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AUGUST 21-27, 2014 | YOUR REGION. YOUR NEWSPAPER.

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL PREVIEW

H O W V E R N O N A DA M S A N D E A S T E R N WA S H I N G T O N B ECA M E A P OW E R H O U S E PAG E 2 0

NEWS

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Outrage continues over the death of beloved Arfee

Steve Gleason and the Gleason Fest lineup

A 50-year-old murder mystery in Coeur d’Alene

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Mike Bookey (x279) CULTURE EDITOR Chris Bovey (x248) ART DIRECTOR

DO YOU THINK FOOTBALL ENCOURAGES VIOLENCE? MATT BELL

No. It doesn’t cause it. It just lets out its expression. Do you think it’s a healthy way to express it? Yes, but it does look like the safety equipment needs to get better from the concussion standpoint.

Laura Johnson (x250)

Michael Mahoney COPY EDITOR

Heidi Groover (x249) Jacob Jones (x237), Deanna Pan (x282), Daniel Walters (x263) STAFF WRITERS

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Today’s football does. All the professional sports have gotten too crazy. Do you think that we are drawn to that violence as a society? I don’t like [violence] when I watch it. I’m always afraid that someone might get seriously hurt

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I don’t think that it encourages physical violence, but I have known groups of football players who may do other sorts of violence. Do you think that is because they play football? I’m not sure if it’s from football, but it seems to be at least related.

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FRANK DEPASQUALE

It’s an outlet for aggression. It’s much better than harming someone with a weapon. If people are aggressive, I would rather see them out on the football field than out on the street being aggressive.

PRODUCTION Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x228), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Spaccia (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

INTERVIEWS BY JENNA MULLIGAN AND FRANNY WRIGHT 08/13/14, RIVER PARK SQUARE

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 5

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College professors are held captive to misguided reforms BY ROBERT HEROLD

A

nother school year is upon us. Over the next few months, university and college committees will form to begin considering colleagues for spring decisions on retention, promotion and tenure. Nervous junior faculty will teach this semester, awaiting the first round of student evaluations — to be summed up, averaged, sliced, diced and re-evaluated. Personally, over my 45 years of college teaching, I haven’t had much to complain about. When I went up for promotion to full professor at EWU, I ranked first in “Teaching Effectiveness.” Over my 14 years at Gonzaga, I did OK. But just the sense that I needed to establish my bona fides underscores my concerns. Student evaluations emerged from the ’60s and ’70s as part of the student demand menu of “reforms.” Perhaps it was the Berkeley free speech movement; no doubt Vietnam (which politicized a generation) had a lot to do with it. Whatever the reasons, students back then demanded “relevancy,” “transparency” and “accountability.” Some even demanded more — control over curriculum, and representation at department meetings. Eventually, under duress, administrators and faculty gave in to many of these demands. One thing for certain: “excellence in teaching” had little or nothing whatsoever to do with the new order; it was all about senior administrators not wanting to deal with sit-ins, and faculty wanting to appear relevant.

T

oday, some 40 years later, we still can’t even agree on the meaning of the term “teaching excellence.” Not to worry: We just assert a positive correlation between “excellence in teaching” and high marks on those pervasive student evaluations. Meanwhile, not much consideration has gone to unintended consequences. For example, what about grade creep? Who would argue that today’s grades are not inflated? The Washington Post cites a theory concluding that professors today are “more prone to assigning less work and giving better grades so that, in turn, students will give them better evaluations, which are a crucial part of the faculty assessment process.” As for the students: unless I’ve missed something, they are no longer at the barricades. Maybe it would be better for us all if they were, even if for only a few minutes a day. But since they aren’t, why continue ramming down their throats what they seemingly couldn’t care less about? Students today often have to be coaxed to even participate in the evaluation process. Gonzaga went from in-class written evaluations

to out-of-class, computer-generated evaluations. The dropoff in participation was dramatic. The fix? The old captive audience tactic: just schedule in-class computer evaluations, thus missing the point entirely. We are producing little more than a statistical illusion, reflecting in large part opinion based on impressions that always are influenced by circumstances. These results are too often treated as if they are somehow scientific. When all is said and done, we are confronted by an unavoidable reality: Academia has taken a politically expedient reform and enthusiastically transformed it into a now long-running show of political correctness. Add in computer technology, and now it has been packaged into ever-finer calculations, resulting in distinctions without a difference used to make important decisions about what makes for a good professor.

I

n his essay titled “Goodbye Mr. Chipstein,” Joseph Epstein, longtime editor of The American Scholar, reflects on his own teaching career at Northwestern University: “As to how successful I was as a teacher in general,” he writes, “I haven’t the faintest idea.” Epstein points out that that he always wanted to “establish a setting of goodwill.” He writes about student evaluations: “They were of little help.” (He does recall one suggestion that he took to heart: He stopped jiggling his keys.) “Although,” he adds, “I could make good students a little better, I could do nothing to improve the mediocre or uninterested. In fact, I believe I made them a little worse by confusing them with my high-flown talk.” Epstein flatly acknowledges that he always taught to the best students in the class: “I knew no other way.” Amen, brother. Statistics fade to black, and we seek out the Professor Epsteins — professors who view teaching less as a career and more as a calling. These are the teachers who have something to say, and the ones who most benefit their students. Colleagues consider their writing, syllabi, reading lists, examinations and grading techniques. It’s an art, not a science easily measured by a computer. Perhaps the best marker is exactly what Epstein’s career exemplifies: evidence of a “continuing engagement with the discipline.” n

COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

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istory buffs have been following this summer closely, tracing each day back 70 years. We all remember how heroic D-Day was — against all odds, the Allies took the beaches and then… got really bogged down in Normandy. In fact, it wasn’t until this week, 70 years ago, that the good guys finally broke through. Why do we stop to remember such moments? Entire nations went mad, and the lessons must not be forgotten. That’s what makes the events of this week, all those years ago, worth recounting. On Aug. 9, Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz, a veteran of both world wars, arrived in Paris as its new German governor. His orders came straight from Hitler: “The city must not fall into the enemy’s hand except lying in complete debris.” What followed were the 16 tumultuous days depicted in the 1965 book Is Paris Burning? Germans controlled the monuments around Paris, waiting for the order to take them down, while French Resistance fighters, with more courage than bullets, could do little. As the Allies worried about the steep price of a siege, Choltitz suprised everyone. Instead of blowing up the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, Notre Dame Cathedral, the bridges of the Seine and more, he peacefully surrended his troops on Aug. 25. Choltitz flatly ignored his Fuhrer’s order. One man stood up to the madness so many had mindlessly followed. Choltitz was no saint; he killed many Allies and sent Jews to their deaths. But he’d finally seen enough of the darkness and spared the City of Light. In prison camp, being secretly audiotaped, Choltitz later told his fellow POWs: “We half-took the Nazis seriously instead of saying ‘To hell with you and your stupid nonsense.’ … Perhaps we bear even more guilt than these uneducated animals.” One of the lessons of World War II is what horrors can unfold when people who should know better keep silent. In the end, Choltitz followed his conscience, but so many others clung to the ravings of a lunatic until the bitter end. In Overlord, his D-Day history, Max Hastings blamed the German officers who, through “obsession with loyalty, [and their] utter inability to grapple with any greater issues of morality, humanity or the historic interests of the German people” kept on throwing lives away through May of 1945. “Suicide,” Hastings added, “for an astonishing procession of German senior officers… became the final expression of their own retreat from reason.” Today, parts of the world have gone mad again; we need history to show us sanity. We must let our consciences be our guide and question authority when necessary. In the summer of ’44, with cities from Stalingrad to Warsaw to Dresden to Hiroshima either destroyed or soon to be, the world needed hope — it needed Paris, like a flower blooming over a field of death.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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COMMENT | IDAHO they are all ready and willing to passionately share what they think. But the source of our political conflicts runs deeper than just the existence of varying opinions. As a whole, people in Sandpoint recognize they live in a great place and believe that they have a responsibility to keep it that way. They don’t always agree about how, and that can lead to fireworks.

Most fights in Sandpoint end up with solutions that, while rarely perfect, end up nudging this small town a little closer towards perfection. CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Why Sandpoint Thrives A lesson from the best place in Idaho BY JOHN T. REUTER

I

am back in my hometown of Sandpoint this week. I wasn’t born here, but it’s the place that most defines me. It’s where I truly fell in love with my wife and where we got engaged. It’s where I first went to work after college at a small weekly newspaper I started with a couple of friends. It’s where I learned who I am and what I’m willing to fight for. Sandpoint is home. Sandpoint also happens to be the best place in Idaho. Trust me. My job over the last two and a half years since leaving my hometown has had me traveling to every corner of Idaho, and while this state is filled with beautiful places and amazing people,

nothing beats that first drive across the Long Bridge, a local production at the historic Panida Theater or just watching sailboats race from City Beach. If you haven’t been here yet, make the trip. But even if you never do, there are lessons Sandpoint has to teach about building and protecting greatness that every city could learn from. The key principle being that paradise is worth fighting for. During my time on the Sandpoint City Council, I came to fully appreciate a local saying that “Sandpoint is a place where we circle the wagons and shoot inwards.” The politics here can be rough-and-tumble. In part, that’s because of the wide diversity of political perspectives, from the far right to the far left. Sandpoint is a town with more than its fair share of eccentric characters, and

This could end up not being particularly effective. If all we did was have a common drive to fight, Sandpoint could just end up as a mini Washington, D.C. — deeply divided and fundamentally broken. But you have to remember the first part of that classic Sandpoint saying: We circle the wagons. And what do we circle the wagons around? Our shared values of community and place. Our understanding that this place that we all already love so much could be even better, or could be lost. Most fights in Sandpoint end up with solutions that, while rarely perfect, end up nudging this small town a little closer towards perfection. Sometimes progress comes in the form of something new, like an old city work yard being turned into a neighborhood park, or a local bus to help locals and visitors get around town. Just as often, progress is about preserving Idaho’s last active, historic train depot or the two-mile lakeside Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail. What I know is that things will keep getting better here, and everywhere that people remember that what we love is worth fighting for.  John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, is the executive director of Conservation Voters for Idaho. He has been active in protecting the environment, expanding LGBT rights and the GOP.

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“If we don’t want to include the public opinion of the poor, we should admit that our charity is possibly more selfserving than helpful.” — RACHEL DOLEZAL

“Though American military power cannot solve all of Europe’s challenges, Europe would be emboldened by strong U.S. words against aggression and lawlessness.” — GEORGE NETHERCUTT

“The least that white people in this country can do when black Americans stand up and say ‘Stop killing our sons’ is to not argue against that demand. To not seek out reasons why maybe their sons deserved it.”

— TAYLOR WEECH

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 9

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

DON’T MINIMIZE MENTAL ILLNESS have read the Inlander regularly since it began publication and deeply

I

appreciate the platform you have provided this year for a public dialogue about mental illness. I was disappointed but not surprised some months ago when an Inlander reader made a Facebook comment to the effect of “playing the mental illness card.” My own personal experience is that mental illness is not a “card to be played”: It is self-monitoring and scratching to keep scraps of productivity and independence that are simple and mundane — casual commonplaces of American adult life. One of my decades-long creative and personal Send comments to inspirations, Robin Williams, recently lost his own editor@inlander.com. struggle. I never met him, and obviously have limited explicit knowledge of his interior demons. But I deeply admired his sensitivity, his charity (in several senses of that word), and his humanity, and the way those qualities were reflected in his extraordinary gifts for storytelling. Another of my heroes with demons, Winston Churchill, advised, “If you are going through hell, keep going.” I am sorry Robin Williams stopped. I am glad for his legacy.

LETTERS

RANDY STOLZ Sandpoint, Idaho

Readers react to “Crowded Out” (8/14/14) about a Washington court ruling outlawing the “boarding” of mentally ill patients in emergency rooms

DAVID TREMBLAY: An admitting psychiatrist should visit a new patient at the hospitals within two hours and act as triage. I am sure that there are exceptions for emergencies at psychiatric facilities for short term overflow. MEGHAN KIRK: Please don’t restrain people to gurneys anymore, for days. Maybe listen to them when they tell you their mother strangled them and give them a choice to leave or stay. JESSE QUINTANA: Just another way to penalize the mentally ill and those in poverty! ELIZABETH FREEMAN: We have a patient in our ER who’s been in the same room for eight days, waiting for placement! One full week gone, and here’s another weekend. … You put anyone in an ER room for that long, and if they didn’t need psych triage before they came in, they sure as hell would by then. MARGARET SIMONSON: Wow. I had no idea the numbers of involuntarily committed patients were so high. We’ve been slapping a Band-Aid on a massively hemorrhaging wound. I’m glad they’ve banned patients from being strapped to gurneys for days until they can be admitted somewhere, and I hope they create more adequate facilities. But with numbers as high as 720 per month, it seems like we are also doing a poor job at prevention. 

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 11

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12 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

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IDAHO

Tina Kunishige, near where Arfee was shot by a police officer, is one of many still upset with how Coeur d’Alene has handled the tragedy.

Dog Town Last month’s fatal shooting of Arfee still haunts the Lake City BY DANIEL WALTERS

C

raig Jones makes the entire drive — from a downtown Coeur d’Alene coffee shop to his father’s barn in Hayden — like this: sitting in his dog’s blood and broken glass, a hole in the van window beside him from the bullet that killed Arfee. “[The van] still smells like him to this day,” Jones says. On July 9, a Coeur d’Alene police officer responding to a report of a suspicious van shot Arfee, Jones’

2-year-old black Labrador, in the parking lot of Java on Sherman. Nearly six weeks later, Jones is still reeling. He and Arfee had slept on the same pillow. Arfee was his constant companion on wallpapering jobs and dirt-bike expeditions, a source of joy after Jones’ separation from his wife and the death of his mother. Now Jones keeps thinking about the trail of blood in

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

his van, picturing Arfee dragging himself wounded to the back, confused why he had been shot. The name “Arfee” had been a joke — the black Lab rarely arfed — but now when Jones types that word into Google, his dog’s death is the first thing that comes up. The shooting has ignited the entire community, spawning multiple Facebook groups, a boycott and a flood of furious messages. After all, the details are incendiary: In an initial press release, the police first called Arfee a “vicious pitbull” instead of a black Lab. Arfee was still inside the van, with the window rolled half up, when he was shot. The cops’ body cameras weren’t turned on, and they left without bothering to find Jones and tell him what happened. The city has so far refused to release the name of Arfee’s shooter. Coeur d’Alene was named “DogTown USA” three years ago by Dog Fancy magazine, but now the Lake City is getting a different sort of attention. ...continued on next page

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 13

NEWS | IDAHO

Craig Jones raised Arfee, the black Labrador pictured, from birth.

“DOG TOWN,” CONTINUED... “I’ve gotten emails from Alabama and Florida and New Hampshire and all over the country of people that are critical of what happened here,” Coeur d’Alene Mayor Steve Widmyer says. “It’s damaged our reputation.”

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Coeur d’Alene City Attorney Mike Gridley double-clicks on an attachment, and furious profanity starts blasting out from his computer: “Yeah, who the f--- shot that goddamn dog, you motherf---ers?! You’re going f---ing down you goddamn motherf---ers! I swear to God you better f---ing watch out. Be careful. Don’t f---ing sleep again!” This message, sent to the city’s criminal division, is far from the only threat. “The magnitude and amount of threats that are happening lends itself to believe that we shouldn’t release the name [of the shooter],” Interim Police Chief Ron Clark says. “It’s above and beyond anything I’ve seen or heard [before].” The public, however, continues to call for the shooter to be identified, and a YouTube message, claiming to be from hacker collective Anonymous, has threatened to expose the personal information of all involved with Arfee’s shooting. Gridley says the name will come out — but likely only after the investigation is completed, and a third party reviews it. Several factors have slowed that investigation, Gridley says. It took weeks for police to be able to get Jones’ van back. Jones has hired two attorneys and a private investigator to sue the city, and one witness hasn’t been willing to talk to cops without them

present. Widmyer says he understands that the lack of information has fostered anger and accusations of cover-up. But post the “pitbull” screw-up, he wants to make sure they gets things right. “I know people have a right to know,” Widmyer says. “They will know.”

UNLEASHED

Tina Kunishige doesn’t take her dog to downtown Coeur d’Alene anymore, despite the nice new dog park. She doesn’t feel it’s safe. Kunishige has never met Jones. But she’s become one of the most active members on the Justice for ARFEE Facebook page, a group still rapidly drawing new members a month and a half after the shooting. To her, Arfee’s shooting exposes a deeper rot within the region’s law enforcement. “I see that a lot of people are getting tired of it,” Kunishige says. “I think the dog shooting is what pushed it over the edge.” The mayor and police chief have apologized for the incident and reached out to Jones, but it hasn’t stopped the outrage from boiling over beyond social media. “Justice for Arfee” bumper stickers have appeared on cars. One SUV had “Please Don’t Shoot My Dog!” written on the back window with white window marker. A separate Facebook group urges nonlethal canine training for Idaho law enforcement officers. In Coeur d’Alene, that demand has been met: Shortly, after the shooting, Clark sent out a series of mandatory training videos to his department explaining how best to deal nonlethally

with dogs. Yet even the woman who sent Java on Sherman the initial warning about a van following her children — the one that eventually drew police incorrectly to Jones’ van — joined the angry chorus. The woman, Jessi Johnson, says Jones’ van didn’t fit her description, that the police abandoned the van too quickly, and that it was obvious the dog wasn’t a pitbull. “Ultimately, I don’t think this officer should have his job and be allowed to carry a weapon,” Johnson says. “We want a name, we want something to be done, and the officer dismissed.” She’s refused to answer investigators’ questions without Jones’ attorney and private investigator present, but doesn’t believe that makes her uncooperative. One the evening of July 18, Johnson and Kunishige joined other activists at the Cherry Hill Dog Park. They hung signs on their dogs saying “Don’t shoot! I’m not a vicious pit.” Attendees sung to guitars and shared memories. Jones didn’t attend the vigil. Everything was still too raw, and he hates losing his composure in public. “It’s not a function that I want to be seen at with tears rolling down with my face,” Jones says.

The dark never looked so good.

CROSSFIRE

On a sunny Friday morning, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel yips in the seat of a Jeep in the parking lot of Java on Sherman. It was here that Arfee was killed. David Patterson, the coffee shop’s owner, made the call that brought the cops to investigate Jones’ van, incorrectly believing it matched the description sent out by Johnson. “I called and trusted the police were going to do their job,” Patterson says. “As a human being, I’m deeply saddened about the events that transpired in our parking lot.” At Java, Jones received two additional insults: A tow truck was called, threatening to tow Jones’ vehicle, and Java’s property manager ordered an angry Jones off the property. That’s channeled community outrage in Patterson’s direction, spawning a “Boycott JAVA on Sherman” Facebook page, threats, angry emails and negative reviews on websites like Urbanspoon. Patterson says the reality is more complicated: The police asked him to call a tow truck. He says he would have preferred for Jones’ van to stay in their parking lot until he could meet with cops. His wife even called the police back, asking that they return to meet with Jones to explain what happened to Arfee. Patterson says he has reached out to Jones, asking what he can do to help, but hasn’t heard back yet. Jones directs the brunt of his anger elsewhere. “I don’t think my resentment is towards them,” Jones says. “They didn’t pull the trigger on my dog.”

