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COMMENT | POVERTY

A Legacy Undone

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A

ll of Spokane hopes that Ron Wells and his team can restore the Ridpath Hotel. Standing empty, it signals abandonment, which invites crime and related trouble from an area reaching out several blocks. Were it to reopen, the economic and social impact would revitalize that entire part of the downtown. At stake is the public interest. Given all that, why has Cathy McMorris Rodgers and her Republican Caucus worked so hard to derail the project? Our Congresswoman would demur. Derail this important private-sector project? What are you talking about? Her party’s contrived debt ceiling fiasco, with another possibly in the works — that’s what I’m talking about. You see, it’s all connected. The public interest connects to private interests — libertarian fantasies to the contrary, there’s no breaking these connections. You mess up one, you mess up the other. The Ridpath restoration serves to illustrate this: “You don’t have to actually default to make the bond markets so jittery that they react,” says Ron Wells. “The very threat last month,” he reports, “made the bond markets jittery.” And “jittery” for Wells has resulted in an increase in borrowing costs, reducing the size of his loan by $802,100. Unless this private sector financial situation can be addressed — and let’s pray it’s not made worse by a repeat of GOP recklessness — Wells may not be able to go forward to address this important public need. And all because Cathy McMorris Rodgers and her caucus seek to use the debt limit as a weapon.

L

ast Friday at St. Aloysius Church on the Gonzaga University campus, Spokane celebrated former House Speaker Tom Foley. Our congresswoman spoke in glowing terms about Foley. It wasn’t lost on many in attendance that she has opposed most everything he stood for. Tom Foley worked to balance the national interest with the interests of his district. Government was important to both. A fair reading of Rodgers’ voting record shows opposition to national needs (economic stimulus projects, health care, immigration reform) and local needs (gutting the Community Development Block Grant Program, cuts to Head Start, and most recently deep reductions in the food stamp program). CDBG, Head Start and food stamps were designed to help poor districts like hers. To make matters worse, she agreed to the infamous Grover Norquist blanket anti-revenue pledge, a big part of the overall problem. The government needs enough revenue. Remember, Ronald Reagan’s tax cuts were a promise to create more revenue for government functions. If we just cut taxes, we would see more growth

6 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

and more revenue, he argued. (In retrospect, it reminds me of the old line about the rain following the plow.) But back to Rodgers’ vote to cut food stamps: Long-time Congressman Norm Dicks credited Foley with creating the program, which has helped feed the nation’s hungry — and helped farmers and grocers. And Journalist Elizabeth Drew further elaborates on Foley’s role in her recent Rolling Stone article, “The Republicans’ War on the Poor.” Democrat George McGovern and Republican Bob Dole had “joined together” to address the obvious need for better nutrition, especially for small children. They had some success, but when it went to the House, the sell got harder. Enter Tom Foley — “the real legislative hero of the program,” writes Drew. What did Foley do? He wisely combined the food stamp program with agricultural subsidies, engaging in what Lyndon Johnson might have referred to as an example of how politics is “the art of the possible.” The conservative farmers were able to be paid for their surpluses, and the liberal city folk who needed the program for urban poor, but resisted farm subsidies, had to go along. Now Rodgers and her party caucus have slashed Foley’s food stamp program — Drew terms their motive “sheer spite” — as they continue to fund crop subsidies for better-off farmers. So just five weeks after Cathy McMorris Rodgers voted to undo Tom Foley’s legacy and leave our nation’s hungry out in the cold, she concluded her glowing remembrance of him in the Spokesman-Review by saying, “We should all follow his example.”

S

o here’s the question — for Spokane, for the Ridpath Hotel and for all those who rely on the social safety net: Over the coming months, will we see and hear the Cathy McMorris Rodgers who spoke at St. Aloysius, or will we see more displays of knee-jerk voting in line with whatever her radical right base demands? If it’s the latter, Spokane and Wells may lose the Ridpath, while our already serious poverty situation gets even worse. By the way, the title of Drew’s article is a riff on a speech by John Kasich, the Republican governor of Ohio. He said: “I’m concerned about the fact there seems to be a war on the poor; that if you’re poor, somehow you’re shiftless and lazy. “You know what?” he continued, “The very people who complain ought to ask their grandparents if they worked at the WPA.” 

COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

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Dealing With Low T BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

I

t used to be that we tried to get more people to vote. In 1870, the 15th Amendment eliminated disenfranchisement over race, officially at least. In 1920, women won the vote. In 1965, a variety of impediments were removed by the Voting Rights Act. In 1971, Americans as young as 18 were allowed into the booth. And in 2006 here in Spokane County, we went to a vote-bymail system to make it easier to be a part of our democracy. Lately it’s been going the other way, however. The Supreme Court just overturned significant parts of the Voting Rights Act, allowing many states to throw up some of those same old roadblocks again. Even former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Jim Wright could not get a voting ID card in Texas because of new restrictions. Apathy is even worse. After steadily climbing until 1960, national turnout has been receding. Locally, after an initial vote-by-mail burst, turnout in Spokane County has settled in around where it was before. And that means that in an off-year primary, like we just had in August, as few as 22 percent may vote. Yes, you can win a primary with 12 percent of the registered voters — not exactly a mandate. Then, in the general election, just having an “R” by your name can win you election after election, as demonstrated by the long, puzzling career of Prosecutor Steve Tucker. Are we just too busy to bother with democracy? We have to wake up: Low turnout is preventing us from tackling our most profound challenges; it also explains the huge disconnect between the needs of the nation and the priorities of the political parties. With their numbers dwindling, voters have lost their primacy to the party bosses and Super PACs. So with another general election in the books — and probably just half the registered voters bothering to participate — it’s time for another reminder that American democracy is no guarantee. Of course, it’s not just about voting — citizens must understand the issues. A life-long civics education is the foundation, and in significant ways, we are failing at that, too. But we could also make our elections a lot less annoying. In Canada, they limit their national campaigns to three weeks. That sounds pretty nice. Finally, technological innovations are worth a look. If we could work out the kinks and vote from a smartphone — you know, in between fevered rounds of Candy Crush and chuckling over Katy Perry’s latest Tweet — we could reach people where they live. Ben Franklin famously qualified the Continental Congress’s gift of a republic by adding, “if you can keep it.” Well, can we? 

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COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

Readers react to “Bullets and Bookbags” (10/31): Will arming adults in schools make students safer? JOHN LEMON: No, but they will probably be much more polite. JESSE ACOSTA: Have you ever tried putting out a fire with more fire?

JACK OHMAN CARTOON

GUEST EDITORIAL

On Human Ground A clash of cultures out in the North Cascade wilderness BY BRENDAN BUZZARD

“U REALLY,

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK. rivercityred. blogspot.com

8 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

ser wars.” That’s what I’ve heard them called before, and every season a different battle seems to erupt: snowmobilers vs. backcountry skiers, hikers vs. mountain bikers, cattle grazers vs. cattle haters. Yes, the lines are stark. Look at them, lined up there at the trailhead: Subaru station wagons on one side, RVs and American-made pickups on the other; Patagonia on this end, Cabela’s on that end. Some call it democratic, these different views of nature, the varied ways of using public land. But let’s not be so warm and fuzzy about it. This is a clash of civilizations. That’s how I feel each autumn during hunting season, when I park at a trailhead on the outer edge of the Pasayten Wilderness in the North Cascades. Normally I try to get here early, a day or two before the opening day, to slip into the wilderness before other hunters arrive. This season, though, I am late, and when I arrive at the end of the dirt road, trucks already crowd the parking area. I pull up next to one of them, its tailgate covered in campaign stickers advertising politics I do not share. As I step out of the car, I am met with hostile glances. Am I imagining it? A group of men is gathered near a large white tent that serves as a base for the packing company that will take them into the wilderness. Boots and wool pants, knives and olive-drab canteens; they stand around checking their rifles. Click-click. One of them wears a pistol on his hip. Ignore them, I tell myself, as I unload my pack and put

on my hiking sandals, but I feel the stares keep coming. Two Seattle-looking backpackers walk by, smiling. I smile back, and watch their faces change as I pull my rifle out of the car, shattering their hopeful urban connection in this rural, wild land. Days later, I am hunting the grassy meadows along a creek bed, creeping over grass and rock, my feet wet with morning dew. On a patch of dirt, I find boot prints, the first fresh ones I have seen in a couple of days, and over a rise on the bank of the stream I see the figure of a man, white-bearded, orange-clad. We recognize each other. It’s them, I tell myself. But I walk over, whispering something apologetic, as though I’m on someone else’s ground. He answers, uneasily at first, and gradually our whispers gain strength, turn to words. We talk about the deer, about the temperature — how it would be hard to keep meat in this heat; we talk about fresh bear tracks, about the geography of trails, about the creek and whether it might be a good place to fish. We linger briefly in the morning sun, and before I pick up my rifle and move off up the valley, we reach out and shake hands, as though in this place we are allowed, for a moment, to transcend the façade, to be human first.  Brendan Buzzard writes from Lost River, tucked up against the mountains of Washington’s North Cascades. A version of this essay first appeared in High Country News.

JAKOB ZETWICK: For those that are so against having a few armed personnel in schools, I am all ears when it comes to hearing about other alternatives to protect our kids. It’s not putting out a fire with fire, it’s fighting fire with fire (which actually happens). It’s called a fire line. STEVE BATEMAN: Give the teachers the proper training, and why not? How would it be any different than having several armed officers on duty? LARRY CEBULA: How about banning all guns not used for hunting? It works in England, where there are only a handful of gun deaths each year. ZACH FRIESEN: Yeah that’s what I want, my kids going to school with a bunch of gun-toting idiots because of the off chance their school will be the one out of thousands that something will happen. MAUREEN PHILLIP JONES: So, just wondering... What happens when a teacher who is not mentally stable reaches the limits of his or her patience in a classroom full of unruly students? We all have had “that” teacher who was verbally or physically abusive in the classroom. Is it really a great idea to arm them? Most teachers do not come close to fitting this description, but there are some who should not be teaching at all. JASON KEEDY: I personally do not want impressionable children believing that an armed gunman on every corner will equal their safety. Schools should not be militarized zones. MAVERIK BURSCH: I don’t necessarily agree with more police at schools, but allowing responsible teachers and faculty to conceal carry would be a very good investment. 

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 9

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COMMENT | SATIRE

Josh the Intern Saves American Health Care BY ANDY BOROWITZ

S

aying that “the American people are fed up with a disastrous website that doesn’t work and never will,” House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Virginia) and a phalanx of congressional Republicans this week unveiled their own healthcare website, EmergencyRoom.gov. “At EmergencyRoom.gov, every American can access the one triedand-true health-care system that has worked in this country for decades,” he said. While HealthCare.gov has frustrated many users with its design, Rep. Cantor said that at EmergencyRoom.gov, “Health care is just three easy steps away. One: enter your Zip code. Two: see the list of emergency rooms. Three: get to the nearest one before you die.” Cantor wasted no time touting the cost savings of EmergencyRoom. gov, comparing it favorably with the notoriously expensive Obamacare

site: “Unlike HealthCare.gov, which private contractors built at a cost running into the hundreds of millions, EmergencyRoom.gov was built for $900 by my intern Josh.” And in contrast with HealthCare. gov’s maze of forms, links, and phone numbers, he said, “EmergencyRoom.gov has just one phone number: 9-1-1.” In what may be the strongest selling point for the new site, Cantor said that the wait time on EmergencyRoom.gov is “virtually nonexistent,” not counting the 12 to 36 hours spent in the actual emergency room. n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | JOBS

Missing Persons W BY JIM HIGHTOWER

all Street analysts, lobbyists and groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce form a cheering squad for maintaining the status quo of America’s do-nothing jobs policy. “Hooray!” they shout to our lawmakers. “The unemployment rate is improving!” Waving fistfuls of cash and doing statistical backflips, the pep squad instructs Congress to forget a national jobs program, raising the minimum wage, extending unemployment benefits, etc. “Push ‘em back! Push ‘em back!” they yell. Well, yes, the jobless rate has fallen to 7.2 percent, but don’t get giddy. In December 2007, when Wall Street’s greed began to crash our economy, the unemployment rate was only about 5 percent, the average length of being unemployed was half of today’s, and far fewer people were forced into parttime work or had to find multiple jobs to make ends meet. And family income was much higher back then. But there’s an even more telling statistic that we rarely hear about: The employment/population ratio. It tells us the number of working-

age adults who are “in the workforce,” meaning they’re employed at least part-time or are looking for jobs. This number has plummeted by five million people since the crash. They’re not working, and they’re not counted as unemployed. That’s five million American workers who have just disappeared. If we added these “missing workers,” as they’ve been dubbed, to the number of unemployed and underemployed Americans, no one could cheer Washington’s do-nothing jobs policy. We need a national “milk carton” campaign, spreading the photos and names of each of these five million missing workers so widely that even Congress will finally recognize it must do something to boost jobs and wages in our country. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 11

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election 2013

Candace Mumm, backed by Council President Ben Stuckart, celebrates Tuesday night.

tipping point

The Spokane City Council tips a little to the left, Washington state shoots down GMO labeling and, as of press time, the levy to buy land around Fairchild was failing spokane city council

Even in a non-presidential year and in a technically nonpartisan race, Tuesday’s election sent a clear message about the city’s current political leanings. With wins for Candace Mumm and Jon Snyder, the Spokane City Council will shift from a 4-3 conservative majority to a union-backed liberal one. In the contentious bid to fill conservative Nancy McLaughlin’s seat representing northwest Spokane, Mumm led conservative Michael Cannon 54-45 percent as of press time. The race drew more than $150,000 in campaign contributions and PAC-funded attack ads on TV and in the mail. In the end, money won the day for Mumm who out-fundraised Cannon by $25,000. “The voters I talked to knew I’m a get-’er-done girl, and that’s what they wanted,” Mumm said among a group of supporters sipping red wine at the Kendall Yards neighborhood clubhouse

Tuesday night. “They didn’t like all the politics.” The ideological divide was clear as Cannon — who sat on Mayor David Condon’s transition team and chairs the city’s Housing and Human Services Board — aligned almost entirely with Condon. Meanwhile, Mumm stood behind liberal Council President Ben Stuckart. The candidates clashed on whether the city should implement a 1 percent property tax increase in the 2014 budget, whether the council should strengthen the city’s sit-lie law and whether the mayor’s recent moves to increase the number of exempt city positions (in which employees are appointed rather than hired through civil service) were beneficial or dangerous. Cannon saw support from Condon, conservative councilmen Steve Salvatori and Mike Allen and a PAC funded primarily by local construction firms, homebuilder groups and City Administrator

sarah wurtz photo

Theresa Sanders. Prominent local liberals like Rich Cowan, state Sen. Andy Billig and Stuckart lined up behind Mumm, a former TV news reporter and Plan Commission member who worked on Mary Verner’s re-election campaign against Condon. Drawing conservative ire, most of her big contributions came from local and state unions, including firefighters, health care workers and county and city employees. Incumbent Councilman Jon Snyder, a transportation-focused member of the council’s current liberal minority, held his seat representing the South Hill, Peaceful Valley and Browne’s Addition against a challenge from Republican and former state Rep. John Ahern. While their race never got as testy as the other, Snyder criticized Ahern for being short on specifics and energy. Ahern challenged Snyder on whether he’d done enough to make the city business-friendly, promising he’d look to loosen regulations. Snyder says he was confident he’d hold onto his seat Tuesday, but was “thrilled” with the nearly 30 percent margin by which he won. Ahern, meanwhile, warned of the impact union-supported victories could have on the city. “I don’t want to see Spokane wind up like Detroit did,” Ahern told the Inlander after results were announced. “The unions that ran Detroit pretty much over-demanded and got too much. That’s why Detroit went bankrupt. Spokane could be on the same road. You get pretty much what you ask for.” — HEIDI GROOVER ...continued on next page

november 7, 2013 INLANDER 13

news | ELECTION 2013

Michael Cannon and fiancé Jodey Miller check early results Tuesday night at their home surrounded by supporters.

Young Kwak photo

“tipping point,” continued...

WASHINGTON STATE INITIATIVES

ALTHOUGH SHE HAD PLACED LOTS OF ORDERS, JAN, THE TOY LADY, IS AMAZED AT THE LARGE QUANTITY OF BOXES OF TOYS BEING DELIVERED TO HER STORE:

! It’s Duh cket o r not nce! e i c s

Oh! I guess it is!

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS 14 INLANDER november 7, 2013

After $27 million and seven months of campaigning, it appears Washington won’t become the first state in the country to mandate labeling of genetically engineered foods after all. Early returns on Tuesday night showed Initiative 522 was failing statewide 45 percent to 55 percent. Voters had rejected I-522 in all but three counties — Jefferson, King and Whatcom. In Spokane, 62 percent voted against the measure. Labeling supporters, however, were cautiously optimistic about their initiative’s chances. “It is really too close to call. We have hundreds of thousands of votes left to be counted in King County alone,” says Elizabeth Larter, a spokeswoman for the Yes on 522 campaign. No on 522 raised $22 million — more money than any other initiative campaign in Washington state history — to defeat the measure, thanks to multimillion-dollar donations from out-of-state biotech giants like Monsanto and DuPont Pioneer, and food-industry stalwarts from the Grocery Manufacturers Association. After an influx of anti-labeling campaign ads hit the airwaves, an October poll showed that support for I-522 had dropped 20 points from the previous month to 46 percent. Opposition on the other hand climbed. The Yes on 522 camp, meanwhile, raised just under $8 million. Although thousands of individual donors from Washington state contributed to the pro-labeling camp, the majority of its financial support came from out-of-state organic and natural product companies, such as California-based Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, which dedicated $1.7 million to the effort. In California, voters rejected a similar ballot measure last year. There, labeling opponents raised five times as much as supporters. “They took a tip directly from Vladimir Lenin — that a lie told often enough becomes the truth, and they used $20 million to tell those lies,” says Ron Cully, a Spokane volunteer for the Yes side. “I don’t think this war is over by any stretch of the imagination.” On Tuesday, Washingtonians also handily rejected Tim Eyman’s “initiative on initiatives,” I-517, with 60 percent of the vote. The measure would have sent any

state or local initiative with enough signatures to the ballot and make “interfering with signature gathering” illegal. Opponents argued that I-517 would infringe on the free speech rights of citizens who voice opposition to signature gatherers and the private property rights of business owners. — DEANNA PAN

Spokane County Proposition 1

Greater Spokane Inc. and the Spokane County Commissioners certainly didn’t undersell their argument for voting for Proposition 1: They tied the very future of Fairchild Air Force Base to the vote, implying economic calamity if taxes weren’t raised to buy a series of mobile home parks located in the Fairchild crash zone. There was no question that the properties have for decades been in a designated crash zone — and encroached on base operations — and that concern persuaded the Airway Heights mayor and most the Spokane City Council to support removing the homes. But the argument didn’t work on the tax-averse Spokane Valley Council nor on Spokane County as a whole. Tuesday night, voters were rejecting Prop. 1 51 percent to 49 percent. As he waits for final tallies, County Commissioner Al French turns his eye to the 4 percent who turned in ballots, but didn’t take a stance on the issue. Meanwhile, local nonprofits who planned to help relocate the current residents in the parks could have been a key ally of the county, but expressed deep concerns about the project. While Habitat for Humanity’s executive director supported the initiative, John Fisher, with Community Frameworks, remained neutral: “Our stance has always been that the timing was off, that new housing needed to be built before residents were placed.” French worries Fairchild remains in jeopardy: “It means the community is exposed when we go into the next round of [base closures]. I’ve got to tell you I’m very nervous,” French says, adding that there’s no way the state or county can afford to buy the properties and relocate the residents. “There’s no other strategy we’re aware of today,” French says. “If there had been other resources we could have tapped, we would have done it.” — DANIEL WALTERS

Election Scorecard All results current as of 10 pm, Tuesday, Nov. 5. Visit Inlander.com for the latest news.

Washington city of spokane

CITY COUNCIL, District 2

CITY COUNCIL, Position 4

CITY COUNCIL, District 3

Spokane County

Spokane School Board

(levy to buy mobile home parks around Fairchild): YES: 49% (38,354) NO: 51% (39,915)

John Ahern: 35%, 4,584 Jon Snyder: 64%, 8,312

Michael Cannon: 45%, 5,314 Candace Mumm: 54%, 6,384 Bob Douthitt: 54%, 15,880 Sally Fullmer: 45%, 13,153

spokane valley

Chuck Hafner: 65%, 7,128 Donald (Don) Morgan Jr.: 34%, 3,771

proposition 1

STate InitiativeS

CITY COUNCIL, Position 1

Initiative 522 (GMO labeling): YES: 45% NO: 55%

CITY COUNCIL, Position 4

517 (petition and initiative rules): YES: 40% NO: 60%

Rod Higgins: 50%, 5,842 Linda J. Thompson: 49%, 5,699 Ed Pace: 49%, 5,790 Gary Schimmels: 49%, 5,793

For Spokane County election results, spokanecounty.org/elections/results.aspx. For Washington results, sos.wa.gov/elections/.

idaho coeur d’alene

post falls

Joseph Kunka: 2%, 102 Mary Souza: 42%, 2,558 Steve Widmyer: 57%, 3,458

Ron Jacobson: 61%, 711 Kerri Thoreson: 39%, 446

mayor

mayor

For Kootenai County election results, kcgov.us/elections/results/.

Coeur d’Alene Mayor

This year, the city of Coeur d’Alene was deeply divided over which mayoral candidate could better fix the city’s divisions. Downtown business owner Steve Widmyer and dark-horse candidate Joe Kunka argued that voting for long-time urban renewal critic and recall cheerleader Mary Souza would only pick at the scabs left after the McEuen Field fight. But Souza countered that healing Coeur d’Alene depended on voting for her, a candidate who champions public votes. On each side, PACs lined up. The Kootenai County Reagan Republicans championed Souza, and non-partisan Balance North Idaho threw their lot in with Widmyer. As the first vote totals trickled in, Souza was losing by 14 percentage points to Widmyer. The city council choices pushed by Souza supporters — Chris Fillios, Noel Adam and Sharon Hebert — were also losing. In the latter days of the campaign, the groups supporting Souza began focusing less on criticizing Widmyer or Kunka, and more on firing salvos at the Coeur d’Alene Press. And a political cartoon Send comments to editor@inlander.com. published on Souza’s site portrays a scraggly-haired ghoul labeled “THE PRESS,” warning “Mary might be mayor! Run for your lives! BE VERY AFRAID.” In fact, North Idaho Pachyderm Club broke from tradition and announced they would not allow Press editor Mike Patrick to speak in front of the club about the results of the elections because the paper “has been so lopsided in favor of the Widmyer slate, it is really reprehensible and disgusting.” Widmyer, for his part, tried mostly to stay out of the fray. For a few moments, an independent Souza-bashing website called “Unfit For Mayor” popped up, but Widmyer says that, even though he didn’t have anything to do with the site, he made the suggestion that it be taken down. And it was. “I think we tried to always take the high road in the campaign and we achieved that,” Widmyer says. — DANIEL WALTERS

letters

november 7, 2013 INLANDER 15

NEWS | DIGEST

PHOTO EYE DESTINATION: D.C.

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

After striking a plea deal with prosecutors, 18-year-old Avondre Graham was sentenced to 10 years in prison for the murder of Sharlotte McGill, who was stabbed while walking her dog along the Spokane River last year.

2.

In a significant week for public safety, the city released a tentative contract agreement with the Spokane Police Guild, and the Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Commission announced its list of 43 recommendations for making regional law enforcement agencies and courts more effective. (See pages 18 and 19.)

3.

Voters across the state cast ballots in Tuesday’s election, electing new leaders and weighing in on GMO labeling. (Local results on page 13.)

4.

A coroner’s report reveals the June death of a 21-year-old man at the Gorge during the electronic music festival Paradiso was related to meth, not MDMA, or molly, as originally suspected.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

A part of the Inland Northwest is going to the other Washington. Last week, workers loaded an 88-foot Engelmann Spruce from the Colville National Forest onto a truck heading to D.C., where it will be displayed as the Capitol Christmas Tree.

5.

A man opened fire at Los Angeles International Airport Friday, killing one TSA officer, the first fatality in the agency’s history.

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

DIGITS

23

Weeks that 17-year-old Patrick Cloud will serve in juvenile detention for an assault outside the Satellite Diner this summer, which was caught on camera by KXLY

16 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

4

Armed robberies in Kootenai County since Oct. 26, including the latest at a KFC restaurant in Hayden last week.

9.4 percent Rate increase Avista natural gas customers will pay this winter.

FOLLOW US: Be sure you don’t miss any of our events, giveaways or exclusive online content; follow us at Facebook.com/theInlander or Twitter. com/theInlander.

NEWS | BRIEFS

Two weeks ago, exchange officials in Washington state discovered that 8,000 people received incorrect tax credit amounts due to a “system error” affecting the staterun exchange, Washington Healthplanfinder. So far, more than 55,000 Washington residents have enrolled in health insurance through the state exchange since Oct. 1. — DEANNA PAN

Free Money The future of the Ben Burr Trail and Riverfront Park; plus, who’s getting a tax subsidy? Roadblocks

With nearly $2 million in federal grant money waiting to be spent, city engineers and neighborhood activists are clashing over a trail renovation project in East Central. The Ben Burr Trail, built on a historic railroad line between Liberty Park and Underhill Park, is currently a narrow, unpaved trail used mostly by pedestrians. In hopes of improving it as a connection between the South Hill and the Centennial Trail, the city has secured $1.7 million in federal grants and local tax dollars. But the federal grants come with requirements that the trail be paved and 10 to 12 feet wide with shoulders so it’s accessible for cyclists and Americans With Disabilities Act-compliant. Not everyone is on board. “It would basically be putting another freeway through the neighborhood, only it’s a freeway for bicycles,” says Jerry Numbers, chair of the East Central Neighborhood Council. “It just hit us blindsided.” But Jan Quintrall, director of Business and Developer Services at the city, says her department has worked with the neighborhood for five years on planning for the project and thought everyone was on the same page. Now, she says, the department will go back to grant funders and see if they can get an exception to build portions of

the trail narrower than 10 feet and meet with “benefited neighborhoods” like those on the South Hill to get more — HEIDI GROOVER input.

You get a subsidy!

About 130,000 people in Idaho and 272,000 people in Washington are eligible for TAX SUBSIDIES to help pay for private insurance plans purchased through the new health insurance exchanges, according to a recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation Of the 29 million people who are potential customers for the exchanges, including those who are uninsured and those who buy non-group coverage, the study found that 17 million people nationally — almost 60 percent of them — can apply for tax credits under the Affordable Care Act. A key component of President Obama’s signature health reform law, the federal tax subsidies are designed to help low- and moderate-income people reduce the costs of their premiums. To qualify, people must earn between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level ($11,490-$45,960 for an individual; $23,550-$94,200 for a family of four).

