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Muddling Through Impressions on how the Syria solution is changing the game

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After a staggering display of mush, muddle and miscues by the world’s lone superpower, a rogue nation appears ready to give up the chemical weapons it supposedly never had. Without a shot’s being fired. This, of course, is a miserable failure in the eyes of the gaseous class, amateur hour in real time, because, well — it wasn’t planned. — Timothy Egan, New York Times, 9/12/13

R

egarding Syria, some thoughts on our emerging, yet largely unplanned, political and governmental universe: 1. Has the world changed? Yes, the geopolitical universe can no longer be explained through Cold War paradigms, when every move, every event, reflected bipolar competition, complete with a cast of surrogates. Going back even before the Cold War, we had a world reduced to constellations of empires and colonies. 2. In this new, cacophonous world, do “grand strategies” have a future? Not as much as they did when we could count on the Cold War paradigm to reduce the number of variables. For sure, gunboat diplomacy has run its course — which makes all those the Republican “neocons” look ever more ridiculous. 3. After playing second fiddle to the Pentagon for decades, the art of diplomacy is emerging again. 4. It needs to be understood that diplomacy is both bureaucratic and social, often practiced during the well-known two-martini lunch — or on a tennis court. President Kennedy learned of Khrushchev’s interest in negotiating our way out of the Cuban Missile Crisis from ABC newsman John Scali, who had the message passed to him over lunch by a friend — who happened to be a top Soviet spy. Yes, diplomacy is a messy and always imprecise business. 5. We can’t understand the various quandaries the United States finds itself in on the world stage without understanding recent history. Consider: In succession we experienced Vietnam, the Six Day War, the Iran embassy debacle, Lebanon, the Bush I invasion, Iran-Contra, 9/11 and the Bush II invasions. As do all countries, America continues to react most to its recent and not-so-recent past — both successes and failures. (Why are the Germans are so stubborn on the matter of maintaining a high-value Euro? Because they remember the 1920s, the Weimar Republic, hyperinflation and Hitler, that’s why.) 6. Do the pundits and most politicians grasp all this? In this ambiguous new world, where time and space are compressed ever more? Timothy Egan gets to the nub of the matter: “But outcomes don’t really matter to those obsessed by who won and who lost, those who see all politics as up-and-down nonsense instead of a clash of ideas with real consequences. [Syria] has to be cast in the tired terms of the daily struggle for

sound-bite supremacy. It’s a debacle. A blunder. A humiliation.” 7. Moreover, the American public doesn’t want to wade into this mess, for reasons that should be obvious. Recent history again instructs those who are paying attention. Bush’s war left an imprint: Don’t believe the government out of hand whenever WMDs are mentioned, and don’t embrace any idea founded on the catch-all of “making the world safe for democracy.” We haven’t forgotten about all our challenges on the homefront, either. Why do we cut food stamps while pouring another $10 billion a month into Iraq and Afghanistan? 8. The president and his secretary of state have stumbled into tactics that can be summed up as “muddling through,” the term first used by Charles Lindblom, who was referring to unplanned incrementalism — taking baby steps toward big decisions instead of unleashing cataclysms. 9. Does “muddling through” represent a decline in American power? It does if by “decline” we refer to that Cold War world, which is no more. For one thing, the American economy relative to the rest of the world isn’t what it was a half-century ago — alone at the top. While still the largest single national economy in the world, ours is no longer the giant as it once was. Consider: The combined European Union economies taken together have recently surpassed the U.S. in GDP. (You know, “old Europe,” socialist Europe, universal health care Europe, gun control Europe, that Europe.) And aside from its ability to deliver pinpoint strikes (which makes Obama’s threat credible), our military can be more like a modern-day Gulliver when we task it with impossible missions like regime change or even culture change. 10. As for Obama’s leadership? Again, Timothy Egan: “The net result, accidental or not, is that Syria is no longer just an American problem. They say they will give up the poison gas that, wink, wink, was never used. The principle, as Obama said, ‘that with modest effort and risk we stop children from being gassed to death,’ is there on the table for a world that preferred to look the other way. And, added bonus: the neocon warriors are gone, homeless in both parties. All of this is a hugely positive leap from where we were a week, a month, or a year ago.” 11. One more thought: Might it be that we would all benefit if world leaders would have those two-martini lunches more often? 

comment | publisher’s note

The Price of Coal by ted s. mcGregor jr.

M

y old office window looked out on the railroad. I got to watch train after train go by, brightened with graffiti applied who knows where. I’d see airplane fuselages, giant wind-farm rotors and boxcar after boxcar filled with who knows what. Of course, I’d also see open-top cars with a seam of black poking out — coal. Coal miners have hit paydirt in Montana and Wyoming, and as America is weaning itself off the dirty fuel in favor of comparatively clean natural gas, they’ve been looking for new buyers. With China and other parts of Asia in their sights, they brainstormed how to ship way, way more coal overseas. They’ve planned three new port terminals in Washington and Oregon, and estimates put the train traffic to feed them at 34 long coal trains per day, running through Sandpoint and Spokane. In Montana and Idaho, the silence of public officials has been deafening; fortunately, in Washington and Oregon, public pressure has recently prompted state and federal reviews of the plans. (British Columbia is taking a second look at expansion plans, too.) There are major health impacts to study, based on blowing coal dust, and increased traffic will require major infrastructure investments in cities and towns across the Northwest. When I watched the trains, I imagined where those cars were going — and that’s where this plan becomes untenable. Just as we’re trying to cut our greenhouse gas emissions, we’d be sending China the raw materials to create those same emissions. It’s just plain ridiculous. Reason, however, seems to be winning the day. First comes the recent BBC headline that China has finally had enough and plans to apply central state control to the use of coal. Why? Last January, a dark cloud literally descended on vast parts of China and just sat there for weeks, creating one of the biggest environmental crises in its history. Witnesses said you could not see 200 feet in front of you, and a recent study shows bad air is cutting the average Chinese lifespan by five years. Basic math is working against the coal ports, too. Three years ago, when these plans were hatched, the price of a metric ton of coal was topping $140; today, that price is $74. Without profit, there will be no project. Still, it’s no time to let up; our public officials — here, regionally and nationally — need to hear that we won’t put up with being exploited for a dying, dirty industry. Yes, we want jobs, but we’re not that desperate. n You can attend a public hearing on the plan to build a new coal-shipping terminal in Longview, Wash., at 5 pm, Wednesday, Sept. 25, at the Spokane Convention Center. For details, visit millenniumbulkeiswa.gov.

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 7

COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

IN AN ACCIDENT?

What issues do you hope Americans talk about in the days following the shooting in Washington, D.C.?

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CADE WALKER: Mental health. BRIE EDWARDS: Stricter gun laws.

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GUEST EDITORIAL

Not Sacred Enough Even magical places like Chief Mountain in Montana are under siege by gas and oil drillers BY DAVE STALLING

I

REALLY,

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK. rivercityred. blogspot.com

8 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

t is difficult to know what’s sacred nowadays because, somehow, money has come to top the list. Why else would anyone consider drilling around Chief Mountain in northwest Montana, along the border of Glacier National Park and the Blackfeet Nation? Elk, bighorns, pronghorn, badgers, wolverines, lynx, mountain lions, wolves all thrive on this land. Clear, clean rivers along the Rocky Mountain Front sustain some of the last remaining healthy populations of west slope cutthroat trout. And grizzlies still wander out onto the plains as they did when the explorers Lewis and Clark came through in 1805. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, this is the place that contains the “top 1 percent” of wildlife habitat remaining in the Continental United States. So if anything can be called “sacred,” I think this is the place. Seven years ago, I assisted a coalition of local hunters, anglers, ranchers, outfitters, businessmen and tribal leaders in a successful effort to protect a significant chunk of the Rocky Mountain front from gas and oil development. As a professional conservationist, I had to be cautious about using emotional arguments. But then at a community meeting, I had to wholeheartedly agree with Stoney Burke, a local man from Choteau, who was accused of being “emotional” about Montana’s Rocky Mountain Front. In reply, he pounded his fist on a table and shouted, “I you can’t be emotional about a place like this, then what the hell can you be emotional about?”

I thought then: If only everyone were as passionate and emotional about sacred places. The mountain has been sacred to the Blackfeet for centuries, and it remains sacred to many First Nation people throughout North America who travel to the mountain for sweet-grass ceremonies, placing prayer flags and other religious rites. When white settlers came through in the early 1900s, they observed Native burial sites along the base of the Chief. But what protection does a sacred place have these days? Recently, the Bureau of Indian Affairs allowed leasing a large swath of land around Chief Mountain for gas and oil development, with the blessing of some tribal leaders and members eager for profit. Others were angered, sickened and saddened. The Blackfeet can be as divided and conflicted as the rest of us when it comes to such things. These days, our society is so divorced from our planet that we forget that clean air, clean water and wild places continue to sustain us all. Elders from southern Alberta’s Siksika Band pass on this tale: Near the end of days, a Great White God will appear from the top of Chief Mountain, and upon his departure the mountain will crumble and be destroyed. I wonder what drilling, what attack on the mountain, will have occurred before the mountain crumbles. I hope we can avoid this atrocity.  Dave Stalling is a writer and wildlife advocate living in Missoula. A version of this editorial first appeared in High Country News (hcn.org).

BRIAN BENDER: It’s not a gun issue, it’s a “heart of man,” mental health, economic pressures or what have you that seem to push people to the edge where they think violence (guns, beating old men to death, domestic violence, rape etc.) are the only option. JAMIE BOSANKO: Why despite roughly 90 percent public approval for universal background checks, Congress is still so hopelessly useless that it can’t get anything passed, and this keeps happening. MELISSA DOBEAS: The importance of putting D.C. behind the Washington part so I don’t have a heart attack when reading ”Shooting in Washington Naval Yard.” (Not the Inlander, of course). CJ VOGES: How in the heck did this guy get in with weapons? There were serious breaches in security! Was anyone on staff armed? PAUL LINDBERG: What makes cops and military people so brittle that gun-violence becomes a reasonable form of self-expression. MARGIE MONTAGUE GANNON: Why we have become a country of such anger. When did we stop using reason? JERI FLAIG: Too many guns available in this world. JON OGLESBY: Funding treatment for mental illness. STEPH MARR: It’s not about guns. Too many or lack thereof. It’s sadly about people randomly killing others. TARA MCALOON: I hope Spokanites stop for a minute and think how lucky they are that this didn’t happen here. And realize that this isn’t an excuse to insult each other over our political beliefs. 

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 9

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COMMENT | SATIRE

McCain: Never Think Before You Attack BY ANDY BOROWITZ

S

en. John McCain (R-Arizona) was harshly critical this week of President Obama’s nationally televised address about Syria last week, telling CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, “The President’s decision to think before attacking another country flies in the face of American foreign policy.” “The United States of America has been involved in countless armed conflicts since this great nation was founded,” McCain said. “Many of those would never have happened if we’d stopped to think about them first. Sadly, the President seems not to have learned this lesson of history.” Calling the President “an Ivy League law professor who never met a thought he didn’t like,” McCain said that he was urging Obama

“to please take thinking off the table.” “The stakes for America couldn’t be higher right now,” he said. “Our global reputation for rushing into war with no advance planning is hanging by a thread.” McCain said that he is attempting to schedule a meeting in the Oval Office, where he plans to deliver a “strong and clear” message to Obama: “Mr. President, what you are doing is playing into the hands of the enemy. Thinking solves nothing.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | CLIMATE

Names With Meaning BY JIM HIGHTOWER

E

nvironmental groups tend to be a bit grim-faced, since they’re constantly confronting industrial uglies that range somewhere between awful and apocalyptic. So it’s a treat when one of them turns impishly playful, as a group of climate change activists called 350 Action recently did. In an act of “serious fun,” this bunch has launched an online petition calling on the World Meteorological Organization to alter slightly the way it names hurricanes. Instead of the generic “Bob” or “Juanita,” 350 Action wants the more numerous and more powerful storms we’ve been getting for the past several seasons to be named after head-in-the-sand politicos who — in mindless defiance of science — are climate change deniers. Thus, we’d have Hurricane Boehner, in honor of the House Speaker who goes to extremes to derail regulations that would stop profiteering polluters from wreaking havoc on the globe’s climate. In standing against needed policy changes, Boehner has been like a rock — only dumber. So he deserves

to have a particularly destructive hurricane branded with his name. Also, since the Weather Channel now attaches monikers to other big weather events, opportunities abound for tagging scientifically challenged politicians with public accountability for their irresponsibility. It would be a useful learning experience, for example, to see the damage done by Tornado “Oops” Perry, or to witness the severe flooding caused by the Michele Bachmann Unstable Air Mass over Minnesota. And Sen. Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, who constantly huffs that climate change is a “hoax,” should be credited with the Inhofe Drought of Biblical Proportions parching the Southwest and Great Plains. For more on the Climate Name Change campaign, go to climatenamechange.org. n

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12 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

0

Emily Harpel, a first-year firefighter with the Department of Natural Resources, digs out a burning stump during mop-up on the Depot Springs Road fire in late August.

JACOB JONES PHOTO

A Summer on Engine 446

Rookie wildland firefighter finds confidence and close bonds out on the fire line BY JACOB JONES

S

cattered across a rocky wasteland of charred pine and scorched brush, stubborn flames flicker against the blackened earth. Yellow-clad firefighters carve trenches into the smoldering hillside, their bent silhouettes breaking the ghostly ribbons of smoke still hanging in the trees. Crew leaders call out work orders over the clinking of shovels on stone. Behind a pair of rhinestone-studded sunglasses, Emily Harpel’s face is streaked with ash. A first-year wildland firefighter, she adjusts her pack and crosses the fire line into “the black.” Heat bakes through the soles of her work boots as she hikes up the incline. “It was a pretty big fire,” she says. Driven by high winds and dry weather, the Depot Springs Road fire burned 50 acres of ponderosa and

pastureland in late August. Wildland firefighters with the Department of Natural Resources and other agencies contained the blaze along this small ridge, about 7 miles east of Cheney. In the two months since she completed her initial training, the 21-year-old Harpel has worked dozens of fires on Engine 446 out of the DNR’s Arcadia District in Deer Park. With the help of her crewmates, she has learned to run a chain saw, operate an engine, decipher radio chatter and identify fire hazards. But Harpel says she also found a new confidence amid a tight-knit community where people work hard, where firefighters can depend on the crew members next to them and where the worst situations often bring out the best in the team.

“You see a lot of things that a lot of people don’t get to see,” she says of firefighting. “You really don’t start to understand until you experience it.”

W

ashington state’s Department of Natural Resources hires hundreds of seasonal firefighters each summer to protect private and state-owned forestland, often recruiting college students or part-time firefighters from local stations. The regional Arcadia District usually brings on about 30 firefighters to cover approximately 2.1 million acres throughout Spokane, Stevens, Lincoln and Pend Oreille counties. Officials report the DNR has spent about $14.7 million this season on wildfire operations statewide with the ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 13

NEWS | WILDFIRE

First-season firefighter Emily Harpel stands in formation with her fellow firefighters-in-training in June. JACOB JONES PHOTO

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14 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

“A SUMMER ON ENGINE 446,” CONTINUED... height of activity between June and mid-September. A 2013 graduate of Whitworth University, Harpel says she joined the DNR this summer for a challenging and exciting new experience. In June, she spent a week at the DNR’s introductory guard school, learning fire behavior and safety protocols. Alongside more than 40 other recruits, she soaked up PowerPoint presentations on command structures and exercises on different hand tools before getting cleared for duty. “I like doing something a little different,” she said in June. “If you’re adventurous and willing to learn, firefighting’s a great thing.” After guard school, she became one of about 12 first-year firefighters assigned to the Arcadia District. She found herself on Engine 446 with engine leader Roger Holloway and firefighter Chris Whitfield. Holloway, an eight-season firefighter, says Harpel always shows up ready to work and excited to learn. She has proven a quick study at sharpening saw blades and stripping hose. An informal mentor, he often stops to quiz her on safety issues or proper firefighting techniques. With a chuckle, Holloway recalls how psyched Harpel was to first see the column of smoke rising from the Depot Springs Road fire as they approached. “She was jumping up and down inside the truck,” he says. “She was pretty excited.”

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ropping their gear in the tall grass, the soot-stained crews spread out in the shade for a quick lunch break. The Depot Springs Road fire still smolders nearby, but they have dug out a fire break all around the head of the fire by now. It’s not going anywhere. Harpel, Holloway and Whitfield perch on the open tailgate of a pickup truck. They wipe sweat from their foreheads with their sleeves and relax. Whitfield pops open a can of dip. Holloway munches an apple, saying it’s the best way to brush your teeth out on a fire. Engine 446 has spent almost every day together this summer. Once strangers, Harpel says they’ve grown close through the fires, work projects, long drives in the engine and other assignments. They chat about the effects of the day’s weather and the strategy used to contain the Depot Springs fire. Every job is a chance to learn.

“Is this the hottest part of the fire?” Harpel questions, referring to the head of the fire. “It’s all like this,” Holloway says. Ed Lewis, a DNR fire suppression forester and supervisor for the Arcadia engine program, soon roars up on a four-wheeler and checks in with each crew on their work assignments for the afternoon. Looking back at the end of the season, Lewis says the Arcadia District has seen more lightning strikes that sparked fires, but fewer new fire starts overall. He estimated Arcadia had responded to about 145 fires by mid-September, well below the average of about 170 fires. “It was just enough to keep us busy and keep the troops busy,” he says. Recounting the season, the crew of Engine 446 ticks off specific fires and memorable moments: Getting doused by aircraft dropping water on the Bluebird fire in July, staging overnight outside a fire near Omak, spending 27 hours straight on a fire line at the Homestead Way fire. “There are times it really stretches you,” Harpel says. “I’ve learned a lot about hard work. … The adrenaline rush of working on a fire really keeps you going.”

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ust two weeks after Harpel finished guard school, 19 welltrained firefighters died in the Yarnell Hill Fire near Prescott, Ariz. As the country grieved, fire investigators worked to piece together how the experienced hotshot crew was overrun. Not since 1933 had so many wildland firefighters died in a single blaze. Arcadia District dedicated a day to mourning the lost crew, emphasizing safety precautions and discussing the deadly ramifications of fire danger. Harpel says the day of reflection helped reinforce the stakes of her work as well as the kinship of the fire community. “It really was eye-opening, I think, to know that those kinds of things still happen,” she says. “It ... hit us pretty hard.” Lewis says Harpel worked hard to rise to the expectations of the job. As the wildfire season starts to wind down, Lewis says he hopes to see her return to firefighting in the future. “She’s a great worker, great work ethic,” he says. “She will be missed.” With a bittersweet excitement, Harpel has already started on her next adventure. She checked in her firefighting gear and bid farewell to her crew on Aug. 31. A few days later, she flew to Tanzania in southeastern Africa to teach English for the next year. Harpel says firefighting helped build her sense of independence and self-reliance as she prepared to work overseas for the next 12 months. The money she earned will help her get reestablished when she returns, but the experience was the true reward. “It goes fast,” she says. “I feel like I just started at guard school, and now it’s over.”

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aking on a wildfire can make a person feel small, Harpel says, but it also offers some staggering perspective. Disaster brings people together, ranks of crew members labor together at something bigger than themselves. Thousands of firefighters, shoulder-to-shoulder, working saws and shovels to push back an unwieldy inferno. In those moments, she’s learned to trust the firefighters next to her — the often grimy and good-natured crew of Engine 446. She’s tried to return that same support. “I feel like they’re my brothers now,” she says. “No matter what, we were always there for each other.” On long shifts and late nights, the crew stood together, far from home and surrounded by flames. They traded jokes and shared secrets. Those were some of the best times, she says, when the intensity of the work cleared away all of life’s other distractions. In the darkness, she could occasionally look up from her shovel and gaze out over acres of glowing embers, counting herself lucky to behold such an overwhelming sight. “It’s just kind of incredible how powerful fire can be,” she says. “When we’re working sometimes, we’d take a moment and just be like, ‘Wow.’ It’s kind of hard not to watch.” n jacobj@inlander.com

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 15

NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

PHOTO EYE ON THIS DAY…

1.

Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old military contractor, shot and killed 12 people Monday during an attack on an office building at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. Alexis was killed during a gunbattle with police.

2.

Spokane police have arrested Kalen J. Bedford, 23, and Carlos A. Fuentes, 25, on charges of first-degree murder in the death of Julian D. Morrison outside the Hop! music venue on Aug. 8. See p. 83.

3.

As diplomatic negotiations continue, United Nations investigators confirmed Monday the use of chemical weapons in a recent mass killing outside Damascus, releasing new details implicating the Syrian government in the attack.

4.

A federal judge ordered an injunction last week to halt “megaload” shipments of oil company equipment along Highway 12 through the Nez Perce Reservation in central Idaho.

5.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Mayor David Condon, left, reads a city proclamation about Constitution Day during a reenactment of the creation and ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Organized by local members of Daughters of the American Revolution, the event, complete with period costumes and a town crier, drew about 40 people to Riverfront Park on Saturday.

Spokane community leaders have again expressed frustrations over downtown public safety issues after a KXLY cameraman captured footage showing a group of youths assaulting a man outside the Satellite diner.

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

DIGITS

20

trillion

16 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Pounds of carbon dioxide absorbed into sea waters each year, according to a Seattle Times special report on the increasing acidification of the Pacific Ocean.

21.8

Percentage of children younger than 18 living below the poverty level in 2012, according to the U.S. Census report on Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage released this week. The poverty rate was similar to findings from 2011.

POT: Visit the blog to read about what local lawmakers are doing to regulate medical and recreational marijuana businesses in town. FOLLOW: Keep up with us 140 characters at a time on twitter.com/ theinlander, where you can also find a list of staffers’ accounts to follow.

NEWS | BRIEFS

You’re on Camera! Spokane police change course and decide to buy body cams; plus, clashing over the Ridpath EYES ON COPS

Citing an ongoing court case over dashboard-mounted cameras, the Spokane Police Department says it plans to buy BODY CAMERAS instead as part of the first phase of implementing recommendations from the Use of Force Commission. The $797,000 purchase also includes a new set of Tasers for the department. In its final report this spring, the commission recommended equipping officers with body cameras and standardizing equipment. The purchase includes 220 body cameras, 220 Tasers and three years of service from “Evidence.com,” the system the department will use to store the videos and Taser use data. The money is part of $1.1 million the City Council took from the city’s reserves in April to spend on the commission’s recommendations. Carly Cortright, the department’s business service director, says a case in Seattle, where KOMO News has sued the Seattle police over release of dashboard camera video, raises questions about a contradiction in state law: While the videos should be available under the Public Disclosure Act, a state privacy law specifically classifies dashboard video as not public until three years have passed (the time a citizen has to file a civil suit against

a city for, say, an officer-involved shooting.) The case is currently before the state Supreme Court and a decision could be months away. Cortright says the department’s legal advisor suggested Spokane police should buy body cameras instead, since they’re not included in the law in question. — HEIDI GROOVER

DUELING VISIONS

As the RIDPATH HOTEL has sat empty, it’s drawn a number of different suitors. Most recently, Ron Wells, a developer known for restoring historic properties, has declared his vision to turn most of the hotel into an apartment complex, featuring some traditional apartments and a number of very small, inexpensive units. But there is also Art Coffey, a former CEO of the Red Lion hotel chain, who wants to keep it as a hotel, expanding rooms and restoring some of the Ridpath’s old grandeur. Wells’ group had most of the pieces, but Coffey purchased five of the condominium units from controversial developer Greg Jeffreys, mere days before Jeffreys was indicted on dozens of counts of fraud. It sparked a

lawsuit earlier this year from Wells’ group, which Wells said found that “the Jeffreys units were created illegally with trumped-up votes.” Coffey is appealing the decision. “My first motivation is to clean up that part of downtown,” he says. “I think it’s really sad what’s happening there. But I’m not going to be taken advantage of in the meantime.” Either way, Wells says his plans are moving forward. The lawsuit may influence the precise makeup of hotel rooms and apartments, but he says it “won’t change what we’re building in either event.” Wells estimates that construction on the Ridpath may start by January. — DANIEL WALTERS

HELP FOR THE HOMELESS

TRUTH MINISTRIES, a Spokane men’s homeless shelter, will close its doors at the end of the month unless donors can raise enough money to keep it afloat. The decade-old shelter sleeps 50 men per night and even more as the nights get colder, on a shoestring $50,000 yearly budget. It’s one of three men’s shelters in the city. According to its founder, Marty McKinney, Truth Ministries, which relies solely on donations, has been running on a $2,800 monthly deficit ever since the economy tanked four years ago. McKinney says he and his wife, Julie, have scraped together enough money to cover September’s mortgage bill and insurance costs, but they still have utilities to pay for, a leaky roof to replace and a gas stove to repair. “What are we going to do? How are we going to pay the bills?” McKinney says. “We believe we’ve come this far, there’s no reason to back it in yet, but it’s kind of hard not to feel depleted.” You can help keep lights on at Truth Ministries by donating online at gofundme.com/4a1q50 or sending a check to P.O. Box 901 Mead, WA 99021. — DEANNA PAN

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 17

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NEWS | EDUCATION

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Fault Lines The East Valley School District got the “seismic change” it was looking for, but it may cost school board members their seats BY DANIEL WALTERS

E

ast Valley School District parent Stacy focused around the decision to extend elementaMontoya pounds the podium, delivering a ry schools from kindergarten through the eighth sermon lambasting the board and superingrade, eliminating separate middle schools. tendent for their transition away from the middle And though he wasn’t the one who initially school system. proposed it, Glenewinkel led the way forward “I am sorry, but I cannot wait for this next on the change, he’s defended it, and he’s become election, because I will speak my mind with my the target for its tireless critics. vote,” Montoya says. “I cannot sell upper-end “It’s been a lot of sleepless nights,” Glenehomes in this market anymore. Do winkel says. “I’ve ground my teeth to you know that? ... If you think this is a nubs. I’ve spent long hours [meetgood plan, then vote for these people ing] with people who are personally Send comments to again.” editor@inlander.com. invested in helping me fail.” Superintendent John Glenewinkel, He argued that the district needed a big, brawny man with a full beard a “seismic change” to rock the status speckled with white, peers over his glasses, quo. East Valley got that. But as the aftershocks scrawling on paper. He isn’t writing notes. are still reverberating, the upcoming school Instead, he’s sketching — diamonds and squares board election could determine whether the and circles, with lines and patterns inside them. changes last. “It’s called graphotherapy,” Glenewinkel f there’s a symbol of the district’s abandonsays after a snapshot of his doodles ended up on ment of traditional middle schools, it can East Valley’s Citizens for Accountable Education be found at Mountain View Middle School, Facebook page. “What it allows me to do — it where windows have been boarded up with allows me to focus on the comments without plywood in an attempt to stop vandals. But if becoming emotionally involved in the personal there’s a symbol of the challenge of that transiattacks.” tion, it could be found in the number of students It’s not unusual for a group of community from East Farms STEAM Magnet School who activists to tirelessly target one aspect of a disstill take band, orchestra and gym classes in that trict: In Spokane, it was the math curriculum; in boarded-up building. Coeur d’Alene, it was the International BaccalauTammy Fuller, principal at East Farms, says reate program. But in East Valley, the outcry has

LETTERS

I

18 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

it was a way to let students use the middle school’s quality facilities and reduce crowding. Glenewinkel says the district could have kept the building closed to “avoid any political fallout,” but chose to use what was best for students. But to critics of the transition to K-8, the boarded-up windows represent an outrage. “The district has absolutely pushed full steam ahead into implementing a system that our district does not have an infrastructure to do,” parent Mindy Stewart says. She also laments how East Farms lacked lockers, forcing middle-grade students to carry heavy bags from class to class. Fuller says that’s the one complaint she heard from students. “They’ve wanted lockers for three years,” Fuller says. “Lockers are lovely.” If the recent bond proposal had passed, Fuller says, she’s absolutely confident that lockers could have been installed. But many opponents of K-8 campaigned against it, and it failed miserably. Nationally, the evidence over K-8 has been inconclusive. Some studies suggest it benefits students by eliminating the academically risky transition from elementary to middle school; others found no significant difference. But in East Valley, the setup is a unique hybrid, an attempt to capture the best of both worlds. As students approach the middle grades, they start taking classes from separate teachers, like they would in middle school. On Mondays, eighth graders and some seventh graders are bused over to the old East Valley Middle School building, where they

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“The feel of the schools is different. The schools feel calm, they feel like communities.” take electives. Many of the critics’ dire predictions haven’t come true. There hasn’t been a spike in behavioral problems. There hasn’t been a mass exodus from the district. Glenewinkel says he expected standardized test scores to dip initially. Instead, with a few exceptions, he says they’ve increased. “If K-8 didn’t work, we wouldn’t see an increase in our graduation rate, we wouldn’t see an increase in the number of kids who are completing college courses, we wouldn’t see increased attendance, we wouldn’t have seen decreased discipline [problems],” Glenewinkel says. His critics counter that the kids graduating at increased rates never experienced the K-8 system. Glenewinkel says that misses the point of the change, which was to wake up the entire district, shaking it free from mediocrity. Glenewinkel says he’s seen the entire district, at all age levels, transform. “The feel of the schools is different,” Glenewinkel says. “The schools feel calm, they feel like communities.”