GOODBYES

Behind a gas station overlooking Coeur d’Alene Lake this past Saturday, Jones tosses a stick into the underbrush. His dog Larry, with a big, thick, curly coat, dashes into the brush to retrieve it. Jones sits at a picnic table, his arms wrapped against his chest, staring blearily into the distance. Eventually, Coeur d’Alene may forget about Arfee. But it’s forever changed how Jones views his hometown. He’s moving to Colorado, he says, as soon as he can. “I’m completely thankful and appreciative and literally humbled by how many people are in shock with me over this, but that’s made me more reclusive,” he says. “It’s hard for me to get that everywhere I go. … I try to shop places I’ve never shopped before. Go to different restaurants.” It took him weeks to be able to pick up his dog’s corpse from animal control. He wanted to say goodbye face to face, but couldn’t bear to open the bag and look. So instead, he used his hands. “I felt him through the bag. Every part of him,” Jones says. “From his ears to his toes and the bullet holes.” As he buried his dog, Jones says, he called the dog’s name like he did every morning, but this time in grief: “Arfee! Arfee! Arfee!”  danielw@inlander.com

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 15

NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

TAXES SPOKANE CASINOS WANT RELIEF T

he smiling employees and gray-haired Friday afternoon crowd inside Hugo’s give little indication of anything less than placid contentment. But behind the scenes, this business is bleeding. Like other luxuries, gambling is still recovering from the recession’s toll, and here at Hugo’s on the South Hill, staff say profit margins have dwindled to the point where they’re facing the prospect of closing. According to information provided by Hugo’s owner H.T. Higgins, gross revenue at the casino has fallen from more than $3 million in 2004 to $1 million last year — all while, Higgins says, wages have increased. Each year, 10 percent of that gross has gone to the city of Spokane. Next door in the county, that tax rate is just 2 percent. Now, in an unlikely alliance, Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart and Councilman Mike Fagan are considering a push to lower the tax inside the city, first to 5 percent, then to 2 percent. The tax rate doesn’t directly affect gamblers since they buy chips at their cash value, and lower taxes wouldn’t necessarily allow more casino tables at Hugo’s. Instead, managers there say it’s a question of survival. “We’ve done all we can do,” says casino manager Bill Varner. Restaurant manager Tami Borja finishes his sentence: “Without sacrificing what we’ve built.” The city of Spokane today has three remaining casinos, down from a dozen in the ’90s, according an estimate from Higgins. “Is it a sign of the times? Yeah, probably,” Fagan says, “but to me we’re talking about 150 living-wage jobs.” Fagan and Stuckart acknowledge that lower taxes will mean a decline in cash to the city’s general fund, where gambling tax is already shriveling. “If they close, we get zero [tax revenue]. Maybe it’s worth it to decrease the percentage, save some jobs and get some revenue,” Stuckart says. “Plus,

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2004

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2.

Autopsies reveal that Michael Brown, the unarmed 18-yearold who was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, was shot at least six times. The shooting has sparked several nights of violent clashes between protesters and police in the St. Louis suburb.

Hugo’s Casino Revenue

0

1.

The Spokane City Council approved a new $1.5 million skywalk — the first in 20 years — connecting the Convention Center with the Grand Hotel Spokane.

2013

JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION

I think it’d be awesome if we’re going to have a five-vote liberal majority and everyone says we’re going to raise taxes, but one of the first things we do is decrease taxes.” During debates over cutting gambling taxes in the city and county, opponents have argued that the move would attract new casinos. Amid new discussions about a cut, Councilman Jon Snyder says he’d prefer to see a graduated rate, where casinos making more money would pay higher taxes. He says that would address the needs of small casinos and concerns that a tax cut could increase gambling. Hugo’s dealer Jerry Trukositz says other casinos’ closures prove increased gambling is a non-issue: “It’s not the gold mine they think it is.” — HEIDI GROOVER

3.

Chinese hackers breached the computer network at Community Health Systems — operator of Rockwood Clinic, Deaconess Hospital and Valley Hospital locally — and stole data on 4.5 million patients.

4.

Iraqi prime minister Nouri al-Maliki agreed to step down last week amid a growing crisis in which Sunni militants have seized large parts of the country.

5.

Kootenai County Sheriff Ben Wolfinger says increases in the local jail population has caused severe overcrowding, recently packing 365 inmates into a facility built for 327.

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

DIGITS

49

Percentage of black men arrested at least once by the age of 23, compared to 40 percent of all men, according to a new study from the University of South Carolina and research partners.

50

Approximate number of rockets militants fired from Gaza into Israel on Tuesday, breaking the latest cease-fire.

NEWS: The future of the STA Bus Plaza isn’t “dim,” says a former STA board chair — despite a Spokesman-Review story on Sunday. Read more and find other news on the blog. FILM: Suds & Cinema returns! We’re showing Die Hard at the Bing Sept. 10, and there will be beer. See you there. EVENTS: Looking for something to do, like, right now? Check Inlander.com/ today.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

“Where Will It Stop?” The Spokane City Council takes on domestic violence PAYING FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

In direct response to a deadly shooting at Rockwood Cancer Treatment Center last month, the Spokane City Council will vote Sept. 15 on two ordinances aimed at increasing PROTECTIONS FOR VICTIMS of domestic violence. On July 8, Christopher Henderson shot his wife, Sheena, at the treatment center, where she worked, before turning the gun on himself, sparking calls for changes to state policies on weapons and mental health treatment. Council President Ben Stuckart and Councilmember Amber Waldref say it’s also what prompted them to sponsor a pair of ordinances adding domestic violence victims to the city’s nondiscrimination law and creating a new fund to support domestic violence prevention and prosecution programs. The changes would outlaw discrimination in housing, employment or public accommodations against those who’ve been “subjected to domestic violence.” The new fund would be created using fines the municipal

court is already charging domestic violence perpetrators. Exactly how much of those fines would be diverted and to which programs will be decided later by the court, Stuckart says. In a council committee meeting Monday, Councilman Mike Fagan, who’s been outspoken about the city’s need to address domestic violence, said he was uncomfortable with adding victim status to the nondiscrimination ordinance because it is not a biological condition. Fagan also voted against additions of gender identity, military status and mental or physical disability to the law. “The question is: Where will it stop?” Fagan said. Committee Chair Jon Snyder asked Stuckart if he had any response. “No,” Stuckart said. “Let him vote against domestic violence protections. I don’t have anything to say to that.” — HEIDI GROOVER

NEW NURSE CONTRACTS

Union officials representing hundreds of local nurses and lab technicians last week announced the long-awaited ratification of a new labor contract with DEACONESS AND VALLEY HOSPITALS after 20 months of contentious negotiations, which included a one-day strike and brief lockout in December. Healthcare 1199NW, a chapter of the Service Employees International Union, announced the agreement Friday, saying representatives had secured staffing level safeguards to ensure nurses and technicians did not get stretched so thin they could not properly monitor or care for patients. “Our hospitals will now listen more closely to us when we say staffing is too low,” says Deaconess technician Mary Robinson in an SEIU news release. “[Managers] can’t send us home early when our patients need us.” Hospital officials previously emphasized they had

maintained staffing levels in accordance with national standards, denying scheduling had created any issues. The new contract also includes “across-the-board” wage increases. Deaconess and Valley hospitals, as well as Rockwood Clinic, all belong to the Community Health Systems network, which announced this week the theft of approximately 4.5 million patient records in a cyberattack from earlier this year. — JACOB JONES

BIG ARMOR

The timing isn’t ideal. With the tear-gas and protests in Ferguson, Missouri, and the nationwide debate about militarized policing, the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office is spending $325,000 of drug forfeiture money to buy a LenCo BearCat G3, one of the heavy-duty ARMORED VEHICLES criticized in Ferguson. But Kootenai County Sheriff’s Capt. Dan Soumas says the BearCat is intended to be defensive, to save officer and citizen’s lives. “Years ago, SWAT teams had more advanced weapons than the general public,” Soumas says. “That’s not the case anymore.” The department could have gone even bigger: Post Falls, with a population under 30,000, is one of several Idaho communities with a Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle — or “MRAP” — obtained through a controversial surplus military equipment program. Last Friday, the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office was another beneficiary of that program, obtaining two Bell OH-58 Kiowa helicopters from the U.S. Army at no cost. “One of them will be used for parts — it’s just going to be cannibalized,” says Sgt. Dave Ellis with the Spokane County Sheriff’s Air Support Unit. “And the other one will be used as backup for when the [current helicopter] is in maintenance.” — DANIEL WALTERS

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 17

NEWS | DEADLY FORCE

Jedadiah Zillmer, 23, was killed by Spokane sheriff’s deputies on Feb. 11.

Fatal Decisions New insight into how law enforcement balances risk and deadly force BY JACOB JONES

W

18 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

hen he pulled off the black balaclava covering his face, Spokane County Sheriff’s deputies report they could see Jedadiah Zillmer crying. Blinking against the bright spotlights and passing traffic, he held in his right hand a black semiautomatic pistol pressed up against his own chin. “I don’t want to live after this,” he told deputies. Zillmer, 23, a recently discharged U.S. Army cavalry soldier, wore a bulletproof tactical vest loaded with handguns and ammunition. He stood now along the driver’s side of his red Honda Civic on Feb. 11, surrounded by deputies and state troopers, ordering him to drop the weapon. An empty bottle of Captain Morgan’s sat on the nearby passenger seat. Zillmer had spent the day drinking after a fight with his wife. His family says counseling had failed to rein in recent mental distress. At about 7 pm, he set off heavily armed and called 911, asking for police to kill him. After a high-speed pursuit along Interstate 90, reports state Zillmer’s Honda was stopped at Indiana and Sullivan. He emerged with a handgun angled up under his chin. A sergeant tried to get him to calm down and talk. “What can you do for me?” Zillmer asked. Hopeless and distant, Zillmer reportedly went down on his knees, telling authorities he was going to remove the bulletproof vest. Deputies watched carefully as he unstrapped the front of the vest and started to lift it up, obscuring his face. While Zillmer had not yet pointed his gun at anyone but himself, his left hand went under the vest, seemingly into a flap or pocket, and deputies feared he might try pulling another weapon. Six deputies opened fire, killing him. A legal analysis of the shooting released last week by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office includes many new details about the incident, including the beliefs each deputy used to rationalize killing Zillmer. It presents a stark look at how law enforcement officers often perceive tense confrontations, and how they come to justify the use of deadly force. “Officers gave [Zillmer] numerous opportunities to end this peacefully,” the legal report concludes. “Officers clearly had probable cause to believe Mr. Zillmer posed a threat of serious physical harm to officers and civilians alike.”

R

etired Bellevue Police Chief D.P. Van Blaricom, who has reviewed hundreds of officer-involved shootings as a certified expert witness, tells the Inlander such shootings must be evaluated as justified or not based on the “totality of the circumstances.” “They have to be judged on a case-by-case basis,” he says. “You have to look at everything that’s going on.” Zillmer’s death marked the second time in a year a local suspect was killed for suspiciously reaching into a pocket. In May of 2013, Spokane Police Department officers fatally shot 21-year-old Justin Cairns when he reportedly reached into his basketball shorts for a cellphone. Beyond legal justifications for deadly force, many departments also have policies clarifying when deadly force may be used. Those policies, which are identical for both the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office and Spokane Police Department, require a threat of imminent harm to officers or bystanders. “An imminent danger may exist even if the suspect is not at that very moment pointing a weapon at someone,” the policy states. “For example … the person has a weapon or is attempting to access one and it is reasonable to believe the person intends to use it against the officer or another.” Cairns’ family has filed a request with the Spokane Police Ombudsman to clarify whether the policy should allow deadly force against someone who does not have a weapon in hand, but may have something in a pocket. That inquiry has not yet released any findings or recommendations. Police contend Cairns was a suspect in a shooting death hours earlier, which elevated his apparent risk to officers and likelihood of being armed. Deputies also cited an increasing number of risks as they confronted Zillmer. “That’s difficult to measure,” Van Blaricom says of assessing such risks. “There’s no bright line.”

W

hen Zillmer set out, desperate and drunk, he told dispatchers he decided he was a “psychopath,” and asked about police procedures for shooting someone, according to reports. Every new update from dispatchers seemed to ratchet up the risk: a suicidal man with a gun, then armed with multiple guns, a combat veteran, armed with an assault rifle, wearing body armor, threatening a shootout — and finally warning he may resort to shooting civilians if “police take too long” to kill him. “When I am done with you,” Zillmer tells a dispatcher, “I am going to hang up and then rock and roll, then uh, when they shoot me in the head, it will be done.” Deputies reported they had many of those threats or concerns in the back of their minds when they opened fire. Most cited fears regarding what Van Blaricom refers to as the “reactionary gap,” in which an initial action can occur before another person has time to respond. “Deputy [Jeff] Thurman … knew from his training that action will always beat reaction,” the legal analysis explains, “meaning Zillmer could get off a shot before he could react to it, giving [Zillmer] tactical advantage.” Zillmer’s veteran status also worked against him, with several deputies citing increased apprehension about his combat training, or the possibility of a grenade or improvised explosive device. After the shooting, authorities held back for 30 seconds as they cleared the area for possible explosives. “Deputy [Dale] Moyer said Zillmer made eye contact with him several times,” the legal analysis states. “Deputy Moyer felt [Zillmer] was picking out targets of opportunity based on his military experience and mental status.” Fatal decisions get made in split seconds. Months later, it’s impossible to tell if Zillmer was trying to draw a weapon or simply struggling to take his vest off. No one knows if his actions were a defiant last stand or a desperate call for help. “These things will always be judged in hindsight,” Van Blaricom says. “People are going to second-guess. … We just don’t know.”  jacobj@inlander.com

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 19

the

football issue EASTERN WASHINGTON EAGLES

2013 record: 12-3 (8-0 Big Sky) 2014 preseason national ranking: 1

EWU wide receiver Cooper Kupp. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SAT, AUG. 23 vs. Sam Houston State, 12:30 pm SAT, AUG. 30 vs. Montana Western, 6:05 pm

20 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

SAT, SEPT. 6 at Washington, 12:05 pm SAT, SEPT. 20 at Montana St., 12:10 pm

SAT, SEPT. 27 at UC Davis, 6:05 pm SAT, OCT. 4 vs. Idaho State, 1:35 pm

SAT, OCT. 11 at Southern Utah, 12:05 pm SAT, OCT. 18 vs. Northern Colorado, 1:05 pm

SAT, OCT. 25 at Northern Arizona, 12:40 pm SAT, NOV. 1 vs. North Dakota, 2:05 pm

SAT, NOV. 8 vs. Montana, 12:10 pm FRI, NOV. 21 at Portland State, 7:10 pm

Tickets at goeags.com/tickets or 1-866-4GO-EAGS

Eagles Rising How Eastern Washington became an unlikely college football powerhouse BY HOWIE STALWICK

E

astern Washington University is a fine educational institution, but prestigious? Not really. Famous? No way. Nationally recognized? Not often. Ah, but then there is football. Since 2000, Eastern Washington has won more games (109) than Penn State, Tennessee and Stanford. Won more conference championships (five) than Alabama and Auburn. Won more national championships (one) than Oregon, Boise State and Michigan. Obviously, the aforementioned schools play a notch above Eastern Washington in the NCAA’s Football Bowl Subdivision. Still, Eastern’s current run of success — including 13 winning seasons in the past 14 years, capped by the 2010 national title in the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly I-AA) — is dazzling for any level of athletics. The reasons behind Eastern’s consistent excellence are many and varied. The coaching and recruiting skills of former head coaches Mike Kramer (1994-99) and Paul Wulff (200007) and current head man Beau Baldwin (since 2008) and their staffs have certainly played a vital role. Arguably, however, the grit and resolve that is the calling card of Eagles football can be traced to a man who was all about grit and resolve as a player, assistant coach, head coach and athletic director at Eastern. Dick Zornes led EWU’s charge into the I-AA ranks in 1984 as head coach, and the Eagles played in the national playoffs just one year later. “This is all a Dick Zornes deal,” insists Kramer, now head coach at Idaho State. “Don’t say Mike Kramer or Beau Baldwin or Paul Wulff without making sure that Dick Zornes is the king of the hill. The three of us are just guys that have stood in his shoes.” Zornes coached and won more football games at Eastern than anyone else, compiling an 89-66-2 record from 1979-93. Kramer and Wulff came to Eastern as assistants under Zornes. “There’s been a succession of awfully good coaches,” says Zornes, who is now retired. “Mike Kramer was a good coach. Paul Wulff, at that level, was a very good coach, I think. And Beau is the best of the bunch. “He is, in my mind, a very, very good coach, especially on the offensive side of the ball. He’s been a real credit to the university in almost every way. Not only his coaching ability, but his humanity and his loyalty to Eastern.”

Zornes is quick to add, “If you don’t have players, I don’t care how good you coach, it doesn’t make a lot of difference.” The state of Washington has long been a fertile breeding ground for college football talent, and the Eagles have prospered by developing in-state players deemed not quite fast or big or skilled enough by Pac-12 Conference schools like Washington and Washington State. “The talent level at Eastern Washington is so good because of the recruiting base,” Kramer states flatly. “The state of Washington has a lot of Big Sky-caliber athletes,” Zornes says. Eastern’s recruiting efforts have always been focused overwhelmingly on in-state talent, partly for budgetary reasons. The Puget Sound has produced a long list of standout Eagles, and Eastern’s occasional recruiting forays outside the state have produced All-Americans like quarterbacks Erik Meyer, Bo Levi Mitchell and Vernon Adams, running back Taiwan Jones and wide receiver Brandon Kaufman. “Winning breeds winning,” says Tennessee Titans offensive tackle Michael Roos, entering his 10th season in the National Football League after starring at Eastern. “Once you start doing it, everyone wants to be part of it.” Four years have passed since Roos and his wife donated $500,000 to help Eastern install its signature red turf. “It’s definitely something that gets talked about,” Roos says. “Some people don’t like it. Some people think it’s cool. Either way, it gets talked about. It puts your school on the map.” Baldwin has kept Eastern on the map by posting a 56-22 record in six years on the job. Zornes wonders aloud how much longer the Eagles can keep Baldwin. “He’s been a great ambassador for the university,” Zornes says. “He makes it fun,” Roos says. “Guys have to work, but while having some fun. Obviously, winning makes working fun. Guys are able to buy in.” The Eagles, coming off a 12-3 season and a second straight loss in the national semifinals, are the consensus No. 1 pick in preseason FCS polls. Success in Cheney has become a foregone conclusion. “I said after three years on the job — and I was head coach there for 15 years — I said, ‘If we do things right at Eastern, we can win a national championship,’” Zornes recalls. 

