHLBERG

I happened upon this dentist who said he didn’t want someone trained. He decided to train me himself. I didn’t get along well with another lady who worked there who had gone to school for her training. It was like she went out of her way to be unkind to me. The dentist said, “Go work it out.” She did not want to work it out, and we both wound up losing our jobs.

INTERVIEWS BY BETH NOTTURNO STARBUCKS ON 29TH AVE., 9/2/13

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 5

CA$H REWARD TOP PRICE$

PAID!

E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton)

Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 8-4

Aluminum Stainless Steel Brass Copper Gold Silver

www.actionrecycling.com

MASON LAW FAMILY LAW • Divorce • Spousal Maintenance / Alimony • Child Support Modifications • Parenting Plans AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

Craig Mason W. 1707 BROADWAY, SPOKANE, WA | 509443-3681

Do you feel lost, alone or bored in your marriage? Are you frustrated, hurt or angry with your spouse?

RETROUVAILLE

CAN HELP!

For confidential information and registration call:

509.520.4118 800.470.2230

www.HelpOurMarriage.com

6 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Cathy McMorris Rodgers held a town hall last month, but defunding Obamacare didn’t win the room for her

C

athy McMorris Rodgers’ summertime town meeting, surprisingly, turned out to be a rousing affair: Cheers, boos and one protester who was actually carried out as he shouted, “She’s a fascist!” And as it turned out, most of the questions at the Aug. 21 event, picked at random, were anything but “softball.” Health care took up the biggest chunk of the hour. McMorris Rodgers opened by reasserting that she wants to repeal the entire law and “start over.” DEFUND OBAMACARE! — that was the partisan battle cry. She did have her supporters. One, who led with “I’m a veteran” (apparently presuming that being a veteran makes him an authority on health care), asserted that he too opposes socialized medicine and supports DEFUNDING OBAMACARE! He then asked for a show of hands of all those who have been in or lived in a country that had socialized medicine. Drat! Over a third of the hands went up. So many socialists, so little time. Faced with this obvious insurrection, he shouted out: “Well, then why don’t you all just move to one of those countries!” (Kind of like the old Vietnam-era line: “America, love it or leave it.”) Then came the curve ball, low and on the outside corner of the plate. The very next questioner, a woman, used her time to ask McMorris Rodgers a question, but also to respond to the anti-socialized-medicine line. She pointed out that our war hero had both veterans’ benefits and Medicare: “He is already living off of socialized medicine.” Her comment was the biggest applause line of the hour.

L

Have you thought about separation or divorce?

Retrouvaille™

Mixed Reviews BY ROBERT HEROLD

483-4094

We offer tools for rediscovering a loving marriage relationship. For over 30 years, thousands of couples have overcome their marriage problems through our program.

COMMENT | HEALTH CARE

Retreat weeke

n

ds Cottonwood, ID Sept 13-15 Spokane, WA S ept 20-22

et’s specify: The Affordable Care Act no doubt will need more work. And how could it be otherwise? The gap between the parties precluded a tightly drawn bill. The Democrats in Congress wanted universal coverage, while the Republicans never deviated from their “exceptionalist” claim that “America has the best health care system in the world” — a claim that moves us right into the theater of the absurd. And we aren’t talking just about covering the poor; no, we’re talking about middle class people who have no institutional health care coverage, get sick and watch their life savings go out the window. (I personally know of three such victims, all hard-working.) Alas, both parties seem to agree on one thing — the continued care and feeding of the for-profit health care industry, no matter what. Nobel Prizewinning economist Joseph Stiglitz reports that the health insurance industry has 3,000 lobbyists, six for every member of Congress, working around the clock to make certain that neither party gets out of line. Whether Nixon or Clinton or Bush or Obama, they all faced the same steep hill

and extreme pressures: Don’t mess with the private, for-profit system. The same questioner went on to chastise McMorris Rodgers and her party for doing nothing more than working to overturn Obamacare, instead of trying to fix it: “It has taken the Congress a century just to get this far; ‘starting over’ is just another way of saying let’s do nothing at all.”

P

resident Obama’s tactics during the debate over health care reform were flawed. What might he have had done differently?  He could have taken up the problem more incrementally, turning the exercise into a play on the old story about the frog in the slowly heating water. Make the opposition deal with the parental coverage issue, the portability issue, the prior conditions issue, then turn to financing all those changes and move on from there.  He could have provided more guidance to Congress.  He could have devoted more time to research and analysis, so that when Republicans claimed that America had the best health care in the world, the absurdity of their position would have been obvious.  He could have talked more about the interrelationships between universal health care, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.  He could have devoted more run-up time to the problems of cost containment.  He could have more effectively illustrated the effects of doing nothing, beginning as he did with the fact that 17 percent of our gross domestic product is spent on health care — by far the highest in the world — and ending with more discussion of the impact of health care costs, especially on small businesses. All this criticism I’d agree with, but in a fundamental way, these are all moot points. We now know that Republicans had no intention of cooperating at all with Obama; no matter what he proposed, they would have opposed. They refused even to be instructed by the Congressional Budget Office’s findings (“CBO has their numbers, and I have mine,” said John Boehner, to which I can only respond “swell”). The GOP instead set out to wallow in demagoguery, the more the better (e.g. death panels). Perhaps this is why Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ few noticeably awkward moments were clustered around the very issue she likely expected to receive the least criticism and opposition. 

COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Beating the Arts Flu BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

T

he shocking death of the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre should not be viewed in isolation; it’s the latest case of a nasty strain of cultural influenza that’s hit the Inland Northwest over the past year. Interplayers and the Civic have been running high fevers; the Spokane Symphony had to call in sick for an entire month; the MAC continues to be quarantined over in Browne’s Addition; and the City of Spokane even pulled the plug on its Arts Commission. If this were a coal mine, we’d be running out of canaries. For some reason, our cultural tradition here has been to let Darwin’s theories rule; arts organizations must pull themselves up by their bootstraps or go the way of the Dodo, we seem to think. This ignores the reality that the traditional arts funding paradigm — government funding, corporate underwriting — has also evolved. But if you peek outside the confines of the Inland Northwest, you’ll see a different picture. Cities that recognize the value of a vibrant arts scene (proven by study after study) are providing a solid foundation for their institutions. In Seattle, they apply most of their admissions taxes to a cultural fund that local arts organizations can apply to for grants. In Denver and Salt Lake City, they have levied a one-tenth of 1 percent sales tax on themselves to fund local arts. In Salt Lake City, they call it ZAP — the Zoo, Arts and Parks Program. In 2011, $1.4 million was distributed to more than 150 organizations. When the tax last came up for approval, more than 70 percent of voters (in one of the most conservative states in the nation) supported it. In Washington, the notion of taxing yourself for the arts hasn’t yet been given the go-ahead in Olympia. Arts advocates, however, have been lobbying for the passage of the Cultural Access Fund, which would allow for a ZAP fund here. Spokane and the Inland Northwest must realize that our arts scene is a fragile thing — so fragile, most grown-up cities have long ago abandoned the idea of leaving it to survival of the fittest. Then we need to strategize a better future, and getting behind the Cultural Access Fund is a no-brainer. But how? Perhaps the Spokane Arts Fund can channel the energies of such a disparate group of individual artists and organizations. Haven’t heard of it? It was pulled out of mothballs just last year by City Council President Ben Stuckart to replace the city’s Arts Commission. Funded by the Downtown Spokane Partnership, the Public Facilities District and Visit Spokane, the Arts Fund’s newly hired executive director, Shannon Roach, will join longtime local arts advocate Karen Mobley there in a couple weeks. It’s good timing, as we need to get our arts scene back in good health. 

Kozm ik Drea mZz y a Hill rd The Janis Joplin Project

2013

Wick ed Obse ssio n To m m y G .

Saturday Sept 7th

N. Market Street on Queen & Olympic

Hippie Happening

10-6 pm

Strawberry Fields

& Raw Sugar

Presented by Hillyard Merchants Committee & Hillyard Hippie Chicks

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 7

COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

How do you define a “good” job? ANTHONY ROBERT SCHULTZ: One that doesn’t require you to work on Labor Day. GOFF DAILY: Any work that leaves you feeling energized for having done it is a good job. REBECCA BLANKINSHIP: Within 25 miles of home. Vacation and sick time. Medical insurance. Part time preferable. EMILY NANCE: My job! Flexible hours and creating passive income instead of working for an hourly wage for the rest of my life!

FUN RET AIL THE RAP Y

BOO RADLEY’S Uncommon Gifts

232 N. HOWARD • 456-7479 ACROSS FROM THE CAROUSEL

20 YEARS VOTED BEST GIFTS

GUEST EDITORIAL

JACK OHMAN CARTOON

Restoring Balance By moving more and more toward one-party rule, the state of Idaho is no longer representing the needs of all its citizens BY TRAVIS MANNING

I

WE CAN HELP!

BANKRUPTCY?

ACCIDENT/INJURY? SOCIAL SECURITY? Taking New Clients Deissner Law Office 509.462.0827 www.deissnerlaw.com 1707 W. Broadway Spokane, WA 99201

Licensed in Washington & Idaho

8 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

am proud to be an Idaho Mormon Democrat. No, that’s not an oxymoron — there are thousands of Idaho Democrats across this great state who are also active members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I was raised in a Mormon household by dedicated parents who happened to be Republican. For years, I esteemed the tenets of the Republican Party as part and parcel to my own moral compass. For years, I was a dedicated Republican and happy with a party perhaps best epitomized by President Ronald Reagan. Pragmatic, Reagan was willing to compromise when necessary because he understood that he was president of the United States of America — not just president of those in his own party. Having worked on George W. Bush’s campaign in Washington state more than a decade ago, and traveled the world and seen many different cultures, I became troubled in recent years with an Idaho political system hell-bent on ignoring hundreds of thousands of Idaho citizens, be they Hispanic, poor, Democrat or otherwise moderate in their viewpoints. Most recently, I became disenchanted with an Idaho Legislature that publicly and unabashedly devalued the funding of Idaho’s public schools. Using an economic downturn as a calculated excuse, the legislature tried to ignore its Idaho Constitutional duty to “establish and maintain a general, uniform and thorough system of public, free common schools.” This same legislature continues to damage public schools today, flying radically in the face of

two-thirds of Idahoans who voted down their extreme measures last year in Props 1, 2 and 3. In recent years, I didn’t leave the Republican Party. The Republican Party left me. The Republican Party is quick to talk about the notion of competition in business, even education, but is slow to recognize the value of competition in the political playing field. It’s ironic that the Idaho GOP platform is quick to want “unequivocal, thorough scientific research” when it comes to managing water flows for fish conservation, but somehow forgets to require the same research for so-called education reforms. A healthy state government in Idaho needs a healthy Idaho Democratic Party. LDS scholar Eugene England, himself a devout Republican, gave insight into the early political issues of the Latter-day Saints. Quoting President Wilford Woodruff, George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith in a May 1891 letter to John W. Young, Woodruff feared one-party domination in the state of Utah: “The more evenly balanced the parties become the safer it will be for us in the security of our liberties; and … our influence for good will be far greater than it possibly could be were either party overwhelmingly in the majority.”  Travis Manning teaches high school English in Caldwell, Idaho. He lost his 2012 campaign to serve in the Idaho Legislature, and is now the executive director of the Common Sense Democracy Foundation of Idaho.

KATIE POUK: I’m a stay at home mom. Out of all the jobs I’ve had, it’s been the most challenging, exhausting and rewarding. I think it’s the best job ever. JOSEPH SMITH: Being happy that Monday has arrived and you are excited to go to work! DONA RAE COLBERT: A good working environment, good co-workers, feeling like you have accomplished something at the end of the day that has done some good, living wage, good benefits and some funny moments to brighten a tough day. MELISSA GUMM: Good environment. A job that makes you feel appreciated for the hard work you put in. DUSTIN MATTHEWS: Oil Boy for Miss Hawaiian Tropic Swim tour. SUMMER B LOVESROB: A job you value, with people who value you, and who express it with action. CHRISTOPHER TSIPRAS: If it hurts people’s health, such as being a bartender, selling gasoline to SUVs, genetically modified savory tasty fast food, you’re part of the problem. Just scratched the surface. Thus I’ll wash dishes for establishments with good report. And ride and fix bicycles. JUSTIN TAYLOR: A job that makes you feel humbled. 

CORRECTION In last week’s Give Guide section in which we listed area nonprofits, we gave the wrong name for Providence Health Care Foundation.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 9

DREAM CREATE | INSPIRE

Kevin & Heather Daines - Liberty Lake, WA

“Our backyard is finally complete and our paradise easily entertains all of our kids, family & friends… and for that we thank Clearwater Summit Group!”

888.201.1037 | ClearwaterSummitGroup.com

10 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

COMMENT | SATIRE

Serious About Syria A BY ANDY BOROWITZ

s the debate over Syria moves to the United States Congress, a leading Senate Republican said this week that the only way to resolve the crisis in the war-torn Middle Eastern country is by “defunding Obamacare at once.” Appearing on the Fox News Channel, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) told host Sean Hannity, “If we’re trying to send a strong message to [Syrian President] Bashar al-Assad, I can think of no better way to do that than by defunding Obamacare.” Elaborating on his strategy, Sen. Cruz added, “By defunding Obamacare, we would basically be saying to Assad, ‘This is how we attack our own President, so just imagine what we’ll do to you.’ That would make him think twice before he pulls another one of his stunts.” “You can fire off as many Tomahawk missiles as you want,” said Sen. Cruz. “But they won’t have the same impact on Syria as defunding Obamacare.” Shortly after his appearance,

Sen. Cruz’s statements drew a sharp rebuke from a fellow Republican, Arizona Senator John McCain, who called the prospect of bombing Syria “the only thing I have to live for.” “Look, I’ve been in a very dark place since the 2008 election,” Sen. McCain told reporters. “There have been a lot of mornings when, quite frankly, I haven’t had a reason to get out of bed. It’s all well and good for people like Ted Cruz to criticize Tomahawk missiles, but hitting Syria is all that’s keeping me going.” Meanwhile, attempting to quell criticism of his proposal for a limited mission in Syria, Obama floated a more modest strategy, saying that any U.S. action in Syria would have “no objective whatsoever.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | LABOR

Setting An Example H BY JIM HIGHTOWER

ow’s this for irony? Ronald Reagan — who is worshipped as the supreme deity by small-government, anti-spending zealots — not only has a government office building in Washington named for him, but it’s the biggest and costliest one ever built. The only face-saving factor in this sardonic incongruity is that managers of the Reagan Building have embraced a right-wing, laissez-faire concept that the Gipper enthusiastically championed: Privatization of government jobs. However, that hasn’t worked out to be a positive for his legacy, since Reagan’s edifice now stands as a model of private profiteering on the backs of workers. In effect, corporate contractors are using privatization and our tax dollars to transform America into a low-wage nation of gross inequality. The building is public property, but its food concessions have been turned over to such multibillion-dollar fast-food chains as Subway. Not only do they pay low wages with no benefits, they’re also being charged with “serious, willful and chronic”

wage theft. In particular, workers in the food court have filed formal complaints with the Labor Department, documenting that while workweeks of 60, 70 and even 80 hours are common, they’re “never paid overtime.” Not only is this a rank violation of our Fair Labor laws, but the practice also means they are being paid less than minimum wage. Come on — even Reagan favored at least a minimal level of decency, fairness and respect for workers. Where’s the morality in CEOs grabbing tax dollars to help subsidize their lavish executive pay packages, then turning around and stiffing their own workers in our name? To help counter this despicable corporate conversion of government into a force for poverty jobs, contact Good Jobs Nation at goodjobsnation.org. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 11

HUGE FACTORY LIQUIDATION

SALE Aug 30th - Sept 15th

HURRY IN FOR THE

BEST DEALS!

Inlanders eat their fries with tartar sauce

Are You An

Inlander? The 246-page, 2013/14 Annual Manual is an in-depth look at what makes our region unique. You’ll find Inland Northwest trivia and everything you need to make the most of the next year.

877-941-1731 720 N. Fancher

Three blocks North of Home Depot in Spokane Valley 12 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

FREE and on stands now while quantities last Always available at Inlander Headquarters in Kendall Yards 1227 W. Summit Parkway

Independent & Free Since 1993

Suspending Suspensions Kicking students out of school rarely works out well, but what’s the alternative? BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

t’s April, and Shadle Park High School assistant principal Phil HighEdward has something to show a group of school staffers. He gathers them in the career center, where he’s lined up 137 separate laminated pictures of 137 different students on a large trifold piece of cardboard, attaching them with Velcro. They are the faces of every student who had been suspended or expelled at Shadle Park from September to April. By the end of the year, the number would grow to 168 — too many to fit on the poster. “These were kids we knew, with hopes and dreams,” High-Edward says. “Kids who wanted to graduate.” And no, most of them hadn’t been suspended for fighting, weapons or drugs. “Everything we thought about suspensions was pretty wrong,” HighEdward says. “To be quite frank, the reason why most kids are suspended is they made an adult mad. We call that disruption.” The next most common reason? Sixty-seven times last year, a student was suspended for attendance problems. It was absurd: Kids were punished for not coming to class by being told they couldn’t come to class. Add all these faces together, and the poster represented more than 11,000 class periods — more than 13 years of class time — missed at Shadle last year because of out-of-school suspensions. And as High-Edward knows all too well, suspension has consequences. A teacher asks him how many of the suspended students stopped attending Shadle altogether. One by one, he begins ripping pictures away from the Velcro.

O

nly 26 years have passed since Spokane Public Schools stopped spanking elementary and middle school students. Now, increasingly, the district is moving away from another traditional form of punishment: The out-of-school suspension. “As more and more parents have to make ends meet with the economy, when a child is suspended, there’s often not parents to supervise,” says Superintendent Shelley Redinger. And there’s another problem: As the district seeks to improve graduation rates, suspensions stand in the way. Two years ago, researcher Mary Beth Celio spent six months immersed in student data, seeking the core of Spokane Public School’s low graduation numbers. She found clear signals that could warn schools a student was in danger of dropping out. “Out-of-school suspension is a big tipping point,” says Fred Schrumpf, the administrator who leads the district’s dropout prevention efforts. A single out-of-school suspension sent a student’s graduation rate plummeting nearly 20 points. The more suspensions to a kid’s name, the grimmer his or her chances. ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 13

10% OFF

NEWS | EDUCATION “SUSPENDING SUSPENSIONS,” CONTINUED...

WITH THIS AD!

Plus a FREE log splitter w/ purchase of wood appliance

Inserts & Stoves

• ENERGY EFFICIENT, • ECO-FRIENDLY • MADE IN WASHINGTON • LONGEST BURN TIME IN INDUSTRY!

R Sprinkler • Fireplace

1-866-AutoRain (288-6724)

DOWNTOWN SPOKANE NORTH SPOKANE SPOKANE VALLEY COEUR D’ALENE

4 LOCATIONS

AUTORAIN.COM

7.95

$

The same research also found dropout risk had skyrocketed among students with more than three unexcused absences. In fact, state law requires districts to file juvenile court petitions if a student has 10 unexcused absences in a year. While suspensions aren’t counted as unexcused absences, the result is the same: The student isn’t there to learn. Even short-term suspensions can last up to 10 days. “When a kid’s missed school, whether they’re skipping or sick or suspended, they’re going to be behind academically,” says Schrumpf. Some kids beg not to be suspended, High-Edward says. Others pretend to shrug it off, like it’s just another vacation. District-wide, the research has already had an impact. Last year, the district handed down longterm suspensions to about 200 fewer ninth-grade students than a few years ago. “Anytime you shine a light on something, you tend to see some change,” Schrumpf says. “Administrators say, I know if I [kick] this student out, that’s going to decrease their chances of graduating.”

per bag

ogers High School, across town from Shadle Park, has both the highest poverty level in the district and some of the highest suspension numbers. From 2009-10, amid a discipline crackdown to change the culture, Rogers issued 1,458 short-term suspensions. Since then, the strategy has shifted. Two years ago, Rogers moved to “in-school interventions.” Instead of sending them home, most suspended students were placed in a classroom where an intervention specialist taught them about “restorative justice.” Troublemakers might write an essay, pen a letter of apology or perform community service. The ultimate goal is to repair their relationship with their teacher and make amends. “They’re talking about taking ownership,” Rogers assistant principal Brett Hale says. “They’re talking about alternatives. How could I have handled the situation differently? How could the teacher support them?” Yet the tactic still left students falling behind in class. In response, Rogers switched its inschool suspension program to focus on intense academic support. Without the restorative justice piece, however, troublemakers kept reoffending. But this fall, thanks to funding from the Empire Health Foundation, students subject to

THE EAGLE HAS LANDED AT WASHINGTON TRUST BANK Get your official EWU Alumni Association Credit and Debit Card — only at Washington Trust Bank. Visit watrust.com/ewuaa for more information.

14 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

in-school suspension at Rogers will have both a certified teacher to help them with their grades and an intervention specialist to help them with their behavior. For cases where out-of-school suspension is absolutely necessary, like those involving fighting or weapons, nonprofits like Youth for Christ and the Boys and Girls Club of Spokane County may begin providing safe and supervised locations.

A

s always, cost constrains the options. Inschool suspension usually requires at least one dedicated staffer and at least one free classroom. Schools like Lewis and Clark High School want to start using in-school suspensions, but haven’t found the funds.

“Anytime you shine a light on something, you tend to see some change.” “The Legislature said they want less suspension,” says Dan Close, assistant principal at LC. “We don’t want kids to miss school either. [But] they don’t give us the resources to do something about that.” Ultimately, High-Edward doesn’t believe any form of suspension is a solution. Punishing without healing underlying struggles, he says, is “akin to looking out in a body of water when a kid is drowning, and just yelling at him to swim harder.” Instead, he believes the secret is forging strong relationships with students long before they get in trouble. The families of all 347 incoming Shadle freshmen received a phone call from him this summer, an invitation to sit down and talk before school started. He met with 201 different families, asking kids about their fears, their middle school mistakes, about what’s going to be different this year. If they screw up, High-Edward already knows their story. “This year we’re not kicking out 125 kids for disruption,” he says. He holds up papers brimming with bar graphs — Shadle’s suspension statistics. “This is the bottom. We’re not getting worse than this.” 

NEWS | WAR

Talking Syria What lawmakers have been saying about the president’s plan for military action BY LISA WAANANEN

P

resident Obama announced on Saturday that he has decided the U.S. should use military force to “punish” the Syrian government for an Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack the White House says killed more than 1,400 people, including more than 400 children — but he will wait for congressional authorization. Members of Congress spent most of the previous week telling Obama any military action Everyone has an opinion on should require their approval, and now Obama’s plan for Syria. they face a vote when lawmakers return to Washington, D.C., on Sept. 9. Here’s what local lawmakers said about military action in Syria prior to Obama’s decision: Sen. Patty Murray, D-WA, in a statement released Aug. 30: “The use of chemical weapons, as well as conventional weapons, on innocent civilians in Syria is abhorrent and must end. However, as the recent past has taught us, we must be exceedingly cautious in making any decision that holds the possibility of entangling our nation in a long, drawn-out conflict.” Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-WA, in a Tacoma News Tribune article published Aug. 28: “Senator Cantwell has serious questions about the strategic goals of a military strike in Syria and possible outcomes,” Cantwell’s statement said. “She looks forward to hearing more from the Obama administration on its strategy Send comments to to promote a stable Syria and avoid openeditor@inlander.com. ended involvement in an escalated regional conflict.” Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-WA, posted on Facebook on Aug. 30: “As the crisis continues in Syria, should the President determine military action is necessary, he needs to respect the Constitution and recognize the authority for action in Syria must come from Congress. The violation of human rights and loss of life is horrendous, yet the President must make his case to Congress and the American people before launching any military strike. Keep calling my office to let me know your thoughts.” Sen. Mike Crapo, R-ID, posted on Facebook on Aug. 28: “Syria is a difficult and tragic situation and one that I continue to monitor. U.S. involvement in Syria must be consistent with protecting our national security interests. It is paramount that the President engage in a full dialogue with the American people and with Congress before taking any action.” Sen. James Risch, R-ID, in a Friday interview with the Idaho Statesman, questioned the long-term consequences and whether it was America’s responsibility to interfere: “We shouldn’t just be attacking to be punitive. I have real reservations about this. … What concerns me the most is where are we going with this?” Rep. Raul Labrador, R-ID, in a newsletter statement dated Aug. 30: “What’s at stake here isn’t the wisdom of going to war with Syria — that is a debate that can and should take place — it’s the question of whether the president will follow the Constitution and whether the Congress will demand that he follow it.” The newsletter statement concludes: “President Obama has yet to make a credible case for action in Syria. The United States — as a free people — should be eternally vigilant against threats to our liberty, both foreign and domestic. But we must do so after robust debate in Congress about the appropriateness of action in Syria and a vote for or against authorization.” n

LETTERS

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 15

NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

PHOTO EYE LETTER BY LETTER

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

In a national address Saturday, President Obama called upon Congress to approve a limited military intervention in Syria in hopes of de-escalating the violent civil war and punishing the government use of chemical weapons. Lawmakers will likely take up the issue Monday.

2.

Amid significant financial troubles, the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre last week announced its permanent closure after 45 years in operation.

3.