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hile the current board has been unanimous in its votes to move to do away with middle school, that could all change this November. East Valley’s long, hard journey over the past few years could be completely reversed. With three positions up for grabs, the two incumbents are the only candidates supportive of the K-8 transition. The rest fall between skepticism over the process and outright antagonism over the changes. At least one change on the board is guaranteed. The two new candidates in District 5, Mike Novakovich and Deanna Ervin, have nearly identical positions on K-8. They aren’t necessarily opposed to the idea behind the change, but believe the implementation has been a disaster and would support carefully returning to traditional middle schools. Glenewinkel, for his part, chuckles when asked what he hopes to bring to the district in the next three years. “As much as I want to be here, I’m pretty realistic that the odds of me being here three more years are pretty slim,” he says. “Any time you have a board that turns over, then the superintendent is at risk. … [But] overall, the work I’ve done here has been pretty powerful.”  danielw@inlander.com

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 19

NEWS | MEDIA

“Mayor” for Sale The Coeur d’Alene Press continues to let politicians own individual words in its news stories BY DANIEL WALTERS

C

oeur d’Alene businessman Steve Widmyer isn’t “That’s crazy. That’s very confusing,” says Kelly mayor. Not yet. But for now, in the Coeur d’Alene McBride, a faculty member at the Poynter Institute, a Press, he owns the word. nonprofit school for journalism, after hearing about the “Coeur d’Alene, meet your next mayor,” begins a Press’ in-text ad practices. “It wouldn’t be confusing if the Press editorial previewing its mayoral coverage. Like every Coeur d’Alene Press had given up on the idea of indepenmention of the “mayor” since the first week of September, dence, and was clearly the word is underlined and highlighted in blue. But click and transparently going on the link, and it doesn’t lead to mayoral candidate proto be taking sides. But if files, the City Hall website, or previous Press articles. they want to embrace the Instead it links directly to Widmyer’s campaign site. notion of independence, The context doesn’t matter. Stories menthen that form tioning Coeur d’Alene mayor Sandi Bloem, of advertising New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, mayors compromises the audience’s perception they are in Rathdrum and Post Falls — all had the word Send comments to independent.” “mayor” linked to Widmyer’s site. So did a While some sites identify ad-purchased editor@inlander.com. story about the Sept. 11 memorial, and one links with a different color or by double underabout a St. Maries mayoral candidate whose lining them, those in the Press are indistinguish18-year-old daughter was murdered. Even in letters to the able from a conventional hyperlink. And the Press specifieditor critical of Widmyer, “mayor” linked to his site. cally promotes its use for political contexts, advertising As media outlets continue to search for how to make “Political ‘HOT’ Link Word/Phrases” for $80 a week on websites profitable, the development of “in-text advertisits website. ing” has worried some media critics. Earlier this year, the Press’ in-text links came under

fire when it linked Coeur d’Alene school board member Brent Regan’s name to the website of Balance North Idaho, the PAC that endorsed his opponent. McBride calls the notion of selling a person’s name to a group supportive of his opponent “completely deceptive” and “inexcusable.” Regan says he called up Press managing editor Mike Patrick to tell him he thought the use of his name was unethical and illegal. “You’ve got to ask yourself, ‘Is this journalism or are you just prostituting yourself to make a buck?’” Regan says. Ultimately, he says Patrick agreed to stop letting groups buy the names of politicians they haven’t endorsed. Patrick did not respond to repeated requests for comment. But Adam Graves, co-founder of Range NW, the marketing firm working on Widmyer’s campaign, is unapologetic. The practice, he says, began during last

“That form of advertising compromises the audience’s perception they are independent.”

LETTERS

year’s recall campaign, where it was employed by Mary Souza, one of Widmyer’s mayoral opponents. He says it’s not only cost-effective, it works. “My guess is the Inlander and Spokesman will follow suit once your bosses see the revenue potential,” Graves writes in an email. “Unethical would be advising our clients to spend their money hitting people who do not vote. We are simply using technology to better use marketing dollars.”  danielw@inlander.com

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FOOTBALL

Washington State students make the “Loser’s Walk” to the University of Idaho after an upset loss in 1954. WSU LIBRARIES’ MASC PHOTO

Reviving Tradition Washington State and Idaho play football on Saturday — and the loser is going to have to walk 8 miles BY MIKE BOOKEY

W

hen Flip Kleffner was the president of the University of Idaho’s student body in 1954, he made one hell of a promise on the eve of the school’s biggest football game of the season. “At the pep rally the night before the game, I said that if we beat Washington State there would be no school on Monday,” recalls Kleffner last week. “I got back to school and I told the president what I’d said.” The Vandals did beat Washington State the next day, by a score of 10-0 in Pullman. The upset win (Idaho was 0-5 going into the game) was their first victory over their 8-miles-away neighbor in 29 years, and the Idaho admin-

istration figured they could honor Kleffner’s promise and shut things down for a day. After all, for the first time that pretty much anyone on campus could remember, about 1,000 Washington State students — cheerleaders and members of the marching band included — were about to make the hike from Pullman to Moscow on foot in a ritual known as the Loser’s Walk. “It was a fierce rivalry. There wasn’t much lost,” says Kleffner. “But we welcomed them with open arms and had a good time.” That 1954 walk was a big deal. It even got a little national press. But it had been a tradition since the

1930s, when the editors of the two schools’ newspapers wagered an 8-mile hike on the outcome of the football game. Soon, student leaders got in on the bet and the conglomeration of losers trekking across the rolling hills that separate the two small-town campuses became ritual. Most of the walks went from east to west, Idaho students cheerfully marching over to Pullman, as you can see on archival film from the WSU library. Kleffner, who played football for the Vandals until injuries sidelined him, went on to serve as the alumni director at Idaho. He still lives in Moscow and follows Vandals football, but acknowledges that the football rivalry, known as the Battle of the Palouse, has cooled — if not completely fizzled — since those years. “I think it lost the fierceness of it that it used to have,” says Kleffner. “Sometimes it feels like they’re just neighbors.” It’s tough for a rivalry — and a tradition like the Loser’s Walk — to survive when the results are so lopsided. Since the Battle of the Palouse began in 1894, Washington State leads the series 70-16 (with three ties) and most of those Idaho wins came before 1930. Since the 1954 stunner, Idaho has won only four matchups, including consecutive games in 1999 and 2000. WSU then reeled ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 21

CULTURE | FOOTBALL “REVIVING TRADITION,” CONTINUED... off seven in a row. The rivalry, which went dormant after 2007, will be resuscitated Saturday night in Pullman. That was the third time the teams put the Battle of the Palouse on extended hold. Between 1979 and 1997, Idaho and WSU matched up only twice. “Rivalry? To me, a rivalry is when the teams line up for the kickoff, nobody can be sure which one will win,” former Idaho coach Jerry Davitch told reporters before the 1978 game that effectively put the Battle of the Palouse to bed for the next two decades. The Loser’s Walk had ceased nearly a decade before. These days, Washington State plays in the illustrious Pac-12 Conference while Idaho has struggled to simply remain in the game on the FBS side (you might remember this as I-A) of Division I. Before that, Idaho was in the Big Sky Conference and Western Athletic Conference, fueling a heated rivalry with Boise State that overshadowed the one just across the state border. WSU, of course, had the Huskies to deal with. But on Saturday, the Battle of the Palouse returns to Martin Stadium. Washington State is 2-1, with a solid victory at USC under its belt; Idaho, though winless, is showing signs of improvement. Among the universities’ student bodies, there’s a feeling that the rivalry between the students (forget what happens on the field for a moment) is reawakening. Over the summer, both schools’ student governments met up and thought they’d breathe some life into the competitive spirit between Pullman and Moscow. “We agreed that we wanted to bring the student rivalry back to this unique situation that we have being so close together,” says Kevin Massimino, vice president of the Associated Students of WSU.

Are You An

In 1957, Idaho students made the trek to Pullman. WSU LIBRARIES’ MASC WSU and Idaho student bodies plan to compete in food drives, a service hours contest, and at some point a tug-of-war set on the Idaho-Washington border that they hope will set a Guinness World Record. Then, just this week, student leaders decided to up the ante. The Loser’s Walk, at least in some form, would return. “It’s a handshake agreement between [the two student governments]. It’s nothing super-official, but we’re of the opinion that you have to start somewhere,” says Associated Students of the University of Idaho President Max

Cowan, who sees a healthy rivalry between the schools as a way to focus on community involvement. Whatever the outcome on Saturday, one set of students is going to be strapping on some comfortable shoes next week. They’ve got 8 long miles ahead of them. n Idaho at Washington State • Sat, Sept. 21 at 7:30 pm • Martin Stadium, Pullman • Tickets at wsucougars. com • Televised on Pac-12 Network; radio broadcast at KXLY, 920 AM

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CULTURE | DIGEST

ART PAUL VEXLER

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Wed, Sept. 25 | 7 PM

Paul Vexler’s “Thick and Thin” exhibit.

O

n the day before the first home football game at Washington State University, a group of visitors in khaki shorts and tennis shoes wandered through the Compton Union Building on a casual self-guided tour and paused in the gallery space outside the auditorium. “So this must be some sort of a free-form engineering exercise,” one said. In a way, yes. On display are the wooden sculptural works of Washington artist Paul Vexler, who crafts elegant forms that expose the natural relationship between art and mathematics. Both geometric and free-flowing,

LISA WAANANEN PHOTO

the sculptures invite the viewer to look from all angles and inspect the craftsmanship up close. The exhibit runs through Sept. 25, when Vexler is giving a closing lecture about his work, but one of his works will remain permanently: Yellow Knot, which the university purchased this year to hang in the light-filled atrium at the other end of the building. — LISA WAANANEN “Thick and Thin” • Closing lecture from artist Paul Vexler on Wed, Sept. 25 at 6 pm • Compton Union Building Auditorium • 1500 NE Terrell Mall, Pullman • seb.wsu.edu

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One of the world’s finest acoustic guitar soloists

WEB | This much is clear: FEEDLY has inherited the RSS Earth after the demise of Google Reader, which allowed users to read news from their favorite sites in one place, via RSS feeds. Google announced plans to shut down its free service this summer, sending devotees into a frenzied scramble to find the next best thing. Enter Feedly, which enables users to choose various display modes, some of them infinitely more attractive than Google’s. On the downside, searching through your feeds for something in particular requires an update: $5 a month, or $45 a year.

APPS | Are you a tireless social climber who collects business cards as trophies? You may need CARDMUNCH, LinkedIn’s free app that allows you to scan cards by using your smartphone camera. From there, human beings — yep, actual people — review the image and accurately do the data entry part for you, sorting the contact info in a searchable database. (LinkedIn promises privacy, if that’s a concern.)

BOOZE | While we may debate whether we’re all getting dumber, we know smartphones are getting smarter. Now with small attachments and an app — BREATHOMETER and BACTRACK are leaders — our phones can tell us if we’re in a condition to drive. Breathometer costs $49 and is scheduled for release next month. Its sensor, about the size of a car key, plugs into your phone’s headphone jack and, when you blow into it, assesses your blood alcohol content. It’ll even locate you by GPS and help you call a cab.

Wed, October 2 | 8PM A panel discussion will follow the film screening, featuring

Sandi Morgan,

Director of the Global Center for Women and Justice at Vanguard University

Thursday, October 3 6PM

DOCUMENTARY FILM

Stay at

Drink at For Reservations Call: 509.747.1041 or visit www.hotelrubyspokane.com

*A $2 RESTORATION FEE IS ADDED TO EACH TICKET COST.

BINGCROSBYTHEATER.COM

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 23

CULTURE | THEATER

Les Joyeux September 19 - October 12, 2013

The cast of The Civic’s Les Miserables. STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

The Civic’s first production since the departure of its artistic director is anything but miserable BY E.J. IANNELLI

Box Office (509-455-7529) or TicketsWest (800-325-SEAT) and TicketsWest.com www.interplayerstheatre.org

“Astonishing!” “An evening you will never forget!” E HOLLYWOOD JOURNALIST

Dare to Believe!

JayOwenhouse.net

Saturday , September 28 4PM & 7:30PM

ticketswest.com • 800-325-SEAT 24 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

I

t’s no exaggeration to say that Douglas Webster knows Les Misérables inside and out. He was first introduced to the musical around 1987, when a mentor mailed him the original cast recording as a double LP that bore a Post-It note with the simple instructions, “Check this out.” Eighteen months later, he was onstage playing Jean Valjean as an understudy in the third national touring production, which, incidentally, brought him to Spokane for the first time. Over time, Webster would be called on to perform the lead role in various productions of Les Mis again and again. As recently as 2008, he was Valjean in the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theater production of Les Mis, and the musical has been a cornerstone of his teachings as a university professor. With so much of his on- and offstage career rooted in Les Mis, it’s no wonder that Webster feels a strong personal connection to this particular musical, which is based on Victor Hugo’s epic (and epically digressive) 1862 novel of the same name. In a pinch, Webster might even admit to seeing some cosmic harmony between this “opera with a pop sensibility” and his own life trajectory as “an actor that went to opera school,” just as he sees an uncanny happenstance between the director position that opened after Yvonne A. K. Johnson’s departure from the Civic and his being asked to fill it. “I got a phone call after the big upheaval here, saying, ‘Are you available to help us out?’ I checked my schedule, and literally to the day I was available,” he says. “It’s just freakish how that worked. I don’t take it as odd when things like this happen and it’s coincidentally perfect. This is a charmed production.” He says that enjoyment is palpable, and that is due in large part to the Civic’s volunteer actors, who are as talented as many professional casts he has worked with. Natalya Ferch in particular has impressed him with her “organic and smart” acting choices in her role as the adult Cosette. “She said, ‘I don’t want her to be just a kept pet, a trophy. I want to find a way for her to be

THE SHOW WILL GO ON

One part of former Spokane Civic Theatre executive director Yvonne A.K. Johnson’s lawsuit against the organization attempted to stop Les Mis from being performed, due to Johnson’s “substantial intellectual property rights” regarding the performance. But two weeks ago, her attorney Bob Dunn says, Johnson decided to stop pursing the injunction. “Yvonne really didn’t really want to interfere with the community’s ability to enjoy theater,” he says. stronger than that.’ And she has. She’s found a few specific physical actions that the audience will either see or feel. All of a sudden, her Cosette is stronger than most I’ve ever seen.” The strengths of the individual actors have allowed Webster to direct with closer attention to detail instead of concentrating on broad spectacle “where everybody times it to be looking left, and gradually center, and gradually to the right.” “At any given point, an audience member may zero in on one of our actors and track them. And if I’ve done my job right, and if the actors are doing their job right, there will be no point in which that actor just holds space. They are always going to be in the process of going from one place to the next without looking busy; they just have purpose.” Webster is directing for the audience members who “are there to look deeper — the people that love the show but want to watch Cosette the whole time, or figure out why Marius winds up with Cosette and not Éponine.” Ultimately, in the face of any residual tension at the Civic, “it’s got to be fun. It has to be an enjoyable experience for people. This should be joyous. And that’s what the audience is going to see,” Webster says and laughs. “They’re going to see as joyous a production as you can have where everybody dies in the end.”  Les Misérables • Sept. 20 to Oct. 20: Thu to Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $26-$33 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard St. • spokanecivictheatre.com

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Oct 4th | First Friday at Barrister Winery 26 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

BREWED IN EUGENE, OR

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER There is no “arts season.” Passion and creativity don’t quite work that way. But fall in the Inland Northwest is about as close as you can come to such a thing. In between their outdoor adventures of summer and their self-imposed exile to the indoor spaces of winter, people in this region like to get cultural when the leaves fall. You’ll see evidence of that in the 55 events we’re recommending you check out — from book signings to rock shows, gallery tours to film festivals. We’re also exploring the engines behind the creative culture of our region. The MOVERS — people taking the scene to the next phase. The SHAKERS — those who are rattling your perception of what can be done in Spokane. The THINKERS — the people who take the time to make sense of everything around us. And of course, the DOERS — the people who put the rubber to the asphalt and make things happen. Enjoy this arts season. It’s going to be a good one. — MIKE BOOKEY, culture editor

NOVEMBER DECEMBER

JASON ALDEAN ................................................ 30 100,000 POETS FOR CHANGE ....................... 30 BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS ......................... 29 LES MISERABLES .............................................. 29

LITTLE SPOKANE RIVER STUDIO TOUR........ 31 MADE IN THE USA ............................................. 30 JAY OWENOUSE ................................................ 30 ZEDD ..................................................................... 31

THE ACT OF KILLING .........................................39 SHERMAN ALEXIE ..............................................39 ARCHIE BRAY FOUNDATION SHOW ..............37 ART FROM THE HEART .....................................37 AUTUMN HISTORIC HOME TOUR................... 42 THE AVETT BROTHERS .................................... 42 BON JOVI .............................................................39 CARRIE: THE MUSICAL .....................................43 HUMANITAS FESTIVAL .....................................33 LES LE PERE ....................................................... 42 LEND ME A TENOR .............................................43 MACKLEMORE AND RYAN LEWIS ................. 42

ANDY McKEE .......................................................33 NEVER THE SINNER...........................................43 POET LAUREATE PANEL.................................. 42 SISTER HELEN PREJEAN .................................. 41 RENAISSANCE FAIR AT GREEN BLUFF .........39 SPOKANE IS READING......................................39 SPOOKY SPOKANE............................................39 SYMPHONY IDOL .............................................. 42 TERRAIN...............................................................37 VISUAL ARTS TOUR ...........................................37 WELCOME TO ZUILL .......................................... 41 WORLD POETRY SLAM FINALS ......................33

AMERICAN IDIOT................................................ 51 THE CHRISTMAS SCHOONER .......................... 51 EPICUREAN DELIGHT ....................................... 45 GELAH PENN ...................................................... 50 GLBT FILM FESTIVAL ........................................ 45 JOHN STOCKTON BOOK SIGNING................. 46 JUDY CARMICHAEL ...........................................47 LAYERED HISTORY AT WHITWORTH ............47

LETTERS HOME ................................................. 50 MAC ART AUCTION ........................................... 46 MOMIX: BONTANICA ........................................ 45 MOSCOW BALLET’S NUTCRACKER .............. 50 NINE INCH NAILS .............................................. 50 PEARL JAM .......................................................... 51 SANDPOINT FILM FESTIVAL ........................... 45 SPOKANE STRING QUARTET .......................... 51

THE BEST LITTLE CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER .. 54 CHRISTMAS BELLES ..........................................53 COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY ..........................53

FIRST NIGHT ....................................................... 56 MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET............................55 NYE WITH THE SYMPHONY ............................ 56

Cover illustration by Karli Ingersoll

SECTION EDITOR Mike Bookey

PHOTOGRAPHER Young Kwak

ART DIRECTOR Chris Bovey

COPY EDITOR Michael Mahoney

CONTRIBUTORS Annemarie Frohnhoefer, E.J. Iannelli, Laura Johnson, Beth Notturno, Emera Riley, Chey Scott, Leah Sottile, Lisa Waananen

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 27

SEPTEMBER

THE CONNECTOR} S

hannon Roach Halberstadt is new to Spokane, but she’s already proud to be here. On a recent chilly morning, she’s wearing a denim jacket — one that already has a metal Spokane Expo ’74 pin affixed to the collar. Halberstadt isn’t even on the job yet as the new executive director of the Spokane Arts Fund — she’s finishing up her MOVER position this week with the Pacific Northwest Chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences (which helps put on the Grammy awards) — but she’s already immersing herself in Spokane’s culture. She’s bought

28 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

MEET SHANNON ROACH HALBERSTADT, THE SPOKANE ART SCENE’S NEW BEST FRIEND BY LEAH SOTTILE

new records at local shops, eaten out at Mizuna and Santé, sipped coffee at the Rocket, watched the Terrible Buttons play at nYne and rocked out to the Postal Service at the Knitting Factory. Her move to Spokane and finding a job in arts administration here was all serendipitous. As a longtime Seattle resident who was a vital part of the art and music scene there, she says she was planning to move to Spokane “for love.” She would be with her husband, but, as an arts administrator, she wasn’t sure where she would land professionally. But then the position with the Spokane Arts Fund opened up. She applied. And she landed it.

Halberstadt’s entrance onto the Spokane arts stage is a highly anticipated one, and not only because of her extensive résumé. She’s worked on the front lines of the Seattle arts scene through grassroots movements and nonprofit organizations. She’s not a stuffy arts gazer: She came up in the underground music scene, has posters of hardcore bands in her house and truly believes that art is vital to a city’s identity. To her, a vital arts scene is everything from white-walled galleries to gritty punk clubs. After working at the University of Washington’s Henry Art Gallery and as the house manager at On the Boards theater, Halber-

stadt quickly became known for her work in the underground music scene in Seattle — particularly at Redmond’s Old Firehouse and as the managing director of the Vera Project, a nonprofit, all-ages music venue. “Especially in the ’90s and early 2000s, there was a lot of stigma against popular music and young people and everything else,” she says. The Firehouse and the Vera Project were “intentionally breaking down those barriers.” At those venues, Halberstadt and her colleagues focused on connecting with youth through art — and not just the traditional mediums. In addition to hosting

live music, the venues hosted silkscreening workshops, graffiti classes, photography instruction. And the venues trusted kids, depending on youth volunteers to even be able to operate: Kids ran sound, took tickets and cleaned up after shows. In the 1990s, Halberstadt was on the front lines of a fight against the infamous Teen Dance Ordinance, which gouged so deep into the all-ages music scene, it threatened its existence altogether. But through the Vera Project, she helped forge relations with government officials skeptical of why punk rock was so vital to the city’s identity. Roach says the groundwork

T H E AT E R

BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS

Nich Witham, who recently trod the Interplayers boards in Speech and Debate and Sirens, returns to star as teenaged Eugene Jerome in Neil Simon’s semi-autobiographical coming-of-age play set in 1937 Brooklyn. This Woody Allen-esque comedy of SEPT. 19sexual awakening and the crazy merryOCT. 12 go-round of family dynamics — the first in the playwright’s famed and acclaimed “Eugene Trilogy” — picked up two Tony Awards when it debuted in 1983 and ran for almost 1,300 performances. Michael Weaver directs what looks to be a promising opener to the theater’s 33rd season. (EI) Interplayers Theater, $12$28, show dates and times vary.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

is already laid in Spokane for the arts scene to explode — she says amazing work has been done here by the Arts Fund and city Arts Commission. And there’s tons of talent. “I don’t think I need to tell you that there’s no shortage of creativity here. People are making really great art, really great music, really great visual art, good performance — across the board, it’s good stuff,” she says. “I think we can really start to articulate the impact of how arts are a part of Spokane’s identity, and how arts can really help to make Spokane a great place to live, a great place to work, a great place to attract talent.” She says part of her initial work will be creating strategic plans for the Spokane Arts Fund and figuring out how to creatively match art with economic development, education and civic engagement.