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 21

THE FOOTBALL ISSUE

The last toss WASHINGTON STATE COUGARS 2013 record: 6-7 (4-5 Pac-12) 2014 Pac-12 preseason poll: 5th, North Division THU, AUG. 28 vs. Rutgers, 7 pm FRI, SEPT. 5 at Nevada, 7:30 pm SAT, SEPT. 13 vs. Portland State, 5 pm SAT, SEPT. 20 vs. Oregon, TBA SAT, SEPT. 27 at Utah, TBA SAT, OCT. 4 vs. California, TBA FRI, OCT. 10 at Stanford, 6 pm SAT, OCT. 25 vs. Arizona, TBA SAT, NOV. 1 vs. USC, TBA SAT, NOV. 8 at Oregon State, TBA SAT, NOV. 22 at Arizona State, TBA SAT, NOV. 29 vs. Washington, TBA Tickets at wsucougars.com and 1-800-GO-COUGS

22 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

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In his senior season, Spokane’s own Connor Halliday hopes to get the national respect he deserves BY HOWIE STALWICK

ne year ago, Connor Halliday passed for more yards than any other player in Washington State history. More yards than all but one other player in Pac-12 history. More yards than all but 20 other players in major college history. Halliday’s reward? Pac-12 coaches left him off the all-conference team. Not even honorable mention. And this summer, ESPN.com left Halliday off its list of the top 25 players in the Pac-12. What’s a guy got to do to earn a little respect? As it turns out, all Halliday has to do is keep his ears open in WSU’s swanky new locker room. “Honestly, I think he has the ability to win the Heisman,” defensive lineman Xavier Cooper says. “He’s one of the best quarterbacks in the entire nation,” head coach Mike Leach says. “There’s not another quarterback in the nation I’d rather have than Connor Halliday,” linebacker Darryl Monroe says. That’s heady praise, considering that ESPN. com placed four quarterbacks on its Pac-12 top 25 list and ignored Halliday. Monroe thinks that’s just nuts. “He has it all,” Monroe says. “He’s a prototypical NFL quarterback. He’s smart. He’s mature. He’s got the swagger. He has the attitude. He has the calm to lead the young guys in the offense. “I believe in Connor Halliday.” Halliday, a fifth-year senior out of Spokane’s Ferris High School, was seemingly born to be a quarterback. His father, Duane, played the position at Coeur d’Alene High and Boise State and tutored his son on playing quarterback at a young age. “As a child,” Halliday recalls with a smile, “I would pick things up and throw them around the house. Whatever I could find. My mom finally said, ‘Duane, we

need to get a football in that kid’s hands.’ So I started doing that, and they got me a little Dallas Cowboys uniform and a little plastic helmet, because that was my dad’s favorite team. I’d wear that around the house and throw the football at Dad until Dad got too annoyed to do it anymore.” No one has ever questioned the strength of Halliday’s mighty right arm, but some have questioned the strength of his head. Specifically, his decisions on when and where to throw the ball. Halliday led the nation with 22 interceptions last year. However, he also led in pass attempts, and he was picked off just five times in the last five games. When you throw the ball nearly 55 times a game, as Halliday did last year in his first season as a full-time college starter, a few balls are bound to wind up in enemy hands. Leach, the first to admit he is highly demanding of his quarterbacks, has frequently praised Halliday for his hard work, improved decision-making and leadership. Players echo Leach’s opinion about their quarterback. “Since I’ve been here,” Cooper added, “we haven’t had a guy at quarterback to step up and be a leader like Connor.” Playing for Leach’s pass-first offense has been a boon for Halliday in the numbers department. He passed for 4,597 yards last season (third in the nation). He set a major college record with 89 pass attempts (that’s not a typo — 89!) at second-ranked Oregon, and his 557 passing yards that night was tops in the Football Bowl Subdivision last year. Numbers like those tend to push players into the hunt for the Heisman, college football’s most prestigious individual award. “It would be amazing to be in that conversation,” Halliday says, “and it would be an amazing reward for everybody, because that means we’re having a year that will be forever remembered in Pullman.” n

The Warrior Face of American Football

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Understanding why some guys put on pads and beat the crap out of each other — and why we watch it happen BY SHANN RAY People who work together will win, whether it be against complex football defenses, or the problems of modern society. — Vince Lombardi

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o you find it fun to cast your body into the air like a projectile in order to smash into the body of another person? Do you love hitting and getting hit? Are you a glutton for punishment? Do you desire to make yourself more susceptible to head injury? Do you like broken bones? If you answered “yes” to the above questions, you might be a football player. OK, there is violence in football, and a lot of it. So why, at the pro and college level, is football the most profitable of all American sports? And why does football have the most television viewers by a wide margin over other sports? Some would say the sport harkens back to that ancient warrior animal we call man, who survives by overcoming his enemies and by keeping his loved ones safe from outside threats. Others would say the power of football is a compensation for our own inner sense of weakness. Still others might point to football as a projection of our will to dominate the world around us. And yet, undoubtedly for me anyway, football contains an uncommon balance of elegance and force, a form of physical beauty that in its finest moments reaches a sense of artistry uncommon in everyday life. Have you seen Robert Griffin III round the edge and eat up turf like a modern Mercury? I know he’s been injured, but I say that flash of light will return. I’m counting on it. Have you seen Johnny Football dance through defenses as if he was made of water? I have. I hope to see it again, many times over. Have you witnessed the presence under pressure, exhibited game after game, by one of the youngest quarterbacks in the NFL, Russell Wilson? Have you taken a minute, or a perhaps a whole season (or maybe your whole life if you’re a die-hard fan), to watch the Seattle Seahawks? I mean the World Champion SEAHAWKS! I’m not sure the mystery of violence, inspiration, and community love that is American football can really be explained. I do believe it embodies the ancient warrior archetype, and so it exists, and gives collective meaning. Rather than trying to detail the mystery, I’ll use a single

moment in the history of the Cheyenne to comment on the warrior’s role in culture. After the Sand Creek Massacre in 1864, when Cheyenne elders, women and children were massacred by U.S. Cavalry, the Cheyenne burned with shame. In an avenging wildfire, Cheyenne warriors — women and men — rose with vindicated eyes to find and kill white people, and a dozen years after Sand Creek, they entered the battle of the Little Bighorn in southeast Montana territory, where they took Custer and kissed the earth with his blood. It happened in a most unassuming way; the lowest and weakest of them gave their lives. Of the Cheyenne, four men put themselves forward. These four were among the poorest warriors, some young, some a little older, having no guns, only bow and arrow, club or hatchet, having ragged clothes, few possessions and no riches. They made a vow to the people. “In our next engagement with the white man, we fight until we die.” Whirlwind, son of Black Crane. Noisy Walking, son of White Bull or Ice. Cut Belly. Closed Hand. Of the four, one was 30 years old and one’s age was unknown. The final two were only 16. The dying dance was prepared, and the men danced until morning, when they emerged and went out through a camp of 8,000 Cheyenne, Sioux and Arapaho, spread four miles along the river. Strategically, they were last to enter the fight, diving on horseback into the enemy’s final position. Many believe the suicide warriors were the deciding factor that day. They fought hand to hand with armed Cavalry soldiers, and all four of them died. Being poor, and having won little or no recognition with their people, the day of their death became the day of their highest honor. Whether or not you believe “just” war exists, war is nearly intractable in the modern psyche. American football is not war. It merely echoes the sacrifice humanity requires.  Shann Ray is professor of Leadership Studies at Gonzaga University. He is the author of Forgiveness and Power in the Age of Atrocity: Servant Leadership as a Way of Life; American Masculine: Stories; and Balefire: Poems. He is also a former college and professional basketball player.

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 23

THE FOOTBALL ISSUE

Idaho defensive end Maxx Forde making a tackle last season.

IDAHO VANDALS

2013 record: 1-11 2014 Sun Belt Conference preseason poll: 9th SAT, AUG. 30 at Florida, 4 pm SAT, SEPT. 6 at Louisiana-Monroe, 4 pm SAT, SEPT. 13 vs. Western Michigan, 2 pm SAT, SEPT. 20 at Ohio, TBA SAT, SEPT. 27 vs. South Alabama, 2 pm SAT. OCT. 4 at Texas State, TBA SAT, OCT. 11 at Georgia Southern, 3 pm SAT, OCT. 18 vs. New Mexico State, 2 pm SAT., NOV. 1 vs. Arkansas State, 2 pm SAT, NOV. 8 at San Diego State, 3:30 pm SAT, NOV. 15 vs. Troy, 2 pm SAT, NOV. 29 at Appalachian State, TBA Tickets at govandals.com

24 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

The new vandals Idaho looks to get out of college football’s cellar, and they might have the weapons to do it BY MIKE BOOKEY

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aybe this is the rebuilding year to end the streak of rebuilding years. That’s what the folks on the other side of the Palouse are hoping this fall, as the Idaho Vandals enter a new season in a new conference with a coach who’s still fairly new to a program where losing has become very, very old. Coach Paul Petrino (yes, of the Petrino family) is back for his second campaign with the Vandals after a debut season that saw him win just one game. Petrino is looking to put that behind him, and he thinks he has a group of guys willing to help him. “There are some good football players out here,” Petrino told reporters the first week of the Vandals’ fall camp. “They’re just going to keep getting better and better. It’s exciting. We just have to keep improving.” Any improvement would be notable for the Vandals. In addition to winning a single game in 2013, they only had one victory in the 2012 season. The 2011 season gave Vandal fans just two wins. If you’re doing the math, that’s only four wins over the course of three seasons, making for a 4-32 record during that span. While the Vandals played without a conference last year, wandering the country for big paycheck games against the SEC’s Ole Miss and eventual BCS national champion Florida State, they now have a home in the Sun Belt Conference. Vandal fans should remember the Sun Belt, where Idaho played from 2001 to 2004. The face of the conference has changed since then, but is still mostly comprised of southeastern teams, meaning the Vandals will racking up some

serious frequent-flier miles in the coming years when they travel to schools like Louisiana-Monroe, Georgia Southern, Texas State, South Alabama and others. The conference also features former perennial FCS powerhouse Appalachian State, which the Vandals face in Boone, North Carolina, to close out the season on Nov. 29. There are a lot of new faces on the Vandals squad, including linebacker Irving Steele, a transfer from an Iowa junior college, who Petrino has already identified as a leader on the field. The 6-1, 222-pound Steele transferred for the spring semester and was with the squad for spring camp. Since then, he said he’s seen a big change and a different energy with the Vandals. “We’re really becoming a team. In the spring we had a couple guys who seemed like they didn’t want to be there. It’s different now. We’re playing like a team,” Steele said after a practice last week. This isn’t to say the Vandals don’t have some experience coming back. Center Mike Marboe enters his senior season as one of the top players at his position in the country, earning him a spot on the watch list for the Rimington Award, given annually to the nation’s best center. You can look for him to anchor an offense that will rely on either Coeur d’Alene High School alum Chad Chalich or Matt Linehan at quarterback. On the defensive side, senior Maxx Forde is expected to keep up his solid numbers from last year, which included 5.5 sacks and nine tackles for loss. Not to be forgotten is punter Austin Rehkow from Spokane’s Central Valley High School, who as a freshman was the nation’s top punter. n

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!-*00-Go-Cougs WSUCougars.com AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 25

THE FOOTBALL ISSUE

Gridiron Eats That liquid cheese from a can isn’t impressing anyone at your football watch parties. Come on, sport. You can do better.

MEMA’S SHRIMP

Mema’s Shrimp are a twist on the ubiquitous chilled shrimp and cocktail sauce platter one finds lurking on every table during football season. The tang of vinegar accompanied with the sharp bite of onions and slight hint of cayenne and paprika pair perfectly with butter crackers and cold beer. 1 pound shrimp, shelled, deveined and cleaned 20 bay leaves ½ cup white vinegar 2 medium yellow onions, peeled and thinly sliced Several dashes Louisiana hot sauce 1 teaspoon paprika ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ cup Worcestershire sauce 2 cups vegetable oil Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Boil until just pink. Set aside to cool. Add 10 bay leaves to vinegar and warm over low heat. Do not boil. Set aside to cool. In a large jar, layer shrimp, onions and bay leaves. Repeat until all shrimp are used. Whisk together the cooled vinegar, hot sauce, paprika, salt, Worcestershire sauce and oil. Pour vinaigrette over shrimp. Shake gently to combine. Refrigerate for a minimum of 8 hours before serving. Serve with butter crackers, more hot sauce and plenty of napkins.

Football snacks don’t have to be lazy BY AMY MILLER-KREZELAK

COACH WILKINS’ DIP

Nothing says comfort — or football — like a warm dip on a chilly autumn day. Named after former Rocky Mountain College basketball coach Len Wilkins, this dip features bacon and scallion that are perfect companions, while crunchy butter crackers provide texture and depth. Toast wedges, flatbread, vegetables, butter crackers and even tortilla chips are all fine vehicles to get more of this dip into your mouth. Resisting it is a fool’s errand, but if you don’t eat meat, simply leave out the bacon. 8 ounces cream cheese 1 cup Swiss or cheddar cheese, shredded ½ cup mayonnaise ½ cup round butter crackers, smashed 8 slices bacon, cooked until well done 2 tablespoons scallions, chopped Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix together the cheeses, mayonnaise and crackers. Spread evenly in a medium, ovenproof casserole dish. Crumble bacon and sprinkle scallions evenly on top. Bake for 10 minutes until lightly bubbling and serve warm.

FISH SAUCE CHICKEN WINGS

Spicy, sweet, savory, sticky, aromatic and deliciously messy, Fish Sauce Chicken Wings satisfy every craving. These wings are highly addictive and can be tampered with to be spicier or milder depending upon personal preference. With a plethora of Asian specialty markets in the area, finding the somewhat exotic ingredients is simple, though most can be found at local grocery stores. 2 pounds chicken wings Juice of one lime Water 5 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped 1 inch piece ginger, peeled and finely chopped 1 Thai chili, finely chopped 3 tablespoons scallions, chopped ¼ cup sugar ½ cup fish sauce 1 cup rice flour ¼ cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped ¼ cup Thai basil, finely chopped ¼ cup mint, finely chopped Rinse chicken wings with lime juice and water and pat dry with paper towels. Mix together garlic, ginger, Thai chili, scallions, sugar and fish sauce. Toss wings in mixture and

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Clean Slate A new coach and new players give Whitworth a fresh look this season BY MIKE BOOKEY

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or the first time since the fall of 1994, there will be a different Pirates head coach pacing the sidelines of the Pine Bowl. After John Tully’s resignation last November, the university was quick to announce its new hire in Rod Sandberg, the former defensive coordinator for Division III Wheaton University in Illinois. He takes over a Whitworth team that saw 50 new players show up to camp, along with a new offensive approach. We talked to Sandberg about his new gig.

New Whitworth head coach Rod Sandberg

INLANDER: How are you liking Spokane? SANDBERG: My family and I left the concrete congestion of Chicago to come to the beautiful Northwest, and we’re loving it and taking advantage of the lakes and mountains. I’d never actually been out here until I interviewed here. You’re coming to a school that had the same coach for 19 years and now has a roster made up of about half new players. Is this a clean slate for you? I think it is a clean slate. We want to reflect and talk about the success of the past and not ignore that. But we’re going to do things differently — not better, not worse — but differently. We have a lot of new coaches… but 12 of the 14 of the coaches are Whitworth grads. It’s new, but it’s not new, in some ways. You hired former Shadle Park High School coach Alan Stanfield to run your offense. What was behind that choice? I’m a defensive coach. That’s the way I’m wired, so I needed to have the best offensive coach I could find. Coach Stanfield is going to take advantage of the skills of our offense, and right now we do have a lot of skill at quarterback.

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You’ve been either playing or coaching at the Division III level for more than two decades. What do you like about this level? Division III is awesome and I have no desire to coach at other levels. These schools have an inherent chance to keep perspective that the student-athlete is really the student. These athletes come because they want to come to the institution first off, and then they want to play the game. n

WHITWORTH PIRATES

2013 record: 4-6 (2-4 Northwest Conference) SAT, SEPT. 6 vs. Lewis and Clark, 1 pm SAT, SEPT. 13 at Whittier, 1 pm SAT, SEPT. 20 at La Verne, 12:30 pm SAT, SEPT. 27 vs. Chapman, 1 pm SAT, OCT. 4 at Pacific (Ore.), 1 pm SAT, OCT. 11 vs. Willamette, 1 pm SAT, OCT. 18 at Linfield, 1:30 pm SAT, OCT. 25 vs. Puget Sound, 1 pm SAT, NOV. 1 vs. George Fox, 12:30 pm SAT, NOV. 8 at Pacific Lutheran, 1 pm

Fighting Words

Two female MMA fighters from Spokane are ready to take on every other woman in the UFC BY CHEY SCOTT

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wo minutes into the first round, Julianna Pena slips her left leg under her opponent’s ankle. The momentum slams them both back onto the mat with a heavy thud. Pena quickly swings herself around to straddle her opponent, a 36-year-old former boxer, and rains fists and elbows onto her head. Pinned down and helpless, her opponent struggles to push her off, but the blows keep landing. With one second left in the round, the referee dives in, pushes Pena off and it’s all over. Pena appears dazed as she moves to the edge of the octagon cage, high-fiving her training partner and fellow Spokanite, Elizabeth Phillips. The brutal victory lands Pena a $100,000 contract with the Ultimate Fighting Championship, known as the major leagues of mixed martial arts. There are fewer than 50 women on a UFC roster that includes more than 500 male fighters. Pena, 25, was joined in June by Phillips. For a young sport — the first UFC event was held in 1993 — equal opportunities for women came much later. As the dominant event promoter and employer of professional fighters, the UFC allowed women into the cage only last year, hosting its first female match in February 2013. Regardless, attention toward female athletes in this male-dominated sport is rising around the world. Early to the party, Spokane’s two up-and-coming female fighters are helping to put this international sport on the map. ...continued on next page

Julianna Pena fights an opponent in 2011 on her journey to the UFC. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 29

CULTURE | SPORTS “FIGHTING WORDS,” CONTINUED...

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his Saturday, Phillips, 28, is set to wake up in Macau, China, for her second UFC match, against another recent women’s bantamweight (135 lbs.) signee, Russian fighter Milana Dudieva. Phillips has been training twice a day, at least five days a week for months. She’ll get up early to get her tight brunette curls braided into tiny cornrows so they stay secure during the fight. Then she’ll fight while her hometown is still asleep, at 3:30 am Pacific time. Adopted as an infant with her half-sister, Kathryn, Phillips and her sister were raised in the small north-central Washington town of Omak. She was a hard-working, three-sport high school athlete and then ran track at Eastern Washington University, but remembers being labeled a “wild child.” During middle school she started getting into fights “over stupid stuff — pointless, stupid shit, stuff that didn’t matter,” she recalls. That aggressive trait got her into more trouble after high school, and she served four months in 2011 at Geiger Corrections Center for assaulting her now ex-boyfriend. When she got out, Phillips was determined to make some changes, re-enrolling in classes to finish an exercise science degree at EWU. Around then, at the encouragement of a friend, she also began training in mixed martial arts. The sport has since become a positive outlet for stress and anger, though Phillips believes she’s also left those rowdier days behind as she’s matured. “I’m pretty calm now, and I don’t know if that’s because I started doing MMA,” she says, laughing.