The NFL has agreed to a $765 million settlement in a class action lawsuit brought by more than 4,500 retired players, including Spokane’s Mark Rypien, over concussions and other neurological injuries.

4.

Federal authorities, led by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, indicated they will not challenge state efforts to legalize recreational marijuana sales in Washington and Colorado.

5.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The iconic letters at the top of the Washington Water Power building disappeared in pieces last week as crews removed them for restoration. The work is one of a handful of Avista’s projects in the area — they’re also renovating Huntington Park, the Upper Falls Powerhouse and the Theme Stream Bridge — in preparation for the company’s 125th anniversary and the 40th anniversary of Expo ’74 next year. The restored sign is expected to be back to light the skyline by next week.

46 DIGITS

th

Idaho’s rank in a newly released national survey of hourly wage earnings. With an average of $18.48 an hour, Idaho workers make 84 percent of the national average.

16 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

53

Number of hours it took 64-year-old Diana Nyad to swim about 110 miles from Cuba to Florida last weekend, becoming the first swimmer to do so without a shark cage.

After a 45-year absence, hydroplanes made a big splash at Lake Coeur d’Alene as thousands turned out for three days of roaring engines and high-speed racing.

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

WIN: Watch out for chances to win free tickets to our next Suds and Cinema event: Animal House and Orlison Brewing beer at the Bing. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for updates. MUSIC: Our music editor, new to Spokane but not to Washington, spent her weekend at Bumbershoot in case you didn’t get to. Check the blog for a recap.

NEWS | BRIEFS

States’ Rights The feds say they won’t challenge Washington state’s pot law; plus, overcrowding at Coeur d’Alene schools FIRE IT UP

Pot advocates and entrepreneurs breathed a collective, if brief, sigh of relief last week when Gov. Jay Inslee announced that the federal government will not sue Washington or Colorado to stop their implementation of RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA RULES. In a phone conversation and letter, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said the feds would not step in to stop the states from moving forward with their marijuana regulations, but will focus on ensuring eight specific areas are addressed. Those include preventing the sale of the drug to minors, distribution of it outside the states’ borders or the use of marijuana businesses as fronts for larger illegal activity. Preventing drugged driving and the growth of marijuana on public lands also made the list. Inslee said he shares those priorities and believes Holder will be satisfied with Washington’s regulation of the drug. The Washington State Liquor Control Board has been crafting regulations for recreational marijuana since Initiative 502 passed last November and expects to begin issuing licenses by the end of the year. — HEIDI GROOVER

CALLING ALL VETS

Several military veterans service organizations — including the Spokane Vet Center, the Spokane VA Medical Center and the county Veterans Court — will present updates on benefits and answer questions on regional support programs during a PUBLIC TOWN HALL meeting next week. Colleen Gilbert with the state Department of Veterans Affairs says a panel representing local veterans services will discuss their ongoing support efforts and Send comments to opportunities. They will also be editor@inlander.com. available to answer questions on accessing their different programs. Gilbert says the panel will also discuss regional facility upgrades and other upcoming veterans events. The Washington state governor’s Veterans Affairs Advisory Committee is hosting the town hall discussion. The meeting is scheduled from 6-8 pm Sept. 11 at the Spokane Vet Center at 13109 E. Mirabeau Parkway in Spokane Valley. — JACOB JONES

LETTERS

STUDENT RUSH

When the COEUR D’ALENE SCHOOL DISTRICT started the new year on Tuesday, the sheer number of students who walked through the doors posed the district with a challenge. “I’ve been walking the schools today, getting to know teachers, and handing out apples, and we’re seeing a lot of overcrowding,” says Tom Hearn, chair of the Coeur d’Alene Board of Trustees. “I think some [classes had] 34 students in a second-grade class. … We’re bursting at the seams.” More than 200 additional students are estimated to be in the district than the year before. The exact number will be determined this week. From there, the district has to decide whether it needs to move desks or staff members to other schools. “Students may have to be bussed and transferred across the district to make it work,” says district spokeswoman Laura Rumpler. While the state of Idaho provides schools with per-student funding, the formula for determining that funding is typically based on last year’s attendance. So on Thursday, Hearn will meet with the rest of the board to discuss the possibility of going to the voters with an emergency levy For his part, Hearn thinks something needs be done about the crowding issue, but isn’t willing to speak for the rest of the board. “There’s always the question of the politics of it,” he says. “Will the community be OK with a tax levy?” There’s precedent for such a levy. In 2009, an increase of just 75 students inspired Coeur d’Alene to request emergency levy funding. And in 1992, the district used the emergency levy to manage an increase of more than 400 students. — DANIEL WALTERS

Snap, Send, Cha-Ching! Mobile Check Deposit

*

101 00-00/000

YOUR NAME SS 123 YOUR ADDRE U.S.A. 12345 ANYWHERE, Pay to the Order of

20

$ Dollars

Security features details on back.

PO Box 4000 WA 99037 Spokane Valley,

For

1:0000000000:

Download the App.

123456 789:

numericacu.com • 800.433.1837 Here’s the legal stuff. *You need a Numerica Checking Account with Online Banking. Standard text message and data rates from your carrier may apply. We have a $20 membership fee for new members. Federally insured by NCUA.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 17

NEWS | EDUCATION

Pass or Fail? Education advocates criticize Washington state’s latest school funding report BY DEANNA PAN

I

n a new report submitted to the state Supreme Court last week detailing the latest school budget appropriations, lawmakers tout the progress they made on a court order to fully fund K-12 education in Washington. But public school advocates remain unimpressed. “I think it puts as pretty of a face on what they did and did not do as possible,” says Tom Ahearne, a Seattle attorney representing a coalition of parents, school districts, community groups and civic Rep. Susan Fagan: “I feel very good organizations that successfully that we could get together and sued the state over inadequate provide almost a billion dollars.” public education funding. In the 2012 McCleary case, the state Supreme Court ruled that Washington is failing its constitutional duty to its school children and ordered the state to fully fund basic education in K-12 schools by 2018. A legislative task force estimated that the state would need to increase public school funding by $1.4 billion in the current budget cycle and $4.5 billion by 2017-19. The court requires yearly reports from the Legislature on progress toward meeting its McCleary mandate. Last year, justices rejected the state’s report. In a statement, Randy Dorn, the state Superintendent of Public Instruction, called the the Legislature’s efforts “incomplete.” “The Legislature fell short,” he says. “They chose to increase the education budget by less than $1 billion.” In June, budget negotiators agreed to appropriate $1.03 billion to public schools over the next two years. Of that, $982 million covers basic education spending, including: $89.8 million for full-day kindergarten $131.7 million for pupil transportation $374.0 million for materials, supplies and operating costs $103.6 million to reduce kindergarten and first grade class sizes in high poverty schools Lawmakers also provided an additional $47 million in funding for non-basic education, including programs helping poor and

RIGHTING W RONGS • REBUILDING LIVES

James R. Sweetser ATTORNEY AT LAW | since 1984 Former Elected Spokane Prosecuter

SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY Call:

509-328-0678

sweetserlawoffice.com 1020 N Washington, Spokane WA 99201

18 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

underachieving students; bilingual children; and allocations for parent involvement coordinators and middle school and high school guidance counselors. They also restored some recessionera salary cuts for teachers and administrators.

“Taking money out of teachers’ pockets on one side and handing it back on the other isn’t improvement.” “I feel very good that we could get together and provide almost a billion dollars,” says Rep. Susan Fagan, R-Pullman, one of the members of the bipartisan committee charged with approving the report. “I think we went well beyond it with all this other additional funding.” But Ahearne notes that these education “enhancements” came at several costs, especially to public school employees: Lawmakers saved almost $300 million by once again suspending voterapproved cost-of-living raises for teachers. “Taking money out of teachers’ pockets on one side and handing it back on the other isn’t improvement,” he says. Ahearne also calls the state’s claim that it’s increasing full-day kindergarten “disingenuous” and disagrees that the state has made significant improvements toward funding school transportation. “There are several full-day kindergartens that are not accepting state money because Send comments to they don’t have enough classrooms to put editor@inlander.com. them in,” he says. “With regard to pupil transportation … what they now claim is full funding is less than half of what their court testimony said full funding would require.” He adds that because new funding in reducing class sizes only applies to children in kindergarten and first grade in high poverty schools, “second graders and third graders are being written off.” “The last time, for the 2013 budget, the court said, ‘Look, state, you fell short,’” he says. “We’ll see if the Supreme Court thinks they did better job this time.” Rich Wood, a spokesman for the Washington Education Association, agrees. He says it’s clear the state still has a long way to go, particularly in increasing teacher compensation and reducing class sizes. “While it was good that the Legislature finally increased funding for K-12 schools instead of cutting it more,” he says, “this K-12 budget fell far short of proving what our kids need.” n deannap@inlander.com

letters

EVERY TUESDAY IN SEPTEMBER 2X Points 8 am – midnight $2 off drinks in all bars and lounges Redeem 2,000 points for $10 EPC (instead of 3,000 points)

– BUY ONE GET ONE HALF OFF –

Breakfast buffet at High Mountain Buffet Espresso drink at Jackpot Java Not valid with other offers.

TOURNAMENT

WEDNESDAYS

$600 weekly prizes Sign-up 5 pm Buy-in $10

An email for food lovers

Sign up at inlander.com/newsletter

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM |

/CDACASINORESORT

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 19

Night Shift Working while the rest of us sleep isn’t easy, but some people prefer it

T

Work. You have to do it. And there’s a good chance you think it sucks because, well, it’s work. In this issue, though, we dive into the workplaces of the Inland Northwest, looking for people with cool jobs and cool offices while also spending some time on the graveyard shift and inspecting the state of our labor unions. There are a million different ways to make a buck in this region, and here’s just a few. Give it a read — remember to clock out first. — MIKE BOOKEY, section editor

20 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

he TVs and neon signs have been illuminating the casino floor all night when daylight starts streaming through the glass doors at the entrance. Like a factory whistle, the morning light alerts Danny Cable his shift is almost over. Gamblers — either up late or up early — sit with cups of coffee at slot machines or the table games that Cable supervises. He started dealing blackjack after BY LISA WAANANEN thinking it would be a fun thing to learn, and he’s been working the graveyard shift at Northern Quest Resort & Casino for three years now. He likes the fast-paced games, like when roulette really gets going with lots of people around the table, but also the quieter hours. “On the weekdays we usually have more regulars, and you can get to know them,” he says. It’s nearly the end of his workday, but he’s still alert and good-natured. He says he drinks a lot of coffee, but would do that anyway. “I was stealing my mom’s coffee when I was a kid,” he says. “I was just destined to be a coffee drinker.” Nationwide, about 15 million people are “shift” workers whose schedules include nondaytime hours. Along with nurses and police officers, the night shift is staffed by truck drivers, pilots, bakers, miners and in-home health care attendants. Someone has to greet travelers at hotels and serve diners at 24-hour restaurants; someone has to keep factories and warehouses going all night. In Spokane County, at least a half-dozen dispatchers are ready at the 911 communications center at any hour. A pair of Avista workers on the Real-Time Energy Desk monitor the vast system of generator facilities to make sure the energy produced will precisely meet customers’ needs minute by minute. They watch energy use peak as day workers get home from work and turn on lights and appliances, and they watch it fall until a low around 4 am, when the rest of us are sleeping. Then they watch it begin to increase again around 6 am as people begin to wake up and turn on their coffee pots and toasters. On the north side of Spokane, Blessed

>

By Design Total Learning Center stays open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for night workers who are also parents of small children. When Terrance Nixon and his wife, Sophia, first started the business as an in-home daycare, their very first parent was a certified nursing assistant whose schedule changed constantly and covered all hours of the day. Now they have parents who are nurses and firefighters, and others who work at Walmart. “We just try to meet the hours that people need,” Nixon says.

W

orking the night shift takes a toll. Research shows that night workers typically get only about five hours of sleep — not enough to sustain maximum performance, says Dr. Gregory Belenky, director of the Sleep and Performance Research Center at Washington State University Spokane. And the amount of sleep is only part of the problem, because humans’ circadian rhythms — our biological clocks — make us naturally more sleepy at night. Take a classic night shift, Belenky says: A person starts in the late evening and works through the low point in their circadian rhythm. Then they get home in the morning and fall asleep, exhausted, only to wake up by 1 pm. A feeling of chronic jet lag can set in, since the light cues are constantly wrong. “The bottom line is shift workers never adjust,” Belenky says. Since night work is inevitable, sleep experts look for ways to make it easier. One possibility is making the night shift longer to build in time for sleeping on the job. Even just a short nap is beneficial, Belenky says. A study of pilots showed that a 40-minute in-flight napping opportunity improved their performance and alertness. “Anything longer than that just improves the benefit,” he says.

W

hen his shift ends at 8 am, Cable leaves the casino each morning just as the majority of Spokane’s workforce is heading into work for the day. He heads home, maybe stops at the store, just like others do in the evening after work. He typically sleeps later in the day before waking up to get to work at midnight. “If I’m tired, I can sleep,” he says. “It doesn’t matter if it’s sunny out or if it’s noisy — not too many things keep me from sleeping well.” After previously working all hours as a truck driver and starting on the swing shift at Northern Quest, Cable likes the consistency of the graveyard schedule. Working nights means the flexibility to forgo sleep for evening events, and the freedom to make doctor’s appointments and run errands without working around work. “I couldn’t imagine working 8-to-4 and trying to make it to the bank,” Cable says. 

I’ M A P OT LAWY E R NAME: HILARY BRICKEN POSITION: ATTORNEY EMPLOYER: HARRIS & MOURE, PLLC; CANNA LAW GROUP YEARS AT THIS JOB: 4 EDUCATION: J.D., UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI SCHOOL OF LAW HOURS/WEEK: 70-80

A

pot. Others know plenty about marijuana and “very little about how to run a business.” Some are looking for help understanding trademark and copyright law and writing contracts and security plans. Some want to make sure the property they’re considering for their new business is 1,000 feet from schools and parks, as mandated by the new law. Others just want to know about the risks of venturing into this new frontier — and there are many. To be a marijuana attorney in one of only two states where pot is legal for recreational use is to work with civil rights activists and businesspeople who believe they’re on the ground floor of the next boom that will make them rich. It means managing their expectations and remembering you’re helping people break federal law along the way. And because of the novelty, it means doing interviews with The Seattle Times, Al Jazeera America and an Italian magazine reporter all in one week. “It’s very sexy,” Bricken says, “transferring from behind the criminal cloak into corporate America.” — BY HEIDI GROOVER

>

year ago, Hilary Bricken’s job didn’t exist. Not really. Bricken started her career suing cruise ships over slip-and-falls. Now she spends her days answering questions about pot: How do I copyright my logo? Why won’t the bank take my money? Where do I actually get the marijuana I want to grow or sell? It’s here, in Bricken’s office — she splits her time between the historic Fernwell Building in downtown Spokane and a high-rise six blocks from Seattle’s Pike Place Market — where Washington’s new class of entrepreneurs come for help. Bricken, who doesn’t smoke marijuana or consider herself an activist, started counseling medical marijuana advocates two years ago, but has been flooded with people looking to get into the recreational market since the passage of Washington’s I-502 this past November. “The lawyering is relatively unsophisticated. It’s business law 101 most of the time,” she says. “But I am able to say I helped start some of these companies, which hopefully will be huge some day.” Some of her clients have the necessary cash, but little knowledge about

Danny Cable’s card-dealing shift at Northern Quest doesn’t begin until midnight. CHAD RAMSEY PHOTO

Hilary Bricken: “It’s business law 101 most of the time.” JAIDEN DIETRICH PHOTO

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 21

T

H

E

W O

R

K

I

S S

U

E

Robin McIntyre, a nurse at Valley Hospital, serves on the bargaining team for the Service Employees International Union.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

N ew Fa ce o f L a b o r The next generation of union leaders look to carry on the promise of the middle class

P

linking and buzzing, the banjo rings sharp against the empty air of the steelworkers’ union hall. An acoustic guitar strikes up a timeworn rhythm as labor organizers, shop stewards and mill workers quietly BY JACOB JONES mouth the words to songs passed down through generations. Under a dim fluorescent glow, a white-haired folk duo fills the early August evening with songs of historic union

struggle, picket line heroes and hard-tested solidarity. “Which side are you on?” they belt, chords jangling and feet stomping. “Which side are you on?” Performing songs from the rise of organized labor in the 1940s, the singers call out tales of triumph and audacity. Their lyrics eulogize larger-than-life labor martyrs and commemorate pivotal battles against injustice. Tamed since its radical origins, the

friends OPEN ENROLLMENT POTTERY CLASSES All Skill Levels & Ages Morning/Evening Classes Fun & Friendly Atmosphere Learn at Your Own Pace Supplies Included

clayconnection.net

714 E. Sprague Spokane | 509-747-6171

22 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

modern labor movement continues to face more conventional struggles. Outsourcing has undercut American manufacturing. Health care and pension costs have skyrocketed. And the recession has pitted workers against the unemployed in a resentful job market. Amid dwindling ranks, labor has shifted momentum from its traditional strongholds in construction and manufacturing over to public sector employees, health care workers and the service

with benefits

industry. But young workers still face new corporate challenges and a narrower path to the middle class. Between songs, guitarist George Mann takes note of the primarily white, middle-aged makeup of the audience. The face of labor is changing, he says, and union organizers need to reach out to the next generation — before it’s too late. As he starts into another song, Mann encourages his audience to sing with

I have a friend!

when you become The Inlander’s friend, you get special treatment! chances to win free tickets exclusive deals • news alerts we’re also willing to twitter you... if that’s your thing.

Fair Trade Your Dorm Room

Open Mon-Sat: 10-5:30

35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

him, to echo more than 150 years of proud history and righteous discontent. Like any union, a chorus grows stronger with every new voice. “You can stand and raise your fists if you want to,” he tells them, “or you can just sit there.”

O

middle-class dream. He says unions help ensure a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work. A longtime member of the cement masons union, Ormsby says he has watched the recession hit local workers hard, accelerating the economic shift toward service industries. In response, labor activism has to move out of the factories and foundries into the hospitals, classrooms and government offices. “That’s where the employment opportunities are,” he says. “The face of labor changed, and it is a reflection of the changing economy. As that changes, we have to adapt to where those jobs are.”

rganized labor has deep roots in the development of American industry. Dan Wilson, president of Spokane’s United Steelworkers Local 338, says the Greatest Generation leveraged labor unions to carve out the middle class in the wake of World War II. Empowered to negotiate wages and benefits, unions helped set the new stanobin McIntyre stands among the updards for the American Dream. and-coming ranks of new labor. A “If you worked hard and made a good nurse in the Intensive Care Unit at Valley wage, you might be able to send your kids Hospital and Medical Center, she serves on to college,” he says. “You might be able to the bargaining team with SEIU Healthcare drive a car. You might be able to own your 1199NW, a regional affiliate of the Service own home. You might be able to retire. … Employees International Union. That was the middle class. That was the Growing up in a union household, McAmerican Dream.” Intyre had heard the old songs and tragic State Rep. Timm Ormsby, who serves stories of labor’s historic struggles. As a as president of the Spokane Regional Labor nurse, she came to recognize the union’s Council, says unions brought democracy to important everyday functions, providing an the workplace. From miners to teachers to infrastructure to discuss patient care, monifirefighters, labor unions have long advotor job performance and air grievances. cated for better pay and improved working “It was something that allowed me to conditions for all, historically helping to do my job to the best of my win the minimum wage, the eightability,” she says. “It allows us hour day, overtime pay, worker’s to voice our concerns and recompensation and sick leave. Send comments to ally make sure our patients and “There are a lot of spillover editor@inlander.com. their safety comes first.” benefits for working folks that have Unions hold both employno affiliation with the labor union,” ees and employers accountable, she says. he says. They ensure that workers receive proper But union membership has steadily training and safe working conditions. They dropped since its peak in the 1950s. Once protect employees from retribution or representing approximately 35 percent of abuse. They offer support and guidance. the workforce, unions now represent just “I can’t imagine not having that back11.3 percent, according to the Bureau of Laing,” she says. bor Statistics. In Washington state, which In a renewed effort to recruit young has the fourth-highest rate in the country, workers, Washington unions have recently union membership fell from 19 percent in encouraged new groups like Young Emerg2011 to 18.5 percent last year. ing Labor Leaders (YELL). Amy Cowin “Organizing more people is always a and Duane Cooper, organizers with the goal of the unions,” Wilson says. “But I Spokane YELL chapter, say it will take dethink right now the unions are really just termination and innovation to carry labor’s trying to maintain what they have.” promise to the next generation of workers. Without union protections, Wilson A city garbageman and shop steward fears workers could face a downward spiral with one of the region’s largest unions, of weakened contracts and deflated wages Cooper says baby boomers have left a large that would drive America further from its

R

LETTERS

6 th

A

gap in institutional knowledge and employment opportunities. Nationwide, corporate profits have ballooned while worker salaries have stalled. Widespread unemployment has fueled resentment toward unions and undermined worker confidence. “People our age, they just feel like they’re lucky to have a job,” says Cowin, with the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1439. “So why would they fight back and ask for more?” In the wake of the recession, workers need more support than ever, they argue, remaining optimistic that organized labor can rebound with the help of technology and increased networking. Organizing young workers will take public education and outreach. They need to pass on the history and lessons of the labor movement’s successes. “Most people like us don’t do things because they’re easy,” Cooper says. “We do them because they’re hard. … I’m in it for the long haul.”

O

ne of the most widely beloved labor anthems traces its origins back to Spokane. Penned by legendary organizer and songwriter Joe Hill, “The Preacher and the Slave” immortalizes the 1910 “free speech fight” in which union workers flooded the city’s jails to protest unconstitutional laws against making political speeches in public. Ormsby, with the regional labor council, says Spokane still possesses that independent community spirit. This city works harder than ever, he says. And while they might not sing as much, the words still ring true. “It’s human struggle,” he says. “As new things come up, the metaphors will change, but I think it’s a universal theme of equity and struggle and trying to provide for a family. Those are common themes.” In the quiet of the steelworkers’ hall, Mann strums the opening bars of “Solidarity Forever” as the audience claps in time. Soft and then slowly building, whispers grow into hearty cheers. A few among the ranks rise up from their chairs and stomp their feet. Their knuckles curl into fists as they hoist their arms high and shout along with the words. “Solidarity forever,” they sing. “The union makes us strong.” 

H E L P WA N T E D ? LOCAL UNEMPLOYMENT RATES AS OF JULY WASHINGTON: 6.9% IDAHO: 6.6% SPOKANE COUNTY: 8.1% KOOTENAI COUNTY: 6.8% SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics

n n u a l

LAST E TO CHANC R! REGISTE

Register Online at:

SpokeFest

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 23

T

H

E

W O

R

K

I

S S

U

E

F LY S PA C E People to People’s near-the-airport digs offer plenty for employees to explore

L

aid out in sprawling, green acreage near Spokane International Airport, People to People Ambassador Programs’ headquarters is a 133,000-square-foot, two-story brick-and-glass mass that carries a certain air of importance when one drives onto the property. “We wanted the BY LAURA JOHNSON building to look like an institution of higher learning,” says Ralph Baard, VP of customer experience, as he walked across the site late last month. This makes sense — the goal of People to People is to create student global citizens by giving them the opportunity to travel the world, meeting new people and experiencing and learning new things. The oblong-shaped entryway features a gigantic photo collage of the People to People movement’s founder, President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Moving into the building’s inner workings, it seems each room is more cavernous than the previous one. A skinny, museum-like hallway, which displays photographs and letters written to the company from presidents and prime ministers, leads to a vast common room littered with tables. There are ping-pong tables in the corner. “This certainly isn’t a strip mall; it has a campus feel,” explains Joy Sturgis, senior HR manager of the for-profit company. “We have ping-pong tournaments every month, and there are volleyball and basketball courts outside. It’s great for team building.” It’s no surprise that things are casual around here. “We get to wear jeans and have fun here,” she says. The 200-plus employees reap the rewards of that ambiance, working in a building that comes with a gym, locker rooms, full-sized kitchen and many other amenities. In 2007, the company moved from multiple offices near Sprague Avenue and Freya Street to its current space, designed by Wolfe Architectural Group. “This is the first time we were all together in the same building,” Baard says. “Plus, we’re close to the airport, which allows easier access for employees who travel here.” Cubicled office space segues into more cubicled office space for all the various departments — marketing, HR, a call center, travel agents and IT. Numerous collaborative meeting rooms are each named after a different country. “We like to stick to the theme here,” Sturgis says. A mailing distribution center which takes up half of the building is no longer in use, thanks to rapidly changing technology replacing mailers. As a result, they are looking for a buyer. “We’re not in a hurry to sell,” Baard clarifies. “We like it here.” 

24 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

PEOPLE TO PEOPLE AMBASSADOR PROGRAMS 1956 AMBASSADOR WAY 200+ EMPLOYEES DESIGNED: 2007

>

People to People’s brick-and-glass, 133,000-square-foot offices. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

>

MY FIRST J O B JERRY SEINFELD

“I was a telephone salesman pitching lightbulbs. It was 1976, and I was just looking for some grocery money. I hated the job, it was horrible. It was all lying, outrageous prices and phony names. I called myself Dave Wilson — you Lightbulb salesman had to come up with a name so people would think they knew you. I’d call and say, ‘Hey, Bill, remember I talked to you 18 months ago? It’s Dave Wilson.’ And the other person doesn’t want to insult me, so they’d say, ‘Yeah, I think I remember.’ I only had the job a couple of weeks and knew it was time to leave as soon as I could afford a loaf of bread.”