“How can we make sure that art is a part of all of these conversations, so it becomes part of the overall identity of Spokane? So it’s just integrated — it’s part of every conversation, it’s part of what people think of when they think of Spokane,” she says. Her longtime home of Seattle eventually came to realize that punk rock was a part of what made the city so special. She thinks she can help make something similar happen in Spokane. “That’s not easy to do. … How do we make arts, just — indispensable? Part of the fabric of who we are?” she says. “I think that shift takes time.” She’s nothing but optimistic. She already sees that Spokane is something special. “We need to brag outside of our borders,” she says. “I think that Spokane could be a really good lesson in mid-sized cities and the arts.” n

T H E AT E R

LES MISÉRABLES

When Victor Hugo wrote Les Misérables in 1860s France, he probably never imagined that singers around the world would enact his story onstage in 2013. But the musical has been a sensation for nearly three decades, and now it’s coming to Spokane. The SEPT. 20Spokane Civic Theatre’s cast and crew OCT. 20 will perform Hugo’s internationally acclaimed story in all of its musical glory, with Broadway veteran Douglas Webster taking the reins as director. You’ll have 19 opportunities to see the theater’s season opener this fall. (BN) Spokane Civic Theatre, $43, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 29

VISUAL ARTS

MADE IN USA: ROSENQUIST/RUSCHA

SEPTEMBER

James Rosenquist grew up in Minnesota during World War II and left for New York. Ed Ruscha grew up in Oklahoma about the same time and ended up in Los Angeles. SEPT. 20Both started their DEC. 14 careers as commercial artists, then appropriated the words and imagery of advertising, quickly becoming known as masters in the pop art movement. Prints from throughout the two artists’ careers (so far), loaned from the collection of Northwest collector Jordan D. Schnitzer, are displayed together for a bicoastal retrospective that chronicles more than half a century of distinctly American work. (LW) WSU Museum of Art, free, gallery hours at museum.wsu. edu

MUSIC

C U LT U R E

JASON ALDEAN

JAY OWENHOUSE

Country acts are the hottest ticket these days — selling more seats than any other musical genre. There’s an hard-to-explain quality about the music that speaks to the gut of this nation. Amongst the pop country acts hitting up the Inland Northwest this year, JaSEPT. 25 son Aldean is one of the most fascinating. He may come off as just another crooning cowboy in a hat with a guitar, but 11 No. 1 country hits don’t lie. He brings the good looks to get ladies’ juices flowing, but has the attitude to keeps the guys around too. No doubt this show will bring many boots through the door. (LJ) Spokane Arena, $29-$55, 7 pm

WO R D S

100,000 POETS FOR CHANGE

It’s no secret that North Idaho has long been at the center of intense controversy and polarization. There was Ruby Ridge. There were the white supremacists. It’s a shame that this is what gets the attention SEPT. 28 in Idaho, and not things like 100,000 Poets for Change. It’s a global event happening on Sept. 28, where poets and musicians in 800 cities around the planet will gather to “promote social, environmental, economic and political change.” Kind of like a modern day “We Are the World.” Poets and musicians interested in being a part of the event can contact Lost Horse Press. (LS) Oak & Fourth Streets, across from the Sandpoint Farmers Market, free, 10 am-1 pm

This Montana-based magician is making a comeback, and it all starts here in Spokane. After losing his wife to illness in 2009, Owenhouse took the past few years off, but is now debuting his new show, which SEPT. 28 features his four children, ranging in age from 9 to 23, and their two tigers. You’ll see Owenhouse levitate, get chopped in half and generally attempt to blow your mind in any way possible. Before his hiatus, Owenhouse toured the world with his show that’s totally family friendly. There’s even an early show, so you can bring the kids and still get them home with plenty of time to spare before bed. (MB) INB Performing Arts Center, $34-$43, shows at 4 and 7:30 pm

Whitworth Theatre presents

THE

Wakefield Mysteries

Adapted by Adrian Henri

A Merryal Romp ev Medi reation fr om C to Nat ivi t y Directed by

Diana Trotter

Oct. 11, 12, 18, 19 at 7:30 P.M. Oct. 13 at 2 P.M. Cowles Auditorium Whitworth University General admission: $8 Student/senior (62+): $6 Tickets: Call 509.777.3707 or www.whitworth.edu/ theatretickets

30 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

MUSIC

ZEDD

VISUAL ARTS

LITTLE SPOKANE RIVER ARTIST STUDIO TOUR

Looking at a completed work on a gallery wall often leaves many of us Sept. 28 wondering how did the artist make this? Where? How long did it take? The sixth-annual Little Spokane River Artist Studio Tour answers many of those questions, providing curious attendees an intimate glimpse into the working process of several recognizable names in local art: Melissa Cole, Kay O’Rourke, Larry Ellingson, Sheila Evans and more than two dozen others. Groups of participating artists set up workspaces and offer artwork for sale at four host studios in the scenic Little Spokane River area. (CS) Map at littlespokanestudios.com, free admission, 10 am-5 pm

This fall, the Knitting Factory hosts the most promising lineup of electronic dance music Spokane has ever seen, with electrohouse DJ Zedd kicking off the season. Spokane has been graced by big names like Sept. 30 Skrillex and Kaskade, but these shows make it known that EDM has arrived in Spokane. Zedd and Krewella breached mainstream radio with their hits “Clarity” and “Alive,” respectively. This late-September show is likely to get the most buzz out of this EDM bonanza, but keep an eye out for other shows this season by Zeds Dead, Disclosure and Adventure Club. (BN) Knitting Factory, $15-$35, 7 pm

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 31

OCTOBER

ARCHITECTURE FOR YOUR HEAD}

OLIVE + BOONE SHAKES UP CONVENTIONAL IDEAS IN FASHION AND ART WITH ITS EDGY, MODERN HEADWEAR BY CHEY SCOTT

E

rin Haskell’s hats aren’t for wallflowers. Women who wear her creations, adorned with sweeping feathers, light-reflecting crystals and delicate lace, will stand out in a crowd and should be prepared to be approached with compliments and curious inquiries of “where did you get that?” Since the 29-year-old Spokane marketing specialist-turnedinterior designer launched her boutique, Olive + Boone SHAKER Custom Millinery, about a year ago, her retro-inspired yet modern and thoughtfully designed headwear has been — quite literally — turning heads

32 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

across the Inland Northwest and beyond. On a muggy late summer evening, a contemporary, stark white room on the first floor of a brick building tucked off Browne Street in downtown Spokane is packed with high-heeled women and dress-shirted men, all crowding around a long black stage running through the room. As heavy bass beats start thumping out of speakers on either side of the stage, a lanky model wearing a beige trench coat steps out from behind a wall and saunters down the runway with purpose. All eyes are on the small, structured oval-shaped pillbox hat perched on her pixiestyled brunette hair that doesn’t

move an inch as she marches in towering platform heels. More trench-coated models emerge, each wearing similarly shaped yet entirely unique headpieces. Some are bright and bold while others are neutral beiges and grays; a few feature large, stiff bows while others are unadorned. Just when the audience thinks the fashion show unveiling Olive + Boone’s fall collection is almost over, another themed group of hats emerges, bobbing on the models’ heads as they march down the stage: fascinators, wedding veils, poufy lace crowns, English-inspired hats, and finally, heavily adorned headbands of fresh roses and greenery. At the

end, a parade of models in short white dresses lines either side of the runway as milliner and designer Haskell emerges, a wide smile stretched across her face, a black lace crown over her forehead and long, wavy auburn hair. The free-spirited designer has only been making and selling her handmade headwear since last summer, but she’s already been discovered by clients as far away as Paris, New York and Los Angeles. In the beginning, Haskell says she struggled with the decision to keep the business in Spokane because of her products’ appeal to a higher-end, edgier fashion demographic. That all changed when she realized how supportive her friends and even

complete strangers were of her vision to create and sell custom, handmade hats out of Spokane. “I feel like Spokane has your back in that sort of sense — people appreciate others taking a chance,” Haskell says. “If you believe in [Spokane], it will believe in you.” Haskell’s designs are partly inspired by a bygone era during the first half of the 20th century when hats were more of a wardrobe staple, combined with the recent revival of high fashion headpieces sparked by the royal wedding of Kate Middleton and Prince William in 2011. Haskell’s formal education in architecture and an admiration of mid-century modern design elements also

REVERSE MORTGAGE

MUSIC

ANDY McKEE

Andy McKee ranks among the world’s most talented acoustic guitar soloists, coming from humble beginnings as a YouTube sensation. The online community brought his clips to somewhere around 80 million views, OCT. 2 blasting him into stardom and inspiring guitar players around the world. If you can believe it, his real strengths lie in his compositional skills — even with his insanely adept picking and strumming ability, he sometimes finds it difficult to play his own compositions. On his website, Andy writes of his Spokane concert: “It will be rocking!” (BN) Bing Crosby Theater, $25, 8 pm

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WO R D S

2013 INDIVIDUAL WORLD POETRY SLAM FINALS

Models (left and top right) display the headwear of Olive + Boone Custom Millinery, designed by Erin Haskell (right). YOUNG KWAK PHOTO influence her designs. Haskell strives to always use high-quality materials to convey her creative philosophy that each piece is intentionally created and meant to last far beyond the special occasion it was first worn to. Olive + Boone (named after her two dogs) hats are constructed from material like Spanish and Chantilly lace, organza and merino wool, and embellished with bird feathers from a local taxidermist, spun horsehair netting and European crystal beads. Each piece is handmade by Haskell or one of three local seamstresses she’s hired to produce hats for the millinery. Because Olive + Boone’s pieces are handmade from high-end materials, each ranges, on average, between $150 and $300. As much as they’re a fashion accessory, Haskell’s creations are also works of art. A permanent downtown showroom for the millinery is currently in the works, in a space on West Sprague Avenue that

Haskell hopes to have open by October. Although she creates pieces to be worn, Haskell doesn’t consider herself a fashion designer, but a product designer. “This is architecture for your head. I strive to take into consideration the geometry of someone’s face and the angles of their face. It’s more about thoughtful design, and that less is more,” she says. Even though she continuously hears doubtful comments from local residents who say they’d never have an occasion fancy or special enough to wear an Olive + Boone hat, it doesn’t hamper her goal to shake up people’s perceptions of when and where hats can be an appropriate or even unexpected accessory. “You don’t have to live in fabulous New York City to wear something fabulous,” she says. “It’s about taking risks and believing in yourself, and that you are confident in that risk.” 

Slam poets from across the U.S. and Canada are set to hit Spokane and hit it hard. There will be bouts between poets, workshops for the poetically inclined and enough thoughtOCT. 3-5 provoking verbiage to carry both the sensitive and the boorish through 72 hours of soul-searching. The event concludes at the Bing Crosby Theater, where the final 12 wordsmiths will sweat, pace, stomp, speak and cause your emotions to flit from laughter to sorrow to empathy and back with their clever phonemes and heartfelt intonations. (AF) Schedule of events at iwps.poetryslam.com

C U LT U R E

HUMANITAS FESTIVAL

The African diaspora has left footprints throughout the Western world, and WSU’s Humanitas Festival is set to celebrate this influence with performances by Step Afrika!, Okaidja & Shokoto and Aché Brasil. Okaidja & Shokoto’s three musicians perform Afro-Cuban, Afro-Brazilian and Afro-Peruvian compositions alongside AmeriOCT. 3-5 can blues, jazz and tap. Aché Brasil, a musical, acrobatic and dance ensemble, celebrates Brazil’s diverse culture. Step Afrika! tours internationally, showcasing stepping, an African-influenced dance style that features footfalls, claps and spoken word. This form of dance first gained popularity in African-American sororities and fraternities, but has since gained a worldwide following, picking up influences from many cultures. On Saturday, the Cougar World Party and Outdoor Festival provides daylong entertainment. (AF) WSU Pullman Campus and other venues, free

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OCTOBER

HAPPY HOUR

VISUAL ARTS

C U LT U R E

MON-SAT 5-8 | ALL DAY SUNDAY

ART FROM THE HEART

TERRAIN

926 W. GARLAND AVE

Art lovers, listen up. The Coeur d’Alene Arts & Culture Alliance hosts its 11th annual arts festival, Art from the Heart, in October. If you’re into any type of art, you can’t miss this event. The local arts nonprofit pulls out all the stops, bringing an orchestra, multiple theater companies, bands and musicians, dancers and visual artists. Regional artists and enthusiOCT. 3-12 asts gather to celebrate, share their craft and teach the community in performances and workshops. It continues through a full week at multiple venues, so attendees can choose a day when the whole family can find something they’re interested in. The aim is to build friendships and share opportunities to foster a stronger art community. (BN) Locations throughout Coeur d’Alene, free admission, event times vary

Yes, Spokane’s grassroots cultural event is growing up — turning 6 years old, in fact. The juried art show/performance art/music showcase/ celebration of anything and everything creative returns to the old Music City building during the Visual Arts Tour. Sorry for those backslashes, but this is an event that requires OCT. 4 a few of those to accurately explain. Featuring artists from around the region, Terrain is as good a sampling of Spokane’s creative culture as you’re going to find anywhere in the city at any time of the year. Here’s proof — they received some 700 submissions for the show. You can see 200 of those on display. Not bad. (MB) Music City Building, begins at 5 pm, free

TERRAIN

ARCHIE BRAY

VISUAL ARTS

VISUAL ARTS

VISUAL ARTS TOUR

ARCHIE BRAY FOUNDATION RESIDENT SHOW

As you likely know, on the first Friday of every month, galleries (and places serving as galleries for that night) around Spokane exhibit the works of our numerous local artists. But that monthly show is supersized twice a year, in October and February, when it becomes the Visual Arts Tour, a weekend-long celebration of creOCT. 4-5 ativity. This time around, you’ll find 31 different exhibitions spread throughout downtown Spokane and other spots around the city. There will be painting, sculptures, performance art and a sampling of just about any other medium you can think of. It’s a good way to get into gear for the region’s bustling fall arts season. (MB) Throughout downtown Spokane, begins Fri, Oct. 4 at 5 pm

SUN-THURS 4pm-MI D NI G HT | FRI - SAT 4pm-2am

The annual Archie Bray Foundation Resident Show has become an October institution here, and it’s the best place to see some of the most seriously kick-ass ceramic work around. Jim Kolva and Pat Sullivan, connoisseurs of great, edgy, groundOCT. 4-25 breaking art, invite residents from Montana’s Archie Bray Foundation — an incredible educational institution focused on ceramics — to show their works here each year. The show takes on many different forms: everything from micro-works to coffee cups and giant installations, often with great narratives and heavy explorations of irony. (LS) Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, free, opening reception Oct. 4 from 5-9 pm; on display through Oct. 25

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 37

OCTOBER

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

THE MUSICAL MAN} S

pend half a minute in the company of Inland Northwest actors, whether professional or amateur, and you’re bound to hear them mention the name Troy. That’s it — just Troy, a mononym like Madonna or Morrissey, caSHAKER sually and inevitably dropped into conversation. The assumption is that the surname, Nickerson, is superfluous. And that assumption is usually valid, especially among this region’s close-knit theater community, which Nickerson, now 47, has been a part of since his teens. “I did theater and danced as a kid,” says Nickerson in a voice so soft-spoken that his words are muffled by an ambient breeze. His first show at the Spokane Civic Theater was at the age of 13, and it wasn’t long before he’d jumped from acting to cho-

38 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

reography and finally to directing, starting with Joseph and the Technicolor Dreamcoat. “I was choreographing a show for Patrick Treadway — I think it was the original Nunsense — and they [the Civic] saw what I was doing and asked me to direct the next show,” he says. “And I’ve pretty much done stuff steadily since then.” “Steadily” is at once the operative word and an understatement. Nickerson estimates the tally of shows he’s helmed is somewhere in the nineties — many of those while still holding down his day job as a stylist at Frenz Hair Design. In the not-too-distant past, it was rare to see a season at the Civic that didn’t feature multiple Nickerson-led productions on the main stage. Around the end of 2012, at the height of the exodus of longtime Civic cast and crew due to the increasingly fraught creative atmosphere there, Nickerson’s name frequently began

TROY NICKERSON HAS BEEN DIRECTING SOME OF THE REGION’S MOST POPULAR MUSICALS FOR 20 YEARS, AND HE’S ONLY PICKING UP STEAM BY E.J. IANNELLI appearing on other playbills, primarily at Lake City Playhouse, where he has overseen acclaimed productions of Rent, K2 (which went on to compete regionally, then nationally in AACTFest), and Into the Woods, starring other Civic émigrés like Andrew Ware Lewis and Abbey Crawford. The quality of those productions made it clear that Nickerson’s reputation among actors as well as theatergoers doesn’t rest on his longevity alone. He has a knack for spectacle that comes across as effortless and unostentatious, although his priorities have changed over time. “When I first started directing, I really came to it from a position as a choreographer,” he says, “and with the shows I was doing, it was actually kind of appropriate. Everything was visual. And definitely during the last period of growth in my life — especially within the last year or so — I come from a different

place. I try to have something to say. Something honest. Even with the goofiest of shows.” Like the actors who omit his surname in conversation, Nickerson holds some things to be universally understood. In this case, it’s the death of his husband, David Gigler, of a heart attack in June 2012. The event continues to affect him in a way that, in his capacity as a director, any shift of emphasis from spectacle to substance seems like an inexorable one. “I was able to do so much, and part of that was because I had someone in my life who picked up the slack. So when that was gone, I didn’t realize it right away, and I jumped right back into those shows: Woods, K2, Bat Boy. And it was tough. I want to slow down a little bit,” he says, though it’s doubtful that this means his forthcoming shows will forego their customary lightning pace for leisurely philosophical forays.

At the moment, Nickerson is working with Ignite! — his first-ever production with the community theater troupe — on Little Shop of Horrors. “I said, ‘If you can build those puppets, go for it.’” Now that the theater has a dedicated facility and is no longer nomadic, Nickerson hopes that their branching out to include musicals will “bring in another audience that will help the theater thrive.” Further on, Nickerson will experience a homecoming of sorts when, after two years of self-exile, he returns to the Civic next spring to direct Gypsy. “I’m totally known for big production musicals,” he says, and he aims not to disappoint any audience members who are equally looking forward to his return. “My whole goal is that they take away something. Nothing’s worse than leaving a production feeling like you’ve just spent two hours of your life that you won’t get back.” n

Sunday, Sept. 29

at Aqua Park

10am to 5pm PERFORMANCE

WO R D S

RENAISSANCE FAIR AT GREEN BLUFF

SPOKANE IS READING

There are still about 150 days until the Season 4 premiere of Game of Thrones, so you might need to get your swords-and-knights fix elsewhere. Though the jousting on Green Bluff may not be as bloody and vindictive as that on Westeros, winter is coming, and sometimes you have to do what you have to do OCT. 5-6 to make it ’til spring. Actors, minstrels, storytellers and nobles have headed for the hills of Green Bluff, ready to welcome us non-artisan peasants with activities like jousting, dancing and that crazy new game the Europeans call bocce ball. So break out that bodice and live your historically romantic fantasies. Men, spruce up those jerkins. Bring the kids (scouts in uniform get in for free) and enjoy the joust. (AF) Back of the Bluff, Green Bluff, $5-$25, 10 am-5 pm

Author Maria Semple, whose credits include writing for Arrested Development and Saturday Night Live, injected her newest book Where’d You Go, Bernadette with wit that requires Seattleites to not take themselves too seriously. Just as Semple did, the story’s protagonist, Bernadette, moved OCT. 10 from L.A. to Seattle and found much to loathe. Haphazard five-way intersections, Keens, snobby Queen Anne housewives and compulsory small talk about the possibility of rain all plague the neurotic ex-architect who lives with her Microsoft husband and gifted daughter. Spokane is Reading presents two opportunities to meet the author, who will read from Bernadette and field questions. The events are free, but seating is first-come, first-served. (BN) Spokane Convention Center Auditorium, free, 1 pm; CenterPlace Event Center, free, 7 pm

Arts music St. Maries

& brews

Festival

Sponsored by the St. Maries Council for the Arts

FILM

THE ACT OF KILLING

In 1965, after a failed coup attempt in Indonesia spurred a military crackdown against suspected communists, low-level gangsters became a feared squad of executioners. Now middle-aged (and older), they happily reminisce about the killings with a documentary filmmaker. At his invitation, they re-enact scenes of violence in the styles of their favorite film genres, until memory bleeds into fiction and becomes too real. Werner Herzog and Errol Morris both liked early versions of the documentary enough to sign on as executive producers; it’s won a ridiculously long list of awards and critics have been almost unanimously awed. But everyone also agrees it’s a raw and difficult film — watch it in the theater, with other people who will want to talk about it afterward. (LW) Magic Lantern Theatre, $7, 7 pm

Art Vendors Beer Garden Silent Auction Ben Whipple The Jam Band Acuff/Sherfey Duo Bill Fletcher & Denny Ray Great Food Kid’s Activities Contact Mary Orr

253.226.3529

What will you build?

MUSIC THE ACT OF KILLING

BON JOVI

Before Jersey Shore flushed the state of New Jersey’s barely-hangin’-on-reputation down the toilet, Bon Jovi was its No. 1 advocate. (OK, Bruce Springsteen was there, too.) After releasing the seminal New Jersey — which included the chart-toppers “Lay Your Hands On Me” and “Bad Medicine” — back in 1988, OCT. 6 the hair-metal band, with the exception of a few breaks in the ’90s, hasn’t stopped since. Gracing Spokane with their presence as part of the “Because We Can” tour, the Jon Bon Jovi-fronted act continues to wail — because, yes, they can. (LJ) Spokane Arena, $59-$179, 7:30 pm

OCT. 10

WO R D S

C U LT U R E

SHERMAN ALEXIE

SPOOKY SPOKANE

This Spokanite long ago left this side of the state, but every once in a while he’ll hop on over to remind us why he’s still one of the most significant literary figures ever to emerge from our region. Sherman Alexie has been riding high off the success of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian for a while now, making him perhaps the premier Native American writer at this moment in time. He’s coming to town with his most recent book, OCT. 9 Blasphemy, in tow. The new collection of short stories features 15 tales fans have come to love, with another 15 brand-new pieces featuring his experiences from a youth spent on an Indian reservation, and more of the humor and wry observations that have made him a mega-famous writer. He’ll read from the book, probably make you laugh and then sign your copy. (MB) Auntie’s Bookstore, 7 pm

In the weeks leading up to Halloween, get chills up and down your spine during the Spooky Spokane walking tours, which feature some unusual and surprising tales regarding the Lilac City’s scarier, lesser-known history. Even for those who scoff at the idea of ghosts, the guided tours OCT. 10-11, through downtown Spokane reveal a darker 17-18 AND past in some of the city’s most recognizable 24-25 historic places. Sure, some of these tales are long-surviving urban legends, but that doesn’t mean they’re any less fascinating or entertaining. The 90-minute tours take place after dark, for obvious reasons, and start at the historic, Art Deco Fox Theater, which apparently has been known to host a ghostly spirit or two. (CS) Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, $15, 7 pm

VOLUNTEER

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 39

OCTOBER

Karli and Caleb Ingersoll inside the space that will soon become the Bartlett. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

A PLACE TO CALL HOME} P

rogress is in full view. Tubing, rubble piles, sawhorses, electrical cords — one has to be careful not to trip MOVERS over jagged edges while meandering through the Bartlett, Spokane’s soon-to-beopen all-ages music venue.