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n a Thursday afternoon in a North Spokane coffee shop, Pena’s appearance contrasts with her tough, boyish fight-night attire of a T-shirt, trunk-length shorts, padded gloves and cornrowed hair. Today, her long, brunette waves hang loose down her back. She has light makeup on behind aviator sunglasses, and dangly, beaded earrings hang above her rhinestoneembellished Affliction brand top. Suddenly, she’s interrupted by a starry-eyed group asking for a picture. “Yeah, absolutely. No problem,” she replies. “My dad is going to be so impressed,” one of the young women says. “I admire you so much,” a heavyset guy in the group confesses as Pena stands between them. “I used to be a wrestler.” Such attention has grown since Pena landed her contract by winning the UFC’s reality show, The Ultimate Fighter, last fall, allowing her to leave a part-time job waiting tables to train and fight full-time. Growing up the youngest of four siblings, Pena remembers that her Venezuelan-born dad was not so pleased at her decision back in 2008 to start training in MMA. “When I first started, he was begging me to quit,” she says. After seeing their daughter’s See more pictures at intense dedication to the sport, inlander.com Pena’s parents and family have grown supportive of her risky career, especially through her ongoing recovery from a major knee injury in January. Weeks before her second UFC fight, Pena tore her meniscus and three of the main ligaments in her knee in a training incident. The UFC flew her to Los Angeles for surgery. It could have been career ending, but she’s just been cleared by her doctor to slowly work back into a training routine. Pena is impatient to get back into the cage. Her fierce passion to succeed in this sport is only magnified by her boisterous personality. She’s loud — patrons at the coffee shop can hear her every word and glance over when her voice rises in excitement, and they hear her describe a win as a kill, and a loss as a metaphoric death.

SLIDESHOW

30 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

Above: Elizabeth Phillips, right, kicks while sparring with Ron Nance at Sik-Jitsu. Right: Coach Rick Little. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS “I respect all women who get in the cage, but I have no choice but to make it personal when I fight. I have to think, ‘This bitch stole my lunch money and my grandma’s pearls and she is going to die,’” she says.

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n a recent sticky summer night, coach Rick Little leans against an unpainted sheetrock wall lined with thin mats and watches Phillips dance around the gym, sparring with a young male fighter about her size. Each time her white glove jabs out toward him, she lets out a quick rush of air from her mouth: psssh! There’s no air conditioning in the north Hillyard warehouse/converted gym, and there’s not much of a breeze coming through an open garage-style door. The room is heavy with the stench of sweat. Little has produced four of the UFC’s current professionals. Before Pena and Phillips, Spokane natives Mike Chiesa and Sam Sicilia made it to the octagon, helping to bring recognition to Little’s gym, Sik-Jitsu, and his training technique. “Rick is the best coach I’ve ever had. No one else has believed in me like him,” Phillips says. Unlike some big gyms in the U.S. that produce multiple pros with staff coaches to teach the individual disciplines that make up MMA — boxing, wrestling, jiujitsu — Little is the only coach for these four fighters. He spends about four hours a day watching MMA fights online to find techniques to teach his own athletes, and he’s been involved in MMA in some form — as a fan, athlete and coach — since its beginning. After high school, Little went to train with champion fighter Royce Gracie for as long as he could afford — seven months. As Phillips goes for another three-minute sparring round, Pena stands over a pair of young women grappling in a corner. She barks directions. One of them, Mariah Pierce, a 15-year-old junior at Mt. Spokane High School, is there in part because of Pena. “Julie is my number one inspiration of the kind of

woman I want to be,” Pierce says. “This is something I want to go big with.”

W

omen have been fighting professionally in MMA almost as long as the sport has been around, through smaller U.S. organizations and in Japan. But it took nearly 20 of those 21 years for the UFC to let women into its cage, which came not long after its president Dana White said he’d never let women in. It was the currently undefeated women’s bantamweight champ, Ronda Rousey — a feisty, smack-talking Olympic judo bronze medalist — who changed White’s overall perceptions of women’s role in the sport. “Julie and Liz are violent females,” Little says. “Like Ronda, they’re trying to hurt their opponent the whole time. They’re not trying to out-point them, they don’t think of the judge, me, their mom — they are looking at their opponent and trying to inflict damage. That is what it truly, to me, takes to win in this sport.” Because of the uncharted territory female MMA athletes face, Pena calls this the “golden age.” “We wouldn’t be fighting in the UFC if it weren’t for Ronda. She is a staple in the sport as far as getting women on the mat,” Pena says. “We’re the Muhammad Alis and Joe Fraziers of our time, and I hope in the future there can be little Floyd Mayweathers and Manny Pacquiaos running around after us.” As more women take up professional fighting with the UFC — the organization recently announced the addition of its new women’s strawweight (115 lbs.) division — Pena and Phillips see limitless opportunities for themselves and other women in the sport. Ask Little what’s next for his female stars, and he’s firm in his belief that Pena is going to be the one to knock Rousey off and become the women’s bantamweight champ. “My goal is to be the champion one day — I didn’t get into this to be top 10 in the world,” Pena says. 

CULTURE | DIGEST

TV SIMPSONS MARATHON T

here was a solid decade and a half when you could watch a rerun (or two) of The Simpsons on any weeknight. It didn’t matter if you moved to a new city or were on vacation across the country, there always seemed to be an episode or two in the hours before prime time. The reruns aren’t so prevalent these days, which is why Simpsons fans should rekindle their love affair with America’s favorite Springfielders this week when the cable network FXX airs all 552 episodes of the show, which has run for 25 years, consecutively… without a break. Given the sheer number of Simpsons fans out there and their propensity for obsession, it’s likely that someone is going to attempt to watch all 276 hours of the show. That person might die, so don’t do that. But there are some episodes you’d be an idiot for missing. If you want to remember when Conan O’Brien wrote for the show, check out “Marge vs. the Monorail” (Fri, Aug. 22, at 6 pm) in which Springfield decides, thanks to a smooth-talking huckster voiced by Phil Hartman, to buy a janky monorail, piloted by Homer. O’Brien also penned “Homer Goes to College” (Sat, Aug. 23, at 12:30 am). Remember when Homer and his friends started a world-famous barbershop quartet and named their album “Bigger Than Jesus”? — that’s on Friday at 11:30 pm. You can also see Homer as the beer baron (Sun, Aug. 24, at 8 pm) and Mr. Plow (Fri. 4:30 pm).

RTY FROM PORTLAND OREGON

CUS PA STEAMFUNK ROCK & ROLL CIR

Don’t try to watch all 552 episodes because you’ll probably die. The marathon will take you to all seven continents the yellow family has visited and approximately 25 countries, including Australia, where Bart was sent to be ceremoniously kicked in the ass for making a prank phone call (Sat, Aug. 23, at 6 pm). You might use the latter part of the marathon to see newer episodes you’ve missed as your obsession has waned over the years. One to suggest is “A Totally Fun Thing That Bart Will Never Do Again,” titled in tribute to David Foster Wallace, which follows the Simpsons on a disastrous cruise (Sun, Aug. 31, at 9 pm). — MIKE BOOKEY

For Your Consideration

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Save 20% - All 4 Shows just $72 now at ticketswest.com TV | Time travel, the space-time continuum: it’s 2014 and we still can’t go back to the past and experience events we wish we could. But in a work of fiction, dropping into a Scottish wormhole is no problem at all. In the new Starz series OUTLANDER, WWII nurse Claire Randall does just that, disappearing into 18th century Scotland while on holiday with her husband. She soon meets the battered but handsome Jamie Fraser, but the story is far more than some bodice-ripper romance. It’s mystery, science fiction and historical fiction all in one neat package. Based on the popular book series by Diana Gabaldon, the show could very well be the next Game of Thrones. Just two episodes in so far, Outlander takes its time to tell its story, and with 16 episodes for the first season, albeit with a halfwaypoint break, that’ll do.

BOOK | Sometimes a book puts you into a fever of sorts; you can’t put it down, life ceases to exist until you’ve finally reached its final paragraph. And with the newly released THE FEVER: A NOVEL by Megan Abbott (not to be confused with Meg Cabot, author of The Princess Diaries), devouring these pages will come as naturally as breathing. When girls at a suburban high school begin to convulse, seize and suffer from heart palpitations, it throws a sleepy town into an uproar. Can the blame be placed on the HPV shot, oversexed teens, algae from a nearby pond or something more supernatural? Following a teenage brother and sister and their father, a popular teacher at the school, the story jumps from character to character as social media runs rampant with accusations and fears.

VIDEO | Admit it. After a hard day at work all you want to do is go home, slip into a leotard and white Anna Wintour wig and dance wildly around the house. All right, perhaps you don’t right now, but after watching the music video to Sia’s “CHANDELIER” on repeat, you’ll soon be tempted to. The video features the Gumby-like performance of a teen dancer (Maddie from Dance Moms, holler) frolicking around what appears to be some sort of drug den. It’s strange, yes. But the song, the lead single off of the Australian pop singer’s July release 1000 Forms of Fear, is as intoxicating as it is freeing. The video makes the song that much better.

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The Wild Flush IPA from English Setter Brewing. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

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We’re More Than Vanilla

BY JACOB JONES

H

ard-working hunting dogs grace photos and paintings along the walls of the spacious and high-ceilinged English Setter Brewing taproom in Spokane Valley. Rotating beers take their names from dog and hunting references like the On Point Pale or Over-Under IPA. Popcorn is served in metal doggie dishes. But English Setter owner and brewer Jeff Bendio notes with great disappointment that the health department does not allow actual dogs in the brewery. Man’s best friend can’t come out drinking. “I wish they were,” he says. Bendio says English Setter, like many breweries, grew out of a passion for brewing and a desire to share the tasty rewards with more than just a small circle of friends. The brewery offers light-bodied ales with relatively low alcohol or bitterness. Most offerings, including the standout Red Setter and Wild Flush IPA, finish clean without any sharp edges or grit. Opened earlier this year, the brewery has at times struggled to keep up with demand, Bendio says, often switching out its nine taps to intro-

duce new seasonal offerings. He says he’s adding two new fermenters to help ramp up his output. Unlike many area breweries, English Setter also boasts a full menu of classic pub fare — sandwiches, fries and flatbreads. Bendio says the kitchen uses a hot-air cooker instead of a traditional deep fryer, getting things crispy without the grease. The taproom, which is 21 and older, also offers growlers and 2.5-gallon “pigs.” Bendio explains that the pot-bellied dispensers seal out air and trap carbonation, keeping beer crisp for several months, unlike growlers which often go flat within days. The brewery also opened a new patio in June. On Saturday evenings, it hosts live acoustic music from 6-9 pm. Bendio says music ranges from classic ‘50s hits to contemporary tunes. “It’s just laid-back,” he says. n English Setter Brewing • 15310 E. Marietta Ave., #4, Spokane Valley • Open Tue-Wed, 11 am-8 pm; Thu-Fri, 11 am-9 pm; Sat, 2-9 pm • englishsetterbrewing.com • 413-3663

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Back to School Porch Light Pizza builds a good pizza for the college kids BY SARAH MUNDS

C

ollege kids love nothing more than trendy, fast, cheap food. College kids love beer. College kids love pizza. With classes about to start back up in Pullman, what’s better than an artisan-fired pizza joint, within walking distance, that will fill you up in under a half-hour and not skimp on the good stuff? Porch Light Pizza prides itself on fast, fired pizza, which they readily accomplish. Thinner-crusted pizza means you’re not going to be waiting there forever while it cooks, and a variety of toppings results in options. For $8, you can amply feed yourself (or you and a friend) with a dinner-plate-sized specialty pizza. You can also build your own masterpiece with a combination of meats, cheeses and veggies. We tried the Ben (pepperoni, mushroom, tomato, artichoke hearts, basil and red sauce) and the Bellissimo (buffalo chicken, bleu cheese, onion and tomato). Thin crust can be tough, but the chefs nailed them (avoiding the temptation of overloading cheese or toppings, so the crust can cook properly). Let’s talk about the green things. Porch Light provides a variety of salads, all around $3 to $6, that are huge, loaded, and fresh. We split a Caprese salad — mozzarella, tomato, basil and balsamic — and felt like it could easily fill up an entire hungry human. The come-right-up-and-order, seat-yourself atmosphere fits Pullman’s casual, college-town ambiance. The location, right down the hill from Greek central next to the library, provides a convenient stop right before afternoon classes or when you need a good excuse to play hooky from long, dull evening lectures. Opened in late April by the same owner who brought us South Fork Public House, Porch Light has been perfecting their process during their first few months in operation. Sometimes they run out of dough before the day ends, but they make sure to update their Facebook page when that happens. n

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Mickey Rourke goes heavy on the makeup for his second trip to Sin City.

Style over Substance

up with a bullet in him; we never discover the deal with the amnesia. Potentially intriguing characters appear and disappear, having done precisely nothing. For extra bonus vacuity and confusion, the various plot threads here aren’t happening simultaneously: some are sequels to events in Sin City and others are prequels. I’d never have guessed that not only is Brolin supposed to be the same character Clive Owen played in the first film, but that Brolin’s version is an earlier, younger one. Meanwhile, the storyline featuring Powers Boothe’s vicious politician, Jessica Alba’s haunted stripper, and Bruce Willis’ cop is clearly following on from events in hopelessness of Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller’s the first film. CGI-noir portrait of Basin City, the hellish world of It gets so that even the unique visual style of the film Miller’s graphic novels, felt excitingly pertinent: we’d seems little more than a gimmick. The black-and-white, been living in that world since at least 9/11. But it’s ancomic-book atmosphere, created as CGI animation for other decade on, and the real world has gotten even more human actors to wander around in, is splashed with unendurably angry, reactionary, and mean-spirited in the vivid color, mostly quite urgent: flames and blood and interim. I don’t need my movies to be all rainbows and lipstick and police sirens get highlighted. It feels like fairy dust, but Dame is monstrous and merciless merely Dame is playing with filmmaking toys it doesn’t really for the sake of merciless monstrosity. Even the vigilante understand; both Rodriguez and Miller are credited as justice it thinks its characters are dishing out — justice directors, though the lack of discipline makes me suspect that is, I suppose, meant to make what we get is more Miller’s work than SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR Rodriguez’s. us derive some pleasure out of the Rated R savagery we’re witnessing — is cold On the plus side — pretty much the Directed by Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez and vacant. only plus side — Dame features both Dame is all ugly posturing. Mal Starring Mickey Rourke, Josh Brolin, Jessica Alba Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Eva Green, mots of fatalistic cynicism get no two of the most bewitchingly magnetic justification in the plot, as with Josh Brolin’s Dwight, actors working on-screen today. They’re never together, the one worrying about letting his monster out; yet we alas: that might be too combustible even for Basin City. never know what his monster is all about. Stories get It’s kind of sad, though, to see Gordon-Levitt’s thread go set up and then go nowhere, like how hulking Marv so desperately nowhere, and Green’s into such toxically (Mickey Rourke, buried under facial prosthetics) starts clichéd misogyny. What a shame that crashing and burnout unable to remember his own name or how he ended ing for no good reason is a tradition in this town. 

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For struggles to even come close to its predecessor BY MARYANN JOHANSON

T

here’s the nihilism of Sin City. A place where wounded men have to remind themselves to “never let the monster out,” and a woman can “makes slaves of men,” and even “good men” are turned on by a woman’s tale of rape (which she invented, of course, because this is Sin City, where you can’t trust a dame). A place where men are nothing but how they can use their rage, and women are nothing but how they can use their bodies. None of it is nice. But it pales in comparison to the nihilism of Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, the latest story about this place, consisting of little more than vignettes on vengeance and cruel parades of sociopathic power performed as gleefully ultraviolent shadow plays. A movie where disjointed parts never connect into a cohesive whole and instead merely bounce around in a random, nasty game of pinball. Is it paradoxical to suggest that even nihilistic stories need a reason to be told? It’s been almost 10 years since the magnificently brutal Sin City, and that’s part of why this unnecessary sequel feels so empty and exhausting (and not in a good way). Back then, the oozing corruption and despairing

34 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT K2: SIREN OF THE HIMALAYAS

Mt. Everest might get all the attention, but any high-altitude climber will tell you that K2 is the toughest mountain of them all. While a few hundred people summit Everest annually, less than 400 have ever reached the top of K2. This documentary follows a 2009 expedition of seasoned alpinists who make a summit attempt in 2009 during a time when very few climbers were finding success on the mountain. Although informative and full of breathtaking views, the film’s structure and editing might leave you underwhelmed. A lot of the footage feels cobbled together and lacking in pacing — but again, those views might make it worth it. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

ALIVE INSIDE

The documentary Alive Inside follows Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, which uses the power of music to invigorate people who are sick and lonely. Just seeing people listening to music on screen, seeing that intense sense of joy and self, it just shows how important music is for this planet. The film understandably won this year’s Sundance Film Festival Audience Award. At Magic Lantern (LJ) Not Rated

she’s been accepted to Juilliard. But then she’s on a family car trip with her parents (Mireille Enos and Joshua Leonard) and younger brother (Jakob Davies) that turns tragic. Mia awakens from the wreckage of an accident on an icy road to find that she hasn’t actually awakened: Her body is in critical condition, and her out-of-body experience allows her to see the life to which she’ll return if she chooses to fight for that life. (SR) Rated PG-13

CALVARY

SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR

This Irish film features a priest (Brendan Gleeson) who is taking confession one day when the man on the other side of the screen informs the priest that he’s going to be killed. The priest then goes out looking for his eventual killer, trying to figure out why he’s a target. Also stars Chris O’Dowd and Kelly Reilly. (MB) Rated R

THE DOG

One day in 1972, John Wojtowicz tried to rob a Brooklyn bank in an attempt to pay for his husband to have a sex-change surgery. It didn’t work, no surprise, but Wojtowicz’s famous hold-up spectacle was the inspiration for the 1975 film Dog Day Afternoon in which he was played by Al Pacino. Now, Wojtowicz is getting his own day on camera in this new documentary about that stint, which compares the film’s fictional elements with the real life event’s facts. Not rated. At Magic Lantern. (CS)

IF I STAY

Mia Hall (Chloë Grace Moretz) is a cello prodigy awaiting news of whether

A follow up to 2005’s Sin City, this installment, directed by Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez, consists of little more than vignettes on vengeance and cruel parades of sociopathic power performed as gleefully ultraviolent shadow plays. A movie where disjointed parts never connect into a cohesive whole and instead merely bounce around in a random, nasty game of pinball. Is it paradoxical to suggest that even nihilistic stories need a reason to be told? (MJ) Rated R

WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL

It remains one of the most incredible winning streaks of all time. Between 1992 and 2003, De La Salle High school in Concord, California, won 151 consecutive games. This film is based on a 2003 book about the team and details the sometimes turbulent experiences of the players and coaches who played for the school during and after the record streak. Stars Jim “dude who played Jesus” Caviezel as legendary head coach Bob Ladouceur. (MB) Rated PG

NOW PLAYING BELLE

Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu MbathaRaw) has always lived her life between two worlds. The illegitimate child of Admiral Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode), Belle is of a higher rank than the servants, but cannot eat with her own family because of her mixed-race

status. Strangled by class systems and prejudice, Belle begins to find her voice only when she falls in love with a man who wants to change the world for the better, but does not have the rank her family requires. At Magic Lantern (ER) Rated PG ...continued on next page

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NOW PLAYING Richard Linklater’s newest film, shot over the course of 12 years, is a true masterwork and eschews the big-bang theory of dramatics in favor of the million-and-one little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. The story focuses on Mason, who we follow from age 7 to 19 as he struggles with divorced parents and the process of learning how to navigate the world. (MB) Rated R

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES

It’s been a few years since James Franco’s ape Caesar took smart pills and then led every other ape in the greater Bay Area on a rampage of epic proportions. Those smart pills ended up causing a worldwide epidemic, killing off much of the human race. War took care of many others. Now, the surviving humans are bristling up against the apes, led by Caesar and the two species are on the brink of war. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE EXPENDABLES 3