On the Riverfront

In Coeur d’Alene, the updating of an iconic park spurred community outrage, sparked a recall effort and defined multiple elections. Now Spokane is preparing to update its own iconic park. A committee, including Inlander Publisher Ted McGregor, has spent months discussing plans to revamp Riverfront Park. In particular, the committee has been focusing on Havermale Island, where old, unprofitable rides, a sparsely attended IMAX theater and a seasonal ice-skating rink reside underneath a webbed pavilion. “Havermale Island has been a tough one, because we’ve felt like the park has struggled to do year-round attractions on the island,” McGregor says. He says the committee has considered turning the pavilion into a flexible seasonal event center that could hold concerts, plays, award ceremonies and host Hoopfest’s center court. The committee has suggested moving the skating rink and aging rides away from the pavilion, adding an amphitheater and creating a new gateway off Washington Street. They’ve looked at possibly installing a skatepark, a new iconic ride and a climbing gym. But the committee is also considering more controversial recommendations, like moving the carrousel or shutting down the IMAX permanently. While the committee has discussed floating a bond, it’s also looking at other funding options, like asking voters for permission to sell excess park properties. — DANIEL WALTERS

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NEWS | POLICE

Far From Over The city’s tentative agreement with the police guild is now public, and it’s only escalating the fight over Spokane’s police ombudsman Council President Ben Stuckart: “The city did a horrible job negotiating.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

BY HEIDI GROOVER

A

fter nearly two years of negotiations, made the agreement, the City is asking for things word came from City Hall last week that that the City had removed from the table to get a tentative agreement had been reached the TA done.” between the Spokane Police Guild and Mayor Among a list of concerns, McClure writes David Condon’s bargaining team. that the role of the ombudsman commission is “TENTATIVE POLICE CONTRACT being expanded beyond what the parties agreed STRENGTHENS OVERSIGHT,” announced a to in negotiations and that the guild opposes city press release Friday. granting the ombudsman “non-disciplinary” Whether oversight has actually been investigative authority. Because state law requires strengthened is now a matter of debate. employers to bargain for things that affect disci“The city did a horrible job negotiating the pline of employees, the guild has argued that any TA [tentative agreement],” says Council President expansion in powers for the ombudsman must be Ben Stuckart. “The TA alone … just doesn’t bargained for in contract negotiations. meet what the voters wanted, what everybody’s For its part, the city made the same argument been working toward for five goddamn years. … last month when Councilman Steve Salvatori inIf we approve that agreement, we’re done for.” troduced an ordinance that would have empowCondon, who had campaigned on expanded ered the ombudsman outside of the bargaining authority for Spokane’s police ombudsman, said process. The city had hired a Seattle-based law Friday that the agreement was a step in the right firm, which concluded that investigative powers direction. The agreement states that both sides for the ombudsman must be negotiated and not believe it meets the requirements of Proposition done through ordinance to avoid an unfair labor 1, which voters overwhelmingly passed earlier practice complaint from the guild. this year to make the ombudsman “totally inde“Even if it’s something they had to negotipendent” according to the City Charter. ate for, why didn’t they?” asks Rick Eichstaedt, But in the proposed police contract, the executive director of the Center for Justice. ombudsman would still lack authority to open City spokesman Brian Coddington says the his own investigations. In fact, language changes confidentiality agreement that kept the negotiafrom the previous contract are few. As under tions secret limits the administration’s ability to the current contract, the ombudsman would be disclose what was or wasn’t “on the table” during limited to observing and asking questions during negotiations. But he and the mayor say the agreeinternal affairs investigations. In one subment’s creation of a new commission stantial change, the agreement establishes appointed by the city council and a commission to have the final say in mayor significantly increases indepenSend comments to cases where the ombudsman and police dence. editor@inlander.com. chief disagree on whether an internal af“It’s our position that we have fairs investigation was satisfactory. fulfilled the City Charter with the In light of what wasn’t included in the agreeTA,” Coddington says. ment, the mayor and councilmembers touted a Ombudsman Tim Burns says the ability to forthcoming ordinance intended to flesh out the complete investigations outside the department is powers of the ombudsman and the commission critical to community perception and trust. Burns and fill in any gaps. says he interprets the language added to the charBut now hopes for that supplemental orditer by Proposition 1 to mean the authority for his nance appear to be losing ground. office to be able to open its own investigations, “There are issues raised in the Ordinance and he’s still “cautiously optimistic” the city will that appear to me to fall under the category of get there somehow. proposals that the City had on the table but that “I think the community has made really clear were not included in the TA,” guild lawyer Hillthere are some things you can’t compromise on,” ary McClure wrote in an email to an assistant Burns says. “I would suggest independent investicity attorney last week. “As a result we are in the gative authority is one of those things.” n difficult position that it feels like as soon as we heidig@inlander.com

letters

18 INLANDER november 7, 2013

NEWS | JUSTICE

Thinking Big

Criminal Justice Commission charts five-year road map to reshape local law enforcement By Jacob Jones

A

yearlong examination of countywide law enforcement, court and jail services by the Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Commission has resulted in an ambitious five-year reform plan to improve efficiencies, cut incarceration costs and expand alternative justice programs. The commission, created in November of 2012, released a draft report last week of more than 40 proposed recommendations, ranging from the consolidation of redundant services to the eventual construction of a Community Corrections Center for directing defendants into specialized courts, social services and drug treatment. “It’s going to take a great deal of political will” to implement, says retired Judge James Murphy, who chaired the three-person commission. “It was a pretty ambitious project.” The commission set out a timeline to monitor progress over the next five years. The first steps recommend a permanent Regional Justice Commission along with a Law & Justice Coordinating Committee, then hiring a criminal justice administrator to oversee smaller work groups and continuing reforms. Murphy says he hopes to see those initial groups move the justice system toward offender-based programs that manage defendants according to their risks or needs. Committees would also take charge of consolidating services, upgrading technology and breaking down obsolete barriers between departments. “It has become clear to us that the regional criminal justice system is maladapted for current and future needs,” the report states. “As it exists, it is stove-piped and inefficient. … There is a lack of trust, no unified leadership, duplicated services between and among jurisdictions across the system, and it unnecessarily costs the city and county taxpayers thousands of extra dollars each day.” From there, the commission would like to see more electronic home monitoring or alternative sentencing. They also recommend expanding therapeutic courts and diversion programs, eventually establishing a 24-hour corrections clearinghouse for “triaging” defendants into their appropriate programs. “There are some functions that are going to take some time,” Murphy says. “Those are some big things.” Many of the commission’s recommendations closely reflect ideas and initiatives championed by the Smart Justice Spokane campaign. Mary Lou Johnson, a volunteer advocate with the campaign, says the commission has presented a strong and compelling argument for reform. “We think it’s really a landmark report,” she says. “They have some really clear ideas.” Breean Beggs, a local attorney and justice advocate, says the new report contains an unvarnished assessment of the complicated problems plaguing the Spokane justice system. “They told the truth of what the current situation is and what needs to happen,” Beggs says. “The public really got what they deserve … a straight answer.” Beggs says the preliminary recommendations read almost like a checklist of Smart Justice proposals. As proud as he is of the final product, Murphy says city and county officials will need to uphold their commitment to changing how the justice system “does business.” “The [commission] and community have been promised that this report will not be ‘put on the shelf,’” the report states, “and it is our hope that the city and county will follow through on this promise to carry out the recommended reforms.” n Read the full report at: http://www.spokanecounty.org/srcjc/.

november 7, 2013 INLANDER 19

The William D. Ruckelshaus Center presents

news | social services

Washington State Governance Series Hear from local legislators, past and present, on how to improve our state legislative process.

Featuring: Rep. Susan Fagan (R-District 9)

Rep. Marcus Riccelli (D-District 3)

Brittny Eidsvoog and her children

Down to the Dollar

• Sen. John Smith (R-District 7) • Rep. Timm Ormsby (D-District 3) • Former Rep. Don Cox (R) • Former Rep. Jeff Gombosky (D) • Former Rep. David Buri (R)

More than 1.1 million people in Washington state lost a portion of their food assistance benefits this month; here’s one family’s story by deanna pan

Hosted By Secretary of State

B

Kim Wyman & David Schumacher

of the Office of the Governor

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sponsored by: The WSU Division of Governmental Studies & Services

rittny Eidsvoog’s most recent receipt from Walmart stretches two feet and 148 items long. Her groceries — about $400 worth — typically don’t last until the 10th of the following month, when her food stamps kick in. So she and her two kids will start eating buttered noodles, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, and Malt-OMeal’s Blueberry Toasters by the bowlful. She bought four supersize bags of cereal last month ($4.98 each) plus three gallons of 2-percent milk ($2.68 each). She stashes the extra jugs in the freezer with the popsicles (on sale for 99¢) and corn dogs ($5.88) in her bedroom beneath an old stereo set. “You can always eat cereal for dinner if you got milk and there’s nothing else,” she says. “It’s not nutritious and it’s by all means not a complete meal, but it gets them to bed without being hungry.” Eidsvoog, 40, strains to speak above a whisper. Her voice is hoarse from a screaming match that morning with her son’s grandmother

– Felonies & Misdemeanors – – Traffic Violations – – Restoration of Gun Rights – – Expungements of Records – 225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

902 North Monroe, Spokane, WA 99201

20 INLANDER november 7, 2013

sarah wurtz photo

(his father’s mother). There’s too much tension between them, and this trailer’s too small. Eidsvoog’s all alone out here in Deer Park, in her clapboard mobile home, where the wind whistles through busted windows and the water, she suspects, isn’t safe to drink. Food stamps are her only source of income. Now she’s bracing herself for another cut. Another thing she’ll have to do without. “Every two dollars count,” she says. In Washington state, more than 1.1 million low-income residents are scheduled to lose a portion of their food assistance benefits this month after a small boost to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) under the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act expired. For a household of three, the maximum monthly benefit dropped from $526 to $497. “It doesn’t seem like a lot,” says John Camp, food assistance program administrator for Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services. “But for these households, it makes a big difference.”

B

efore Eidsvoog moved to Deer Park three years ago from Palisades with her two children, Dagan and Aleya, ages 4 and 8, and Dagan’s dad, she had fresh fruits and vegetables all the time. She worked for her money — driving a tractor for cherry pickers, housekeeping and as an administrative assistant. Now she sweeps pine needles, cleans and helps care for her cancerstricken landlady in exchange for rent and utilities. There was a time when Eidsvoog was getting $1,000 in cash each month through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and Social Security, after Aleya was diagnosed with leukemia as a baby. But two years ago, her TANF benefits expired, and with her daughter’s cancer — thankfully — in remission, she no longer receives a Social Security check. Last year, her car was repossessed after she took out a highinterest title loan to pay a $300 utilities bill. Bus lines don’t run through Deer Park. She’s stuck. So once a month, Eidsvoog gets a ride into Spokane, where she tries to spend her entire monthly benefit because she doesn’t know when she’ll have another chance to go to a grocery store. Eidsvoog doesn’t need a list when she goes shopping. She buys the same things month after month. Whatever she can’t buy with her EBT card, her landlady supplies. That how’s her cellphone is paid for. That’s how she pays for toilet paper, dish soap and cat food. She goes without Tylenol, aspirin and lotion. New back-to-school clothes and Christmas presents, too. Last year, she recycled some of Dagan and Aleya’s old toys that had been in storage for two years, praying to God they didn’t remember they were theirs from before.

E

idsvoog’s pantry is stocked: Bumble Bee tuna, Kraft macaroni and cheese, chickenflavored ramen, refried beans, rice and spaghetti. She almost always buys off-brand, with the exception of her creamer: French vanilla CoffeeMate. It’s expensive — $5.26 for a big bottle at Walmart, $7 at Yoke’s — but she makes it last. “That’s my thing in my life,” she says. “It’s what makes my days doable.” Eidsvoog is self-conscious about her home. There are holes in the walls and her pantry from slammed elbows and fists. The window by the box fan is splintered like broken ice. She told her landlady a bird crashed into it. The bathroom door features a head-sized gash the shape of a scar. “This was one of the you’re-lucky-it-wasn’t-yourface-bitch,” she says. The doorknob is crooked from desperate twisting. Tape can hold some

things together. Her living room is all shades of gray, brown and beige. This is where Eidsvoog sleeps, next to the old wood-burning stove, because her room isn’t insulated. Some nights, she wakes up and sees Dagan’s dad standing over her. He bailed two years ago. He was addicted to heroin and there were other women. He gets into the trailer by reaching through a small window, covered only by foil and bubble wrap, and unlocking the door. This is where he slammed his body against her back, threatened to break it before she kicked out a window in a panic. Where she sucked dirt and dust from the carpet fibers trying to breathe when he pinned her to the floor. He’s pulled a gun and put it to her head. Slugged her in the face. Her black eye looked like a lens from Jackie Onassis’ sunglasses. This is is where he tells her, “You don’t know how close I was to killing you.” Eidsvoog doesn’t have any family out here. Her mother died of cancer three years ago. No one stops by or calls to say, “You’re alright” or “I love you” or “You’re OK.” She wonders: If he ever killed her, would anyone know? “We don’t have anybody,” she says. “There’s nobody I can call for help.”

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wo years ago, Eidsvoog was charged with stealing $16 worth of food from Walmart. A friend stuffed deli meat, cheese and Kool-Aid in her purse; now she owes Walmart $400 in legal fines. “There was no food to feed my kids,” she says. “All I had was a can of corn. What are you supposed to do?” Eidsvoog is a felon. Even if she had a car to drop her kids off at daycare, apply for jobs and drive to work, employment would be hard to come by. Sixteen years ago, she and an old boyfriend were caught selling drugs. Eidsvoog did 36 months in prison and three months in a drug treatment program. “It is what it is… I’m still paying for it,” she says. “I want a job so blistering bad I can’t see straight.” She sometimes wonders if her kids would have a better shot at life if she gave them up. She could never do that, but at the same time, she never imagined they’d be living like this. She had dreams, but she can’t talk about them. It’s too real. “God doesn’t give you anything you can’t handle,” she says. “Maybe I’ll go get a vacation for the rest of us and life will just be breezy cheesy here on out. I don’t know. I don’t want to do this until I die. I don’t.”  deannap@inlander.com

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 21

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VISUAL ARTS

Out of the Ordinary Gelah Penn uses unconventional materials to make her mark BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

W

hile sports seem easily digested by mainstream audiences — hit, throw, shoot, score — the visual arts often benefit from a little explanation. One doesn’t have to know the history of basketball, for example, to appreciate the satisfying swish of a deep three-pointer. The work of contemporary artists, on the other hand? That’s what makes the Visiting Artist Lecture Series such a gem. Every year, late fall to early spring, VALS presents three artists whose work provides plenty to chew on, such as artist Gelah Penn, first up in the series held at Spokane Falls Community College, Eastern Washington University and the MAC. “I’m most comfortable working in the interstices of drawing, painting and sculpture,” said Penn in an email interview from her New York City home. Working with synthetic materials like netting, fishing line, and plastic tubing, Penn employs conventional artists’ practices in unconventional ways. “I generally begin with a site visit or, if necessary, photographs of the space. Then I ...continued on next page

Gelah Penn’s “Where the Sildewalk Ends” (above ) and “The Big Heat” (below).

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 23

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24 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS “OUT OF THE ORDINARY,” CONTINUED... do very rudimentary, ruminative sketches,” she says. She is especially drawn to such “architectural curve balls” as columns, arches, and ductwork, responding to spatial challenges with line, shape, and sometimes color as she creates site-specific installations that climb up walls, wrap around corners, and tumble down from ceilings. “I plan the areas where I want a concentration of ‘marks,’ but I don’t like to work things out in too much detail,” she says. “I prefer to do much of the decision-making on site. Then I bring all my materials to the space in giant Ziploc bags. The process is somewhat like taking one’s studio practice out into the world, and in that way, there’s a risky, performative aspect to it.” The result is work that embodies both two-dimensional and three-dimensional qualities, changing with the viewer’s vantage point as light and shadow and material play off each other. It’s reminiscent of a photography technique called painting with light, where the aperture is deliberately left open to capture the essence of the light source — fire, a moving glowstick, a flashlight — as it moves through the frame. That is the feeling of her work: a shadow of its former self, a meditation on something already beyond our frame of reference. The connection to photography, at least to film, is apropos. Many of her titles — pieces like “Niagara,” “Shadow of a Doubt,” “Reckless Moment” — are influenced by film noir and echo the stark, graphic quality of 1940s and ’50s-era movies. Penn eschews color, except where it might provide visual punch, such as the red exclamations in “The Big Red One” and more recent inclusions of painted plastic tarps in her work to “provide an ambiguous, provocative undercurrent.” It’s something you might ask her to explain further at any of the VALS three presentation locations.  Gelah Penn • Wed, Nov. 13, at 11:30 am • SFCC sn-w’ey’-mn Building, Room 110 • 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. • Wed, Nov. 13 at 6:30 pm • The MAC • 2316 W. First Ave. • Thu, Nov. 14 at noon • EWU Art Auditorium • 526 5th St., Cheney • Free • sfccfinearts.org • 533-3746

CULTURE | DIGEST

TV MASTERS OF SEX S

howtime’s Dexter has finally wrapped, no one’s exactly sure what harebrained plotline Homeland is going to follow next and Shameless continues to get more depressing, so it was important that the premium cable channel came up with a new show this fall to reel in TV nerds (and critics) once again. They looked to the wildly successful Mad Men on AMC for guidance. But while Masters of Sex is a period piece brimming with all of the prim hairdos and modern furniture of the 1950s, it’s not like Mad Men at all — there’s nowhere near as much drinking and smoking, and it’s set a decade earlier. Sex? There’s plenty. The show follows the real-life story of decorated OB/ GYN William Masters and his assistant Virginia Johnson, who at Washington University in St. Louis took the scientific study of human sexuality to new heights. Masters of Sex has the subject matter every cable network craves, along with a title suitable for late night programming. Michael Sheen (Midnight in Paris, 30 Rock) and Lizzy Caplan (Party Down) anchor the show with excellent portrayals. Without serious, talented actors, it easily could be misconstrued as smut dressed in scientific clothing. Before Masters can get financing for his project, he sets up shop at a local brothel, watching sex from a peephole, taking notes. As the study progresses, masturbation is thoroughly examined by taking heart rates and body

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Masters of Sex takes on the taboos of the 1950s. part measurements. On the sidelines, Masters’ wife is having trouble conceiving and Johnson explores the balance between work, male companionship and motherhood. We know Masters and Johnson are going to get together. But before the sexual explorers can fully connect, there must be a lot of built-up tension between them, and wives and ex-lovers hurt along the way. Masters of Sex has been hailed by many critics as the best new show on TV. It’s not, but gets a lot of points for just showing up. — LAURA JOHNSON

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For Your Consideration BY LAURA JOHNSON

Frank Vigola, Vinny Raniolo and Peppino D’Agostino

Wed November 20 | 7:30pm To benefit PBS Television

DAN CUMMINS DVD | Not all black-and-white films are old. FRANCES HA had a small release in theaters earlier this year. On Nov. 12, the film comes out on DVD. It follows a group of 20-somethings who are at various levels of finding themselves in New York City. Our heroine Frances (Greta Gerwig, who co-wrote the script with boyfriend/director Noah Baumbach) is the most lost of them all. An apprentice at a modern dance company, living with a best friend who’s moving out, klutzy Frances must find her own way through love and life. What makes this otherwise pretentious film approachable is the way it feels lived-in; the way conversation flows the way people in their 20s would say it. And it gives us this amazing excuse of a line: “I’m sorry. I’m not a person yet.”

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DRINK | Normally, I leave the snobby beer drinking to those with a fine palate for such things that taste terrible. Instead, I opt for the classically “old man” set of cocktails. The philosophy: One drink is all you need for the night, and the Manhattan, Old Fashioned and Tom Collins are the drinks of choice. That was until tasting the FRENCH 75 at Bistango Martini Lounge downtown. Created with love using gin, Champagne, lemon juice and sugar, the not-toosweet, effervescent beverage is insultingly refreshing while hiding the fact that it’s mostly alcohol.

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CULTURE | LITERATURE

20th anniversary

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a wine and microbrew icrobrew Tasting Saturday, November 9th • 7:00 - 10:00 pm mirabeau Park hotel $45 per person ($50 at the Door) MuSt be 21 to atteND.

TasTeof greaThundreds wines and microbrews! enjoy incredible hors d’oeuvres prepared by the inland northwest culinary academy.

Live music by The marTini broThers!

tickets and more information available online: spokanecorkandKeg.com

THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY PRESENTS Symphony SuperPops

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Saturday, November 9 - 8pm

Matt de la Peña was a college basketball star before finding a love for writing.

The Spokane Symphony ignites with the Big Band era and special guest Matt Catingub. Songs include: “It Had To Be You,” “All of Me” and “Take the A Train”

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26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Matt de la Peña’s book was banned from a Mexican-American studies program. What gives? BY LEAH SOTTILE

M

att de la Peña wasn’t a writer. He wasn’t a great student. He was a kid who could shoot hoops. Basketball got him into college, and college showed him he could write. Professors believed in him, and a year after he graduated from the University of the Pacific, he discovered that those same professors who coached him toward writing in college had also taken the liberty of sending in applications to MFA programs on his behalf. Today he’s the author of four — nearly five — young adult novels that have topped booklists since 2005. Last year he saw

his book Mexican WhiteBoy banned from a Tucson, Ariz., school district for “promoting racial resentment” in a Mexican-American studies program. We got on the phone with de la Peña to talk about writing for young adults, and ask him if it feels cool to be banned. INLANDER: What made you want to write young adult books? DE LA PEÑA: It wasn’t anything that I thought of at all. In fact, when I found out my first book was coming out as a young adult title, I had to Google what “young adult” was. I had never heard of it. Once the first [book] came out I started to understand the market. It’s a good area for me because I love the coming-of-age story. You’ve got a lot of young superfans. What’s amazing about it is I end up in a lot of tougher schools. And a lot of the kids that I meet, they remind me of how I was when I was young. It’s not that they’re not intelligent, it’s not that they’re ignorant at all. They just don’t know about the possibilities that they could pursue. I love going in there and talking about the power of reading. I’m like, ‘Hey, I’m just like you and I became an author.’

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Did you ever think you’d be writing books that would be inciting so much controversy? That’s the last thing that you think about when you write a book. When I did become an author and I heard of other authors being banned, I was like, ‘Hey man, maybe they can ban me, that would be cool.’

That’s just shocking to me. It’s a politically motivated decision. And this school, it’s about 80 percent Hispanic. So you know, it was an amazing idea: ‘Hey, let’s motivate these kids, and teach these kids books about them by people who look like them.’ It really did motivate the kids. My book was [banned] because it was ‘inciting racial tension.’ I don’t think they read the book. I think it’s just the title. [As a kid], I was initially inspired by reading books that I connected to personally. But that led me to reading to some of the canon that these schools push. And I love the canon. A lot of the canon is just amazing literature; I couldn’t have gotten to if it weren’t for multicultural lit.  leahs@inlander.com Gonzaga University Visiting Writers Series feat. Matt de la Peña • Thu, Nov. 14, at 7:30 pm • Gonzaga University • Cataldo Hall Globe Room • 502 E. Boone Ave. • Free • Allages • gonzaga.edu • 328-4220 • A workshop on voice and dialogue with Matt de la Peña • Sat, Nov. 16 from 10 am-3 pm • Argonne Library • 4322 N. Argonne Rd. • $89-$104 • inlandnw.scbwi.org

(Photos by Turner Rouse, Jr., John Daughtry, Litwin)

So how did the whole Arizona controversy play out? You get a lot of weird emails as an author. And one day this woman wrote me an email that said, ‘Your book has been banned from my classroom, what can you do about it?’ I was like, ‘This person is nuts.’ Slowly I was getting more and more messages... She told me that this Mexican-American studies program [in Arizona], which was highly successful, was pulled from the school. They were literally reading Mexican WhiteBoy in one of the classes when one of the superintendents came in and boxed the books — pulled the books right out of their hands. It’s so symbolic.

Contains adult Content and strong language

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 27

CULTURE | BOOKS

John Stockton after learning he’d been drafted by the Utah Jazz in 1984.

You Don’t Know John

The famously private John Stockton improbably writes an autobiography BY MIKE BOOKEY

J

EDUCATE

CELEBRATE

DEMONSTRATE

PRESENTED BY UNITY MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION CENTER

Join us as we come together to support global justice. All are welcome! Friday Nov. 15, 2013 12 to 12:30 pm Gonzaga Crosby Center For more information (509) 313-5836 | gonzaga.edu/idot

28 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

ohn Stockton is one of the most famous Spokanites of all time. But he’s also kept a remarkably low profile, his main public exposure being those requisite cutaways to the stands during televised Gonzaga basketball games so an ESPN commentator can say something like, “And there’s Hall of Famer John Stockton.” Even as a player, Stockton kept to himself. He was always short with the media, and even when he announced his retirement, he did so with less than two sentences while leaving the locker room. He’s left his mark on Spokane, but has hardly capitalized on his fame. I mean, the guy could probably get elected mayor if he wanted. With this in mind, the news that John Stockton had written an autobiography came as a bit of a surprise. Last week his book Assisted: An Autobiography, written with the help of childhood basketball coach and Spokane attorney Kerry L. Pickett, hit shelves, giving the first in-depth look into a life story so closely guarded as to create a mystique around the man. If anything, the book attempts to answer how someone could be this good at something and not want to tell everyone how good he is. It’s the story of a reluctant hero. For lifelong Spokanites, the book’s early pages are filled with familiar, nostalgic anecdotes about growing up in the classically American mid-sized city. Even when he’s writing about playing in the Olympics or hitting a last-second three-pointer in Houston that sent the Utah Jazz to the 1997 NBA Finals, things manage to come back to his dad’s bar, Jack & Dan’s. Stockton tells the story of his athletic development as if it happened almost accidentally. He just happened to be good at basketball and loved to practice, he writes. When reminiscing about his high school days, he casually mentions that he broke the league scoring record his senior year. His writing is humble, almost to a fault. In the foreword, good buddy and on-court partner Karl Malone gushes about the guy who fed him bounce passes in Salt Lake City for al-

most two decades. He pops up frequently in the pages, as he should — you can’t have Stockton without Malone. This isn’t a shocking self-exposé by any means. Stockton was perhaps the least controversial NBA star of all time. But he does bruise his own apple a few times, mentioning how he once rigged a Campbell’s soup label-gathering contest in elementary school, had to resign as an altar boy for missing a Mass and was fired from a construction job. Once Stockton crashed his dad’s car, blowing out two tires and ruining two rims; he clandestinely replaced all of it with a friend, then dumped the damaged tires into the Spokane River. He didn’t reveal the secret to his dad — who played a central role in his life and is a key figure in the book — for 25 years. That’s about as bad as he gets. Assisted doesn’t teach us how to make those one-handed, three-quarter-court bounce passes that made Stockton a highlight-reel darling, or give us the key to shutting down Michael Jordan off the dribble. Rather, we learn a lot about Stockton’s marriage, the birth of his six kids and plenty of trivia. For instance, Stockton paid $125 per month for his apartment his rookie year with the Jazz and didn’t turn on the heat to save money. Although it’s more than 300 pages, Assisted is a fast read, and while there are no shocking revelations, it does address some of the questions that have surrounded the low-key white guy in short shorts (don’t worry; he writes about the shorts). The most impactful chapter addresses his dislike of being famous. In fact, he hated it. And he hated that he put his wife and kids in the public spotlight. He makes a perfectly understandable case for wanting to keep a low profile, in case you’ve been holding that against him. n John Stockton book signing • Sun, Dec. 8 at noon • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

11 13

flying high FORECAST 4 | LOCAL MOUNTAINS 6-14 | REGIONAL RESORTS 16 | EVENTS 26 | THE LAST RUN 28

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

featured in way of life

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RED Mountain is not for everybody. Clearly, some skiers like waiting in lift-lines for three hours a day and fighting for powder.

Who are we to question their motivation?

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DITCH THE CROWDS

2 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

EDITOR’S NOTE

A CHILL IS IN THE AIR

O

ur early season mountain snowfall was welcomed with much excitement, but it quickly changed back to more normal temperatures for the season. We were fortunate to have a beautiful fall, with colors in brilliant shades of yellow and red and weeks of sunny days. The cold weather, along with a strong windstorm, broke that cycle, and snow has returned to the forecast. Area resorts are lighting up their snowmaking machines, ski swaps are coming and going, movie premieres are reuniting winter friends, getting us hungry for the upcoming season, and area skiers are eager for more snow to fall in the mountains as we wait for opening day announcements.

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SNOWLANDERNW

SNOWLANDER.COM NEWS & NOTES 4 M T. S P O K A N E

49 DEGREES NORTH

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L O O K O U T PA S S 10 SCHWEITZER

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E X P E R T A DV I C E 29

Here at Snowlander, we’re ready to open the doors to the second annual Snowlander EXPO this weekend. This year, we’re excited to add the Inlander PowderKeg Brew Festival to the program. We’ve got more than 20 breweries and cider houses lined up; they’ll be pouring their frosty craft beers and ciders for those over 21 years of age. We’ve got backcountry awareness seminars, and regional resorts on hand to take season pass pictures while getting everyone stoked for the upcoming season. Area ski shops will be selling skis, snowboards and outerwear to get you ready for when opening day finally rolls around. On Saturday evening, the Spokane premiere of the Teton Gravity Research movie Way of Life will be screened adjacent to the EXPO as we celebrate the weekend and toast the upcoming season. Remember that the first 2,000 entrants to the EXPO — on both days — will receive a free lift ticket to Red Mountain or 49° North. And there’ll be a ton of other giveaways throughout the weekend. We’re less than a month away to predicted openings, and the best time of year in the Northwest. Hope to see you at the EXPO. Think snow! — JEN FORSYTH Snowlander Editor jen@snowlander.com

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 3

NEWS AND NOTES

Some recent shots from Mount Spokane KRISTEN WHITAKER PHOTOS

WHAT TO EXPECT Ski enthusiasts, head to the hills. Just embrace the winter ahead; don’t bother trying to predict it. “To tell you the truth, there’s really not a lot to go on this year,” says John Livingston, a meteorologist with Spokane’s National Weather Service office, which tracks weather patterns in the region at Spokane International Airport and other measuring points. That’s because Livingston and his peers look to the “tropical Pacific” — the ocean along the equator from South America to Indonesia — for signs of unusually warm, cold or wet winters here in the Inland Northwest. Cooler than normal sea-surface tempera-

tures, la niña, can warn of unusually cold temperatures ahead; warm temperatures, el niño, can mean a warm winter is coming. And this year, things look, well, unremarkable. “If you want to condense it down into just a couple words,” Livingston says, “It’ll be a normal winter.” A normal winter in the region means about 17 inches of precipitation measured in liquid form, according to the National Weather Service. (Some areas in North Idaho can see as much as 60 inches of liquid a year, Livingston says.) Those 17 inches translate to snowfall between 45 and 50 inches, though the area’s

mountain resorts, of course, see much more. Mount Spokane reports average annual snowfall of 300 inches, and Lookout Pass can see up to 400 inches. But even “normal winters” in the area can be unpredictable. Back in the winter bridging 1996 and ’97, the Pacific winds signaled a neutral winter ahead. Then the area got “clobbered,” Livingston says. A massive ice storm hit, December’s rain and snowfall broke records and the spring brought river flooding and even tornadoes. So maybe it is worth holding out for some excitement. — HEIDI GROOVER

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JUST 1 HOUR EAST OF SPOKANE ON I-90

Red Mountain is scheduled to open Dec. 14. ERIC GONZALEZ & GEORGE HOGARTH PHOTOS

MOUNTAIN EXPANSION After two years of construction, the largest ski terrain expansion in North America will make its public debut on opening day at RED MOUNTAIN RESORT in Rossland, B.C, currently scheduled for Dec. 14. The 997-acre expansion of the resort’s Grey Mountain rivals the size of Washington’s Mt. Baker and increases Red’s inbounds terrain by 60 percent. With nearly 2,800 acres of skiable slopes, the expansion makes Red (about two and a half hours north of Spokane) the eighth largest ski area in Canada and the 18th largest in North America.