“All I ever liked about offices was being able to type up stories on the computer when no one was looking. I was never paying attention in meetings because I was usually scribbling bits of my J.K. ROWLING latest stories in the margins of the Secretary pad or thinking up names for my characters. This is a problem when you’re supposed to be taking minutes of the meeting.”

HUGH JACKMAN Clown

“I am really bad at magic. I, in fact, used to be a clown at kids’ parties. I was Coco the Clown, and I had no magic tricks, and I remember a 6-year-old standing up at a party saying, ‘Mummy, this clown is terrible, he doesn’t know any tricks’ — and he was right.”

SOURCE: THE DAILY BEAST

One Hour Body Treatment Specials

September SPA SPECIALS

Mon – Thurs $70 • Fri – Sun $80

Treatments include Mountain Rain Shower Scrub and Wrap, Wetlands Body Refiner, Seasons Lavender Mint Cooler, Wild Rose Nourishment and Sacred Forest.

Add any of our 1-hour body treatments to any regular priced massage or facial for an additional $60 Add a Shellac manicure to any one hour service $25 Call to book today! 1 855 232-2772 Same day service, same person must receive both services.

COFFEE FFEE TO

Cocktails

THURS, SEPT 26TH • 2 - 7 PM

Celebrity make-up artist teaching you tricks of the trade! Colorscience mineral make-up specials! $25 registration includes $25 retail credit Credit good night of event only. 1 8 0 0 5 2 3 -2 4 6 4 | CDAC A SI N O . COM |

/CDAC A SI N O R E S O RT

25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 25

DY N A M I C DESIGN NORTHSIDE

SPOKANE VALLEY

9719 N. Division St. 509-455-8290

15110 E. Indiana Ave. 509-924-8187

GreenCupboards melds a modern office culture with a “green” historic space, inspiring collaboration

I

THE AREA’S BIGGEST HARDWOOD SELECTION!

INVENTORY INVENTORY BLOWOUT SALE! Save on the on the latest flooring during the Inventory Blowout Sale at Carpet One Floor & Home and pay nothing for one full year!* Come shop the latest styles and the best brands in hardwood, laminate, carpet, tile & more. It’s easy to make the perfect choice with our SelectAFloor system & all of our flooring comes with a lifetime guarantee – our Beautiful Guarantee.

NO PAYMENTS FOR ONE YEAR* Don’t miss our Inventory Blowout Sale, where you can save on select styles of carpet, hardwood, laminate, vinyl or tile for every room in your home. Enjoy your new floor for one full year with no payments and no interest.

GET EXCLUSIVE PRIVATE SAVINGS OF $100 Take an extra $100 of all your flooring purchases when you bring in this letter to Carpet One Floor & Home. That’s in addition to the 10-25% savings currently offered to the general public. Offer ends 09/30/13. We hope to see you soon.

SAVE

50

%

UP TO

STOREWIDE PLUS

SPECIAL

FINANCING AVAILABLE*

Sincerely,

Store Owner At participating stores only, not all products at all locations. Photos for illustrative purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Offers cannot be combined with other discounts or promotional offers and are not valid on previous purchases. ©Carpet One Floor & Home®. *See store for details. Subject to credit approval. †See actual warranty at store for complete details.

100

$

OFF

Any Purchase of $1,499 or More!

26 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Now available with

See store for details.

t would be unusual for a company like GreenCupboards, an e-commerce venture specializing in environmentally conscious consumer products, not to be located in a space designed to minimize its environmental footprint. And the young, Spokane-based company is aptly headquartered in one of the city’s most innovative repurposed spaces — the McKinstry-owned, historic Spokane & Inland Empire Railroad (SIERR) Building on East Spokane Falls Blvd. Pulling open the glass doors of BY CHEY SCOTT GreenCupboards’ offices is akin to stepping inside a massive university study hall, or what one might envision the headquarters of Facebook or Google are like. There are no cubicles, no interior walls. The mostly youngish employees are seated at plain white tables, configured into U-shaped sections around the perimeter and in the middle of the spacious, open, high-ceilinged room, abuzz with the sound of keyboards clicking and voices talking, laughing and taking phone calls. Built in 1907, the 68,000-square-foot brick warehouse originally served as the city of Spokane’s electric railroad car repair and storage depot, but the historic structure now is one of a handful of LEED Gold-certified (one of the highest ratings for a building project granted by the U.S. Green Building Council) buildings in the area after being renovated a few years ago. Last August, a large space inside the building’s front became the headquarters of GreenCupboards — an online retail startup founded in 2008 by two Gonzaga University graduates and their professor after their idea for the venture won a business plan competition. Despite what to an outsider looks like a loud, chaotic workspace, GreenCupboards’ director of marketing Dan Peck says the space’s open layout allows teams of employees working on various projects to easily communicate with one another and with other departments’ teams, a trend becoming more common around the country. The flexibility of not having individually designated cubicles also allows the more than 70-person staff to easily move around as projects are begun and completed. Not even GreenCupboards’ co-founder and CEO Josh Neblett has a private office, Peck mentions. “We feel more like a team and avoid things like people feeling like there are closed-off doors and meetings, and it helps contribute to our core values of communicating transparently to suppliers and customers,” he says. In the event that GreenCupboards’ employees need to hold a private meeting or just want to get away from the busy buzz of the office, the building’s center section, outside of any tenant offices, contains several community conference rooms — with names recalling the building’s heyday, like Roundhouse 1 and 2 — that can be reserved online when needed. The pattern on the carpet between the community conference rooms features two parallel gray lines about three feet apart that run from the front to the back of the building, a reminder that railroad tracks once ran through it. 

>

T

H

E

W O

R

K

I

S S

U

E

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

509-868-9181

11107 E. 21st Ave Ext. 2309 South 3923 E. 34th Ave Ext. 2159 2324 E. 6th Ave Ext. 2109 2515 S. Grand Blvd Ext. 2319 1722 S. Stevens St Ext. 2239 2527 E. 5th Ave Ext. 2289 North 6011 N. Royal Dr Ext. 2329 3509 E. Courtland Ave Ext. 2299 1622 W. Kedlin Ln Ext. 2189 2525 W. Courtland Ave Ext. 2769 2127 E. South Crescent Ave Ext. 2999 Nine Mile Falls 13509 W. Meadowview Ln Ext. 2369 Chattaroy 7621 E. Hamilton Rd Ext. 2339 7623 E. Hamilton Rd Ext. 2349 Lake 3994 Cedar Bay Rd #63 Ext. 2049 12515 S. Clear Lake Rd Ext. 2229 Spokane Valley 2011 N. Center Rd Ext. 2379 11107 E. 21st Ave Ext. 2309 Airway Heights 12617 W. Tower Ave Ext. 2259 Deer Park 5270 Scotts Valley Rd Ext. 2359

GREENCUPBOARDS 850 E. SPOKANE FALLS BLVD. 70+ EMPLOYEES DESIGNED: 2011

>

“I don't work 9-5, I work start to finish.” Scan to view all listings

TO ACCESS EXTENSIONS, CALL

GreenCupboards: working without many walls. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

1-800-720-6008 www.SpokanePillar.com

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 27

T H E

W O R K

I S S U E

Appetizers • Homemade Soups Handtossed Brick Oven Pizzas Salads • Po’ Boys • Burgers Pastas • Sandwiches • Steaks Seafood and More

BAR & GRILL

BURGERS & BALL GAMES Like us on Facebook • ProspectorsSpokane.com LUNCH & DINNER - DAILY 11AM-9PM - FRI & SAT TIL 10PM BREAKFAST - SAT & SUN OPEN AT 8AM | HAPPY HOUR - 3PM-6PM DAILY

12611 N. Division St | North Spokane - Wandermere | (509) 467-6177

Thursday, October 3rd 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM The Lincoln Center Headliner

Shaun Jones Opener

Drew Barth

Special Survivor Price $

50

28 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

$75 includes dinner and entertainment

Brian Youngberg: “We want to avoid them thinking it’s a camping trip.”

CHAD RAMSEY PHOTO

I TEAC H P EO PLE H OW TO SURV IV E IN T H E WO O DS NAME: SENIOR AIRMAN BRIAN YOUNGBERG JOB TITLE: SURVIVAL, EVASION, RESISTANCE AND ESCAPE (SERE) FIELD

TRAINING INSTRUCTOR

EMPLOYER: FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE YEARS ON THE JOB: 3 EDUCATION: SERE SPECIALIST TRAINING HOURS/WEEK: VARIES: 40 HOURS A WEEK; PLUS UP TO 17 HOURS IN THE FIELD

S

enior Airman Brian Youngberg has jumped out of a moving aircraft 55 times and counting, and it never gets any easier. “It scares me every time,” he says. Youngberg, 26, is no adrenaline junkie, but he’s a passionate teacher. So for his students’ sake, he braves every helicopter parachute jump with a smile on his face. He’s a member of the 22nd Training Squadron at Fairchild, home to the U.S. Air Force’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) school. There, he’s tasked with teaching young airmen how to survive in the wilderness should, say, their planes go down in combat. His students spend one week on base, learning, among other things, how to butcher and preserve meat; tie hitchings, knots and lashings; and build shelters in simulated arctic, tropical, desert and forest environments. After that, they head 70 miles north to the mountains in the Colville and Kaniksu national forests, where students receive hands-on survival train-

ing. Youngberg can’t reveal too many specifics. SERE specialists have to keep much of training a secret in order to maintain an element of surprise. “The possibilities of what could change are ultimately endless,” he says. “We want to avoid them thinking it’s a camping trip.” The training includes survival medicine, food and water procurement, camouflage techniques and how to deal with the psychological stress of isolation. Some of these kids, Youngberg says, have never seen snow or lived outside of a city. The course certainly isn’t fun, but it equips young airmen with, as he puts it, “the skills and confidence to return with honor.” In the field, he’s sure to remind them not to lose hope if they ever find themselves scared and alone, trapped behind enemy lines. “People are looking for you,” Youngberg says. “You do your part and remember, everyone else is doing their part. It’s going to work out somehow.” — DEANNA PAN

I’ M A RO LLER COASTER REPA IR MA N NAME: Zane Sturgill JOB TITLE: Roller Coaster Maintenance EMPLOYER: Silverwood Theme Park YEARS ON THE JOB: 6 HOURS/WEEK: 45

M

ost mornings by around 4:30, Zane Sturgill is working on a roller coaster. He starts by checking the massive electrical motor that carries the cars up the slope of one of Silverwood Theme Park’s four coasters. He checks the air system and the brakes. On the park’s two wooden coasters, he keeps an eye out for worn boards. He inspects the restraint system. He replaces bolts and checks torque. Then, with an arsenal of tools and replacement parts strapped to his body, Sturgill ascends the tracks. This is not easy. “You can imagine, hiking those things is rough. And if you strap on 30-40 pounds of steel, it gets really tough,” says Sturgill, a 28-year-old member of the park’s roller coaster crew, charged with keeping some of the country’s most gut-gurgling rides in shape — and more important, safe. Yes, he rides the roller coasters just about every day. But no, he doesn’t get scared; not on the rides, and not when he’s perched 100 feet in the air working on the famed Tremors wooden coaster. Before coming to Silverwood, he worked in construction and faced no shortage of dangerous tasks.

“I was the guy who they would send up way in the air,” he says. “When I was a kid, I would be climbing trees to see how high I could get. Now they pay me for it.” Although Silverwood is closed during the winter months, Sturgill’s work isn’t over. While the park is covered in a blanket of snow, Sturgill and the crew, headed up by Mike Vanden Heuvel, are charged with removing all the coasters’ cars from the track and taking them to a shed where every — and he stresses every — bolt is replaced, weld is tested and car is painted. A coaster like Tremors takes between 80 and 100 trips along its track each day. That adds up to some serious use — more than 10,000 miles of travel over the course of the year — so there is some significant wear and tear to deal with. For Sturgill and the rest of the crew, the fruit of these labors is knowing that Silverwood is safe. Sturgill doesn’t take this responsibility lightly. “I’m always thinking that my wife and kids could be riding these coasters pretty much any day,” he says. — MIKE BOOKEY

L A U NN

D 3R A

Zane Sturgill: “I was the guy who they would send up way in the air.”

Chad Ramsey Photo

september 5, 2013 INLANDER 29

U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

HIRING OUR HEROES

2013 HIRING OUR HEROES VETERANS EVENT Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 404 N. Havana - Spokane WA

Friday, September 20

not just news.

HIRING FAIR:

amazing

10 AM - 2 PM

SEEKERS: EMPLOYERS: JOB Register for FREE at HOH.Greatjob.net

stories

Must register for FREE at HOH.Greatjob.net

to guarantee admission. Walk-ins welcome but space not guaranteed.

A workshop for veterans and other military job seekers that focuses on resume writing, tips for successfully navigating hiring fairs, military skill translation, and interviewing will start at 9am. To register for the Hiring Our Heroes Employment Workshop, visit hohworks.eventbrite.com For registration questions, please contact us at hiringourheroes@uschamber.com or call 202.463.5807

HIRINGOURHEROES.ORG

“Generation Screwed,” June 6, 2013

30 INLANDER september 5, 2013

W

The Gee House is home to eco-minded Gonzaga students. young kwak photo

I Live in a Green House

hen you picture college housing, you often think of a run-down house, perhaps with a ratty couch on the porch, beer cans strewn in the front yard, and maybe some Pineapple Express posters lining the walls. You picture students sweating out the summers and wearing parkas inside during the winter to save a few bucks. You don’t picture living in a green house — as in environmentally minded (technically it’s bright orange) — but I’ve been fortunate enough to call it home. The Gee House, as it’s called, is a co-op home in the Logan Neighborhood. For me it’s been a one-of-a-kind living experience. The residential building is LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum certified, as well as Energy Star rated. It’s also won a bevy of awards, most recently the Best of America Living Award. Buzz Price, the owner, teamed up with Dennis Cunningham, President of ActiveWest Builders, to create, design and build his dream home. While Price knew he wanted to make the building a co-op style house, Cunningham brought the environmental aspect to the project. Cunningham makes it quite clear that a LEED certification isn’t easy to come by. Every part of the building and its materials had to be inspected and certified, and inspected again. The building’s main source of heat comes from water under the cement floors. Every appliance, from the laundry room to the kitchen, is Energy Star rated. The windows are strategically placed throughout the house for natural light, and the design allows for the airflow to negate the need for much air conditioning. All materials used to build the Gee came from within 500 miles, and 90 percent of the waste material was recyclable. The list goes on, and makes it apparent how much thought and

“That was the best way to live in college. You were How 10 strangers and I learned to live an environmentally friendly life more like a family than just BY ANNA CLAUSEN living together.” dedication went into creating the house. The Gee as a building is a work of art, but the uniqueness of the co-op lifestyle drew me back for another year. During his college years at Berkeley, Price lived in a house a lot like the Gee. He wanted to bring the style back to Spokane, where he didn’t see anything like what he grew up with. “That was the best way to live in college. You were less isolated, and more like a family than just living together,” he said. I decided to test out this sort of social experiment after seeing an ad in the school paper ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 31

CULTURE | COLLEGE LIFE

September 19 - October 12, 2013

Above: the author gives a tour of her green-friendly home. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

“I LIVE IN A GREEN HOUSE,” CONTINUED... Box Office (509-455-7529) or TicketsWest (800-325-SEAT) and TicketsWest.com www.interplayerstheatre.org

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

Saturday, September 7th LIVE MUSIC - GIVEAWAYS - PROMOS SALES AND CLINICS See our website for performance info! RUMENT USICAL INST M TE LE P M CTION CO L, & INSTRU SALES, RENTA SSIONALS! FOR STUDENTS

AND PROFE

RMANCE AND PERFO RVICE RECORDING D LES AN SE SA T EN M IP EQU

1430 N. Monroe - 509.444.4140 HoffmanMusic.com

32 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

and taking a tour. Of 10 other roommates, I knew no one, including the roommate I’d share a bathroom with. I had no idea what to expect. The idea of the Gee seemed like The Real World, and we all know those people are not polite (nor sane). But instead of roommates with anger management issues, the unique house attracted truly unique and pretty awesome people. In my time here I have lived with a roommate who grew up on a commune, an intern for the NBA, one of our school mascots, and a vice president of the Gonzaga Society of Women Engineers. And Price was right; we did become like family, as cheesy as that might sound. Price says the Gee has lived up to his expectations. He joined us for a graduation party at the beginning of the summer and felt that the party was exactly what he envisioned for the Gee. He wanted it to be a place for friends and families to gather and enjoy all of the unique features the Gee has to offer. But it’s not just family and friends who have noticed my house. Complete strangers have stopped me on my way out to either tell me how “tight” the house is or ask me what it is more times than I can count. I see cars slow down and stare dumbfounded at the place. People don’t know what to make of this huge orange, modern building next to a Mexican restaurant in the Logan Neighborhood. That was Price’s intent. “I call it nose-on-window marketing. I want people to look in and be fascinated by it. It really grabs your eye,” he said. Cunningham doesn’t know if the LEED Platinum-and-green building will catch on in Spokane, due to the added price and time commitment it takes to make a building green, but Price hopes to construct more buildings like the Gee House at other colleges once he starts to turn a profit. As of now, it’s me and three roommates for the fall semester. One weird family in a green (or orange) house. 

CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER CALLING IT QUITS L

ast week a single lamp illuminated the North Idaho College auditorium stage that was the longtime home of the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, which abruptly announced it was disbanding after 45 years of providing professional productions to North Idaho. It’s an old theater superstition — the idea being that a theater should never be left completely dark, lest a ghost take over the building. The light, left as a tribute to the company’s legacy, also served as a reminder that the region had lost a significant cultural organization. The CDAST board of directors voted to disband the nonprofit organization just days after the theater wrapped up the summer’s four-show season, during which it had asked the public for $150,000 in donations in order to keep the theater afloat. “With both season ticket and individual ticket sales down significantly this year, there is no indication Coeur d’Alene has an appetite for the type of presentation our organization, in its current form, is consistently able to produce,” said board president Joseph Anderson in a statement. For executive director Michelle Mendez, the announcement (and, in turn, her termination) came as a shock, considering she felt she’d developed a viable plan that would have allowed CdAST to return next year. “I’m shocked. We raised $60,000 in less than two weeks,” she says of the last-minute cash quest the theater started near the end of the season. Mendez also says that artistic director Roger Welch had offered to take a $20,000 annual pay cut to help the group stabilize its budget.

901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638

Friday, September 6th @ 7:30pm

Northwest Bellydance Company

Arabesque Presents

A scene from CDAST’s Mary Poppins.

MIKE McCALL PHOTO

The theater’s productions, which employed professional actors and crew, cost as much as $100,000 per show. This leaves a sizable hole in the theatrical landscape of the Inland Northwest, especially in North Idaho. But fear not — Coeur d’Alene still has theater, especially in the form of the Lake City Playhouse. Still, that lone candle is a sad sign for theater lovers. — MIKE BOOKEY

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 7TH | 7PM

BIG CITY COMEDY JEBB FINK AWARD WINNING HOST AND COMEDIAN

For Your Consideration

DUANE GOAD COMEDIAN, WRITER AND VOICE TALENT FOR MSN-TV

KEN HABIB VALLEYFEST COMEDY COMPETITION FINALIST

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH | 8PM

BY BETH NOTTURNO

8PM

ALBUM | Working intensively in the studio with jazz musicians, vocalists, guitars, trombones — even weird instruments like a toy piano and a harmonium, Pretty Lights (aka Derek Smith) made A COLOR MAP OF THE SUN completely from scratch. He pressed the recordings into vinyl records and sampled them turntable-style to produce the electronic album. His funky bass style, infused with two and half years of attention to each hand-crafted detail, results in a wholly unique album that’s perfect for a long drive or a chill party.

TV | The casually surreal and darkly humorous FX network comedy WILFRED puts Elijah Wood on set with an Australian dude in a dog suit. Everyone else sees Wilfred as a furry gray mutt, but to Wood’s character Ryan he’s a bipedal stoner confidant. The juxtaposition of Ryan’s sanity and Wilfred’s crudely profound doggy insight revolves around themes like fear, pride and guilt, employing clever twists on mental health and the side of ourselves that we hide from the real world. 

YOUTUBE | Jason Silva, host of NatGeo’s Brain Games, delivers optimism and visual profundity in his video series SHOTS OF AWE. Zooming through images of galaxies and brain neurons, Silva invigorates our humdrum routine in 180 seconds with his fast-talking philosophy about wonder, technology, human potential and awe. Each video scrambles our perception of the mundane with a boost of fresh perspective, doing the trick a lot more effectively than your usual shot of espresso. 

A Unique Blend of Spanish, Classical, Flamenco, Opera and World Music

Friday, September 27 | 8pm Stay at

Drink at For Reservations Call: 509.747.1041 or visit www.hotelrubyspokane.com

*A $2 RESTORATION FEE IS ADDED TO EACH TICKET COST.

BINGCROSBYTHEATER.COM

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 33

FIND ART and more this Friday, Venues open 5 - 8 pm PATIT CREEK CELLARS TASTING ROOM

ADAMS STREET AREA BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE. Presenting Edward Gilmore’s exhibit: “In The Raw.” Artist’s reception 5pm, Beacon Hill’s Bistro Buffet, 6-8pm. Music by “Lonesome” Lyle Morse, 6:30-10pm. Reserve a table 465-3591.

KOLVA SULLIVAN GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST., SUITE A Exhibiting clay works by Alaskan artist and Gonzaga graduate Sarah Beaty. Show title: weight•less.

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. Trackside Studio Ceramic Arts Gallery, in its 7th year, welcomes local educator and longtime Spokane ceramic artist, Gina Freuen. Chris Kelsey and Mark Moore along with Gina will be exhibiting together with a blended exhibit that should be a delight to clay patrons throughout the region.

CARNEGIE SQUARE AREA ANDY’S BAR & GRILL

1401 W. 1ST AVE. Featuring surreal impressionism paintings of the night sky by Serge. Also check out our delicious food and drinks menu.

DAVENPORT HOTEL AND STEAM PLANT AREA * BABY BAR

827 W. 1st AVE. (directly behind Neato Burrito)

Join us for First Friday. We are featuring artist Vincent Myron Clayton Stevens.

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

906 W. 2nd AVE. (across from the Steam Plant) We have Pat McVay’s chainsaw art and Don Ashford’s pottery for September First Friday. Brent Edstrom Trio will be playing from 7-9pm.

MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX 1001 W. SPRAGUE AVE. Take an architectural tour of Spokane’s art deco treasure and premier arts venue. The 1931 hall was restored in 2007, staying true to the original graced by Crosby and Sinatra, with decorative fi xtures and handpainted murals carefully chosen to fit the period. A jazz duo will play in the lobby as concessions are served 5-8pm.

822 W. SPRAGUE AVE. (across from the Davenport) Featuring award-winning, mixed media artist Rachel Dolezal’s All Media Show. Artist’s reception 4-6pm with complimentary hors d’oeuvres. From 6-8pm enjoy Hot Jazz, Pre-war Swing, Jump Blues & Jazz Manouche by Hot Club of Spokane! Savory bites menu available.

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

901 W. 1ST AVE. Combining technology, music & culinary arts, Synesthesia is an event that engages the audience across the sensory spectrum, blending motion, sound, light, & taste into a shifting, all-encompassing experience. An interactive experience designed by Alan Chatham & music by Darrin Schaffer. Sets: 7-7:45pm, 8:15- 9pm, 9:45-10:30pm.

unless otherwise noted.

BRICK WALL GALLERY

BENNETT BLOCK, MAIN & HOWARD (2nd floor skywalk level) The Brickwall Photographic Gallery is featuring colorful photos of Allan Bruce Zee from Portland, OR for the month of September. Also hosting “Through the Lens of Homelessness: a Photovoice Exhibit.” Displaying a dozen photographs portraying life on the streets taken by House of Charity clients themselves. The goal of this exhibit is to bring about awareness of life on the streets. Open until 8:30pm

DOWNTOWN CORE AREA ARBOR CREST TASTING ROOM

808 W. MAIN AVE. (River Park Square, third level) Featuring artist Casey Klahn’s colorful paintings for the September First Friday.

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

707 W. MAIN AVE. (Crescent Court skywalk level) Scott Dillon exhibits his sculptures in wood and metals of his family heritage for the month of September. Show titled: “My heritage: the Fine Art of Metal and Wood.” Music and refreshments. Also featuring decorated/designed chairs from the recent “Chair Affair.”

RIVER PARK SQUARE/FOOD COURT

808 W. MAIN AVE. (3rd floor) First Night Spokane Rising Stars: Singer, Songwriter and hometown girl, Makenzie Curtis will move you with her smooth and methodic vocals. 5:30-7:30pm.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

120 N. STEVENS ST. (Main & Stevens) Enjoy an amazing photography from around the world from Dennis Isip and music from local musician Darin Hilderbrand. Skylite Cellars will be on hand with new wines and amazing deals Festivities begin at 5pm, music from 6:3010pm. 5 Wineries, 50 Wines, 1 Location.