40 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Envisioning where the stage and bars will be isn’t too challenging while touring the downtown old-brick structure — unfinished slats stand as placeholders. This dusty space is Caleb and Karli Ingersoll’s baby. They want the feel to be modern. Exposed walls, white and black

THE BARTLETT STILL HAS MILES TO GO, BUT THE SPIRIT OF THE NEW MUSIC VENUE IS VERY MUCH ALIVE BY LAURA JOHNSON

space, minimal artwork. But the building hasn’t been occupied in 10 years. Last week, Caleb made the leap and quit his job as a sound technician. He and his wife are now official business owners of a place that won’t be open until November. The vision: to cultivate the local music scene,

help it evolve, make sure young people can get involved. “It’s a no-brainer for us to create an all-ages venue,” Caleb explains. “We both grew up going to shows, and we want the next generation of Spokane to be able to experience that too.” This will not be just another place hipsters go to hang

out and drink Pabst Blue Ribbon. While there will be alcohol (only wine and beer), the venue will not focus on the beverages — it’s about the music. That’s why everything will be set up with musicians in mind. From the state-of-the-art sound system to the built-in merchandise booth, the pair is

going off of what they expect of a venue. As touring performers, both as solo acts and with their band Cathedral Pearls (currently on hiatus in lieu of the Bartlett), they’ve catalogued a wish list of what they require. “It’s important the music sounds good,” Karli says. “We’re really catering to the sound.” They’ve had this dream — to have a venue of their own — even before they got married three years ago. After waxing poetic to enough friends and family about it, they were encouraged to start an Indiegogo account, which raised $21,000 to throw at the idea. But the toughness of the industry isn’t lost on them. They’ve watched as numerous live music clubs shut down in this town. “We expected this thing to be impossible,” Caleb says. “We looked at eight or nine different buildings and found the process discouraging. We weren’t sure we’d find something.” But then their friend Dan Spalding stepped in. The wellknown local artist had just bought a property and thought it would make a great space for live music. The couple agreed. While the neighborhood doesn’t cater to the country club set, with nYne next door and Mootsy’s and Jones Radiator, among others, coloring in the Sprague Avenue blocks, the Ingersolls believe it will work well for their operation. But how will they succeed where countless others have failed? The plan is to open the front part of the space every day at noon, sell coffee and choice nib-

bles during the day, then turn into a bar at night. The back area, with the stage, will host four or so acts a month along with a weekly open mic. “From touring around, we’ve seen that having a separate part is huge,” Karli concludes. “Dual income with a separate café allows us to make money, as the shows won’t.” Cover charges will be a bit more substantial than the usual $3 to $5 range you might find at a dive bar. They see the 200-capacity space as a stepping stone to the Knitting Factory. The goal is to bring in more national acts with local openers. “We want this to be a higher quality experience,” Karli says. “There won’t be that many shows happening every month, so we want this to be more of the ‘fine dining’ venue of the music scene.” There’s already been a setback. The soft opening, scheduled for Oct. 6 and featuring Pickwick, has been moved next door to nYne, but the Ingersolls aren’t deterred. They’ve booked multiple shows, including Sallie Ford & The Sound Outside and Shelby Earl, for the end of the year. They’re charging ahead. “We care about this scene,” Karli says. “We come into this business with a musician’s perspective. We’re almost there.” n lauraj@inlander.com

WO R D S

SISTER HELEN PREJEAN

You might not know it, but there are some nuns out there who are serious badasses. Leading that pack is Sister Helen Prejean. After witnessing the execution of a death row inmate in 1982, she wrote the book Dead Man Walking: An EyewitOCT. 11 ness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States — which then became a movie and a play. But she didn’t stop there: Prejean has done what few others will, standing beside six men as they were executed and continuing to fight for the banishment of the death penalty. She has also written extensively about, and continues to fight for, the wrongfully accused. (LS) Gonzaga University Globe Room, free, 7 pm MUSIC

WELCOME TO ZUILL

Zuill Bailey, classical heartthrob and recently appointed artistic director of Northwest Bach Festival, takes cello in hand for both Robert Schumann’s “Cello Concerto in A minor” and Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo Variations” in this chock-full concert program that also OCT. 12-13 features Andrew Norman’s modern piece “The Great Swiftness” and the entirety of Beethoven’s “Seventh Symphony.” Eckart Preu will conduct. The “Welcome to Zuill” title of this second concert in the symphony’s Classics series is either painfully matterof-fact or a head-scratching shot at a pun; if the latter, it might have something to do with the fact that Bailey’s holding a free master class (get it? Zuill/school?) at 3 pm on the Friday before the concerts. (EI) Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, $15-$54, Sat at 8 pm, Sun at 3 pm

The Bartlett grand opening weekend feat. Cave Singers, Radiation City, Terrible Buttons, Silver Torches, Dead Serious Lovers, Mirror Mirror, Scott Ryan and more • Nov. 7-9, 8 pm • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • All-ages • thebartlettspokane.com

Spend September Weekends in Lincoln County! NEW USED CONSIGNMENT CO2 REFILLS

GRAND OPENING

Sept. 20-22 43rd Odessa Deutschesfest – German Food, Music, Biergarten & More Sept. 28 Harrington Fall Festival & BBQ with Investigator James Clarkson presenting “Northwest UFO Heritage” in the Historic Opera House Sept. 28 Almira Country Fair featuring Nashville Recording Artist Chase!

Find details on these & other fun events in Lincoln County at

www.VisitLincolnCountyWashington.com SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 41

MUSIC

SYMPHONY IDOL

In this clever, genre-spanning concert with the Spokane Symphony, a trio of recent American Idol finalists — LaKisha Jones, pictured, (from Season 6), Haley Scarnato (Season 6) and Matt Giraud OCT. 19 (Season 8) — bring their voices to the Spokane stage. Expect to hear hits from Celine Dion, Journey, Whitney Houston, the Charlie Daniels Band, Evita and more — all backed by instrumental arrangements performed by our city’s resident symphony orchestra. Morihiko Nakahara, who also serves as music director of the South Carolina Philharmonic, will conduct this entertaining start to the symphony’s SuperPops concert season. (EI) Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, $26-$62, 8 pm MUSIC

OCTOBER

THE AVETT BROTHERS

Mere months after the bluegrass/folk-loving Avett Brothers took on the Festival at Sandpoint, the group announced they would rather not skip the stop between Seattle and Montana on their upcoming tour. For fans of banjo-infused anything, the announcement of the OCT. 19 Spokane stop was most thrilling. Even better is the fact the Avetts’ latest disc Magpie and the Dandelion (let’s be honest, there could not be a more girly name for an album) comes out earlier the week they perform, meaning Spokane will be one of the first places to hear all of the new music live. (LJ) INB Performing Arts Center, $34.50-$45, 8 pm C U LT U R E

14TH ANNUAL AUTUMN HISTORIC HOME TOUR

Last fall, with the National Trust for Historic Preservation Conference held here in town, Spokane Preservation Advocates organized a special tour of the impressive South Hill homes on Sumner Avenue and Cliff Drive. This year, the tour explores a less-traveled area of OCT. 20 historic significance: Millwood. The self-guided tour begins on North Marguerite Road and includes the Rosebush House, a unique example of the cottage-inspired French eclectic style built in 1923 for the general manager of the Inland Empire Paper Company, now listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The ticket price gets you the tour brochure with a map of the locations and information about each home. (LW) 3303 N. Marguerite Rd., Millwood, $15, noon to 4 pm

VISUAL ARTS

LES LE PERE

With a penchant for pencil sketches and drawings, Les Le Pere has been an artist for most of his life. The Magic of the Objects exhibit is a collection of a lifetime of his work, “from some of his first scribblin’s to pieces created especially for this show.” A native of EastOCT. 22 ern Washington, Le Pere earned his MFA from WashingDEC. 20 ton State University. This influence may be seen in his outdoor backgrounds, but the foreground tends to be pure Americana. If his intricate, quirky and almost always narrative drawings seem familiar, then you may own a few Tom Robbins novels — Le Pere’s work graces the covers of several. (AF) Jundt Art Museum, free, reception Oct. 25 at 5 pm, lecture at 7 pm WO R D S

PANEL OF POET LAUREATES

For someone who pens lyric and rhymes, perhaps the utmost career achievement is being named a poet laureate; meaning he or she has been appointed by a government or institutional body as its official poet. The U.S. has one, states have them and many major cities also have designated poet laureates. Spokane is currently in the market for one, and the person who takes that title will be OCT. 23 revealed sometime this fall. Aptly timed with the upcoming announcement is Auntie’s Bookstore’s regional poet laureate panel, featuring Washington state Poet Laureate Kathleen Flenniken, Boise’s Poet Laureate Diane Raptosh and U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate and Spokane resident Kenn Nesbitt. They’ll be joined by Spokane’s to-beannounced, first-ever poet laureate. The panel discussion centers on answering the question of what role poetry plays in modern life. (CS) Auntie’s Bookstore, free, 7 pm MUSIC

MACKLEMORE AND RYAN LEWIS

Nothing can hold these two down. Not whacked-out music videos, not bad haircuts, not the absence of a major record label — nothing. Instead, Macklemore’s rapping paired with the producer/DJ skills of Ryan Lewis keeps getting bigger and bigger, thanks to relentless radio play of their OCT. 23 various singles. Thankfully, because Lewis originally hails from Spokane, the act never fails to stop here while on tour. For them, it really is giving back to the bedrock fans, the ones who always believed. As The Heist — much of which was performed at last year’s smaller-venued Spokane show — has been out for a year now, it will be interesting to see if the duo pulls out new material for this tour. Either way, fans will be thrilled by their presence. (LJ) Spokane Arena, $32.50-$45, 8 pm

Unlimited, My Way

SM

Unlimited while on the Sprint network. Excludes price and phone selection. Account must remain in good standing. Prohibited network rules and restrictions apply.

sprint.com/unlimited

42 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

T H E AT E R

CARRIE: THE MUSICAL

Yes, there’s a musical version of Carrie. It first hit Broadway in 1988, not starring Sissy Spacek. At the time it was one of the most expensive flops ever to hit the stage, closing after only five performances. Last year, offOCT. 23-24 Broadway dusted off the relic of a production. This year, the brandnew local theater company Lilac City Performing Arts follows suit. Raising funds for its cause on Indiegogo.com and by other means, the community group is built on the philosophy of producing plays that will provoke thought and inspire discussion. This will be the company’s first show. (LJ) Bing Crosby Theater, $20-$25, 7:30 pm T H E AT E R

NEVER THE SINNER

Interplayers, Spokane’s professional theater, showcases some of the region’s best acting talent every year, and its 33rd season will be no different. This October brings Never the Sinner, a theatrical recreation of the historic 1924 Chicago trial of Leopold OCT. 24and Loeb. The two wealthy university stuNOV. 9 dents kidnap and murder a 14-year-old in an attempt to commit the perfect crime, and lawyer Clarence Darrow comes to their defense in a stand against capital punishment. The Interplayers cast brings the drama to life, starring Michael Weaver as Darrow. (BN) Interplayers Theatre, $12-$28, opening night, Oct. 24, 7:30 pm

McCONKEY YOU HAVE ONE LIFE. LIVE IT.

OCTOBER 15th, 2013

BING CROSBY THEATRE

Doors open at 7 | Movie starts at 7:30

Tickets T H E AT E R

LEND ME A TENOR

You can’t have a farce without a few mistaken identities, and Lend Me a Tenor has them in spades. There’s also the jealous wife, the slamming of doors and ludicrous costumes. To go into the ins and outs would require far more space than we’re allotted here OCT. 25(this is farce, after all), but let’s just say NOV. 10 in a suitably breathless way that there’s a nervous tenor who’s supposed to play Othello in a Cleveland Grand Opera Company production, but then someone gives him a tranquilizer and he falls asleep and everyone thinks he’s dead but the show must go on so someone else fills in for him and earns rave reviews, resulting in confusion. Phew… and any disclosure more risks being a spoiler. (EI) Lake City Playhouse, $11-$17, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm

The Sports Creel 12505 E Sprague Ave 924-2330 or TicketsWest.com

(509)

The Friends of Manito Presents...

Saturday, September 21, 2013 11:00am to 2:00pm Manito Park

(East of Duncan Gardens on Tekoa Street)

Dress in Renaissance Costume & Become a Knight or Lady of the Court!

Games • rts • Crafts Treasure Quest Design a Princess or Robin Hood Hat Storytelling of the Era

NEW Fairy Glen & Catapult

provided by Spokane Renaissance Fair

www.friendsofmanito.org

FREE & Open to the Public SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 43

NOVEMBER

MAKING COOL STUFF} B

eyond the Linux-based computer lab, windows into smaller rooms reveal computer towers in various states of disassembly, tables of soldering tools and tiny microcontrollers, loose cords and wrenches. Shelves hold beige printers and an old brown telephone, stored in the building for years before the current DOERS tenants moved in. On every surface, assorted bits of technology lays unveiled, dissected and reimagined. “You wouldn’t know it, but we’ve done a lot of cleaning and sorting and throwing stuff away,” says Nathan Cutler.

44 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

“Yeah, this is about a thousand times better than it was when we started,” Dan McGee says. McGee and Cutler are board members, along with David Freiberger, of Spokane Create!, housed a few blocks off East Sprague Avenue in a low-profile building that trembles when trains rumble by on the neighboring tracks. Imagine a high-tech nerd clubhouse — then forget the glassy surfaces, rounded corners and high ceilings of an Apple Store. Forget The Matrix. Here, between these paneled woodgrain walls — “the beautiful wood grain,” McGee jokes — aesthetics

THE TECH-FOCUSED DIY MOVEMENT FINDS A HOME IN SPOKANE BY LISA WAANANEN

matter less than potential. Here, everything is seen for what it could become: A boxy old printer becomes a treasure chest of motors and parts. A siren sitting atop a filing cabinet is a challenge to come up with a good use for it. In the next room, members are calibrating a 3D printer made of 3D-printed parts. “One of the things we always love is building things that build other things,” McGee says. Each Wednesday evening, members stop by to work on their own projects and see what other guys are working on — and so far it is pretty much guys, though wives and girlfriends often tag along. The word “play” gets used

a lot. Don’t be intimidated by enthusiastic conversations about Arduinos and Raspberry Pi, CNC mills and step motors. These are nerds who want to teach you to nerd out with them. “We really want to encourage people to just try to do stuff,” Cutler says. “A lot of times people are so afraid to fail. And we want to give them skills on how to troubleshoot, so they can try to fix something on their own, and we want to encourage people to work together.” The idea for a space like this had been simmering online for some time when the group first got together the last weekend of January. Other cities have thriv-

ing community workshops — often called hackerspaces or makerspaces — grounded in the value of actual, physical places where people can collaborate and create actual, physical things. Most are tech-focused, but some have branched out into other types of making things, like sewing, cooking and more traditional art. A central idea is peer learning, which can mean classes and lectures or something much less formal. In Spokane, the word spread online through Reddit and Craigslist. The group started meeting regularly, but it was an exciting day in April when the owner of Banner Fuel said they were wel-

Nate Cutler (left) and Dan McGee work on a spark gap ignitor at Spokane Create! YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

come to set up shop in the building that hadn’t been used recently for anything but storage. Once a month, the group holds a meeting for any business and some type of learning activity, and Wednesdays are always open for whatever projects people have in mind. A recent project made a front door lock that members can access through wireless to get into the building whenever they want. Other projects are more about seeing what’s possible. Alan Chatham, who’s been promoting interactive art through events like Art Up Weekend and his organization Laboratory, is a bridge between the group’s more technical side and Spokane’s artistic community. Right now, Cutler says, someone who wants to learn how to machine something or design a circuit board pretty much has to sign up for a college class. The

hope is to get more tools and “cool stuff,” along with building a community of members who bring in new skills. “If we can get all these people with different backgrounds together, we can really learn from each other,” Cutler says. Anytime someone has knowledge others don’t becomes an opportunity for sharing. It’s a frustration McGee says he’s shared with others in the group, that learning new things isn’t a priority once you leave college. “It’s like you’re expected to just move on, and not to learn anymore,” he says. “And that’s one thing I think is very different about this group of people, that everybody has a real hunger for knowledge and really wants to keep pushing themselves.” n Find out more at spokanecreate.org.

FILM

FILM

GLBT FILM FESTIVAL

SANDPOINT FILM FESTIVAL

PERFORMANCE

C U LT U R E

MOMIX: BOTANICA

EPICUREAN DELIGHT

For the past 15 years Spokanites have been able to watch short films about one-night stands, drag queens, mistaken identities, mistaken genders, confused lovers and befuddled families, and longer films about identity and purpose, NOV. 1spirituality and religion, the aftermath NOV. 3 of AIDS, the horrors of hate crimes and the joy of marriage and children. The GLBT community has many faces and many art forms through which to express the complexity of the GLBT experience, but film, especially these independently funded works created by passionate directors, showcases GLBT humanity, in all of its shades, in a very real and tangible way to a wide audience. (AF) Riverpoint EWU Auditorium, prices and times vary

For dance enthusiasts and theater lovers alike, Momix: Botanica brings just the right amount of dazzling fantasy to the stage, all through the use of the human body. Creating scenes of nature via costumes, puppetry, lighting, custom-made props and music, Momix, a Connecticut-based dance company, attacks the senses by making the viewer wonder, “How in the heck did they manage that?” The multimedia experience will be held at the Fox and promises viewers raw and inventive dance at its best, exploring the seasons and senses through tantaNOV. 6 lizing imagery and thought-provoking expression. The company features Spokane native Amanda Hulen, making her first appearance in her hometown since becoming a professional dancer. (ER) Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, $28-$38, 7:30 pm

It seems these days every community wants to have its own take on Sundance. And for the fourth time around, Sandpoint is no exception. Local and international filmmakers alike are celebrated at this one-day event, while vying NOV. 2 for the coveted Audience Choice Awards along with first-, secondand third-place cash prizes. A Lifetime Achievement Award also will be given. Chances to mingle with the films’ creators are offered at pre- and postproduction parties. Submissions for the festival are open until Sept. 30. (LJ) Panida Theater, Block 1: Free; Block 2 and 3: $5, noon, 3 pm and 6 pm

Spokane is a great place to eat. Not buying it? Well, then get yourself to the 32nd installment of Epicurean Delight — which benefits the Inland Northwest Blood Bank — at the Spokane Convention Center and taste the food of more than 30 restaurants from around the Inland Northwest. The black-tie (or as close to black-tie as you can get) event allows you to load up on hors d’oeuvres, first courses, entrées and desserts created by a wide range of local chefs, all of whom will be on hand. There’s also a selection of local wines and beer to wash down NOV. 8 all this scrumptious fare. By the end of the night, judges announce the winners in each category, adding a little friendly competition to the evening. (MB) Spokane Convention Center, $150/person, 6 pm to midnight

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VISUAL ARTS

JOHN STOCKTON

MAC ART AUCTION

This NBA Hall of Famer and Spokane native didn’t say much when he was out on the court with the Utah Jazz, setting NBA career records for both assists and steals. He didn’t talk to reporters all that often, and even now, back living in Spokane, he keeps NOV. 9 a low profile. But this fall, Stockton releases his autobiography, appropriately titled Assisted, and finally opens up and tells the story of a life that began in Spokane’s Logan neighborhood and took him through Gonzaga and into the annals of basketball history. At this event, he’ll be on hand to sign his book just a few weeks after its release. If you ever wondered what was going through Stockton’s mind when he was slinging half-court passes to Karl Malone all of those years, here’s your chance to learn. Speaking of Malone, he penned the book’s foreword. (MB) Auntie’s Bookstore, 2 pm

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Our local arts community has certainly taken a few big blows this year, with organizations in just about every form of artistic expression struggling to maintain past levels of funding from both public and private sources. Those circumstances make events like the Northwest Museum of Arts NOV. 9 & Culture’s annual gala and juried art auction ever more important to continue preserving the arts community. This annual event is fancy — it’s blacktie optional and takes place at the swanky Davenport Hotel. All work up for auction this year is by Inland Northwest-based artists, and each piece was personally selected by Chris Bruce, director of the WSU Museum of Art. Part of the proceeds from the art sale benefit the MAC’s mission. (CS) Davenport Hotel, $100/person, 5 pm

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VISUAL ARTS

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Rose Bond’s innovative animations explore “the notion that buildings hold accretions of memory; how the brain seems to process multiple projections; and comments upon the archive and narratives that reshape them.” Her work has been described as “large scale architectural animation” and holds NOV. 12a dreamlike, unFEB. 7 canny edge. But because the images she reveals are so familiar and the renderings so vivid, the viewer can’t help but feel as if they have been to these places before, and this resultant sense of return is somewhat comforting and tangible. (AF) Whitworth’s Bryan Oliver Gallery/Lied Center for the Visual Arts, free, MonFri 10 am-6 pm, Sat 10 am-2 pm

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If you’re a public radio listener, Judy Carmichael needs little or no introduction. In addition to 20 years of hosting her own show, Judy Carmichael’s Jazz Inspired, she’s a frequent guest on A Prairie Home Companion and has received her fair share of mentions NOV. 11 on NPR’s Morning Edition. Count Basie — who for all his talent was never awarded with his own NPR show — also knew who Carmichael was. Out of respect for her skill, he nicknamed her “Stride,” pretty much acknowledging her as an embodiment of an entire jazz style. On this evening, she’ll perform selections from her new album Come and Get It, which boasts inspiration from musicians as diverse as Fats Waller and Peggy Lee. (EI) Bing Crosby Theater, $10-$20, 7:30 pm

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T H E AT E R

VISUAL ARTS

LETTERS HOME

GELAH PENN

“It got pretty scary here for a couple of days. The day after we started bombing, Saddam began launching scuds. The air raid sirens sound, everyone puts on their gas mask and then goes to the scud bunkers. It was pretty scary the first couple of times, but it started getting old. Especially when we shot them all down.” That’s from a letter a friend of mine wrote on NOV. 15March 23, 2003, and posted onNOV. 16 line earlier this year to mark 10 years since that date. Letters Home, performed by the traveling Griffin Theatre Company, is a play composed of similar letters from troops during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. With minimal set design, the show presents soldiers’ experiences of the uncertainty and comradeship of war, in their own words. (LW) Jones Theatre at Washington State University, 7:30 pm, $9-$18

The sinewy, abstract installations by New York City artist Gelah Penn fall somewhere between sketch and sculpture. The site-specific works don’t hang politely on walls or ignore them completely — they take over, as if they grew organically on the gallery walls like alien plants, both utterly beautiful and unsettling. Penn, who has described what she constructs as a “kind of NOV. 13meaty ephemerality,” is the visiting NOV. 14 artist of this year’s Visiting Artist Lecture Series. Penn is influenced by film noir and fiction; you know those uneasy sound effects they use in movies at tense moments? Looking at her works can feel sort of like that, in the most fascinating way possible. (LW) Nov. 13: Spokane Falls Community College, 11:30 am; Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 6:30 pm; Nov. 14: Eastern Washington University, noon. All free

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MOSCOW BALLET’S GREAT RUSSIAN NUTCRACKER

Each year a touring ballet company from some larger metropolitan area stops in the Inland Northwest to perform the traditional and beloved story of The Nutcracker in the weeks leading up to the holiday. And this year, Nutcracker fans are in for a treat. The Moscow Ballet — as in the capital of Russia — is set to perform NOV. 13the classic holiday ballet for two NOV. 14 nights at the Bing. Though the performance may be a little early in the season for some, it’s unknown whether or when Spokane will get another opportunity like this, as the award-winning Russian company usually sticks to bigger cities on its annual North American tour. It’s bound to be an experience unlike any other Nutcracker performance Spokane has seen. (CS) Bing Crosby Theater, $30-$177, 7:30 pm

MUSIC

NINE INCH NAILS, EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY

Trent Reznor, the multitalented singer, writer, instrumentalist and composer behind rock outfit Nine Inch Nails, has been busy in the past five years. Since indicating that NIN was no more, he started a music project with his wife, wrote movie scores, won an Oscar and a Grammy and performed at summer festivals. The ever-evolving artist delivered fans NOV. 19 a shocking surprise by releasing an eighth NIN album, Hesitation Marks, in August and announced a massive tour that stops in Spokane. A night of Reznor’s haunting industrial rock is paired with opening act Explosion in the Sky’s self-described “cathartic mini-symphonies.” (BN) Spokane Arena, $29.50-$69.50, 7:30 pm

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CLASSICAL

GREEN DAY’S AMERICAN IDIOT

SPOKANE STRING QUARTET

Billie Joe Armstrong and the men of Green Day wrote the rock opera American Idiot circa 2004, inspired — or pissed off — by the political climate of the Bush era. In 2008, they began a collaboration with Tony Award-winning director Michael Mayer to bring Saint Jimmy and Whatsername to life in a musical adaptation. The punk-rock characters have kicked traditional Broadway NOV. 22characters off the stage with their NOV. 23 leather studded boots, taking hundreds of audiences on an emotionally exhausting ride that still leaves them with enough energy for a standing ovation. The tale follows three disaffected suburban youth who flee to the city and find love, addiction, war and apathy. (BN) INB Performing Arts Center, $30-$75, 8 pm

The string quartet is arguably the best formation of classical instrument ensembles ever created. It contains the proper amount of brilliant voices — the rafter-seizing of the first violin, the meaty middle of the second violin and viola and the steady rudder of the cello. Back for their 35th season, the Spokane String Quartet employs this perfect formation to its highest capabilities, showing off the deeper cuts of the NOV. 24 quartet repertoire: John Pickard’s “String Quartet No. 5” and Sir Edward Elgar’s “Quartet in E Minor, Op. 83.” Pay no attention to the boring sound of the piece’s titles; they reflect nothing of the magic that will happen on stage when performed. (LJ) Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, $12-$20, 3 pm

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T H E AT E R

THE CHRISTMAS SCHOONER

What’s Christmas time without a elegantly adorned, aromatic evergreen tree to brighten the long winter nights? This holiday season, the Spokane Civic Theatre attempts to answer this question through its performance of the holidaythemed musical A Christmas Schooner. The story, based on real historic events, tells NOV. 22the tale of a 19th century schooner DEC. 22 on the Great Lakes whose captain risks his life to transport fir trees across the frigid winter waters from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to Chicago. There, the captain sold the trees mostly to the city’s German immigrants, who celebrated the long-practiced holiday tradition of decorating them inside their homes. The award-winning musical ran for 12 consecutive seasons in Chicago after its original debut in 1996. (CS) Spokane Civic Theatre, $22-$30, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm

MUSIC

Keep your family entertained all season long with ideas from our FAMILY section

PEARL JAM

The gods of rock and roll have smiled upon Spokane and — perhaps thanks in part to a Hail Mary request by the Inlander earlier this year — Pearl Jam is coming to Spokane for the first time in 20 years. You probably think Pearl Jam is a ’90s band about which we should care little. Wrong. They’re one of the biggest arena rock acts left in the country, and the fall tour that drops them off at the Spokane Arena is almost totally sold out in every city where it stops. Their new album is called Lightning Bolt. It comes NOV. 30 out on Oct. 14, and from the few tracks we’ve got our ears on, it’s a return to the aggressive, in-your-grill Pearl Jam of the Vitalogy era. This is going to be a hell of a show. (MB) Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena, $69.50, 7:30 pm

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 51

DECEMBER

Eastern Washington University writers and instructors (left to right): Natalie Kusz, Shawn Vestal, Christopher Howell, Sam Ligon and John Keeble. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

THE WORD BOOM} H

uddled around a table in a bustling South Hill pub, five writare THINKERS ers talking about writing. This is what writers do when they’re not writing, and it’s

52 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

not unusual for them to do it in places that might serve a beer or two. They’re talking about how it’s a good time to be a writer in Spokane. Local authors are releasing excellent books. Poetry readings have popped up all over

THE CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM AT EWU IS THE ENGINE OF SPOKANE’S THRIVING LITERARY SCENE BY MIKE BOOKEY town. Young people are getting excited about literature and writing. And whether these four men and one woman will admit it or not, they all have something to do with this as part of the creative writing Master of Fine Arts

program at Eastern Washington University — which has served as an engine of sorts, powering the literary surge you’ll find in the city and beyond. “The writing scene is vigorous in Spokane. And the artistic scene is really strong in this town,

and it really wasn’t 10 years ago,” says Sam Ligon, a novelist and EWU associate professor in the program who also serves as the editor of Willow Springs, the university’s literary magazine. “But we’re not the whole scene,” says Ligon after a pause.