The expansion also makes Red “more family-friendly,” says Fran Richards, Red’s vice president of marketing, as the majority of the new terrain offers wide-open runs for intermediate and beginner skiers. Like the other mountains at Red, the volcanic shape of Grey Mountain allows for a 360-degree skiing experience for anyone with a single lift ticket. “Red is one of the few places where you can take the lift to summit of the peak and ski all sides of the mountain, which is pretty rare,” Richards explains. Even with the massive expansion, Richards prom-

ises that Red, known for its steep chutes and powdery glades, will retain its authenticity. “Some of the other resorts have gotten so big, and so trafficked, that you really don’t get that sense of escapism that you do at Red,” says Richards. “We still want to keep the uniqueness and independent feel. Our goal with the resort, really, is to build it for the next generation of snowboarders and skiers.” — DEANNA PAN

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 5

MOUNTAIN PROFILE

MOUNT SPOKANE WHAT’S NEW

Mount Spokane started a significant remodel last season with the 1,200-squarefoot addition to the Main Lodge, creating new seating for 100 people and a new outdoor deck. The remodel path continued this past summer as part of the long-range improvement plan for the ski area. This season, skiers and riders will notice restrooms that are now ADAaccessible and completely new from the ground up, as well as new exterior siding and windows. Other lodge improvements include a new Internet Café featuring Red Chair bench seating, custom counter-height tables and, of course, free Internet. “Mount Spokane has purchased a new chairlift!” says Kristin Whitaker, mountain services and marketing manager. “The legendary Alpine Chair from Bridger Bowl, Montana, was secured and transported to Spokane this summer, where it was (originally) built by Riblet Tramway Company.” The terrain expansion plan calls for the chair to be installed on the northwest slopes of the mountain; if the expansion is approved, the new lift will service seven new runs. “We’ve also installed a new webcam that will show true and accurate snowfall,” Whitaker says. “It is focused on a snow stake that shows 24-hour snowfall.

6 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Trust the webcam to always show accurate conditions.”

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

Mount Spokane understands how unfamiliar the first time can be for beginners, whether it’s your first time skiing or boarding or just your first time on a new mountain. Last season, Mount Spokane introduced the First Timer’s Video Guide, available on its website. “It’s to familiarize beginners with the mountain experience before they ever set foot on the mountain,” says Whitaker. “It’s a great way to increase comfort level for newbies, and make the process of learning to ski and ride that much easier.” Since creating and posting the guide, Mount Spokane has seen a decrease in recurring questions from beginners, and plans to expand on the video series in the future. “Personally, before I try something new, I go online and try to familiarize myself with it as best I can,” says Whitaker, “and I know many people that do that these days.” You also can download the Mount Spokane app, available for your smartphone. “It’s awesome,” says Whitaker. “It’s the only app out there that has Facebook and GPS integration and allows you to find your friends on the mountain. We’ve all lost our friends

on a powder day — now you can pull up the app and see what chair your buddies are riding and meet them there for the next run.” Challenges on the app will enable users to test speed, build vertical and check in for rewards. New challenges will be added regularly, and the overall King of the Hill at season’s end will be awarded with a season pass for next season.

HOT DEALS

For the best price, purchase tickets online. It can save you anywhere from 4 percent to 50 percent. Make sure your purchase at least a day in advance. From now until Jan. 1, the popular Stocking Stuffers are available to purchase online or at the mountain. The cost until then is $99, and you get three adult lift tickets or five youth tickets. They’re non-transferable and make great Christmas gifts. Afterward, the price increases to $129. Direct-to-Lift tickets are available at the REI store in downtown Spokane, at a highly discounted rate for REI members. Just show your REI card to receive the discount. Direct-to-lift tickets are also available at Yoke’s Fresh Market — save a few bucks and buy before heading up to the mountain. — JEN FORSYTH

LIFT TICKETS Adult: full day $39 midweek / $52 weekend & holiday / half day $35 midweek / $41 weekend & holiday / night $24 / Sunday $38 half day Youth (7-17): full day $32 midweek / $42 weekend & holiday / half day $27 midweek / half day $31 weekend & holiday / night $24 / Sunday $25 half day College/Military: full day $35 midweek / $45 weekend & holiday / half day $31 midweek / $34 weekend & holiday / night $24 / Sunday $28 half day Senior (62-69): full day $32 midweek / $42 weekend & holiday / half day $27 midweek / $34 weekend & holiday / night $24 / Sunday $25 half day Super Senior (70+): full day $24 midweek / $29 weekend & holiday / half day $24 midweek / $29 weekend & holiday / night $24 / Sunday $23 half day Chair 5 only: full day $24 midweek / $31 weekend & holiday / half day $24 midweek / $24 weekend & holiday / night $24 / Sunday $23 half day

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 7

MOUNTAIN PROFILE

49° NORTH WHAT’S NEW

49 Degrees North has focused this summer on making small improvements, taking a little breather, as it’s been in expansion mode for most of the past decade. The largest growth spurt occurred in 2006 with the development of the Sunrise Basin area, adding 500 new acres of terrain and 20 new runs. Fast forward only two years, and 49° broke ground on the Angel Peak expansion, adding acreage, steeps and another chairlift. “This season we are focusing on the small items (that will make a huge difference), like new lighting, new doors and new wiring in the existing lodge,” says Sherry Brewer, director of marketing and sales for 49 Degrees North. It seems as if expansion is always on the horizon at 49. Talk has started and plans are being made to enhance the base area lodge, Brewer explains: “We are drafting plans to expand the current lodge. Expanding and improving the existing rental, retail and food service areas.”

learning concept.” Terrain-based learning is a concept sweeping the industry, focusing on each individual resort’s uniqueness and what a new skier or snowboarder wants to focus on, wrapping it all together, making it fun but also achieving results to ensure they return to the slopes. This goes for all abilities. Brewer adds: “49 Degrees North has some of the best tree skiing in the region.” Want to learn how to ski trees? Take a lesson.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

LIFT TICKET DEALS

“To make the most of your time at 49 Degrees North, I’d say take a lesson,” Brewer says. “We are focusing on the terrain-based

8 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

SPECIAL DEALS

This time of year, all mountains boast great deals, and 49 Degrees North has its own special offers. Looking for a place to host your next company field trip? Got a family reunion coming up and want to get the family out and active? Think about 49 for your next group function. “The more people you bring up, the better the discount,” Brewer says. Contact her (935-6649, ext. 607) for more details on group pricing. Not sure how much you’ll be able to get up to the mountain this season? Have fear of committing to one mountain, but still want

the ability to ski or snowboard for a cheaper rate? Check out the Six Packs at 49. They’re a great way to save money, and make the perfect stocking stuffer. They’re completely transferable and have no blackout dates, making gifting and using them easy and affordable.

SEASON PASS

Did you forget to buy your season pass before the deadline? Still want to buy a season pass to 49? You have one more opportunity to get the early season pass price, at the Snowlander EXPO. Representatives from 49 will be on hand at the EXPO, offering one last chance to get that early season deal.

LESSONS

The ski and ride school at 49 Degrees North offers a full array of options when it comes to learning, offering multi-week programs, group and private lessons. Purchase before Nov. 15 to get the best price on lesson packages. — JEN FORSYTH

LIFT TICKETS Adult: full day $52 limited / $57 unlimited / $45 half day Youth (7-17): full day $46 limited / $48 unlimited / $39 half day College/Military: full day $49 limited / $51 unlimited / $43 half day Master (70+): full day $49 limited / $51 unlimited / $43 half day  Chair 3 only: full day $45 / half day $38 NORDIC TRAIL: Day Pass $7 limited / $12 weekends and holidays (weekend includes Friday)

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MOUNTAIN PROFILE

LOOKOUT PASS WHAT’S NEW

Most of the improvements you’ll find at Lookout Pass can be seen in the terrain parks. “We’ve moved the location of the Huckleberry Jam Park and worked on building features geared for beginners and intermediates,” says Christopher “Cash” Barrett, marketing and snow sports director. Instead of focusing on the big dogs, they’re working on the concept of progression, getting those wanting to try terrain park-style riding properly trained. There’a another exciting addition to the team at Lookout Pass: “We have attained a PSIA (Professional Ski Instructors of America) Demo Team member, and have added a cross-country/Nordic skiing program,” Barrett says. With cross-country trails accessible right from the base area, this is an exciting addition to Lookout’s already well-rounded learning programs. “Our new team member won’t be here until the end of December, as they are a part of the Demo team and are currently training at Copper Mountain in Colorado,” Barrett says. “We have also added a NEXT level telemark program (in addition to a NEXT level alpine program). All of our

10 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

coaches are 100 percent certified for the discipline they specialize in. This is one of the few places in the entire country with that designation.” Upgrades have been made to the Ski School and Rental Shop to ensure an easier flow of participants and customers, especially for those new to Lookout Pass and skiing/snowboarding. Another small change? The Downhill Divas program has been moved to Fridays. In addition to the terrain park and dedication to the improvement of learning programs, Barrett also reports that the Lookout Pass website has continually been upgraded over the past several months, making for easier navigation and integration. There’s a downloadable trail map for smartphones, with QR code assistance. “We continue to receive plenty of quality snow (400 inches annually on average) and will continue with our quality grooming,” says Barrett.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

Barrett says the best deal is the EZ Ski & Ride 1-2-3 program: “Boards, boots, skis, poles, ticket and lesson for three different

days for 100 bucks. And at the end of it, you get a free season pass to Lookout Pass for the remainder of the season.” Taking a lesson is the best way to make the most of any mountain. Even if you’re an experienced skier or boarder, having an instructor can benefit you — you’ll be shown secret stashes and fun tree lines, which could take you days or weeks to find if you were searching for them without local knowledge.

SPECIAL DEALS

The wide variety and amount of learning options available at Lookout Pass, as well as the affordable pricing, is what sets it apart from other regional mountains. For more than 75 years, the most unique option has introduced more than 60,000 kids to the worlds of skiing and riding. The Lookout Pass Free Ski School is just that: free, with skiing and riding lessons for kids (ages 6-17). Equipment is not included, though the Rental Shop has everything you’ll need to get going. — JEN FORSYTH

LIFT TICKETS Adult: full day $36 midweek / $39 weekends & holidays / half day $31 midweek / half day $34 weekend & holiday Junior (7-17): full day $26 midweek / $28 weekend & holiday / half day $22 midweek / half day $24 weekend & holiday College/Military: full day $34 midweek / $37 weekend & holiday / half day $29 midweek / half day $32 weekend & holiday Seniors (62+): full day $26 midweek / $28 weekend & holiday / half day $22 midweek / $24 half day weekend & holiday Boomer Fridays (40+): $26, not valid Dec. 27 & Jan. 3

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 11

MOUNTAIN PROFILE

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN WHAT’S NEW

This season at Schweitzer Mountain Resort is a special one. Schweitzer turns 50 years old and has several celebrations to honor the event. “Friday, December 13th, is community day, where lift tickets will be $10, with proceeds going to local charities,” says Sean Mirus, Schweitzer’s director of marketing. The next day is Founder’s Day — lift tickets will only be $19.63, commemorating the year Schweitzer started operations. The après-ski party at Taps will unveil the 25-year-old time capsule that has been buried at the base of Snow Ghost. Back by popular demand this season is the sun deck outside of the Lakeview Lodge. The deck has always been synonymous with sunny days and imbibing après-ski beverages after a great day on the slopes, while watching the sunset over the South Bowl ridge. Now locals and visitors will once again be able to enjoy this longstanding Schweitzer tradition. On-mountain improvements include cutting a new FIS downhill course and a new progression terrain park. Schweitzer’s new downhill course is located on the Stella high-speed lift. This summer, crews widened the Shortcut trail to connect upper Cathedral Aisle and the lower section of Zip Down — which will now be known as SARS Spur. “The new terrain park — Southside Progression Park — will replace the Starfish Terrain Park and will be located on

12 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Crystal Run, next to the Stomping Grounds Terrain Park,” says Mirus. This new park will be larger in size, allowing for a greater number of features. Schweitzer is all about the passholder perks; it’s joined forces with 11 other ski resorts as part of the Powder Alliance. The way this program works: Schweitzer season passholders can ski three full days at some of the best resorts in the West; Stevens Pass, Crested Butte, Snowbasin and Bridger Bowl are just four of the ski areas on this impressive list. Other great season passholder perks: • 10 percent cash bonus on all of the cash you add to your season pass; add $100 and you’ll receive $110 on your pass, which you can use for retail, lodging and food purchases and save money. • $20 off-day ticket to Schweitzer’s sister resort, Whitewater Ski Resort, located outside Nelson, B.C. • Monthly drawings: you’re entered every time your pass gets scanned. Prizes include a season pass for next season, skis, and a $500 gift card.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT AND SPECIAL DEALS

Even if you aren’t a Schweitzer passholder, there are plenty of deals available to get you skiing

inexpensively. Schweitzer has a new partnership with Lake Louise and its Louise Plus card. “This partnership was just finalized in the last couple of weeks,” Mirus says. “This is the first time Lake Louise has had a U.S. partner in their card program. The $99 card is available to purchase on Schweitzer’s website. This card gets you your first, fourth and seventh day free. Every other day, you get $20 off the purchase of your lift ticket.” This program’s best perk? Cardholders can use it at Schweitzer, Lake Louise Ski Resort, Castle Mountain Resort, Panorama Mountain Village and Revelstoke Mountain Resort. Through Nov. 10, Schweitzer will sell its Ski-3 packs at the discounted rate of $165, a $48 savings. The Ski-3 packs are completely transferable and do not have blackout days. Sunday Solution lift tickets are a great way to experience Schweitzer. From 12:30 pm to close on Sunday (holiday weekends excluded), if you purchase your ticket online, it’s $25 ($35 at the ticket window). If you want a lift ticket for just the beginner chair, Musical Chairs lift tickets are free if you purchase them online. “It’s just one of the ways we are creating opportunities at Schweitzer to ski at an affordable rate,” says Mirus. — JEN FORSYTH

LIFT TICKETS Adult: full day $71 / half day $61 Junior (7-17): full day $50 / half day $40 College/Military: full day $61 / half day $51 Senior (65+): full day $61 / half day $51 Child: full day (6 & under with adult) free Musical Chairs only: full day $25 / half day $20 Musical Carpet only: free

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 13

MOUNTAIN PROFILE

SILVER MOUNTAIN WHAT’S NEW

Silver Mountain Resort’s operations team has been hard at work this summer on the development of another new run that will even excite the most advanced skiers and boarders. “The new run is named Shady Lady — a clue as to where it is located,” says Neal Scholey, director of sales and marketing. “It is north-facing, with a great, steep pitch.” Silver isn’t announcing the exact location of the new run, though you’re invited to the mountain this winter to discover where it is. “We also made some additional improvements to the run we cut last season, Bootlegger, located uphill from Moonshine,” says Scholey. “Paul Hegg has been busy this summer cutting brush and alder. He is a machine!” The improvements to Bootlegger will allow even more access to a whole new stash. This extensive brush-cutting, occurring all over the mountain, means Silver will be ready for an earlier opening, allowing access to more terrain. “Now hopefully we’ll get blessed with snow, and we’ll have

14 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

some epic skiing here at Silver in no time at all,” Scholey says.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

Although Silver is the most easily accessible ski resort in the Inland Northwest, the best way to take full advantage of its location and make the most of your time is to stay overnight in one of its Gondola Village condos at the Morning Star Lodge, recently named a 2013 Certificate of Excellence winner by TripAdvisor. “We have great lodging here at Silver,” says Scholey. “Our package, that includes skiing, lodging and access to the waterpark, is $86.75 per person (see below for details) on weekends. It’s a good deal. We believe the best way to make the most of your trip here is to park your car and forget about it. With the Silver Rapids Indoor Waterpark, you can master the surf wave, enjoy the indoor and outdoor hot tubs, and then walk to the gondola the next day.”

SPECIAL DEALS

To assist skiers and boarders looking for the full mountain experience, Silver offers several attractive lodging packages. The most popular, with the greatest variety of activity, is the “Ski, Surf and Splash” package, enabling you to do it all: ski, surf on the FlowRider surf wave, splash around in the rest of the activities at the waterpark, or just soak in the hot tubs near the lounge. The package price, based on four-person occupancy, includes lift tickets and waterpark access for a family of four. A great option for the family that doesn’t ski but wants to get on the mountain is the “Snow and Splash” package: Enjoy the five-lane tubing park, then warm up in the indoor waterpark, where the water is always 84°. The package, based on four-person occupancy, includes tubing passes and unlimited access to Idaho’s largest indoor waterpark. — JEN FORSYTH

LIFT TICKETS Adult: full day $52 / $56 holiday / half day $43 / $46 half day holiday Youth (7-17): full day $37 / $41 holiday / half day $32 / $35 half day holiday College/Military: full day $47 / $51 holiday / half day $40 / $43 half day holiday Senior: full day $42 / $46 holiday / half day $35 / $39 half day holiday SCENIC GONDOLA RIDE ONLY Adult: $17 / $18 holiday Youth: $13 / $14 holiday Senior: $13 / $14 holiday SNOWTUBING: Adult: $20 / $22 holiday Youth (4-17): $18 / $20 holiday Child: (3 & under) free

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 15

W

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REGIONAL RESORTS Sunshine Village Lake Louise Kicking Horse

Mount Norquay 1

Cal gary

1

Nakiska

Revelstoke

Ka m loop s

Panorama Silver Star 6

Whistler/ Blackcomb

Fairmont

6

97

5

93

B R I T I S H

Ke low na

A L B E

C O L U M B I A

Big White 33

Kimberley

6

Apex

3

Salmo

3

Mount Baldy

Fernie

3

Whitewater

Red Mountain

95

395

Mount Baker

2

Sitzmark

Turner

Schweitzer Loup Loup

5

49 North

2 95

Mount Spokane We na tc he e

90

Ya k im a

5

195

395 12

White Pass

84 Mount Hood Meadows

Snowbowl Mi ssou l a

Wa lla Wa lla

P o r t l a nd

Lookout

95

WA S H I N G T O N

Crystal

5

90

Silver Mtn

Snoqualmie

M O N T A N A 93

90

Oly m pi a

Blacktail

Coeu r d’Al en e

Spokane

2

Mission Ridge

Whitefish

o

Stevens Pass Se a ttl e

Leth bri dge

3

N e lson

Mount Hood Ski Bowl

Timberline

Bluewood

I D A H O

Lost Trail

Disco

95

84

15 15

O R E G O N

Brundage Sun Valley

Mount Bachelor

Tamarack

Anthony Lakes

RESORTS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST BY JEN FORSYTH

95

49° NORTH

Chewelah, Wash. • ski49n.com 1,850 vertical feet • 82 runs 49 Degrees North, known as the “Northwest’s Favorite FamilyFriendly Resort,” stands by that designation proudly, offering 2,325 acres of skiable terrain, with a wide variety of immaculate groomers for all abilities as well as the kind of tree skiing found at regional catskiing operations, accessed by one of their many chairlifts. Top it off with a rustic lodge, which hosts the 95

84

Boomtown Bar, a favorite among 49° regulars.

ANTHONY LAKES

North Powder, Ore. • anthonylakes.com 900 vertical feet • 21 runs Located in the northeastern corner of Oregon outside the charming town of La Grande, Anthony Lakes Ski Area offers powder, views and 1,100 acres of natural glades and groomers. Additionally, Nordic trails and cat-skiing are available. With 84

Twin Falls

18 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

93

86

84

S-11

Blacktail Mountain (406) 844-0999

with fresh snow, tons o’ runs, both steep and deep, and special

P-3

225

skifernie.com

248

N48˚00.122 W114˚30.0689 N49˚27’47.02” W115˚05’08.74”

210

N49˚41’22.22” W116˚00’19.52”

93

Fernie, BC

Kimberley Alpine Resort

skikimberley.com

he mountains are coming alive again,

(250) 427-4881 O-14

Kimberley, BC

Lookout Pass Ski Area

skilookout.com

(208) 744-1301 C-8

Loup Loup Ski Bowl

A-14

Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort

Wallace, ID

skitheloup.com

Silver Mountain F ____

6. Which western Canadian ski resort, with their most recent expansion, will become one of the top 10

49˚North E ____

5. Which lucky Inland Northwest ski resort recently acquired Bridger Bowl’s historic double “Red Chair”? 4. People make the trek up to the Gem Lake area to see the legendary formations of snow and ice stuck to the trees — also known as the “Snow Ghosts” — at which resort?

(866) 699-5334 or (509) 557-3401

Okanogan, WA

missionridge.com

(509) 663-6543 or (509) 663-3200 E-4

Mount Baldy

K-11

Mount Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park

Wenatchee, WA

skibaldy.com

(250) 498-4086 or (866) 754-2253

Oliver, BC

mtspokane.com

3. Which western Canadian ski resort is home to the longest illuminated ski slope?

(509) 443-1397 or (509) 238-2220 H-5

Red Mountain Resort

L-8

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Mead, WA

redresort.com

(250) 362-7384 or (800) 663-0105

Rossland, BC

schweitzer.com

2. Which funky mountain town regularly receives national and international high praise?

MAPAN EPICOUTSEASON

(208) 263-9555 or (800) 831-8810 N-14

Sandpoint, ID

Silver Mountain Resort

silvermt.com

(866) 344-2675 E-6

Kellogg, ID

Sitzmark Ski Area

gositzmark.org

(509)485-3323 or (509)-486-2700 M-20

Tonasket, WA

O-8

tamarackidaho.com Tamarack, ID

Turner Mountain Ski Resort

skiturner.com

(406) 293-2468

1. Which Northwest ski resort has history dating back to the 1930s?

Fernie D ____ Red Mountain C ____ Big White B ____ Kimberley A ____

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Libby, MT

Whitefish Mountain Resort on Big Mountain

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Powpow Stay TASTE THE

EASTERN WASHINGTON | NORTH IDAHO | WESTERN MONTANA | SOUTHEASTERN BRITISH COLUMBIA

RESORT GUIDE

N-14

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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7,050

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9

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92

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N47˚32.38644 W116˚7.96362

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73

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~LODGING~ Wallace

(208)

699-7554

BROOKS HOTEL - Wallace (208) M-10

556-1571

GUESTHOUSE INN & SUITES Kellogg

783-1234

(208)

HERCULES INN - Wallace (208)

556-0575

MULLAN HOUSE BED & BREAKFAST Mullan

(208)

682-5678

15%

N48.886171 W119.165066

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4,300

4,950

650

80

2

0

10

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N44.674167 W116.121667

300

4,900

7,700

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6

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37

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169

N48˚36'18.03" W115˚37'50.87"

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3,842

5,952

2,110

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Whitefish, MT

Whitewater Ski Resort

skiwhitewater.com

(250) 354-4944 or (800) 666-9420

Nelson, BC

260

N48˚29'01.16" W114˚21'27.31"

300

4,464

6,817

2,353

3,000

14

3

98

10%

40% 35%

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147

N49˚26'34.50" W117˚08'43.98"

480

4,526

6,570

2,044

1,184

4

0

78

12%

44% 32%

12%

(208) (800)

OR TH INLAND N

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Feb 26 Foggy Bottom Lounge (509) 238-2220 X

Mt. Spokane, Spokane, WA Pend Oreille Winery (208) 265-8545 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint, ID

Mar 08 Boomtown Bar (509) 935-6649 X X

X X X X X X X X

49 Degrees N., Chewelah, WA

Downtown Crossing (208) 610-8820 206 N. First Ave., Sandpoint, ID

Mar 19 Taps (208) 263-9555

Schweitzer Mountain, Sandpoint, ID

Listen for more Details Your Adventure Starts Here

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WASHINGTON 49 Degrees North, known as the “Northwest’s Favorite Family-Friendly Resort,” stands by that designation proudly, with 2,325 acres of skiable terrain and a wide variety of immaculate groomers for skiers of all abilities, as well as the kind of tree skiing found at regional cat-skiing operations. A rustic lodge hosts the Boomtown Bar, a favorite among 49° regulars.

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Angel Peak at 49° North - 49° North Photo BRITISH COLUMBIA Big White definitely lives up to its name. It’s “big” in the sense that it offers close to 3,000 acres of terrain with a whopping 16 lifts to take you there. And there seems to be an infinite amount of eating and shopping options to keep you entertained after a long day on the hill. It’s “white” in the sense that it gets a healthy allotment of snowfall, with an annual average of more than 24 feet.

Red Mountain Resort BRITISH COLUMBIA The resort in Rossland, B.C., has long been known for having an abundance of incredibly deep snow and plenty of steeps – approximately 37 percent of its terrain is designated as advanced. Now it boasts one of the largest single-season expansions in North America over the past several decades. Expansion to the Grey Mountain area will add an additional 1,000 acres, giving Red Mountain 2,682 total skiable acres. IDAHO The resort turns 50 years old this season, with more to celebrate than just being a half-century old. In addition to 2,900 skiable acres over two massive bowls, it’s added a beginner terrain park — the Southside Progression Park — near the existing Stomping Grounds Park, as well as the return of the sun deck outside the Lakeview Lodge. Schweitzer is the largest resort in the Spokane metro area offering a full menu of lodging options and several dining and shopping outlets in the village, to explore after a day on the slopes.

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L-14

Fernie Alpine Resort

Silver Mountain

BRITISH COLUMBIA Be prepared to be awestruck by terrain quality and the sheer number of options at Fernie, with five bowls — all different in their own way — endless steeps, challenging glades and pristine groomers to keep you entertained. There’s a wellequipped village with several dining and shopping options, and one of the coolest ski towns north of the border just down the road.

IDAHO Silver Mountain Resort in Kellogg is comprised of two mountain peaks offering 2,200 vertical feet over 1,600 acres. The adventure at Silver begins with a ride up the scenic gondola to the mountaintop village, and the mountain has an extensive variety of terrain, with glades and groomers. At day’s end, treat yourself to waterslide fun and a soak in the hot tubs at the Silver Rapids Waterpark, Idaho’s largest indoor waterpark.

Whitewater Mountain Resort Fernie Alpine Resort - Robin Siggers Photo

BRITISH COLUMBIA Known as the Bavaria of Canada, it’s a true winter playground. Nestled above the town of Kimberley, it boasts plenty of sunny days and so many extracurricular activities outside of skiing and boarding, you’re sure to find an adventure for everyone in the family. There are kids’ après-skiing activities almost every night, with the family ice skating rink the hub of the activities.

BRITISH COLUMBIA Nestled in the shadows of Ymir Peak outside the funky, eclectic town of Nelson, B.C., Whitewater attracts attention from around the world from those searching for steeps, deep snow, and a variety of chutes, bowls and glades. In 2010, it completed its first major terrain expansion in 34 years by adding a triple chair and access to 750 acres of new terrain. Whitewater Mountain Resort - Bryan Ralph Photo

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WALLACE INN - Wallace

58 Bridge St., Sandpoint, ID

9520 N. Government Way, Hayden, ID 219 Lounge (208) 263-5673 219 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint, ID

Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park

STARDUST MOTEL - Wallace

area.

(509) 443-6500, 4318 S. Regal St., Spokane, WA Rusty Moose (208) 267-1950 7211 Main St., Bonners Ferry, ID

Feb 05 Trinity at the City Beach (208) 255-7558 Feb 19 Capone’s Pub & Grill (208)-667-4843

WASHINGTON Spokane’s local and most convenient ski area is located only 28 miles from downtown. It has the largest amount of night skiing terrain in the region, and the most night skiing hours — every Wednesday through Saturday until 9:30 pm.

Kimberley Alpine Resort

Jan 22 Waddell’s Neighborhood Pub & Grill

MOUNTAIN GEAR

RYAN HOTEL - Wallace (208)

70%

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Big White Ski Resort

A COMFY COTTAGE VACATION RENTAL

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49° North Mountain Resort

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5,250

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6,780

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Mt. Spokane, Spokane, WA

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Your Adventure Starts Here

Tamarack Resort (208) 325-1000

K-4

REGIONAL MAP

blacktailmountain.com

Kalispell, MT

Fernie Alpine Resort (250) 423-4655

N-3

INLANDER ISSUES

$5 OFF

ANY FOOD PURCHASE IN ANY VENUE AT THE COEUR D’ALENE CASINO RESORT Expires March 15th, 2014. One redemption per customer. Excludes alcohol. No cash back. Ring as Comp Marketing.

OCTOBER 17 • NOVEMBER 7 • DECEMBER 19 • JANUARY 16 • FEBRUARY 13

13 -14

AT THE SHOW Historic Wallace Chamber of Commerce

208-753-7151

NOVEMBER 8 & 9 SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER

ONLINE

wallaceidahochamber.com

WWW.SNOWLANDER.COM

1 800 523-2464 | CDACA SI N O.COM

/SNOWLANDER

/CDACA SI N O R E S O RT

The Inlander has published its annnual fold-out map of the Northwest’s ski and snowboard resorts. Get your free map at select Inlander rack sites, area winter sports retailers and at Inlander HQ, 1227 West Summitt Parkway.

10/15/13 2:43 PM

Big White half-hour from the British Columbia city of Penticton, Apex offers large amounts of precipitation with low humidity and cold temperatures, making for the lightest champagne powder imaginable and giving visitors a quintessential Canadian ski vacation without all of the crowds.

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Great Fa lls

BIG SKY

Big Sky, Mont. • bigskyresort.com 4,350 vertical feet • 250 runs Big Sky Resort is going big for its 40th birthday. It recently acquired neighboring resort Moonlight Basin, giving the resort a total of 5,750 skiable acres over three mountains. Big Sky boasts 400 inches of that famous Montana “cold smoke”; couple that with lots of sun and it makes most days epic, especially if you’re a seasoned Big Sky veteran. Come ready with your ski legs and willingness for adventure, as a trip to the top of Lone Peak (11,166 feet) is essential. Big powder, long groomers and nine terrain parks make for a myriad of options.

Helena

Big Sky Mountain

90

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Bridger

a top elevation of 8,000 feet, the powder is light and the crowds are minimal, which makes skiing and snowboarding at Anthony Lakes worth a road trip.