STEAM PLANT

159 S. LINCOLN ST. Check out the whimsical, colorful art by Debbie McCulley. Her imagery includes her famous Martini Frogs, Party Animals and images that were recently selected for the Utility Box Beautification Program in downtown Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. She will also show her Wine Cork Necklaces and Bottle Stoppers! And yes, there will be samples of Steam Plant beer!

Done in acrylic and oil, watercolor and pastels and drawings in charcoal, pen and ink this exhibit is not to be missed. River Park Square, 3rd floor, Food Court, First Night Spokane Rising Stars: Singer, Songwriter and hometown girl, Makenzie Curtis will move you with her smooth and methodic vocals. 5:30-7:30pm.

Featured Artist Tiffany Paterson at Global Downtown GLOBAL DOWNTOWN

726 W. RIVERSIDE AVE. Please join us for First Friday. On display art work by Tiffany Patterson & live music by Dead Serious Lovers. Come mingle with Tiffany and listen to great music.

KRESS GALLERY/RIVER PARK SQUARE

808 W. MAIN AVE. (3rd floor) Kress Gallery “The Art of the Absurd” – From Surrealism to Nonsense. Local artist Tom Quinn’s paintings often surprise the viewer with their hard edges and finicky detail.

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N. HOWARD ST. Please join us for July’s First Friday & view the wide range of photos by Jenny Lange, from beautiful serene close-ups of local, wild flowers to colorful graffiti from Spain.

WHITESTONE WINERY

8 N. POST ST., SUITE 8 Casual atmosphere, great art & live music, light snacks, wine tasting, glass pours & bottle purchases 6-9pm! Featuring artist Allyson Cochrane. Live music by Mark Lee.

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE

402 W. MAIN AVE. (Liberty Building) 3 Minute Mic - Open Mic Poetry 7-9pm (sign up starts at 6:30). Read an original poem or maybe even just read a personal

BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE

108 N. POST ST. We will be celebrating with music by Karrie O’Neill, Happy Hour 4-6 and half price all Eats menu 5-8. Escape the ordinary and join us.

BOZZI COLLECTION GALLERY

211 N. WALL ST. Featuring sculptor James Rea’s figurative works in stone and terrazzo, as well as classic works, like his intricately hand carved violin in Carrara marble, and some abstractions in stone and other media.

downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

find art

September 6th!

exhibit by Michael Shuey on display. Michael will be highlighting vineyards throughout The Evergreen State and grapes grown locally. Artist’s reception.

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT ELIXIR SALON

favorite. Feel free to just come and listen. All ages are welcome!

FIRST AVENUE AREA - EAST END

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS 331 W. MAIN AVE. Spokane artist Barry Anderson will be showing his stunning pop art collection. The pieces in his collection range from whimsical black and white images, to vivid bold colors that are a feast for the eyes.

HERBAL ESSENCE CAFÉ

CUP OF COOL WATER

1106 W. 2ND AVE. Interactive art! Grab a can of paint and join in the creation! (wear old clothes)! See art on display by Cup of Cool Water youth and artist Charlie Schmidt (the “Fastest Artist in America”). Charlie will tag full blast with partners Stow Miller and Joe Ferrante, and will show a few of his Keyboard Cat paintings. Large canvases being painted & eats! The cause is great... helping Spokane’s homeless youth! 6-8pm.

CAT’S EYE

1 S. WASHINGTON ST. Cool School at Cats Eye. Megan Holden will be showing with her intricate black and white drawings. Conrad Bagley will have crayon creations. Jamming music and delicious food. We are moving so come in and buy previous work at a discount.

NORTH BANK AREA

115 N. WASHINGTON ST. We are featuring the modern, bright & brilliant oil on canvas paintings by artist Lynn Hanley.

CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY

LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N. WASHINGTON ST., SUITE 105 Gordon Estates will be pouring tastings from 5-9pm while Carey Brazil lays down the soundtrack. The walls will be adorned with Nico Archer’s unique interpretation of the world around us. This trifecta is bound to please three of your 5 senses.

POTTERY PLACE PLUS

203 N. WASHINGTON ST. (main floor of Auntie’s) Featuring guest artist Dennis Smith’s show RICHNESS ALL AROUND. From people to the environment interpreted in Dennis’ own special, wonderful and sometimes whimsical way. Artist’s reception 5-9pm.

SANTÉ RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

728 E. SPRAGUE AVE. Please join us for First Friday. We are featuring local artist Christopher Defeo who will have a permanent small gallery in our salon.

404 W. MAIN AVE. Listen to live music by Paul Abner of Direction Arts, view large acrylics & abstract watercolors by Megan Broughton & enjoy a special menu featuring a sausage fresh sheet with house made condiments & beer pairings for First Friday.

ECHO BOUTIQUE

621 W. MALLON AVE. (in the Flour Mill) Featuring new works by abstract artists Melinda Melvin and Jeffrey Loyd. Both Melvin and Loyd explore the use of color and design, each with different, extraordinary results. There will also be a chocolate tasting competition with prizes. Stop by for a truly fun evening!

176 S. HOWARD ST., SUITE A Featuring portraits and landscapes by artist Darcy Lee Sexton. Also artisan jewelry from Union Studio Metals, Jody Steensland, Allison Kalloway & Megan Holden. Artists’ reception.

GINA’S DESIGN CENTER

811 W. 2ND AVE. Please join us this First Friday. We are featuring artist Kirsten Stobie. Kirsten is constantly in search of new styles, textures & techniques & the endless possibilities of art.

HO HO TERIYAKI CHICKEN

621 W. MALLON AVE., (in the Flour Mill) Featuring the beautiful watercolor paintings of owner Ho Lan. Don’t forget to try our fabulous menu! 4-7pm.

RED DRAGON DOWNTOWN

1406 W. 3RD AVE. Museum quality, historical life-sized portraits of my family cira 1920 China (Few photographs of this time period still exist today). Belly dancing in the Red Lantern Lounge starting at 5pm.

RIVERFRONT PARK

The IMAX Theatre, Spokane Falls SkyRide, Carrousel, Pavilion Attractions and Tour Train are open daily.

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA

SECOND SPACE GALLERY

BARILI CELLARS

610 W. 2ND AVE. Featuring new young artist Jesse McKenzie. She paints vibrant acrylics of leopards, lions, music, fantasy, emotions and romance. Prints available. Wine tasting offered next door at Barili’s Cellars!

608 W. 2ND AVE. Join Barili Cellars on First Friday from 4-9pm and enjoy current wine releases & fun art. We will be displaying paintings, pottery & poetry by Bellingham artist Jodee Adams-Moore. Jodee’s influences come from running journeys in the woods & mountains.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

319 W. 2ND AVE. “Grapes of Washington,” a photographic

MARKETPLACE WINERY

39 W. 2ND AVE. Large colorful works by painter Ricco diStefano are moments in his mind that he shares with the world! Back by popular demand, music by Maxie Ray Mills! Featuring EMVY and BridgePress Cellars/ 2012 Award Winning Wines.

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. MAIN AVE. FLESH: new artwork by Margot Casstevens & Carrie Scozzaro. Two artists explore the concept of “flesh,” focusing on loss, death, growth, and transformation.

SARANAC PUBLIC HOUSE

21 W. MAIN AVE. We have a group art show with 16 area artists each displaying one “diamond shaped” canvas with their own style of painting, illustration & mixed media all hung in a grid pattern on one wall. Featuring a live collaboration drawing. Music by Djing, REDKING, DOC ZAY & others.

SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET

24 W. 2ND AVE. First Friday Bike Ride: Enjoy First Friday in a whole new way! Meet at the Marketplace Cork & Keg from 6-7pm, then onward through the city to various First Friday participating venues! A $3 donation will get you special deals on local foods and brews. All proceeds go to help the Spokane Public Market.

WEST DOWNTOWN AREA THE MAC – NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE

2316 W. 1ST AVE. 5 galleries full of exhibits on Plateau Tribal Cultures, extreme NW explorer – David Douglas, Spokane modern architecture & art from the MAC collections. Free admission.

* Located in the Davenport District – DavenportDistrict.org

FIRST FRIDAY 16 Artists

Blue Moon Waffles These waffles are perfect for any meal! This recipe uses Blue Moon Belgian White to create light, fluffy waffles combined with a subtle yeast/Blue Moon flavor.

Collaborative Show DJS & LIVE ART

INGREDIENTS • 2 cups flour • 1 tsp baking powder, 1/2 tsp baking soda • 1/4 tsp salt • 2 Tbs sugar • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten • 1 cup Blue Moon Belgian White wheat ale • 3/4 cup milk • 4 tbs butter, melted • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract • 1 Tbs finely grated orange zest • Powdered sugar (optional)

21 West Main Ave 509-473-9455

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Preheat waffle iron according to manufacturer directions. 2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and sugar. Set aside. 3. In a seperate bowl, combine eggs, Blue Moon, milk, butter, vanilla and orange zest. 4. Fold together egg and flour mixtures until well combined. 5. Cook batter according to waffle iron directions. Serve warm, garnished with powdered sugar or other desired toppings.

SaranacPublicHouse.com

downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

Street Art

MIKE McCALL PHOTO

A boom in galleries makes downtown CdA a visual arts destination BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

S

ome people go for the art, taking advantage of the opportunity to talk to featured artists. Others go for social buzz, an evening out… shopping, visiting, dining, and perusing the gallery scene. Known as an artwalk, the emphasis on walking can get lost as these events grow. Not so in Coeur d’Alene, which seems to be experiencing a renaissance, welcoming new galleries into the fold over the past year. Focused around downtown’s Sherman Avenue and the surrounding streets, Coeur d’Alene ArtWalk has managed to maintain a local feel, totally walkable in a few hours. Blackwell Gallery (205 Sherman Ave.) was opened in 2012 by partners Mike Bacon, an artist who also exhibits at the gallery, and Bill Wendlandt, who purchased and renovated the historic Blackwell House into the new Blackwell Boutique Hotel. Blackwell Gallery showcases mostly local, emerging artists, emphasizing modern, original work — no reproduction prints — and low-edition photography. “If it will fit in the condo with all stainless and concrete floors, overlooking Elliott Bay in Seattle, it will work [at Blackwell Gallery],” says Bacon. The 500-square-foot gallery space is bright, hip and displays a simultaneous assortment of work from their growing roster of artists, such as the stunning abstractions of Hiromi Okumura. ArtCoLab (108 N. Fourth St.) brings custom cool to Coeur d’Alene with an innovative shared workspace from partners Scott Lakey aka Dove of Born Invincible Design, and Jeremy Deming aka Jerm of JermDesign. Look for bright orange walls, bold graphics, one-off bikes and wonderfully outlandish exhibitions like Monsters X Robots (through October).

36 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Featuring Lakey, Derming and tattooist/artist Scotty Hankins, the exhibition includes their 15-by-3-foot monster-themed version of The Last Supper. September’s ArtWalk will include the unveiling of a rockabilly monster pin-up girls print series, also through October. Other new galleries include Art de Vine (1506 Northwest Blvd.) by longtime painter and instructor Barbara Irvine and Edward Gilmore’s resurrection of the failed Spokane Studio 66 in its new CdA location (321 E. Front Ave.). CdA Galleries (213 E. Sherman) isn’t new; it’s been tucked inside the CdA Resort for nearly 30 years. This spring, however, it relocated to Sherman Avenue to promote a large holding of mostly Western paintings and bronze sculpture by national artists. September means the Sixth Annual Miniatures by the Lake nationwide invitational. Also more visible is Studio 107 (503 E. Sherman), which relocated last spring to the former Barrel Room No. 6 locale and features more than 20 regional artists in a boutique-like wine-bar setting. Seems you can’t walk but a few feet along Sherman Avenue without seeing an art gallery: Summers Glass (211 E. Sherman), Gallery Northwest (217), Painter’s Chair Northwest (223), Angel Art & Antiques (423), and Devin Galleries (507). And no artwalk would be complete without a stop to The Art Spirit Gallery (415 E. Sherman), with an impressive 16-year history of rotating monthly exhibitions, featuring acclaimed regional artists, and annual events like the clay invitational and December’s Small Artworks Invitational. September marks the anniversary of its 150th exhibition, featuring perennial favorites Harold Balazs and Mel McCuddin, combined age 165 years, most of them spent making art. n

Patio g n i n i D Enjoy rEfrEshing drinks & dinnEr on our bEautiful patio!

patio music series SUMMER 2013

Thoughtful food, fine cocktails, &

JUSTADD

gracious hospitality in the heart

DRY FLY

of Spokane’s Gonzaga District. Located at 913 East Sharp Street. cloverspokane.com facebook.com/cloverspokane

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 6, 6:30 pm - 9:30 pm

[drink responsibly]

Paul Grove SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 7, 6:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Evan Denlinger FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 13, 6:30 pm - 9:30 pm

DRY FLY

fEaturEing liVE MusiC on thE patio. (WEd-sat)

VODKA | GIN | WHISKEY | BOURBON

509-489-2112

DRYFLYDISTILLING.COM LOCALLY OWNED | LOCALLY MADE | LOCAL INGREDIENTS

1003 E TRENT # 200 | SPOKANE

On the Traffic Circle In Browne’s Addition

1928 West Pacific • ejsgardenbistro.com 509-443-3544

TBD SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14, 6:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Karrie O’Neill FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 20, 6:30 pm - 9:30 pm

We have a menu that will make your mouth water!

2501 N. 4th St. Cd’A, ID / 208.765.2555 / sataycatering.com

Seating available for large groups & private parties. Upstairs bistro bar for late night fun. Bistro is open daily for lunch and dinner.

Dan Conrad Please visit our website for more information on our upcoming fall & winter concert lineup, plus live jazz for Sunday brunch. If you are a musician and would like to play at Clover, please email info@cloverspokane.com we love all types of music, from strings to acoustic guitar.

Extraordinary. Served Daily.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 37

Apple Artistry Spokane welcomes two new cideries as interest in hard cider picks up across the Northwest BY CHEY SCOTT

T

he distinctive aromas of fruit and yeast are immediately perceptible. At first, the combination is redolent of an apple pie baking in the oven, yet not as sweet, and there’s also a richer tinge to the air that brings to mind gently swirling and inhaling the notes in a glass of red wine. These are the smells of cider being made. In a newly renovated downtown warehouse on Washington Street near the railroad tracks, Liberty Ciderworks co-founders Rick Hastings and Austin Dickey — wearing matching brown T-shirts bearing Liberty’s logo — are spending a warm Sunday evening checking on batches of cider in big stainless steel fermentation tanks and crossing off items on a seemingly unending to-do list before the public debut of Liberty’s artisan hard cider late this fall. There are labels to design, a tasting room to finish, local distribution to arrange, and of course bottles to fill, which currently sit in towering, plastic-wrapped stacks off in the corner of the modestly-sized production room. Similar in process to winemaking but with an end result that features an alcohol-by-volume percentage generally higher than most beers and lower than most wines, hard cider is quickly gaining attention across the Northwest and the country. Cider may make up just a fraction of the alcoholic beverage market, but industry watchers say it’s lately become the fastest growing market segment. It’s taken years of planning and countless experimental batches for Liberty Ciderworks to get to this point (both owners also have full-time careers) and the excitement between Hastings and Dickey over introducing their traditional, English-inspired apple cider to the Inland Northwest is as apparent as the aromatic mix of apples, yeast and tannins in the air. The timing for Liberty’s debut couldn’t be better. Hard apple cider is exploding across Washington, Oregon and the rest of the Northwest, evident in the number of new cidermaking operations that have started up in the region just this year. Spokane is now home to two cideries; in addition to Liberty Ciderworks, there’s Twilight Cider Works, which opened in May up in Green Bluff. West of the Cascades, the Seattle Cider

Liberty Cider Works is one of two Spokane-area businesses hopping on the cider bandwagon. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

38 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Co. launched late last month, touting itself as the city’s first cidery since Prohibition. Cider is quickly gaining ground in Oregon, too, which is home to at least 15 cideries, according to the Northwest Cider Association. Portland and Seattle are also home to cidercentric bars: Bushwhacker Cider and Capitol Cider, respectively. The Northwest Cider Association, headquartered in Seattle, offers membership to cidermakers across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and western Canada, and estimates the number of cideries in the region is now double what it was at this time last year. Its member count currently sits at 32, with the bulk of those in Washington and Oregon. Some are brand-new, while others have been in operation for some time but only recently joined the young trade group. The association promotes its members and the industry through events like the currently ongoing third annual Washington Cider Week, a 10-day (Sept. 5-15) celebration of craft cider across the state.

T

he cider fermenting in the stainless steel tanks in Liberty’s small-scale production facility — along with the types of cider grabbing attention across the country right now — isn’t what many might expect. It’s not just overly sweet apple juice with alcohol in it, as Will Jordan, cidermaker and founder of Twilight Cider Works, puts it: “It’s an artisan-style beverage that’s more about balancing flavors.” Those flavors include the bitter tartness of malic acid, found in higher quantities in the varieties of apples grown specifically to make cider. They aren’t as sweet or juicy as culinary apples, with their dry tannic acids, or tannins, that create a trait of dryness in hard ciders as well as wine. Cider apples tend to have less sugar, thus ciders aren’t as sweet because the sugar is largely consumed during fermentation. The semi-dry and dry traditional-style ciders gaining popularity now aren’t comparable to mass-produced ciders like Woodchuck and Hornsby’s, Hastings says. Some regional cidermakers are even leaning toward the creativity of craft beer brewing by adding infusions of hops, other fruit juices or herbs to their ciders. With Washington holding strong to its place as the No. 1 apple-producing state in the U.S. and Oregon hanging on at the No. 8 spot, it makes sense that cider should be big here, so why is it just now taking off? Hard cider was the beverage of choice for Colonial Americans, who brought traditional cider apples and the know-how of cidermaking over from England, where the beverage is still prevalent. Cider was often safer to drink than water, and also was the easiest way to preserve the orchard harvest. Though cider’s popularity was already in steady decline at the turn of the 20th century, most modern cidermakers credit Prohibition for largely wiping cider from America’s collective memory. There’s no one reason for cider’s sudden resurgence, but rather a number of factors. The craft beer movement may be reaching a market-saturation peak, and that gives cidermakers an opportunity to offer a new, related product to both beer and wine lovers looking to try something new. Liberty’s cidermakers, along with Twilight’s Jordan, agree that cider is the next logical step for beer enthusiasts, because of its local ties to the region and the artisanal process to make it. The current medical buzz around Celiac disease that’s created a demand for gluten-free foods has also influenced cider’s upsurge, since it’s a grain-free beverage. The local food movement is also partly credited with bringing cider back into the market across the Pacific Northwest because the apples are readily available from our orchards. Cidermaking is also well-supported in other states with notable apple production, including New York, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Virginia. The hope of Spokane’s commercial cidermakers is that the industry growth continues, so consumers who aren’t familiar with the cidermaking process and the ranges of cider styles can discover its benefits. “It’s an in-between drink,” Hastings says. “There are times when nothing is better than a beer, and times when I would drink nothing other than wine, but there are times when there is nothing better than a cider, period.” n Twilight Cider Works and Liberty Ciderworks Washington Cider Week Tasting • Sat, Sept. 7 from 2-4 pm • $5/six tastings • Vino! Wine • 222 S. Washington St. • 838-1229

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 39

Why URM Food Service?

FOOD | OPENING

SUPERIOR SERVICE “Our business model is unique. We own a store, a Hispanic deli and bakery, a sports bar, and a fine dining restaurant. We also produce fresh tortillas. URM has the diverse products and unusual items we require to keep our shelves filled and our clients happy. Their excellent customer service and partnership has helped to make our business a monumental success.”

Sergio & Mayra De Leon Owners DeLeon Foods, Inc. Agave, Inc. Sergio’s Mexican Sports Bar and Grill

Donny Hart of Donny’s Place, left, and his father and chef Daniel Hart. JOE KONEK PHOTO

All In the Family Donny’s Place offers a fine-dining feel in an unexpected Hillyard location BY CHEY SCOTT

I

f you didn’t know what was there, it would be hard to guess what lies inside the tiny pale-yellow building just off the corner of North Crestline Street and Diamond Avenue, with its curved metal sign above the doorway bearing the words “Donny’s Place.” A restaurant offering a fine-dining experience in the Hillyard neighborhood — which has long held the reputation of one of Spokane’s rougher areas — probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. Inside is a warm and intimate — yet slightly cramped — dining room that presents itself like an Old World Italian eatery. Warm, olive-green walls are decorated with shiny copper pots, and crisp white linens cover the eight or so tables of varying sizes, all set with a full service of silver and finished with a single-stem flower vase and glowing red candleholder. Diners seated at a corner booth crammed in next to an upright piano can see everything, from the front door and the host stand — the traffic rushes up and down Crestline just beyond curtained windows — and the entrance to the kitchen, the dish room and the restroom. Opening this past April, it’s taken time for Donny’s Place to gain recognition in the local dining scene, if only partly because of its unusual location and reliance on word-of-mouth recommendations. Currently it’s open four days a week, only for dinner. If there aren’t any customers, it’s not unusual for 24-year-old Donny Hart, a first-time restaurant owner, to close up shop for the night. Reservations are recommended for

Exceeding Expectations Delivering Value

that reason alone, as well as the eatery’s limited capacity. While Donny greets customers and waits tables, his father Dan prepares food in the kitchen and Donny’s younger brother Danny washes dishes in the back. Without knowing who was who, it would be easy to mistake Dan, a tall, robust man with a friendly Santa-esque beard, as the owner/chef. He pops in and out of the kitchen to converse with patrons while Donny stands at the front door and nervously glances over to make sure guests’ water glasses are still full. On first glance, the Italian-fare menu seems stripped-down and basic, but that’s for a reason, Dan explains, adding that he is open to taking customer requests for meals if it’s something he has the ingredients to prepare. On a warm August night, the pizza oven isn’t in use because it would heat up the building too much, so guests are left to choose from either pasta or meat-based dishes (all entrées are a flat $15). At first it may seem like Donny’s Place is a bit disorganized and spur-of-the-moment, but don’t let that fool you. The portions are huge — even splitting an entrée is more than adequate. Even though it’s just Dan working back in the kitchen, the food comes out quickly and is savory, fresh and satisfying, as well as affordable.  Donny’s Place • 2103 E. Diamond Ave. • Open Wed-Sat from 5-11 pm • 979-2741 • facebook.com/DonnysPlaceSpokane

JAN, THE TOY LADY, IS INTRIGUED BY THE VARIOUS SCIENCE BOOKS AND KITS AT WHIZ KIDS: ! Out Look mer m Su tion vaca unced bo just way. a

South Spokane

(509) 467-2755

www.urmfoodservice.com LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1921

40 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

3223 E. 57th Suite k REVEL77.com 509.280.0518

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS

FOOD | OPENINGS

Coming Attractions A handful of new restaurants and bars are coming soon BY LISA WAANANEN

T

here will be french fries. That’s one significant difference that will set the reincarnated Geno’s apart from its new owners’ flagship restaurant, the Elk Public House. The reason is simple — “Geno’s had a fryer,” says Marshall Powell, general manager and part owner of the soon-to-open restaurant. The owners of the Elk and its sister restaurants were already talking about Geno’s (1414 N. Hamilton St.) when disaster struck earlier this year. In June, a fire believed to be caused by arson broke out between Geno’s and a neighboring apartment building, damaging the kitchen. Geno’s closed its doors. Now with new owners and some new kitchen equipment, the Logan neighborhood restaurant is getting ready to reopen in the next month. The original hope was to be open for the beginning of the school year, but the process took longer after the fire. “We decided to do it right instead of rushing it,” Powell says. The restaurant will be the same casual neighborhood dining concept as the company’s other

restaurants — Powell says they have “de-circused” the interior — but with more TVs and a sportsoriented college atmosphere. The previous owner and chef at Geno’s, William Webster, is renovating a new spot with plans to open later this fall: Webster’s Ranch House Saloon (1914 N. Monroe St.), a restaurant and smokehouse in north Spokane at what was previously Working Class Heroes. In downtown Spokane, the two partners behind the now-closed Marquee Lounge each have a new nightlife spot in the works. Since Jeremy Tangen bought the old Ugly Bettie’s, the space has been fully gutted and renovated to reopen this fall as Borracho Tacos & Tequileria (211 N. Division St.), a bar specializing in Mexican cuisine and infused tequilas made in-house. Matt Goodwin is opening a throwback-style cocktail bar in the Peyton Building, cheekily called the Volstead Act (12 N. Post St.) after the 1919 law establishing Prohibition. The focus will be classic pre-Prohibition-style cocktails made with quality liquor. Goodwin is also planning to open the Boiler Room in north Spokane with a focus on wood-fired pizza and craft beer. 

L FALA RTS

W E I V E PR

mprehensive co st o m ’s st e w h The Inland Nort vents calendar fall and winter e

TM

ON STANDS TH SEPTEMBER 19

HAVE AN EVENT? Submit your fall event information to getlisted@inlander.com by Sept. 5th

For advertising info please contact 509.325.0634 ext. 216 or sales@inlander.com

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 41

Spokane’s BEST New Bar!