Next to him, the poet Christopher Howell, an EWU professor and former Washington Book Award winner, chimes in. “It’s a natural attitude of the community, which is a creative and integrated community. No one is saying, ‘Hey, we need to make an impact,’” says Howell. But at the head of the table, John Keeble, nursing a pint of beer, knows how much the literary landscape has changed in Spokane since the advent of EWU’s creative writing program, the Inland Northwest Center for Writers. He’s now semi-retired, serving as the program’s professor emeritus as he prepares for the release this fall of his latest novel, The Shadows of Owls, but in the early 1970s he arrived at EWU from Rhode Island to find hardly a writer in sight. “There were no readings in Spokane. None. It’s hard to believe everything there is going on now,” says Keeble. Around the table, everyone nods. Across the table from Ligon, Keeble and Howell sits Natalie Kusz, a widely published memoirist who heads up the program, and Shawn Vestal, a SpokesmanReview columnist who studied under those around the table when he got his MFA about five years ago. This year he released his debut collection of short fiction, Godforsaken Idaho, which received positive reviews from regional and national publications. The two-year MFA program, conducted out of EWU’s Spokane branch, features about 50 students ranging in age from 22 to 58. Very few are from the region, Ligon notes. “About 90 percent of the students are from elsewhere in the country — all over the country.

That’s good for Spokane,” says Ligon. The program’s most visible public element is its Get Lit! literary festival, bringing big names to town each spring for a week of events including workshops, lectures and something called Pie and Whiskey — which is exactly what it sounds like — served with a chaser of readings from excellent wordsmiths. But the MFA students are out in the city beyond that festival — they enroll in internships with local organizations, and teach at prisons, nursing homes and schools through the Writers in the Community program. Kusz’s own child experienced one of the elementary school poetry sessions, giving her an inside perspective on what her own program is doing in the community. “At that age, the more physical-type kids are the safe people. When kids read their poetry in front of the class and realize it’s something they’re good at, that is powerful,” she says. With all this outreach, combined with a staff that includes award-winning novelist Gregory Spatz, creative nonfiction writer Rachel Toor and poet Jonathan Johnson, the school’s literary impact is hard to ignore. Add the graduates and local writers who serve as guest teachers, including Shann Ray and others, and that impact is even more discernible. Vestal has another way of measuring the boom in the Spokane literary scene. He just looks up at his bookshelf. “I decided that I should put all the books by people I know on one shelf. By the time I got the poetry and the short stories and the chapbooks, the books from Spokane people wouldn’t fit on that shelf,” he says. n

CLASSICAL

COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY

Would the Christmas holiday be complete without music from Mannheim Steamroller? A resounding no! And Coeur d’Alene Symphony knows it. That’s why the second half of their two ChristDEC. 4 mas at the Kroc concerts will include arrangements by these popular re-inventors of Yuletide favorites. The first half will feature Brahms’ Violin Concerto in D major, which has only tenuous Christmas links at best (it debuted on New Year’s Day in 1879), yet was catchy enough to serve as the inspiration for “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” from the Andrew Lloyd Webber/Tim Rice musical Evita. The symphony’s very own Karen Hoatson will solo. (EI) Salvation Army Kroc Center, $40-$80, 7:30 pm T H E AT E R

CHRISTMAS BELLES

Jessie Jones, one of the co-writers of Dearly Departed, which Lake City Playhouse staged just over two years ago, clearly has an itch to scratch. He’s a co-writer of this holiday-themed farce that gleefully wallows in the same comedic milieux: a dysfunctional Southern family and a ridicuDEC. 6-22 lously over-the-top cast of supporting characters that includes an ornery Santa and an Elvis impersonator. Every trailer park stereotype you can think of gets draped in tinsel and lights as the Futrelle Sisters (Frankie, Twink and Honey Raye) attempt to stage a Christmas program for the town to remember. Suffice it to say, it should be refreshingly chaotic holiday fare. (EI) Lake City Playhouse, $11$17, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm

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Perhaps you remember Loretta Swit from the 1980s television version of one of the greatest Christmas stories ever — about a family full of badass little hoodlums who end up being cast in the annual Christmas Pageant. (Mary had a dirty face! And the shepherds said swear words!) Yes, there are antics galore and neighborhood gossips, but eventually the good Christians (after DEC. 12a bit of healthy shaming) relearn the true meaning DEC. 20 of Christmas. The JACC’s theater troupe may not have Loretta Swit, but it’s hard to imagine the cast will lack the charm necessary to pull off this heartwarming story. There’s a happy ending and a moral, so bring the kids. (AF) The Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, $10-$15, 7:30 pm

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MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET: THE MUSICAL

The musical world can be grateful that Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins were never on a plane together, and perhaps even more grateful that those four once converged on a Memphis recording studio in 1956, where they played one DEC. 12another’s top hits, made a record and never got together DEC. 15 again. Fortunately, that December night is re-enacted on stage for those of us who failed to, umm, be born prior to the Vegas years. So relive, or live, the glory that was the golden age of rock and roll at the INB, where the Tony-award winning musical is performed as the latest edition of West Coast Entertainment’s Best of Broadway. (AF) INB Performing Arts Center, $35-$75, show times vary

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DECEMBER C U LT U R E

FIRST NIGHT

Downtown Spokane will transform into a massive extravaganza on Dec. 31 to welcome the first moments of 2014. First Night is more than just a New Year’s party, inviting families and their kids to mingle for a night of art and culture. Nearly 40 venues host around 150 of the region’s dancers, singers and visual artists. This year, cabaret singer Abbey Crawford brings Miss Abbey’s Steampunk Spectacular at the Convention Center, complete with a steam engine-era art exhibit and bellydancing. A karaoke competition called “Singing in the New Year” holds all-ages auditions on First Friday events at the STA Plaza in October, November and December. After a DEC. 31 public vote, the top eight face off at the New Year’s party, with the winner crowned king or queen of karaoke. (BN) Downtown Spokane (multiple venues), $13, 6 pm

56 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

CLASSICAL

NEW YEAR’S AT THE SYMPHONY

You could ring in the New Year surrounded by a bunch of drunks at a bar, or you could make a more classy evening of it. The Spokane Symphony and Chorale is here to help with that. Their New Year’s Eve ode to joy begins with a performance of Beethoven’s DEC. 31 spectacular Ninth Symphony, a holiday tradition from Germany introduced by music director Eckart Preu, followed by a “Puttin’ on the Ritz” party at the Davenport. These tickets have sold out every year, so act accordingly. (LJ) Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, $16-$23, 7:30 pm

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CALENDAR

Culture

9/20-22 Valleyfest, Mirabeau Park and CenterPlace 9/21-10/27 Apple Festival at Walter’s Fruit Ranch 9/21 Equinox Artists’ Fair, Revel 77 Coffee 9/21 From Hell to Healing: Song & Stories of Iraq War

veteran Jason Moon, Unitarian Universalist Church

9/21 Pyrate Revel, Northwest Renaissance Festival 9/22 Moscow Food Co-op 40th Anniversary Carnival

Film

SEPTEMBER 19-25 Classical

9/19 Faculty Chamber Music Series, University of Idaho 9/20 Jazz Band and Choir concerts, University of Idaho 9/21-22 Spokane Symphony Classics: Virtuosity Required, The Fox Theater

9/22 A Grand Interlude, Harrington Opera House 9/24 WSU Faculty Artist Series: En Chamade and the WSU Brass Quintet, Bryan Hall Theatre

9/25 Spokane Symphony Ensembles, Spokane Valley Library

9/24 French Film Festival: “Rust and Bone,” Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre

9/24 “Gasland Part II” documentary, Bing Crosby Theater 9/25 “Age of Champions,” Garland Theater 9/25 SpIFF Professor Series: “Pan’s Labyrinth,” Bing Crosby Theater

Music 9/19 9/19 9/20 9/20 9/20 9/20

Dizzy Wright and Emilio Rojas, The Center Ray Wylie Hubbard, Chateau Rive Colby Acuff and Justin Sherfey, The Phat House Diesto, Rasputin and Bloody Gloves, Carr’s Corner Green Jelly and Xingaia, The Hop! Spokane Songwriters feat. Dirk Lind, Allen Surdez, Dave McRae and Brett Dodd , Grande Ronde Cellars 9/20 Table Top Joe, Mootsy’s 9/21 Adrenaline Rush, The Center 9/21 Brothers ov Midnite, NOBE, MJ + Inhuman Beatbox and Tear Free, Mootsy’s 9/21 Kid Rock, Northern Quest Casino 9/21 Rock Hard in the Park feat. Five Finger Death Punch, Greyhound Park 9/21 Walking Corpse Syndrome, Ruines Ov Abaddon and

The Center The Vibrators and Collateral Damage, The Hop! Jaeda + Half Zodiac and Jonny October, Mootsy’s Matt Nathanson and Joshua Radin, Knitting Factory The Queers and others, The Center Jason Aldean and Jake Owen, Spokane Arena Plain White T’s, Knitting Factory The Contenders, University of Idaho

9/19-11/3 Two to Tango: Artist and Viewer, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

9/20-12/14 Made in the USA: Rosenquist / Rushcha, Museum of Art/WSU

9/20-10/6 Melissa Cole, Manic Moon & More 9/20-11/8 Wood & Watercolor Show, The JACC 9/21 Free Family Saturday at the MAC 9/23-10/18 Mapping the Spokane (River) installation and community project, SFCC Fine Arts Gallery

9/25 Lecture by artist Paul Vexler, WSU Pullman

Theater

9/19-22, 9/25 Brighton Beach Memoirs, Interplayers 9/19-22 Damn Yankees, Lake City Playhouse 9/20-22 Les Misérables, Spokane Civic Theatre 9/20 Spokane Civic Theater 67th Anniversary Gala 9/20-22 The Box Production: Asylum, Theater Arts for Children

9/20-22 The Importance of Being Earnest, Pend Oreille Playhouse

Visual Arts

9/19-9/27 All Media Juried Show, Chase Gallery 9/19-11/2 American Prints from the Permanent Collection, Jundt Art Museum

9/19-30 Casey Klahn , Arbor Crest Tasting Room 9/19-11/1 Compulsive Continuation, A Celebration of Her 90th: Pauline Anderson Haas, Bryan Oliver Gallery

9/19-30 Dennis Smith, Pottery Place Plus 9/19-10/12 Drawn to the Wall V, Jundt Art Museum 9/19-10/5 Harold Balazs: Alive at 85, and Mel McCuddin:

Lately 80, The Art Spirit Gallery 9/19-10/9 Julene Evert, Moscow Food Co-op 9/19-28 Margot Casstevens & Carrie Scozzaro, Saranac Art 9/19-28 Tresia Oosting, Tinman Gallery 9/19-10/12 Robert S. Neuman: Definition of Place, 19522012, Prichard Art Gallery 9/19-27 Sarah Beaty, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery 9/19-12/31 SPOMa: Spokane Modern Architecture, MAC

The Plain White T’s come to town on Sept. 25.

Words 9/19 9/20 9/21 9/21 9/21 9/25 9/25

Author Kathy McIntosh, Auntie’s Bedtime Stories Spokane: “Pillow Talk,” Spokane Club Author Mark Porter, Auntie’s Author Scott Elliott, Auntie’s Local Author Saturday, BookPeople of Moscow Dinty W. Moore, University of Idaho Law School Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

This FALL, set your Pace www.VisitSandpoint.com

Scenic Half Marathon

WaCanId Bike Tour

Draft Horse and Mule International

Harvest Wine Walk

Oktoberfest

It’s a fall full of frenzy Toast the season at Fall Fest, Aug. 31Sept. 2 at Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Gawk at the scenery in the Scenic Half Marathon, Sept. 15, and in the WaCanId bike ride, Sept. 16-21.

Then watch gentle giants at the Idaho Draft Horse and Mule International, Sept. 19-22. Come October, celebrate the season all month during Harvest Wine Walk, Oct. 3-Nov. 2, plus at Oktoberfest,

Beautiful MOST

SMAL

Oct. 5, and Harvest Fest, Oct. 12. Then Oct. 19 the Warren Miller Ski Film primes the pump for ski season. Go to www.VisitSandpoint.com to set your pace this fall!

L T OW N

2 011 What a Beautiful PACE SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 57

SEPTEMBER

26-OCT.2

Classical

9/26 WSU Symphony Orchestra, Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU 9/27 Brad Richter & Vicktor Uzur, The JACC 9/27 WSU Faculty Artist Series: “Dawn to Dusk in Song,” 9/28 9/28 9/29 10/1 10/1-2 10/1

Bryan Hall Theatre Spokane Jazz Orchestra: “Cabaret,” The Bing Washington Idaho Symphony, Jones Theater WSU Washington Idaho Symphony, Clarkston High School John & Gerald Clayton, University of Idaho Spokane Symphony: Chamber Soiree, Spokane Club WSU Jazz Band Concert, Bryan Hall Theatre

Comedy

9/27 Before It’s In Theaters, Blue Door Theatre 9/28 Safari, Blue Door Theatre

Culture

9/26-28 78th Annual Greek Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church

9/26 Annual Gala and Fundraiser, The Kenworthy 9/27 10th annual Courtyard step show, University of Idaho 9/27-28 Mad Hatter Vintage Flea Market, Five Mile Grange 9/28 Jay Owenhouse, INB Performing Arts Center 9/28 “Under the Sky Light” Fall Equinox dinner and concert, Bank Left Gallery 9/28-29 Inland Empire Philatelic Society Apple Harvest Stamp Show, Hilton Garden Inn, Airway Heights 10/2 “Are You an Inlander?” trivia competition, The Viking

Film

9/26 “Long Distance Revolutionary: A Journey with Mumia-Abu Jamal,” Magic Lantern

9/26 “Waiting for Superman,” The Book Parlor 10/1 French Film Festival: “Chicken with Plums,” The Kenworthy

Music 9/26 9/26 9/26 9/26 9/27 9/27 9/27 9/27 9/27 9/27 9/27 9/27 9/28 9/28 9/28 9/28 9/28 9/28 9/28 9/28 9/28 9/29 9/29 9/29 9/29 9/30 10/1-2 10/1 10/1 10/2 10/2

Frightened Rabbit with Augustines, Knitting Factory Nicole Lewis, Arbor Crest Winery Steve Earle & The Dukes, The Mastersons, The Bing The Dodgy Mountain Men, Jones Radiator Andre Feriante & the Bohemian Entourage, The Bing Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Citizen Cope, Knitting Factory Dick Hensold, Pend d’Oreille Winery Guitars for Kids benefit concert feat. The RBC Band, Junkyard Duo, Republic Brewing Co. Lavoy, nYne Bar Learning Team, Mootsy’s Ra the Rugged Man with guests, The Center Beyond Belief, Evolved and others, The Center Dick Hensold, Caridwen and Greg Spatz, Mosaic Fellowship Elton Jah and others, Knitting Factory Flaamingos with Mirror Mirror, Jones Radiator Hog Heaven Big Band, Dahmen Barn Inland Northwest Blues Society feat. VooDoo Church and Lonesome Lyle Morse, The JACC Lei Majors CD Release Party, The Hop! Maroon 5 with Kelly Clarkson, The Gorge Satriarch, Skinwalker and more, Carr’s Corner Common Ground, Arbor Crest Winery Gin Blossoms, Coeur d’Alene Casino Natty Vibes with The Steppas, The Center Psyclon Nine and Dawn of Ashes, The Hop! Zedd with Oliver and Alex Metric, Knitting Factory Caravan of Thieves, John’s Alley Dark Star Orchestra (Grateful Dead Tribute), The Bing Tech N9ne with guests, Knitting Factory Andy McKee, Bing Crosby Theater Datsik with guests, Knitting Factory

Interplayers’ 2013-2014 main stage season opener is Brighton Beach Memoirs, which runs through Oct. 12.

Theater

9/26-29, 10/2 Brighton Beach Memoirs, Interplayers 9/26-29 Damn Yankees, Lake City Playhouse 9/26-29 Les Misérables, Spokane Civic Theater 9/27-28 Hit and Run Playwrights Festival, Stage Left Theater 9/27-28 Missoula Children’s Theater: Robinson Crusoe, Beasley Coliseum

9/27-28 The Counselor, Panida Theater 9/27-29 The Importance of Being Earnest, Pend Oreille Playhouse

9/28 Heart for the Arts Gala, Liberty Lake Theatre

Visual Arts

9/28 Little Spokane Artist Studio Tour, North Spokane 9/28 Spokane Valley Arts Council Artist Showcase and Auction, CenterPlace Event Center

10/1-12/31 “Birds in Art” group exhibition, Chase Gallery 10/1-11/5 Landescapes Exhibition, WSU Pullman 10/1-10/31 The ArtFall Season, Gallery Northwest

Words

9/26 Author Jan Martinez, Auntie’s 9/26 Lecture: Building for War, Civilian Contractors and Marines of Wake Island, North Spokane Library

9/27 Poet Janee Baugher, Auntie’s 9/27 Washington state Poet Laureate Kathleen Flenniken, Chewelah Civic Center

9/28 100,000 Poets for Change, Sandpoint 9/28 Inland Northwest Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators’ 9th Annual Conference, Spokane Club

9/28 Lecture: Building for War, Civilian Contractors and Marines of Wake Island, Spokane Valley Library

9/29 Palouse Country Cowboy Poet Association, Dahmen Barn 10/1 North Idaho Reads: Food and Memories with Chef 10/2 10/2 10/2 10/2

Adam Hegsted, Coeur d’Alene Casino Broken Mic, Neato Burrito F-Word Live Poetry Slam, The Kenworthy Lecture: The Magnificent Peutinger Map, The MAC Visiting Writers Series: Bruce Holbert and Shawn Vestal, Gonzaga University

Sept 20 – Oct 20, 2013 The

Christmas Schooner

Nov 22 – Dec 22, 2013

Second Samuel

SUDS

Crazy for You

The

Jan 17 – Feb 9, 2014

April 4 – 19, 2014

The Tempest

Becky’s New Car

The Mousetrap

Gypsy

Oct 25 – Nov 24, 2013

Jan 31 – Feb 23, 2014 Feb 28 – March 16, 2014

March 14 – April 13, 2014

Three Musketeers

May 2 – June 1, 2014

May 16 – June 15, 2014

Apple Festival

Weekends sept 21 - oct 27

Tickets: 509-325-2507

www.SpokaneCivicTheatre.com TicketsWest: 1-800-325-SEAT | 1020 N Howard St.

58 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

U-Pick Apples & Pumpkins, Live Music, Pony Rides, Face Painting, Corn Cannon, Pea Box, Breakfast, BBQ, Caramel Apples & Sweet Treats in Cafe, and Much More!

appleranch.com • 505-238-4709

OCTOBER 3-9 Classical

Comedy

10/3 Laugh for the Cure feat. Shaun Jones and Drew Barth, 10/4 10/5

Culture

10/3-5 Humanitas: World Arts Festival, WSU 10/3 Step Afrika!, Beasley Coliseum 10/4 African Music Concert, Dahmen Barn 10/4-6 Custer’s Fall Antique Show, Spokane County Fair &

10/3 Spokane Symphony Ensembles, Airway Heights

10/4

10/3 10/4 10/5

10/5 10/5 10/5

10/5 10/5 10/5 10/8

Library WSU Wind Ensemble & Symphonic Band, Bryan Hall WSU Faculty Artist Series: “Basso Continuum,” Bryan Hall Live simulcast of The Metroplitan Opera’s “Eugene Onegin,” Regal Cinemas Northtown & Riverstone KPBX Kids’ Concert: Baroque TubaFest, River Park Square Omar Faruk Tekbilek, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center Spokane Symphony Ensembles, Cheney Library WSU Faculty Artist Series: Solstice Wind Quartet, Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU

The Lincoln Center Short Stacks and No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre Safari, Blue Door Theatre

Expo Center Spokane Valley Rotary Men of Fashion Show fundraiser, CenterPlace Event Center German-American Society Oktoberfest, Deutsches Haus Nordic Spirit Concert, Dahmen Barn Spokane Beard & Mustache Epic Beard Competition, The Vault Social Club

Film

10/3 “Not My Life” screening hosted by Sandie Morgan, 10/3

Bing Crosby Theater “GMO-OMG,” The Magic Lantern

10/3 10/5 10/7 10/8 10/10

Manhattan Short Film Festival, The Kenworthy G-Dog, Panida Theater Cult Film Festival, Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre French Film Festival: “La Pirogue,” The Kenworthy “The Act of Killing,” Magic Lantern

Music

10/3 Bullet for My Valentine with guests, Knitting Factory 10/3 Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar 10/3 The Novocaines, Exile Parade and The Copper Gamins, The Center

10/3-4 The True Spokes, John’s Alley 10/4 Authority Zero with Storm Normandy, The Center 10/4 Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar 10/4 Okaidja & Shokoto, African music performance, WSU 10/4 Ron Keiper, Pend d’Oreille Winery 10/4 The Alliance, Bing Crosby Theater 10/4 The Coalition, The Hop! 10/5 Battle of the Bands Toys for Tots Fundraiser Concert,

Spokane Valley Eagles 10/5 The Family Band feat. Ricky Raccoon and Rusty Nail, LeftBank Wine Bar 10/5 The Valley with guests, Mootsy’s 10/6 Bon Jovi, Spokane Arena 10/6 Hooligan Records, The Hop! 10/6 The Bartlett soft opening feat. Pickwick and Tomten, nYne Bar 10/6 Thomas Rhett, WSU Pullman 10/7-8 Fox Street Allstars, John’s Alley 10/8 Krewella with guests, Knitting Factory 10/9 Douglas Cameron, John’s Alley 10/9 K.O.E., Dirty Savage, Mutiny Inc. and others, The Hop!