BIG WHITE SKI RESORT

APEX MOUNTAIN RESORT Pocatello

Penticton, B.C. • apexresort.com 2,000 vertical feet • 70 runs Destination amenities, dry Okanagan powder, smooth cruisers and steep chutes adds up to an Apex Mountain adventure. Located a 189

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Kelowna, B.C. • bigwhite.com 2,550 vertical feet • 118 runs This resort comes by its name honestly, with nearly 3,000 patrolled acres of skiing and the most night skiing terrain in western Canada. After a big day on the mountain, big offerings ensure the entire family can meet any après-ski and non-skiing needs. Activities range from the one-of-a-kind 60-

foot ice climbing tower to the “Mini Z” children’s snowmobile track. A vacation at Big White will leave the entire family happily exhausted.

BLACKTAIL

Lakeside, Mont. • blacktailmountain.com 1,440 vertical feet • 32 runs Located above Flathead Lake in western Montana, Blacktail Mountain offers world-class views of Glacier Park and the Mission, Whitefish and Cabinet mountain ranges from its mountaintop village — a view every level of skier gets to enjoy, as this is an “upside-down mountain.” All skiers and boarders have a top-to-bottom ski run before ever riding a chairlift. Blacktail offers a well-balanced mixture of terrain, with more than 1,000 skiable acres.

BRIDGER BOWL

Bozeman, Mont. • bridgerbowl.com 2,700 vertical feet • 71 runs This world-class, community-owned ski resort is getting quite the facelift this season with the installation of two new chairlifts, a significant enhancement for this big mountain

BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN RESORT

McCall, Idaho • brundage.com 1,800 vertical feet • 46 runs It’s located in the high mountains of central Idaho, near the cute little lake town of McCall. Brundage, known for its powder-packed glades and luxuriously wide groomed runs,

BLUEWOOD

Dayton, Wash. • bluewood.com 1,125 vertical feet • 24 runs Looking for a unique ski adventure that can only be found in the hills of southeast Washington? Try a skiing and wine-tasting adventure — preferably in that order. Bluewood pairs nicely with a mid-winter winetasting getaway to Walla Walla, where award-winning wines are available after skiing some of the area’s best glades. A truly decadent ski adventure awaits those looking to do something a little different this winter.

Discovery playground known for its friendly local vibe. Bridger Bowl boasts 2,000 acres of skiable terrain and is located only 20 minutes from the university town of Bozeman, which offers an impressive variety of dining, nightlife, entertainment and lodging options.

receives an average of 320 inches annually of the Best Snow in Idaho™, which blankets the 1,500 acres of lift-served terrain and an additional 19,000 acres through backcountry snowcat operations. Brundage offers a remote ski adventure that’s not too far from home. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 19

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Kimberley Alpine Resort

CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN

Crystal Mountain, Wash. • skicrystal.com 3,100 vertical feet • 57 runs Crystal, located in the shadows of volcanic giant Mt. Rainier, prides itself on variety. The largest ski resort in Washington state and one of the Northwest’s top skiing destinations, Crystal boasts 2,600 acres of gentle groomers,

challenging steeps, glades, chutes and endless backcountry options for those seeking a little more adventure. Between the welldeveloped base area village and mountain lodges, dining options are plentiful. There’s even a taco truck, serving up everything from breakfast burritos to après-ski cervezas.

DISCOVERY

Anaconda, Mont. • skidiscovery.com 2,340 vertical feet • 67 runs Commonly known as “Disco,” Discovery Ski Area has all the ingredients for a genuine Montana ski adventure. Discovery offers 2,200 acres of well-balanced terrain for all ability levels — everything from wide-open cruisers to steeps that will challenge even the most

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expert skiers. Lodging is available at the three surrounding towns of Anaconda, Georgetown and Philipsburg, each offering a unique experience.

FAIRMONT

Fairmont, B.C. • fairmont.com 1,000 vertical feet • 13 runs Fairmont Hot Springs, the base camp for the Powder Highway, is the

ideal vacation destination for those wanting to learn but also seeking to soak their cold, tired bodies in the Nordic-style hot and cold plunge pools. Because of its location, central to the nearby resorts of Kicking Horse, Panorama, Kimberley and Fernie (from 30 minutes to two hours away), even seasoned skiers and boarders will enjoy a Fairmont vacation.

FERNIE ALPINE RESORT

Fernie, B.C. • skifernie.com 2,820 vertical feet • 112 runs Be prepared to be awestruck by the terrain quality and sheer number of options at Fernie Alpine Resort; five bowls, all unique in their own way, offer endless steeps, challenging glades and pristine groomers to keep you entertained. In addition, a well-equipped village with several dining and shopping options and one of the coolest ski towns north of the border is just down the road.

KICKING HORSE

Golden, B.C. • kickinghorseresort.com 4,130 vertical feet • 120 runs “Raw ruggedness” is the best way to describe Kicking Horse Resort, a well-hidden mountain offering world-class skiing that’s well worth discovering. Kicking Horse is not for the faint of heart, with 85 inbounds chutes, the fourth highest vertical drop in North America, and 50 percent of 2,800 skiable acres designated as expert/advanced. With stats like those, remember to pack your ski legs and “A-game” for a truly kick-ass ski adventure.

KIMBERLEY ALPINE RESORT

Kimberley, B.C. • skikimberley.com 2,470 vertical feet • 80 runs Known as the Bavaria of Canada, this is a true winter playground. Nestled above the town of Kimberley, it boasts plenty of sunny days and so many extracurricular activities outside of skiing and boarding, you’re sure to find an adventure for everyone in your family. Almost nightly kids’ après-skiing activities are offered, with the family ice skating rink as the hub.

LAKE LOUISE

Lake Louise, Alberta • skilouise.com

3,250 vertical feet • 139 runs The Lake Louise Ski Resort is the jewel of the historic Banff National Park and the birthplace of skiing in Canada. Lake Louise consistently receives acclaim as one of the most scenic ski areas on the planet, but offers more than just endless views, with legendary powder, bright blue skies and an astounding 4,200 acres of skiable terrain. Outside of skiing, Lake Louise has a multitude of dining and lodging options between Banff and the Lake Louise village.

impressive number of high-quality cross-country skiing trails. Loup Loup adds to this reputation with two trail systems and 23 kilometers of track-set trails. Downhill skiing is also available, with 300 acres of terrain. Known for sunny days and dry snow, Loup Loup is located off scenic Highway 20 on the eastern side of the North Cascades.

MOUNT BACHELOR

Bend, Ore. • mtbachelor.com 3,370 vertical feet • 71 runs It’s easy to feel like you’re on top of the world when skiing at Bachelor. The summit is an impressive 9,065 feet, the highest in Oregon and Washington. Pair that with nearly 3,700 acres of skiing, one of the longest ski seasons in the Northwest and a funky mountain

LOOKOUT PASS SKI AREA

Mullan, Idaho • skilookout.com 1,150 vertical feet • 34 runs Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area is famous for access, snow accumulation, free ski school and its chili — seriously. Located conveniently on the Montana/Idaho border off Interstate 90, Lookout Pass receives an average of 400 inches of snow annually and has offered a Free Ski School since 1940. If powder, ease of access, a cool little ski area and a bowl of delicious chili interest you, you’ll love Lookout.

LOST TRAIL POWDER MOUNTAIN

Sula, Mont. • losttrail.com 1,200 vertical feet • 45 runs Lost Trail is located on the Idaho/ Montana border on scenic Highway 93, 45 minutes south of Hamilton, Mont. This still-undiscovered gem is a local secret and tops the list of the “mom-and-pop”-style ski areas that make Montana skiing so unique. If you’re lucky enough to ski Lost Trail on one of its numerous powder days, you’ll understand why this area is a favorite with so many.

LOUP LOUP SKI BOWL

Okanogan, Wash. • skitheloup.com 1,240 vertical feet • 10 runs Skiing in north-central Washington has long been known for a

Mission Ridge

MISSION RIDGE

Wenatchee, Wash. • missionridge.com 2,250 vertical feet • 36 runs Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort is only 12 miles from the world-famous apple orchards of Wenatchee, but it feels a million miles away, with sweeping views of the region’s ring of volcanoes and other surrounding jagged peaks. Located on the eastern slope of the Cascades, Mission Ridge is blessed with dry, light snow and sunshine and also offers 2,000 acres of wide-open groomers and challenging off-piste terrain.

town conveniently 22 miles down the road — with a bevy of terrific brewpubs — and you’ve got yourself a well-rounded ski adventure.

MOUNT BAKER

Glacier, Wash. • mtbaker.us 1,500 vertical feet • 32 runs Mount Baker Ski Area is situated between the beautiful peaks of Mount Shuksan and Mount Baker. The area’s proximity to the coast is one of the reasons it consistently receives the most snow in the Northwest, averaging more 700 inches annually. The area boasts the world record for snowfall — the ...continued on next page

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 21

REGIONAL RESORTS

Mount Norquay 1998-99 season, with a staggering 1,140 inches, or 95 feet! Located an hour east of beautiful Bellingham, Baker is a Northwest favorite.

MOUNT BALDY

Oliver, B.C. • skibaldy.com 1,300 vertical feet • 35 runs Located in the Okanagan country of British Columbia, Mount Baldy offers plenty of sunshine, tree skiing and untracked powder. In the heart of wine country near Oliver, Osoyoos and Penticton, a trip to Mount Baldy will take you to a place where skiing and the mountain lifestyle are celebrated — a true hidden gem.

MOUNT HOOD MEADOWS

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Parkdale, Ore. • skihood.com 2,780 vertical feet • 85 runs Located on the sunny, windprotected side of Mt. Hood, Meadows offers terrain that will challenge all levels of skiers and snowboarders. Enjoy the wide-open terrain off the Cascade Express, known as the most popular cruising terrain in Oregon. At an elevation of 7,300 feet, it offers incredible views of the surrounding terrain. Looking for more of a challenge? Try the endless pitch- and powder-filled Heather Canyon.

MOUNT HOOD SKIBOWL

22 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Government Camp, Ore. • skibowl.com 1,500 vertical feet • 65 runs Mount Hood Skibowl amenities go far beyond expectations. Not only is it one of the country’s oldest ski resorts, it also boasts one of the largest night skiing operations.

Plenty of activities, including snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, sleigh rides and snow tubing, will keep all snow lovers entertained. Lodging is available nearby in Government Camp or right down the road in the charming town of Hood River.

MOUNT NORQUAY

Banff, Alberta • banffnorquay.com 1,680 vertical feet • 28 runs With a family ski resort tradition since 1926, Mount Norquay is one of Banff’s best-kept secrets. It’s located in the protected playground of Banff National Park, set above the picturesque town of Banff. Top elevation for this resort is 8,040 feet, and it covers 190 acres.

MT. SPOKANE SKI & SNOWBOARD PARK

Mead, Wash. • mtspokane.com 2,000 vertical feet • 45 runs Spokane’s local and most convenient ski area is located just 28 miles from downtown. Mt. Spokane has plenty more to brag about, with the greatest amount of night skiing terrain in the region and the most night skiing hours — every Wednesday through Saturday until 9:30 pm.

NAKISKA

Kananaskis, Alberta • skinakiska.com 2,560 vertical feet • 64 runs This conveniently located resort 45 minutes from Calgary is making some big improvements this season, including a new tubing park, an additional magic carpet and snowmaking improvements.

Upgrades to the village include a BBQ area — two additions to a ski area loaded with worldclass amenities. There are more than 1,000 acres to explore, with something for every type of skier.

PANORAMA MOUNTAIN Panorama, B.C. • panoramaresort.com 4,000 vertical feet • 120 runs Panorama Mountain Village has it all: wide-open groomers, challenging tree lines, steep and deep bowls, and the largest slopeside hot pools in Canada to top off your great day on the slopes. With more than 2,800 acres in the scenic Canadian Rockies, Panorama offers a lot for beginners and intermediates. For experts, the Taynton Bowl’s 700 acres feature all black-diamond runs.

RED MOUNTAIN

Rossland, B.C. • redresort.com 2,920 vertical feet • 87 runs Red Mountain Resort has long been known for an abundance of crazydeep snow and plenty of steeps — approximately 37 percent of its terrain is designated as advanced. Now it boasts one of the largest single-season expansions in North America in the past several decades. The expansion to the Grey Mountain area will add an additional 1,000 acres, giving Red Mountain 2,682 total skiable acres.

REVELSTOKE MOUNTAIN

Revelstoke, B.C. • revelstokemountainresort.com 5,620 vertical feet • 65 runs

7 Lifts • 82 Trails • 2,325 Acres

Revelstoke In addition to boasting more than 3,000 acres of skiing serviced by a top-of-the-line lift network, Revelstoke offers an incredible number of alpine possibilities, with a helicopter and cat-skiing operation available right in the same base area. Bring your ski legs and a willingness to use them; the longest run is nearly 10 miles in length, with incredible fall lines. This season, Revelstoke has improved some of its beginner terrain, providing more green skiing options.

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT

Sandpoint, Idaho • schweitzer.com 2,400 vertical feet • 92 runs Schweitzer Mountain Resort turns 50 this season, with more to celebrate than just being a halfcentury old. In addition to 2,900 skiable acres over two massive bowls, it’s added a beginner terrain park, the Southside Progression Park near the existing Stomping Grounds Park, and the return of the sun deck outside the Lakeview Lodge. Schweitzer is the largest resort in the Spokane area, offering a full slate of lodging options and several dining and shopping outlets in the village to explore after a day on the slopes.

SILVER MOUNTAIN

Kellogg, Idaho • silvermt.com 2,200 vertical feet • 73 runs Silver Mountain Resort consists of two mountain peaks offering 2,200 vertical feet over 1,600 acres. Your adventure at Silver begins with a ride up the scenic gondola to the mountaintop village. Silver features an extensive variety of terrain, with glades and groomers. At the end of your day, treat yourself to waterpark fun and a soak in the hot tubs at the Silver Rapids Waterpark, Idaho’s largest indoor waterpark.

SILVER STAR MOUNTAIN

Vernon, B.C. • skisilverstar.com 2,500 vertical feet • 115 runs Silver Star Mountain offers a full array of dining, shopping, lodging and nightlife options in a quaint, Victorian-themed village. In addition to 3,000-plus acres of inbounds skiing, there are boundless acres to explore in their heli-skiing terrain and several options to keep the kids active, including snowmobiling, a climbing wall, ice skating, and tubing. New this season, Silver Star has added a Katal airbag that will be operated by its Freestyle club on Friday and Saturday evenings. ...continued on next page

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SITZMARK SKI AREA

Havillah, Wash. • gositzmark.org 660 vertical feet • 10 runs Located 20 minutes outside Tonasket in beautiful north-central Washington, the Okanagan highlands fixture offers 10 runs and additional cross-country trails.

SNOQUALMIE PASS

Snoqualmie Pass, Wash. • summitatsnoqualmie.com 2,280 vertical feet • 25 runs With something for everyone, Snoqualmie Pass is the most accessible ski destination in the Seattle area, 54 miles east of the city off Interstate 90. The four areas that make up the Pass, each with its own personality, total 1,981 skiable acres. Alpental is known for having some of the most challenging terrain in North America, while Summit Central features revolutionary terrain parks. Enjoy a fun-filled night at Summit West, or go back in time and ski Summit East.

SNOWBOWL SKI

Missoula, Mont. • montanasnowbowl.com 2,600 vertical feet • 42 runs On the lengthy list of must-ski mom-and-pop Montana ski areas, Snowbowl is up there with the best of them. Located 20 minutes from downtown Missoula, Snowbowl features an annual average of 300 inches of snow and an exciting mix of steep terrain. Stay slopeside

24 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

at the European-style lodge Gelandesprung, or choose from one of the many downtown hotels for the quintessential Missoula experience.

STEVENS PASS

Skykomish, Wash. • stevenspass.com 1,800 vertical feet • 37 runs At first glance, Stevens Pass is nothing spectacular. But spend a little time exploring, and you’ll find Stevens has it all — steeps, groomers and passionate locals. Located off Highway 2, 35 miles west of the quaint Bavarian town of Leavenworth and 90 minutes from Seattle, Stevens has three well-equipped lodges, a terrain park regularly featured in ski movies, terrain to keep the most experienced of skiers and boarders challenged, and spectacular views of the North Cascades.

SUN VALLEY RESORT

Ketchum, Idaho • sunvalley.com 3,400 vertical feet • 75 runs Well-appointed lodges, immaculately groomed runs that seem to go on forever, sunny skies and beautiful views of the Sawtooth mountains — we’re just scratching the surface of what makes Sun Valley so special. The city of Ketchum splits the resort: Bald Mountain offers the big mountain experience, with challenging bowls, steep groomers and the most beautiful mountain

top lodges found in the West, while Dollar Mountain, near the famous Sun Valley Lodge, offers a nicely maintained beginner area, as well as terrain park features that keep park riders going all day.

SUNSHINE VILLAGE

Banff, Alberta • skibanff.com 3,520 vertical feet • 107 runs Located in the heart of Banff National Park, Sunshine Village is full of options for dining, lodging and skiing. With more than 3,300 acres of skiing over three mountains and 12 lifts to get you to where you need to go, Sunshine delivers an exciting ski adventure. The season is long, typically mid-November through mid-May, and its great variety meets the needs of skiers of any ability, with 15 acres of terrain park features. It averages 360 inches of snow annually, with great views and sunshine, and it’s only 90 minutes from downtown Calgary.

TAMARACK

Tamarack, Idaho • tamarackidaho.com 2,800 vertical feet • 37 runs Tamarack, located in the Payette River Mountains of central Idaho, offers a family-friendly experience with amenities for everyone. Tamarack has 900 acres of skiable terrain for all abilities, two terrain parks, 25 kilometers of Nordic trails and an efficient lift system to get you to where you need to go faster. There are several lodging options

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Stevens Pass available in the village area, and enough dining options to keep even the pickiest eaters satisfied.

TIMBERLINE

TURNER MOUNTAIN

Libby, Mont. • skiturner.com 2,110 vertical feet • 25 runs Located in northwestern Montana in the mountains of the Kootenai National Forest, Turner Mountain has the best fall-line skiing in the Northwest, hands down. Find it on a powder day, and you’ll have an experience of a lifetime. This mom-and-pop operation offers a little over 2,000 feet of leg-burning goodness, with more than 60 percent of the terrain geared for expert skiers. A short drive from the small town of Libby, it’s even available for private rental.

Whistler, B.C. • whistlerblackcomb.com 5,280 vertical feet • 200 runs Whistler/Blackcomb, two hours north of Vancouver, won over the world as host of the 2010 Olympic Games. But to Northwest skiers and boarders, it needs no introduction. A premier ski destination with incredible terrain (8,100 acres, 16 alpine bowls), massive amounts of snowfall (an annual average of 469 inches), a sophisticated lift system (37 of them) and spectacular amenities, Whistler/Blackcomb has more than enough to keep you entertained, from first tracks through après-ski enjoyment.

WHITE PASS

Naches, Wash. • skiwhitepass.com 2,050 vertical feet • 45 runs Located on scenic U.S. Highway 12, White Pass offers amenities you might find at bigger resorts but with half the number of people. The mountain has a nice mix of rolling terrain, great tree skiing, terrain parks and a healthy number of cross-country trails. Add beautiful views of nearby Mt. Rainier, onmountain lodging and dining options, and this is a true gem located 50 miles west of Yakima.

 VISIT INLANDER.COM/SNOWLANDER FOR THE LATEST NEWS.

WHITEFISH MOUNTAIN RESORT

Whitefish, Mont. • skiwhitefish.com 2,350 vertical feet • 102 runs Whitefish is getting bigger this season, adding four new intermediate runs. The mountain already offers commanding views of Glacier National Park, Whitefish Lake and the surrounding mountains. The terrain expansion is phase one of a two-year project to expand intermediate terrain. There are endless options for how to experience a Whitefish ski adventure, ranging from how to get there (train, plane or automobile), where to stay (the mountain, downtown or in between at the Lodge at Whitefish Lake) and the sheer amount of terrain available. Bowls, steeps, private stashes and wide-open groomers are all at your fingertips.

WHITEWATER SKI RESORT

Nelson, B.C. • skiwhitewater.com 1,300 vertical feet • 46 runs Whitewater, nestled in the shadows of Ymir Peak outside the funky, eclectic town of Nelson, B.C., regularly attracts attention from around the world from those searching for steeps, deep snow, and a variety of chutes, bowls and glades. In 2010, Whitewater completed its first major terrain expansion in 34 years, adding a triple chair and access to 750 acres of new terrain. 

Freeride Media

Timberline Lodge, Ore. • timberlinelodge.com 3,690 vertical feet • 41 runs The only resort in the Northwest open year-round — almost. Timberline typically celebrates two season openers, one for winter, the other for summer, and boasts an 11-month ski season. This mountain offers old-world charm with the historic lodge at the base area, and new-school skiing and riding with an immense amount of freestyle terrain. Nestled on the slopes of Mt. Hood, Timberline is truly the most unique ski resort in the Northwest.

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 25

WINTER EVENTS $45 per person, including rental and instruction. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) SKI INSTRUCTOR CLINIC Aspiring instructors are invited to take part in the two-day clinic taught by professionals on Nov. 29-30. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208744-1301) TRI-CITIES SKI SWAP For all you snowbirds in southernwestern Washington, head to the gear and clothing swap from Nov. 29-Dec. 1, Fri from 5-9 pm, Sat from 9 am-5 pm, and Sun from 11 am-3 pm. Free admission. Holiday Inn at TRAC, 4525 Convention Pl. Pasco, Wash. theskiswap.com (509-522-1443) VILLAGE LIGHTING CEREMONY Welcome the holiday season with a visit from Santa, hot cider, cookies and Christmas carols, along with a craft bazaar featuring local artists selling handmade items. A toy drive benefiting Toys for Tots also takes place. Nov. 30. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-344-2675)

DECEMBER

HOLIDAY WELCOMING E Santa will hit up the Silver Valley.

ven though the corporate world seems to now agree on starting the holiday rush well before many of us have even planned our Thanksgiving dinner menu, we’re not all in that much of a hurry. To usher in the official holiday season — i.e., after Thanksgiving — the town of Kellogg, Idaho, along with Silver Mountain Resort, host an annual, city-wide celebration on the first Saturday of December, with a parade through town and an evening fireworks display. Though the day-long celebration culminates up at the base of Silver Mountain with a spectacular lighting of the village, events hosted throughout town during the day include a craft bazaar featuring local artisans and vendors, photos with Santa and a kid’s holiday movie screening, says Colleen Rosson, events coordinator with the Silver Valley Chamber of Commerce in Kellogg. Later on, starting at 5 pm, an evening lights parade leads from downtown Kellogg up to the Silver Mountain Village, wrapping things up on a cozy note with Christmas carols, hot beverages and cookies, and another appearance from the Man in Red. — CHEY SCOTT Kellogg Christmas Celebration • Sat, Dec. 7 from 10 am-6:30 pm • Free admisson to most events • Downtown Kellogg, Idaho and Silver Mountain Resort • silvervalleychamber.com

NOVEMBER WAY OF LIFE Screening of Teton Gravity Research’s new winter sports movie. Nov. 8 at 8 pm. $10. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191) SNOWLANDER EXPO 2013 The annual two-day event features local vendors offering discounted prices on winter sports gear, season pass photos from local mountains, factory reps on site and more. Nov. 8-9, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 10 am-6 pm. $5-$7. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/expo POWDERKEG INLANDER BREW FESTIVAL The first annual winter beer festival features Inland Northwest craft beer and cider makers, focusing on seasonal winter

26 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

styles, and runs in conjunction with the Snowlander Expo. Nov. 8-9, Fri from 4-8 pm, Sat from 10 am-6 pm. $7 admission (includes entry to expo), $15-$20 sample packages available, Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/expo SARS SKI SWAP Take part in Schweitzer Alpine Racing School’s annual gear swap on Nov. 9 from 9 am-2 pm. $2/person, $5/family admission. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd., Sandpoint. sars.net (208-263-1081) ANNUAL TWINKIE ROAST Take part in the annual tradition at REI of roasting Twinkies in a “sacrifice” to ask the snow god Ullr to give us a good season. Pick up season passes and check out the offerings from the Spokane Nordic Ski Association. Nov. 10 from 11 am-5 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/

stores/Spokane (328-9900) POWDER TO THE PEOPLE Screening of a snowboard film, benefiting SOS Outreach, featuring giveaways and a signing with professional boarder Jesse Burtner. Nov. 16 at 7 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. spreadtheshred@gmail.com BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL Screening of the touring film festival, featuring films on outdoor exploration and adventure, hosted by Mountain Gear. Nov. 15 and 17. Time and ticket prices TBA. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) CROSS OVER TO CROSS COUNTRY Skiers don’t have to wait until the lifts open to enjoy the early season snow —  hit the cross-country trails instead during introductory weekends from Nov. 16 to Dec. 8 (Sat and Sun from 9-11 am).

SNOWSHOEING BASICS Find out what kind of gear you’ll need to get started in this winter activity and where to go for a good hike. Dec. 5 at 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/ stores/spokane (328-9900) BIG WHITE LIGHT UP The annual kickoff of the holiday season starts when the village comes alive with lights as families bundle up to watch and enjoy hot chocolate and roasted chestnuts. Dec. 6 at 6:30 pm. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) WSU SKI AND GEAR SWAP The 39th annual WSU gear swap includes vendors from all over the Northwest selling new and used items at discounted prices. Dec. 6-7, Fri from 6-9 pm and Sat from 9 am-noon. $1 admission. WSU Hollingbery Fieldhouse, Pullman. skiswap. wsu.edu (335-8732) TOUR OF LIGHTS As part of the mountain’s annual Christmas Light Up, new this year is a selfguided nighttime snowshoe hike through the forest to view lighted displays. Dec. 7 from 5-8 pm. Free, excludes snowshoe rental. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) SKIING & SNOWBOARDING BASICS New to the snow-sport world? Attend this informational session on picking out appropriate clothing and gear to stay warm and comfortable on the slopes, and find out what to expect once out on the mountain. Dec. 12 at 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/stores/Spokane (328-9900) SCHWEITZER COMMUNITY DAY Head up to the mountain and take advantage of $10 lift tickets — 100 percent of the proceeds will be donated to area nonprofits. Dec. 13. $10. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-255-3070)

BIG REDS AT BIG WHITE The popular annual wine-tasting event returns in 2013, featuring wines from more than 30 local wineries in the Okanagan region, paired with appetizers from the mountain’s restaurants. Dec. 13-14 from 7-9 pm. $60/one night, $100/two nights. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) WOMEN’S SNOWSHOE DAY This day is all about the ladies, who are invited to bring a friend up to the mountain for two-for-one trail passes and snowshoe rentals. Dec. 14. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649) NIGHT SKIING KICKOFF PARTY Bringing the first night skiing event of the season in with a bang, the mountain will be aglow in lights and everyone will get a chance to win some sweet swag. Dec. 20. Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr., Mead, Wash. mtspokane.com (238-2220) SCHWEITZER FOUNDERS DAY This year’s Founders Day is a big deal, marking 50 years since Schweitzer was founded. In celebration, all lift tickets are $19.63, and the 25-year time capsule will be opened. Dec. 14. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-2553070) SANTAS SKI FREE The first 30 skiers and riders to the Village in full Santa or Mrs. Claus attire get free lift tickets. Then the whole group of Santas rides down the mountain for a group photo. Dec. 21 at 9 am. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) FREERIDERS CAMP Children (ages 10 and older) are invited to ride with the pros and play in the terrain parks in daily camps held from Dec. 21-23. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) CHRISTMAS ON THE MOUNTAIN Attend the torchlight parade, kids activities including the chance to meet Santa himself, as well as live music in the lodge. Dec. 21. Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com (663-6543) CHRISTMAS AT SILVER MOUNTAIN It you’re celebrating the holidays on the mountain, keep an eye out for the jolly old elf himself on the slopes. Dec 24-25. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-3442675) CHRISTMAS BUFFET Enjoy a traditional holiday feast on Dec. 25 from 11 am-2 pm. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-7441301) CRUISE THE BLUES Head up to the mountain and ski all the intermediate “blue” (intermediate/ advanced skiers and riders) runs to win prizes on Dec. 28. Whitefish Mountain Resort, 3889 Big Mountain Rd., Whitefish, Mont. skiwhitefish.com (406-8622900) MOUNTAIN MUSIC FESTIVAL The annual series kicks off with a con-

cert in the lodge and night skiing on the slope, with concerts and night-skiing to follow every Saturday. Dec. 28 through Feb. 22, Saturdays from 4-8 pm. Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com (663-6543) SILVER STAR RAIL JAM The first rail jam of the season is held under the lights and features skiers and snowboarders performing jaw-dropping tricks as they compete for prizes. Dec. 28 from 6-8 pm. Price TBA. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) NIGHT SKIING FOOD DRIVE One of only four night skiing opportunities at 49 this year, featuring lit runs on both upper and lower mountain areas. Bring a couple cans of food to get a lift ticket for only $4. Dec. 28. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649) AVALANCHE AWARENESS COURSE Learn what the indicators of an avalanche are as well as survival and digging methods in this one-day introductory course on Dec. 29. $35. Whitewater Ski Resort, 601 Front St., Nelson, B.C. skiwhitewater. com (250-354-4944) GREAT SCOTT CROSS COUNTRY RACES The annual event returns, where relay teams take to the mountain on their snow implement of choice: skis, snowshoes or snowbikes. Dec. 29. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) AVALANCHE AWARENESS CLASS Learn the signs of danger and how to get to safety. Dec. 29 from 9:30 am-12:30 pm. Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com (663-6543) NEW YEAR’S PARTY Celebrate and count down to the New Year with your family earlier in the evening with a special NYE dinner, or head to the dance party and countdown to midnight in Noah’s Canteen. Dec. 31. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-3442675) NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY There are parties for all ages, including a tubing party, “tween” party and a countdown with live music all night at Taps bar. Dec. 31. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

JANUARY JACKASS DAY Celebrate the mountain’s 45th birthday and humble beginnings with a party in Noah’s Loft featuring ski and board movies, games and more on Jan. 10. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-3442675) DOWNHILL DIVAS A women-only ski program with the mountain’s top female instructors, intended to spark camaraderie while focusing skiing skills, starts on Jan. 10, and takes place on Fridays from 9:30 am to noon through March 21. $35/session or

$90 for three sessions. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208744-1301) WINTER TRAILS DAY The Snowsports Industries of America Winter Trails Day gives kids and adults the chance to try out snowshoeing and cross-country skiing by offering free access to trails and hosted snowshoe hikes. Jan. 11. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) FUN AND FEMALE SNOWSHOE PROGRAM A ladies-only snowshoe adventure through the pristine B.C. mountains, led by the mountain’s female staff members, is a great introduction to the low-impact sport of snowshoeing. Jan. 11, 18 and 25 from 3-4:30 pm. $59 per person. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) FREE SKI SCHOOL Register early for Lookout’s popular free ski school program for kids (ages 6-17), which takes place every Saturday from Jan. 11 through March 15. Beginners from 10-11:15 am, intermediate from 11:30 am12:45 pm. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) NATIONAL LEARN TO SKI & SNOWBOARD WEEK If learning how to ski or snowboard — or improving the skills you already have — is on your list of things to do this season, check out the weeklong schedule of events from Jan. 12-18. Whitewater Ski Resort, 601 Front St., Nelson, B.C. skiwhitewater.com (250-354-4944) WINTERFEST & DEMO DAY Enjoy the heart of the ski season with a free snowshoe trek through the woods, mini ski lessons, product demos and more from Jan. 11-12. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649) KID’S TELEMARK SKI CLINIC Introductory clinic for kids ages 6-14, led by guest instructor Ned Ryerson from Aspen, Colo. Jan. 12 and/or 14, half-day or full-day sessions from 10 am-3 pm. $49-$69. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649) MOONLIGHT DINE & SKI Enjoy an evening dinner at the summit before flying back down the mountain. Jan. 18. Time and price TBA. Whitefish Mountain Resort, 3889 Big Mountain Rd., Whitefish, Mont. skiwhitefish.com (406862-2900) NIGHT SKIING FOOD DRIVE One of four night skiing opportunities at 49 this year, featuring lit runs on both upper and lower mountain areas. Bring a couple cans of food to get a lift ticket for only $4. Jan. 18. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah, Wash. ski49n.com (935-6649) NORTHERN LIGHTS The mountain comes alive with bursts of color and light during the annual torchlight parade, fireworks show and an after party in the Village. Jan. 19. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) 

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28 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Your Adventure Starts Here

IN GEAR

HEEDING THE CALL When the powder is deep and the mountain beckons, who can say no? BY JEN FORSYTH A winter ritual, with little shoveling JIM CAMPBELL ILLUSTRATION

L

iving in a mountain town during ski season can be summed up in a couple of cold realities: four months of sleep deprivation and neglected personal responsibilities. Not much happens other than “ski, eat, sleep and repeat.” Hundreds of dollars are spent to acquire new gear. My justification? I don’t have an expensive jeans or purse habit, but an expensive ski habit. I spend all fall simplifying life so once ski season arrives, life can go on autopilot until spring. That said, ski life presents some mountain-town living woes.