In the third installment of this action franchise, in which an aging crew of dogooder mercenaries have to challenge their group’s original founder (Mel Gibson, apparently allowed in movies again), who’s now a ruthless arms trader. The cast includes Sylvester Stallone (who wrote the script), Jason Statham, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Antonio Banderas, Wesley Snipes, Harrison Ford and Dolph “Ivan Drago” Lundgren. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

The girl has cancer, the boy is in remission from cancer; this story can only end badly. As far as teenage cancer love stories go, John Green’s recent young adult novel of the same name isn’t half bad — not nearly as sappy as A Walk to Remember. With Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent) as the lead for this film adaption, many lovesick teenage girls and their boyfriends will show up for this one. (LJ) Rated PG-13

THE GIVER

Based on the classic young adult novel of the same name, The Giver is set in a utopian society with almost no struggle or pain. When a young man (Brenton Thwaites) is selected to learn the history of his surroundings, the truth of how things came to be so perfect comes into view. Starring Jeff Bridges as the Giver and Meryl Streep as the Chief Elder. (MB) Rated PG-13

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

The titular Guardians are a ragtag, fivepronged crew of interstellar outcasts tasked with stopping Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace), a rogue zealot bent on planetary destruction. The Guardians are led by Peter Quill (Chris Pratt), a cocky, wisecracking treasure hunter from Earth who likes to go by Star-Lord. (SS) Rated PG-13

HUNDRED- FOOT JOURNEY

Directed by Lasse Hallstrom, The Hundred-Foot Journey is the story of Hassan Kadam and his family. After relocat-

ing from their home country, India, the Kadam family decides to open an Indian restaurant, Maison Mumbai, in their new home in the south of France. After seeing Maison Mumbai, Madame Mallory, the harsh restaurant owner across the street, senses competition and treats her new competitors with vengeance. (MAB) Rated PG

INTO THE STORM

In the small northern Oklahoma town of Silverton, a team of storm chasers — led by driven filmmaker Pete (Matt Walsh) and meteorological researcher Allison (Sarah Wayne Callies) — try to find some amazing footage for their planned documentary before their funding runs out. Meanwhile, it’s highschool graduation day in Silverton, and vice-principal Gary (Richard Armitage) is trying to track down his missing son, Donnie (Max Deacon). Then, a massive tornado hits. (SR) Rated PG-13

LET’S BE COPS

Being a cop can be tough. That’s what best of friends Ryan (Jake Johnson from New Girl) and Justin (Damon Wayans Jr.) find out anyway in the film that could have been called “Let’s Be Stupid.” One night, the pair dresses up as cops for a costume party, only to realize they like the attention the uniform gains them. Things quickly escalate however, when they get involved with some real mobsters. Soon their pretend badges aren’t nearly as fun as they used to be. Meanwhile, many ridiculous gags keep the audience laughing (many involving comedians Rob Riggle and KeeganMichael Key) until the plot has to kick in at the end. (LJ) Rated R

LUCY

Scarlett Johansson continues her scifi streak playing the titular character working as a drug mule in Taiwan when a drug accidentally leaks into her system, giving her access to 100 percent of her brain. Now in possession of otherworldly powers, Lucy goes on a rampage to take vengeance against those who’ve wronged her. (MB) Rated R

MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT

Stanley (Colin Firth) is a touring stage illusionist who also delights in acting as a debunker of fraudulent mediums

and diviners of all kinds. So when he’s informed by an old friend that a young woman named Sophie (Emma Stone) is enjoying the patronage of a wealthy family in France while claiming to make contact with the dead husband of the matriarch (Jacki Weaver), Stanley is more than happy to take on the job of exposing her. (SR) Rated PG-13

A MOST WANTED MAN

It’s tough to see these posthumously released Phillip Seymour Hoffman films and realize the talent that was lost, but here we go again with A Most Wanted Man. Hoffman plays a German intelligence officer who is trying to ferret out terrorists in Hamburg, the city where the Sept. 11 attacks were planned and where paranoia runs high. (MB) Rated R

SNOWPIERCER

It’s the future and everything is super screwed up thanks to a weather control experiment gone wrong, leaving the world completely frozen. The only remaining humans live on a train that circles the globe, never stopping. On that train, there’s a strict divide between the haves and have-nots, overseen by a fierce administrator played by Tilda Swinton. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES

Your favorite post-pubescent crimefighting amphibians are back on the big screen after a couple decades away and they have a bit of a different look, but still love to kick butt and eat pizza. This doesn’t stray far from the established TMNT storyline as the four ninjas go after a crime lord who is trying to destroy New York City. Megan Fox stars as television reporter April O’Neil. (MB) Rated PG-13

WHAT IF

Daniel Radcliffe has done the Harry Potter thing and mastered Broadway, so, what the hell, why not get into the romantic comedy business, right? Here, he stars as the charming Wallace, a nice British guy who thinks he’s hitting it off with a woman (Zoe Kazan), only to realize she has a boyfriend. Even worse, she puts him in the dreaded “friend zone” and he has to struggle with the fact that he’s in love with her. (MB) Rated PG-13 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

100

Boyhood Snowpiercer

83

Planet of the Apes

79

Guardians/Galaxy

75

Magic in the Moonlight

54

Into the Storm

44

Ninja Turtles

34

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

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FILM | REVIEW

IF I STAY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1200) 240 515 750 1020

FRANK MILLER'S SIN CITY A DAME TO KILL FOR 3D (R) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 300) 530 800 1030

That Titanic move never gets old.

High Fidelity

WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1245 350) 700 955

SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR R

Daily (12:40) (5:15) 9:45 In 2D Daily (3:00) 7:30

WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL

PG Daily (11:15) (1:50) (4:30) 7:00 9:30

If I Stay nails so much aboutBY its source material — except key details of tone

Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, August 22, 2014. Saturday, August 23, 2014. Sunday, August 24, 2014. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 8/19/2014 081914070029 Regal 865-925-9554

We see the beginnings and arc of her romance with Adam (Jamie Blackley), an on-the-rise rock band frontman who sees a kindred spirit in Mia’s passion for music. And eventually we see that the weeks before the accident found Mia at a crossroads, as her own musical future in New York puts tension on the future of her relationSCOTT RENSHAW ship with Adam. If I Stay is often truly lovely in its small charor a movie lover, the journey down the acter moments — which is somewhat surprising, road of reading source material is a perilconsidering Cutler’s primary directing experience ous one. It’s axiomatic that a movie is not has been with documentaries (The September Issue), a book or a stage play, and that two artistic forms and not with actors. There’s an unusual, spiky often demand different approaches. But it also chemistry between Moretz and Blackley that forces a deeper interrogation of what “works” in hints at the occasional conflict between their reart, and why. What does it mean to be “faithful” spective musical worlds, while Leonard and Enos to the source material? And how much is it posget some terrific scenes that allow their rebel sible to separate the story from the way a given history to inform their parenting without turning artist tells that story? them into clichés of the “cool parents.” In many ways, director R.J. Cutler’s adaptaYet there are times when If I Stay seems incation of Gayle Forman’s young-adult novel If I Stay pable of duplicating what was so powerful in Foris scrupulously faithful to its source material. It’s man’s prose. There’s an almost elegiac stillness the story of 18-year-old Mia Hall (Chloë Grace to much of the book, even as the extracorporeal Moretz), a cello prodigy awaiting Mia wrestles with devastating news of whether she’s been accepted loss and witnesses the anguish of IF I STAY to Juilliard. But then she’s on a family those around her. That’s a tone Rated PG-13 car trip with her parents (Mireille Enos filmmakers generally are afraid Directed by R.J. Cutler and Joshua Leonard) and younger to attempt, and Cutler is no Starring Chloë Grace Moretz, brother (Jakob Davies) that turns Jamie Blackley, Joshua Leonard different. tragic. Mia awakens from the wreckage Perhaps it’s nitpicking to of an accident on an icy road to find expect so much from If I Stay, that she hasn’t actually awakened: Her body is in especially when it’s so generally effective as a critical condition, and her out-of-body experience different kind of teen romance, and as a celebraallows her to see the life to which she’ll return if tion of familial love in the broadest sense of the she chooses to fight for that life. term. A movie is not a book, and the mournful Like Forman’s novel, Shauna Cross’ screenfeeling evoked by a writer’s words on a page is a play weaves its way between flashbacks and the much harder trick to pull off in a studio-approved events at the hospital where Mia lies comatose. adaptation. 

F

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

FRANK MILLER'S SIN CITY A DAME TO KILL FOR 3D (R) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 305) 515 630 930 1035

IF I STAY

PG-13 Daily (11:40) (2:00) (4:25) 6:45 9:00

THE EXPENDABLES 3

PG-13 Daily (10:50) (1:15) (4:00) 6:40 9:20

THE GIVER

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:25

LET’S BE COPS

R Daily (12:45) (3:00) (5:15) 7:20 9:50

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:15) (4:30) 6:45 9:00

IF I STAY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(100 335) 645 925

INTO THE STORM

PG-13 Daily (11:20) (1:20) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

PG-13 Daily (10:40) (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 9:40

LUCY

R Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:10 9:20

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR R

Daily (12:40) (5:15) 9:45 In 2D Daily (3:00) 7:30

WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL

PG Daily (11:15) (1:50) (4:30) 7:00 9:30

IF I STAY

PG-13 Daily (11:40) (2:00) (4:25) 6:45 9:00

THE EXPENDABLES 3

WHEN THE GAME STANDS TALL [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sat.(100 345) 650 945 Sun.(100 345) 635 925

PG-13 Daily (10:50) (1:15) (4:00) 6:40 9:00 9:20

THE GIVER

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:25

LET’S BE COPS

R Daily (12:45) (3:00) (5:15) 7:20 9:50

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES PG-13 Daily 9:30 In 2D Daily (11:45) (2:00) (4:20) 7:15

INTO THE STORM

PG-13 Daily (11:20) (1:20) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35

FRANK MILLER'S SIN CITY A DAME TO KILL FOR 3D (R) ★ Fri. - Sun.(100 345) 700 950

THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY

PG Daily (11:00) (1:40) (4:10) 6:50 9:30

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY PG-13 Daily (4:20) 9:40 In 2D Daily (10:40) (1:40) 6:30 7:00

LUCY

R Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:10 9:20

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES IF I STAY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(100 345) 705 950

PG-13 Daily (4:00) 8:45

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE

PG Daily (11:00) (12:50) (2:40) (4:30)

TAMMY

R Daily (2:00) 6:45

EARTH TO ECHO PG Daily (11:00)

Times For 08/22 - 08/24

Regal_082114_4V.pdf

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 8/22/14-8/28/14

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 37

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Like us on Facebook for upcoming events & specials! 38 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

Open Ears,

Full Hearts I

t most likely won’t take Steve Gleason’s hearing. That’s the thing about amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the incurable neurological disease also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. It takes everything away slowly — movement, swallowing, talking and eventually breathing ability — but the five senses generally remain. For the third annual Gleason Fest, the former NFL, Washington State University and Gonzaga Prep football star will be in attendance, employing those senses to experience the lineup of eight local and national acts. Steve and his brother Kyle Gleason have always been fans of live music, checking out bands like Delbert (who reunited for last year’s Gleason Fest)

GLEASON FEST, SATURDAY 2 PM: Pine League 2:45 PM: The Rustics 3:30 PM: Hey! is for Horses 4:15 PM: Mama Doll 5:30 PM: Tango Alpha Tango 6:45 PM: Old Man Canyon 8 PM: The Grizzled Mighty 9:15 PM: Lukas Nelson (Willie Nelson’s son) & Promise of the Real The event includes two beer gardens and various food trucks and vendors.

Steve Gleason is a huge music fan, and this year he’ll be back to bring awareness to ALS with Gleason Fest BY LAURA JOHNSON

and Black Happy while growing up in Spokane. “Spokane made us the men we are today. The people there just continue to show us so much support,” says Kyle from his home in San Francisco. When Steve was officially diagnosed with ALS in 2011, Kyle wanted to create an event that would not only raise awareness for ALS but also give back to their hometown, where their father still lives (their mother works at WSU as an academic advisor). After the success of Gleason Gras at the Superdome in New Orleans, Kyle wondered if they could do something similar on the streets of downtown Spokane. “What if we could really use rock ’n’ roll to save the world?” Kyle asks, tongue in cheek. Like last December’s Spokane Arena Pearl Jam concert, when Steve — who uses eye-tracking technology to communicate — picked the setlist. He also has a hand in selecting bands for Gleason Fest. The search process involves Steve, Kyle and Gleason Fest event coordinator and promoter John Blakesley, who also books the Elk Fest lineup, brainstorming the perfect list of bands. “We did well this year,” says Blakesley of the lineup, headlined by Willie Nelson’s son Lukas. Things are growing. Last year’s attendance doubled to 1,000 people and ...continued on next page

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 39

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MUSIC | FESTIVAL “OPEN EARS, FULL HEARTS,” CONTINUED... there’s a committee now. The coordinators want this to become a marquee family event, something that will run after they’re all gone. Gleason Fest is Kyle’s big homecoming party; he says the event is one of the most important Listen to Steve Gleason’s days of the year for him. Music is summer 2014 playlist. something that still brings Steve so much joy, and now it’s Kyle’s turn to give back to a brother who has provided him with so many opportunities. “From the Rose Bowl to NFL games, getting me into things that otherwise I would never have been, places I didn’t belong, he always took me with him,” Kyle says.  lauraj@inlander.com

AT INLANDER.COM

Gleason Fest feat. Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real and more • Sat, Aug. 23, 2-11 pm • $20 • All-ages • Division and Main • gleasonfest.org

THE ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE CRAZE

No doubt you’ve seen various videos of celebrities and normal folks alike dumping freezing water over their heads. The act may be blowing up your Facebook and Twitter feeds, but the Ice Bucket Challenge is more than just a chance to cool down on a hot day. Its real platform is to spread ALS awareness. Steve Gleason recently did the challenge naked, to up the ante. At the end of his video, he smiled. The push has raised $15.6 million nationwide, compared to $1.8 million over the same period last year, according to the ALS Association. Find out more at teamgleason.org. (LJ)

Explore the beauty and fun today at: www.visitnorthcentralidaho.org 208.507.1904

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MUSIC | HIP-HOP You’re Invited to Lunch! Now Open at 1 1 am 3RD PLACE BEST BEER BAR!

We’re excited to announce the beginning of a new chapter for Andy’s, we’ve surprised you with BRUNCH, filled you up with DINNER, and now we’re gonna tackle LUNCH!

Thursday Aug 21st

SEA GIANT, PAISLEY DEVIL & CLUSTERF**K Friday Aug 22nd

SALLY JABLONSKY & RIPE MANGOS Saturday Aug 23rd

BOAT RACE WEEKEND Sunday FUN DAY Aug 24th

THE NEHEMIAH SHOW Happy Times prices all day!

Monday Aug 25th TRIVIA! Starts at 7pm Tuesday Aug 26th

OPEN MIC OF OPENNESS Wednesday Aug 27th

Work It

Fly Moon Royalty mixes hip-hop and funk into one fresh package.

WHISKEY WEDNESDAY WITH SALLY BOP JAZZ COCKTAILS & 25 CRAFT BEERS

Chase Down the Party

BY AZARIA PODPLESKY

S

509.747.0304 1401 W. 1ST AVE

120 E. Sprague Ave.

Seattle’s Fly Moon Royalty isn’t afraid of a little ‘world domination’ with its music inger Adriene “Adra Boo” Green and producer/DJ Mike “Action Jackson” Sylvester, aka electro-soul duo Fly Moon Royalty, are no strangers to elbow grease. After all, they met while working at a restaurant in Seattle. “As soon as he said he was a producer, it was like, ‘Boom!’” Green says their connection. Once the duo began working together, other musical projects took a backseat, and the pair released its self-titled debut in 2011. Rave reviews from the likes of Seattle and City Arts magazines, which named Fly Moon Royalty one of the city’s best new bands and best local band, respectively, performances supporting soul band Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings and Chewelah native Allen Stone, and 2012’s Dimensions EP propelled the band into early 2014 and the release of its second EP, Unfinished Business — much of which was heard at the duo’s stunning Marmot Fest set last month. The five-track EP was the product of the duo’s unstoppable work ethic, culled from extra songs Green and Sylvester had in their arsenal. “The EP was called Unfinished Business because those songs were that,” Sylvester says. “We have a full-length album that no one’s heard yet. It’s some of our best work, in my opinion. It’s hard to sit on it … But we thought we needed to take care of unfinished business before releasing that.” Unfinished Business finds the pair combining the

The Gateway Bar Between Downtown & Browne’s Addition

genres that inspired them to pursue music — funk (Green) and hip-hop (Sylvester) — to create a fresh sound. The Daft Punk-like “DNA,” a late addition to the project, is heavy on vocoder and splits Unfinished Business into two halves. The first half opens on a funky note with “Piece of Me,” followed by “No Pain No Gain,” which has a more soulful vibe. On both tracks, Green’s sultry pipes add intensity to Sylvester’s groovy beats. The more hip-hop-focused latter half includes “Step Hard” and “The Anthem,” both featuring solid verses from Sylvester and even fiercer vocals from Green. Not ones to slow down, Green and Sylvester say the next few months involve a lot of prep work for 2015, which Green says, perhaps notso-jokingly, involves “world domination.” “Basically, it’s us filling in the blanks,” she says. “Our management team and our booking agent are really gunning hard for us this year, and we’re planting a lot of seeds.” “We have a strong team and a good game plan,” Sylvester adds. “We’re ready to put in the work.” n Fly Moon Royalty with Flying Spiders • Fri, Aug. 22, at 9 pm • $8 • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents. com • 624-4319

Aug 22, 2014 9:00 - 1:30am

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www.the5kglowrun.com AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 41

MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK THE SUPERSUCKERS

T

he Supersuckers are the greatest rock ‘n’ roll band in the world, according to them. And while we don’t have enough time in this paragraph to debate that assertion, what’s important is that the rock/punk/country Seattle band is an entertaining one. With Eddie Spaghetti at the helm, the four-piece has been blasting eardrums and encouraging people to drink a lot of beer for more than two decades. Their January record Get the Hell is as consistent as ever, offering up tasty, in-your-face tunes, perfect for a summer’s night party. — LAURA JOHNSON The Supersuckers with Laylah’s Drink • Thu, Aug. 28, at 8 pm • $12 • All-ages • The Hop! • 706 N. Monroe • thehopevents.com • 328-5467

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/21

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Performers on the Patio feat. Bridges Home BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Orenda Fink with The Holy Broke, Matthew Winters J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser J COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Browne’s Addition Summer Concerts feat. Hot Club of Spokane CURLEY’S, Usual Suspects THE FORK (208-292-4392), Truck Mills GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Cheryl Branz CD Release Show THE HANDLE BAR, Six-Strings n’ Pearls J HAYDEN CITY PARK, The Ryan Larsen Band J THE HOP!, Giving Rocks feat. Nixon Rodeo, Project Narwhal, Seven Cycles, Elephant Gun Riot J JJ’S GRILL AND BREWHOUSE (467-4267), Chris Rieser & Jay Rawley J JONES RADIATOR, Sea Giant, Paisley Devil, Clusterf--J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Particlehead J MOOTSY’S, Dan Smith (of Listener), Red Sweater Lullaby, Stolen Nation J RIVERSTONE PARK, Summer Concerts at Riverstone feat. Bluestreak TEMPLIN’S RED LION (208-773-1611), Rockin’ on the River feat. Sammy Eubanks THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Death By Pirates WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Pacific Suns ZOLA, L.O.S.