FOOD | UPDATE

Country Bar

Come and enjoy our NEW OUTDOOR BEACH AREA!

Live Mu sic Thur, F : ri & Sat

JOIN US for the JASON ALD EAN After Party

Power Hour Specials (4-6pm): ks Half off well drinles tt bo tic es m do & Win a ean Jason Ald ar! it u g signed

Wed. Sept. 25

th

Acoustic Per country star Tformance by homas Rhett.

Tickets $5

Raci Erdem toasts to the success of the Oval Office.

OVAL OFFICE

CHRIS BOVEY PHOTO

620 N. Spokane St. | Post Falls 208-777-2102

D

on’t listen to pundits. The approval rating at the Oval Office couldn’t be higher. Far from Washington, D.C., this Post Falls sister restaurant to Raci Erdem’s White House Grill is a plenty happy place. There are two happy hours, from 3-6 pm and again from 9-11 pm, when you can eat, drink or both, with most dishes going for just $5.50 a pop (how’s that for an economic plan?). Try appetizers like happy mushrooms (sautéed in butter, soy sauce and chili flakes), skinny secretaries (grilled asparagus in a lemon and olive oil sauce)

or lamb burgers stuffed with gooey Gorgonzola. Although beer and wine is served, the real draw is the martinis, not only for the taste but for the names. Try the Global Warmer — plum vodka, habanero simple syrup and guava nectar. Or the Larry Craig, with plum vodka, pineapple juice and black raspberry liqueur. A classic example of Erdem’s offbeat humor, it encourages you to “come out of the closet and embrace the fruit.” Nothing like a little political humor with your cocktail. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

wine cellars

9.13.13

Sponsored by

6:00 PM

Classic

Car Show

CHATEAU RIVE at the Flour Mill music by

TICKETS TERRIBLE BUTTONS SILENT AUCTION advance $35 drink local with & ART SALE at the door $40 RIVER CITY BREWING & DRY FLY DISTILLING #dmcw13

Save the Date Sunday, Sept 15 11 am – 2 pm • Free Admission! arborcrest.com Ages 21+ • Cliff House Estate & Tasting Room • 4705 N Fruithill Rd • 509.927.9463

42 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

VISIT SPOKANERIVERKEEPER.ORG to BUY TICKETS or FOR MORE INFORMATION

FOOD | sampler

BIRDY’S SPORTS BAR 12908 U.S. 395 | 863-9572 Dan Birdwell left the construction industry to open this sports bar with his baseball-loving family last spring and quickly built a loyal fan base of Whitworth students and northside professionals. You won’t find anything revolutionary (or wings, for that matter) on the menu, but their burgers, dogs and sandwiches are just the ticket when you’re parked for a few hours to watch the game on TV. EICHARDT’S 212 Cedar St. | Sandpoint 208-263-4005 One of Sandpoint’s best spots for live music and good beer, Eichardt’s hosts a steady stream of musicians playing blues, honky-tonk or jam-band fare, while the taps are updated constantly with new micro and craft brews. The clientele is decidedly athletic — mountain bikers, skiers, snowboarders and other adventurers — so don’t expect chili fries and football. Don’t feel like having a drink? No problem. Grab yourself an elk burger, one of the Caesar salads or salmon ranchero.

Manual ANNUAL

pubs LANTERN TAP HOUSE 1004 S. Perry St. | 315-9531 When it opened in 2009, the Lantern Tavern — at 200 square feet — was one of the smallest bars in Spokane. Now in the space formerly occupied by the Perry Street Cafe, the Lantern welcomes newcomers, regulars and their kids with plenty of seating and a full menu alongside the craft brews. Bestsellers include the fish and chips, buttermilk pork sandwich and the Smashburger. Chef Troy Webber describes the menu’s inspiration as coming from a desire to create “everything from scratch ... classic pub-style food but tastier, fancier than the average sports bar. POST STREET ALE HOUSE 1 N. Post St. | 789-6900 Post Street’s prime downtown Spokane location across from the Davenport Hotel draws a mix of businessmen, concertgoers, sports fans and college kids, all looking to kick back and eat some good grub. Their alehouse sauce is the binding element of their menu — this tangy fry sauce goes well with just about everything on their menu — from

fried horseradish pickle chips to their popular angus burger. Wash down an in-house smoked pulled-pork sandwich with one of their 26 draft beers, 13 of which are on rotating taps. ZOLA 22 W. Main Ave. | 624-2416 We’d tell you that Zola has the best design of any bar in Spokane, but that would be pointless. You’ve been there already. Everyone in the tri-county area has. Full bar, concrete floor, cougars, excellent bar food, a design that draws from reclaimed junk and circus parts and a surprising amount of good local live music make for just about the best time you can have in town. Zola’s is more a bar/music venue than a dinner joint, but the food served isn’t your average bar fare. n

entrée

THE INSIDER’S GUIDE TO THE INLAND NORTHWEST

ON STANDS

NOW!

Test your Inland Northwest knowledge  with the Are You an Inlander? quiz.

Get the scoop on the local food scene with our Entrée newsletter. Visit Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up.

67

th

Tempt your tastebuds with 300+ restaurant and winery listings in the FOOD section

ry Sale a s Anniver Keep your family entertained all season long with ideas from our FAMILY section

Not like every other furniture store. Everything in the store is on sale

12 MONTH NO INTEREST FINANCING • GREAT PRICING AND SELECTION FLEXSTEEL • SIMMONS MATTRESSES • HOOKER • STANTON • EKORNES

2424 N. 4th, Cd’A 208 765-3674 rungefurniture.com

RUNGE CLEARANCE CENTER 303 Spokane Ave, Cd’A 208 664-2131

Commit to shopping local and let the SHOPPING section be your guide with 140 options from boutiques to furniture stores Find it FREE at over 1,000 Inlander locations throughout the Inland Northwest - while supplies last! Always available at Inlander Headquarters: 1227 W. Summit Parkway, Kendall Yards, Spokane.

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 43

Oscar Season Don’t trust the “awards bait” when looking for movie greatness this fall BY SCOTT RENSHAW

A

t last, the summer movie season is over. For those who found themselves frustrated by a nonstop parade of superhero fantasies, apocalyptic extravaganzas and boneheaded comedies, there’s a feeling in the air that now comes the time of year when — if I’m not a 15-to-25-year-old white male — Hollywood might actually be about to release some movies meant for me. Don’t kid yourself. You don’t matter. I don’t mean you specifically, of course. You’re a wonderful human being, and the world is a better place because you’re in it. I’m just playing the odds here, because virtually nothing the mainstream filmmaking community does has anything to do with what you, Average Person Reading This, might want to see in a movie theater. During the summer, that might seem to be an obvious statement. Sure, occasionally a movie starring women (The Heat) or AfricanAmericans (Lee Daniels’ The Butler) achieves some measure of box-office success. But we can dismiss that as an aberration, because come on — it’s not as though women or non-whites are interested in stories about people who look more like them. That’s just crazy talk. But it actually runs deeper than that, because Hollywood isn’t merely targeting 15-to25-year-old white males in North America. This is the era of global box-office, after all, and that means making movies that translate easily to appeal for foreign markets. That’s why you’ll see so many computer-animated features; kids are kids, and dubbing is easy. That’s why you’ll see a conspicuously multiracial cast like that of Fast & Furious 6; all the better to market it to the rest of the world. If you’re a movie industry executive, and you’re trying to preserve your job by avoiding risky misfires, building blockbusters for the consumption of the entire world is the smart play. Ah, but what about what happens when the kids are back in school, and multiplex offerings suddenly suggest that the film industry is concerned with stories about complicated adult humans on planet Earth? These are movies in which people talk to one another, and there may not be a single special-effects shot or

44 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

gunshot. Doesn’t that suggest a different set of principles are at work? Yes, it does. Those principles, however, once again have nothing at all to do with you, unless it’s incidental. That’s because the fallto-holidays movie season is all about the image of the movie business that Hollywood wants to sell. Like virtually everything else in Hollywood, it’s a battle of egos, of people trying to win. The object of the victory just changes from money to awards, allowing executives and actors to spend some time believing that it’s all about the art. Studios don’t make “awards bait” movies — including this year’s scheduled biographies of famous figures like Nelson Mandela and Walt Disney, or historical dramas like The Monuments Men, or literary adaptations like August: Osage County — because they think you want to see them. They make those movies because they want to win awards. If they do, maybe they’ll also convince you that those movies are better than other movies, and in so doing make more money. The astonishing thing is that great movies still manage to happen. They happen because directors, writers and actors throw their heart and soul into what they do, and sometimes they make amazing work in spite of the demands of a machine designed to create either “properties” or “prestige.” Or they create that work outside of the machine entirely, taking a chance that somehow, a film festival or critical consensus or word of mouth will build audience interest. It becomes ever more crucial to understand, even when the posters are covered with laurel branches from festival appearances or the trailers are full of somber symphonic music, that you’re always being marketed to. Maybe find a critic you trust to help guide you, or experiment with something just because it intrigues you. Just remember, while the serious movies tell you they deserve serious attention, that awards consensus is just like any other consensus: It’s based on the broadest possible appeal, and rarely on idiosyncratic or daring ideas. The movie you love the most this fall might be the one that nobody else would ever consider “award-worthy.” Maybe that’s exactly the way it should be. n

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS CUTIE AND THE BOXER

Ushio Shinohara is an artist best known for dipping his boxing glove-clad hands into paint and then punching the hell out of a canvas. Noriko Shinohara is his wife. She’s an artist, too, but much of her life is spent enduring the madness of her husband and keeping their 40-year marriage intact. This documentary, directed by first-timer Zachary Heinzerling, takes us inside this odd union as Noriko (aka Cutie) tries to step out from her husband’s shadow and make a name for herself. At Magic Lantern. (MB) Rated R.

MUSEUM HOURS

Working as a security guard at an art museum in Vienna, Johann has found a sense of peace in the quietness of the gallery’s halls. Then, a Canadian woman,

unfamiliar with the city but intrigued by art, arrives at the museum and soon befriends Johann. Together, they tour the museum, learning more about themselves than the pieces of art they are supposed to be inspecting. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated.

RIDDICK

Vin Diesel returns as Riddick, the interstellar warrior we first met in Pitch Black and then saw return to action in 2004’s Chronicles of Riddick. This time around, he’s been left for dead on a barren planet where he’s forced to fight for his life against alien beasts. Then, a bunch of bounty hunters come looking for the mole-eyed hero and, again, he has to fight for his life. (MB) Rated R.

NOW PLAYING 2 GUNS

Cruising around in a vintage Dodge Challenger, the DEA’s Bobby (Denzel Washington) and Navy investigator Stig (Mark Wahlberg) are both working undercover but make for such convincing bad-asses that they even have each other fooled. Indeed, the hook here is that, having been assigned by their respective agencies to infiltrate a crime syndicate, each assumes that the other is a criminal. It’s only once they’ve robbed a bank together (in order to secure evidence, naturally) that they realize each other’s actual allegiances. (CW) Rated R

20 FEET FROM STARDOM

We know names like Bruce Springsteen, Sheryl Crow and Mick Jagger. Names like Merry Clayton, Darlene Love and Claudia Lennear aren’t so familiar. We know the stars, but we don’t know the backup singers. This moving documentary puts the women who have supported these stars in the spotlight. One story looks at singer Judith Hill, recent contestant on NBC’s The Voice, and her partnership with Michael Jackson. At Magic Lantern. (JR) PG-13

BLACKFISH

Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s stunning documentary centers on a male orca named Tilikum who has been responsible for the death of three people, most recently the much-publicized 2010 death of a SeaWorld trainer in Orlando. He was terrorized by the other whales with whom he shared a tank and also spent his early years cooped up in a tiny holding pen at a third-rate amusement park. But the film’s reach goes far beyond Tilikum’s violent history, laying out the inherently problematic issues associated with putting a massive mammal — and massively intelligent, in some ways more so than humans — into captivity. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG-13

BLUE JASMINE

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To

THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT

NATIONAL LAMPOON’S Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the have-nots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CLOSED CIRCUIT

Paranoia is the order of the day in this courtroom drama about what happens after a terrorist explosion in London. A defense barrister (Eric Bana) and defense advocate (Rebecca Hall) must hide the fact that they had an affair. But things ramp up when they start feeling they’re being watched and followed for other reasons. Director John Crowley keeps the tension high, at first with words and surveillance cameras, then by turning it all into a full-fledged thriller. (ES) Rated R

DESPICABLE ME 2

Gru is back with his minions and adopted daughters in the animated sequel, picking up as the Anti-Villain League cracks down on high-tech super-criminals. The agency calls on (or rather, kidnaps) Gru for his ex-villain expertise, but will he be able to juggle the mission on top of his paternal duties? Get ready to giggle for returning voice actors Steve Carell, Kristin Wigg, Miranda Cosgrove and the adorably clumsy minions. (ES) Rated PG

ELYSIUM 

In this sci-fi tale, the 1-percenters don’t just live in their own world philosophically and in terms of lifestyle; they’ve literally left the planet behind. Orbiting above Earth is the titular satellite/habitat, where those who can afford it enjoy the bliss of cure-all medical technology and breathable air, while the surface world has turned into one massive, overpopulated, disease-ridden wasteland. But then one of those lowly Earth dwellers (Matt Damon) gets exposed to a lethal dose of radiation, and his only chance of survival is finding a way to get up to the medical marvels of Elysium. (SR) Rated R

ANIMAL HOUSE WED. SEPT. 11 BING CROSBY THEATER $

4 MOVIE $ 3 BEER

BEER FLOWS AT 6:30PM MOVIE SHOWS AT 7:30PM With an intermission for your beer drinking pleasure

SERVING 3: $

SPONSORED BY

LIZZY’S RED LAGER & HAVANÜTHER LIGHT PILSNER

inlander.com

...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 45

FILM | SHORTS

over again. Neil Patrick Harris starred in the 2011 version, and he’s doing it again. This time around, the Smurfs team up with Harris and other human friends to save Smurfette (voiced by Katy Perry) from the evil Gargamel (voiced by Hank Azaria). (JR) Rated PG

NOW PLAYING FRUITVALE STATION

You often hear of a film: “It was in some festivals.” This film from young director Ryan Coogler did more than just appear at some festivals. It debuted at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award for U.S. dramatic film. Produced by Forest Whitaker and based on a true story, the film offers an intimate look at the final day in the life of a man named Oscar Grant, who was shot dead by a police officer in 2009 at an Oakland, Calif., BART station. At Magic Lantern (JR) Rated R

REVERSE MORTGAGE

Free Local Information Ask About New Changes Larry Waters 208-762-6887 NMLS ID 400451

157 W. Hayden Ave Ste 104 | Hayden ID, 83835 NMLS1079636

GETAWAY

Ethan Hawke gave us an amazing performance in the remarkable Before Midnight earlier this year, so it’s OK for him to take some time to do something, well, less remarkable. Here, Hawke plays Brent Magna, who used to be a professional race car driver, which comes in handy when his wife is kidnapped by some jerk and he has to steal some other chick’s car (that chick is a post-Bieber Selena Gomez; the car is a Shelby Mustang) and drive really fast to rescue said wife. (MB) Rated PG-13

Or scan with your Smartphone

Times For 8/6 - 8/12

EVENT GOERS READ

REALLY,

GET LISTED.

JOBS

Ashton Kutcher takes a break from embarrassing himself on Two and a Half Men to star as Apple founder Steve Jobs in this biopic of the man who made the iPhone possible. You’ll learn all about how Jobs dropped out of college yet still managed to change the way we listen to music, surf the Internet and take photos of ourselves. (MB) Rated PG-13

KICK ASS 2

Our favorite wild-ass, silly-ass, violentass youth superheroes, Kick Ass and Hit Girl are back again this summer to totally ass things up and fight some crime. This time around, they’re joined by other masked crime fighters, including Colonel Stars and Stripes (Jim Carrey). They’ve teamed up to fight a bad guy (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) who this time around calls himself by a name we can’t print here. (MB) Rated R

KINGS OF SUMMER

That desire to be free from your parent’s rule and live life as you choose is a common one. This film tells the story of three friends who make this romantic fantasy a reality. Running into the woods to build their own house, they come to better understand the meaning of friendship, family and what it means to rule. Delightful performances mark this unique coming of age story. At Magic Lantern (JR) Rated R

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK.

LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER

rivercityred. blogspot.com

Send us your info at GETLISTED@INLANDER.COM and we’ll help connect you to the right people.

46 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Forest Whitaker plays the lead role in this loosely interpreted story of former White House butler Eugene Allen, turned here into a fellow named Cecil Gaines. His ability to avoid conflicts and please people catches the eye of a White House staff recruiter, who brings Cecil on during the Eisenhower administration, beginning service that would take him into the Reagan years. Also stars Oprah Winfrey! (SR) Rated PG-13

ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US

If you’re over the age of 17, you probably have no idea what One Direction is. Allow us to school you on the subject: it’s a British boy band who sing inconsequential music about inconsequential topics. Now there’s a concert film — for some reason directed by Morgan Spurlock of Super Size Me fame — coming to theaters so young girls can scream at the screen and fantasize about marrying one of them. The fact that you now know about One Direction will have no impact on your existence. (MB) Rated PG

PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS

The son of Poseidon, Percy Jackson (Logan Lerman), ventures out into the Sea of Monsters with his friends to find the Golden Fleece, which holds the power to restore peace to their town. Full of myth, magic and adventure, this movie takes the viewer along for the quest with impressive visual effects. (JR) Rated PG

PLANES

Disney has almost made the movie Cars again. This time, it’s just with planes. Dusty, voiced by Dane Cook, is a plane with dreams of becoming a champion racer, but he’s afraid of heights. With the help of his mentor Skipper (Stacy Keach), Dusty sets out to make his dreams come true. He meets goofy characters voiced by Brad Garret, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and John Cleese along the way. (JR) Rated PG

PRINCE AVALANCHE

This delightful film follows the experiences of a couple of guys isolated out in the woods, whose job it is to paint the yellow lines on the asphalt road that winds through the wilderness and pound mile markers into the roadside along the way. Alvin (Paul Rudd) and Lance (Emile Hirsch) are a mismatched pair, and all the fun, tension and resolution of the film derives from their incongruence. Most of the time, we watch them merely discuss the messed-up relationships they left back in the city. Surprisingly, that’s what makes this film work. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

SMURFS 2

The origin of these little blue dudes and dudettes goes all the way back to 1958. Originally appearing as comic strip, the Smurfs have been reincarnated over and

THE SPECTACULAR NOW

Sutter Keely is the most popular guy at his school. He’s funny, he parties, he has a hot girlfriend and he lives “in the moment,” that is until his girlfriend dumps him and he wakes up one morning on the lawn of “nice girl” Aimee’s house. Aimee (Shailene Woodley) is completely the opposite of Sutter: She has goals, she’s smart and a little shy and nerdy. In many ways, this plot like the typical “bad-boy-meetsgirl-next-door” coming-of-age story, but this film — from the writers of modern cult classic — doesn’t take the harsh realities of youthful love and confusion about the future and tie it all up in a tidy little package. (CS) Rated R

UNFINISHED SONG

This uplifting British comedy introduces us to self-described “miserable old Arthur” (played by Terence Stamp, the guy who was General Zod in Superman) whose wife drags him into a senior citizen’s choir. He’s not happy about this because, well, he’s not really happy about anything, ever. But following his wife’s wishes, he begins singing hip songs with the help of a zesty young choir director. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG-13

WE’RE THE MILLERS

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time pot dealer who finds himself in major debt to his supplier (Ed Helms). He’s then forced to make a trip to Mexico to pick up some bud, and he believes he’ll keep a lower profile if he crosses the border with his family. Without one, he recruits a nerdy boy, a punk girl and a stripper (Jennifer Aniston — as a stripper!) to pose as his kin travelling in an RV. (JR) Rated R

THE WORLD’S END

Gary King Simon Pegg plays a sad-sack 40-something for whom life’s window has seemingly already closed, leaving him with no option other than to take solace in past glories and live as if encased in amber. Determining that he has unfinished business in his hometown, Gary convinces his estranged friends to take another crack at conquering “The Golden Mile” — a 12-pub/12-pint crawl that saw Gary and his friends fall well short of finishing 23 years earlier. (CW) Rated 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Blackfish

83

The World’s End

83

Prince Avalance

72

The Butler

67

Elysium

60

Kings of Summer

59

Closed Circuit

53

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

FILM | EVENT

THE MAGIC LANTERN SEPTEMBER 6TH - SEPTEMBER 12TH BLACKFISH (80MIN PG-13) Fri/Sat: 8:30, Sun/Mon: 6:30, Tues/Weds: 8:30, Thurs: 3:00 CUTIE AND THE BOXER (80MIN -R) Fri/Sat: 6:45, Sun: 4:45, Mon-Thurs: 6:45 MUSEUM HOURS (106MIN-NR) Fri/Sat: 4:45, Sun: 2:45, Mon-Thurs: 4:45 PRINCE AVALANCHE (93MIN-R) Fri/Sat: 3:00, Sun: 1:00, Mon-Thurs: 4:15 UNFINISHED SONG (91MIN PG-13) Fri/Sat: 6:15, Sun: 3:15, Tues-Thurs: 6:15 THE KINGS OF SUMMER (96MIN-R) Fri/Sat: 8:05, Sun: 5:15, Tues-Thurs: 8:05 FRUITVALE STATION (85MIN-R) Fri/Sat: 4:30, Sunday: 1:30 20FT FROM STARDOM (90MIN PG-13) Fri/Sat: 2:45, Sun: 7:00

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 6th THRU SEPTEMBER 12th

$1

WEDNESDAYS

4

$ 50 BOTTOMLESS POPCORN!

ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 RIDDICK

R Daily (4:10) (4:45) 6:40 7:15 9:15 9:45 Sat-Sun (11:00) (11:30) (1:30) (2:00)

THIS IS THE END

R Daily (5:00) 7:10 9:35 Sat-Sun (2:40)

ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US

Daily (3:20) 7:20 Sat-Sun (11:20) In 2D Daily (5:20) 9:20 Sat-Sun (1:20)

PG

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES PG-13 Daily (4:00) 9:10

LEE DANIEL’S THE BUTLER

Turbo

Lower Learning

Fri 5:00 Sat-Sun 12:30 5:00 Mon-Thurs 5:00

Eight years of college, down the drain...

PLANES

PG Daily (5:00) 7:10 Sat-Sun (12:30) (2:45)

WE’RE THE MILLERS

R Daily (4:35) 7:00 9:30 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:00)

PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS PG Daily 6:50 Sat-Sun (11:10) (1:40)

DESPICABLE ME 2 WORLD WAR Z

World War Z PG-13

Fri 7:00 Sat-Sun 2:35 7:00 Mon-Thurs 7:00

PG-13 Daily 6:30 9:00

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY G Sat-Sun (12:00)

YOU’RE NEXT R Daily 9:15

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

RIDDICK

BY MIKE BOOKEY

O

ELYSIUM

PG Daily (4:15) Sat-Sun (12:15) (2:30)

Animal House taught us that college is the best excuse to be an idiot you’ll ever have h, Animal House. The film that launched millions of toga-clad youth, pledge pins safely secured and cheap beer in hand, out into the privileged waters of collegiate Greek life. Few films have encouraged the sort of irresponsibility and recklessness that this 1978 release unleashed upon the impressionable minds of America’s allegedly best and brightest. Probably because of this, no other college movie has enjoyed the sort of reverence that has been bestowed upon Animal House. We’re showing this for the third installment of the ongoing Suds and Cinema series because our readers voted for it in a perfectly democratic manner (an internet poll). It’s going to be a blast. You know, drinking local beer while John Belushi, God rest his soul, drinks a lethal amount of hardly local beer on the big screen. You’re free to cheer when he squeezes mashed potatoes out of his mouth or smashes a guitar, and you can dance along as he gets down to “Shout,” but isn’t there more to Animal House? From one perspective? No, not really. It’s a movie about a hapless gang of fraternity members hell-bent on throwing their lives away, and if possible taking the university down with them. But from another, maybe it was saying something. This is a story about screwing up

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:30 9:20 Sat-Sun (12:45) R Daily (4:15) 6:50 9:15 Sat-Sun (11:30) (1:50)

while you still can get away with it — as long as you were lucky enough to have landed in college despite the fact that, by all indications, you’re quite stupid. It’s a weird movie in that it was made in the late ’70s, a decade after societal norms had been upended, especially on college campuses, but is set in 1962, before any such momentum took hold. Is it a look at a more innocent time in collegiate life before the longhairs sullied the purity of a four-year college education? Is it an indictment of the first wave of the Baby Boomer generation? Hell no. If anything, it’s a vindication. Remember the epilogue? It’s a montage letting us know how successful, or at least mostly successful, all of these guys became later in life. Were John Landis (who’d go on to direct Blues Brothers) and Harold Ramis (who wrote Caddyshack, Stripes and Ghostbusters) trying to apologize for their own generation’s moral degradation? No. They were just remembering how scandalously fun college can be. n Suds and Cinema: Animal House • Wed, Sept. 11; doors open (and beer flows) at 6:30 pm, movie at 7:30 pm • $4 admission, $3 Orlison beers • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave.