CLOTHING CONUNDRUM

Simplicity stops when I go to my ski closet. Some of my hardest decisions during the season have to do with what to wear. I have a puffy jacket for every occasion — eight puffy jackets, to be honest.

POWDER PROBLEMS

During the season, I live for powder days when we get snow down in the valleys. This typically ensures a “blower” powder day on the mountain. The blanket of snow in town comes with annoyance that I must shovel snow, thanks to city ordinances. I’ll assess if I can neglect snow removal until after “hot lapping” my favorite powder stashes for the day. The neglect continues due to the powder-day ritual of toasting a great day with an après-ski beer. Upon returning home, I hope my neighbor has cleared my sidewalk. If so, a bottle of wine goes a long way to say “thank you.” But it’s not always that simple. Why I don’t just buy a snowblower? I can’t — I have superstitions. If I buy one and we have a bad snow year, it’s because I bought a snowblower. Now if someone gives me a

snowblower? That’s different. Hint, hint.

WORK WOES

Certain days require me to ski, then go to work. This is the only way I can reach 100 ski days in one season. This routine sees me heading up the hill to get in an hour of skiing before heading back down the mountain to go to work. Usually after changing quickly in the parking lot, brushing my hair, pulling it back to hide my helmet hair, and arriving at work with wind-burned, goggle-indented cheeks, complemented by an ear-to-ear smile.

TRAVEL TROUBLES

My travel routine could be classified as “burning it at both ends.” The 100-day goal typically requires me to ski my “home mountain” then drive to my destination, only to arrive in the middle of the night in a blustery snowstorm, and somehow justify that it makes no sense to get a hotel room, but rather to just sleep in the car in the parking lot — that’s why zero-degree sleeping bags and headlamps were invented, right? After a couple of days of hard-charging a new mountain, the drive home is usually in the wee hours of the night. I arrive home sleep-deprived, too tired to shovel the newly accumulated snow that fell while I was out of town. Again, I neglect it so I can find the comforts of my warm bed and rest my tired legs. I fall asleep promising myself I’ll get up early to do some snow management before heading back up the mountain the next morning — unless, of course, it’s another powder day. Living in a mountain town can bring its own vicious cycles.  jen@snowlander.com

EXPERT OPINIONS special advertising section

Winter in the Inland Northwest is loaded with opportunity. There’s so many great activities and many things to prepare for as we move into the season of snow. It’s always helpful to have experts to help guide the way. The following opinions and short features from area businesses can help as you navigate your way to a great winter season.

gear The Importance of a Good Fit by: Corey Smith Ski boots provide the direct connection between you and your skis.  The movements of the boots control the movements of the skis, and since you control the boots, you want to be sure you to have the best fit possible – leaving nothing to chance between you and the skis. A sloppy fitting boot can allow the foot to move around within rather than being one with the ski.  This can make it very difficult, not only to start and complete turns, but to maintain general control; ultimately resulting in fatigue and possible injury due to greater muscle use.  Some people try to compensate for a sloppy fit by wearing additional socks or tightening the boots as tight as they can get them.  This can result in poor circulation in the feet causing them to become very cold while skiing.  A properly fitted boot will allow you to control your skis, keep your feet warm and won’t cause rubbing or blistering anywhere on the foot or ankle; nor will it cause bruising to the shin area. Always take your time when purchasing boots and always go to a local shop, never purchase boots on line. The liner inside a ski boot will compress once you’ve worn it a while so it’s important to get a good feel for the boot by wearing it for several minutes.  Take the boot off and put it back on. See how it CONTACT US feels after another few minutes.  A poor fitting ski boot has the potential not only to be very painful, but can also PHONE 1-208-772-0613 negatively affect your future relationship with the sport. EMAIL cda@tri-state.com

WEB www.t-state.com

Fitness for the slopes If you are new to skiing or snowboarding or if it’s your first time on the slopes since last season; ski and snowboard fitness is something we all need to look at before the snow flies. Focus on these health and fitness tips so you can hit the slopes all season long. Hit the gym. Priming your muscles before the snow even falls will prep you for skiing’s intense workout. It’s best to try and avoid skiing yourself into shape. You will enjoy the sport more if you are physically fit. Try hitting up the local gym and work on strengthening your legs and cardiovascular system with both strength and endurance training. Remember weight bearing exercise plays an important role in strengthening tendons and ligaments. Eat healthy and stay hydrated. A long day skiing or riding increases the amount of fuel your body needs. A full healthy meal before you hit the slopes is ideal. If you are crunched for time, adding good carbohydrates to your diet will keep you toasty and full of energy. It’s easy to forget how much you are losing in sweat when it’s cold because you just don’t feel it. Drink more water and stay hydrated. Start out easy and follow the code. The biggest mistake skiers and snowboarders make is skiing or riding beyond their skill level. Even experienced powder hounds will need to take it easy for the first few runs. Remember there is a full season ahead and you want to enjoy it to the fullest. Make sure you know and follow the Skiers Responsibility code. Ski in control so you are able to avoid others; give people downhill the right of way; look up before you merge onto a trail; never rest in a blind spot for other skiers or riders; and always obey posted warning signs. Follow these rules, and you’ll be riding the slopes well into spring.

CONTACT US 3311 Flowery Trail Road, Chewelah WA PHONE 509-935-6649 EMAIL ski49n@ski49n.com WEB www.ski49n.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 29

EXPERT OPINIONS | special advertising section

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Here are a couple crucial things to remember while in search of the perfect boot for you. • Boots are by far the most important piece of equipment you will own. • The first time you try on a boot will be the tightest it will ever be. After 4-5 days of skiing they will feel significantly bigger than when you first tried them on in the shop. • Make sure you are shell fit in a boot, if you don’t know what that is, ask your salesperson, if they don’t know what that is, go somewhere else… • There is seldom such thing a thing as a perfect fitting boot right off the shelf, luckily any good bootfitter can customize a boot to fit your foot perfectly, especially after a couple days of skiing. • Get a footbed, whether trim-to-fit or custom they will help the fit and performance of your boot. Come see at the ski show, or the shop, and we can get you completely dialed in!

CONTACT US ADDRESS 2925 S. Regal PHONE 509-534-4554 Facebook.com/SpokaneAlpinehaus

This year why not make the holiday season extra special by visiting the charming town of Nelson, British Columbia and ride the deep powder of Whitewater Ski Resort? Located just 3 hours North of Spokane, Whitewater is known for its Canadian hospitality, delicious food, and deep coldsmoke powder. For families travelling with younger children make sure to check out Whitewater’s Holiday Camps. This 5 day camp is for kids aged 4 to 13 and is designed to improve their skills amongst new friends. Camps run daily starting December 27, just $178 + tax for a full week of full day lessons! Can’t commit? Ask about our drop in rates! NEW this year Queen City Shuttle & Charters is running a shuttle five days a week from Spokane to Nelson, just $198 + gst for a return trip! www.kootenayshuttle.com/spokane/ Ski & Stay Packages starting at $97+tax per person, based on double occupancy. Call now to book a your holiday full of Canadian memories.

CONTACT US PHONE 1-800-666-9420 EMAIL info@skiwhitewater.com WEB www.skiwhitewater.com

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EXPERT OPINIONS

mountain events 49 Degrees North December 14th • Holiday Season/ 7 Day Operations begin December 28th • Night Skiing January 4th • Night Skiing

Lookout Pass November 29th • Boomers Friday November 30th • Ski Instructors clinic December 1st • Ski Instructors clinic December 19th • Christmas Holiday begins December 21th-23th • Freeriders camp

Mt Spokane December 18th • Holiday Season/ 7 Day Operations begin Dec 18th- Jan 2nd • Holiday Daily Daycare Dec 20th • Night Skiing begins & Tubing Hill opens

Schweitzer November 16th • Pass pick up/ Ski Shack December 13th • Community Day December 14th • Founders Day December 15th • Nice Turns trial run December 24th • Ski with Santa

Silver Mt November 2nd • Winter Swap November 29th • Projected opening November 30th • Village Lighting Ceremony December 20th-22nd • US Airbag Tour January 10th • Jackass Day/ 45th Anniversary

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 SNOWLANDER 31

32 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Bringing the ’50s Back Mary Lou Henderson might not have been a star cook, but she made one heck of a dip BY JO MILLER

A

photograph taken on a pine-tree-lined street shows a 20-something woman donning a collared checkered dress, a long coat, a short, bobbed haircut and a smile. That’s Mary Lou Henderson in a black-andwhite snapshot of mid-20th century Spokane. Her family — specifically her daughter and two of her grandchildren — recently dug up that photo and many others from the basement and digitized her likeness for the wraparound label of a dip. Called Henderson Dip, it was Henderson’s creation from the 1950s. Her family is now commercially releasing it through Cliff Cannon Foods, the company they created last year. It’s now available in local grocery stores. Henderson grew up in the childhood home of Bing Crosby, which her parents bought from the Crosby family. It’s now part of the Gonzaga University campus. Then after a short stint of living in the Eastern Washington town of Hartline, Henderson returned to Spokane in the ’50s with her husband and lived in the South Hill’s Cliff Cannon neighborhood. Henderson was a typical housewife, says her daughter Becky Fix, a local elementary school teacher. Henderson, who passed away in 1984, was fun and bubbly, loved decorating the house, socializing with her girlfriends and matching her ...continued on next page YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 29

$17.Salad9Entrée5 Dessert

FOOD | BUSINESS

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Henderson Dip owners (left to right) Becky Fix, daughter Taylor Kaiser and son Christopher Greene. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“BRINGING THE ’50S BACK,” CONTINUED... clothes perfectly. “We were a little worried sometimes about her fashion sense,” she says, noting a time her mom wore a paper dress to match the paper tablecloths at a rehearsal dinner. Another thing Henderson did that sometimes turned out a bit questionable was cook. Fix says she overcooked things. “Her cooking was always kind of a debatable issue in our family,” she says. “I think she thought she was pretty good at it, but I remember when [my parents] went out for dinner on a weekend with friends or something like that, we were tickled we could have Swanson TV dinners. That was a great treat for us.” Henderson did manage to make some dishes well, but those were usually for guests, like when she hosted her supper club. “When she had people over, she cooked up a storm,” Fix says. “She did twice-baked potatoes, beef stroganoff, those kind of things. But as a child in the house, we kind of always felt the company got better food than we did.” But one thing was always present, and that was the dip. “My grandma was not a very good cook,” says Christopher Greene, Henderson’s grandson (Fix’s son) and a Spokane attorney. “She has just a handful of recipes that have been passed down, and this is one of them.”

T

he thick, creamy tomato-and-onion dip — which the family always called Henderson Dip — was a staple at family gatherings.

Baby Back Ribs

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“Through the ’50s and ’60s and on, this dip has kind of been at every family event: funerals, weddings, barbeques, etc.,” Greene says. The dip has a cream cheese base with tomato, onion and secret spices. It’s not like a French onion or ranch dip, but has its own flavor, he says. Carrots and other vegetables are a good dipping choice, and it works as a spread on sandwiches, bagels and burgers as well as in recipes, such as stuffed chicken breast and salmon. “For generations we had it with Ruffles,” he says. Fix says she remembers watching her mom make the dip for every gathering, and after Henderson died, Fix took on the duty of bringing the dip to each get-together. “It was something that was just always there,” Fix says. “As we grew up … [my mom] always said to us kids, ‘You need to bring this to the party. You need to bring this to the lake. You always need to bring Henderson Dip wherever you go.’ It just took on a life of its own. It really did.”

N

ow the family is bringing the dip to the public. About two years ago, Fix and Greene, along with Greene’s sister Taylor Kaiser, who works as an insurance agent, started the process of creating Cliff Cannon Foods and getting Henderson Dip ready to distribute. The idea to package and sell the dip was originally Fix’s brother’s, who would make the suggestion at family gatherings. He died in 1994 before he could do anything about it, and between his death and 2011, no one really thought about selling Henderson Dip, Greene says. It came up again when Greene was unemployed for two years between taking the bar exam and looking for a job. After Fix’s husband passed away in 2011, Greene told her that maybe it was time to start up the family business. “It came to us at the right time,” Fix says. “It filled a lot of voids.” Now Henderson Dip can be found at the Spokane Rosauers stores and all Yoke’s locations. Greene says he plans to eventually bring it to the rest of the Northwest, as well as add other products, including more dip flavors and other Henderson recipes from the ’50s. Between scouring old photo albums, digging up newspaper clippings of Henderson on society pages and gathering family and friends at their launch party at the Spokane Club last week, going back in time has made the whole experience an emotional one, says Fix. “It’s been a big journey of awakening that past,” she says. The past was on display at the launch party, with black-andwhite photos of Henderson on every table and all the guests tasting Henderson Dip with chips, vegetables, sliders and artichokes. “I know she’d be proud of all of us,” Fix says. “She would have been the light of the party… the belle of the ball. She probably would’ve been wearing a paper dress and had her hair styled and get quite a kick out of it.” n

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 31

FOOD | LATE NIGHT

FOOD | BEER

Snow Beer The PowderKeg brew festival offers cold comfort for your taste buds BY MIKE BOOKEY

B

eer and snow are perfect mates. A good, hearty beer pairs well with a snowy evening or a long day on the slopes. It’s with this in mind that the Inlander decided to add a beer festival to its annual Snowlander EXPO. The featured beers from 20 different breweries run the gamut in terms of style, but mostly lean toward the stronger, sweeter brews that go well with cold weather and holiday celebrations. With a tasting package, you get a sampling glass and can taste your way around or choose a pint if you find something especially tasty. Commemoritive stainless steel growlers are also for sale. Here are five to keep on your shortlist to taste at this weekend’s PowderKeg brew festival.

GOATNIK RUSSIAN IMPERIAL STOUT

Now with new owners, Wild Dawgs has reopened downtown.

Return of the Dawgs

Iron Goat Brewing Co. This Spokane brewery has been impressive this fall with their fresh-hop beers, and this high-gravity stout shows that they can handle their malts. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Downtown’s Wild Dawgs serves up hot dogs and flatbreads long into the night BY LISA WAANANEN

B

ack when it opened in 2011, Wild Dawgs was known more for its logo than its food. The cartoonishly raunchy logo of a woman eating a hot dog spurred feverish TV coverage and divided Spokanites into those who found it hilarious and those who found it offensive. Some citizens boycotted the joint. Controversy aside, the spot earned a following as a late-night hangout, and Brett Hendren and Scott Lea were among the regulars who were bummed when the place closed last year. But they’d been thinking about getting into the bar and restaurant industry, so after months of calling the former owner they finally got in touch in July and took over. Hendren and Lea have made some changes — after talking with other local businesses, they decided to ditch the controversial logo. They’ve kept the font, though, and they’re not against fun — there’s always a new joke or deep thought chalked on the sandwich board out front. Tucked under the concrete swoops of the Parkade, the diner-style nook is a cozy spot to start a night on the town or stop for a hangover-preventing snack before heading

32 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

home. Few places in Spokane are open so late — 3 am on Friday and Saturday — and Hendren says nights vary from low-key to packed, based on what else is happening downtown. The most popular gourmet “dawgs” ($5.95) remain on the menu, like the “Funky Mama” with jalapeño, mozzarella, grilled onions, tomato and pineapple sauce, or the “I ♥ Spokane” with cream cheese, bacon, onions, mushrooms, ketchup, mozzarella and pineapple. Diners can opt for a German sausage inside their massive bun, or for the popular veggie dog. “I get tons of regulars just from that,” Hendren says. But not everyone wants a hot dog, Hendren says, so they added a menu of flatbreads with a variety of toppings ($5.95). Right now they serve wine and beer, with an emphasis on local and regional breweries, and plan to have a whiskey-focused full bar by New Year’s.  Wild Dawgs • 102 N. Howard • Mon-Thu, 11 am-10 pm; Fri-Sat, 11 am-2:30 am • 255-3688 • facebook.com/ Wilddawgs

BOOTJACK IPA

Icicle Brewing It’s not a winter beer, but crisp, floral notes result from the choice Yakima hops in this brew.

HO! HO! WINTER ALE

Diamond Knot Brewing This Mukilteo, Wash.-based brewery has been cranking out this burly winter beer for almost a decade. Ringing in at a relatively daunting 8.5 percent alcohol, the Ho! Ho! can sneak up on unsuspecting imbibers — but it’s impressively drinkable for such a high-gravity brew.

WINTER WARMER ALE

No-Li Brewhouse This Spokane-style seasonal is red in color and is candy-sweet on the front end, but is backed up with enough hops for a nice balance.

SAISON D’FRIOD

Ramblin’ Road Beer We haven’t had it, but fledgling brewery Ramblin’ Road is looking to make a splash with this Belgian beer, the only saison to be found at PowderKeg.  PowderKeg • Fri, Nov. 8, 4-9 pm; Sat, Nov. 9, 10 am-6 pm • Spokane Convention Center • Tasting packages $15-$25

FOOD | SAMPLER

BURGERS

The Frankenstein burger at Boomers JENNIFER DEBARROS PHOTO

BLACK DIAMOND BILLIARDS AND EATERY 9614 E. Sprague | 891-8357 It’s one of the best reasons to dabble in Spokane Valley nightlife. The Black Diamond — or the Diamond, as the locals say — is a one-stop adult playground, filled to the brim with pool tables, live DJs, food specials and a ton of craft brews on tap. Monday is spaghetti night, and you can fill yourself up with a plate of pasta, salad and garlic bread for just $7. With daily happy hour on weekdays and a full dessert menu, there are so many other reasons to love this place. BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR AND GRILL 18219 E. Appleway | 368-9847 Two things about Boomers that you need to forget: it’s in a shopping center strip mall surrounded by grassy, empty lots. Once you’ve forgotten this, you’re free to enjoy the kind of place where bands play classic rock every weekend and the burgers are juicy and full-textured. The best seller is the Frankenstein, a burger decked out in fried Spam, fried egg, deep-fried onion, chipotle brown gravy and (says the menu) an ambulance. The Patty Benatar, Mr. Mojo Rising and Sublime burger each come with their own signature extras. CHARLEY’S GRILL & SPIRITS 801 N. Monroe | 328-8911 This cozy restaurant and lounge on Monroe provides a quiet retreat from the hustle and bustle of the courthouse next door. The menu features Angus beef hamburgers, 8-ounce sirloin steaks, fried appetizers, a full bar and a retro cigarette vending machine. Tickets for the Spokane Arena, INB Performing Arts Center, Fox Theater, Bing Crosby Theater, or Spokane Civic Theatre will get you 20 percent off food items.

CRAZY G’S 821 N. Division | 315-8943 This clean, modern local hot spot, with nostalgic posters of Spokane, serves hot dogs, Phillys and burgers with pretty much any kind of cheese your heart desires. The burger menu options are merely suggestions, so dare to be different by adding toppings like bacon, sautéed mushrooms, caramelized onions — and of course crazy sauce. MARY LOU’S MILK BOTTLE 802 W. Garland | 325-1772 You can’t go wrong with diner-style food and ’50s nostalgia, especially at this neighborhood icon. The retro-throwback restaurant in the heart of the Garland District takes customers back to a simpler time, when the burgers were served with homemade milkshakes, the fries were cut fresh, and the bill didn’t hit our pocketbooks too hard. You can relive the past with a patty melt and huckleberry milkshake, made (of course) with Mary Lou’s own homemade ice cream. PARADISE CREEK BREWERY 245 SE Paradise St., Pullman | 3389463 Paradise Creek finally gives you an excuse to use the words “adorable” and “beer” in the same sentence. Located in an antique post office, they’ve mastered the art of taking the old and adding flair. Standouts include the Lamb Burger and the BBQ sauce made with their own porter. THRIFTY SCOTSMAN 12024 E. Sprague | 928-2214 They weren’t joking with the thrift thing. This place is cheap. Inside the small, unadorned block building are a smattering of old-fashioned arcade machines, but the real fun is going through the drive-thru. Trust us. Try a Scotsman Burger. You’ll be glad you did. 

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Always in reach NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 33

Not Hammered Home Thor: The Dark World muddles in disjointed complexity BY SETH SOMMERFELD

I

mminent universal destruction. Intergalactic love. her body, awakening the dark elves and starting their plot Snarky Kat Dennings one-liners. Portal-esque dimento find her and use the power to destroy the universe. sion-hopping. Stellan Skarsgård running around Thor must pull out all the stops, including trusting the Stonehenge in his birthday suit. Thor: The Dark World tries antagonistic Loki (Tom Hiddleston), in the hopes of to tie all these fragmented elements together for another thwarting the elves. hit installment in Marvel’s ongoing Avengers saga. The The characters spend most of the movie’s first half key word being tries. delivering dialogue that attempts to explain the plot, but After the events of The Avengers, it remains a jumbled mess throughout. At THOR: THE Thor (Chris Hemsworth) battles and one point, after one of Thor’s informaDARK WORLD brings peace to the ethereal nine realms. tive monologues about Asgard, Jane, Rated PG-13 Back on Earth, his love, astrophysicist batting her lashes and caressing his hand, Directed by Alan Taylor Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), waits and says, “I like the way you explain things.” Starring Chris Hemsworth, continues to research with her quipThe sheer stupidity of the allegedly happy assistant Darcy Lewis (Dennings). Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston romantic line, set against a scenic, spaceUnfortunately, the nine realms are planet CGI backdrop, immediately trigcoming into alignment for the first time gered flashbacks to Portman’s abysmal in millennia, causing invisible interdimensional portals performance opposite Hayden Christensen in Star Wars to appear. Jane accidentally is sucked into one that leads Episode II: Attack of the Clones. directly to long-buried Aether, the power source for the The first Thor movie succeeded largely because Asancient dark elves — led by the evil Malekith (Christogard’s complexity wasn’t the focus. All that needed to be pher Eccleston) — who millennia ago were defeated by understood was that Thor had been banished to a small the Asgardians. She accidentally triggers it and it enters New Mexico town. Thor became likable via archetypi-

34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Hemsworth’s hammer falls soft this time around. cal, fish-out-of-water humor. But with the majority of The Dark World taking place on Thor’s otherworldly turf, Hemsworth has to play the character in a cocksure way that detracts from his endearing-galoot dynamic. Try as he might, Thor is no Asgardian Tony Stark. It’s apt that The Dark World centers on quickly switching between realms; the film’s tone switches at an even more breakneck speed, compounding the confusion. It’s almost more of a comedy than an action film, with characters slinging witty retorts more often than Thor slings his hammer. But the constant comic relief undercuts the emotional weight of the dramatic moments. It’s not that the jokes aren’t amusing, but instead of giving characters depth, they become two-dimensional joke delivery machines. The screenwriting team clearly took cues from the wit of Joss Whedon’s Avengers script, but forgot its heart. At one point, a sacrificial death that’s meant to ring tragic is immediately followed by Dr. Erik Selvig (Skarsgård) giving a speech packed with loony scientific jargon in what’s revealed to be a mental institute. For all its shortcomings, Thor: The Dark World employs some creative, unexpected plot turns, keeping viewers on their toes. And in terms of keeping up with the narrative story line leading to the next Avengers film, The Dark World is essential viewing. Those willing to just give into the simplicity of “Thor’s the good guy. The dark elves are bad. Let’s watch Thor beat the dark elves,” could leave satisfied with a large-scale action film that’s surprisingly funny. But it requires a commitment to shutting one’s brain off. Perhaps that should be the movie’s tagline. Thor: The Dark World: “Shhh… just go with it. Avengers 2 will be here soon enough.” 