42 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

FESTIVAL OCTAPALOOZA

O

ctapalooza is not a house party. It’s a festival thrown in local musician Levi Steverding’s half-acre backyard in Hillyard, so don’t get confused. Back for the fifth time, the event includes the biggest lineup yet with Norma Jean (pictured), Night Verses, FAUS, Jedediah the Pilot, Civilized Animal, the Revision Scheme, Pine League and For the Likes of You. Also important to note: there will be a giant Jenga game set up for the public, along with 5-gallon beer pong, a life-size foosball court and a chance to get a $5 haircut from a local barber. Beer will be provided by River City Brewing, for those who are into that sort of thing. — LAURA JOHNSON Octapalooza feat. Norma Jean and more • Sat, Aug. 23, at 2 pm • $15/$18 day of • 21+ • The Octagon, 4811 N. Myrtle • monumentalshows. com • 844-2187

Friday, 08/22

219 LOUNGE (208-263-9934), Flying Mammals BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Fly Moon Royalty (See story on page 41), Flying Spiders BIG SKY’S TAVERN (489-2073), Red Eye Logic BOLO’S, Torino Drive BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Limosine BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls BROOKLYN DELI & LOUNGE (8354177), Doug Schumacher J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Bart Budwig CARLIN BAY RESORT, Aftermath THE CELLAR, Fur Traders CHECKERBOARD BAR, Captain Algebra & Hot Hoodoo COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Bill Bozly, The Rub, Tribute Band

CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Charlie Butts & the Filter Tips CURLEY’S, Bruiser DINKI DI’S (208-773-3987), Fun in the Sun Beach Party feat. Cary Fly, Bobby Patterson and more J DOWNTOWN PULLMAN, National Lentil Fest feat. Igor & the Swamp Donkeys, Perry Acker, The BGP and more FEDORA PUB, Ron Greene FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Phoenix FORTY-ONE SOUTH (208-265-2000), Truck Mills FREDNECK’S (291-3880), Ken Davis & Friends GATEWAY MARINA AND RESORT (208-582-3883), JamShack GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Joel Brantley THE HANDLE BAR, Usual Suspects J THE HOP!, All Hail the Yeti, Dark White Light and more IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-290-

2280), Charley Packard IRON GOAT BREWING CO. (4740722), Madeline McNeill IRON HORSE BAR, Slow Burn JOHN’S ALLEY, Earphunk JONES RADIATOR, Sally Jablonsky, Ripe Mangos J KNITTING FACTORY, GA’s Too Broke to Rock feat. Otherwise J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Pamela Benton THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Liz Rognes LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Brown Family Band MAX AT MIRABEAU, Ticking Time Bomb THE MEMBERS LOUNGE (703-7115), Fabulous Fridays ft. DJ Wesone NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred J NYNE, Fun Ladies, The Camaros and DJs The Twin Towers J PARK BENCH CAFE (456-4349), Just Plain Darin

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Nicole Lewis J RED LION HOTEL AT THE PARK (326-8000), Chris Rieser & Maxie Ray Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, DJ D3VIN3 REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Olivia de la Cruz THE ROAD HOUSE (PRIEST RIVER) (208-448-1408), Sammy Eubanks ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band THE ROCK BAR, Armed & Dangerous ROCKER ROOM, Dragonfly J SARANAC PUBLIC HOUSE, Lilac Linguistics with Zapp Spaccy, Leo Skeptics, Kane Bridge One, Kosh, Jaiiu, Ocean Jams SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, DJ Q SPIKE’S PHILLYS AND MORE (4893647), Jimmy Nuge SWAXX (703-7474), Prom Reloaded THE VIKING, The Step Brothers WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON,

Jeff Neuhaus ZOLA, Karmas Circle

Saturday, 08/23

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn  THE BIG DIPPER, Bluestreak with Laddie Ray Melvin  BING CROSBY THEATER, Dave Rawlings Machine BOLO’S, Torino Drive BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Limosine BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls  BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Junior La Cuesta CAPTAIN’S WHEEL (208-683-6504), Usual Suspects CARLIN BAY RESORT, Aftermath THE CELLAR, Fur Traders COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Bill Bozly, The Rub, Tribute Band CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Charlie Butts & the Filter Tips CURLEY’S, Bruiser DINKI DI’S, Fun in the Sun Beach Party feat. Rumbleboy, Black Rose, Innersanctum  DOWNTOWN PULLMAN, National Lentil Fest feat. Kara Hesse, Jeff Evans, Tommy Simmons, The Horde & The Harem and more  DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, Summer Sounds feat. Broken Whistle  DOWNTOWN SPOKANE, Gleason Fest (See story on page 39) feat. Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Old Man Canyon, the Grizzled Mighty and more  ELK PARK, The DBC Band FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Phoenix GATEWAY MARINA AND RESORT, JamShack  GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Jack Johnson and more THE HANDLE BAR, Six-Strings n’ Pearls  THE HOP!, NW Beards Association Fundraiser feat. Comfort Zone IRON HORSE BAR, Slow Burn JOHN’S ALLEY, Ethan Keller Group  JONES RADIATOR, Boat Race Weekend THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Dirk Lind, Gabe Knox LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kari Marguerite LOON LAKE SALOON (233-2738), Untyed MAX AT MIRABEAU, Ticking Time Bomb  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Nick Grow, Maxie Ray Mills NORTHEAST WASHINGTON FAIR GROUNDS, Johnny & the Moondogs NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred, DJ Patrick NYNE, DJ C-Mad  THE OCTAGON, Octapalooza Outdoor Festival feat. Norma Jean, Night Verses, Faus, Jedediah The Pilot and more RED ROOM LOUNGE, DJ D3VIN3 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band ROCKER ROOM, Dragonfly  ROCKET MARKET, Brett and Janet Dodd with Dave McRae

UNDERGROUND 15, Mudhelmet, Marco Polo Collective THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, The Step Brothers WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Pacific Suns ZOLA, Jesse Weston Trio

Sunday, 08/24

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Concerts on the Cliff feat. Tuxedo Junction BIG BARN BREWING CO., Chuck Borris  THE BIG DIPPER, Rogue Valley, Bard THE CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh CONKLING MARINA, PJ Destiny CURLEY’S, Torino Drive  THE HOP!, The Finns tour kickoff PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, David Gerald WEBSTER’S, Chris Lucas ZOLA, Son of Brad

Monday, 08/25

 THE HOP!, King Scrub with Stephanie Keller, Treveezy and more SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, DJ Q ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 08/26

Anjelah Johnson saturday september 13 martin Woldson theater at the Fox 1001 w. sprague ave · spokane, wa 7:30pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

dave rawlings machine

featuring: gillian welch · John paul Jones · willie watson · paul kowert

tuesday sept 23 bing Crosby theater

901 west sprague ave · spokane, wa · 7:30pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest · charge By phone 800-325-seat tickets also at Bing crosBy theatre Box office, the spokane arena Box office & the inB performing arts center Box office

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BORRACHO TACOS & TEQUILERIA (822-7789), DJ D3VIN3 THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Kosh  DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Strictly Business  THE HOP!, Hawthorne Heights, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, New Empire and more  ROCKET MARKET, Tommy Gant

Wednesday,08/27 219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls THE CELLAR, Riverboat Dave  DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Live After 5 feat. The Clumsy Lovers EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Spokane Singer Songwriters Open Mic  THE HOP!, Simon Says Die, Move the Earth, Method of Conflict JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Starlite Motel PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, 7Horse SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Kicho WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Nate Ostrander ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

 THE HOP!, The Supersuckers (See story on facing page), Laylah’s Drink, Aug. 28 JONES RADIATOR, She Keeps Bees, Aug. 28

MUSIC | VENUES

an evening of stand up comedy with

AND RAINING JANE Wednesday oCtober 22 inb perForming arts Center

334 w. spokane falls Blvd spokane, wa 8:00pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

IgnIte the nIght tour

& old dominion monday oCtober 27 martin Woldson theater at the Fox 1001 w. sprague ave · spokane, wa 8:00pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest · charge By phone hone 800-325-seat

& greyhounds

saturday november 8 inb perForming arts Center 334 w. spokane falls Blvd · spokane, wa 8:00pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARLIN BAY RESORT • 14691 Idaho 97, Harrison, • 208-689-3295 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 20 W. Jerry Ln., Worley • 208-263-6971 CONKLING MARINA • 20 W. Jerry Ln, Worley • 208-686-1151 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LIBRARY LOUNGE • 110 E. 4th Ave. •747-3371 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 43

Liliana Barbieri’s “Cedar Street Bridge.”

VISUAL ART ARTISTS AT WORK

With beautiful inspiration in nature all around, the Inland Northwest is a natural place for any artist to want to call home. While Spokane and Coeur d’Alene remain the region’s art meccas, up north in the Pend Oreille Valley there’s a long list of local, professional artists to boast of. This weekend marks the second of the 11th annual, two-weekend tour of artists’ studios in and around the cities of Sandpoint, Hope, Ponderay, and Sagle, Idaho. More than 30 artists have gathered at 19 tour stops around the region to showcase their work in a variety of media: painting, sculpture, jewelry, photography and textiles. The scenery along the way makes the tour a fully immersive visual experience. — CHEY SCOTT Artists’ Studio Tour of North Idaho • Fri-Sun, Aug. 22-24, 10 am-4 pm • Free • See event map and details at • 208-2632161

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

44 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

FESTIVAL LOVELY LENTILS

COMMUNITY GATHER BY THE WATER

National Lentil Festival • Fri, Aug. 22, 5-11 pm; Sat, Aug. 23, 7:30 am-5 pm • Free • Reaney Park and Spring Street parking lot, downtown Pullman • lentilfest.com • 334-3565

Gathering at the Falls Powwow • Aug. 22-24; event times vary • Free • Lilac Bowl, Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard • 362-2178

About a quarter of the lentils grown in this country are done so in the Palouse region. So it makes sense that Pullman has thrown an annual festival for the past 26 years to celebrate the fibrous legume. The event kicks off Friday evening with free lentil chili for all, just to whet the palate. Saturday, be on the lookout for the Tase T. Lentil 5K Fun Run, a softball tourney, yoga and the great lentil cook-off. Also exciting: the beer and wine garden opens at 10 am. Both days, there will be live music from acts like Igor & the Swamp Donkeys, Blake Noble, Cody Beebe & The Crooks and the Olson Bros Band. You’ll never think of lentils the same way again. — LAURA JOHNSON

In our city that’s geographically centered around the Spokane Falls, the community often gathers around the river. We walk along it, cool off in it and appreciate its beauty on a sunny day. The annual Gathering at the Falls Powwow is rooted in that tradition of congregating by the water, and showing local appreciation for the Spokane River. The weekend-long powwow hosts tribes from all around the region, showcasing their heritage with dancers, food and musicians. On Friday evening, the family-focused Youth Powwow offers games and prizes. Dancing starts up again the following day with contest categories for all ages and skill levels. — JENNA MULLIGAN

o 10 PM t M A 1 1 ILY OPEN DA

n o i s s i m d FREE A

THEATER ORLANDO, OUTSIDE

For the actors and actresses in this touring production of Shakespeare’s As You Like It, performances are not limited to the stages of dark auditoriums. Instead, they’re filling parks with the sounds of sonnets and laughter. Montana Shakespeare in the Parks, based out of Montana State University, tours nationally every year, bringing theater and performance culture to small communities across the Northwest. In its 42nd year, the group is staging 75 shows, including this weekend’s in Liberty Lake. Directed by Kevin Asselin, the adaptation of the comedy follows two characters, Rosalind and Orlando, as they undergo exile. This nonprofit ensures access to all interested spectators by offering free admission — just as you like it. — JENNA MULLIGAN Shakespeare in the Park • Sat, Aug. 23, at 5 pm • Free • Pavillion Park • 727 N. Molter Rd., Liberty Lake • shakespeareintheparks.org

• Great FooBdooths • 45 Foodnu Items • 225 Me

August 27 September 1

$3 BITES

offered DAILY! 3-5 PM and 9-10 PM

s ge Garden s a r e v e B lt • 3 Adu e Concerts on 3 Stage • 100 Freg over a measly $9.95 • Nothin

2014

You’ll never eat it all!

Riverfront Park • Spokane, WA

Food Vendors

Azar’s Café Express Bacon Wrapped Hot Dogs Baja Babes Tacos Baja Bowl/Glazed and Confused Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Bloem Flowers, Chocolates, Paperie Charlie’s Cheesecakes County Fair Foods Crepe Tyme Dim Sum Wok Eggroll Express & Teriyaki Eldon’s Italian Sausage Sandwich Euro Gyro Fiesta Time Foods Glazed Doughnut Burgers

include

Gourmet Soul Gumbo Goddess Island Noodles Island Slaw J B Grilled Gourmet Cheese Sandwich Kang Mongolian Kochi Teriyaki Grill Leonardo’s Bistro Longhorn BBQ

Lylo’s Teriyaki Mary Lou’s Ice Cream Philly Bros./Fry Guys Pizza Rita Shiskaberry’s Shortcake Heaven Southern Roasted Corn Taste of India Terry’s Breakfast Twister’s Funnel Cakes 3 Ninjas Trophy Spice Westmoreland Concessions The Whitehouse

BEER GOOD THINGS IN SMALL BATCHES

After the success of their first small-batch brew festival, No-Li Brewhouse is doubling down with No-Li 12, featuring a dozen beers you wouldn’t typically find on tap. Several of the creations are barrel aged, including a Jet Star Imperial IPA that’s been sitting in a Dry Fly whiskey barrel, and a Wrecking Ball stout aged in a barrel formerly used for Townshend Cellar red wines. There are also specially made beers that aren’t necessarily aged, but made in small quantities with creativity in mind. The previous one sold out, so advanced tickets are recommended. — MIKE BOOKEY

Headline Concerts include

Produced with assistance from: Second Harvest Food Bank, The Travelodge, Silhouette Staging and Lighting, Impact Lighting, Electric City, Inc., Pro Sound Audio, Too Far North Talent Booking, KXLY-TV, Eljay Oil Denise Adam, Wild Bill Graphics, Starplex/Crowd Management Services, American On-Site Rental, Spokane Parks and Recreation Department, the staff of Riverfront Park, Spokane Police Department, Spokane Fire Department, Spokane Regional Health District, Washington State Liquor Control Board, Design Spike, Inc., Oxarc and A to Z Rental. Sponsored in part by: SR Media/The Spokesman-Review, Comcast, BATH FITTER of Eastern Washington & North Idaho, Verizon, Inland Northwest Bank, Centurylink, Geico Insurance, Renewal by Andersen, Washington Healthplanfinder, Grant County Tourism Commission, ATM Marketing, Budweiser, No-Li Brewing, KXLY-TV, Eljay Oil and A to Z Rental. 0rganized by: The Six Bridges Arts Association

For a complete list of food booths and bands: 509.921.5579 or

No-Li 12 • Sat, Aug. 23, from noon-4 pm • $20/advance, $27/door • No-Li Brewhouse • 1003 E. Trent • nolibrewhouse.com

spokanepigout.com

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

GATHERING OF THE BEARDLESS The Spokane Beard and Mustache Foundation hosts an event to share how to enter its Epic Beard Competition on Oct. 4. Entrance is free, but donations supporting the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. All-ages concert to follow at 9 pm ($5). Aug. 23, 6-8 pm. The Hop!, 706 N. Monroe St. spokanebeardmustache.com (954-0952)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300)

EXPEDITION A fast-paced improvised comedy show, rated for all ages. Fridays all summer, through Aug. 29, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Red Dragon, 1406 W. Third. (4756209) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. (835-4177)

Men in the Making, Big Mumbo Blues Band, Jim Boyd Band, Ayron Jones and the Way, Chance McKinney, Laura Love & Big Bad Gina, Los Lobos, Peter Rivera & Celebrate, Rail, Randy Hansen, Willie Nile, Zoe Muth & The Lost High Rollers, Jonathan Jackson + Enation, Too Slim & The Taildraggers, Sammy Eubanks . . . And many more

Copyright ©2014 A Burke Event All rights reserved

CHECK OUT WHAT’S HAPPENING

AT THE LANTERN! rd

August 22 + 23 HOt August Nights nd

Icicle Brewing

rd August 22nd +23 LIVE MUSIC

10pm

th th September 11 - 13 SOurs ‘N September

Sour beer fest & Live music LANTERN

ONES! Where friends meet & make new

A Quaint Tap House in SPOKANE’S Perry District Specializing in craft beers, Cocktails, wine, and pub food.

TAP H USE O

1004 S. PerRy St. Spokane • 509.315.9531 • lanterntaphouse.com

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 45

RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess Under neW AnGer MAnAGeMent

When my boyfriend and I started dating, he was kind of a hothead. His first encounter with my friends was a game of touch football on the beach. He and another guy collided, and he lost his temper. There was a good bit of yelling, and I think people were pretty shocked. To his credit, he realized he had an anger problem. Over time, he has worked hard on it, and now he doesn’t blow up anymore. He really is a changed man, and I AMY ALKON thought people would recognize it, but I’ve recently learned that they all still see him as the scary-angry guy. Is there any way to change that? —Asking For A Second Chance In touch football, you’re only supposed to put a hand or two on another player — as opposed to, oh, tearing out his soul with your bare hands, grinding it into a fine powder, and sprinkling it on your cornflakes. Sure, in the months following that friendly Sunday afternoon death match, your friends had various opportunities to see that your boyfriend’s changed. Sadly, this probably hasn’t made the slightest dent in their opinion of him, thanks to our brain’s penchant for energy conservation. Once we’ve figured something out — some bit of information or how to do something — our brain creates a cognitive shortcut, shrink-wrapping and storing the knowledge set so, the next time around, we’ll react automatically instead of having to think the thing through. These cognitive shortcuts work great when you, say, want more light to read by. You know to reach over and switch on a lamp; you don’t have to figure out what a lamp is or whether yanking the dog’s tail might make his eyes light up the room. Unfortunately, this autothink makes undoing first impressions like trying to unspill red wine on a white rug. The next time we see a person, our brain shoves us our mental flashcard on them — “Oh, right, Explody McSploderson.” There’s no mulling over whether that view of them might be due for revision. Researchers, predictably, call this cognitive laziness “first impression bias.” It’s a form of confirmation bias, our tendency to favor information that confirms our beliefs and ignore any that suggests we might be mistaken. Information updates are especially easy to overlook when they’re subtle, like an explody guy shrugging off a small affront, which is far less visual and memorable than that time he turned into Conan The Touch Football Barbarian. A way to overcome first impression bias, suggested by research by Kai H. Lim, is presenting new information about your boyfriend in such “unambiguous” and “vivid” ways that it becomes hard to ignore. Tell friends straight-out that he’s changed, and explain his motivation — ideally while walking past him meditating on a park bench with the Dalai Lama or running a rescue for hummingbird single mothers. At the very least, tell stories — true stories — laying out how differently he now responds. Information presented in story form tends to be stickier, and “vivid” mental pictures of his transformation may quash the ambiguity that helps maintain first impression bias. Finally, add a call to action — a request that friends give him a second look through the lens of this new information. They just might see that they can sit down to dinner with the guy without worrying he’ll go off on them: “My name is Inigo Montoya. You bumped my arm reaching for the bread. Prepare to die!”