Pacific Rim Fri-Thurs 9:20pm

R Daily (1:30) (2:00) (4:10) (4:45) 6:40 7:15 9:15 9:45 Fri-Sun (11:00) (11:30)

THIS IS THE END

R Daily (2:40) (5:00) 7:10 9:35

GETAWAY

PG-13 Daily (1:10) (3:15) (5:15) 7:25 9:30 Fri-Sun (11:00) PG

PG-13

ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US

Daily (3:20) 7:20 Fri-Sun (11:20) In 2D Daily (1:20) (5:20) 9:20

YOU’RE NEXT R Daily 9:15

924 W. GARLAND • 509.327.1050 WWW.GARLANDTHEATER.COM

THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES PG-13 Daily (1:20) (4:00) 6:45 9:25 Fri-Sun (11:00)

LEE DANIEL’S THE BUTLER

PG-13 Daily (1:25) (4:10) 7:00 9:40 Fri-Sun (10:50)

ELYSIUM

R Daily (1:50) (4:15) 6:50 9:15

PLANES

PG Daily (12:50) (3:00) (5:10) 7:10 Fri-Sun (10:50)

WE’RE THE MILLERS

R Daily (2:00) (4:35) 7:00 9:30 Fri-Sun (11:30)

PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS

INCREDIBLE NEW SCREEN & SURROUND SOUND!

PG Daily (1:30) 6:50 Fri-Sun (11:10)

THE WOLVERINE PG-13 Daily 4:10 9:10

RED 2

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (3:50) 6:20 8:50 Fri-Sun (11:00)

DESPICABLE ME 2

PG Daily (2:00) (4:15) 6:30 Fri-Sun (11:50)

2 GUNS

R Daily 9:00

SEPT 14 3PM 7PM

THE HEAT

R Daily (4:10) 6:45 Fri-Sun (11:00)

WORLD WAR Z

PG-13 Daily (1:30) 9:00

TWO WORKS BY STRAVINSKY

$1 OF EACH TICKET SALE GOES TO RESTORATION

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

AT THE BING 901 W. SPRAGUE AVE, SPOKANE | 509.227.7638

THE SMURFS 2 PG Fri-Sun (12:30)

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY G Fri-Sun (11:30)

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 9/6/13-9/12/13

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 47

PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT W/ JOLIE HOLLAND ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS | $15/$20

SEPT 5 | 7PM

BING CROSBY THEATRE

VICCI MARTINEZ

SPECIAL GUEST ALL AGES | 7:00PM DOORS | $12

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

SEPT 6 | 7:00PM

SOUND REMEDY

ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS | $10 ADV

THE CENTER

SEPT 10 | 7PM

ROCK 94.5 PRESENTS

EYE EMPIRE 21+ ONLY | $10 ADV

THE CENTER

SEPT 11 | 7PM

DIZZY WRIGHT SEPT 19 |7PM

W/ FUTURISTIC & EMILIO ROJAS ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS | $15 ADV $30 MEET AND GREET

THE CENTER

GIRL IN A COMA & HUNTER VALENTINE KRISS KRISSY ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS | $12

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

SEPT 22 | 7PM

DARK STAR ORCHESTRA ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS

OCT 1 | 7PM

BING CROSBY THEATRE

ANDY McKEE

ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS | $25

BING CROSBY THEATRE

THE CENTER TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: THECENTERSPOKANE.COM 6425 N. LIDGERWOOD

48 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

OCT 2 | 8:00PM BING CROSBY THEATRE TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM 901 W SPRAGUE

A New Voice The second coming of Alice in Chains By Laura Johnson

T

he human body is made to be resilient, to survive in times of unbearable turmoil and heartbreak. The brain may even cope by putting up barriers — amnesia may set in. But Alice in Chains has not forgotten what happened to original singer Layne Staley, who died of a drug overdose in 2002. They have not forgotten what happened to bass player Mike Starr, who died in the same way in 2011. The death of a lead vocalist is a crushing blow from which many, if not most, bands would not recover. How can a group move on from it? How do the band’s fans accept the new? William DuVall knows this dilemma better than anyone. Becoming the band’s permanent lead singer back in 2006, he was unsure of his place. He wasn’t from Seattle; he couldn’t possibly become Staley. But knowing co-founder Jerry Cantrell for years — DuVall’s group Comes with the Fall was the backup band on Cantrell’s solo tour in 2002 — it wasn’t awkward. Confidence ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 49

FRIENDLY SERVICE & C LA SS IC C O C K TA IL S Beer Cocktails Music Food

HAPPY HOUR

MON-SAT 5-8 | ALL DAY SUNDAY

926 W. GARLAND AVE

SUN-THURS 4pm-MI D NI G HT | FRI - SAT 4pm-2am

120 E. Sprague Ave.

says

M

L A C O L DRINK at the FAIR GREAT 15th IT A E AK

DAY

ept Sun • S ALL DAY —Garden — eer Lions Club B at the

ree h T

L icious l e D

ocal Brews

You Pick four Beer SampleRS TWO ½ Beers ONE Full Beer

Only

$

6

MUSIC | alt metal “a new voice,” continued... was cultivated through fans still resonating with the band. “Bringing myself, my life experience into it, that’s what the whole thing is about — Layne was great because he was being who he was,” DuVall says. “It would be a grotesque disservice to the entire enterprise to do it any other way. You can’t control the life or death of friends, but we made the personal decision to continue on.” Even after being a part of the group for seven years, the fact that he’s not an original member is still hard to shake. “Sometimes I do get tired of people talking about it,” DuVall admits. “Sometimes you want to talk about the present and the future and not the past.” The Alice in Chains origin story has all been told before. The group was part of the Seattle grunge movement in the early ’90s, and like all the other bands that didn’t know how to cope with fame, they weren’t impervious. At that point, DuVall was in Atlanta rocking with hardcore-punk groups that would be a precursor to the Pacific Northwest scene. “All the stuff that predated Seattle, those are my brother bands,” DuVall says. “I remember the early Soundgarden sound coming out and thinking, ‘Oh, they’re pretty cool.’ Of course, when it all exploded, it was verification of what we had been doing in Atlanta.”

“We had pulled off a second act; it would have been silly to not follow up.” But as DuVall says, there comes a point when there needs to be a real continuation of the band, not just a celebration of the past. That’s what making 2009’s Black Gives Way to Blue was all about. With the success of its single “Check My Brain” and the album going gold, a comeback was cemented. “We had pulled off a second act; it would have been silly to not follow up,” DuVall explains. “It’s been a reawakening internally. We’re in a fortunate place to even have this discussion — that’s not lost on any of us.” The recently released The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here took almost four years to complete (thanks to a relentless tour schedule and Cantrell’s shoulder surgery). But when the disc finally dropped, it hit No. 2 on the Billboard charts. “That was so validating,” DuVall says. “It was a validation and a vindication of everything we’ve done.” Their sound is still heavy, with smashing bass and drums and darkly themed lyrics with rock leanings in the melody. Also still there is the aspect that always separated Alice in Chains from the pack, the vocal harmony between Cantrell and now DuVall (the two switch between lead and backing vocals). “I was a guitar player first — that was never the case before [with Staley],” DuVall says. “I’m going note for note with Cantrell. It’s a different chemistry with us, but with the same naturalness, not contrived. There’s a reason I was asked to even join.” As far as what he’ll do after the tour wraps up early next year, a long vacation somewhere tropical is in order. But Alice in Chains’ resurgence is far from over. “It might be a good time to run on this forever,” DuVall says. “I don’t see any plans for us to shut down the whole thing or anything like that. But we tend to be a bit cagey about these things — we’ve learned the hard way that planning things is an opportunity to make the universe laugh.” n lauraj@inlander.com Pain in the Grass Tour Day 2 feat. Alice in Chains, Jane’s Addiction, Coheed and Cambria, Circa Survive and more • Sat, Sept. 7 at 1:30 pm • Gorge Amphitheatre, George, Wash. • $73.90 and up • All-ages • ticketmaster.com • (800) 745-3000

50 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

MUSIC | punk

Bad Brains

Eamonn Parke photo

A lot of thought goes into Dislich’s noise By Leah Sottile

T

o some, Dislich will be the loudest thing they’ll ever want to hear. Which is funny, because what’s happening behind the scenes in the band is hardly a bunch of macho dudes playing riffs and swilling cheap beer. There’s some of that, but according to drummer Ryan Beitz, Dislich is actually very consciously trying to break the typical stereotypes of heavy music. This is a group whose members talk about feminism and their philosophical stance on the phallus at band practice. “We play kind of meatheadish music and it’s all by people who have degrees,” he says. Currently, Beitz is in the process of applying for doctoral programs in phi-

losophy. “I guess we’re a weird bunch. We intellectualize about it all, but the sound is still meathead.” It has that going for it — but still, Dislich has something more than the average mic-barking hardcore band. The Moscow group makes a fierce brand of hardcore, frenetic and anxious, shrill and chest-tightening and dotted with moments of almost overwhelming technicality. It’s hardcore that upends the rules, challenging traditional takes on the style. A big part of that has to do with singer Melissa Finley, a waif of a woman who doesn’t yell or scream into the microphone, but actually shrieks — almost like she’s exorcising demons from her own depths. It’s an intense

thing to hear and watch, especially since Finley makes no efforts to overtly feminize herself as she performs. “I was involved in a lot of symphonic and orchestral music in high school, and I danced a lot. I wanted to incorporate my previous music experiences with modern dance and being really free onstage,” she says. “One thing that’s really important for me, being the frontwoman, is to be really bombastic and exciting. I think it’s fun to be violent and explore how people react to it.” She says that people love what she’s doing. “They’re not used to seeing a woman in a band, but also a woman who will push you into the mosh pit.” The rest of Dislich are men, and Beitz says he also thinks about gender in the songwriting process. Where another metal band might make music that’s driving and overly phallic, Dislich tries to balance that out with sounds they feel are more feminine. “I’ve tried to think of it that we’re trying to be a little more feminist in genre,” Beitz says, chuckling. “And the only way that I, as a man, can apply feminine music, to me, is to not bore the girls that get dragged along to the show.” n leahs@inlander.com Dislich plays with Lord Dying, Losing Skin and Hooves • Fri, Sept. 6 at 8 pm • Carr’s Corner • 230 S. Washington St. • $7 • 21+ • 474-1731

at BARRISTER WINERY FEATURING

ALL NEW WORKS SEPTEMBER 6TH 5PM-10PM

ED GILMORE’S FIRST SHOWING OF 2013

For more information call 208.704.3158

Sunday, Sept 8th “Away” is a Four Letter Word Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, Minister

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 51

music | sound advice

CELEBRATION HOFFMAN MUSIC TURNS 100

A

nything that stands the passing of an entire century deserves some respect. Spokane’s own Hoffman Music Co., sellers of instruments, sheet music and DJ equipment, celebrates this milestone Saturday with friends, family, and most important, people who appreciate and make music. With one stage in the parking lot and another inside in the Acoustic Room, the event features locals acts like Robert Vaughn, Trailer Park Girls, Acuff and Sherfey and Terrible Buttons, along with a performance by the Mt. Spokane High School marching band at 11 am. The day will also include a raffle drawing and clinicians. Here’s to another 100! — LAURA JOHNSON Hoffman Music Anniversary Celebration feat. Terrible Buttons, Robert Vaughn and more • Sat, Sept. 7 from 10 am to 5:30 pm • Hoffman Music • 1430 N. Monroe St. • Free • All-ages • hoffmanmusic. com

J = the inlander RECOMMENDs this show J = All Ages Show

Thursday, 9/5

Arbor Crest Winery (927-9463), Hot Club Trio J Bing Crosby Theater, Jolie Holland, Portland Cello Project Bucer’s (208-882-5216), Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen Trio Coeur d’Alene Casino, PJ Destiny the Cellar, Issac Walton Clover (487-2937), Paul Grove Curley’s, DBC Band Forty-One South (208-265-2000), Truck Mills Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos J the Hop!, Elektro Grave Jones Radiator, Harolds IGA, Holy Broke J Laguna Cafe, Just Plain Darin LeftBank Wine Bar, Nick Grow J Luxe Coffeehouse, Dirk Lind O’Shay’s, Open mic Rico’s (332-6566), Palouse Subterranean Blues Band The Roadhouse, Sammy Eubanks Rock Bar, Armed and Dangerous Splash, Steve Denny the Swamp, DJ Aphrodisiac Viking, Jordan Collins, Cross My Heart Zola, Fus Bol

Friday, 9/6

315 Restaurant, Craig Catlett Trio Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn Big Sky’s Tavern (489-2073), PJ Destiny Bolo’s (891-8995), Nova Bucer’s (208-882-5216), Garrett Knight Buckhorn Inn (244-3991), Tufnel J Carr’s Corner, Lord Dying, Dislich (See story on page 51), Losing Skin, Hooves CdA Cellars (208-664-2336), Donnie and Nancy Emerson

52 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

FUNDRAISER COEUR D’ALENE MUSIC FEST S

andpoint shouldn’t be the only lakeside Idaho town with a successful music festival — that’s the thinking behind the Coeur d’Alene Music Festival. It won’t take place until next September, but in the meantime the festival committee is holding a fundraiser for what is to come. On Saturday, 12 local bands, including B Radicals, Tanner Azzinnaro, Moksha and the Angela Marie Project, will play all day long in the name of spreading the word. Half of the proceeds will go to Coeur d’Alene School District #271’s arts programs; the other half will go directly to funding the 2014 event. A beer garden, featuring CdA’s own Trickster’s Brewing Company, will also be onsite. — LAURA JOHNSON Coeur d’Alene Music Festival fundraiser feat. B Radicals, Tanner Azzinnaro (pictured), Moksha, Angela Marie Project and more • Sat, Sept. 7, 10 am-10 pm • White House Wedding & Event Center • 805 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • Suggested donation $5 • All-ages • facebook.com/ coeurdalenemusicfestival

The Cellar, Bakin’ Phat J The Center, Vicci Martinez The Checkerboard Bar, Kancerus, Unicorn Cannery, Mojave Wizard, Somatic Clover (487-2937), Evan Denlinger CDA Casino, Bad Monkey, Bill Bozly Coldwater Creek Wine Bar (208-263-6971), Mike & Shanna Thompson The Country Club (208-6762582), Ryan Larsen Band Fedora Pub, Truck Mills First Street Bar & Grill (2762320), Bruiser Fizzie Mulligans (466-5354), Shiner Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos Gorge Amphitheater (785-6262), Avenged Sevenfold, Volbeat, All That Remains, Airbourne, Baroness, HIM and more Grande Ronde Cellars (4558161), Brent Edstrom Jazz Trio

J The Hop!, Downfall of Gaia, Black Table Iron Horse (208-667-7314), Slow Burn Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy John’s Alley, Micky and the Motorcars Jones Radiator, Xerox Machine Kenworthy (208-882-4127), Portland Cello Project J Knitting Factory, Sick Puppies, Redlight King, Charming Liars Max at Mirabeau (922-6252), Bobby Bremer Nectar (208-882-5914), Just Plain Darin nYne, The West, DJ MC Squared Pend d’Oreille Winery (208-2658545), Bridges Home Red Lion Hotel at the Park (326-8000), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley The Roadhouse, Luke Jaxon Sante (315-4613), Paul Abner

Saranac (473-9455), DJ Redking, Doc Zay J The Shop, DJ Soott Soulful Soups & Spirits, DJ Deuce Splash, Steve Denny, The Hitmen Sullivan Scoreboard (891-0880), Triple Shot Viking, DJ Jacob Sampson Whitestone Winery (647-5325), One Match Left Zola, The Fat Tones

Saturday, 9/7

315 Restaurant, Darin Schaffer Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn Bolo’s (891-8995), Nova J Boots Bakery & Lounge (7037223), The Twin Towers Bucer’s, Jon & Rand Buckhorn Inn (244-3991), Tufnel The Cellar, Bakin’ Phat J Chaps (624-4182), Just Plain Darin

The Checkerboard Bar, David Simmons, Alex Alamos, Chelsey Heidenreich Band, WayWard Too Cda Casino, Bad Monkey, Bill Bozly Coldwater Creek Wine Bar (208263-6971), Touch of Jazz the Country Club (208-6762582), Ryan Larsen Band First Street Bar & Grill (2762320), Bruiser Fizzie Mulligans (466-5354), Shiner Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos J Gorge Amphitheater (7856262), Pain in the Grass feat. Alice in Chains (See story on page 49), Jane’s Addition, Coheed and Cambria and more Green Owl (208-448-1995), YESTERDAYSCAKE J Hoffman Music 100th Year Celebration, (See story above) Robert Vaughn, Hank Nordstrom, Snap the Nerve, Terrible Buttons

and more J the Hop!, Awaken the Sleeping, Lavoy, Undercard, Blame Shifter, Ashes of Yesterday Iron Horse (208-667-7314), Slow Burn John’s Alley, Vial8 Jones Radiator, Bad Motivators, BBBBandits LeftBank Wine Bar, Truck Mills Max at Mirabeau (922-6252), Bobby Bremer Mootsy’s, Dizzy Bats, Andy Rumsey, Grumpus nYne, DJ C-Mad Pend d’Oreille Winery (208-2658545), Justin Lantrip Red Lion River Inn (328-9526), Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve The Roadhouse, Luke Jaxon J Rocket Market (343-2253), Starlite Motel J the Shop, Jonathan Nicholson Splash, Steve Denny, The Hitmen Sullivan Scoreboard (891-0880), Triple Shot J Coeur d’Alene Music Fest fundraiser, (See story on facing page) B Radicals, Tanner Azzinnaro, Moksha, Daniel Mills, Angela Marie Project and more Zola, The Fat Tones

Sunday, 9/8

Arbor Crest Winery (927-9463), Ryan Larsen the Cellar, Pat Coast Cda City Park, The Rhythm Dogs Daley’s Cheap Shots, Jam Night

with VooDoo Church J the Hop!, Open mic and Messy Marv After Party J Lindaman’s (838-3000), Ellis CD release show Northern Quest, Trace Adkins, Brett Eldredge Pend d’Oreille Winery (208-2658545), The Causeway Splash, Steve Denny Spokane Interstate Fair, Hotel California (Eagles Tribute) Zola, Troubadour

Monday, 9/9

Bowl’z Bitez and Spiritz (3217480), Open mic Eichardt’s, Blues Jam with Truck Mills J the Hop!, Element a440, Betrayed by Weakness, Helldorado, Damage, Thirion, En PJ’s Bar (328-2153), Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck Rico’s (332-6566), Open mic Soulful Soups & Spirits, DJ Fusion Zola, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 9/10

315 Restaurant, The Rub Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn the Cellar, Max Daniels J the Center, Sound Remedy Kelly’s Irish Pub (208-667-1717), Powell Brothers J Moscow Food Co-op (208-8828537), Tom Drake J Red Rooster Coffee (202-

9138), Open mic The Roadhouse, Justin Jurkovac J the Shop, Michael Skillingstad Splash, Steve Denny Spokane Interstate Fair, The Band Perry Zola, Dan Conrad and the Urban Achievers

Wednesday, 9/11

Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn J Bistro on Spruce (208-6641774), Truck Mills the Cellar, Riverboat Dave J the Center, Eye Empire Eichardt’s, Charley Packard Fedora Pub, Kosh Iron Horse Bar (926-8411), Open mic Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy Red Room Lounge, Brian Ploeger Quintet The Roadhouse, Last Chance Soulful Soups & Spirits, Open mic Splash, Steve Denny Spokane Interstate Fair, Eli Young Band Suki Yaki Inn (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck Zola, The Bucket List

Love Cats?

Follow Chey Scott’s

Cat Friday Blog for your weekly

feline fix!

Coming Up...

Lantern Tap House (315-9531), Mama Doll, Hannah Reader on Sept. 12 Chateau Rive (795-2030), Dirty Martinis for Clean Water feat. Terrible Buttons on Sept. 13

INLANDER.COM/BLOGS

WHITWORTH’S EVENING

TEACHER CERTIFICATION HELPED BRENT GO FAR.

all the way to

hawaii. After a career as a television advertising executive, Brent Murakami changed paths by enrolling in the evening teacher certification program. Student teaching in Hawaii led to a permanent teaching position at Waipahu High School. And he’s not done yet! Brent is now completing an online master’s degree at Whitworth, most likely while sitting on the beach.

Become a teacher. Enroll now. whitworth.edu/etc 509.777.3222

music | venues 315 restAurAnt • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 BABy BAr • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 the BelltoWer • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 BIng crosBy theAter • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BIgfoot puB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 cArr’s corner • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 the cellAr • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 the center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 the checkerBoArd BAr • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 coeur d’Alene cAsIno • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 curley’s BAr & BIstro • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Hauser • 208-773-5816 dAley’s cheAp shots • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 eIchArdt’s • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 fedorA puB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 fIZZIe MullIgAn’s • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 fox theAter • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 gIBlIAno Brothers • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 the hop! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 Iron horse • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 John’s Alley • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 Jones rAdIAtor • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 knIttIng fActory • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 lAgunA cAfÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 leftBAnk WIne BAr • 108 N. Washington St. • 315-8623 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MeZZo pAZZo WIne BAr • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 Moon tIMe • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 northern Quest cAsIno • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 nyne • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 o’shAy’s • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 roAdhouse country rock BAr • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 the shop • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 soulful soups & spIrIts • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 splAsh • 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-4000 the sWAMp • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZolA • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 53

PERFORMANCE MOVEMENT MEDLEY

If ballet tights and tutus seem too mainstream, Spokane’s Northwest Bellydance Company offers something a little less traditional. While many members of the team have years of ballet experience under their coin-covered belts, the troupe defies conventional dance with its fusion of tribal influences. Guest dancer Tempest joins the team to shimmy and twist onstage, breaking down boundaries with her unique costumes and gothic-steampunk style. Grab some ethnic food beforehand for an out-of-the-ordinary date night. — BETH NOTTURNO Northwest Bellydance Company: Arabesque • Sat, Sept. 7 at 7 pm • $8-$20 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • northwestbellydance.com • 481-1533

54 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

MUSIC CONCERTOS AND COMPOSERS

ART TEMPORARY MURALS

Eclectic Cabaret • Fri, Sept. 6 at 7:30 pm • $10-$15 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • ticketswest.com • 227-7404

Drawn to the Wall V • On display Sept. 6 to Oct. 12, Mon-Sat from 10 am-4 pm • Artist reception on Thu, Sept. 12 from 6-8 pm • Free • Jundt Art Museum at Gonzaga University • 502 E. Boone Ave. • gonzaga.edu/jundt

It’s a sign that the fall arts season is almost here: Venues across the Inland Northwest start to fill up their September schedules with concerts like the Bing’s upcoming Eclectic Cabaret, featuring more than 20 professional local musicians. The cabaret-style concert features a program of mostly modern chamber music and is presented by Gonzaga University’s music department, which just received accreditation from the National Association of Schools of Music. The diverse evening features everything from jazz piano and an orchestra to American fingerstyle guitar music. We challenge you to try to keep your toes from tapping during the entire show. — CHEY SCOTT

Every three years, Gonzaga University invites five prominent Northwest artists — this time it’s Margot Casstevens, Elaine Green, Kurt Madison, Roger Ralston and Carl Richardson — to come draw on the walls. Each artist gets two weeks with a full museum wall to create large-scale art. After the exhibit ends, the walls get painted over and put back to work as gallery partitions. It’s an inversion of everything we expect from a gallery: The art isn’t on the walls, it’s the walls themselves, and is designed for impermanence. — LISA WAANANEN

get listed!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

20

$

September 27, 4-9pm September 28, 1-8pm

COMMUNITY CYCLING CELEBRATION

You don’t have to be an avid cyclist, or even a casual one, to participate in the sixth annual SpokeFest this weekend. In fact, the event was created with all levels of pedalers in mind. The event offers four routes to choose from, including a 1-mile loop through Riverfront Park that highlights cycling safety and is an ideal option for families. Feeling like going a little farther and getting in a workout while enjoying the scenery? SpokeFest also offers a 9-mile loop, part of which is along the Bloomsday course, a 21-mile loop along the river, or a 47-mile route up to Four Mound. Don’t forget your helmet! — CHEY SCOTT SpokeFest • Sun, Sept. 8 from 8 am-2 pm, route starts staggered between 8-10 am • $15-$20 • Riverfront Park, start area between Post and Stevens • spokefest.org

• 3 Beer Gardens • Over 100 kegs of beer • Keg tapping ceremony

THEATER LADIES NIGHT

Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple is one of the most beloved pieces of pop theater, it’s two leads Oscar and Felix serving as truly memorable characters that have been emulated to no end in other plays and films. Ignite! Community Theatre has opted for the female version of the script, which Simon adapted in 1985, trading Oscar and Felix for Olive and Florence. And, instead of a poker game, the gals and their gal pals are engaged in a match of Trivial Pursuit. — MIKE BOOKEY

Advanced tickets may be purchased @

CoeurdAleneOktoberfest.com

The Odd Couple (Female Version) • Sept. 6-7, 13-14, 20-21 at 7 pm; Sept. 8, 15, 22 at 2pm • Ignite! Community Theatre • 10814 E. Broadway Ave., Spokane Valley • $14/adults, $12/seniors, students, military • ignitetheatre.org

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 55

RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess TILL DEAD END DO US PART

I’ve been separated from my husband for two years. (Our divorce isn’t yet final.) A terrific man sought me out when he was breaking up with his girlfriend, but then he got back together with her and said we could only be friends. We still get together at times, and he told me, “I’m just not ready to give up my girlfriend, although I may feel different when your divorce is final.” I’ve tried moving on, but whenever I get to a AMY ALKON good place, he calls and is interested again! I normally wouldn’t allow this behavior, but I enjoy his company so much! —Crushing The fact that a man calls for you to come running isn’t necessarily reason to do it, unless you’re a golden retriever and he’s got a dirty tennis ball to throw you. Assuming you live in North America and not a culture where marriage is a big tent filled with lots of wives, a man’s involvement with another woman should immediately disqualify him from consideration. Accepting continued contact with a downgrade to “only friends” works if you can shift the man into the friends-only slot, but it seems you can’t, and it seems that’s just how this man likes it. You’re now his ego’s girlfriend and his backup entertainment when his girlfriend’s getting her nails done. Okay, so technically you’re not yet available, but that’s just a matter of paperwork; you aren’t romantically attached to another person. What’s keeping you stuck on this man is a psychological fishhook called “intermittent reinforcement.” When rewards for our behavior (like affection or attention we’re shown) come regularly and predictably, we relax and take them for granted. But the stuff that sods the ground for an obsession is random, unpredictable reinforcement — a guy you can’t have who occasionally surprises you by throwing you a bone of hope: telling you that he isn’t ready to give up his girlfriend but “may feel different when your divorce is final.” Sure, and the moon may grow a mustache and start orbiting your dentist’s office. So, no, you aren’t stuck on him because it’s so darn enjoyable being with him. It’s because he’s turned you into a lab rat frantically pushing a bar for a hit of rat chow that only sometimes comes. The way to kick the habit is to recognize this, detach, and have the self-discipline to stay detached. Send him a message that it’s over and not to contact you again, and then do everything in your power to keep that from happening: Mail your phone to a stranger in China, and hole up in an out-of-the-way motel. Of course, you could just change your number and not answer your door, but going to at least a little more effort might help reinforce that you have a new policy: No matter how handsome, amusing, and compelling a man seems, you will chase him only if he also happens to be sprinting away with your purse.