Performance

10/4 “Bad Girls, I’m Talking ‘Bout Them Bad Girls,” SCC Lair 10/4 Veggie Tales Live, The Fox Theater 10/5-6 Spokane Renaissance Faire, Green Bluff 10/5 Star Searchin’ Finals, Knitting Factory Veggie Tales Live stops at the Fox Theater on Oct. 4

The 201 3 Spokane

10/6 “Costly Desires” feat. the Dry Bones Arts Collective of Seattle, Bing Crosby Theater

10/7 Festival Dance: Aché Brasil, Beasley Coliseum

Theater

10/3-5 Damn Yankees, the musical, Lake City Playhouse 10/3-6 Les Misérables, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/3-6 Ordinary Time, Hartung Theater, U. of Idaho 10/4-5 “Ax of Murder,” Circle Moon Theater 10/4-5 The Counselor, Panida Theater 10/5-6, 10/9 Brighton Beach Memoirs, Interplayers Theatre 10/6 Capitol Steps, the Musical, INB Performing Arts Center 10/6 Frosh on Stage, Whitworth University

Visual Arts

10/3-9 Art from the Heart, Coeur d’Alene 10/3-27 Palouse Watercolor Socius exhibition, Dahmen Barn 10/4-25 Annual Archie Bray Foundation Resident Show, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery

10/4-31 Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore and Gina Freuen, Trackside Studio Ceramic Gallery

10/4-26 Dan McCann & Bernadette Vielbig, Saranac Art Projects 10/4-26 Intuitive Chaos: Larry Ellingson, Spokane Art School 10/4-31 Linda Lowry, Arbor Crest Tasting Room 10/4-31 Neil Clemons: “phoTEXTography,” Pottery Place Plus 10/4-11/16 Still Vertical: Harold Balazs & Mel McCuddin, Tinman Gallery

10/4 Terrain, Music City Building 10/4-5 Visual Arts Tour, Downtown Spokane

Words

10/3 Author Chet Caskey, Auntie’s 10/3-5 Individual World Poetry Slam, Downtown Spokane 10/4 Author Tess Taylor, BookPeople of Moscow 10/6 BootSlam, Boots Bakery & Lounge 10/6 Poet Melissa Lowdon, Auntie’s 10/7 Author Paul Bogard, BookPeople of Moscow 10/8 Visiting Writers Series: Garnet Hertz, WSU Pullman 10/9 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito 10/9 Sherman Alexie, Auntie’s

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 59

OCTOBER 10-16 Classical

Comedy

10/11 No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre 10/11-12 Nuthouse Improv Comedy Troupe, WSU 10/12 Baby Boomer Comedy Show, The Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre

10/12 Safari, Blue Door Theatre

Film

10/11 Banff Radical Reels, Panida Theater 10/12 Radical Reels Film Tour, Bing Crosby Theater 10/13 “The Walking Dead” Season 4 Premeire, Bing Crosby Theater

10/11-12 Coeur d’Alene Symphony: Picture This!, Kroc Center 10/11 WSU Vocal Extravaganza, Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU 10/12-13 Spokane Symphony Classics: Welcome to Zuill,

10/14 “American Winter,” Bing Crosby Theater 10/14 Cult Film Festival, Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre 10/15 French Film Festival: “Romantics Anonymous,”

10/13 James Reid, classical guitar, St. John’s Cathedral 10/14 Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra wtih Arianna

10/16 Food for Thought Film Series: “Yogawoman,”

Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre

Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre

10/16 SpIFF Professor Series: “Amelie,” Bing Crosby Theater

Zukerman, The Fox Theater

Music 10/10 10/10 10/10 10/10 10/10 10/10 10/11 10/11 10/11 10/11

Blaze & Kelly, Panida Theater Diamond Head, Raven and others, The Hop! Disclosure with T. Williams, Knitting Factory Maria In the Shower, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Sun Blood Stories, John’s Alley Har Mar Superstar, The Center Heart, Beasley Coliseum Kid Ink, Knitting Factory Koffin Kats, Reason for Existence and Almost Home, The Hop! 10/11 Life in Color: 2013 Rebirth Tour, Spokane Arena 10/11-12 McTuff, John’s Alley 10/11 One Street Over, Pend d’Oreille Winery 10/11 Starlite Motel, LeftBank Wine Bar 10/12 Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar 10/12 The Radical Something with Down With Webster, The Center 10/12 Widower, Apollo, Perceptionist and others, The Hop! 10/13 Gwar with Whitechapel, Iron Reagan and A Band of Orcs, Knitting Factory 10/13 The Maxies and The Beat, The Hop! 10/14 Hemlock, The Hop! 10/14 Zeds Dead with Paper Diamond and others, Knitting Factory 10/15 Deicide, Disgorge, Broken Hope and others, The Hop! 10/16 Brothers Gow, John’s Alley 10/16 Carbon Leaf with Brian Wright, Knitting Factory 10/16 Sons of Providence, The Hop!

Performance

10/10-11 Spooky Spokane walking tours, The Fox Theater 10/11-12 Creepy Hallow, Northwest Renaissance Festival 10/13 Vicki Lawrence & Mama: A Two Woman Show, Northern Quest Casino

Vicki Lawrence & Mama: A Two Woman Show hits Northern Quest on Oct. 13.

CUSTER’S 38

TH

Antique

Visual Arts

10/10-12 Art from the Heart, Coeur d’Alene 10/11 Beyond Pink Designer Bra Fashion Show and Auction at Spokane Convention Center

10/11-11/2 Allen and Mary Dee Dodge, The Art Spirit 10/11 ArtWalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 10/11-11/6 Ron Seiler, Moscow Food Co-op 10/12-11/2 Artist Dan Kiessling, Bank Left Gallery

Words

10/10 Author Mary Brooks, Auntie’s 10/10 Spokane is Reading feat. Maria Semple, Spokane Convention Center and CenterPlace

10/11 The Journey Toward Justice: Sister Helen Prejean, Gonzaga University

10/12 Author Eldon Taylor, Panida Theater 10/12 Author Liza Bley, Auntie’s 10/15 Presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, Whitworthy University

10/16 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

$175 Reserved Table of Six $35 General Admission $15 EWU Student

SALE

October 4 - 5- 6, 2013 Saturday

Sunday

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Spokane Fair & Expo Center

Presented by:

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6 Admission

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Good all weekend! Kids 12 & under free

60 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Anything Goes, the Musical, INB Performing Arts Center 10/10-12 Brighton Beach Memoirs, Interplayers Theatre 10/10-13 Les Misérables, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/10-13 Ordinary Time, Hartung Theater, U. of Idaho 10/10 Sacagawea: An Interpretive Dramatization, SFCC Spartan Theatre 10/11-12 “Ax of Murder” mystery dinner theater, Circle Moon Theater 10/11-12 “Reunion with Murder” mystery dinner theater, The Cutter Theatre 10/11-13 It Was a Dark and Stormy Night, StageWest Theater at Emmanuel Lutheran Church 10/11-13 M*A*S*H, Pullman Civic Theater 10/11 Murder at the Bing, Bing Crosby Theater 10/11-12 The Counselor, Panida Theater 10/11-13 The Wakefield Mysteries, Whitworth University, Cowles Auditorium

Purchase Your Tickets Today!

Collectors

Friday

10/10-13

ANNUAL

FALL

&

Theater

509-924-0588 www.CusterShows.com

OCTOBER 17-23 Classical

10/17 WSU Faculty Artist Series: “Heavy Metal,” Kimbrough 10/19 10/20 10/20 10/22

Hall Spokane Symphony Superpops: Symphony Idol, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox Palouse Choral Society: Encore!, St. Boniface Catholic Church, Uniontown Spokane String Quartet: Counterculture, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox WSU Faculty Artist Series: Collaborative and Solo Works for Violin and Viola, Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU

Comedy

10/18 No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre 10/19 Safari, Blue Door Theatre

Culture

10/17-18 Spooky Spokane walking tours, The Fox Theater 10/18-20 Bead Stampede, Spokane County Fair & Expo

Center 10/18-20 Washington State Quilters Show, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 10/19 Brongaene Griffin: Celtic music, Dahmen Barn 10/19 The Pumpkin Ball, Spokane Convention Center 10/20 Spokane Preservation Advocates’ Autumn Historic Homes Tour, Millwood

Film

10/17 The Inlander’s Suds & Cinema film series, Dazed and Confused, Bing Crosby Theater

10/18-19 Wild & Scenic Film Festival, Panida Theater 10/23 Warren Miller’s Ticket to Ride, WSU Pullman

Music

10/17 Jonathan Warren & The Billy Goats, John’s Alley 10/17 Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar

10/17 Red Fang, The Center 10/18 Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar 10/18-19 Industrial Revelation, John’s Alley 10/18 Passion Pit with The Joy Formidable, Knitting Factory 10/18 Ruff Shod, Pend d’Oreille Winery 10/18 Society 1 with The Maension, The Center 10/18 The Moody Blues, Northern Quest Casino 10/19 Living Colour, Knitting Factory 10/19 Nine Pint Coggies, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center 10/19 The Avett Brothers with Nicholas David, INB 10/19 10/20 10/20 10/21 10/21 10/22 10/23 10/23

Performing Arts Center Tommy G., LeftBank Wine Bar El Katif Shrine Band, Harrington Opera House Monsters Scare You! with guests, The Hop! Joe Pug with Vandaveer, Mikey’s Gyros Joe Satriani, The Fox Theater The Used with William Control, Knitting Factory Songwriters in the Cellar, Grande Ronde Cellars The Freeway Revival Band, John’s Alley

Performance

10/18 Martha Redbone Roots Project, Daggy Hall, WSU 10/18-19 Creepy Hallow, Northwest Renaissance Festival 10/18-19 Stage One , Wadleigh Theater, WSU 10/19 “A Night of Edgar Allen Poe” with Lake City Playhouse, Bing Crosby Theater

Theater

10/17-20 Les Misérables, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/17-20 M*A*S*H, Pullman Civic Theater 10/18-19 “Ax of Murder” mystery dinner theater, Circle Moon Theater

10/18-20 Death by Chocolate, Liberty Lake Theatre 10/18-19 It Was a Dark and Stormy Night, StageWest

10/18-12/1 “Comic Art Indigene,” art from the New Mexico Museum of Indian Art, Prichard Art Gallery

10/18-11/16 “Life on the Lake” juried photography exhibition, Redtail Gallery

10/18 Mapping the Spokane lecuture and reception with Gregg Schlanger, SFCC Fine Arts Gallery

10/22-11/19 Bordering the Surreal: Photos by Jim Stone,

David Graham and others, SFCC Fine Arts Gallery

10/22-12/20 Leslie W. LePere: Magic of the Objects, Jundt Art Museum

Words

10/17 Author Sarah Conover, Auntie’s 10/17 Authors Jim and Linda Hunt: “Bold Spirited Travelers,” North Spokane Library

10/17 Cliff Barackman: Finding Bigfoot lecture, WSU 10/18 “You Are Next” feat. four teen literature authors, Auntie’s Bookstore

10/19 Authors Jim and Linda Hunt: “Bold Spirited Travelers,” Argonne Library

10/19 Local Author Saturday, BookPeople of Moscow 10/20 Authors Jim and Linda Hunt: “Bold Spirited Travelers,” Cheney Library

10/20 Investigative journalist and author Christian Parenti, Bing Crosby Theater

10/20 Spokane Poetry Slam, The Lantern Tap House 10/21 Author Steven Jimenez, Auntie’s 10/22 Visiting Writers Series: Washington state Poet

Laureate Kathleen Flenniken, Museum of Art/WSU

10/18-20 Sherlock Holmes, Theater Arts for Children

10/23 Visiting Writers Series: Lisa Olstein, Gonzaga

Lake City Playhouse performs A Night of Edgar Allen Poe at the Bing on Oct. 19.

Liza Bley 10/12 Sarah Conover 10/17 Steven Jimenz 10/21 Poet Laureate Panel 10/23 Laurie Frankel 10/25 Rosanne Parry 10/29 Marissa Meyer 10/30 3 Minute Mic 11/01 John Stockton 11/09 Carol Hipperson 11/11 Jeannie Opdyke 11/14 Nance Van Winckel 11/15 Brandon Cole 11/19 Kate McLachlan 11/22 Small Business Saturday Events 11/ 11/30

Visual Arts

10/18-20 Little Shop of Horrors, Ignite! Community Theatre

Chety Caskey 10/03 Fall Johny Keeble 10/04 Events Sherman Alexie 10/09 Preview: Mary Brooks 10/10

The Wakefield Mysteries, Whitworth University, Cowles Auditorium 10/23 Carrie the Musical, Bing Crosby Theater

10/23 Author Tyehimba Jess, University of Idaho 10/23 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito 10/23 Panel of Poet Laureates feat. Kenn Nesbitt, Kathleen

Theater at Emmanuel Lutheran

402 W. Main Ave. Spokane, WA 99201 (509) 838-0206

10/18-19

Spokane String Quartet

Flenniken and Diane Raptosh, Auntie’s University

3 P.M. SUNDAY, OCT. 20, 2013 MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX

3 P.M. SUNDAY, NOV. 24, 2013 BING CROSBY THEATER

3 P.M. SUNDAY, JAN. 19, 2014 BING CROSBY THEATER with Dawn Wolski, soprano and Larry Jess, trumpet

3 P.M. SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 2014 MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX with Lydia Brown, piano

3 P.M. SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014 BING CROSBY THEATER

Even more events to come!

For tickets call (800) 325-SEAT or visit

www.auntiesbooks.com

www.spokanestringquartet.org SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 61

OCTOBER 24-30

Film 10/24 10/25 10/25 10/26 10/28

Warren Miller’s Ticket to Ride, WSU Pullman SpIFF Halloween Film screening, Garland Theater Warren Miller’s Ticket to Ride, Bing Crosby Theater Warren Miller’s Ticket to Ride, Panida Theater Cult Film Festival, Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre

Music

10/23 Macklemore & Ryan Lewis with Talib Kweli, Big Krit,

Classical

10/24 WSU Faculty Artist Series: “Art Songs of England,” Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU

10/25 Gonzaga Choir: The Luminous Soul, St. Aloysius Catholic Church

10/26 Gonzaga Men’s and Women’s Choruses, Gonzaga University, Chapel Hall

10/26-27 Spokane Symphony Classics: Angels are Among Us, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

10/26 WSU Choral Festival, Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU

Comedy

10/25 No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre 10/26 Safari, Blue Door Theatre

Culture

10/24-25 Fall Craft Fair, Providence Sacred Heart 10/24-25 Spooky Spokane walking tours, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 10/25-26 Autumn Arts and Crafts Festival, Beasley Coliseum, WSU Pullman 10/25 Masque-your-aid Benefit for Communities in Schools of Spokane County, Red Lion Hotel at the Park 10/26 Odyssey Youth Masquerade: Werewolves of London, The Lincoln Center 10/26 Unity Spiritual Center Arts & Crafts Festival, Unity Spiritual Center

10/24 10/24 10/25 10/25 10/25 10/26 10/26 10/26 10/26 10/27 10/27 10/28 10/29 10/30

Spokane Arena David Nail, Knitting Factory Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Federico Aubele with Lisa Alma and Bias, The Bartlett Steve Neff, Pend d’Oreille Winery Hog Heaven Big Band, Dahmen Barn Kari Marguerite, LeftBank Wine Bar Odyssey, Xingaia, Seven Cycles, Honey Badger and more, The Hop! Polyrythmics, John’s Alley American Me and Thick as Blood, The Hop! Styx, Clearwater River Casino Okkervil River with Matthew E. White, Knitting Factory John Wayne and The Pain, John’s Alley Hooligan Records, The Hop!

Performance

Warren Miller’s 2013 touring winter sports action film Ticket to Ride hits several venues in the Northwest this week. Theater at Emmanuel Lutheran

10/25-26 Creepy Hallow, Northwest Renaissance Festival 10/25-26 Stage One, Wadleigh Theater, WSU

10/25-27 Lend Me a Tenor, Lake City Playhouse 10/25-27 Little Shop of Horrors, Ignite! Community

Theater

10/25-26 Noises Off, Gonzaga University 10/25-27 Second Samuel, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/25-27 Sherlock Holmes, Theater Arts for Children

10/24 Carrie the Musical, Bing Crosby Theater 10/24-27 Death by Chocolate, Liberty Lake Theatre 10/24-26, 10/31 Never the Sinner, Interplayers Theatre 10/24-26 The Diary of Anne Frank, Schuler Performing Arts Center, North Idaho College 10/25-27 It Was a Dark and Stormy Night, StageWest

Theatre

Visual Arts

10/24-12/31 “Please Do Not Touch”: EWU Faculty

10/25 Reception for Magic of the Objects, by Leslie W. LePere, Jundt Art Museum

Words

10/24 Author Kurt Bubna, Auntie’s 10/24 Authors Jim and Linda Hunt: “Bold Spirited Travelers,” Spokane Valley Library

10/29 Author Rosanne Parry, Auntie’s 10/30 Author Marissa Meyer, Auntie’s 10/30 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

Exhibition, EWU Gallery of Art

Internationally acclaimed and Grammy-winning jazz saxophonist

with the award-winning

Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble Dan Keberle, director

SATURDAY NOV. 2, 8 p.m.

Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox Admission: $17; $12 student/senior (62+). Tickets available through Ticketswest (www.ticketswest.com) and the Fox Box Office (509.624.1200 or www.foxtheaterspokane.com). Info: 509.777.3280

62 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

OCTOBER

31-NOV.6

11/2 11/2 11/2 11/3

Classical 11/1

11/1 11/2

11/6

Symphony with a Splash: November First Friday, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox WSU Orchestra Festival, Kimbrough Hall Coeur d’Alene Symphony Musical Soiree and Dinner, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center

11/6

Holy Names Music Center Performathon, River Park Square Washington Idaho Symphony feat. Inon Barnatan, Jones Theater at Daggy Hall, WSU Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox Washington Idaho Symphony feat. Inon Barnatan, Clarkston High School Spokane Symphony Ensembles, Moran Prairie and Deer Park libraries WSU Jazz Festival, Kimbrough Hall

Comedy 11/1

Family Dinner and Short Stacks, Blue Door Theatre

11/2

10/31-11/2 The Diary of Anne Frank, Schuler Performing

Safari, Blue Door Theatre

Arts Center, North Idaho College

Culture

11/1-3 Disney’s Tarzan, the musical, performed by CYT-

Film

11/1-3 11/1-3 11/1-3 11/1-2

11/2

11/1-2 11/1 11/2-4 11/2 11/6

German-American Society Pioneer Day, Deutsches Haus

Horror Film Festival, Stage Left Theater “Into the Mind” winter sports film, Panida Theater GLBT Film Festival, Riverpoint EWU Auditorium Sandpoint Film Festival, Panida Theater SpIFF Professor Series: “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” Bing Crosby Theater

11/1 11/1 11/2 11/2

Visual Arts

11/1-30 Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore and Gina Freuen, Trackside

Music 10/31 10/31 11/1 11/1 11/1

11/6

Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Pest, The Hop! A Touch of Jazz, Pend d’Oreille Winery Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Never Met Deadman, Cold Blooded, Skinwalker and more, The Hop! Roach Gigz, The Center Tom Catmull and The Clerics, The Cutter Theatre Tommy G., LeftBank Wine Bar Trapt with Devour the Day, Knitting Factory

Studio Ceramic Gallery

11/1 First Friday, Downtown Spokane 11/1-29 Julia Galloway ceramics exhibition, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery

11/1-30 Kurt Madison and Mariah Boyle, Saranac Art Projects 11/1-30 Patti Simpson, Arbor Crest Tasting Room 11/1-30 Randi Harris pop art exhibit, Pottery Place Plus 11/3-12/29 Home for the Holidays exhibition, Dahmen Barn

Words

Performance

11/1 11/3 11/4

11/6

11/6 11/6

11/1

North Idaho, The Kroc Center Lend Me a Tenor, Lake City Playhouse Little Shop of Horrors, Ignite! Community Theatre Noises Off, Gonzaga University Shrek the Musical by CYT Spokane, Bing Crosby Theater Disney’s Tarzan, the musical, performed by CYTNorth Idaho, The Kroc Center

The Improvised Shakespeare Company, Jones Theater at Daggy Hall, WSU MOMIX: Botanica, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

Theater

10/31-11/3, 11/6 Never the Sinner, Interplayers Theatre 10/31-11/3 Second Samuel, Spokane Civic Theatre

11/6

Three-Minute Mic, Auntie’s BootSlam, Boots Bakery & Lounge Visiting Writers Series: W. Scott Olson, Museum of Art/WSU Broken Mic, Neato Burrito Lecture: Digitial Restoration of Antiquities: Medieval manuscripts and scrolls from Herculaneum, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture Robert Hastings: UFO’s, The Secret Story, WSU Pullman

SpIFF’s fall film series hosted by local professors features Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind on Nov. 6.

15th Annual Spokane

PRESENTS

GLBT Film Festival

Meet me at the Film Festival

November 1, 2, 3, 2013 SpokaneFilmFest.org Riverpoint EWU Auditorium 688 N. Riverpoint Blvd., Spokane Tickets available at the door

Friday, November 1st Saturday, November 2nd Friday, November 8th Saturday, November 9th Sunday, November 10th

7pm 3pm & 7pm 7pm 3pm & 7pm 3pm

901 W. Sprague Avenue

Tickets Available Online at www.cytspokane.com Adults $12 • Children (12 & Under) $11 • Seniors (65+) $11 Group Discount (10 or More Tickets) $10

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 63

NOVEMBER 7-13 11/10 11/10 11/12 11/12 11/13

Jazz pianist Judy Carmichael, Bing Crosby Theater WSU Symphony Orchestra, Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU Spokane Symphony Superpops: Big Band, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox American Guild of Organists’ recital, St. John’s Cathedral Spokane Youth Symphony: Earth, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox EWU Composers Forum Concert, Music Bldg. Recital Hall, Eastern Washington University Music from the Palouse: Mozart!, University of Idaho EWU Woodwind Concert, Music Bldg. Recital Hall, Eastern Washington University

Comedy

11/8 Family Dinner, Blue Door Theatre 11/8-9 Nuthouse Improv Comedy Troupe, Wadleigh Theater, 11/9

Palouse Christmas open house, Bank Left Gallery Trauma Transformed to Art, Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

Film 11/8

Teton Gravity Research winter sport film, Panida Theater 11/13 Food for Thought Film Series: “A Place at the Table,” Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre

Music

Classical 11/7 11/7 11/9

11/9 11/9

Washington State University Safari, Blue Door Theatre

11/7 Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar 11/7-10 The Bartlett grand opening weekend feat. the Cave

11/8 11/8 11/9 11/9 11/9 11/10 11/12 11/12 11/12 11/13

Singers, Radiation City, Terrible Buttons, Silver Torches, Dead Serious Lovers, Mirror Mirror, Scott Ryan and more, The Bartlett Britchy Folk Duo, Pend d’Oreille Winery Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Brian Carter, Dahmen Barn Son of Brad, LeftBank Wine Bar The Fat Tones, Panida Theater Tyrone Wells, Chateau Rive Open mic, The Bartlett Rittz and others, Knitting Factory The Black Dahlia Murder with guests, The Center Soja with Common Kings, Knitting Factory

Performance

11/7-10 Disney on Ice: Rockin’ Ever After, Spokane Arena 11/13 Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker, Bing Crosby Theater

Culture

Theater

Presbyterian Church 11/8-9 Artisans Marketplace, The Spokane Club 11/8 Epicurean Delight, Spokane Convention Center 11/9-10 18th Annual Fall Folk Festival, Spokane Community College Lair

North Idaho, The Kroc Center 11/7-9, 11/13 Grease, Regional Theatre of the Palouse 11/7-10 Lend Me a Tenor, Lake City Playhouse 11/7-8 Mark Twain on Man and His World, Interplayers Theatre

11/8-9 25th Annual Jubilee International Marketplace, First

11/7-10 Disney’s Tarzan, the musical, performed by CYT-

Young actors from Spokane’s Christian Youth Theater perform Shrek the Musical at the Bing Nov. 8-10. 11/7-9 Never the Sinner, Interplayers Theatre 11/7-10 Second Samuel, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/8-10 Fiddler on the Roof, Pend Oreille Playhouse 11/8-10 Shrek the Musical by Christian Youth Theater Spokane, Bing Crosby Theater

11/9

Tears of Joy Theatre: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center 11/10-11 Mark Twain on Man and His World, Interplayers Theatre 11/8-10 Nora, Stage Left Theater

Visual Arts

11/8 ArtWalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 11/8-12/11 Naomi Gray, Moscow Food Co-op

11/8-30 Victoria Brace, The Art Spirit Gallery 11/9 MAC Art Auction and Gala, The Davenport Hotel 11/12-12/31 Poetics & Public Projection: Layered History -

Redrawn Memory by Rose Bond, Bryan Oliver Gallery, Whitworth University 11/13 Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Gelah Penn, Spokane Falls Community College and The Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture

Words

11/9 John Stockton autobiography signing, Auntie’s 11/11 Author Carol Hipperson, Auntie’s 11/12 Renee Montagne of National Public Radio’s Morning Edition, Bing Crosby Theater

11/13 Author Teju Cole, University of Idaho Law School 11/13 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

SPOKANE FOLKLORE SOCIETY PRESENTS

Two Free presentations by

BEST-SELLING AUTHOR

-MARIA SEMPLE-

THURSDAY

OCT 10 

Celebrating Our Area’s Cultural Diversity



November 9th & 10th 2013 Sat 11am to 10pm • Sun 11am to 5pm Spokane Community College | Lair Student Center | 1810 N. Greene St.

8 Stages featuring 100 Performances Dance| Music | Craft Sales Workshops | Jam Sessions New England Contra Dance Children’s Activities

Music to Enjoy Folk | Bluegrass | Blues Celtic | Hawaiian | Japanese Old-times | Scottish |African Middle Eastern | Scandinavian East Indian | Native American

For more info contact 828-3683 or SpokaneFolkFestival.org

64 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

1pm | Convention Center Conference Theater Downtown Spokane

7pm | CenterPlace 2426 N. Discovery Place Spokane Valley Doors open 45 minutes prior to each event start time. An ASL interpreter will be present at the 7pm event.

NOVEMBER 14-20 Classical

11/14 Brass Extravaganza Concert, Music Bldg. Recital Hall, Eastern Washington University

11/14 Pianist Jason Farnham, The Panida Theater 11/15 Brass Chamber Music, Bryan Hall Theatre, WSU 11/16 KPBX Kids’ Concert: Happy Days are Here Again!, Bing Crosby Theater 11/16 Patrick Bell, Celtic harpist and storyteller, The Panida Theater 11/16-17 Spokane Symphony Classics: Dazzling Brilliance, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/17 Gonzaga Music Composition Recital, Gonzaga University 11/19 Gonzaga Jazz Ensemble, Gonzaga University 11/20 Guitarists Frank Vigola, Vinny Raniolo and Peppino D’Agostino, Bing Crosby Theater

11/15 Family Dinner, Blue Door Theatre 11/16 Safari, Blue Door Theatre

11/16 11/17 11/18 11/19 11/19 11/20

Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Seth Walser & Tarrel Cripps, Pend d’Oreille Winery The Clumsy Lovers, Knitting Factory Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Marshall McLean Album Release with Mama Doll and Bart Budwig, The Bartlett Morgan Page with guests, Knitting Factory Gramatik with guests, Knitting Factory The Casualties, The Hop! 3OH!3 with The Summer Set and others, Knitting Factory Nine Inch Nails with Explosions in the Sky, Spokane Arena Keller Williams, The Center

Performance

11/14 Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker, Bing Crosby Theater

11/15-16 Letters Home, Jones Theater at Daggy Hall, WSU 11/16 Spokane Aerial Performance Arts: Bang Bang!, Location TBA

11/17 Festival Dance: The Ballet Folklorico “Quetzalli” de

11/14-16 Frozen Dinner, Gonzaga University 11/14-17 Grease, Regional Theatre of the Palouse 11/14-17 Inspecting Carol, Spokane Falls Community College

11/16 Jingle Bell Run, Riverfront Park 11/15 “A Fierce Green Fire,” The Panida Theater

Marshall McLean releases a new album on 11/16 at the Bartlett. 11/15-17 The Fantasticks, Eastern Washington University

Visual Arts

Theater

Culture

’Tis the season for a holiday shopping tradition!