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS 12 YEARS A SLAVE

Based on his autobiography, this film tells the story of Solomon Northup, the free man turned slave in pre-Civil War U.S. It’s a heart wrenchingly amazing story about a man conned into slavery despite being a free citizen and his desperate fight for freedom. Chitewel Ejiofor finally gets center stage, but the film also features an all-star cast including Brad Pitt and Paul Giamatti. Definitely a powerfully artsy take on an old subject. (KS) Rated R

ABOUT TIME

British, redheaded and freckled, Domhnall Gleeson knows how to be awkward, because he already looks the part. Then you add Rachel McAdams and have a dramatic romance. The story follows 21-year-old Tim who finds out he’s inherited his family’s curse: the ability to time travel. Turns out, it’s a great way to get a girlfriend. A moment becomes moments, and his gift allows him to take a little more from each one. (KS) Rated R

AFTER TILLER

Martha Shane and Lana Wilson direct a film about uncomfortable realities. In 2009, doctor George Tiller was gunned down in church. He was one of the few doctors to perform third trimester abortions, and the eighth doctor murdered for his profession. Controversial even among pro-choice voters, this documentary follows late-term abortionists, and the tragic stories of the women who seek out the surgery. Forcing viewers into the shoes of women who are struggling with the morality of their decisions, as well as the practitioner who faces literal gunfire because of their occupation, After Tiller confronts the complexity of choice. At Magic Lantern (ER) PG-13

MONEY FOR NOTHING: INSIDE THE FEDERAL RESERVE

Director Jim Bruce takes us inside the Federal Reserve, connecting America’s central bank to an ever shifting economic system. Through the tangled web of money lent and spent, economists and senior fed officials are convinced that it all leads back to the Fed itself. Through a myriad of reviews and experts, this documentary cracks open the mystery of the Federal Reserve, an institution that has been regulating America’s economy for more than 100 years. (ER) Unrated

MOTHER OF GEORGE

The story unfolds simply enough, with a wedding — a gloriously colorful, traditional African ceremony. The newlyweds are Ayodele (an incredible Isaach De Bankolé) and Adenike (Danai Gurira, also amazing), two immigrants in their 30s who love each other wholly. Ayodele runs a restaurant with his younger brother, working hard to provide for his wife so she can stay at home. But when they are unable to conceive a child, things change drastically. At Magic Lantern (LJ) Rated R

THOR: THE DARK WORLD

After the events of The Avengers, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) battles and brings peace to the ethereal nine realms. Back on Earth, his love, astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), waits and continues to research with her quip-happy assistant Darcy Lewis (Kat Dennings). Unfortunately, the nine realms are coming into alignment for the first time in millennia, causing invisible interdimensional portals to appear, threatening to destroy the universe. (SS) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING ALL IS LOST

We never learn the name (or anything else) of the grizzled yachtsman (Robert Redford) whose eight-day fight to survive on the open sea is chronicled in J.C. Chandor’s magnificently primal All Is Lost. After all, how in the world are we supposed to sympathize with our soggy protagonist if we don’t know details about a rift with his daughter, or a childhood trauma he needs to overcome, or even why he’s sailing alone in the middle of nowhere? Chandor refuses to waste time on such frills, allowing Redford’s status as iconic figure to do much of the heavy lifting. The result is a kind of pure visual cinema that tramples the listlessness of other films that call themselves “action movies.” (SR) Rated PG-13

BAD GRANDPA

The Jackass crew makes its triumphant return as Johnny Knoxville takes on 86-year-old Irving Zisman, while he and his grandson, Billy, played by Jackson Nicoll, travel across country. Apparently the fake old people doing bad things trope hasn’t been beaten to death with a stick just yet, as Zisman performs prank after obnoxious prank on unsuspecting victims, who can’t believe this “grandpa’s” behavior. (But, of course, they at-

tempt to help him through his illegal or just plain stupid predicaments.) Some of the highlights include, in typical Jackass fashion, thievery, crashing into giant penguins and putting a child stripper routine into a beauty pageant. (ER) Rated R

BLUE JASMINE

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the havenots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 35

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 8th THRU NOVEMBER 14th

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FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

NOW PLAYING fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. Another great film from director Paul Greengrass (United 93, the first two Bourne entries). (ES) Rated PG-13

CARRIE

Chloe Grace Moretz revives Carrie White, a shy, lonely girl who craves love and attention from the very group that viscously bullies her. Her overly religious mom, portrayed by Julianne Moore, isn’t much help either, as her solution to Carrie’s woes is corporal punishment. When she’s invited to prom (yeah, we know how this is going to end) and is pushed too far, she goes on a telekinetic rampage with a body count in this retelling of Stephen King’s classic novel. (ER) Rated R

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS TWO

Flint Lockwood (voice of Bill Hader,) the lovable inventor, has achieved his dreams and is now working for his idol, Chester V, creating things to benefit society. But when he learns that the food machine he thought he had destroyed is still up and running this time producing scary humanoid food hybrids including melonheads, mosquitoasts,  and shrimpanzees he and his team, including love interest and weather girl Sam Sparks (voice of Anna Faris,) must get rid of the machine once and for all in this animated flick. PG (ER)

THE COUNSELOR

With an all-star cast, director Ridley Scott shines light on the extravagant nature of greed. When a lawyer (Michael Fassbender) wants to make himself a quick buck, he decides to involve himself in the world of drug trafficking. All does not go as planned, of course, and the fallout affects everyone in his life, including beautiful fiancée (Penelope Cruz), seedy middleman (Brad Pitt) and mysterious power couple (Cameron Diaz and Javier Bardem). (ER) Rated R

DESERT RUNNERS

Some people are bonkers, as evidenced by the four runners featured in this gorgeously produced documentary. They are each running in four different races, each entailing a five-day, 155-mile trek through some of the planet’s most brutal deserts. At first the film seems like a simple, “look-at-these-weirdos” type story, but soon things turn much, much more serious. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight Rises) stars in and makes his writingdirecting feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. A great supporting cast: Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore as possible love interests, Tony Danza and Glenne Headley as Jon’s parents, only make things better. (ES) Rated R

GRAVITY

ENDER’S GAME

Decades after Earth repelled an invasion by  insect-like aliens who killed tens of millions of humans, the planet is preparing for another invasion by the “Formics” that may or may not come by training all kids in tactics and strategy in the hopes of finding a new “Julius Caesar or a Napoleon” who will win the war decisively. Andrew “Ender” Wiggin (Asa Butterfield) is plucked from his regular school to attend the orbiting Battle School, because Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) and Major Anderson (Viola Davis), who run the place, think he could be the legendary-scale genius they’re looking for. (MJ) PG-13

ENOUGH SAID

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s exhusband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R

ESCAPE PLAN

Ray Breslin (Sylvester Stallone) breaks out of prisons for a living. But when his last job goes wrong and he is effectively buried in a high-tech security facility so far off the map his own team can’t find him, he knows he’s been set up. Recruiting fellow inmate Emil Rottmayer (Arnold Schwarzenegger) to make one last escape from the most fortified prison in the world might seem a little cheesy, but the big explosions and promises of punishment make up for it in this action-oozing flick. (ER) Rated R

FREE BIRDS

As Thanksgiving approaches, so does, apparently, the turkey buddy films. When two turkeys from opposite sides of the track team up to stop the Thanksgiving slaughter, they travel back in time to the very first Thanksgiving to take turkey off the menu, permanently. What ensues is a bunch of silliness and a lot of turkey jokes, just in time for the holiday season. Starring the voices of Owen Wilson and Woody Harrelson. (ER) Rated PG

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

INEQUALITY FOR ALL

This film takes a look at the ever widening economic gap, following former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich as he attempts to shed light on the shrinking middle class. The 2007 Occupy Wall Street brought attention to the economic disparity that has emerged in American society today, but Reich takes it further, tracing the very origins of the gap, and discusses what can be done to improve an economy where the majority of the wealth is held in the hands of a very few. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated PG

LAST VEGAS

When Billy decides to finally tie the knot to a much younger woman, he calls out his senior friends for one last hurrah, which of course means a bachelor party in Las Vegas. What ensues is typical “I’m old” jokes — from not knowing who rapper Fifty-Cent is to the always hilarious complaints about medication and bad hips — this flick covers age by laughing at it.  With an all-star cast of actors including Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline, this comedy once again revisits the notion that although people may age, they don’t actually mature. (ER) Rated PG-13

MUSCLE SHOALS

The laid-back documentary Muscle Shoals celebrates this little-known chapter in American music history with equal measures of affection and respect. Talking heads like Keith Richards and Bono speak about the place almost reverently (a little odd in the latter’s case, given that U2 has never recorded there), while others give their props to the humble studios’ formative influence on their careers. Also features some excellent interviews with the queen herself, Aretha Franklin. At Magic Lantern (SD) Rated PG 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Gravity

96

All is Lost

88

Rush

75

Muscle Shoals

75

Don Jon

59

Ender’s Game

57

Thor: The Dark World

57

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

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FILM | REVIEW

Adv. Tix on Sale THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

THOR: THE DARK WORLD IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1130 100) 400 510 700 1000 1030

MET OPERA: TOSCA (NR)

Sat.955 AM

THOR: THE DARK WORLD [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1215 215 300) 630 745 915

LAST VEGAS [CC] (PG-13) Fri.(1150 245) 640 930 Sat.(245 PM) 640 PM 930 PM Sun.(1150 245) 640 930

FREE BIRDS IN REALD 3D [CC] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(200 PM)

FREE BIRDS [CC] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1140) 430 650 920

ENDER'S GAME [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1200 330) 715 1015

Oh Boy

Danai Gurira is stunning in Mother of George.

CARRIE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1255 340) 705 935

ESCAPE PLAN [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(110) 415 730 1010

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1235 350) 710 1005

THOR: THE DARK WORLD

Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:30 Sat-Mon (11:30) In 2D Daily (2:30) (3:50) (5:00) 7:30 8:40 9:45 Sat-Mon (11:00) (12:00)

PG-13

ENDER’S GAME

PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:40 Sat-Mon (11:40) PG Daily (2:50) Sat-Mon (10:40) In 2D Daily (3:15) (5:15) 7:10 9:15 Sat-Mon (11:10) (1:10)

LAST VEGAS

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:20) 6:40 9:10 Sat-Mon (11:45)

GRAVITY

PG-13 Daily (4:50) 6:50 9:00 Sat-Mon (12:45) In 2D Daily 6:20 Sat-Mon (1:30)

GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1205) 530 750 1020 Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, November 08, 2013. Saturday, November 09, 2013. Sunday, November 10, 2013. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 11/5/2013 110513070017 Regal 865-925-9554

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Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

FREE BIRDS

Mother of George explores fertility issues through the guise of Nigerian culture BY LAURA JOHNSON

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1225 325) 725 945

t’s the plight of many a Western working consults a witch doctor — none of it helps. Not woman — waiting too long to have a child, helping matters are two would-be-grandmas who enduring that pain of not being able to do won’t stop putting insurmountable pressure on what is so essentially female. But where many the couple to conceive. American couples would opt for in vitro fertilizaThe cinematography here is as indie as tion treatments or adoption, these alternatives, it gets. The camera looks through windows, as we learn in Mother of George, are unthinkable through inside rooms’ translucent curtains, makto those in a traditional Nigerian culture, even if ing language nonexistent at times. Often, the lens they’re living in Brooklyn. will focus on one person in a scene when there The story unfolds simply enough, with a are actually two, forcing the viewer to guess the wedding — a gloriously colorful, traditional other’s identity. Sometimes shots are right in African ceremony. Everyone is beautiful here. people’s faces, other times they blur, focusing The megawatt smiles, bright headscarves and only on a hand. This adds to the claustrophobic dresses are more radiant than feeling as our heroine slowly MOTHER OF GEORGE Hollywood starlets could ever runs out of options. Rated R hope to be. At about the midway point, Directed by Andrew Dosunmu The newlyweds are Ayoher mother-in-law concocts Starring Isaach De Bankolé, Danai Gurira dele (an incredible Isaach De a plan not far removed from At Magic Lantern Bankolé) and Adenike (Danai Biblical times; either Adenike’s Gurira, also amazing), two imhusband should take another migrants in their 30s who love each other wholly. woman, or she should get it on with his brother. Ayodele runs a restaurant with his younger “It is the same blood,” after all. brother, working hard to provide for his wife so But as deplorable as the situation becomes, she can stay at home. the story moves far beyond desperate infidelity Eighteen months into the union, despite lots and lies that gnaw away at one’s soul to explore of baby making (which the film shows), no baby the depths of forgiveness in a way no other film has been made. Adenike is beside herself. Her in recent memory has achieved. The action may husband refuses to see a doctor for assistance. move at a snail’s pace, but the ending will never So she drinks terrible-tasting tea twice a day, she leave you. 

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

PG-13 Daily (4:10) 6:50 9:35 Sat-Mon (10:45) (1:35)

GRAVITY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(315 PM)

BAD GRANDPA

R Daily (3:20) (5:30) 7:40 9:40 Sat-Mon (11:00) (1:15)

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1245 310) 735 955

PG Daily (3:00) (5:10) 7:10 Sat-Mon (10:50) (12:50)

CARRIE

R Daily 9:15

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

THOR: THE DARK WORLD

Adv. Tix on Sale THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

PG-13 Daily (1:00) (2:00) (3:30) (4:30) 6:10 7:00 8:40 9:30 Fri-Mon (10:30) (11:30) In 2D Daily (12:00) (1:30) (2:30) (4:00) (5:00) 6:30 7:30 9:10 9:50 Fri-Mon (11:00)

FREE BIRDS

THOR: THE DARK WORLD IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(100) 400 700 1000

PG Daily (2:40) Fri-Mon (10:30) In 2D Daily (12:35) (4:40) 6:45 8:50 Fri-Mon (10:20) (11:15)

ENDER’S GAME

PG-13 Daily (1:30) (2:10) (4:00) (4:40) 6:30 7:10 9:00 9:40 Fri-Mon (11:40)

LAST VEGAS

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (2:40) (4:20) (5:00) 6:40 7:15 8:50 9:35 Fri-Mon (11:45)

THE WIZARD OF OZ PG

Adv. Tix on Sale THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

THOR: THE DARK WORLD IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri.630 PM

Daily (12:30)

BAD GRANDPA

R Daily (1:15) (3:20) (5:30) 7:40 9:45 Fri-Mon (11:00)

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

PG-13 Daily (1:35) (4:10) 6:50 9:35 Fri-Mon (10:40) PG-13

GRAVITY

Daily (3:10) (5:15) 7:20 9:25 Fri-Mon (10:30) In 2D Daily (12:30) (5:15)

CARRIE

R Daily 9:20

MET OPERA: TOSCA (NR)

Sat.955 AM

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 PG Daily (12:50) (3:00) (5:10) 7:10 Fri-Mon (10:50)

THE COUNSELOR

Big Screen: THOR: THE DARK WORLD [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri.405 PM 700 PM

Times For 11/08 - 11/10

R Daily (4:20) 9:20 Fri-Mon (11:20)

ESCAPE PLAN

R Daily (1:50) 6:50 Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 11/8/13-11/14/13

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THE RETURN OF LIVE MUSIC Nov 21st - HELMET 38 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Making the Trade-Off Music streaming services are criticized for puny pay models, but local artists just want their music heard BY CHEY SCOTT

I

ALLEN DUFFY ILLUSTRATION

t’s never been easier to listen to music. It’s also never been easier for up-and-coming artists, including Inland Northwest-based acts, to disseminate their work to listeners. With dozens of online, on-demand music streaming services, both free and subscription-based — Spotify, Rdio, Pandora, SoundCloud, Rhapsody, even YouTube — we’ve entered an age of unprecedented access to music. As modes of music listening trend in this direction, concerns are also being raised as to whether musicians are being fairly compensated for their work, in contrast to profits from a physical or digital album sale. Most ad-free subscriptions to streaming services cost, on average, less or the same per month as one digital album purchase, about $10, from iTunes. Making global headlines several months ago was a decision by the hit-making British rock group Radiohead to pull several albums from Spotify’s catalog, one of the top online streaming services. The move prompted a flurry of editorials denouncing the way the company compensates artists and rights holders. According to Radiohead’s Thom Yorke, the band took its music off Spotify to protest the miniscule amounts — as low as thousandths of pennies per play — it pays newer, up-and-coming artists. Spotify didn’t respond to the Inlander’s requests for this story. For many musicians based in the Inland Northwest, making their original music available on growing services like Spotify is all about the positive exposure to be gained. But for musicians trying to make a living income from their work, streaming services can be detrimental, which is how Kent Ueland views it. Ueland is most recognizable as frontman of the local, dark folk group Terrible Buttons, but also has a solo project, The Holy Broke. Stressing he’s not speaking for all members of his band (Terrible Buttons’ music isn’t currently on streaming services or iTunes, just independent artist hub Bandcamp), Ueland says he believes services like Spotify, because of its pay structure, actually prevent artists from becoming successful and surviving as musicians long-term. “I think Spotify is a big reason people don’t hit the road as much as they should, because it’s hard to tour,” he says. “If you’re trying to make a tour not a vacation, you’re hoping that a couple people bought

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 39

MUSIC | THE DIGITAL AGE “MAKING THE TRADE-OFF,” CONTINUED... the CD, and then a couple [more] people hear it and buy it online.” Groups that simply enjoy writing and playing music as a cathartic, creative outlet, like rockers the Camaros and hardcore outfit Losing Skin are, in part, satisfied with the opportunities streaming services offer to be discovered by new listeners locally and beyond. For Losing Skin, having music on Spotify, iTunes, Amazon and other online services was more a choice of convenience, since their label, Blasphemour Records, handled the digital distribution of their newest album I: Infinite Death, released in August. If the label hadn’t managed the distribution, band member Matt Johnston says they still would have wanted to get the album onto services like Spotify. “If someone hears about us, it just makes us that easier to find, and if you’re already using the service it’s much more convenient than searching Google,” adds Alex Boston, Losing Skin’s lead singer. Johnston and Boston both subscribe to online music streaming services, though in many cases they say they prefer to purchase other artists’ work if it’s something they’ll listen to often. “To me, mp3s are disposable, and it has more substance when I have to spend money to have it in my hands,” Boston says. “If it comes down to ‘I don’t want to offer my art for an online service for people to listen to because I’m not getting paid,’ you’re losing the purpose of why you record music in the first place.” Losing Skin hasn’t yet received compensation from plays its album has received since being released, because digital music services disburse royalties quarterly. Whatever they do earn, the band plans to funnel back into

Local Rockers, the Camaros, choose to have their music on services like Spotify even though they’re earning mere pennies from royalties. MIKE McCALL PHOTO other projects. The Camaros’ first full-length record Ladies? was released and added to Spotify’s catalogue just short of a year ago, but because the income from any plays via Spotify and other services they’re on have been so nominal, the group admits they don’t check their account often, or even know how much it’s profited them. Like Losing Skin, money made will go back into the band’s next record. “If we were trying to make a living at this, I think we would see Spotify as something that would be difficult to

combat, but we’re just trying to get people out to see our shows,” says Camaros guitarist Eric Woodard. Lead singer Mark Robbins wonders, though, how much being on Spotify has resulted in listeners not buying the Camaros’ album, knowing it’s available to stream online. “There is a certain amount of street cred I give to bands who don’t put their music on those [services],” Robbins says. “I think that’s kind of cool. They don’t want people to have easy access to it, they want people to seek it out and listen to it.” n

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MUSIC | METAL

Why So Serious?

Saturday Nov 9th

THE BETTY’S w/ GOOD NIGHT VENUS Sunday Nov 10th

MOVIE NIGHT & HAPPY TIME PRICES

The Black Dahlia Murder delivers brutal death metal with a smile on their faces

Monday Nov 11th TRIVIA NIGHT - at 7! w/ TOM BONANNA KING

BY LEAH SOTTILE

Tuesday Nov 12th

D

eath metal has never been funny. It’s been bloody, scary, morbid and always dramatic — from the time California band Possessed struck the first notes of their 1985 record Seven Churches, an album that arguably forged the death metal genre. Death metal was the guttural-voiced, loose-cannon little brother of early ’80s thrash bands. It was meant to be a little unsettling and strange. “Death is usually about violence and/or evil,” writes “Sargon the Terrible” on MetalCrypt.com. “Doom is usually about something depressing, but Black Metal is expressly about evil and hatred, never anything else.” Over the past 20 years, death metal musicians have changed missions somewhat, combining low, brutal vocal stylings with melodic guitars — almost like mashing together Judas Priest’s music with deep, throaty Cookie Monster vocals. But generally the mission has stayed the same for all death metal bands: brand your bands with an almost unreadable logo, be scary and play the hell out of your instruments. That’s where the Black Dahlia Murder changed things up. For the past 10 years they’ve stayed true to death metal’s roots and sound, but have packaged and presented it in more of a tongue-in-cheek, punk-rock way — like they can’t be bothered with all of death metal’s rules and

restrictions. “It seems like people want for you to be categorized so cut and dry,” singer Trevor Strnad told KillYourStereo.com earlier this month. “It’s like bucking the stereotypes within the death metal scene. I used to look at it like, ‘These are my people, I can’t wait to just be surrounded in death metal.’ Now, it’s like, they look at me and I have short hair and they make judgments about me.” That’s never deterred Strnad and his bandmates. In a video for “Goat of Departure,” a track off the band’s most recent album Everblack, the band dresses in tuxedos and ape costumes and plays a set in a tiny Detroit tavern. A few years ago, in a video for “Necropolis,” the band dressed like a bowling team and sang out over the lanes of a bowling alley. “We are known for having a sense of humor. I think it has made us stand out,” Strand told KillYourStereo. “We are a serious band, we take our music very, very seriously, but just that approach and having fun, I think it has made us stand out to people.”  The Black Dahlia Murder with Skeletonwitch, Fallujah and Noisem • Tue, Nov. 12 at 7 pm • The Hop! • 706 N. Monroe • $17; $20 day of show • All-ages • holdmyticket.com • 328-5467

TONE DEAF TUESDAY KARAOKE - at 9! Wednesday Nov 13th

SALLY BOP JAZZ & WHISKEY WEDNESDAY

25 Craft Beers & Craft Cocktails 120 E. Sprague Ave.

SAT & FRI

This group proves people are still having fun in Detroit.

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at Club Red 6pm-10pm

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SETH WALSER

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 41

MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

OPENING THE BARTLETT

FOLK CLOUD PERSON

here’s usually cause for celebration after a birth. Sometimes that celebration needs to last four nights in a row; at least that’s the case with the brand-new, it’s-finally-herefolks music venue, the Bartlett. Thursday’s lineup concludes with California indie rock group Blouse, followed by Seattle trio the Cave Singers on Friday and the 11-person folk orchestra Typhoon (pictured) on Saturday. Spokane’s own folk rockers Terrible Buttons close out the weekend Sunday. (The full lineup is listed in the music calendar below.) With a bang this big at the beginning, we can only hope this venue only gets louder from here. — LAURA JOHNSON

T

n the beginning, Cloud Person was just that. Pete Jordan started the now-sixpiece outfit as a solo project. But soon he needed a violin and stand-up bass to fill out his acoustic guitar sound, then drums and keys. The Seattle band’s sound is reminiscent of Neutral Milk Hotel, and just like that was — and is — Jeff Mangum’s band, Cloud Person is Jordan’s project — he wrote, recorded and mixed the new album Monochrome Places. It’s his cloud; he’s just inviting others to come and sit on it with him. — LAURA JOHNSON

The Bartlett Grand Opening with Blouse, Typhoon, Terrible Buttons, Cave Singers and many more • Thu-Sun, Nov. 7-10 at 8 pm • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • Fri-Sat, $15/$20 door; Sun, $10/$15 • All-ages • thebartlettspokane.com

Cloud Person with & Yet, Strangled Darlings and Tyler Aker • Fri, Nov. 8 at 9 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • $5 • 21+ • 838-1570

I

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 11/7

J THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Blouse, Psychic Rites, Dead Serious Lovers (See story above) BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BUCKHORN INN, Texas Twister THE CELLAR, Kosh COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, CdA Charter Academy Jazz, Choir Combos and more GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos THE HOP!, Generation EDM JOHN’S ALLEY, Down North JONES RADIATOR, Seth Walser J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, DIONVOX, The Tone Collaborative, Bodhi Drip, Moksha RICO’S, Palouse Subterranean Blues Band SPLASH, Steve Denny THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJ Seli ZOLA, The Return of Cruxie

Friday, 11/8

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Bill Bozly J THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. The Cave

42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Singers, Radiation City, Kaylee Cole (See story above) BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Protocol J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Fabio Undulata THE CELLAR, Barry Aiken and Northpoint COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ron Greene, Harmony Clayton, YESTERDAYSCAKE COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Bright Moments THE COUNTRY CLUB, Country Line CURLEY’S, Bruiser EICHARDT’S, The Cole Show FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Nate Ostrander FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Slow Burn THE FLAME, DJ Wesone GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos THE HOP!, Light Up the Sky, What Wings Once Held, Like Vultures, Resverie, Elements IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Shiner IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Down North JONES RADIATOR, The Finns J KNITTING FACTORY, Too Broke to Rock feat. Bobaflex J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Pamela Benton

LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Kori Eagle J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Lyle Morse J MOOTSY’S, & Yet, Strangled Darlings, Cloud Person (See story above), Tyler Aker NECTAR TASTING ROOM (869-1572), Truck Mills NYNE, The Divine Jewels PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Britchy Folk Duo THE PHAT HOUSE, Angela Marie Project ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), DJ JWC, The Usual Suspects SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Kosh J SILVER AUCTIONS, KYRS 10th Anniversary Party feat. Son Dulce TWELVE STRING BREWING COMPANY, Maxie Ray Mills ZOLA, Dirty Rice

Saturday, 11/9

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Bill Bozly J BABY BAR, The Bad Lovers, BBBBandits, DJ Case J THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Typhoon, Silver Torches, Le Wrens (See story

above) BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Protocol THE CELLAR, Barry Aiken and Northpoint J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin, Tyler Coulston CLOVER, Nick Grow COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ron Greene, Harmony Clayton, YESTERDAYSCAKE COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Steve Simisky COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Ben Baker THE COUNTRY CLUB, Country Line CURLEY’S, Bruiser FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Nate Ostrander FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Slow Burn GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Invasive, Mudhelmet, Vultra, Ashes of Yesterday IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Truck Mills IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Shiner IRV’S, DJ Prophesy J JONES RADIATOR, The Bettys, Good Night Venus LA ROSA CLUB, Cedar and Boyer THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, LaVoy LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Son of Brad LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls

J MERLYN’S (624-0957), “I’m With the Banned” aftershow feat. 66beat, Rice Queen, Bloody Gloves MOOTSY’S, Moral Crux, The Blowouts, Gorilla Rabbit Chicken NYNE, The Divine Jewels J PANIDA THEATER, The Fat Tones J THE PHAT HOUSE, World Bandits RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve REPUBLIC BREWING CO., The Lowest Pair ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), DJ Sonny SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Kosh J THE SHOP, The Oracles Kitchen SILVER FOX (208-667-9442), Usual Suspects J SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (533-7000), Fall Folk Festival feat. Juliana & Pava, Musha Marimba, Chutzpah, Sidhe, Bridges Home, Arvid Lundin, Moksha, Floating Crowbar and more SWAXX (703-7474), DJ K Phi VFW POST 5924 (292-8252), Back in Time Band THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, The Wreckers ZOLA, Dirty Rice

 THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Terrible Buttons, Mirror Mirror, Scott Ryan (See story on facing page) THE CELLAR, Pat Coast CHATEAU RIVE (795-2030), Tyrone Wells DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church JOHN’S ALLEY, Casey Donahew Band  SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (533-7000), Fall Folk Festival feat. Plaid Cat Trio, Dead Man’s Pants, Truck Mills, Amy Bleu, Starlite Motel, Sea Giant and more ZOLA, Bill Bozly

Monday, 11/11

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open mic  CALYPSOS (208-665-059), Open mic  THE PHAT HOUSE, Lucas Brown and Todd Michael Miller PJ’S BAR & GRILL, Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck  RICO’S, Open mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander and friends

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

Tuesday, 11/12

 THE BARTLETT, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Max Daniels FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, The Black Dahlia Murder (See story on page 41) with Skeletonwitch KELLY’S IRISH PUB, The Powell Brothers  KNITTING FACTORY, Rittz, Snow Tha Project, Jarren Benton, Wildcard  THE PHAT HOUSE, Jazz Night PICNIC PINES (299-3223), Texas Twister  RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO. (3217935), Open mic RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), Open mic with Frank Clark SPLASH, Bill Bozly THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJ Q THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Cameron Moore ZOLA, Dan Conrad

Wednesday, 11/13 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CENTER, Eric Nuehasser  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard  THE HOP!, Sound Wars with DJs Doktor Reaktor, Wyrmwood, Killmore, Wabbajack IRV’S, DJ Prophesy

 KNITTING FACTORY, Soja with Common Kings  LATAH BISTRO, Bob & Dave  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Ken Davis  THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic with Mike Bethely RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared

MUSIC | VENUES

“flat-out flat-out electrifying!” electrifying! - Boston Globe

the groundbreaking

WAYY musical BROADWA

Coming Up ...

JONES RADIATOR, Sol Seed, Nov. 14 CARR’S CORNER, Quality Control Tour feat. OverTime, Illest Uminati, Whiteboy Lingle, EpiK, E The Hustler, Cordell Drake, True Justice, Nov. 14 MOOTSY’S, Brothers Ov Midnite, Micmoss, B. Durazzo, Fresh Kils, Mad Dukez, JB Nimble, Nov. 14 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Grayskul, Graves33, Jaeda, Nov. 14 CHATEAU RIVE, Chateau Guitar Masters with Pete Anderson and Sammy Eubanks, Nov. 15 KNITTING FACTORY, The Clumsy Lovers with Carli Osika, Nov. 15 BUCKHORN INN, Oasis Reunion Show, Nov. 15-16 JONES RADIATOR, The Flannel Attractions, Nov. 15 JONES RADIATOR, Jones Radiator 3rd Anniversary Party, Nov. 16 KNITTING FACTORY, Morgan Page, Beltek, Topher Jones, Nov. 16 SWAXX, Grade A CD Release Party, Nov. 16 THE BARTLETT, Marshall McLean Album Release Show with Mama Doll, Bart Budwig, Nov. 16 CARR’S CORNER, Carson Allen, Ashtree, Raze the City, John Michaelson, Rylei Franks, Nov. 16 KNITTING FACTORY, Gramatik with Herobust, Ex Mag, Nov. 17 THE BARTLETT, Blitzen Trapper, Heatwarmer, Nov. 19 THE HOP!, The Casualties, Negative Approach, MDC, Revolt, Reason for Existence, Faus, Nov. 19 KNITTING FACTORY, 3OH!3 with The Summer Set, Wallpaper, New Beat Fund, Nov. 19 SPOKANE ARENA, Nine Inch Nails, Explosions in the Sky, Nov. 19 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR, NiN After Party feat. Black Lodge, Nov. 19 BABY BAR, Guantanamo Baywatch, Primal Shakes, Normal Babies, Nov. 20 ZOLA, Cruxie and the Zola Thanksgiving Party, Nov. 21 KNITTING FACTORY, Pretty Lights with Odesza, Nov. 21 THE CELLAR, Current Flow, Nov. 22-23 SPOKANE ARENA, Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Nov. 22 BING CROSBY THEATER, Quarter Monkey CD Release, Nov. 22

(Photos by Turner Rouse, Jr., John Daughtry, Litwin)

Sunday, 11/10

Contains adult Content and strong language

november 22-23 |

INB Performing Arts Center

BestofBroadway Spokan

e.com

Enter to wIN tICkEts at Inlander.com! @WCEBroadway

/WestCoastEntertainmentSpokane

Your Football Headquarters & #1 Wing Destination!

31

WITH MOUTH WATERING FLAVORS!

GO

COUGS!