Hot to tot

Is there a way to make sure someone is on birth control? My girlfriend says she is, but I don’t believe her. I know she really wants to have a baby. I’m not ready to be a father yet — or maybe ever — so I need to get to the bottom of this. —Worried You’re perhaps more of an adoption man — into adopting the sort of little rascal you can leave tied to a parking meter during brunch without anybody calling social services on you. Unfortunately, a man has limited control over whether a woman he’s with gets a bun in the oven with his DNA baked into it — that is, unless he gets snipped or padlocks his zipper and chucks the key in the ocean. Of course, the single worst form of birth control is trusting that a woman — especially a woman longing for a baby — is actually taking or using hers. A mitigating factor is whether she’s shown herself to be ethical. Consider whether that describes your girlfriend. If not, you might want to make that a requirement for any partner of yours — before you find yourself reading “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” aloud for the 300th time in a week, as it’s the only way to keep your toddler from screaming like a goat being slaughtered. n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

46 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMMUNITY

PAJAMA DAY AT MOBIUS Wear your favorite pajamas to the children’s museum and create some fun nighttime crafts in the “Out of Hand Art Studio.” The first 125 children receive a book light from Avista. Aug. 22, 10 am-5 pm. Free with admission. Mobius Kids, 808 W. Main. mobiusspokane.org (624-5437) RUN TO THE PARTY Event previewing the upcoming “Glow in the Park” 5K fun run, with a quick jog before a glow party at the club. Ages 21+. Aug. 22, 9 pm. Club 412, 412 W. Sprague. tinyurl. com/lhtyw42 CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS WALK The fifth annual 3-mile walk in Medical Lake includes a barbecue and live entertainment, and is hosted by the Clayton Schneider Foundation. Sat, Aug. 23, at 10 am. Free, registration required. $15 T-shirts available. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre St. facebook. com/theclaytonschneiderfoundation (723-7765) 4TH ANNUAL DOGGIE DIP After the city pools close for the season, they’re open for dogs to take a splash, with proceeds benefiting SpokAnimal and the Spokane Parks & Rec Foundation. Well-mannered dogs must be attended to by an owner and have proof with them of an up-to-date rabies vaccination. Aug. 23, and Aug. 25-27, times and locations vary. spokanimal.org POST FALLS POLICE OPEN HOUSE 4th annual “Cops-n-Kids and Rodders-nMore” open house event, featuring a car show ($10-$15 registration, 9 am day of), emergency vehicle parade and tribute to

local first responders, a food drive and family activities. Aug. 23, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Post Falls Police Department, 1717 E. Polston. postfallspolice.com UNIONTOWN LIBRARY BOOK SALE A used book sale and open house to raise money for the library’s relocation into the former Fire Station. Event at the Uniontown city hall. Aug. 23, 8 am-3 pm. City Hall, Uniontown, Wash. (509-229-3880) FAMILY FUN DAY Second annual event, hosted by American Family Insurance, offering free family activities, including a barbecue, kids’ carnival games, face painting, local pet adoptions and more. Aug. 24, 11 am-3 pm. Free. American Family Insurance, 106 N. Evergreen. (924-4704) PAWS IN THE POOL The third annual event, hosted by Spokane Valley Parks & Rec, opens up the city pools to local pups. Aug. 24-25; times vary. Pre-registration suggested. Dogs must be at least 6 mos. old and current on vaccines. $5/dog. spokanevalley.org/ recreation (688-0300) LIONS CLUB TRAIN RIDES The North Pend Oreille Valley Lions Club hosts its annual scenic train rides along the Pend Orielle River from Ione to Metaline Falls, Wash. Aug. 30-31. $15/adults, $10 seniors and children ages 2-12. lionstrainrides.com (509-445-2640) SPOKANIMAL’S RACHAEL RAY 100K WRAP-UP PARTY SpokAnimal celebrates its participation in the national challenge to win 100K for the shelter with games, cake, and bows and ribbons to “wrap-up” your new pet to take home. Aug. 30, 12-4 pm. SpokAnimal, 710 N. Napa. spokanimal.org (534-8133)

6th Annual

Saturday August 30, 2014 Labor Day Weekend

Tickets $12 advance $15 at gate Kids 6 & under FREE

CELEBRATE THE SONG ! TWO STAGES of ORIGINAL LIVE MUSIC ALL DAY! FRUITION STRING BAND SHOOK TWINS DESERT NOISES HILLFOLK NOIR THE WASTELAND KINGS and much more! Great FOOD & DRINK, Local ARTISANS Fun for the whole family!

WallowaValleyMusic_082114_2V_JP.pdf

FESTIVAL

NORTH IDAHO FAIR & RODEO The annual community fair and rodeo celebrates Kootenai County’s 150th anniversary, and features competitive agricultural exhibits, food, live music, a rodeo, demolition derby and more. Aug. 20-24, gates open at 9 am daily. $7-$9; parking $3 kids 5 and under free. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Gov’t Way. northidahofair.com (208-765-4969) BONNER COUNTY FAIR The 2014 county fair is themed “Welcome to the Land of Awes” and includes a rodeo, ag displays, the cowboy boot camp, demolition derby, food, entertainment and more. Aug. 19-23. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave. co.bonner.id.us (208-263-8414) GREEN BLUFF PEACH FESTIVAL Juicy peaches are ripe in the orchards and ready for harvest, and many orchards and farms also sell peach cobbler, ice cream, cakes and pies. Festival runs Through Sept. 1. Green Bluff Growers, Mead, Wash. greenbluffgrowers.com RIVERSTONE STREET FAIR Coeur d’Alene’s Riverstone Village hosts a weekly outdoor market and street fair, hosting 200+ vendors of arts and crafts, food, live music, a farmers market and more. Thursdays from 4-9 pm, through Aug. 28. Free. riverstonestreetfair.com AIRWAY HEIGHTS FESTIVAL & CAR SHOW Includes the 31st annual Ford Open Car Show, local food and craft vendors, kids carnival games and activities, the 4th annual watermelon races, 2nd annual “Airway’s Got Talent” and more. Aug. 2223. Free. Sunset Park, S. King St. cawh.org

CLAYTON COMMUNITY FAIR Weekendlong community fair hosting a livestock sale (Sat) and a fire dept, ambulance and Med Star demo (Sun). Aug. 22-23 from 8 am-8 pm, Aug. 24 from 8:30 am-4 pm. $2. Clayton Fairgrounds, Clayton, Wash. claytoncommunityfair.com (276-2444) GATHERING AT THE FALLS The annual cultural event commemorates gatherings of past generations as a sacred tradition of many Northwest tribes to celebrate the Spokane River’s resources, and to create or renew friendships. Dancers and singers, young and old, come from near and far to showcase their songs and their dance styles for the community. Aug. 22-24. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. facebook.com/RiverfrontParkPowwowSpokane NATIONAL LENTIL FESTIVAL The annual celebration of the Palouse’s beloved legume features cooking demos, a parade, fun run, bike ride, food/drink vendors, live entertainment, local vendors, the lentil chili cook-off and more. Aug. 2223. Free admission. Downtown Pullman. lentilfest.com (800-365-6948) MILLWOOD DAZE The 6th annual community festival raises funds for Meals on Wheels Spokane, and includes a fun run, local vendor/nonprofit booths, pancake breakfast, vintage motorcycle show, pet food drive and more. Aug. 23, 8 am-3 pm. Free to attend. Downtown Millwood, Wash. mowspokane.org (232-0864) PIG OUT IN THE PARK The 35th annual, six-day food and music festival features 45 food vendors and more than 100 concerts and performances on three stages. Aug. 27-Sept. 1. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. spokanepigout.com (879-0826)

FILM

ROCKET MARKET MOVIES: FERNGULLY An outdoor movie screening projected on the side of the market, starts at dusk. Aug. 21. Free. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (509-343-2253) SHARKNADO 2: THE SECOND ONE Screening of Syfy’s pulp horror sequel. Aug. 21, 8 pm. Regal Cinemas, 4750 N. Division. fathomevents.com MOVIES IN THE PARK: FROZEN Free showing in the park, with activities and crafts an hour before the film at dusk. Aug. 22. Free. Mirabeau Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Parkway. spokanevalley. org (688-0300) DR. STRANGELOVE Screening of the classic (rated PG) as part of the Garland’s 2014 Summer Movie series. Aug. 23 at midnight, Aug. 26 at 7 pm and Aug. 28 at 9 pm. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) KLINK’S RESORT SUMMER SHORTS Screening (8 pm) of locally-made short films, preceded by a photo booth, s’mores station and snacks. Filmmakers range from ages 10-60. Aug. 23, 7-10 pm. Free admission. Klink’s on the Lake, 18617 Williams Lake Rd. tinyurl.com/lvoqeac (235-2391) SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER: FROZEN Outdoor movie screening, starts at dusk. Aug. 23. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. (534-1647) BEGIN AGAIN A chance encounter between a disgraced music-business executive and a young singer-songwriter new to Manhattan turns into a promising collaboration. Aug. 28, 7:30-9 pm. $5-$7.

The Kroc Center,

Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida. org (208-255-7801) THE DOG An intimate portrait of the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the inspiration behind Al Pacino’s character in Sidney Lumet’s Oscar (R)-Nominated “Dog Day Afternoon.” Aug. 28, 7:30 pm. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. (209-2383) ROCKET MARKET MOVIES: STAR TREK (REBOOT) An outdoor movie screening projected on the side of the market, starts at dusk. Aug. 28. Free. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253)

FOOD & DRINK

LPOW TAP PARTY The Lake Pend Oreille Waterkeeper celebrates National Water Quality Month with a special beer release and tap party at MickDuff’s new beer hall, with proceeds benefiting the LPOW’s work. Aug. 21, 5:30-8 pm. Free admission. MickDuff’s Brewing Company, 312 N. First Ave. lakependoreillewaterkeeper. org (208-597-7188) VINO WINE TASTING Fri, Aug. 22 feat. Nysa Vineyard of Oregon, from 3-6:30 pm ($15). Sat, Aug. 23 feat. wines of Catalonia, Spain, from 2-4:30 pm ($10). Wine available by-the-glass; tastings include cheese and crackers. Vino!, 222 S. Washington (838-1229) WINES OF SOUTH AFRICA Tasting class featuring 2 white and 6 red wines hailing from the wine regions of South Africa. Aug. 22, 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (509-343-2253)

HEROES VS. VILLAINS PUB CRAWL Dress as your favorite hero or villain, (real or imagined) and hash it out over drinks at a pub crawl event with prizes, costume contests, games and more. Aug. 23, 6 pm-2 am. $20. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe. tinyurl.com/mkadbm8 LAUGHING DOG 9TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY The Sandpoint brewery celebrates its 9th anniversary with a party, live music, barbecue, games and more. Aug. 23, 12-7 pm. Laughing Dog Brewing, 1109 Fontaine Drive. laughingdogbrewing.com (208-263-9222) NO-LI 12: SMALL BATCH FESTIVAL The brewery hosts its second small-batch beer fest, featuring 12 rare beers on tap including barrel-aged, experimental and infused beers, along with food and live music. Limited tickets available. Aug. 23, 12-4 pm. $20-$27. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent. nolibrewhouse.com DINNER, SCOTCH & CIGARS Master of Whisky, Breck Taylor, and Masselow’s Chef Tanya Broesder guide guests through a 3-course dinner paired with Johnnie Walker Scotch, finishing the night in Legends with a cigar and Johnnie Walker Blue. Tickets must be purchased on site. Aug. 25, 5-9 pm. $65 (40 seats only). Masselow’s, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6020) NEIGHBORHOOD BARBECUE SERIES Central Lutheran Church hosts weekly neighborhood barbecues every Wednesday at 6 pm, through Aug. 27. Free. Central Lutheran Church, 512 S. Bernard St. (624-9233)

MUSIC

DINNER CONCERT FEAT. BRETT YOUNG Acoustic performance by the Nashville singer/songwriter. Ticket price includes dinner from Chef Joan of Swilly’s, with tableside bar/dinner service during performance. Doors open at 5 pm. Aug. 21, 6:30-8 pm. $48. BellTower, 125 SE Spring St, Pullman (509-334-4195) HENRY C. & THE WILLARDS A blues/ rock/Americana concert. Aug. 23, 7:30 pm. $8. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (509-229-3414) MILONGA The latin-rhythm group performs Aug. 23 at the Otis Orchard branch (1 pm) and the Spokane Valley branch (4 pm). Free. scld.org COMMUNITY MUSIC DAY A day of music and fun, with free music lessons for all ages and abilities. Other activities include yard games, face painting, movies, demos, a record sale and more. Aug. 24, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Holy Names Music Center, 3910 W. Custer Dr. (326-9516) COMMUNITY BAND OF THE PALOUSE: 2014 is the 10th anniversary season of the Summer Plaza Concerts at the 1912 Center. Aug. 25, 5:30-8 pm. Free. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third, Moscow. 1912center. org (208-669-2249)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

THURSDAY NIGHT PADDLES The CdA Canoe & Kayak club hosts weekly paddles, open to the public, Thur, 5:30-7:30 pm. See site for details. Free. cdacanoekayakclub.com

AUGUST 7-24

Coeur d’ Alene

CST Summer Camps!

Staged Reading Fundraiser $25

August 11-15 Ages 10-13

August 18-22 Ages 14-18

August 25-29 Ages 10-15

Sept. 20th - 7:30pm The Dome in Hayden

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CDASUMMERTHEATRE.COM • 208-660-2958 AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 47

GREEN

ZONE GREEN ZONE | LANGUAGE

Reefer Roots Is the word “marijuana” racist? BY KATE GIBBONS

T

here is a debate swirling around marijuana that has nothing to do with legalization. It has to do with the word itself. Long part of the American pot vocabulary, the “m” word is considered by some to be derogatory and racist.

48 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

REAC

164,0

H

00

SPOK AN COUN E T READ Y ERS

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 and Initiative 502). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington State, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor Control Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

CALL 325-0634 xt. 215 EMAIL sales@Inlander.com

While cannabis is the scientific name, the term marijuana has been the moniker of the leafy green since the early 1900s, when it is believed that zealous narcotics agents, anti-drug politicians and financially motivated businessmen began using it because it sounded more sinister. Historians trace Marijuana or “marihuana” back to Mexican and Spanish cultures, where it was used as a slang term for the dried flowers of the cannabis plant used in recreational smoking. According to Drug Enforcement Agency records, Mexican immigrants commonly smoked the drug and California was the first to ban the “preparation” of hemp. Its racist transition is frequently credited to newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst and Harry Anslinger, former head of the long-defunct Federal Bureau of Narcotics. Beyond the assumption that Hearst was a racist, it is

thought he believed that farmers would begin growing hemp instead of trees for paper — the same swath of land could yield four times the amount of hemp — and put his fortune in jeopardy. History shows that after the repeal of alcohol prohibition in 1933, Ansliger turned his attention to marijuana. Although not solely responsible, together the duo helped the Marijuana Tax Act pass in 1937. These days, a few people have come right out and said that marijuana is not racist, most going the way of High Times. The prominent cannabis magazine said that the word marijuana is and isn’t racist, reasoning that while its roots may be derogatory, today the word is commonplace and has lost most of its racial implications. Time will tell if the nation’s lexicon reverts back to the botanical term or sticks to the “m” word, but as with most things related to pot, there will be a debate. n

EVENTS | CALENDAR

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SPRINGDALE MOTORCYCLE RODEO 2014’s event features several new events, live music and more. Aug. 2324. Springdale, Wash. frontierdaysrodeos.com PRIEST LAKE TRI Participate as a team or individually in an Olympic- or sprint-distance triathlon. Aug. 23, 8 am. $65-$210. Hill’s Resort, 4777 W. Lakeshore Rd. priestlakerace.com THE SLIME RUN An obstacle-course style 5K run/walk during which participants are sprayed with green “slime.” Aug. 23, 10 am. $27-$65. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd. theslimerun.com SPOKANE RIVER CLASSIC A casual or competitive event offering a 1.3-mile and 5.4-mile course with buoys, open to kayaks, canoes and stand-up paddle boards. Event followed by root beer, food trucks and a beer garden. Put in at the McKinstry building’s river access point. Aug. 23, 7:30 am-1:30 pm. $20. SIERR Building at McKinstry Station, 850 E. Spokane Falls Boulevard. sckc. ws/src (487-7085) ST. JOHN SPRINT BOAT RACES Annual Sprint Boat Races at Webb’s Slough in St. John, Wash, held in a natural amphitheater on the Palouse and featuring on-site camping, grass-covered terraces and local food/drink vendors. Aug. 23, events start at 9 am. $15-$35. webbsslough.com (648-3393) FREE STATE PARK DAY Washington State Parks and Rec allows visitors access to all state parks without a Discovery Pass. Includes access to Riverside State Park and Mt. Spokane State Park. Upcoming 2014 “free” days include Aug. 25, Sept. 27 and Nov. 11. discoverpass.wa.gov. (800-833-6388) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. SALEMKEIZER VOLCANOES Games held daily Aug. 25-29 at 6:30 pm. $5-$11/ single game. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. (535-2922)

THEATER

CDA SUMMER THEATRE: THE ADDAMS FAMILY CST is the first professional regional theater to produce the new musical comedy, a recent Broadway hit. Through Aug. 24, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $19-$49. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED) A performance mash-up featuring 37 plays in 97 minutes, by Moscow Art Theatre (Too). Aug. 21-23, at 7:30 pm. $15. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) THE EMPIRE SINGS FLAT Summer season production of an original, locally-written Western-themed melodrama. Through Aug. 24, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $16-$18. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St, Wallace. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) THE MUSIC MAN Performance of the classic Broadway musical, featuring local cast members of all ages. Through Aug. 23 at 7:30 pm, also Aug. 23-24 at 1:30 pm. $10-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N Grand, Pullman. rtoptheatre.org (509-334-0750) CDA MURDER MYSTERY THEATRE A dinner-theater performance during which characters are introduced, a murder occurs, questions and clues arise, and the audience has a chance to guess who dunnit, and the mystery

is eventually solved. Aug. 22 from 6-9 pm. $30-$35. CdA Cellars, 3890 N. Schreiber Way. cdacellars.com QUICK EXIT A comedic play about life, love, religion, death and the things we leave behind. Contains adult content/ language. Aug. 22-23, from 7-9 pm. $8-$10. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St., Bonners Ferry. (208-267-7327) LCP 54TH SEASON PREVIEW SHOW Cast members perform songs from the theater’s upcoming main stage musicals, plus selections from its new “Concerts at the Bing” series. Aug. 23, 7:30 pm. $15. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. (208-667-1323) SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK Performance of “As You Like It” by Montana Shakespeare in the Park. Aug. 23, 5 pm. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd, Liberty Lake. shakespeareintheparks.org

VISUAL ARTS

ANN CHRISTENSON The Museum of Art/WSU hosts a retrospective journey through a Fine Arts Faculty Focus Exhibition by artist/ceramicist Ann Christenson. Show runs through Sept. 13, with an opening reception and artist talk Aug. 28 at 6 pm. Museum open Mon-Sat from 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. WSU Pullman campus. museum.wsu.edu (509-335-1910) SANDPOINT ARTIST STUDIO TOUR The 11th annual self-guided tour lets the public visit the working studios of North Idaho artists. Aug. 22-24. Free. arttourdrive.org (800-800-2106) MEDITATION: ZHANG GUANGHUI An exhibition of large-scale woodblock prints by the Chinese printmaker, which explore themes of continuity and change, intimacy and publicity. Aug. 23-Sept. 20; public walk-through Sept. 12, at 10:30 am. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga.edu/ jundt (313-6843)

WORDS

BETH CAMP BOOK LAUNCH Release of “Years of Stone,” a historical fiction novel set in Australia, and a quarter finalist in Amazon’s 2014 Breakthrough Novel competition. Aug. 22, 9:30-11 am. Free. Revel 77, 3223 E. 57th Ave. (863-5536) CARRIE MAY LUCAS Signing of “Where Fault Lies,” a book examining the healing process for victims of rape, sexual abuse or domestic violence. Aug. 23, 12-2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. carriemaylucas.com (838-0206)

ETC.