11/14 11/15 11/15 11/15 11/16 11/16

Veracruz, Beasley Coliseum, Pullman 11/20 Mannheim Steamroller: A Christmas Celebration, INB Performing Arts Center

Comedy

Film

Music

Spartan Theatre 11/14-17 Second Samuel, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/15-17 Fiddler on the Roof, Pend Oreille Playhouse 11/15-17 Nora, Stage Left Theater

11/14 Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Gelah Penn, Eastern Washington University

11/14 WSU Student Entertainment Board’s Arts 30 Year Celebration, WSU Pullman

11/15-12/31 Unique Gifts Show, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center 11/15-17 Yuletide holiday arts festival, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

Words 11/14 11/14 11/15 11/16 11/17 11/18 11/19 11/20

Author Melanie Thon, Whitworth University HUB Jeannie Opdyke: “In My Hands” book talk, Auntie’s Poet Nance Van Winckel, Auntie’s Author Jess Steven Hughes, Spokane Valley Hastings Spokane Poetry Slam, Lantern Tap House Poet Padraig O Tuama, Whitworth University HUB Brandon Cole: “Reel Life” book talk, Auntie’s Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

Custer’s 37th Annual

One of a Kind Jewelry • Wearable Fiber Art • Functional Pottery Original Paintings • Metal Art • Woodworking • Photography Mixed Media • Holiday Decor • Specialty Foods and much more!

Spokane Fair & Expo Center

404 N. Havana Rd. • Spokane, WA • Free Parking

November 22 - 23 - 24, 2013 Friday 10 am - 8 pm

Saturday 10 am - 6 pm

Sunday 10 am - 4 pm

Admission $7.00 • Good all weekend! • Kids 12 & under free Presented by:

Over 300 Professional Artists and Crafters! 5 0 9 - 9 2 4 - 0 5 8 8 • w w w. C u s t e r S h o w s . c o m

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 65

NOVEMBER 21-27 Classical

11/21 Gonzaga Choir with Incendo: Bolivian Baroque Bravado, Gonzaga University, Jepson Hall

11/21 Instrumental and vocal jazz concert, Showalter Auditorium, Eastern Washington University

11/21 WSU Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band, Bryan Hall Theatre

11/22 EWU Music Faculty Concert, Bing Crosby Theater 11/22 From Rome to the New World: The Music & Drama of the Jesuit Baroque, Gonzaga University

11/24 Gonzaga Wind Symphony, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/24 Spokane String Quartet: The British Invasion, Bing Crosby Theater 11/25 SFCC Community Band, Spokane Falls Community College Music Auditorium

Comedy

11/21 11/22 11/22 11/22 11/23 11/23 11/23 11/23 11/23 11/27

Tera Melos with Zorch, The Center Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Mike & Shanna Thompson, Pend d’Oreille Winery Trans-Siberian Orchestra: The Lost Christmas Eve, Spokane Arena Aaron Carter, Knitting Factory Meat Puppets with The World Takes, The Center Odyssey, Honey Badger, Czar and others, The Hop! Shelby Earle, The Bartlett Truck Mills, LeftBank Wine Bar Thy Art is Murder with guests, The Center

Theater

11/21-24 Inspecting Carol, Spokane Falls Community College Spartan Theatre

11/21-24 Our Town, Interplayers Theatre 11/21-24 Second Samuel, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/21-23 The Fantasticks, Eastern Washington University 11/22-24 A Christmas Schooner, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/22-23 American Idiot, the Broadway Musical, INB

Give your Christmas an electric jumpstart with Trans-Siberian Orchestra at the Spokane Arena on 11/22.

Performing Arts Center

11/22 Family Dinner, Blue Door Theatre 11/23 Safari, Blue Door Theatre

11/22-24 Nora, Stage Left Theater 11/27 Our Town, Interplayers Theatre

Culture

Visual Arts

11/22-24 Custer’s Christmas Arts & Crafts Show, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center

11/22-12/31 Spokane Art School Faculty Show, Tinman Gallery

Music

11/20 Songwriters in the Cellar, Grande Ronde Cellars 11/21 Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar 11/21 Pretty Lights with Odesza, Knitting Factory

Words

11/23 Author Jess Steven Hughes, South Hill Hastings 11/26 Authors Lisa Borders and Ron MacLean, Auntie’s 11/27 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

Tera Melos (above) and Zorch play at the Center on Nov. 21.

One of Those Days

Shriners Hospital Duck Waddle 5k FUN RUN Sunday! September 29, 2013

THE ORDINARY LIFE OF A SUPERHERO

Register online TODAY at: http://tinyurl.com/duckwaddle

From ripping out your favorite pair of pants to stepping in poo, Even Superheroes can have “One of Those Days”.

Registration: 11 a.m. • Race Start: Noon Floating Dock in Riverfront Park - Spokane, WA

Or send us A CHECK with your name, address, email & T-shirt size to: (Checks Payable to SHC Spokane) SHC Duck Waddle - Public Relations 911 W. 5th Avenue Spokane, WA 99204 (509) 455 - 7844

Limited Edition Superhero inspired

Screen Prints By Local artist

Derrick King at

Proudly Supported by:

815 W Garland Ave

$15 Entry Fee (non-refundable) NO REFUNDS

NO TRANSFERS, NO ROLLOVERS, NO MEDICAL COMPS

66 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

First Friday October 4th 5-8PM opening reception

Then check out

“No Clue!”

A murder mystery where the crowd gets to decide who the kille r is.

NOVEMBER

28-DEC. 4

Classical

12/2 SFCC Orchestra, Spokane Falls Community College

Music Auditorium Gonzaga Jazz Combos, Gonzaga University SFCC Choral, Spokane Falls Community College Music Auditorium Cheney Jazz Collaboration, Music Bldg. Recital Hall, Eastern Washington University Coeur d’Alene Symphony: Christmas at the Kroc, Kroc Center SFCC Jazz Band, Spokane Falls Community College Music Auditorium Coeur d’Alene Symphony: Christmas at the Kroc, Kroc Center

12/3 12/3 12/4 12/4 12/4 12/6

Comedy

11/29 Family Dinner, Blue Door Theatre 11/30 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 12/6 Short Stacks, Blue Door Theatre

Culture

11/30-12/1 Country Christmas Antiques and Arts and Crafts Show, hosted by Two Women Vintage Goods at Moran Prairie Grange Spokane Public Radio Open House

12/3

Film

11/29 Backcountry Film Festival, The Panida Theater

Music

11/29 Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar 11/29-30 Celtic Thunder: Mythology, Northern Quest 11/29 11/29 11/30 11/30

Resort and Casino Cold Blooded, The Hop! Powell Brothers, Pend d’Oreille Winery Emily Baker, Pend d’Oreille Winery Pearl Jam, Spokane Arena

Theater

11/28-12/1 A Christmas Schooner, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/28-12/1 Our Town, Interplayers Theatre 12/4 A Christmas Carol, Hartung Theater, University of Idaho

12/4 Our Town, Interplayers Theatre 12/4 Stage II Shorts, Whitworth University, Cowles

Celtic Thunder performs at Northern Quest Resort & Casino Nov. 29-30.

Auditorium

Visual Arts

11/29-12/1 Handmade Ornament Show, Tinman Gallery 11/30 Slighty West of Spokane Artist Studio Tour, Cheney and Medical Lake

Words

11/30 Local Author Saturday, BookPeople of Moscow 12/1 BootSlam, Boots Bakery & Lounge 12/4 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito Spokane Public Radio Open House on Dec. 3

d a e r b r e g n Gi F F O D IL CHRIST KITCHEN

BU

, 2013 5 1 r e b m ce Sunday, De otel H t r o p n e The Dav Grand Hall of the Doges Pennington Ballroom

Gingerbread Build-Off | 10am - 1pm Culinary teams decorate enormous gingerbread structures, in just 3-hours, as the public watches... voting for their favorite!

Wa ch professtio gingerbr nal e hous ad being beus ilt VOTE UR FOR YROITE! FAVO ets $ 1 k o V te Ticfor $ 5 6 r o

2012 Gingerbread Winner

Kids Event | 10am - 4pm

‘Kids of all ages’ can make their own mini-gingerbread house GINGER Products sales & prices vary

BREA$D Pictures KITS 7 $5

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 67

DECEMBER 5-11

12/6 12/7 12/7 12/7 12/7 12/7 12/8 12/8

Classical

12/5 EWU Symphony Orchestra, Showalter Auditorium,

Eastern Washington University 12/5-8 Spokane Symphony: The Nutcracker Ballet, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 12/5 Winter Classics Concert feat. Zuill Bailey and Natasha Paremski, The Cutter Theatre 12/6 EWU Choral Concert, Music Bldg. Recital Hall, Eastern Washington University

12/9

Gonzaga Music Flute Recitals, Gonzaga University De Colores Handbell Choir, The Cutter Theatre Gonzaga Music Piano Recitals, Gonzaga University Spokane Jazz Orchestra: A Glenn Miller Christmas, Bing Crosby Theater Winter Classics Concert feat. Zuill Bailey and Natasha Paremski, Barrister Winery WSU Holiday Concert, Bryan Hall Theatre, Washington State University Holiday Jazz Concert, Eastern Washington University Winter Classics Concert feat. Zuill Bailey and Natasha Paremski, Coeur d’Alene, private residence Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra with Natasha Paremski, Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox

Comedy

12/6 Nuthouse Improv Comedy Troupe, Wadleigh Theater, 12/6 12/7

Washington State University Season’s Greetings, Blue Door Theatre An Evening with Maria Bamford, Knitting Factory

12/7 Safari, Blue Door Theatre

12/5 Stage II Shorts, Whitworth University, Cowles

Culture

12/5-8 The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, Pullman Civic

12/6 Winter Craft Fair, Providence Holy Family Hospital 12/7 Deck The Falls, The Cutter Theatre

Music

12/5 Adventure Club, Knitting Factory 12/5 Death by Stereo, No Bragging Rights and others, The

Hop! Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Jake Robin, Pend d’Oreille Winery Smile Empty Soul with Acidic, Knitting Factory The Hot Club of San Francisco: Cool Yule, Jones Theater at Daggy Hall, Washington State University 12/7 Nightmare Before Xmas, The Hop! 12/7 Truck Mills, LeftBank Wine Bar 12/8 Chris Isaak, Northern Quest Casino 12/8 Jake Miller with guests, Knitting Factory 12/9 Oak Ridge Boys Christmas Show, INB Performing Arts Center 12/11 Tedeschi Trucks Band, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

12/5 12/6 12/6 12/6 12/6

Performance

12/5-7 Popvich Comedy Pet Theater, Bing Crosby Theater 12/6-7 Moby Dick, Wadleigh Theater, Washington State 12/7 12/8

University Festival Dance: Joy to the World, Administration Auditorium, University of Idaho Popovich Comedy Pet Theater, The Panida Theater

Theater

12/5-8 A Christmas Carol, Hartung Theater, University of Idaho 12/5-8 A Christmas Schooner, Spokane Civic Theatre 12/5-8 Our Town, Interplayers Theatre

The Spokane Symphony performs the score for The Nutcracker Ballet, at the Fox from Dec. 5-8.

THE

NUTCRACKER WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA!

The Spokane Symphony featuring the State Street Ballet

December 5 - 8, 2013 Five exciting performances!

A CHERISHED HOLIDAY TRADITION AT THE FABULOUS MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX

Tickets/Info 509-624-1200 spokanesymphony.org

68 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

sponsored by

Auditorium

Theater

12/6-7 A Celtic Christmas, Circle Moon Theater 12/6-8 A Christmas Carol radio broadcast performance, StageWest Theater at Emmanuel Lutheran

12/6-7 A Dickens of a Dinner, Lion’s Share Theatre 12/6-8 Christmas Belles, Lake City Playhouse 12/6-8 Tiny Tim’s Christmas, Liberty Lake Theatre 12/10 A Celtic Christmas, Circle Moon Theater 12/11 A Christmas Carol, Hartung Theater, University of Idaho

12/11 Our Town, Interplayers Theatre

Visual Arts

12/6-31 15th Annual Small Artworks Invitational, The Art Spirit Gallery

12/6-31 Annual College of Art & Architecture Faculty Exhibit, Prichard Art Gallery

12/6-8 Cherry Street Studios Holiday Open House, Cherry Street Studios

12/6 First Friday, Downtown Spokane 12/6-31 Gina Freuen Invitational ceramics show, KolvaSullivan Gallery

12/6-28 Katie Creyts, Saranac Art Projects 12/6-31 Northwest Ceramics Invitational, Trackside Studio Ceramic Gallery

12/6-31 Sheila Bledsow, Arbor Crest Tasting Room 12/6-31 Spokane Jewelers Guild exhibition, Pottery Place Plus

12/7 8th Annual Holiday Gift Gala, Dahmen Barn 12/7 Holiday Lunch and Art Showcase, Bank Left Gallery

Words

12/6 Author Jess Steven Hughes, Shadle Hastings 12/6 Three-Minute Mic, Auntie’s 12/11 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

DECEMBER 12-31 Classical

12/13-14 Gonzaga Choirs: Candlelight Christmas Concerts, St. 12/14 12/14 12/14 12/15 12/15

Aloysius Catholic Church James Edmonds Piano Competition, Music Bldg. Recital Hall, Eastern Washington University Palouse Choral Society: Noel, Dahmen Barn Washington Idaho Symphony: A Family Candlelight Christmas, Jones Theater at Daggy Hall, Washington State University St. John’s Cathedral Choirs: Traditional Carols, St. John’s Cathedral Washington Idaho Symphony: A Family Candlelight

Christmas, Clarkston High School

12/16 Clarion Brass: This is What Christmas Sounds Like,

Kroc Center 12/17-18 Clarion Brass: This is What Christmas Sounds Like, St. John’s Cathedral 12/21 “Winter Solstice” Christmas Dinner and Concert, Bank Left Gallery 12/21-22 Spokane Symphony Superpops: Holiday Pops Celebration, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 12/28 Sandpoint High School alumni choir concert, The Panida Theater 12/31 Spokane Symphony: New Year’s Eve with Beethoven’s Ninth, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 12/31 The Spokane Symphony’s Puttin’ on the Ritz, The Davenport Hotel

Comedy

12/13 Season’s Greetings, Blue Door Theatre 12/14 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 12/15 Christopher Titus and Rachel Bradley, Knitting Factory 12/20 Season’s Greetings, Blue Door Theatre

12/21, 12/28 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 12/27 Season’s Greetings, Blue Door Theatre

Culture

12/20 Campbell House Holidays, The MAC 12/20 Winter Solstice Concert, Unitarian Universalist Church 12/31 First Night Spokane, Downtown Spokane

12/12-15, 12/19-23 Traditions of Christmas, Kroc Center 12/14 Allegro Dance Studio Christmas recital, Panida 12/16 The Nutcracker by the Eugene Ballet, Panida Theater

Theater

Film

12/12-14 A Celtic Christmas, Circle Moon Theater 12/12-15 A Christmas Carol, Hartung Theater, U. of Idaho 12/12-15, 12/19-22 A Christmas Schooner, Spokane Civic

Theater 12/18 “Elf,” Bing Crosby Theater

12/12-15, 12/19-22 Christmas Belles, Lake City Playhouse 12/12-15 Million Dollar Quartet, the Broadway Musical, INB

12/14-15 Bing Crosby Holiday Film Festival, Bing Crosby

Music 12/12 12/12 12/13 12/13 12/14 12/14 12/18 12/18 12/19 12/20 12/20 12/20 12/21 12/21 12/21 12/26 12/27 12/27 12/28 12/31

Bridges Home performs at the Pend d’Oreille Winery in Sandpoint on Dec. 20.

Performance

Theatre

Performing Arts Center

Metalachi, Knitting Factory Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Will Hoge with Red Wanting Blue, Knitting Factory Nightmare Before Xmas, The Hop! Son of Brad, LeftBank Wine Bar Rising Stars Series: Colby Acuff and Justin Sherfey, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center Sallie Ford & The Sound Outside with The Kids, The Bartlett Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Bridges Home, Pend d’Oreille Winery Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Spokane Songwriters-in-the-Round, Grande Ronde Cellars Bing Crosby Theater Christmas Celebration, Bing Crosby Theater Garage Voice, The Bartlett Nightmare Before Xmas, The Hop! Nick Grow, LeftBank Wine Bar Carey Brazil, LeftBank Wine Bar Scott Reid, Pend d’Oreille Winery Charles Tappa Trio, LeftBank Wine Bar Sensation Show Band: New Year’s Eve show, Northern Quest Casino

12/12-14 Our Town, Interplayers Theatre 12/12-15 The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, Pullman Civic Theater

12/12-15, 12/19-22 The Best Little Christmas Pageant Ever, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center

12/12-15 Tiny Tim’s Christmas, Liberty Lake Theatre 12/13-15 A Christmas Carol radio broadcast performance, StageWest Theater at Emmanuel Lutheran

12/13-14 A Dickens of a Dinner, Lion’s Share Theatre 12/13-15, 12/20-22 The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, Pend Oreille Playhouse

12/13-15, 12/20-22 The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Theater Arts for Children

12/19-24, 12/26-30 Away in a Basement, Interplayers 12/22 Children’s Holiday Pageant, Unitarian Universalist Church

Visual Arts

12/13 ArtWalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 12/13-31 Sue Segota, Moscow Food Co-op

Words

11/14 Visiting Writers Series: Matt de la Pena, Gonzaga 12/15 Spokane Poetry Slam, Lantern Tap House 12/18 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

American Prints from the Collection (through Nov. 2) Drawn to the Wall V (through Oct. 12)

Jundt Art Museum Hours: Monday - Saturday: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Sunday closed Information: 509.313.6611

Join us for special events and screenings throughout the year: PROFESSOR SERIES Enjoy classic & contemporary films specilally selected by local professors and critics. Participate in Q&A sessions and learn more of the art and history of film with local experts and cinephiles. Select Wednesdays / 7pm the Bing Crosby Theater Tickets: $7 / $5 with valid Student ID The 2013 Professor Series is presented by SpIFF and The Bing Crosby Theater

SEPT 25: Pan’s Labyrinth

(2006) Guillermo del Toro’s dark fairy tale about seeing the magic of life despite harsh circumstances, hosted by David Calhoun and Brian Clayton of Gonzaga University. Sponsored by the Faith and Reason Institure of Gonzaga University. In Spanish with English subtitles.

OCT 16: Amelie

(2001), by Jean-Pierre Jeunet (A Very Long Engagement, Micmacs) is an irresistible confection of a movie about love & destiny in the city of light, with Leonard Oakland of Whitworth University. In French with English subtitles.

SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2014 January 24th to February 1st, 2014. Visit our web site: spokanefilmfestival.org • fall calendar • film information • festival schedule & tickets • sign up for email updates

NOV 6: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

(2004) Michel Gondry’s (The Science of Sleep, Be Kind Rewind) alternatively playful and evocative meditation on love, memory, and meaning, with Pete Porter of Eastern Washington University and Director of SpIFF.

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 69

Jundt Art Museum

313-6611

K

Slightly West of Spokane Artist Studio Tour

244-3279

cityofcheney.org

Kolva-Sullivan Gallery Kroc Center

458-5517 208-667-6301

L

Arbor Crest Winery

927-9463

The Art Spirit Gallery Auntie’s Bookstore

208-765-6006 838-0206

Bank Left Gallery

878-8425

Barrister Winery

465-3591

325-2507 838-8511

Liberty Lake Theatre

342-2055

Spokane Community College scc.spokane.edu

327-8000

Lion’s Share Theatre

327-1113

Little Spokane River Artist Studio Tour 714-2526

M

ewu.edu

F 208-883-3267

First Friday Spokane downtownspokane.org

Beasley Coliseum

335-3525

First Night Spokane firstnightspokane.org

Bing Crosby Theater

227-7638

The Fox Theater

Blue Door Theatre

747-7045

The Book Parlor

328-6527

BookPeople of Moscow

208-882-2669

Bryan Oliver Gallery

777-3258

C Carr’s Corner

474-1731

The Center CenterPlace Event Center

433-7323 688-0300

Chase Gallery/Spokane Arts Fund 321-9614 Chateau Rive Checkerboard Bar

795-2030 535-4007

Circle Moon Theatre

208-448-1294

Clearwater River Casino

208-298-1400

CdA Arts & Culture Alliance 208-292-1629 Coeur d’Alene Casino

208-769-2600

Coeur d’Alene Symphony

208-765-3833

Custer Enterprises

924-0588

The Cutter Theatre

446-4108

CYT - North Idaho CYT - Spokane

cytnorthidaho.org cytspokane.com

70 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

624-1200

G The Gallery Northwest

208-667-5700

Garland Theater

327-1050

German-American Society

747-0004

Gonzaga University The Gorge Grande Ronde Cellars Greyhound Park

gonzaga.edu livenation.com 455-8161 800-786-9666

H Harrington Opera House

253-4719

Holy Names Music Center

326-9516

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox

328-9310

The Hop!

328-5467

I Ignite Community Theatre ignitetheatre.org INB Performing Arts Center

279-7000

Interplayers Theatre

455-7529

J Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center 208-457-8950 John’s Alley Jones Radiator

279-7000

Spokane Fair & Expo Center

477-1766

Spokane County Library District

456-3931

208-883-7662 747-6005

209-2383

Spokane Internatl. Film Fest spokanefilm.org spokanejazz.org

Spokane Poetry Slam spokanepoetryslam.org Spokane Preservation Advocates 344-1065

Manic Moon & More

413-9101

Spokane Public Radio

Mootsy’s

838-1570

Spokane Renaissance Faire

Moscow Food Co-op

208-882-8537

Museum of Art/WSU

335-1910

scld.org

Spokane Folk Fest spokanefolkfestival.org

Mad Hatter Vintage Flea Market 990-4558

thebartlettspokane.com

The Bartlett

Spokane Convention Center

Spokane Jazz Orchestra

The MAC

E

Festival Dance Academy

325-3001

The Spokane Club

The Lincoln Center

455-8888

Eastern Washington University

B

Spokane Art School Spokane Civic Theatre

facebook.com/lilaccityperformingarts

artisanbarn.org

The Davenport Hotel

279-7000

Lilac City Performing Arts

D

435-1576

Spokane Arena

315-8623

208-667-1323

The Magic Lantern

Dahmen Barn

Spokane Aerial Performing Arts

LeftBank Wine Bar

Lake City Playhouse

A

spokanefalls.edu

208-882-4127

Knitting Factory

VENUES

sfccfinearts.org

SFCC Music Department

The Kenworthy

FIND THE

SFCC Fine Arts Gallery

kpbx.org theguild2010.org

Spokane Songwriters

N

spokanesongwriters.org

Neato Burrito/Baby Bar

847-1234

Northern Quest Casino

242-7000

Northwest Bach Festival

nwbachfest.com

Northwest Renaissance Festival

nwrf.net

nYne Bar

474-1621

P

Spokane String Quartet

998-2261

Spokane Symphony

624-1200

Spokane Valley Arts Council

924-5009

Spokane Youth Symphony spokaneyouthsymphony.org St. Aloysius Catholic Church stalschurch.org

The Panida Theater Pend d’Oreille Winery

208-263-9191

St. John’s Cathedral

208-265-8545

Stage Left Theater

Pend Oreille Playhouse

671-3389

The Phat House

443-4103

Pottery Place Plus

327-6920

Prichard Art Gallery

208-885-3586

838-4277 spokanestageleft.org

StageWest Community Theater

235-4575

T Terrain

terrainspokane.com

Theater Arts for Children

328-4886

Providence Holy Family

shmc.org

Tinman Gallery

325-1500

Pullman Civic Theatre

332-8406

Trackside Studio Ceramic Gallery 863-9904

R

Two Women Vintage Goods

Red Lion Hotel at the Park Redtail Gallery

326-8000 208-946-8066

951-0523

U Unitarian Universalist Church

325-6383

Regional Theatre of the Palouse 334-0750

Unity Spiritual Center

838-6518

Republic Brewing Co.

University of Idaho

775-2700

Revel 77 Coffee

280-0518

River Park Square

363-0304

S Sandpoint Arts Alliance

208-265-2787

uidaho.edu/calendar

V Valleyfest

valleyfest.org

The Vault Social Club

863-9597

The Viking Bar & Grill

315-4547

W

Saranac Art Projects saranacartprojects.wordpress.com Schuler Performing Arts Center 208-769-7780 SFCC Drama Department spokanefalls.edu

Washington Idaho Symphony

332-3408

Washington State University about.wsu.edu Whitworth University

whitworth.edu

BM_Harvest Pumpkin_9-3x11_09357-6 JC.indd 1

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Why URM Food Service?

SUPERIOR SERVICE “Be it baking ingredients, coffee cups, or dish machine service, URM has what we need to keep our artisan bakery running smoothly. Our Sales Consultant, Greg Fong, and the rest of the customer service team provide the support and products we need to produce the best possible baked goods for our customers. That’s what local businesses do – support each other.” Kevin & Brenda Gerhart The region’s best chili recipes are in competition for a nationally sanctioned contest in Colville.