GO

HAWKS! SERVING BREAKFAST SAT & SUN AT 9AM

315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 43

PERFORMANCE BALLET AT THE BING

Those who consider it a classic experience to see the Nutcracker during the holidays are in for a sugar-plum-coated treat this year, as the Inland Northwest get two very different chances to see the performance. The first comes a little early, when the acclaimed Moscow Ballet (as in Russia, not Idaho) stops at the Bing for a two-night performance of the fairy tale love story between young Clara and the handsome Nutcracker Prince. The Russian ballet company started North American tours of the production 20 years ago, and usually makes stops in much larger cities than Spokane, so don’t miss the chance to see it. See the ballet again in a few weeks with music performed by the Spokane Symphony, as dancers from the State Street Ballet take the stage. — CHEY SCOTT The Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker • Nov. 13-14 at 7:30 pm • $30 and up • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7404

44 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

COMMUNITY AWESOME AUCTION

FESTIVAL TRADITIONS OF FOLK

KYRS 10th Anniversary Party • Fri, Nov. 8 at 7 pm • $15-$20, kids under 12 free • Silver Auctions • 2020 N. Monroe • kyrs.org

Spokane Fall Folk Festival • Nov. 9-10, Sat from 11 am-10 pm, Sun from 11 am-5 pm • Free admission • Spokane Community College Lair • 1810 N. Greene • spokanefolkfestival.org • 828-3683

On October 26, 2003, KYRS began broadcasting. From humble beginnings came great things, as KYRS now streams across parts of six countries. For the past 10 years, KYRS has a filled a need that other radio stations haven’t, providing underrepresented members of the community with an outlet to express themselves. Celebrating a decade on air, the station invites friends and supporters down to Silver Auctions for a night of live salsa music and dancing, food and drinks and a silent auction to reflect on how far it has come and ensure its continued success. — EMERA L. RILEY

Clogs and kilts are encouraged, but not required. These things and more will fill the SCC Lair, showcasing a wide range of cultures and traditions for the community to immerse itself in all weekend long. Since its humble beginnings at the Unitarian Universalist Church during the unforgettable ice storm of 1996, the local festival has grown substantially, now hosting more than 100 performing groups over two days. The festival also hosts numerous artisan vendors, craft stations and workshops, including an African Dance Party. — KATELYN SMITH

E A S T E R N W A S H I N G T O N U N I V E R S I T Y A N D T H E D A N I E L A N D M A R G A R E T C A R P E R F O U N D AT I O N P R E S E N T

THEATER DELICATE NO MORE

Ah, the good old days — when middle-class wives didn’t have to work outside the home, when their husbands treated them like another one of the children, always made to be happy and unaware of pesky things like finances and voting. But in the late 1800s, the Norwegian play A Doll’s House, written by Henrik Ibsen, speculated that females wanted more out of life and marriage. Nora, written by film legend Ingmar Bergman, updates and tightens the story for a new audience, but leaves the show’s still somewhat controversial ending entact. Stage Left Theater takes on the production, beginning this weekend and ending Nov. 24. — LAURA JOHNSON Nora • Nov. 8-24 • Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $10 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third • spokanestageleft.org • 276-2775

AN EVENING WITH STEVEN PINKER T H U R S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 4 , 7 P. M . INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, SPOKANE Faced with the ceaseless stream of news about war, crime and terrorism, one could easily think we live in the most violent age ever seen. In this startling and engaging talk, New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker argues just the opposite is true. TICKETS: $7 GENERAL ADMISSION, AT WWW.TICKETSWEST.COM OR 1.800.325.SEAT

THEATER LETTERS AT WAR

“I know I haven’t written in a while. I’m sorry, but I’ve been pretty busy.” It’s a common first line in Letters Home, which presents actual letters — some funny, some sad, many both — written by soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan as monologues, accompanied by images from soldiers’ actual experiences. Performed by Chicago’s Griffin Theatre Company, the play brings to life the perspectives of soldiers at war — not as “heroes” or PTSD statistics, but in their own words as sons and daughters, parents and loyal friends. — LISA WAANANEN

FOR MORE INFO, CONTACT LAURA THAYER 509.359.4860 OR LTHAYER3@EWU.EDU A BRIEF BOOK SIGNING WILL FOLLOW IN THE LOBBY.

Letters Home • Nov. 15-16 at 7:30 pm • $9-$18 • Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall • Washington State University, Pullman • performingarts.wsu.edu

EXPO THE SNOWLANDER SHOW

It already snowed this week, a reminder that winter starts early around these parts. If you need another reminder, the Inlander is hosting its annual Snowlander Expo, a gathering of all things skiing, snowboarding and beyond. There will be massive sales on snow gear, and you can get your season pass photo taken care of for all the region’s resorts. Perhaps most alluring, though, is that entrance to the event gets you a lift ticket to either 49° North or Red Mountain Resort. See p. 32 for more on the Expo’s PowderKeg beer festival. — MIKE BOOKEY Snowlander Expo • Fri, Nov. 8 from 4 to 9 pm; Sat, Nov. 9 from 10 am to 6 pm • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • snowlander.com

EVERY DOLLAR MAKES A DIFFERENCE $45 of every $100 spent at a local business stays in our community.

*Source: thinkshopbuylocal.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 45

Spokane Folklore Society Presents 18th Annual

FALL 2013 Celebrating Spokane’s Cultural Diversity

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 LAIR AUDITORIUM

11-1

1:30 2:30 3:30 4:30 5:30 6:30

KPBX FM 91.1 Live Radio Show-Audience Welcome Salish School of Spokane-Native American song, dance, stories Kelly Irish Dancers and The Broken Whistle Band Juliana & Pava-ancient Russian polyphonic folk song Musha Marimba-joyful marimba music from Zimbabwe Halau Hula O Ku’ulei-traditional Hawaiian Hula dance Chutzpah-klezmer Eastern European Jewish folk music

1:15-1:45 2-2:30 2:45-3:15 3:30-4 4:15-4:45 5-5:30 5:45-6:15 6:30-7

Tim Connor-finger style blues, rags, Americana Dan Burt-historical cowboy songs Dario Re-singer/songwriter Chasing Velvet-folk infused originals Lokahi-contemporary Hawaiian Tim Platt-solo finger style guitarist Collins Loupe-contemporary finger style guitar Allen Surdez-singer/songwriter original tunes

THE UNDERGROUND

11:30-Noon 12:15-12:45 1-1:30 1:45-2:15 2:30-3 3:15-3:45 4-4:30 4:45-5:15 5:30-6

Portatos Accordion Band-eclectic tunes Kasia Haroldsen & Family-Polish folk and original material Huckleberry Jam-Celtic and Appalachian Dave McRae & Michael Robinson-folkabilly Spokane Community Choir-choral music from around the world Sondahl & Hawkins-American music from the last century Sidetrack-family friendly and danceable Frank Delaney & Friends-traditional folk music Level 4-vintage blues and jazz

BLUEGRASS N’ MORE ROOM 109

11-11:30 11:45-12:15 12:30-1 1:15-1:45 2-2:30 2:45-3:15 3:30-4:00 4:15-4:45

SASQUATCH ROOM 124C

11:30-Noon 12:15-12:45 1-1:30 1:45-2:15 2:30-3 3:15-3:45 4-4:30 4:45-5:15 5:30-6 6:15-6:45

Brett & Janet Dodd-original songs Michael & Keleren Millham (Sidhe)-voice and guitar duo Bridges Home-Americana Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots-Celtic Blue Ribbon Tea Company-folk and blues originals Gefilte Trout-klezmer and Eastern European folk music Koyasuyo-music from the Andes Humphrey, Hartman & Cameron award winning songwriting and tight harmonies Moksha-instrumental world fusion music Floating Crowbar-high-energy Irish and British Isles music

LITTLEFOOT ROOM 124A 11-11:30

11:45-12:15 12:30-1

Gary A. Edwards-original folk, country and western Glen Bair-original poetry and songs Carl Allen-60’s folk

5-5:30 5:45-6:15

The Turner Sisters-eclectic vocal harmonies The “Lilies of the Valley” 3-part harmony Acuff and Sherfey-high-flying acoustic duo Crab Creek Wranglers-songs of the old west Brad Keeler Trio-vintage bluegrass and Americana Browne’s Mountain Boys-traditional bluegrass Crawdad Run Duo-traditional old-time The Afterthoughts-multi-generational diversified bluegrass Kevin Pace & the Early Edition-bluegrass and gospel April Fool Band-bluegrass with hot guitar licks

CAFETERIA STAGE

11-11:30

11:45-12:15 12:30-1:30 1:45-2:15 2:30-3 3-3:30 3:30-4:30 4:30-5:30 5:30-6 6:15-7:15 7:30-8

Nine-Pint Coggies-music of 18th century Scotland Silver Spurs Youth Folk Dancers-dances of the world English Country Dances with Mitchell Frey-what Jane Austen wrote about. Stevens County Stompers-clogging Spokane Argentine Tango-demo of various styles Contra Dance Workshop with Emily Faulkner Contra Dance with Crooked Kilt and Emily Faulkner International Folk Dance with Karen Wilson-Belleasy folk dances from around the world Swing Basics-dance workshop with Susan Dankovich Back Adit-swing and jazz Contra Dance Introductory Workshop with Nora

8-10

Scott Contra Dance with Out of Nowhere and callers Nora Scott and Ray Polhemus

CONFERENCE ROOM FIRST FLOOR ROOM 126 STORYTELLING & MUSIC WORKSHOP

11:30-1:30 1:45-2:45 3-4 4:15-5:30

Spokane Storytellers League-stories for young and old at heart Jenny Edgren-songs for kids of all ages Carl Allen (Seattle)-Woody Guthrie’s Grow Big Songs Music Workshop: From the Delta to Chicago 1925-1945 with Tim Connor finger-picking styles from the early blues era

SMALL GYM BUILDING 5

11-11:30 11:45-12:15 12:30-1:30 1:45-2:15 2:30-3 3:15-3:45 4-4:30 4:45-5:15 5:30-6 6:15-6:45

Tribe Zaghareet-belly dance with live music Coeurimba-Southern African-style marimba Scottish Pipers, Highland and Country Dancers Holy Trinity Greek Dancers-dances from across Greece Mukogawa University Students-Japanese dance and songs Northwest Hula Company-traditional Hawaiian and Polynesian dances Grant School Drummers and Dancers-African songs and dances Nah’Joom Dancers-American belly dance Coeur d’Alene Youth Marimbas-southern Africanstyle Malidoma World Dance-American Tribal Style belly dance

Two Days of Amazing, Inspiring Performances - for FREE! Saturday, Nov. 9th • 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. | Sunday, Nov. 10th • 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. 8 Stages • 119 Performing Acts • Activities & Crafts for kids Food • Ethnic Arts & Crafts for sale • Three Contra Dances Live KPBX Radio Show 11am - 1pm Saturday 1-1:30 1:45-2:15 2:30-3 3:15-3:45

Silk Road Band-folk songs from along the Silk Road Sea Giant-alternative folk band original music Steve Schennum-fascinating songs Laddie Ray Melvin-image rich songs

MAGIC SHOW CLASSROOM 2 BUILDING 5

2:30-4:30

Dick Frost-magic show for all ages

BLUEGRASS N’ MORE ROOM 109

Noon 1 2 3 4

MAGIC SHOW CLASSROOM 2 BUILDING 5

2:30-4:30

Dick Frost-magic show for all ages

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10 LAIR AUDITORIUM

11 12 1 2

3:15 4:15

Celtic Nots-Celtic & Not Celtic Baharat Dance Company-authentic dance of the Middle East and North Africa Robbins Rebels Fife & Drum Corps-traditional fife and drum from 18th and 19th century Rhymes of the Ranches - cowboy poetry with Glen Bair, Dick Warwick, Ted Hensold, & Bill Siems Haran Irish Dancers-traditional and contemporary Irish step dance Spokane Taiko-traditional Japanese drum and dance

SASQUATCH ROOM 124C

11:30-Noon 12:15-12:45 1-1:30 1:45-2:15 2:30-3 3:15-3:45 4-4:30

Musaiique-folk jazz The Plaid Cats-mix of genres with smooth harmonies Dan Maher-host of Inland Folk Sharp/Brownhawk-Native American songs and flute Kosher Red Hots-Yiddish, Ladino, klezmer 2 Bit Jugband-Ken Glastre, Michael Gifford, Deann Logan Dead Man’s Pants-original roots, country, folk, rock

LITTLEFOOT ROOM 124A

11-11:30 11:45-12:15 12:30-1 1:15-1:45 2-2:30 2:45-3:15 3:30-4 4:15-4:45

Ron Doyen-sliding into the blues John Paul Shields-Peruvian guitar Richard Clarkson-coffee house folk music Truck Mills-multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Mike Skalstad-original folk and folk rock Patrice Webb-Folk/Americana Amy Bleu-modern folk James Funke-Loubigniac-folk music on the Hurdy Gurdy

THE UNDERGROUND

11:30-12 12:15-12:45

Starlite Motel-acoustic pop “Lonesome” Lyle Morse-traditional and original blues

Western Reunion-western/cowboy Big Red Barn-rhythm & bluegrass Heartbreak Pass-bluegrass Johnny and the Moondogs-honky tonk Kevin Brown-critically acclaimed original songwriting

CAFETERIA STAGE

11-11:45

12-12:45 1-2 2:15-3:15 3:30-5

Mele Polinahe & Kiakahi O’Hula-music and dance of Hawaii Spokane Chinese Dance Group-traditional dance Valley Crosstrailers Square Dance -demo and workshop Family Dance with Susan Dankovich Contra Dance with Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots and caller Mitchell Frey

CONFERENCE FIRST FLOOR ROOM 126 MUSIC WORKSHOP & STORYTELLING

Noon-1

1:30-3:30

Come and Strum-Autoharp/Mountain Dulcimer with Jeanette Sheeran Spokane Storytellers League-stories for young and old at heart

SMALL GYM (BUILDING 5)

11 12 1 2 3 4

Moorea-bellydance fusion Na Ho’Olaule’a Dance Company-Hawaiian Hula and Polynesian dance West African Dance Party-learn to dance West African style Merry Missives of Moscow-youth dancers performing English Country and Morris dances Sesitshaya Marimba-sounds of Zimbabwe Sisters of Selket-Bellydance

SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE LAIR STUDENT CENTER 1810 N. Greene St For More Information, Call, 828-3683

www.spokanefolkfestival.org

Sponsored by: Avista Foundation, The Pacific Northwest Inlander, Inland Northwest Community Foundation, Humanities Washington and Spokane Community College

Schedules Subject to Change - 15 minute break between acts

relationships

Advice Goddess The Butt Stops Here

My husband and I both smoked pot regularly, but I quit several years ago, and he began smoking nightly. I kept encouraging him to quit because it makes him mentally disappear. He goes through periods when he doesn’t smoke (mostly because of my nagging), and then we’re able to connect and have a loving relationship. But he inevitably falls back on this nightly habit, and I become frustrated and resentful. Recently, I discovered amy alkon a large stockpile of hidden video footage he’d taken of women’s booties. In one video, I was standing next to him, oblivious, as he videotaped the woman ahead of us in line. I was shocked that he was capable of this kind of disrespect. We had an emotionally-wrecked several weeks. He slept on the couch, and I avoided him. I told him that if the nightly pot smoking and the butt videotaping were to persist, I’d have to move on. I was convinced that leaving was probably the best choice. But since I said this, he’s only smoked a couple of times, and we’ve been reconnecting. He says he���s not making any more videos because he saw how upset it made me. I love this guy, but am I deluding myself in thinking he can change?  -Hesitant When you marry a man, it isn’t because you’re looking to walk off into the sunset all by yourself while he’s lying facedown on your living room floor staring at an ant, realizing he totally gets what the ant is thinking. Your husband — let’s call him “the old bong and chain” — is an addict. You may not think of him that way, because he probably doesn’t have a physical dependence on weed or running around town making butt-umentaries (say, in the way I have a physical dependence on break-a-tooth-black coffee). Probably what he has is a psychological addiction to checking out (instead of engaging emotionally), and he’s using these habits as transportation to get there. To explain that further, an addiction treatment specialist I respect, Dr. Stanton Peele, in “7 Tools to Beat Addiction,” writes, “When people turn to an experience, any experience, for solace to the exclusion of meaningful involvements in the rest of their lives, they are engaged in an addiction.” Another addiction therapist I respect, Dr. Frederick Woolverton, in “Unhooked,” explains that what all addictions have in common is a longing to avoid “legitimate suffering” — difficult emotions that are a normal part of being alive. So, no, your husband’s saying no to butt cheeks and “only sometimes” to pot probably isn’t enough. These are just his preferred forms of checking out. To avoid simply replacing them with new forms, he needs to recognize that he’s been using them to duck feeling his feelings — maybe just in your marriage but maybe in other parts of his life, too. He also needs to commit to changing this, but not because you’re hassling him and it would be an even bigger hassle to get dumped by you. (Change is especially tough for the emotion-averse.) He needs to come to the conclusion that it’s worth it to tough it out and feel so he can connect with you on more than the pothead’s deep philosophical questions, “What does paisley sound like?” and “Are we out of Funyuns?” It isn’t easy to go straight from the daily numb to “Hey, intensity, here I am,” and addicts are already in the habit of going straight to easy. Your husband might avoid setbacks by using a practice called “mindfulness meditation” as training wheels for living in the now instead of avoiding in the now. This form of meditation involves sitting or lying quietly, scanning your body with your mind and observing your thoughts and bodily sensations nonjudgmentally, as if they were scenery you’re passing in a car. I know this sounds airy-fairy. But a growing number of solid studies (by molecular biologist Jon Kabat-Zinn and neuroscientist Richard Davidson, for example) find that regular mindfulness meditation diminishes stress and anxiety and dampens reactivity to emotional discomfort, helping people stand back a bit from their feelings instead of letting their feelings get them in a death grip. It’s possible to do mindfulness meditation without a program, but the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Center for Mindfulness, founded by Kabat-Zinn, has a link to programs and teachers around the U.S. and Canada (bit.ly/ MBSRsearch). Taking a class in this could even be something you do together and might be the start of lots of things you do together. If he’s sincere about wanting you more than he wants to check out, you could soon have a husband you can count on to be there for you — and not just as a large, heavy, smoking object keeping the couch cushions from running into the street and getting hit by a car. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

events | calendar

Benefit

EPICUREAN DELIGHT The 32nd annual gala features 30 local wineries and breweries and more than 30 local restaurants, with proceeds benefiting the Inland NW Blood Center. Nov. 8 from 6 pm to midnight. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. epicureandelight.org (232-4567) BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS BENEFIT BREAKFAST Learn about the local mentoring program and how it impacts the futures of children in the area at an annual fundraiser event. Nov. 15, 7:308:30 am. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. (328-8310 x. 223) CRAB FEST FUNDRAISER Third annual all-you-can-eat crab fest and auction as a fundraiser for the Shadle-North Lions Club. Nov. 16, 6:30 pm. $35. St. Thomas Moore Catholic Church, 505 W. St. Thomas More Way. (475-1668) HELPING HAND FOR HUTCH BENEFIT Fundraiser for a community member battling Leukemia, with a silent auction and chili feed. Donated auction items welcomed. Nov. 16, 5 pm. Donations accepted. Monterey Cafe, 9 N. Washington St. (868-0284) SPOKANE VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM FUNDRAISER 9th annual luncheon fundraiser featuring a living history presentation of the Civil War, a themed meal and a silent auction. Nov. 16, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $20. Opportunity Presbyterian, 202 N. Pines Rd. (922-4570)

Comedy

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. See weekly schedule online. Thursdays, 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. uncledscomedy.com (483-7300) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays, 8 pm. Free. Chan’s Dragon Inn, 1406 W. Third. (838-6688) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Allages. Saturdays, 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) ALL-AGES COMEDY OPEN MIC Second and fourth Thursday of every month, 6 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. 5 min. per performer. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234)

Community

HONORING OUR VETERANS DINNER Three-course dinner, keynote presentations, music by the Fairchild Air Force Base Honor Guard, the Masterclass Orchestra and more. Nov. 7 from 5:308:30 pm. Free to veterans, $15 public. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803) HELP THE HUNGRY FOOD SORTING Join other volunteers to sort and pack produce and other bulk food items for delivery to local emergency food outlets. Ages 14+. Fri-Sat, 9 am; Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat, 1 pm. Also Nov. 14, 18, 20 at 5:30 pm, through Dec. 24 Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. 2-harvest.org (252-6267) KYRS 10TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY Celebration events include a silent auc-

tion, raffle, dancing, live music by Son Dulce, food and drinks with all proceeds benefiting the station. Nov. 8, 7 pm. $15-$20. Silver Auctions, 2020 N. Monroe St. kyrs.org (747-3012) COMMUNITY LIBRARY BOOK SALE Used library books for sale including hardcover and paperback books, children’s books, DVDs and more. Nov. 9, 10 am-2 pm. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612) HARRY POTTER PARTY Fundraising event featuring craft activities, themed food, costume contest and more. Nov. 9, 5-9 pm. $5-$8. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines, Ste. 3S. (995-6718) SPECIAL OLYMPICS BOWLING TOURNAMENT Athletes from the Inland Northwest compete Nov. 9-10. The nonprofit is in need of volunteers to help the athletes on the lanes and present awards. Contact Jill Ives at jives@sowa. org for more info. Free. Lilac Lanes, 1112 E. Magnesium Rd. (800-442-2508) FALL FOLK FESTIVAL 18th annual event featuring cultural music, dance, food, art and more, representing traditions in cultures from all over the world. Nov. 9, 11 am-10 pm and Nov. 10, 11 am-5 pm. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. spokanefestival.org (533-7000) SPOKANE MAGIC CLUB The Spokane Magic Club hosts a show with multiple performers competing against each other. Nov. 9, 6:30 pm. $5. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. corbinseniorcenter.org (327-1584) THE WELCOME: A PUBLIC LISTENING Veterans dealing with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) present their stories through works of art to the community, facilitated by Warrior Songs. Nov. 9, 7:30 pm. $20/public; free for veterans and their families. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Fort George Wright. warriorsongsspokane.org (518878-8579) HUMANITIES-BASED EDUCATION Three public forums on the basic tenets and roles of a humanities-based education and critical thinking in society, hosted by KYRS. Nov. 10, 4-5:30 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. kyrs.org (844-4288) CATHOLIC CHARITIES VOLUNTEERs Learn about volunteer opportunities with the local nonprofit. Nov. 12, 10-11:15 am. Catholic Charities Family Service, 12 E. Fifth. catholiccharitiesspokane.org (358-4270) HONORING HOMETOWN HEROES The annual Red Cross luncheon event honors local leaders who have significantly contributed to the community through acts of heroism and service. Nov. 13 from noon-5 pm. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. redcross.org (326-3330) INTERNATIONAL DAY OF TOLERANCE All are invited to stand for justice by linking arms and forming a line of solidarity to support equity and social justice. Event includes speakers, music and more. Nov. 15, noon. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga. edu (313-5836) JINGLE BELL RUN/WALK 5K run/walk fundraiser for the Arthritis Foundation, featuring holiday-themed costumes. Nov. 16 at 9 am. $10-$20. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokanejinglebellrun.kintera.org (315-9862)

Crafts

JUBILEE INTERNATIONAL MARKETPLACE The 25th annual event features fairly-traded handcrafts from 30+ global and local vendors and artisans. Nov. 8, 10 am-7 pm and Nov. 9, 9 am-4 pm. Free. First Presbyterian Church, 318 S. Cedar St. spokanefpc.org (747-1058) CRAFT FAIR Handmade crafts and baked goods for sale. Nov. 9, 9 am-3 pm. Chattaroy Community Church, 3711 E. Chattaroy Rd. (509-238-6051) FALL BAZAAR St. Francis of Assisi Parish Women’s Club Bazaar features a luncheon from 11 am-2 pm, baked goods, gift basket raffle and more. Nov. 9, 9 am-5 pm. St. Francis of Assisi Social Hall, 4420 N. Jefferson St. (509-533-0163) HOLIDAY BAZAAR The 85th annual bazaar features handcrafted items, baked goods, raffles, vintage items and more. Nov. 9 at 9:30 am. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (838-4277) HOLIDAY GIFT & FOOD FAIRE The 23rd annual event features local vendors selling handmade items and food, as a fundraiser for student programs and scholarships. Nov. 9, 9 am-4 pm. $1. CdA High School, 5530 N. 4th. (208-691-0337) HOLIDAY GIFT FAIR Handmade gifts, jewelry, home decor, glass art and more. Nov. 9, 9 am-4 pm. New Life Assembly of God Church, 10920 E. Sprague. newlifeperfectgiftfair.com (928-3342) JEFFERSON CRAFT FAIR Local crafters and vendors, including baked goods and kids activities. Nov. 9, 9 am-4 pm. Jefferson Elementary, 3612 S. Grand Blvd. (263-0511) SCANDINAVIAN BAZAAR Annual event featuring baked goods and more with proceeds benefiting local charity organizations. Nov. 9, 10 am-1 pm. Central Lutheran, 512 S. Bernard St. (624-9233)

Etc.

GREEN SCENE SOCIAL Networking event hosted by the Cascadia Inland Brand Collective, Spokane’s local green building group. Nov. 7, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. The Blind Buck, 204 N. Division St. (208-660-4361) INTRO TO DRONES COURSE Special interest course on the history, current events and future applications of drone technology. Nov. 7 and 8 from 6:308:30 pm. $39. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208-769-3222) PHOTOGRAPHER JERRY PAVIA “Selkirks Spectacular” presentation by the garden and nature photographer, hosted by the Inland Empire Gardeners club. Nov. 7, 6:30 pm. Free. CenterPlace Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. tieg.org (535-8434) BANK LEFT GALLERY HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Ninth annual Christmas open house event featuring local artwork on display, gift items and more. Nov. 9, 10 am-5 pm. Free. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St., Palouse, Wash. (878-8425) BEGINNING BEEKEEPERS CLASS Class for beginning beekeepers, including information needed to pass the Wash. State Beekeeping Assoc. test. Saturdays, 10 am-2 pm through Nov. 16 $30-$40. Pizza Factory, 123 S. Broad St. wpbeekeepers.org (863-5666) HERBICIDES, PESTICIDES & THE HONEY BEE Presentation by Jim Miller and Gina Jackson on how agricultural chemicals affect the honey bee and other insects. Nov. 9, 11 am-1 pm. Free. Sun People Dry Goods, 32 W. Second.