EVERYTHING HAPPENS FOR A RAISIN

I am 18 and took a baking course at a cooking school, where I met this dreamy 19-year-old guy. We both constantly found lame excuses to be around each other, so I was fairly positive our attraction went both ways. I get that men need to show their interest by asking you out, so I flirted and flirted and waited and waited for him to ask me out, but he never did. Now the course is over, and I’m wondering what I did wrong and whether I missed out on the love of my life! —Confused Perhaps he was hoping he could get a girlfriend the way a dog gets food scraps: just wait for a woman to fall on the kitchen floor and then carry her off in his teeth. He may now be hitting himself upside the head with a wire whisk for showing all the mojo of garnish. This also may have been a situational crush — one that he couldn’t follow through on outside the test kitchen due to his having a girlfriend or even a boyfriend. Or maybe he’s just being 19. At 24, with a little more experience, he might do more than make like a kid staring into the bakery window. Sadly, all that matters now is what he didn’t do. But you did the right thing by not making up for a guy’s inability to squeak out a request for a date. Keep on flirting, and stop fretting that you may have “missed out on the love of (your) life!” Sure, you may have — if you’ve always dreamed of a day when you’d spot a white horse galloping toward you in the distance and, as it drew closer, see that there’s no prince, only a bag of frozen vegetables ducttaped to the saddle. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market. (483-7300) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays at 8 pm. Free. Ages 21+. Chan’s Red Dragon, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) SHORT STACKS Live improvised comedy show. Sept. 6 at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) BEFORE IT’S IN THEATERS Live comedy show based on audience suggestions of movies. Fridays at 8 pm, Sept. 6-27. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows every Sunday at 9 pm. Free. Goodtymes Bar and Grill, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) COMEDY OPEN MIC Stand-up comedy open mic night. Sept. 12 and 26 at 6 pm. Free. All-ages. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) BADA BING COMEDY SHOW Live comedy show featuring Jebb Fink, Duane Goad and Ken Habib. Sept. 13 at 8 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638)

COMMUNITY

MAKE IT A MILE WALKING PROGRAM Walking group to train for the Spokane Heart and Stroke Walk on Sept. 14. Meets on Tue and Thu from noon1 pm, through Sept. 12. $25, includes shirt. Meets at Riverfront Park Rotary Fountain, 570 N. Howard St. Check in at the Fleet Feet tent. (328-4786) PALOUSE EMPIRE FAIR Rodeo, vendors, exhibits, animals, live entertainment and more. Sept. 5-8. $3-$6 daily admission. Palouse Empire Fairgrounds, Colfax, Wash. (397-6263) ICE CREAM SOCIAL Ice cream social and dancing. Sept. 6 at 8 pm. Free and open to the public. N. Spokane Dance Center, 7427 N. Freya St. Another social on Sept. 7 at 8 pm, Western Dance Center, 1901 N. Sullivan Rd. squaredancespokane.org (979-2607) VINTAGE CAR SHOW Vintage cars from 1900-1983 on display, along with food vendors, raffle and more. Sept. 7 from 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. Mirabeau Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Parkway. (922-3431) HEROCLIX BENEFIT FOR JEFF NEUMILLER Heroclix tournament party to raise funds for Jeff Neumiller to fund his treatment for colon cancer. Sept. 7 at 5 pm. $35, including dinner. Allages. Pacific Avenue Pizza, 2001 W. Pacific Ave. (624-0236) HOT SEPTEMBER NIGHTS CAR SHOW 2nd annual “Hot September Nights” car show fundraiser benefiting cancer research organizations, featuring live music, beer garden and more. Sept. 7 from 1-8 pm. Free admission, $10/car entry. JJ’s Grill & Brewhouse, 8801 N. Indian Trail Rd. (467-4267) ORGAN TRANSPLANT FUNDRAISER Community rummage sale and car wash fundraiser benefiting the Children’s Organ Transplant Association, in honor of Kyle Sipe, a Post Falls resident in need of a heart and double-

lung transplant. Sept. 7 from 8 am-5 pm. New Life Assembly of God Church, 10920 E. Sprague Ave. (328-2994) COBRA POLO CLASSIC Annual charity polo match benefiting the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Spokane. Sept. 8 at 12 pm. $200+. Spokane Polo Club, 7500 U.S. Hwy. 2. rmhcspokane. org GRANDPARENTS DAY CELEBRATION Family event featuring live music, a catered meal, activities and more, benefiting Greater Spokane County Meals on Wheels. Sept. 8 from 1-4 pm. $15, kids under 10 free. CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place. (924-6976) SPOKEFEST Annual cycling festival including a 1- to 2-mile family ride, a 9-mile Spokane Falls loop, a 21-mile river loop, and the 47-mile Four Mounds loop. Sept. 8 starting at 8 am. spokefest.org GLENROSE SUMMER MARKET Farmers market, live music, vendors and more. Sept. 10 from 3-7 pm. Free admission. Little Yellow Schoolhouse, corner of 37th and Fancher. (944-1085) FEED THE NEIGHBORHOOD Free meals provided every Wednesday from 4:30-6 pm. Free. (Volunteers also needed to cook and serve meals) 7th and Catherine Ave., Post Falls. (208661-5166) KIDICAL MASS A three-mile family ride on anything with wheels that rolls, hosted by Spokane’s Summer Parkways. Sept. 12 at 5 pm. Free. South Perry Neighborhood, starting at Two Wheel Transit Bike Shop, 817 S. Perry St. summerparkways.com VOCATIONAL TRAINING MEETING Women’s auxiliary meeting on vocational training and helping prepare women for the workforce. Sept. 12 from 1-2:30 pm. Free. Union Gospel Mission Center for Women & Children, 196 Haycraft, CdA (208-665-4673)

ETC.

RINGLING BROS. CIRCUS Acrobats, stunt performers, animals and more. Sept. 5-9, times vary. $10-$45. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (325-7328) ARABESQUE Annual dance production by Northwest Bellydance Company featuring guest performer Tempest. Sept. 7 at 7 pm. $8-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (481-1533) NIGHT OF STARGAZING Rangers from Riverside State Park and the Spokane Astronomical Society host stargazing atop Steptoe Butte. Sept. 7 at 7:15 pm. Free. Steptoe Butte Park, off Hwy. 195 north of Colfax. (465-5064) E. WASH. GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY Monthly meeting featuring presentation on using court records in geneaology. Sept. 7 from 1-3 pm. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. ewgsi.org (328-0786) SHAMANISM WORKSHOPS Angelic merkaba ascension class. Sept. 7 from 9 am-4 pm. $66. Pet communication class through shamanic journeying also offered from 5-7 pm. $33. Private residence near Elk, Wash. healingearthvortexes.com (262-4685) FRIENDS OF MANITO PLANT SALE Plant sale featuring blueberry bushes, hostas, bulbs and more, as well as live music, informative talks and demos through the day. Sept. 7 from 9 am-4 pm, members sale at 8 am. Manito

Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. friendsofmanito.org (456-8038) SHARE THE DHARMA DAY Daylong retreat event featuring workshops on Buddhist teachings, guided meditation, vegetarian potluck and group discussions. Sept. 8 from 9:45 am-3 pm. Sravasti Abbey, 692 Country Lane, Newport, Wash. (447-5549) HUNTING FOR WILD MUSHROOMS Learn about different species of mushrooms, where to find them in North Idaho and more. Sept. 9 at 6:30 pm. Free. Spirit Lake Library, 32575 N. Fifth Ave. (208-632-5353) IDAHO MEDICAID PANEL A panel of Idaho state legislators and members of the state’s Medicaid working group discuss and answer questions about the new changes to Medicaid in Idaho. Sept. 9 at 6:30 pm. Free. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) TED TALK DISCUSSION GROUP Weekly discussion group on TED talks. Meets Wednesdays at 5:30 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. chatham@labaratoryspokane.com

FILM

CRYSTAL FAIRY & THE MAGICAL CACTUS Screening of the comedy starring Michael Cera. Sept. 5 and 7 at 7:30 pm. $6-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. (208-263-9191) THE HUNTING FILM TOUR Screening of the touring film festival. Sept. 6 at 6 pm. $12-$15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. (208-263-9191) QUICK EXIT Peformance of an original play by Chris Herron. Sept. 6-7 and Sept. 13-14 at 7:30 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. (208263-9191) GIRL MOST LIKELY Comedy. Sept. 7-8, times vary. $3-$6. Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-4127) SUDS & CINEMA Screening of “Animal House” as part of The Inlander’s Suds & Cinema film series, featuring beer from Orlison Brewing Co. Sept. 11 at 6:30 pm, film starts at 7:30 pm. $4/ movie, $3/beers. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com NATIONAL VELVET Screening as part of the “Great Sports Films at the Library” series. Sept. 11 at 5:30 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5336)

FOOD

KEG & COCKTAIL PARTY Release of the new Widmer/Cigar City Brewing’s “Gentlemen’s Club” beers, inspired by the Old Fashioned cocktail. Sept. 5 from 5-8 pm. Free admission. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls. (208457-9885) LATTE ART COMPETITION Compete with other baristas to create art in latte foam. Sept. 6 from 7:30-10 pm. $5. Indaba Coffee, 1425 W. Broadway Ave. facebook.com/indabacoffee (443-3566) HIEROPHANT MEADERY OPENING Grand opening of the meadery, featuring honey-wine tasting and more. Sept. 7 from 1-6 pm. $8/person. Hierophant Meadery, 16602 N. Day Mt. Spokane Rd. (208-405-8338) CIDER WEEK CIDER TASTING Taste six

ciders from Spokane-based Liberty Ciderworks and Twilight Cider Works as part of Washington Cider Week. Sept. 7 from 2-4:30 pm. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. nwcider.com (838-1229) Ales for TrailsOutdoor microbrew festival featuring regional breweries, live music and food, benefiting the North Idaho Centennial Trail Foundation. Sept. 14 from 1-7 pm. Silver Beach Marina, 3204 E. CdA Lake Dr. (208-292-1634) Cider & Summer SparklersSample a variety of local hard ciders and sparkling wines for Washington Cider Week, with live music and food available. Sept. 14 from 3-6 pm. $10. Spice Traders Mercantile, 15614 E. Sprague Ave. (315-4036)

Music

The Portland Cello ProjectConcert featuring special guest Jolie Holland. Sept. 5 at 8 pm. $15-$20. All-ages. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) Sheet Music Exhibit“Battles, Balderdash & Beauty” exhibit of historic sheet music. Runs through Dec. 3. Public reception Sept. 12 from 2-4:30 pm. Gonzaga University Foley Center Library, 502 E. Boone Ave. libguides.gonzaga. edu/sheetmusic (313-3847) Heidi KubanAmerican folk music dinner concert. Sept. 6 and 7 at 6:30 pm. $25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy. 211 off Hwy. 2, Newport, Wash. circlemoon. webs.com (208-448-1294) Eclectic CabaretCabaret-style concert featuring 20 musicians, hosted by the Gonzaga music department. Sept. 6 at 7:30 pm. $10-$15, free to Gonzaga students. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (313-6733) Coeur d’Alene Music FestivalSecond annual music festival and fundraiser concert benefiting the Coeur d’Alene School District arts programs, featuring local and regional bands, food and a beer garden. Sept. 7 from 10 am-10 pm. White House Mansion, 805 E. Sherman Ave. (362-0013) 100 Years of MusicCelebration of the 100th anniversary of Hoffman Music featuring live music, prizes, demos and more. Sept. from 10 am-5:30 pm. Free. Hoffman Music, 1430 N. Monroe St. (444-4140) Trace Adkins and Brett Eldredge Country music concert. Sept. 8 at 6 pm. $59-$99. All-ages. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. northernquest.com (481-6700) Kirtan and Musical Performance Kirtan chant featuring Gina Salá and Daniel Paul. Sept. 12 at 7 pm. $15-$20. South Perry Yoga, 915 S. Perry St. southperryoga.com (443-6241) Newport Music FestivalLocal bands performing on two stages, open mic sessions, workshops, contests, food and beverage vendors, camping and more. Sept. 13-15. $10-$40. Newport City Park, 1st St. and Calispel Ave. pvbluegrass. com (738-4141)

Sports

Spokane Table TennisPing-pong club meets on Saturdays from 1-4 pm and Mondays and Wednesdays from

more events

Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.

7-9:30 pm. $2/visit; open to the public. North Park Racquet Club, 8121 N. Division. (768-1780) Selkirk Lakes HikeGuided hike to Trout and Big Fisher lakes in the Selkirk Mts. north of Sandpoint. Sept. 7 from 8 am-4 pm. Free. Moderately difficult terrain. Register with gdelgadillo@idahoconservation.org (idahoconservation. org) Williams Memorial Bike RideFourth annual North Idaho College Brian Williams memorial poker ride featuring life music, barbecue, auctions and more. Sept. 7 at 1 pm. Starts at O’Shay’s Irish Pub, 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Dr. (208676-7169) Adopt a CragLocal climbers and outdoor enthusiats are invited to help clean up climbing areas in the park. Sept. 7 from 8 am-noon. Free. Q’emiln Park, 12201 W. Parkway Dr., Post Falls. (208769-7809) Spoke-Ed Cycling education event featuring free bike tuneups and SpokeFest packet pickup. Sept. 7 from 10 am-1 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) Dodgeball with NFL ProsPlay dodgeball with former NFL players John Bronson and Larry Stevens. Sept. 7 from noon-2 pm. $20. Sky High Sports, 1322 E. Front Ave. (321-5867) Sweyolakan PaddleFestCommemorative paddling trip fundraiser around the 104-mile shoreline of Lake Coeur d’Alene, hosted by Camp Sweyolakan staff and alumni, in wood canoes from the camp’s fleet. Paddle begins on Sept. 8 at 8:30 am, goes to Sept. 19. Starts at Camp Sweyolakan, 3088 W. Lutherhaven Rd., CdA. (747-6191) Spokane Table Tennis ClubPingpong club meets Sundays from 1:30-4 pm and Wednesdays from 6:30-9 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (456-3581) Spokane ChiefsPreseason hockey game vs. the Tri-City Americans. Sept. 11 at 7:05 pm. Eastern Washington University, University Recreation Center, Cheney. spokanechiefs.com

Theater

Hog HeavenPerformance of an original script as a college scholarship fundraiser. Sept. 6-15, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 E. Greenbluff Rd. oldorchardtheatre.com DeathtrapComedic thriller performed by the JACC’s Theatre Troupe. Sept. 5-15, Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10$15. The Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) The Importance of Being Earnest Performance of the Oscar Wilde play. Sept. 13-29, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave, Newport. (671-3389)

Visual Arts

Palouse Patchers“Elements: Water, Earth, Wind and Fire” themed quit show by members of the Palouse Patchers Quilt Club of Moscow. Aug. 29-Sept. 29. Artist reception Sept. 8 from 1-3 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown, Wash. (229-3414) Idaho’s Bookers DozenTraveling display of a juried exhibition of handmade books by artists around the U.S.

and the world. Runs through Sept. 27. University of Idaho Library, Moscow. (208-885-6066) Drawn to the Wall VInvitational exhibtion featuring drawing installations by Margot Casstevens, Elaine Green, Kurt Madison, Roger Ralston and Carl Richardson. Sept. 6-Oct. 12. Public reception Sept. 12 from 6-8 pm, walkthrough Sept. 13 at 10:30 am. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga. edu/jundt (313-6611) First FridayNew art gallery shows and exhibits, live music and more. Sept. 6 from 5-8 pm. Free. Locations throughout downtown Spokane and beyond. For a complete listing go to Inlander. com/FirstFriday or see page 34. Wood Turning Demo & Classes Demonstrations of wood turning by master wood turner Keith Gotschall on Sept. 6 from 2-5 pm and 6-9 pm. $5$10. Wood turning classes on Sept. 7 and 8, $125/day. Riverview Retirement Community, Wood Shop Bldg., 1711 Ross Ct. inwwoodturners.com CdA Artist Studio TourTour seven private art studios featuring 17 artists. Sept. 7 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Locations throughout the Coeur d’Alene area. artsincda.org (208-292-1629) Palouse Women ArtistsMixed media exhibit featuring small works by women artists of the Palouse region. Sept. 7-Oct. 5, artist reception Sept. 7 from 1-3 pm followed by an artist dinner from 5-7:30 pm. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St., Palouse, Wash. bankleftgallery.com (878-8425)

Words

Broken MicSpoken word open mic night. Wednesdays at 6 pm. All-ages. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. (847-1234) Pamela ProehlThe author will read from and sign copies of her debut novel “The Heartbreak Killer.” Sept. 5 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) Three Minute MicOpen mic poetry night as part of First Friday events. Sept. 6 at 7 pm, sign-ups at 6:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) Mark PorterThe author will sign copies of his book series. Sept. 7 from 2-5 pm. Auntie’s Books, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) Genie Frisbee HigbeeThe author will sign copies of her debut book, “Invented August.” Sept. 7 from 10 am-5 pm. Studio No. 4 of the CdA Artists Studio Tour. artsincda.org (208-659-7576) Kenn NesbittThe U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate will read from his newest book “Kiss, Kiss Good Night.” Sept. 7 at 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) Jamie FordTalk and book signing by the Wash. native and NYT best-selling author for the release of his next novel “Songs of Willow Frost.” Sept. 11 at 7 pm. Free, reservations required. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) Jonathan EvisonThe Washingtonbased, award-winning author will read from and sign copies of his work. Sept. 11 at 7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople, 521 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-2669) n

CO•ED ADULT VOLLEYBALL VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE FOR C/D LEVEL PLAYERS. TUESDAYS | C Team plays 6-7:30pm | D Team plays 7:30-9pm. $200 per team - 8 player max

MEN’S BASKETBALL LEAGUE “OPEN GYM TRYOUTS” FOR MEN 18-45 YRS September 3rd, 10th & 17th from 4:30-6:30pm | $2 LEAGUE PLAY STARTS SEPTEMBER 24th LEAGUE PLAYS THURS 6:30-9pm | SAT 12:00-2:30pm $250 per team - 8 player max FOR TEAM REGISTRATION: WWW.ECSPOKANE.ORG | (509) 808-1235 EAST CENTRAL COMMUNITY CENTER | 5OO S. STONE.

Two Free presentations by

BEST-SELLING AUTHOR

-MARIA SEMPLE-

THURSDAY

OCT 10 1pm | Convention Center Conference Theater Downtown Spokane

7pm | CenterPlace 2426 N. Discovery Place Spokane Valley Doors open 45 minutes prior to each event start time. An ASL interpreter will be present at the 7pm event.

Loll Outdoor Furniture Sale! 15% off



Downtown • 824 W Sprague Avenue • 509-340-2800 • www.wojoworks.net

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 57

BUYING Estate contents /

household goods. See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF SPOKANE Case No.: 11-2-01901-7 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AURORA LOAN SERVICES LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MERRILL MONDAY; et al, Defendants. TO: FINANCIAL RECOVERY GROUP THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE SAID DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 1st day of August, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the Plaintiff, AURORA LOAN SERVICES LLC, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for Plaintiff, McCarthy & Holthus, LLP at the office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The basis for the complaint is a foreclosure of the property commonly known as 3204/3206 Meadow Glen Lane, Cheney, WA 99004, Spokane County, Washington for failure to pay loan amounts when due.

] - 5:30pm m a 0 3 : 8 [ i. Mon. - Fr(509) 444-7355 lander.com : E PHON BulletinBoard@In mmit Parkway E-MAIL: ON: 1227 West Su A 99201 IN PERS Spokane, W SHAMANIC & SACRED GEOMETRY Classes 509-262-4685 HealingEarthVortexes.com

Massage room to share. Plea se contact (509) 990-4967

Toyo Tires For Sale

Christian Science Healing

FREE SQUARE DANCE FUN PARTY

195/50 R16 84H Garit KX under 5k mi $300 OBO 509-481-5590

& ICE CREAM SOCIAL

Theodora Sallee, Practitioner 509481-8585 or 509-723-4671

Sept 6th at 8pm

North Spokane Dance Center 7427 N. Freya

Sept 7th & 13th at 8pm Western Dance Center 1901 N. Sullivan

LOCAL, T INDEPENDEEN AND FRE SINCE 1993!

EVERYONE WELCOME! Have fun & Stay in shape!

509.979.2607

squaredancespokane.org Fall Clean Up!

Lawn mowing, weed whacking, shrub pruning, firebreak, hauling 999-1545

Meet Gay & Bi Locals

MCCARTHY & HOLTHUS, LLP 19735 10th Ave NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo WA 98370 PH: 206-319-9100

Send Messages FREE! 206-877-0877, Use Code 7973

? N QUESTIO A B C D

THE NETHERCUTT

F O U N D AT I O N C I T I Z E N S H I P

TOURNAMENT

What is the name of the current Speaker of the House of Representatives?

The Nethercutt Foundation is offering local 4th, 8th and 12th graders the chance to win scholarships, prizes and even a trip to Washington D.C.

Look for answer in next week’s issue of the Inlander! 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

17

22

58 58 INLANDER INLANDER SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 5, 5, 2013 2013

30. “It Ain’t All About the Cookin’” memoirist Deen 32. “The ____ of Steve” (2000 comedy) 35. Accumulation that will cause the White Rabbit to slip and fall if he doesn’t slow down? 39. Approves 40. Jack of “The Great Dictator” 41. 2010 Apple release 42. “Swan Lake” move 43. Symbols of slowness 45. What Jack Sprat’s wife suffers from? 50. U.S. senator who retired in 2013 after representing Maine for three terms 51. Pond problem 52. Village 53. It’s often made at an ATM ... or a hint to 17-, 22-, 35- and 45-Across

59. Jim Davis cartoon dog 60. Uganda’s Amin 61. First-aid item 62. Seeger of the Weavers 63. Westernmost Scand. Peninsula country 64. Texas city named after a Ukraine city Down 1. U-turn from NNE 2. Pop ____ question 3. British ref. for wordsmiths 4. California’s historic Fort ____ 5. He wrote “Nothing Compares 2 U” 6. O’Connor who had a hit with “Nothing Compares 2 U” 7. Heavy instruments to march with 8. “The Simpsons” Squishee seller 9. Pickle 10. Roll out

24

THIS

25

28 30 36

39

40

31

37

32

33

34

56

57

58

38 41

42

43

47

48

50

44

49

51

52

53

54

59

60

61

62

63

64

55

“Withdrawal”

11. “The Stars and Stripes Forever” composer who happens to have “usa” in his name 12. Not as bright 13. Setting of the 2012 play “Abigail/1702” 18. Bearded beast in Africa

TO LEARN MORE: nethercuttfoundation.org

13

19

23

29

46

12

21

27

35

45

11

B Capitalism

16

18 20

1. Lowers oneself? Across 7. Blues guitarist ____ Mahal 10. Org. that trademarked “Pony Express” in 2006 14. Shepherd of “The View” 15. Kick things ____ notch 16. Fed. agency whose reach “goes from the surface of the sun to the depths of the ocean floor” 17. Person asking for change from a couple exchanging nuptials? 19. Parking lot sign 20. “99 Luftballons” singer 21. Paris’ ____ d’Orsay 22. Reason the casino owner gave for replacing old slot machines for new ones that just use buttons? 26. Joined the conversation, with “in” 28. Prepare for planting 29. “Perfect Strangers” actor Mark ____-Baker

10

15

14

26

ANSWER:

COMING THIS FALL!