LATIN DANCING UNDER THE STARS: David Diaz of Satori dance studio leads a lesson 6 pm, followed by dancing from 7-10 pm outdoors, with tapas, non-alcoholic drinks and raffle items for purchase. Aug. 23. $10/person; $15/pair. Unity Spiritual Center, 2900 S. Bernard St. unityspokane.org (8386518) EASTSIDE OUTSIDE FREAKOUT Spokane Vintage Warehouse’s summer parking lot sale, hosting 20 local vendors of vintage, handmade, junked/ salvaged and miscellaneous goods. Aug. 24, Sept. 7 and Sept. 21, from 9 am-4 pm. Free. Spokane Vintage Warehouse, 2226 E. Riverside Ave. tinyurl.com/od4e5zs (535-0457) 

AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 49

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Though permanent tattoos come with some well-known risks, temporary tattoos applied to the skin’s surface may also cause problems. Not all temporary tattoos pose this risk, but “black henna” certainly does. This particular kind of henna, unlike to the traditional red or brown henna dyes that are plant-based, contains paraphenylenediamine or PPD, which is made from coal and is an ingredient in hair dyes. Application of PPD to the skin may result in loss of pigmentation, blistering, welts, reddening or permanent scarring.

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44. -nik kin 45. 1997 Missy Elliott album that went platinum 47. Catch-22 49. Vet, e.g. 50. Over 50% of U.S. presidents: Abbr. 51. They’re always done by one 53. “Treasure Island” author’s monogram 56. Honest ... or a description of the circles in this puzzle’s grid 64. Go crazy (about) 67. Paint the town red 68. Big time 69. No longer playing: Abbr. 70. Found fault with 71. Hunky-dory 72. Medium strength? 73. Locale in a Neil Simon play

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DOWN 1. Second Amendment subject 2. Pig-roasting occasion 3. Clouseau, e.g.: Abbr. 4. Just ___, skip and jump away 5. Prefix with gram 6. Mideast moguls 7. Religious subgroups 8. Use a swizzle stick 9. “Arrivederci” 10. Acquire, as debt 11. Curve 12. Muscle mag topic 13. Mendes of Hollywood 19. It can be found under TUV 21. Frobe who played Goldfinger 24. Become lax 25. “I wish!” 26. Bowling lanes 27. Some footnotes

“UP AND UP”

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 51

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I Saw You

I Saw You

I Saw You

I Saw You

Four Years Since Yokes You were my childhood love and we shared a moment in life together. You would call me your jasmine to your Aladdin holding my hand at all times showing everyone I was your girl! We were so young and yet I have yet to feel that love again. You let me go against all my wishes and today I know that it is so I have a piece of life that I would not have and yet I still feel the love for you every time I dream of your face! I saw you standing in the isle in Yokes in Deer Park and the feeling that I once felt over came me just days after dreaming of you in a line. I was not alone or able to tell you that I have always loved you since I was a child and I dream of a life with you often. It is not a line it is fact...the dreams I have of you are so vivid and clear with everyday color. I wake up feeling that I am now dreaming a life without you! It would be a fairytale to think we could of been childhood sweethearts and to be still together but it would have been all God wanted had it been long running. We never spoke again once you left me and yet my heart still yearns for your touch and our young love once again. I know that I was one of many faces that wanted to be with you and you picked me. We were kids, but the love I felt then was as grown up as I am now and I feel that I may never know a love as real as we had for such a short time at such young age! You said you loved me first, I remember it like yesterday, me on the bus, you standing at the window and knowing I loved you the moment I saw you at age 11. I don’t feel it naïve I feel it to be my truth and the way my heart feels has felt and may forever feel this way! It has been over 20 years and four years ago that moment in a grocery store was bad timing, but if I had the chance now I would ask for you to give me a chance with no childhood games for you to fall victim to, a chance to see that childhood love could have and could become a life we could share together me and you

living real life side by side. I would support you in all you do as I always did even when you said you wanted to be a kid and explore....us as kids or not my love was always the real thing and I until this day feel yours was too! We were old souls with young lives, if you are out there and ever wonder as I have of us, with possible dreams of me, please find me, I want to start grown up lives with young love that never dies! Inshallah (god willing) you could find me!

by the entrance to the patio. I was wearing a white button up and have blonde hair. I wanted to come say hello, but didn’t want to be rude. If you’re single email me at millermangolf@gmail.com

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TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” Peterson’s Grocery I saw you Sunday, 4 pm. Peterson’s Grocery in CDL. You invited me for a beer but I never found you on the beach. Maybe because you never took off your dirt bike helmet or sunglasses!?! What do you look like? Intrigued. I think I could recognize your calves, work boots or possibly your smile. Let’s get that beer! Police Officer I saw you crossing Gardner Ave and Walnut(?) on 8/13/14 wearing jeans, t-shirt (gun, badge, guess you are in police work?) and I asked for directions. You were kind enough to help me. Me: SUV, white sweater. We spoke for a few minutes about other topics until someone honked. Think your name started with “J”. I’d like to continue the conversation..... prosecuteandprotect@gmail.com Red Robin I saw you at North Point Red Robin on the 13th of August around 7. You have brownish/black hair and a wonderful smile. You were there with your son and mom, we shared a few glances. I was the guy sitting in the booth in your direct line of view, we were seated

At The Knit We were at The Next Big Thing at the Knit. You: Perfect smile, beautiful stunning woman. We were at the bar talking most of the night. And actually went out to eat too. I know you have your surgery on Thursday, and I just hope it goes well. I really hope you get to see this and the doctor doing the surgery prescribes you some mexican ibruprofen. You’ll know who wrote this. I really would like to see you again. Coffee sometime? Manito Tap House Friday, August 1st. Beautiful blond (no ring) at the bar with another attractive blond (with ring) at ManitoTap House around 5. Was at a table with a friend who left early. Then sat with other friend at bar and that’s when I saw you. You both left shortly thereafter so didn’t get a chance to try and catch your eye /say ‘hi’. Would like that opportunity! Rosauers I saw you at Rosauers on 3rd, July 8, you were behind me at the deil. You ordered strips, then I saw you at the bakery, then at the checkout, but I left before you finished. I saw you looking for me in the parking lot. I tried to find you but couldn’t. If you’re single let’s meet there for lunch. Downtown Brewery Wonderful loving soul beautiful lady! You say you are shy, but you don’t seem shy to me. I try to play the confident guy when I see you, but I am just as shy as you if not worse. I may be just a couple years older, but we have so much in common... You work at a local brewery downtown, I stop by only to chat with you; because you have so much to tell when you are willing. Maybe we can play some Mario Party or watch a movie, maybe “The Wizzard”

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

52 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

Cheers RE: Suicide Sucks Thank you for the jeer. Please note that it held little to no value after you stated that you didn’t know Som or any of the facts. I don’t think anyone should ever praise another for taking their own life, we don’t disagree there. My community, my city and my friends are remembering the warmest, most kind and friendly soul this town has embraced. We decide to remember him not for the suffering in his life that led to him leaving us. We want to remember him for great heart he had, the hard work he produced and the love he gave. You wrote that “you don’t like to judge” but I think you know that’s a lie. Your words hurt an already grieving community. Whatever satisfaction you hoped to gain from your post, I hope you failed to receive. This wound is too close, real and recent. For any stranger to show such a lack of tack, disrespect and poor judgment to the thousands of lives Som impacted in a huge, positive way is a tragedy. Plans? What Plans? Sweetie! Its been a year now since we got engaged and it has been nothing but pure happiness! We love each other more everyday and couldn’t imagine life without each other. We have made the best of every situation we have been through. We are so blessed with our home and family. So congratulation on the best year of our lives and lets celebrate on not having any stinkin wedding plans yet! I love you for a thousand years! Honeybears To the Inlander For Sponsoring the Book of Mormon I got into the Book of Mormon and I saw your sponsorship signs all over the theater. Great show and you

Be Cheerful! ...get free sweets Submit your Cheers at inlander.com/sweet and be entered to win:1 Dozen “Cheers” Cupcake s Courtesy of Celebrations Bakery Winners drawn bi-weekly at random. Must be 18 or older to enter.

Cheers

Cheers

Jeers

deserve cheers for bringing it to Spokane.

business, they put in old parking meters that do not accept credit or debit cards. Employees at The Union have provided clients with quarters to avoid getting a parking ticket as everyone gets used to the new meters. Thank you to the owners and employees for running a first class business!

that was where you were headed right?

A Real PNW Gentleman My sister and I found ourselves lost on one of the 100 degree days while hiking the Idaho Pan Handle National Forest and after losing a lot of hope and sweat we ran into a man biking down the trail who not only gave us directions that helped us find our car, but also very kindly gave us the rest of the water out of his camelback. Thank you very much... you made our month!! Good Morning! Vietnam! Cheers to Robin Williams. He gave the world the gift of laugher. And if we couldn’t laugh, we’d all go insane. I’ll never forget his quote as the genie in Aladdin, “But oh, to be free. Such a thing would be greater than all the magic and all the treasures in the world.” As an actor, he was a skilled artist, and his movies will resonate with not only me but countless others. As a comedian, he was a genius. The world lost a treasure of their own. He made people feel good even when he himself wasn’t feeling good. Rest in peace, Robin Williams. Yours Forever I ask myself everyday how I was so blessed to find someone like you. Everyday is complete when I wake in the morning and realize that this really isn’t a dream. You are the most amazing mom and wife that a man could ever ask for. My Mom did tell me that I would find the one for me and she was so right. I love that we make each other laugh and we look at life as a gift not as work. I truly am in love with you JM Forever.... RM Common Sense To those who keep the speed limit, ride, or walk single file on the side of the S curve on Clarke through Peaceful Valley. Also to those who stop for the deer, quail, cats, marmots, loose dogs or kiddos. And joggers who use the sidewalks instead of running down the middle of Clarke. It’s not all perfect, but awareness and common sense, not to mention courtesy, can prevent tragedies. It’s only a mile and a half long, take it easy. New Downtown Parking Meters Cheers to The Union Yoga and Spin studio for their handling of the new parking meters on the streets around their business. Not only did the city take away every free parking spot available near their

A Simple Thank You To the women who personally talked to my boss about my customer service at the dressing room at Value Village. Taking five minutes out of your day to compliment my work truly made my whole day. Thank You! National Anthem My grandson Jace had a day out with GreatGrandma DeLaTorre and me this last Saturday. We decided Fairchild would be our destination as Jace is just like his Dad he loves airplanes. Any time one flies over he either knows what it is or he asks what kind of plane it is. After filtering through the Base exchange and then of course a quick burger from Burger King we ventured over to the plane museum just past the front gate. We started at the fighter jets, reading the plaques and finding out who the pilots were, the nick name and what battles it had endured. While walking to the next plane we came to an abrupt stop, Jace removed his hat faced the front gate and the B-52 and sang the National Anthem. Grandma and I at attention as well, I think we even joined in. I am so very proud of Jace and is Grandma as he is very nice boy and obviously very patriotic at a young age of almost 4 on September 10. We have been put through the ringer from the family as I should have videotaped the event but of course it will only be in Grandma’s, Jace’s and my memory but I just had to share. Do you know any other four year old who knows the words and can sing the National Anthem. Jace’s timing could not have been more perfect.

Jeers Bicycle Accident July 19, 2014 I was hit on my bicycle at Progress and 16th when the female driver ran a stop sign “probably texting”. You were so nice to me at the scene and you said you would buy me a new bike, well you caused this accident, but now you are out to save yourself from a insurance increase at the expense of me a 65 year old widow with health conditions. My life went on hold because of your selfish actions. The Devil comes for those that haven’t a conscience. I bet you even lied to your son about what you did,

’S THIS WEEK! S R E ANSW

Train Bridge Art The artwork at 2nd and Maple St. is horrible. It gives me a terrible feeling as I’m sitting at the light. The painting of the man with glasses and stubble beard has evil eyes and looks like a child molester full of hate. Then, to make matters even worse, next to him is a small girl that looks like she’s crying (screaming) in pain. Doesn’t give you a ‘warm fuzzy feelin’! C’mon, if you’re going to graffiti every inch of concrete downtown, please make it something that’s pleasant to look at and that makes people feel happy. Too much anger coming through from these so called artists! RE: Suicide Sucks Dear Inlander: What in the world gives you the right to publish the ignorant b.s and noise on Isamu’ s suicide that you published? How Ignorant of you Would you or the person that emailed that jeer to you say the same of a cancer patient? Oh, they do not deserve anything nor are they worthy of being honored because they let cancer take them, no not one person would say that! Depression is no different, Som lost a battle with a deadly disease! To the person that wrote that ignorant b.s and to you that published it, get your head out of your sweet asses and wake the hell up! Words can hurt, his boys or family could read that and have to sit with it forever! Smdh at all of you! Speed Trap Jeers to the Spokane motorcycle police who decided to setup a speed trap on I-90 west bound near Garden Springs. Setting up a speed trap on the left hand side of the highway right where there is a crest in the road and then flagging down drivers with your hands is extremely unsafe for all of us. Including yourself. What were you thinking? Your number one priority needs to be public safety. But then again who am I to judge? I was just part of the pile-up that almost happened due to your negligence and bad judgement. Bike Riders Friday evening 8 pm, twilight. West Clarke Avenue., from my front porch. You a female adult riding a bike, not wearing a helmet, bike had no lights. Him, “Kevin” age around six to eight, riding a bike ahead of you, wearing a helmet, riding as fast as he can, not in control. Bike also had no warning lights.The two of you seemed to belong together, you were yelling at him anyhow. A car going west on Clarke slows, attempts to continue. You and Kevin do not move to the side. Finally clear for the driver. Driver passes and Kevin circles across the road. Shortly after two drunks in a blue Ford slam around Ash onto Clarke. Typical Friday night in PV. Then it is 9 pm, dark, and here you and little Kevin come again, almost totally invisible, coasting merrily down Clarke. You are creating the situation that might not end up well unless you start to THINK. Lights on the bike, both wearing helmets, alert. You, the adult must be in charge of that child as well as yourself.

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OMEN’S EEKEND CAMP FOUR ECHOES

Relax | Restore | Rejuvenate A guilt-free escape filled with delectable food, wine and fun.

SEPTEMBER 5–7, 2014 Camp Four Echoes Windy Bay at Lake Coeur d’ Alene

Register online at: WWW.GSEWNI.ORG, or call 509-747-8091 x 204

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Have an event? GET LISTED! Submit your event details for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander.

• Community • Film • Food & Drink

• Music • Sports • Theater

• Visual Arts • Words • Etc.

Deadline is one week prior to publication UP AND UP

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 53

Justice Denied

Susan Stewart (inset) and Tubbs Hill ANNIE KUSTER PHOTO

Fifty years later, the brutal murder of a 17-year-old in Coeur d’Alene remains unsolved BY LISA WAANANEN JONES

O

n the Saturday morning of Aug. 22, 1964, Coeur d’Alene’s fire chief was walking with his family on Tubbs Hill when he spotted bloodstains on the ground. He followed the trail of blood about 60 yards through brush and rocks to the shore, to a scene he surely hoped it would not lead: the naked body of a teenage girl floating face down in the shallow water of Lake Coeur d’Alene. The summer she was 17, Susan Stewart came from Missouri with her mother and brother to spend a few months in the resort town on the lake. Her parents were from the area, and her father was an Army sergeant stationed in Okinawa. The family planned to join him overseas when the season ended. On the evening of Friday, Aug. 21, Coeur d’Alene was sunny and still summer-warm. In Seattle, police were setting up barricades against throngs of teenage girls screaming for the Beatles on their world tour stop. In Atlantic City, Democrats were gathering for the national convention under the pall of John F. Kennedy’s assassination nine months earlier. In Saigon, protests against the military regime were escalating into chaos

54 INLANDER AUGUST 21, 2014

in the streets. In the relative peace of Coeur d’Alene, Susan Stewart left home around 7 pm to go for a walk.

A

bloody rock was determined to be the murder weapon. The victim’s face and head had been so violently beaten that it took some time to identify her as Susan Stewart, who’d been reported missing Friday night when she failed to return home. Her father rushed back from Okinawa; the bloody rock was sent to Washington, D.C., for FBI testing. The police chief, who’d taken over just three weeks earlier, called it “the biggest case we have had in the 18 years I’ve been in the Coeur d’Alene Police Department.” It was a case full of intriguing clues that led nowhere. Police said they found no reason to believe sex was a motive. An autopsy revealed the teenager was pregnant when she was killed, but the likely father was located back in Missouri and ruled out as a suspect. Her clothing was missing, from her green blouse to her blue cutoff jeans, and the only item of hers ever found was a chain with a religious medallion. A community effort to comb the hillside a week

later turned up nothing. Police chased leads across the Northwest and administered more than a dozen polygraph tests, but discovered nothing. A reward for information was set; a memorial service was held. Susan’s mother and brother moved overseas to join her father as planned, and the murder receded from the headlines into the uneasy silence of stories without endings. The case remains open and officially under investigation, with no active leads.

H

ad she lived, Susan would be 67. She might now be a grandmother tending children at the lake or a retiree on a cross-country road trip or a lady at the grocery store who passes by unnoticed. She might have been dealt a more common death by car crash or heart attack or cancer. She may have left Coeur d’Alene at the end of the season and never returned. Instead, she lingers in questions that fade but never leave the place where land meets water, where 50 years have worn the sharp edges off the Who and Why and left only the unanswerable What if? 

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Back to School

It’s getting dark earlier and to the delight of most parents, school is about to start. Whether you love long, hot summer nights or sweater weather, the freedom of summer or the structure of the school year, fall is coming and you might as well get ready. Summer sales abound, but even with nice cool nights, it would be difficult for us to sleep if we didn’t remind you to Shop Local. You may have noticed that this is the College Football Issue. There is much to do to prepare for the season that is now upon us. There are tailgating supplies and team sportswear to stock up on. Stats to learn and games to get on your calendar. When you look for that perfect leather recliner for your

football fan, check out our local furniture stores and spend your money with the folks who live here. Chances are they will be cheering for the same teams you are. Some say this is the best weather of the year, and shopping is always a great way to get outside during football season. Your garden has more to give you, so go ahead and stock up on fall veggies or the colorful plants that show up now. And don’t forget to pick up a little treasure for yourself while you are out getting the kids set up for school. Just remember that shopping local has a big impact on the health of our local economy and the welfare of your neighbors. Shop local. It matters.

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AUGUST 21, 2014 INLANDER 55


Inlander 08/21/2014