(368-9378) HOLISTIC FAIR Hosted by the Spokane Holistic Chamber of Commerce, with 35 vendors and informational presentations. Nov. 9, 10 am-5 pm. Unity Spiritual Center, 2900 S. Bernard St. unityspokane.org (496-8138) BUMP TO BABY EXPO Parenting expo featuring local vendors and services, contests, demonstrations and more. Nov. 10, 11 am-4 pm. $5. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. bumptobabyexpo.com (477-1766) NONPROFIT CONFERENCE “Excellence in Nonprofit Leadership: Ensuring Mission-Focused Success,” hosted by Leadership Spokane, featuring workshops and presentation on fundraising management. Nov. 12, 7:30-11:30 am. $50. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. (321-3639) WOMEN & HEART DISEASE “What Women Need to Know About Heart Disease” presentation on risk factors, prevention, screening and symptoms. Refreshments served, registration requested. Nov. 12, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Sacred Heart, 101 W. Eighth Ave. phc.org LINDA SMITH: SEX TRAFFICKING PRESENTATION The former U.S. Congresswoman and founder of Shared Hope International is a leader in the global movement to end sex trafficking. Nov. 13, 12-1:30 pm. $20. Red Lion at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. spokanecollegewomen.org (368-0695) WASHINGTON STATE GOVERNANCE SERIES Local state legislators, past and present, talk about ways to improve the state’s legislative process, hosted by Sec. of State Kim Wyman. Nov. 13, noon. WSU, Riverpoint Campus, 600 N. Riverpoint Blvd. spokane.wsu.edu (358-7500) GSI BIZSTREET: MEET THE PRESS Get an inside view on building a positive relationship with local media, featuring presentations by Inlander Editor Jacob Fries, Spokane Public Radio correspondent Paige Browning and KHQ’s Sean Owsley. Nov. 14, 7:45-9:30 am. $20-$35. Greater Spokane Incorporated, 801 W. Riverside Ave. greaterspokane.org (321-3630)

Film

OUR NIXON One-night screening of the film featuring home movies filmed by Richard Nixon’s closest aides. Nov. 7 at 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (209-2383) WAY OF LIFE Teton Gravity Research’s new winter sports movie. Nov. 8 at 8 pm. $10. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191) AFTER TILLER Documentary on the assassination of Dr. George Tiller, a doctor who provided third-term abortions for women. Nov. 11, 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. (209-2383) MONSTERS UNIVERSITY Family animated film. Doors open at 2 pm. Nov. 11, 2:30 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-819-9281) JOURNEY TO TIBET Screening of a rare film made in 1931, hosted by the Whitworth History Dept. Nov. 13, 6:30 pm. Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne, (777-4492) A PLACE AT THE TABLE Screening of the film as part of the “Food for Thought” film series, hosted by the Moscow Food Co-op. Nov. 13, 7 pm. Free. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. (208-882-4127) THIS SPORTING LIFE Screening as part of the “Great Sports Films at the Library” series. Nov. 13, 5:30 pm. Free. Downtown

Library, 906 W. Main Ave. (444-5336) MONEY FOR NOTHING One-night screening of the documentary on the U.S. Federal Reserve. Nov. 14, 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main. (209-2393)

Food

EXPERIENCE SUSHI Chef Jim Wolters leads a class on set up, rice prep, ingredient selection and sushi-making techniques. Nov. 7, 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) FORT GEORGE BREWERY TASTING Hosted beer tasting by the brewery in Astoria, Ore., featuring bourbon barrel aged beers on tap. Nov. 7, 5-7 pm. Free admission. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way. corkjoy.com (208-457-9885) SPARKLING & CHAMPAGNE Tasting class on sparkling wines, including four selections from Champagne, France. Nov. 7, 6:30-8:30 pm. $25. Total Wine & More, 9980 N. Newport Hwy. (466-1644) POWDERKEG BREW FESTIVAL The first annual winter beer festival features Inland Northwest craft beer and cider makers, focusing on seasonal winter styles, and runs in conjunction with the Snowlander Expo. (Entry included in expo admission) Nov. 8, 4-9 pm and Nov. 9, 10 am-6 pm. $7. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/ expo (279-7000) SMALL FRENCH VINEYARD WINES Import wine class with guest host Tristan Ohms. Reservations required. Nov. 8, 7 pm. $20. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) WINE TASTING Friday features Basel Cellars of Walla Walla; Saturday features Patit Creek Cellars of Walla Wall. Nov. 8, 3-6:30 pm and Nov. 9, 2-4:30 pm. $15. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) CORK & KEG FESTIVAL The annual holiday beer and wine tasting event, hosted by the Washington Restaurant Association’s Spokane Chapter, features appetizers from the INCA and live music. Nov. 9, 7-10 pm. $45-$50. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. spokanecorkandkeg. com (467-7744) FAIRFIELD SERVICE CLUB DINNER FUNDRAISER Annual prime rib and oyster dinner, with proceeds funding Fairfield’s Flag Day celebration in June. Nov. 9, 5 pm. $20. Fairfield, Wash. Contact LoriJS@hotmail.com WINEMAKER’S DINNER Five course meal paired with wines from Five Star Cellars. Reservations required. Nov. 10, 4-7 pm. $69/person. 315 Martinis and Tapas, 315 Wallace Ave, CdA. 315martinisandtapas.com (208-667-9660)

Music

JUDY CARMICHAEL Concert by the Grammy-nominated jazz pianist. Nov. 7, 7:30 pm. $10-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7638) NEW LIFE BENEFIT CONCERT Featuring local bands Awaken the Sleeping and Apollo’s Creed, benefiting an ongoing project to build a schoo for a village in Uganda. Nov. 8, 7 pm. Free, donations accepted. Liferoads Church, 4209 E. Pacific, Spokane. liferoads.org (328-1099) SPOKANE NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE “Music for a Modern Ear” concert by the newlyformed ensemble, featuring original music written by its members. Nov. 8, 7 pm. Music City, 1322 N. Monroe St. (625-6200) ALL AMERICAN: ART SONGS & MUSI-

CAL THEATER Concert featuring Brian Carter and Julianna Witt, instructors at Washington State University. Nov. 9, 7:30 pm. $7-$10. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) GREATER PALOUSE YOUTH ORCHESTRA High school students in the orchestra are involved in university-level programs. Nov. 9, 2-5 pm. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. (208-885-6111) ILLUSIONS OF ELVIS Local artists, including Brad Mitchell and Ray Sutton, present tributes to Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, The Big Bopper, Annie Lennox and other artists. Nov. 9, 7 pm. $15. Women’s Club, 1428 W. 9th Ave. (838-5667) PIANISSIMO! Featuring faculty and students from the University of Montana School of Music. Nov. 9, 7 pm. Free, donations accepted. Steinway Piano Gallery, 13418 E. Nora Ave. (327-4266) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SuperPops Series: “Big Band” feat. conductor Matt Catingub. Nov. 9 at 8 pm. $26-$62. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. (624-1200) SPOKANE YOUTH SYMPHONY Season opening concert titled “Earth,” featuring pieces by Beethoven and Alexander Borodin. Nov. 10, 4-6 pm. $12-$16. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) MUSIC FROM THE PALOUSE Concert featuring Mozart pieces as part of the Auditorium Chamber Music Series. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm. $10-$20. U of Idaho Admin. Building, 851 Campus Dr. (208-885-7557)

Performance

DISNEY ON ICE: ROCKIN’ EVER AFTER Disney characters take to the ice in a spectacle of song and dance. Nov. 7-10, show times vary. $18-$57. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. (279-7000) MOSCOW BALLET’S GREAT RUSSIAN NUTCRACKER Performance of the classic holiday ballet. Nov. 13-14 at 7:30 pm. $30$177. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. nutcracker.com (509-227-7404) LETTERS HOME Monologues based on letters from U.S. troops involved in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, presented by the Griffin Theatre Company. Nov. 1516 at 7:30 pm. $9-$18. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSUPullman. (325-4328)

Sports

SNOWLANDER EXPO 2013 The Inlander-hosted, annual event features local vendors offering discounted prices on winter sports gear, season pass photos from local mountains, factory reps on site and more. Nov. 8, 4-9 pm and Nov. 9, 10 am-6 pm. $7. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/expo (279-7000) SARS SKI SWAP Schweitzer Alpine Racing School’s annual gear swap features new and used winter sports gear for sale. Nov. 9, 9 am-2 pm. $2-$5. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave. sars.net (208-263-1081) ANNUAL TWINKIE ROAST Annual tradition of roasting Twinkies in a “sacrifice” to ask the snow god Ullr for a good season. Pick up season passes and more. Nov. 10, 11 am-5 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) SKATE WITH THE CHEIFS The community is invited to skate alongside team members in a fundraiser event benefiting the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Nov. 12, 6-7:30 pm. $5. Eagles Ice-A-Rena,

6321 N. Addison St. (509-489-9295)

Theater

GREASE Musical performed by the Regional Theatre of the Palouse. Through Nov. 17, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, also on Nov. 16-17 at 1:30 pm. $17-20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N Grand Ave. rtoptheatre.org (334-0750) LEND ME A TENOR Musical comedy. Oct. 25-Nov. 10, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $11-$17. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden. (208-667-1323) NEVER THE SINNER Thriller based on the 1924 trial of Leopold and Loeb. Through Nov. 9, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayers.com (455-7529) SECOND SAMUEL Comedy. Through Nov. 24, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) TARZAN THE MUSICAL Musical by members of CYT North Idaho, based on the Disney animated film. Nov. 8-9 at 7 pm, Nov. 10 at 3 pm. $8-$14. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho. org (208-765-8600) FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Musical performed by local children ages 12-17. Through Nov. 17, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave. pendoreilleplayers.org (447-9900) GUYS & DOLLS Musical performed by the Moscow Community Theatre. Through Nov. 12, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun. at 2 pm. $15. Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) NORA Play adapted from the 1879 script for “A Doll’s House,” on women’s emancipation issues. Nov. 8-24, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org (276-2775) A POTPOURRI OF PLAYS II Ten short readers’ theater comedy plays presented by members of the Corbin Players. Nov. 8, 2 pm. $10-$12. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. (327-1584) SHREK THE MUSICAL Performance by CYT Spokane, based on the DreamWorks film. Nov. 1-2 and Nov. 8-9 at 7 pm, Nov. 2 and 9-10 at 3 pm. $10-$12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404)

Visual Arts

HOT OFF THE PRESS Exhibit featuring printmaking works by University of Idaho Students. Artist reception Nov. 7 from 5-7 pm, exhibit runs through Nov. 19 Free. Third Street Gallery, City Hall, 206 E. Third St. (208-883-7036) ARTWALK Monthly art showcase at downtown galleries and businesses. Nov. 8 from 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown CdA. artsincda.org (208-292-1629) VICTORIA BRACE Exhibition featuring 20 new oil paintings by the Spokane artist. Show runs Nov. 8-30. Artist reception Nov. 8 from 5-8 pm. Free. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. (208-765-6006) MAC ART AUCTION The annual fundraiser includes silent and live auctions of local artists’ work, dinner and live music. Art to be auctioned can be previewed at the museum through Nov. 8. Nov. 9, 5 pm. $100. The Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. (363-5323) VISTAS OF THE INLAND NORTHWEST Features works by local artists Tom Hanson, Craig Shillam, Tom Bowman, Travis Chapman, Dian Allison, Natalie Utley and others. Through Nov. 30. Free. Pacific Flyway Gal-

lery, 409 S. Dishman Mica Rd. (747-0812) EVE DEISHER & ANN CHADWICK REID “Transient Terrain: Cutting and sewing transform drawing” exhibition. Runs Nov. 11-Feb. 7, 2014, opening reception Nov. 12 from 5-7 pm. Free. Schuler Performing Arts Center at NIC, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-7780) POETICS & PUBLIC PROJECTION: ROSE BOND “Layered History — Redrawn Memory” featuring the work of the award-winning animator and artist. Artist reception and lecture Nov. 12 from 5-6 pm. Exhibit runs through Feb. 7, 2014. Free. Bryan Oliver Gallery, Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-4513) VISITING ARTIST LECTURE SERIES: GELAH PENN The NYC-based artist speaks about her work and career as part of this years VALS, themed “Recasting Traditions.” Lectures held at SFCC on Nov. 13 at 11:30 am, and at The MAC at 6:30 pm, and on Nov. 14 at noon at EWU. All events are free. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931)

Words

“I’M WITH THE BANNED” A discussion of censorship and punk rock in conjunction with the release of the 2013 Comic Book Legal Defense Fund’s Liberty Annual, hosted by Leah Sottile, Sheri Boggs, Brian VanderVeen and John Waite. Music by local bands to follow. Nov. 9, 7 pm. Free. Merlyn’s, 19 W. Main. (624-0957) AUTHOR CAROL HIPPERSON Local Pearl Harbor survivors are in store to sign copies of the author’s book “Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific” in honor of Veterans Day. Nov. 11, 1-2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) F-WORD LIVE POETRY SLAM Feminismthemed poetry slam, featuring local spoken word activists and performers. Nov. 12, 6 pm. $5. University of Idaho, 709 S. Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-6111) GABOR ZOVANYI Lecture by the EWU prof., based on his book “The NO-Growth Imperative: Creating Sustainable Communities Under Ecological Limits to Growth,” with proceeds benefiting KYRS. Nov. 12, 7 pm. $5. Community Building, 35 W. Main. (747-3012) KEEPING OUR HERITAGE ALIVE Presentation by Coeur d’Alene Tribe culture director Quanah Matheson on the history of the tribe, in association with Native American Heritage Month. Nov. 12, 6:30 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612) NPR’S RENEE MONTAGNE Talk by the award-winning journalist and host of NPR’s Morning Edition. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm $20-$27. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) AUTHOR TEJU COLE The internationallyacclaimed novelist and photographer reads from and signs copies of his books. Nov. 13, 7:30 pm. Free. University of Idaho Law School, 709 Deakin. udiaho.edu ROBERTA BROWN & PATRICIA O’CONNELL The editors of “Selected Letters of A.M.A. Blanchet, Bishop of Walla Walla and Nesqualy (1846-1879)” sign copies and discuss the collection. Nov. 13, 7 pm. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) GONZAGA VISITING WRITERS SERIES Presentation by young adult author Matt de la Pena. Nov. 14 at 7:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6681) n

NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 49

5:30pm] m a 0 3 : [8 Mon. - Fr(i.509) 444-7355 lander.com PHONE: BulletinBoard@In it Parkway E-MAIL: 1227 West Summ 1 : 20 IN PERSON Spokane, WA 99

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR

INDOOR GARAGE SALE & FLEA MARKET Greyhound Park & Event Center

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Crafts, unique gifts, baked goods & more $1 Admission 12 & Under Free

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Smokers Wanting to Quit Needed

The WSU Spokane Sleep Center needs smokers 22-40 willing to quit cold turkey. Earn up to $285. 509-3587756 for more info. IRB#13177

BUYING Estate contents / household goods. See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

Christian Science Healing

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SYNTHETIC OIL CHANGE 3 FOR ONLY $12995

ACROSS 1. Up 7. IMHO cousin 11. Z4 automaker 14. Gary of “Apollo 13” 15. Kitchen flooring, for short 16. “Seinfeld” uncle 17. Surgical inserts 18. Concerning 19. ____ Miss 20. Reason the pet owner gave for not neutering Felix? 23. It’s quite a story 24. Litigators’ org. 25. 1930s film dog 28. Task for a Saudi Arabian public relations man? 33. Hydroelectric structure 34. Hit hard 35. Stomach, to a tot 36. “Don’t ____” (2005 hit song) 39. Actress Zadora

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THIS ANSW WEEK’S E PAGE RS ON 65 41. Chapter 42. Govt. agency that’s assbackwards? 43. Casual greetings 44. Marble, e.g. 45. Sch. named after a televangelist 47. Something that requires a huge cleanup crew? 52. Baseball great ____ Speaker 53. Quick swim 54. “Let the Sunshine In” musical 57. Words spoken during a swearing-in (or what’s found in 20-, 28- and 47-Across) 62. ____ Beta Kappa 64. Harmony 65. 1914 Edgar Rice Burroughs novel “At the ____ Core” 66. It’s quite a stretch 67. California-based oil giant 68. Ghost

69. Something to hang your hat on 70. Look 71. Dogmata DOWN 1. Elves, to Santa: Abbr. 2. “Die Hard: ____ Vengeance” (1995 film) 3. Light breakfast 4. “The Autobiography of My Mother” author Jamaica 5. First-year Spanish verb 6. One out on a limb? 7. Like bananas Foster 8. Smarty-pants 9. The “I” in IHOP: Abbr. 10. It may be spun 11. 49-0 NFL games, e.g. 12. Man’s name that’s Latin for “honey” 13. Blue state?

“AFTER ME”

21. Character who says “Sorry, we’re closed,” the last line of the series finale of “Cheers” 22. Wagering locale: Abbr. 26. Shih ____ (Tibetan dogs)

27. Princess in L. Frank Baum books 29. Kind of trail 30. Big guns in the Mideast 31. Bounce (off) 32. Stoudemire of the NBA

36. Target of some surgery 37. Rush ____ 38. Aiming high 40. Patient waiting 46. Herald 48. Suffix with Taiwan 49. Show teens watch for laughs, in slang 50. Org. trying to clear the air? 51. He declined the 1964 Literature Nobel 55. “Somebody shot me!” 56. Chills, so to speak 58. Some health warnings: Abbr. 59. “Reader, I married him” heroine 60. Big celebration 61. It’s on a roll 62. Vigor 63. Garden tool

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IN PERSON OR BY MAIL: 1227 West Summit Parkway, Spokane WA 99201 Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 51

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Cheers

STCU - Valley 4pm, October 31st, at STCU in Spokane Valley cash machine. You: beautiful blond wearing gray. We both were headed to cash machine, I told you to go ahead. I asked after you were done if you wanted your receipt. You came back and got it from me and smiled. You are so pretty I have memory burn. Are you single? Dinner? Apollo246@outlook.com

staff for teaching our kids. They will remember this undefeated season for the rest of their lives.

age could get away with that we all wish we had the courage to say ourselves. Thanks Leah, it was a good reminder.

November 5th, the first day of snow! Our car died right in the middle of the intersection, and you stopped and pushed our car out of the intersection. You even stayed with us until we got things figured out. You practically saved our lives! What really blew me away was when we thanked you and you simply said, “This is what we’re supposed to do. We’re supposed to help each other.” You have given me more hope in the people in this world. Maybe there are some good people out there. Thanks so much!

Curly’s My younger friend and I (both blondes) saw you at Curly’s, Thursday, October 17th, outside. You are a Christian Biker, tall, about 60 years old. You stood behind a table of people we were talking to! I later thought I should have asked if you were single and if I could get your number

Happy 30th Birthday! To my remarkable man: You’re the kind of guy to want your cake and eat it too. I love you and your sweet tooth, and can hardly wait to see you sink your teeth into the cakes that I bring home for you year after year. Happy 30th Birthday. Love, your bumbum So Much To Be Thankful For Jack: With one of the best holidays about to arrive again, I look forward to the apple pie that Essie always brings to our feast. As a widow, I couldn’t ask for better neighbors to take care of me. I am thankful for your family. Hope all the kids will be around this year. Owen J

Maple CHAS New pharmacist? You helped me refill my prescription Thursday morning, October 24th and I keep wishing I’d made more conversation with you. You’re quite cute with your surreptitious smile. Put a non-identifying email I’m the tweedy guy a bit older than address in your message, like you. I would love to meet you for “petals327@yahoo.com” — not coffee and chat!

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52 INLANDER NOVEMBER 7, 2013

I Saw You

NorthTown Mall I saw you Friday night, 10-31-13. You were walking thru NorthTown Mall, you had the most prefect blue eyes with the best bright blue eye shadow. We were walking together, you asked how I was doing, I said good. I asked the same for you and you said you were working on it. I gave you a thumbs up and we went our ways. We saw each other outside for a sec. As we were walking by I smiled at you. Maybe you woudn’t mind getting to gether one day Walmart On Sprague We ran into each other on November 1st around 7pm. I was the tall, blond guy in the WSU jacket. You were wearing glasses and asked me if “I knew where the beer isle was.” I responded with, “I don’t work here,” and then pointed you in the right direction. I didn’t even think to get your number. What an idiot I am. Party?

You Saw Me RE: Pilgrims Market Just responding to your ad that we may have seen each other in Pilgrims Market in CDA October 12th.Was it around 7 or 8 pm? Was wondering if I might have been the one. tjscda@gmail. com

Cheers The Bears October 29th at Dwight Merkel. The Bears won the Championship verses a very tough Mt. Spokane team in one of the most exciting comeback football games I have ever seen. Great job Bears! and thanks to Coach and

Mama Mia’s The table I was sitting at was so full, I should have seen it coming. A bowl of really hot soup almost fell into my lap (It was even one of those slow motion kind of happenings.) Thank you to the thoughtful waiter, who saved the day! Your quick thinking spared me from a nasty burn. Birthday Thoughts As I reach my 61st birthday, on the tail end of the premature death of a wonderful woman and my best friend, I am struck by my own mortality. As a result, I would like to take the time to recognize and thank my family for all they do for me and others. I have a strong, hardworking and giving daughter; a compassionate, hardworking and charismatic son ; and a protective, hardworking and caring husband. Each child has a loyal, supportive and loving husband and wife, respectively, and beautiful and amazing children. I am truly blessed and forever greatful. Mrs. Z. Never Too Old Cheers to Leah Sottile, the author of this past week’s Never Too Old. Often times it’s easy for us all to overlook our elderly neighbors or family members and forget that they’ve lived through things that are indeed remarkable- both big and small. Reading this made me miss my grandma who is still alive but comes and goes cognitively. It made me cherish her stories of growing up in North Dakota, her altogether way too dirty jokes, and the times that she would say something that only someone her

My Love Life is to short to be away from one another, why do we let this happen? I love you !! Eh?! It’s never a good idea to redline an engine unless it’s already broken in. Just another reason why not all things are at their best when in mint condition. “next year in Jerusalem” Bender Kate Conger RE: Truth To Power Thank you for your article on the stories underrepresented by corporate media. I would like to encourage you to read Ralph McGehee’s “Deadly Deceits: My 25 Years in the CIA.” Mr. McGehee stated that in the 1980s, the CIA employed over 50 people whose job was to “wash” the news before we got it. They have done a good job of confusing and misleading Americans (ie. Viet Nam, Kennedy Assassination, 9/11, Benghazi Attack, et al). In the movie “Safe House” there is a powerful line in which the CIA department head states that “People don’t want to know the truth! The truth keeps them up at night.” I encourage your efforts at uncovering the truth. Halloween Cheers/jeers to the guy out in the pretty fairy costume with hot pink tutu on Halloween night. You had by far one of the funniest male costumes, my friends and I died laughing. Jeers because you bombarded us with fairy dust and my apt is covered in glitter. It is everywhere like herpes, can’t get rid of it. Sincerely, Red Riding Hood! 11-7 Happy Birthday to Maria on Ruby. Happy Birthday to a wonderful and special lady. When you entered this world, the world became a better place, and I am so happy to have you in my life. I know you make my life better, and I wish you the best and happiest birthdays ever, and I love you so very much! Yours truly, Huckleberry Hound. Good Samaritan To the group of individuals who raked my lawn. Cheers!!! That was a very nice thing to do. No wonder I love living in Cd’A. I will definitely pay it forward.

Thanks Much! Drive thru at Jack in The Box, November 4th. I didn’t realize I forgot my wallet at home until I was inches away from that quick and delicious sausage, egg, and cheese sandwich. You definitely saved my day when you paid for my breakfast behind me! Jack would be proud. Found Family Pet To the kind and generous people who rescued our Silky Terrier on Sunday, November 3rd near Hamilton and Mission. He got out of our back gate and ran out. We were worried he wouldn’t be found safe. You graciously turned him over to SCRAPS and we brought him home where he is happily playing with his football once again. Thank you for sparing us broken hearts. May your generosity be rewarded many times over. Thanks Again! Cheers to the nice woman in line at Walmart who paid for my groceries after my card declined. It was very generous of you and I really appreciate it. I will always think of what you said. Pay it forward... Thanks again. Happy Birthday Maria You are the best thing ever and I hope that your birthday rules! I can’t imagine life without you! I love you sooo much! Love, your Anthony

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Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

I Love You I know the holiday’s are hectic and we need an extra measure of kindness and grace this time of year, I Love you more than you’ll ever realize and am happy to extend you the kindness and grace that you need! I absolutely love It that you find me sexy when I don’t feel sexy, even If I don’t always act like It. I am so glad I get to spend forever with you! Love Me.

obey the law and stop at said cross walk when myself or any other pedestrian is attempting to enter into the crosswalk, not make eye contact with me, then suddenly look away because you know you have broken the law. Yes, it is the law to stop at a crosswalk when a pedestrian is attempting to enter, not just when they are in the crosswalk. Please obey the law.

Red Light Runner To the driver who ran a red light but gave me enough time to narrowly escape being hit, thank you. I don’t know what I would have done if my car was totaled and I couldn’t get around this winter. And please drive more safely because not everyone will have enough time to escape your reckless driving.

Pedestrian Crossing To the minds responsible for finding a cost effective way to protect pedestrians crossing Hamilton in the U district, without any real disruption in the flow. This setup appears to work quite well, it would be nice to see more of them on some of these darker streets.

Here’s A Tip Jeers to those that come into restaurants expecting so much and not wanting to give anything back. I give your table of 6 great service, bringing you your numerous orders in a very timely manner, refilling your tea and sodas several times, and everyone at the table was obviously having a great experience until it came time to pay. I have served you before as well as other servers at my establishment and we know not to expect a good tip, regardless of service. This time you came in with a large enough group to deem auto gratuity of 15% which I happily added to the bill to save from getting stiffed. All hell breaks loose and you request my manager stating my service was terrible, I never checked on your table, the food was bad, and demanded the gratuity be removed. Shame on you! You know who you are and this goes out to anyone else who thinks not tipping your server is acceptable. It is not! We work hard for our money and depend on your tips to pay our bills. So if you don’t have enough money to eat out and take care of your server, don’t eat out!

Happy 35 Birthday To my wonderful husband Jeff! I love you more than words can describe! You are such an amazing father to our three beautiful boys. I know things can get crazy but I want to take the time to tell you how much we appreciate all that you do for us, even though you’re getting so old. I hope you have a wonderful birthday! Love you lots!

Jeers t’s Happening Again 28th and High Dr....now that it’s dark, you are again letting your dog out to do his business, rather than doing your job as a dog owner. And once again, your dog is using my yard, as it is very close to his house. You know who you are, and I know who you are. Wouldn’t want to put your dog through a trip to the pound, but I will, if that’s what it takes. Why don’t you get out the door, walk your dog, bring a bag, and pick it up.That’s what I do with my dog. Do the right thing and be a considerate neighbor and responsible pet owner. Spokane Drivers I am a public transportation user. I have a short walk that involves crossing a busy street that has a marked cross walk with no traffic lights. As a pedestrian, I rely on you to

Four Wheel Drive A jeers to the bozos in the 4x4s, AWD’s, and drivers with dagger-toothed studded tires who think they can drive anyway they want in the snow: slow down, obey the speed limit, and don’t try to pass just because you think you can. Not all of us are as macho as you but we all want to get to our destinations safely. Showing a bit of restraint will impress folks more than when you gun it from light to light like an idiot.

B M W F W I W O K E N L E O O N I L N I S E O L E O T S A S T E N L L O W E C A T S M E T O T O A B A G A B U Z Z A C G I V E M E C ’S T U M M A R THIS WEEK! D A M A S S S R E A E R ANSW P I A C H A O R U O R B Y O S Z E M E S S S U P E R S I H A I R D I P T R I S T E R M E F A T A E P R E E A R T H S S Y N C P H I S P I R I T O C R A E O N T E N E T S S E E M P E G AFTER ME

A W S I S T T H S A

Contact Cody George 509-755-7529 cody.george@khco.com

An email for food lovers

Driving In The Snow As winter driving is upon us, reminder to everyone who drives an automatic vehicle. You can still gear down to second gear (2 instead of D) to use the engine’s torque for safer driving on snow and ice. Much safer than riding your brakes. Also, stick a bag of sand in the back of your car, the added weight can’t hurt. Plus if you find yourself stuck and spinning, you’ll be glad to have the sand on hand.

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Booey's Sauce puts a kick to every meal!

Car Burglar To the jackhole that ransacked my car in Cheney. I want to thank you for taking all of my school books, my bookbag, my gym bag and my CD’s. Enjoy the free stuff and have a nice life dirtbag!

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Bad Table Manners Jeers to the person that sits at the lunch table in our staff lounge. Must you blow your nose everyday, while the rest of us are trying to eat. It’s bad enough you blowing your nose at the table, but do you really need to examine the contents in the tissue before crumpling it and setting it onto the lunch table? Disgusting!

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NOVEMBER 7, 2013 INLANDER 53

Kristin Cowan as Ariel from The Little Mermaid with Disney on Ice. Feld Entertainment photo

Skating Home

Kristin Cowan returns to Spokane with Disney on Ice By John Allison

K

ristin Cowan answered her phone the other day from a Portland hotel room, understandably a little tired. She’d been up many hours since the 4 am wake-up call for morning show TV interviews. Still on her schedule for that night was yet another curtain call on a frozen ice rink. But she was excited to talk about the Disneyesque dream, so many years in the making, about to unfold this weekend in her hometown of Spokane. Cowan is one of the lead skaters in Disney on Ice’s Rockin’ Ever After show, which opens here tonight and continues through the weekend. Since turning professional in 2007, she’s performed in Buenos Aires, Santiago, Istanbul, Prague, Paris, London, New York, Mexico City, and dozens of other major cities. But when she glides through the curtain at Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena, she will finally be back in front of a home audience. She has some significant Spokane bona fides. Her grandfather is legendary KHQ-TV news anchor Bob Briley. Her mom is Robin Briley, a former KXLY news director who skated professionally in the Ice Capades as a young woman. Her father is Rich Cowan, a principal in the Spokane movie and media company North by Northwest, and the 5th District’s 2012 Democratic nominee for Congress. With ice skating deep in the family blood, Cowan began lacing up her skates at the age of 5 and began com-

54 INLANDER november 7, 2013

petitions at 7. She loved it and was winning events. There were countless 5:45 am alarms for before-school practice at Eagles Ice Arena, and more skating in the afternoon. Then at the tender age of 12, it all went away. Cowan was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis and was forced to leave competitive skating. It was a crushing blow, but she moved on and kept a happy disposition through her teen years and graduation from Spokane’s Lewis & Clark High School in 2005. She enrolled at Santa Clara University with an eye on accounting. Along the way, her arthritis issues gradually improved. With prompting from friends, a former coach, and her mom, Cowan began listening to the idea that her ice-skating dream was still alive. Midway through her sophomore year at Santa Clara, she put it out there. She made an audition tape, and somebody liked it. She got an offer to join Holiday on Ice in Europe. She finished her spring semester and came home to Spokane to turn herself back into a full-time skater. “That summer I trained and trained at the rink in Spokane. I had taken a lot of time off, and didn’t know what to expect,” she says. She bought a plane ticket for the Netherlands. Looking back, she remembers a lot of anxiety about showing up in a foreign land and not knowing exactly how it might go. But that old competitive drive kept her focused.

Kristin Cowan at age 7 “After I started practicing with them, I told myself, ‘This is going to be fun. I feel prepared,’” she says. The first job was a nine-month European tour that turned into three years’ worth of continuing contracts. Then she took jobs with a series of smaller shows, one of which caught the eye of a Disney casting agent sitting in the audience at Myrtle Beach, S.C. In the Disney show, she skates as Ariel from The Little Mermaid. One of the show’s centerpiece numbers sees her performing acrobatic skate stunts high on a swinging rope — tricks that required several weeks of intense instruction and practice at a special circus school. At 26, Cowan is coming up on her seventh year in professional shows. She knows that someday she’ll skate off the ice and back into college to finish her accounting degree. But for now she’s having fun, making good money, and building a lifetime of great stories to tell. Like the time the tour landed in New York last year, immediately after Hurricane Sandy. With seemingly half of the region displaced from their homes, there were no hotel rooms. But the show went on, for an audience that badly needed a diversion. It may be hard for her to skate here without being hit by emotion. “My grandma and grandpa have never been able to see me skate professionally,” she said. They’ll be right there near the front, in a row or two of family and close friends, all watching the spotlight following the skater they know, the one with the beaming smile. As the rest of the audience enjoys the show, they’ll know what it took her to get here. n Disney on Ice: Rockin’ Ever After • Thu-Fri, Nov. 7-8 at 7pm; Sat, Nov. 9 at 11:30 am, 3:30 pm, 7 pm; Sun, Nov. 10 at 12:30 pm and 4:30 pm • Spokane Arena • $18-$23/adult, $10/kids • spokanearena.com

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rom a humble start nearly 20 years ago, The Inlander family of publications has grown from a little 28-page paper, published on a wing and prayer in those early years, to a wide range of media. Our family started a newspaper in our hometown to help Spokane and the Inland Northwest become a more dynamic place to live. We wanted to make it a place where a small, corner coffee shop could thrive alongside Starbucks; where more promoters would bring more shows, knowing people would actually buy tickets; to make it a little more like Seattle or Portland, but without the traffic or pretentiousness. A creative, open-minded place. A fun place. A place we can all be proud to call “home.”

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Inlander 11/7/2013