Harry Reid Robert Baynor John Boehner Nancy Pelosi

1

LAST WEEK’S QUESTION: What is the economic system of the United States?

21. Grinding tooth 22. Dressed to the ____ 23. Prefix with potent or present 24. Pianist’s practice piece 25. Cabinet member? 26. Advertising award

W

27. Country bumpkin ANSW EEK’s E 30. Hearth tool page RS on 31. Darth, at one time 63 32. Two-inch putt, say 33. Uptight, informally 34. Bookies give them 36. Actor whose 2002 mug shot is listed as a “TSG favorite” on thesmokinggun.com 37. “Hold your horses!” 38. Dynasty after the T’ang 42. Tribe in “Dances With Wolves” 43. First apartment, perhaps 44. Klutz 45. Camera lens setting 46. + end 47. Namely 48. Up and about 49. “Avatar” actress ____ Pounder 53. Triumph 54. 2011 Colbie Caillat hit 55. Drink name suffix 56. Mich. neighbor 57. Crossword entry: Abbr. 58. Thompson of “Back to the Future”

Year Round Skinny Dipping (208) 686-8686

Green Team Residential & Commercial Cleaning - Free Estimate 509-230-9081

Family Fun

Learn to Square Dance! 7424 N Freya Tuesday Oct 1st 7pm-9pm, Sundat Oct 6th 4pm-6pm 489-4832 or 768-7777

PHONE: (509) 444-SELL • EMAIL: sales@inlander.com IN PERSON OR BY MAIL: 1227 West Summit Parkway, Spokane WA 99201

Bridge Lessons

Ice Cr ea m & mo re

Learn to play the modern way

Beginning, Intermediate & Advanced Classes Starting in September Valley, South Hill, Northside & Cheney Locations

Mountain Alchemology $ OFF

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

1001 W. 25TH AVE.

CORNER OF 25TH & MONROE

509.535.7171

Call Brenda Simpson

20

THESCOOPSPOKANE.COM

509-926-6973 to register

Why Do I Get Angry?

Anger education for families, certified agency 953-5585

www.spokanebridge.com

Customized Facial Treatments Eyebrow Design High Frequency Acne Treatments Facial & Body Waxing BT Micro Chemical Peels

Desert Jewels Nursery

Call: 509.368.4754

Specializing in beautiful plants for home and commercial landscapes. Save water, save resources.

Master Tom Pomilla & Master Nelson Pinto

CLASSES OFFERED

Now Open Fridays & Saturdays Through October 5 9AM to 5PM

• Native Shrubs, & Perennials • Rock Garden Plants Fall planting is best for shrubs & perennials. Many fall planting discounts!

9809 E. Upriver Dr.

(509)893-3771

info@desertjewelsnursery.com • desertjewelsnursery.com

Tang Soo Do  Farang Mu Sul Women’s Self-Defense Fitness Kickboxing Little Dragons Program

20 SUMMITDOJOS.COM Call Today: 509.979.1900

$

OFF A MONTH

ON ALL YEAR ENROLLMENTS

Northeast Apts

1 bd $450, 2 bd $550, w/storage unit & carport. Call Jane 483-3542

Lee Apartments

Close to Museum. Clean Retro 40's Building. Quiet area. Large yard. 2 Blocks from Park. 1 BR $535

Call 747-1414

Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

sales@inlander.com

Landlords:

ANY $60

SERVICE * NEW CLIENTS ONLY

Roosevelt Apts

Historic Brick Building~Walk Downtown~Front & Back Courtyards~Hardwood Flrs~Across from Park,1 bd $640-$650, Studio $550

Call 747-1414

to advertise:

444-SELL

S.Hill 2.5 & 3 Bd Apts. Historic

Harmony Yoga Fall Schedule Flow, Hatha Yoga, & Prenatal Yoga For complete schedule harmonyoga.com • 509.747.4430

BEST MEDICAL CONSULTATION OFFERING SERVICES FOR: • D.O.T. Physicals • Sports Physicals • Weight Loss • Alternative Herbal Medical Treatment Options CALL TODAy TO SeT uP yOur APPOinTMenT WiTH Our CLiniC.

509-467-1990 bmcmmj.com

624 W. Hastings #18 • Spokane, WA

1510 N. Argonne Rd. Suite B

Family Friendly Military & Law Enforcement Discounts

50/HR

$

Specializing in: • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Sports • Trigger Point Therapy

Got Deep Tissue? Specializing in Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Deep Tissue :: Hot Rock :: Sports :: Relaxation Online Scheduling :: Located Near Huckleberry’s

Roger Vasquez LMP 1414 W. Garland #102 509.280.2161 Lic #602890076

mansion,Lndry,pets $675-$745.

509-924-0059

We’re Here To Help. Not already a member? call (509) 535-1018 or visit our website.

“Serving Landlords for over 40 years” www.landlordassoc.org

3004 E. Boone

1 bdrm 1 bth apt, close to SCC, water/ sewer/trash paid, on-site laundry, smoking ok outside, but not in apt. No pets, $425, + $350 dep., application fee $35.

Call 509-534-4147

JOE’S

420

Agricultural Medical Cannabis Collective Mon-Sat 10am-6pm

HOURS Sun 10am-2pm

9317 E. Trent 509.534.1222

Dezana Aman, LMP

509.998.0255 ArtOfMassage-Spokane.com

MA 60016914

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 59

“Spokane’s Original Gourmet Cupcake Shop”

Check out our fall inspired flavors!

50% Off Purchase limited to 1 dozen.

Like us for Daily Specials!

your next purchase*

*Must present coupon. Limited availability. Not valid with other offers, special or pre-orders, promotions, discounts or punch cards. Offer expires 9/12/13.

713 W. Garland Ave. Spokane • 509-327-3471 • CelebrationsSweetBoutique.com

MOISTURE IN YOUR WINDOWS? Don’t Replace. RESTORE for Less!!

FREE ESTIMATES

CALL TODAY! 509-284-4427 TheGlassGuruofSpokaneValley.com

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Jeers

Cheney Public Library I saw you 8/22 at the Cheney Public Library around 4:30. You had deep red hair and was wearing a denim vest and I rode into the parking lot on a red moped wearing a Misfits t-shirt. After you held the door open for me, we both spent a moment eyeing the CDs. I don’t know what the social etiquette is for asking a gorgeous woman out at a library, but I regret not doing it. I’d like to get to know you a little better. Coffee or a drink perhaps?

up downtown! We exchanged smiles and before I knew it you were gone. Coffee and a lox bagel or a glass wine with you someday would complete me. Same place next Friday?

ER Nurses Cheers to the Holy Family ER Nurses and staff for consistantly giving excellent care to patients every day. You are truly an amazing group of people that go above and beyond. Love, Assistant Nurse Manager Barbie.

can. it can be a fun learning experience. like I said originally he was peacefully in his stroller minding his own business. sounds like “quite the experience to me!” he wasn’t screaming, he wasn’t pulling things off the shelf-he was making animal sounds! If you’re going to get heated over your child doing such an innocent act then of course you’re going to be stressed out shopping. I have been shopping with my child thousands of times and it has never been “it’s standard reasonable parenting” to disrespect her for any reason. I didn’t approach the lady in the store, what exactly would that of done? So no, I wasn’t a “know it all, nosy, stranger” thanks for assuming though, oh and why wouldn’t I post in the Jeers? I certainly wasn’t cheering from the disrespect to the child!

Downtown AMC To the concessions guy! Your name is Daniel and you are way taller than I am and have a super great smile! I haven’t been able to stop thinking about you ever since my friend ordered his popcorn from you! We came in August 27th, around 4:30. You are just super handsome and I haven’t been able to get you off my mind! Nevada and Hamilton I saw you on Monday morning going down Nevada/Hamilton St. I turned off of 2nd and you got on the freeway. I saw your gorgeous smile in your mirror as I smiled back. You were in a red Ford Escape. Single??..Coffee sometime?.. Hayden Thomas Hammer I saw you at Hayden Thomas Hammer. You: beautiful girl with blue eyes wearing a smoky the bear shirt. You had the passion of a vegan and the body of a vegetarian. Your intelligence and child like enthusiasm blew me away. I don’t usually come to this side of town but I am glad I did!

$10 MVP

$3 OFF

HAIRCUT

ANY HAIRCUT

First Time Clients Only • Valid ID Required Regular Adult and Child prices and ages may vary by location. Present coupon before haircut. Not valid with any other offer. Coupon may not be bartered, copied, traded, or sold. Valid only at Spokane area locations. EXPIRES 10/15/13 • CODE 2106/2107

Loyal Returning Clients • Valid ID Required Regular Adult and Child prices and ages may vary by location. Present coupon before haircut. Not valid with any other offer. Coupon may not be bartered, copied, traded, or sold. Valid only at Spokane area locations. EXPIRES 10/15/13 • CODE 2108

NORTH SPOKANE | NORTHTOWN SQUARE | 4805 N. DIVISION ST. | 509-624-2404 SPOKANE VALLEY | SPRAGUE & SULLIVAN | 10 N. SULLIVAN RD. | 509-242-3434

IT’S GOOD TO BE A GUY

sportclips.com

AMAZING FOUND FURNISHINGS AT GREAT PRICES EVERY DORM ROOM DESERVES A VINTAGE MAKEOVER!

2607 NORTH MONROE • 325-2607

60 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Sandpoint Super 1 Foods Tuesday, August 20, right around 12:30 p.m. You are the beyond attractive blonde lady, wearing a green skirt and black top. I walked into the store and you were standing at the cold beverage display. I excused myself, as I reached and grabbed a beverage and you grabbed two monster cans. I noticed you again at checkout and you were talking with two young kids, then I wanted to say something to you, as we walked out, but you were on your phone. I happened to notice, that you walked to the store and as you left, you headed north toward the school? Not that you would remember, but I was the guy wearing dark blue work pants and a grey tee shirt, 6’ and short blonde hair. Going out on a limb here, but what the hay! If you happen to read this and would like to meet for coffee or lunch?

Interested? Mature gentleman in blue golf shirt/black shorts smiled at mature lady, who seemed to respond with a mysterious Mona Lisa-like smile. I’m still visualizing that captivating smile the day after. Could you be both interested & available?

Cheers To K&S my fave personal chef-tobe and the sexiest fashion blogger around. I feel lucky to have met you while living in Spokane and I’m so thankful for the friendship we’ve

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” made. I’ve loved our talks, drinks and laughter. It’ll suck having to say goodbye! Thanks for letting me invade the awesome bond you have. I can’t wait to see where the fitness-nutrition-photographyblogging world will take y’all (to Austin please, ASAP!) Here’s to future adventures and visits. Ciao for now, your girl on TV. SPD Cheers to the Spokane Police that investigated our next door neighbor on August 21st. My husband and I heard what sounded like someone being brutally murdered along with a ton of yelling (some of it was in tongues). Thanks for making sure there weren’t any dead bodies in there, just demons in the basement. I’m glad your report will probably include “a couple inside their home were attempting to rebuke the spirits in their basement. They informed us the priest will be there tomorrow.” Thanks for keeping us “alive” folks from worrying about the noises next door. Great Customer Service! Cheers to the waitresses at the Wall Street Diner. I go there often and they are always so busy, barley room to stand! The wait staff is so awesome! They are never rude or in a hurry to get you out the door. Not once have I ever waited for food or a refill. Their jobs are hard, and it takes special people not to be rude! So thanks Wall Street Diner for always being friendly and having the best breakfast in town, the tuna melts not bad either! Spokane needs more great customer service like this.

Thanks To All Just got back from Spokane after three weeks there. I was looking for a summer home. I want to thank all the nice people that help me get around. The city bus drivers were the most helpful. Dave Thank you for all that you do. We appreciate everything. And we want to let you know that you are not only a great neighbor, but a good friend too. It’s nice to look out for each other. Thank you! Your friends from across the street, and tofu he likes you too You Make Me Smile Silverwood August 24th. You arrived at the park smiling and looking beautiful like you always do. You have beautiful long redish brown hair, tattoos on your wrists and one on your wedding finger. I only know this because I saw you there and... I was with you when you got those tattoos. You make me smile and bring so much meaning to my life. I love you Brittany.

Jeers

RE: Perplexed Yes, indeed I am perplexed at your pretentious, downgrading, and ignorant jeers I had the misfortune of reading. Style, my dear, is not about wearing the most expensive name brands (only people who consider themselves better than everyone else, i.e. snobs, do that). Style is looking great, feeling great, and not maxing out your credit card to do so (or maxing out the sugar daddy’s). I suspect as you traipse around Spokane in your overpriced fashions, you most certainly are mocked as snobbish (and if the tone of your jeers is any indication, then I have no doubt you are mocked accordingly). So, you can take your red-soled louboutin stilettos and shove them up your snobby arse. In the meantime, I’ll traipse around in my reasonably priced Calvin Klein pumps and hope I never have to knock you upside the head with my stylish Kate Spade purse!

RE: Perplexed I truly feel sorry for you that you feel the need to become so defensive over someone sticking up for a child. Yes I was heated, and yes I was passionate, these are children we are talking about. Children that grow into adults. We need to be passionate! Children are molded by the way they are treated when they are put in our care. These are not little jokes running around, they are human beings who will someday make RE: Perplexed The reason you their own decisions and choose are mocked as “snobbish” is not how to treat people. This comes because you “traipse around town” about by how they are treated. your $1,500/pair louboutins or When children are learning (ei: your $2,500/outfit chloe; you are making animal sounds!, counting, mocked as snobbish because you abs’s) it is absolutely detrimental to stick your nose in the air to anybody their growth to make it into a who does not have your same negative experience. When my values. For some of us, your outfit daughter is making animal sounds represents a quarter/semester in a store-guess what?? I ask her to of school, a car payment, house give me more sounds. I stimulate that little mind that is so obviously craving learning at all times. i would never dream of yelling at her for it! and it completely broke my heart when you said “it’s standard reasonable Carolyn C. is this week’s winner parenting” that is exactly of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! what is wrong with Send in your CHEERS so society!! Not only is it deemed OK but it is “it’s you too can be enstandard reasonable parenting” to tered to win 1 dozen treat our children like garbage. I “Cheers” cupcakes at love how you refer to the animal Celebrations Sweet noises and the child just “making Boutique. noise”. Shopping with kids can be quite the experience...yeah it sure

WINNER!!

Rocket Bakery Downtown August 23rd. You, you, you took my breathe away. I was enjoying my lunch on the patio when you pulled up. You stepped out of your Acura, with your legs that went on for miles... Your amazing smile light “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

payment, or small vacation. We know there are different fabrics other than leather and lace (we are pretty familiar with flannel and denim), some of us just can’t justify spending that type of money on something that you only get to wear for one or two seasons before it’s no longer in style. As to our husbands, don’t worry about them; they are pretty happy that we don’t try to spend their entire paycheck on clothes. And lastly, if you’re so bothered, please feel free to move to the places that the hobos dress better than we do, we won’t be hurt in the least.

offended the lackadaisical, huddled mass clones. Truly, I am not sorry. My point which you obviously missed---was this--where is our originality as a city? Yes, per capita, Spokane and its outlying areas does make less money than say, Seattle however money isn’t the issue nor is it your perception of my supposed superficiality. It’s that as a whole, we take no pride in how we present ourselves--Spokane prances around like a bunch of sloppy Joes and Janes. If you work in a business office, how come you cannot muster enough strength to merely tuck in your shirt? Or the food industry--may you pull back your hair and not be dripping with metal on your face? That has nothing to do with salary, it’s selfrespect! A chunk of my original posting was not published which would have aided in my case-our youth is under the impression that being sloppy or scantily clad is ok and it’s not--”farming town” or not. By the way, here’s a history lesson--Spokane is industrial and it’s outlying areas are agricultural... in closing, I am not sorry you think so poorly of my opinions. Did I strike a nerve? Was my post not readily accepted because it had nothing to do with drug addicts or poor drivers not yielding to pedestrians? I have volunteered all my life and was raised in a middle class family who worked hard for their money--I didn’t receive an allowance when I was at home nor was I handed a car or an iphone like most of my peers and their prospective siblings. My designer finds are a mix of saving my hard earned money--in the medical field-- and discount shopping. I am a well-educated individual and my contention was simply this-take pride in yourself--you’d think Spokanites are manic depressive clones by looking at us.

but your ‘safety issue’ sure went to hell after honking at me to watch you quickly almost side-swipe a cab to get around us, didn’t it. We exchanged a few choice words at the next light as you slowly rolled down the back windows…to what (?) add a dramatic affect that you had 2 children in the car ~ I am sure by the embarrassment on their faces that they are more than aware of the passive-aggressive nature their Mother possesses. Remember to buckle up, kids

Admonitions 8/27/13 @ 11:50am, Washington and 2nd. You: Driving a blue convertible VW Beetle, screaming “Get off your phone, you dumb b@!*%!” (presumably not your finest moment). Me: driving a dirty SUV, screaming “F*@& you!” in response (not my finest moment, either). The facts: I had put my golden retriever of 12.5 years down 30 minutes earlier. I had finally stopped bawling like a little kid 5 minutes earlier. I had to be back to my stressful job as a law office assistant 5 minutes later. I was stopped at a stop light when I chose to quickly respond to my friend’s thoughtful text of “I’m so sorry about your dog” with “Thanks, it’s been a rough afternoon” I more than understand your concern, but self-righteous, expletive-laden admonitions aren’t going to prevent car wrecks. Why don’t you try what I do the 364 days of the year I’m not putting down a beloved pet; meditate on how each car contains a whole world of emotions, thoughts, stressors, imperfections and human beauty and vigilantly apply your brakes when necessary. Same PanhandlerI ran into that same panhandler that every one keeps jeering about. Same old story, ran out of gas can’t work, something like that. This was in the parking lot of my motel. Hope that he gets put away someday. RE: Perplexed Clearly, my befuddled mind misspoke and

Patience To the gal in the silver SUV that was so concerned about safety downtown in front of River Park Square Mall. I was picking up my daughter and 86 year old Mom (did you not see them reaching for the door handle?) Yes, my car may have been indeed jutting out a bit,

U S P S T A J S T O O P S N O A A A P U I S H E R R F U L L M B U W E D D I N G U S E E M A N E N R A R M O F N O C A U S E L L I T D C H I M E T A O A U L A P N N I L HIS WEEK’s L A N D T R E D N O W ANSWERS! I C E I N I P A D I E K A O S K O S N A I L S P L I E A C T I O N F A T A T T R S C U M S N O W E L T H D R A W A I W N W O T O D I N E I I D I O D I E O D E S S A N O R P E T E al Withdraw

Shopping Carts & Bus RidersTo all those bus riding Wal-Mart customers in Airway Heights who thinks it’s okay to take a shopping cart off the property to the bus stop. If you can’t carry your groceries that far you should have thought of that before you bought it all. How do you get your groceries home from the bus stop once you get off the bus? Even more concerning, what makes you think it’s ok to tip the shopping cart over in the dirt and then use it as a bench. One of the stops even has a real bus stop with a bench and you still feel the need to sit on the cart. I put my food in that cart, I don’t need the extra side of dirt and grime. Stand your lazy ass up and stop ruining the carts for the rest of us. I was standing outside of 7-11, looking at the Red Box movies and smoking a cigarette. You took the time to stop your minivan, with kids in it, roll down the window and say “you shouldn’t smoke marijuana at a Red Box where kids go to.” Then you called me a f---ing loser. Nice. Jeers to you, woman. There were no kids around the Red Box. I was smoking a cigarette, which the last time I checked is legal. But then, so is pot. You should pull your head out of your butt and stop being so nosy and judgemental. Did you just assume I was smoking a joint because I have long hair? I know I shouted some profanity to you, but you deserved it. And you had already used profanity in front of your own kids prior to that. I feel bad for your kids because they’re probably going to grow up to be foul-mouthed judgmental mean people, just like you. Next time you accost me, I will blow my second hand smoke into your kid’s face. All I have to say is you’re lucky my blonde haired friend did not witness that.

ENTER TO WIN

JOE SATRIANI UNSTOPPABLE MOMENTUM TOUR 2013 OCTOBER 21ST • MARTIN WOLDSEN THEATER AT THE FOX

TICKETS & GUITAR!

PROVIDED BY MARKS GUITAR SHOP

go to www.inlander.com/satriani to enter

ARLAND Gtattoo and piercing • LASER TATTOO REMOVAL •

TATTOO & BODY PIERCING

• BRANDING • HOSPITAL GRADE STERILIZATION

CALL 509-327-2333 602 w. garland • www.garlandtattoo.com

Booey's Sauce puts a kick to every meal! Now Available at:

Kitchen Engine Main Market Sonnenberg’s

Pool World River Ridge Hardware

A great finishing sauce for beef, pork, poultry, and seafood.

Created in Spokane, Washington BooeysGourmet.com

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 61

I

n about 900 A.D., in the forests of what is now North Idaho, a cedar sprout poked through the ground near a small stream. Meanwhile, Danish Vikings sacked the city of London for what would be the last time, algebra was in its infancy and Russia had just been founded. More than a millennium later, the same cedar is still standing. Settler’s Ancient Cedar Grove, which is up the north fork of the Coeur d’Alene River, is one of three spots in the region offering a cool, shaded walk over groomed trails, and of the three, is easily the most accessible by car. It’s awe-inspiring to be in the presence of a living organism that old. Diane Robbins of Star Valley, Wyo., visited Settler’s Grove in 2007 when she lived in Osburn, Idaho. The grandmother of five is back vacationing the historic mining area and included a trip to see the trees again with her grandkids. “I just wanted them to learn a little about history,” she says. These cedar trees have withstood the elements, fires, drought and the advancement of Western civilization. They’re not threatened by the logging industry anymore because the grove is federally protected. Jason Jerman, a silviculturist (someone who specializes in the cultivation of forest trees) for the U.S. Forest Service in Coeur d’Alene, says a tree is defined as “ancient” when its trunk diameter exceeds 5 feet. Many of the trees in Settler’s Grove easily exceed that. “Most of those trees are well over 500 years old,” Jerman says. That was around the time of the Catholic Reformation, Columbus beginning his third voyage to the New World and Leonardo da Vinci beginning work on the Mona Lisa. The largest tree in the grove has a diameter of about 9 feet, which Jerman estimates makes it about 1,200 years old.

J

Settler’s Ancient Cedar Grove was here before us — and, in all likelihood, will be here when we’re gone By David Teller

erman says that accurately determining a cedar’s age is difficult because of a number of variables like weather patterns, the abundance of moisture and the environment where the tree starts out. If it’s surrounded by a lot of older trees, they will absorb more moisture from the ground, making it more difficult for the younger saplings. Once the older trees die or are removed, the younger ones get more nutrients and sunlight. He adds that the large trees are more than 120 feet tall, but many are hollow due to fire or disease. Because of cedars’ resilience, the disease or damage only affects the tree for a while, until it grows over the affected area. On the outside, a solid surface with thick bark will grow; on the inside will be holes and cavities. As a result, it can be nearly impossible to get a good core sample, which shows the yearly growth rings throughout the life of the tree and provides the most accurate way of determining a tree’s age. One factor working in this particular grove’s favor is that its environment is prone to flooding. “It’s sort of a natural fire extinguisher,” Jerman says. On the other hand, snow does quite a number on the cedars. The grove is cluttered with the remains of trees that have toppled over as a result of accumulation. In many cases, root beds the size of a Chevy Suburban have been ripped out of the ground as a tree fell.

S

62 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

Prone to flooding, Settler’s Grove acts as a natural fire extinguisher.

ettler’s Grove is easy to reach by car. Halfway between Prichard and Murray, Idaho, turn left and drive about 6 miles. The last 4 are a dirt road. Aside from the fresh air and pleasant silence of the remote area, walking through the grove makes you think of what it would be like to be in the same spot, listening to the same trickle of the same small stream, for longer than any human could comprehend: before European settlers arrived in the Inland Northwest, before the Civil War, even before the American Revolution. These trees have prevailed. They measure how brief a human life is, and prove what was already happening before anyone came along will continue long after someone born today has lived a full life. n

Stay Connected, Wherever You Are Follow the Inlander and INHealth on Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for exclusive news, contests and more!

SEPTEMBER 5, 2013 INLANDER 63

CAR GIVEAWAY! September 2 Starting July 1st receive on

e drawing ticket for ever y

CHEVY CAMARO

nd

• 13th • 27th | 7 pm

1,000 points earned on ma

chine play.

CHRYSLER 200 DODGE CHALLENGER

Must be a Rewards member. Drawing tickets are for the 2nd, 13th and 27th drawings. Must be picked up before 6:30 pm each drawing night. Points not deducted from card. Must be present to win. Contestants can only qualify once per day. Winners are responsible for applicable taxes. See Rewards booth for details. Employees not eligible. Cars not guraranteed in shown colors. Customer gets choice of three cars Sept 2nd, choice of two cars 13th and remaining car on the 27th.

1 800 523-2464 | CDAC A SI N O.COM |

/ CDAC A SI N O R E S O RT

25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58


Inlander 9/05/13