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Heated Competition

Petit Chat Village Bakery

Loads of chili come to Colville for its first international chili cook-off BY JO MILLER

C

loves. Anchovies. Chocolate. Coca-Cola. Marmite. You might not think of those as normal chili ingredients, but when the competition is on, some cooks pull those out as secret weapons. But no cooks at a chili cook-off will ever say exactly what they’re putting in their chili to give the flavor depth, smooth over acidic tastes or do whatever they need to do in hopes of crafting a winning recipe. “There’s really an art to making chili,” says Jo Ann Bender, who is helping put on the first Northwest International Chili Cook-Off in Colville on Saturday. Cooks from Canada and the Northwest are set to compete in a cook-off aimed to raise funds for Colville Rotary Club charities and serve as a qualifying event for the Chili Appreciation Society International’s (CASI) annual chili cook-off championship in Terlingua, Texas. The chili will be plentiful and the varieties vast: German white chili, lentil chili, Hawaiian chili, buffalo chili (yes, with real buffalo), vegetarian chili and barbeque chili are some of the flavors cooks will present, says Bud Budinger, chairman of the cook-off. “Everyone’s got their own idea of what constitutes chili, and they don’t agree,” he says.

Double-blind judging determines the winning chilis, and Lynne Brokaw, the regional CASI referee who has judged chili since 1984, will oversee the panel of judges. As far as flavors go, Brokaw says she’s expecting anything. Ingredients can be as individual as the chefs, she says, but what makes a good chili is what it does to judges’ taste buds. “It has to smell like chili. It has to look like chill. It has to taste like chili — not barbeque sauce, not spaghetti,” Brokaw says. “It should have a little bit of bite, both front and back, [and] should be a little hot when it hits your mouth. Then when you swallow it, there has to be a little bit of an afterglow.” Cook-off attendees will be able to go around and taste spoonfuls of chili from the cooks all afternoon. But beyond chili, there will be vendors selling other food, old-time honky-tonk music, clog dancers, an equestrian drill team and aptly named Blazing Saddles bike ride.  Northwest International Chili Cook-Off • Saturday, Sept. 21 from noon to 6 pm • $12 for adults; free for children under 8 • Northeast Washington Fairgrounds • 317 W. Astor Ave., Colville, Wash. • colvillerotarychilicookoff. webstarts.com

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 73

FOOD | FARMS

Fresh From the Web Northwest Farm Fresh brings local produce at the click of a mouse BY JO MILLER

B

rowsing stand after stand stacked with carrots, squash, berries and baked goods is the norm when you think of shopping at a farmers market. But a new dimension of clicking and dragging your produce to a virtual shopping basket has become an option as online farmers markets continue to emerge. “It is a new thing, but it’s growing like gangbusters,” says Shelly Stevens, founder of Northwest Farm Fresh, a local online farmers market. Stevens, who helped found the Chewelah Farmers Market in 2008, used the relationships she developed with local farmers and customers to start up an online farmers market called the Chewelah Valley Fresh Market in early 2012. Since, Stevens has expanded her online market and changed the name to Northwest Farm Fresh. She added a drop-off location last year in Colville, and a third drop-off location began in Spokane on Sept. 18 at Lasagna’s-On-Ya.

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Adding Spokane was the next logical step in growth for Northwest Farm Fresh, Stevens says. With a larger urban and suburban population, presumably fewer Spokanites are growing their own food, whereas Stevens County is largely a farming county. “By reaching into that denser population in Spokane that do not have that lifestyle, I think ultimately it’ll be super-beneficial for these small farmers to be marketing their products there,” she says. Here’s how the market works: Customers register online for free and have from Wednesday through Monday each week to shop — choosing produce, meats and breads from approximately 38 farmers as far north as Orient and as far south as Reardan. Tuesday is pickup day from 3-6 pm. You choose if you want to pick up in Chewelah, Colville or Spokane, and you pay for the order in person. The online market helps solve the problem for folks who can’t make it to regular farmers markets because of their schedule but want to buy local, Stevens says. Farmers also benefit from the larger customer base and exposure. The website provides information about each farmer, such as growing practices and how animals are raised. “Most small farmers don’t have the savvy to market themselves online, so this fills that niche for them,” Stevens says. 

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Northwest Farm Fresh • Order from Wednesdays at 9 am to Monday at noon; Pickup on Tuesdays from 3-6 pm • nwfarmfresh.com

Would You Recognize A

Victim Of Domestic Violence?

These are pictures of local domestic violence survivors 1 out of 4 women will experience a form of violence in her lifetime!

Stop Violence Against Women Day September 27th | 11:30 am – 8 pm Women’s Health & Resource Fair with the N. Idaho Affiliate Susan G. Komen for the Cure Coeur d’ Alene Casino Resort Hotel 37914 S Hwy 95 Worley, ID 83876

Best Ever Cheeseburger $9.50

26 beers on Tap Best Food in Town 7 Hi-Def TVS Happy Hour 4-6 pm Daily

Join us. Together we can make a difference! Cost is $75.00, includes catered lunch, prime rib & salmon dinner, keynote presentations, breakout sessions, mini-spa treatments, health & wellness screenings, door prizes & more. To register please call: (208) 686-0601 or Find us on facebook: Stop Violence Against Women Day This is a fundraising benefit for the Coeur d’ Alene Tribe’s Stop Violence against Woman Program

poststreetalehouse.com 509 789 6900 SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 75

The Wolverine takes a whole new approach to crime this time around.

Cold Justice

In one of a very impressive series of twists (this is the only one I’ll give away), a desperate Keller — positive that Alex has his daughter hidden away somewhere — takes Alex himself and hides him away somewhere, ready to inflict all sorts of barbarous punishment on him if he doesn’t talk. Suffice it to say he doesn’t, and the film, under the tense direction of Denis Villeneuve (Incendies), bursts into some sections of brutal violence (let’s hear it for the make-up people in those spots where we see the aftermath). But this isn’t exactly a vigilante film. It’s more of a cat-and-mouse game in which the players are both good guys trying to prove who the bad guy is, albeit working in totally different manners. It features a slightly overthe-top performance from the grieving, fiery Jackman, vinced that Keller is getting in the way of his investigaand a strangely (and well done) underplayed one from tion. In the film’s early stages, it’s pretty obvious who’s Gyllenhaal, whose character has a nicely subtle air of responsible for the kidnapping. It’s that creepy guy Alex mystery around him, and whose feelings are Jones (Paul Dano), the fellow with the IQ sometimes revealed through his constant of a 10-year-old who was sitting in his RV PRISONERS display of nervous blinking tics. It’s a film filled right outside the house where the girls Rated R with everyday normal people who are visibly disappeared, and who is arrested. But hold Directed by Denis Villeneuve on: There’s no proof, and without proof, Starring Hugh Jackman, Jake upset, playing out a story that’s shocking and a suspect can only be held for questioning Gyllenhaal, Terrence Howard, nerve-racking, but you can’t take your eyes away from it as that negative energy ebbs and for a certain amount of time. After all, this Paul Dano flows. lost soul could have just been parked there All of this intensity is pushed along by to take a brief nap. There are certainly no a grim musical score that’s often made up only of low signs of any struggle inside the RV, and Alex has no renotes, held out for long stretches. Its title is perfect, cord. Although there is a moment — when Keller, against because in the end, it’s very clear that every character is the detective’s warnings, starts following Alex as Alex is a prisoner of his or her own doing. And speaking of endout taking his little dog for a “walk” — that we’re assured ings, Prisoners has a very cool one.  he’s a bona fide weirdo.

The kidnapping film is played out, but Prisoners gives the genre a new twist BY ED SYMKUS

Y

ou know the story: A loved one is nabbed, the cops don’t know what they’re doing (or aren’t involved), a relative of the victim goes after the perpetrator(s). Think Taken, Frantic, Ransom, Commando, The Marine. The list could go on, but the well-worn premise goes in all sorts of new directions in Prisoners. This is, in Hollywood terms, a two-hander — a story with two protagonists, both equally involved in solving the crime and setting things straight. Hugh Jackman is Keller Dover, a happy family man whose young daughter, along with a friend’s daughter, vanish after going out to play during a Thanksgiving dinner. Jake Gyllenhaal is Detective Loki, the loner cop with a record of solving every case he’s been given, who’s assigned this one. From their first meeting, these two are at odds. Keller thinks that the detective isn’t working fast enough and isn’t paying attention to obvious clues, while Loki is con-

76 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS

Set in rural Texas sometime, presumably, in the ’70s, Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara are Bob and Ruth, young lovers star-crossed by a robbery gone wrong. Surrounded by the law in a clapboard house, the pair, along with a cohort, try to shoot their way out. Ruth wings a sheriff, but Bob takes both her gun and the blame, and ends up with a 25-year prison sentence. The kicker? Ruth is pregnant, and their mutual yearning for each other leads Bob to attempt a jailbreak, which succeeds — up to a point. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated R

BATTLE OF THE YEAR

A down-and-out star basketball coach, Jason Blake, is propositioned by an old friend to train American dancers under the assumption that a great coach can turn any group of individuals into a team. Although knowing seemingly nothing about dancing, but a sure heck of a lot about coaching, Blake, played by the gorgeous Josh Holloway, attempts to turn his group of ragamuffin (but attractive!) dancers into championship winners. The stakes are high, the dramatic music loud, as Blake’s team might be the one to win it all, although, that hasn’t been done by a U.S. team in 15 years. (ER) PG-13

PRISONERS

The kidnapping-revenge genre gets a refreshing makeover when a child goes missing, Dad gets mad, and the cops don’t know what to do. It stars Hugh

Jackman (the dad) and Jake Gyllenhaal (the detective). This goes places that Taken and Frantic never thought of going. A real nail-biter that’s violent and unpredictable. (ES) Rated R

THANKS FOR SHARING

Thanks for Sharing tells the story of three friends all battling with the same demon: sex addiction. Adam, played by Mark Ruffalo, finds himself falling in love with a beautiful, successful Phoebe (Gwyneth Paltrow) and in doing so once again comes face to face with the same sexual demons he thought he had defeated. Meanwhile, his compatriots, Mike, portrayed by Tim Robbins, finds security in smothering his family in order to control himself, while Neil (Josh Gad) is just coming to terms with his addiction, and is already struggling on the rocky road to recovery. (ER) Rated R

MUMIA: A LONG DISTANCE REVOLUTIONARY

This documentary follows  Mumia AbuJamal, an African American convicted of murdering a policeman in 1981, at the height of his political activism. Spending the majority of his life in prison, living under the death row sign, Abu-Jamal has stirred intense debate with his continued outspokenness. Before his arrest, he was a thought-provoking journalist and revolutionary. After his arrest, he continues his history of speaking out from behind bars. At Magic Lantern (ER) Unrated 

NOW PLAYING 2 GUNS

Cruising around in a vintage Dodge Challenger, the DEA’s Bobby (Denzel Washington) and Navy investigator Stig (Mark Wahlberg) are both working undercover but make for such convincing bad-asses that they even have each other fooled. Indeed, the hook here is that, having been assigned by their respective agencies to infiltrate a crime syndicate, each assumes that the other is a criminal. It’s only once they’ve robbed a bank together (in order to secure evidence, naturally) that they realize each other’s actual allegiances. (CW) Rated R

AUSTENLAND

Keri Russell stars as an American woman so obsessed with the works, life and everything else of Jane Austen that she decides to blow most of her savings to go to a resort in England called Austenland. As you might guess, that resort is for Austen freaks to pretend they are living in the time of Jane. And, of course, our heroine soon finds a couple love interests to keep her busy. (MB) Rated PG-13

BLACKFISH

Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s stunning documentary centers on a male orca named Tilikum who has been responsible for the death of three people, most recently the much-publicized 2010 death of a SeaWorld trainer in Orlando. He was terrorized by the other whales with whom he shared a tank and also spent his early years cooped up in a tiny holding pen at a

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NO PAYMENTS FOR ONE YEAR* third-rate amusement park. But the film’s reach goes far beyond Tilikum’s violent history, laying out the inherently problematic issues associated with putting a massive mammal — and massively intelligent, in some ways more so than humans — into captivity. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG-13

BLUE JASMINE

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the have-nots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

DESPICABLE ME 2

Gru is back with his minions and adopted daughters in the animated sequel, picking up as the Anti-Villain League cracks down on high-tech super-criminals. The agency calls on (or rather, kidnaps) Gru for his ex-villain expertise, but will he be able to juggle the mission on top of his paternal ...continued on next page

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Turbo Fri 5:00 Sat-Sun 12:00 5:00 Mon-Thurs 5:00

THE MAGIC LANTERN SEPTEMBER 20TH - SEPTEMBER 26TH

IN A WORLD (93 MIN -R)

Fri/Sat: 3:00, 7:00 Sun: 2:15, 6:15 Mon-Wed: 5:30

AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS (95 MIN-R)

Fri/Sat: 5:00, 9:00 Sun: 4:15 Mon-Wed: 7:30 Thu: 5:15

SHORT TERM 12 (96 MIN -R)

THE WAY WAY BACK (96 MIN-PG 13)

Fri/Sat: 4:30, 8:30 Sun: 1:45, 5:45 Tue-Thu: 7:00

MUMIA: A LONG DISTANCE REVOLUTIONARY Thurs: 7:00

The Lone Ranger PG-13

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In this sci-fi tale, the 1-percenters don’t just live in their own world philosophically and in terms of lifestyle; they’ve literally left the planet behind. Orbiting above Earth is the titular satellite/habitat, where those who can afford it enjoy the bliss of cure-all medical technology and breathable air, while the surface world has turned into one massive, overpopulated, disease-ridden wasteland. (SR) Rated R

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Luc Besson directs this film in which a not so typical family, the  Manzonis,  are relocated under the witness protection program from their Brooklyn home to a small town in France. The former mobsters, now turned snitches, handle their problems in their new lives via violence, bribery and the occasional explosion. As the odd events pile skyward, it becomes apparent that their new location is still not enough to hide them from their former mafia cronies. Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer and Tommy Lee Jones star. (ER) Rated R

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DRAMA OF ASTONISHING “GRADE A: AEMOTIONAL PURITY.” – Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

“BRIE LARSON IS A REVELATION... ONE OF THE YEAR’S BEST PERFORMANCES. An exceptional film in every way.” – Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

“A

WONDER. EXCEPTIONAL, MOVING AND INTIMATE.

Honestly earns every bit of its emotional impact.” –Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

“THE

duties? Get ready to giggle for returning voice actors Steve Carell, Kristin Wigg, Miranda Cosgrove and the adorably clumsy minions. (ES) Rated PG

THE FAMILY

The Conjuring

924 W. GARLAND • 509.327.1050 WWW.GARLANDTHEATER.COM

NOW PLAYING ELYSIUM 

Fri/Sat: 2:30, 6:30 Sun: 3:45 Mon-Thu: 5:00

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

Fri 7:00 Sat-Sun 2:05 7:00 Mon-Thurs 7:00

FILM | SHORTS

FINEST AMERICAN DRAMA SO FAR THIS YEAR.

Brie Larson gives a star-making performance.” –David Edelstein, NEW YORK MAGAZINE

Ethan Hawke gave us an amazing performance in the remarkable Before Midnight earlier this year, so it’s OK for him to take some time to do something, well, less remarkable. Here, Hawke plays Brent Magna, who used to be a professional race car driver, which comes in handy when his wife is kidnapped by some jerk and he has to steal some other chick’s car (that chick is a post-Bieber Selena Gomez; the car is a Shelby Mustang) and drive really fast to rescue said wife. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE GRANDMASTER 

Directed by Wong Kar-Wai, Grandmaster tells the story of Ip Man, the martial arts master who trained Bruce Lee. Ip Man looks back on his life during a time of political change in China, in which the Japanese have invaded Manchuria. Through his trials and tribulations, mainly a flurry of violence and perfectly timed punches, Ip Man discovers himself and, of course, kicks butt while he’s at it. (ER) Rated PG13

IN A WORLD...

Lake Bell wrote, directed and stars in this big-hearted comedy that goes behind the scenes of the voiceover industry — in other words, the dude who says “In a world..” at the beginning of those action movie previews. As Carol, Bell gives us a luckless daughter of a voiceover master who is trying to forge her own career in the industry while also dealing with her nutso family. It’s quirky and full of laughs, but also a sign that Bell is an indie director to keep an eye on. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R.

INSIDIOUS CHAPTER 2

DEMAREST F

I

L

M

S

STARTS FRIDAY 9/13

MAGIC LANTERN 25 WEST MAIN AVENUE

(509) 209-2383 SPOKANE

78 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 Pacific Inlander Wednesday, 9/11 4 Unit Square(3.6x5.4)

The Lambert family returns in the sequel to the bone-chilling thriller aptly named Insidious: Chapter Two. Patrick Wilson stars as Josh Lambert, the reassuring father to the now healing family, attempting to erase the events of the past.  But as unusual things begin to once again happen in the household, Renai Lambert,

played by Rose Byrne, begins to suspect that perhaps her husband’s reassurance is simply denial, and something has followed her hubby out of the spirit-world, (ER) Rated PG-13

ren planet where he’s forced to fight for his life against alien beasts. Then, a bunch of bounty hunters come looking for the mole-eyed hero and, again, he has to fight for his life. (MB) Rated R.

JOBS

SHORT TERM 12

Ashton Kutcher takes a break from embarrassing himself on Two and a Half Men to star as Apple founder Steve Jobs in this biopic of the man who made the iPhone possible. You’ll learn all about how Jobs dropped out of college yet still managed to change the way we listen to music, surf the Internet and take photos of ourselves. (MB) Rated PG-13

LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER

Forest Whitaker plays the lead role in this loosely interpreted story of former White House butler Eugene Allen, turned here into a fellow named Cecil Gaines. His ability to avoid conflicts and please people catches the eye of a White House staff recruiter, who brings Cecil on during the Eisenhower administration, beginning service that would take him into the Reagan years. Also stars Oprah Winfrey! (SR) Rated PG-13

ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US

If you’re over the age of 17, you probably have no idea what One Direction is. Allow us to school you on the subject: it’s a British boy band who sing inconsequential music about inconsequential topics. Now there’s a concert film — for some reason directed by Morgan Spurlock of Super Size Me fame — coming to theaters so young girls can scream at the screen and fantasize about marrying one of them. (MB) Rated PG

PLANES

Disney has almost made the movie  Cars  again. This time, it’s just with planes. Dusty, voiced by Dane Cook, is a plane with dreams of becoming a champion racer, but he’s afraid of heights. With the help of his mentor Skipper (Stacy Keach), Dusty sets out to make his dreams come true. (JR) Rated PG

RIDDICK

Vin Diesel returns as Riddick, the interstellar warrior we first met in Pitch Black and then saw return to action in 2004’s Chronicles of Riddick. This time around, he’s been left for dead on a bar-

Brie Larson plays Grace, a supervisor in a foster home for at-risk teens. Although madly in love with her boyfriend Mason, played by John Howard Gallagher Jr., Grace is seemingly unable to express herself when things get tough. Finding a connection with Jayden, a troubled teen new to her group home, and more distance in her relationship, Grace begins to realize she needs to take the advice she gives to her kids, and finally, open up a little. At Magic Lantern (ER) Rated R

THE WAY, WAY BACK

Fox Searchlight continues to establish itself as, perhaps, the premier indie film distributor. From them we’ve received films like Sideways, Juno and Slumdog Millionaire. Their newest film seems to contain the same charm they’ve become known for. This time around, Steve Carell, Toni Collette, Maya Rudolph and a young actor named Liam James look to deliver said charm with a tale about a forlorn kid who finds a new life with a summer job at a water park. At Magic Lantern (JR) PG-13

WE’RE THE MILLERS

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time pot dealer who finds himself in major debt to his supplier (Ed Helms). He’s then forced to make a trip to Mexico to pick up some bud, and he believes he’ll keep a lower profile if he crosses the border with his family. Without one, he recruits a nerdy boy, a punk girl and a stripper (Jennifer Aniston — as a stripper!) to pose as his kin travelling in an RV. (JR) Rated R

THE WORLD’S END

Gary King Simon Pegg plays a sad-sack 40-something for whom life’s window has seemingly already closed, leaving him with no option other than to take solace in past glories. Determining that he has unfinished business in his hometown, Gary convinces his estranged friends to take another crack at conquering “The Golden Mile” — a 12-pub/12-pint crawl that saw Gary and his friends fall well short of finishing 23 years earlier. (CW) Rated 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

The World’s End

83

In a World

79

Prisoners

74

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints

70

The Butler

67

Elysium

60

Austenland

42

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

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FILM | REVIEW

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Throwback Crime

Casey — the other Affleck.

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T

Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, September 20, 2013. Saturday, September 21, 2013. Sunday, September 22, 2013. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 9/17/2013 091713070028 Regal 865-925-9554

exas filmmaker David Lowery (director time to time to check on Ruth and her young of the award-winning short film “Piodaughter, with an eye toward filling the romantic neer,” co-editor of Shane Carruth’s Upvacuum left by Bob’s incarceration. Lowery’s stream Color) has made a drop-dead-gorgeous script downplays Foster’s own yearnings (he’s movie. Ain’t Them Bodies Saints appears to be kith obviously a stand-up gentleman of the oldand kin to 1970s outlaw rural romances like school variety) and the whole film strikes a tone Terrence Malick’s Badlands and the benevolent, somewhere between Hank Williams’ plaintive, inspirational spirit of Robert Altman. sorrowful, hound-dog croon and a Dorothea Set in rural Texas sometime, presumably, Lange photo of hard-bitten doom. in the ’70s — Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara The balance between the slight, near-mythic are Bob and Ruth, young lovers star-crossed narrative and the eye-wateringly beautiful by a robbery gone wrong. Surrounded by the cinematography (courtesy of Bradford Young), law in a clapboard house, the pair, as well as the aching, spare score by AIN’T THEM along with a cohort, try to shoot Daniel Hart, creates a movie that’s BODIES SAINTS a more lovingly crafted tone poem their way out. Ruth wings a sheriff, Rated R but Bob takes both her gun and the than anything you’ve seen as of late. Directed by David Lowery blame, and ends up with a 25-year It’s a hardscrabble, heartbreaking, Starring Casey Affleck, prison sentence. The kicker? Ruth is love-and-death affair, and the fact Rooney Mara, Ben Foster pregnant, and their mutual yearning that you just know it’s going to end for each other leads Bob to attempt badly for all involved from the get-go a jailbreak, which succeeds — up to does nothing to dispel the pleasure of a point. While Bob’s stuck in prison, Patrick watching Affleck and Mara swoon toward each (Foster) — the lawman winged by Ruth, unaware other in the seemingly perpetual twilight of the it was she who fired the pistol — swings by from magic hour — and of life. Stunning. 

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2013

HUGH JACKMAN

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WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1240) 425 740 1015

Director David Lowery uses some 1970s inspiration in Ain’t Them Bodies Saints

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NOVEMBER 8TH & 9TH

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RIDDICK [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(115) 400 650 930 ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US THE EXTENDED CUT [CC] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(340 PM) ONE DIRECTION: THE EXTENDED CUT IN REALD 3D [CC] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(105 PM) 615 PM 950 PM THE WORLD'S END [CC] (R) Fri. - Sun.(100 PM) MORTAL INSTRUMENTS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(105 PM) 405 PM 705 PM

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 PRISONERS

R Daily (3:00) 6:20 7:00 9:00 Fri-Sun 9:35 Sat-Sun (11:35)

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2

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THE FAMILY

R Fri-Sun (4:30) 7:00 9:30 Mon-Thu (4:00) 6:30 9:00 Sat-Sun (11:30) (1:50)

RIDDICK

R Fri-Sun (4:45) 7:15 9:45 Mon-Thu (4:15) 6:45 9:15 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:00)

LEE DANIEL’S THE BUTLER

LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(130 PM) 430 PM 745 PM

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:30 9:20 Sat-Sun (12:45)

ELYSIUM [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(130) 410 655 940

R Daily (4:15) 6:50 9:15 Sat-Sun (11:40) (1:50)

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PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(125) 445 735 955

R Fri-Sun (4:35) 7:00 9:30 Mon-Thu (4:20) 6:40 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:00)

WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(135) 420 705 945

ELYSIUM PLANES

WE’RE THE MILLERS

PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS PG Daily (3:50) 6:50 Sat-Sun (11:10) (1:30)

DESPICABLE ME 2

PG Daily (4:15) Sat-Sun (12:15) (2:30)

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UNFINISHED SONG

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PG-13 Daily (2:40) (5:00) 7:20 9:10 9:40 Fri-Sun (12:20)

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.440 PM 835 PM

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INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 THE FAMILY

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THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES PG-13 Daily (1:20) (4:00) 6:45 9:25 Fri-Sun (11:00)

LEE DANIEL’S THE BUTLER

RIDDICK [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(115 PM) 425 PM 825 PM

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THE SPECTACULAR NOW (R) Fri. - Sun.(100 PM) 650 PM 915 PM

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THE HEAT

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY G Fri-Sun (11:40)

RED 2

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (3:50) 6:20 8:50 Fri-Sun (11:00) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 9/20/13-9/26/13

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 79

SPOkane’s new

e r e i m e r p

b u l c e c n da

e s to c o m e is r p r u s h it w

GRAND OPENING th 7 September 2

l Back to schoo Toga Party formerly

ots upstairs from sh e. ue av @ 412 w sprag and sprague on between washingtt | 8pm-2am sun sa m-2am mopen 5p

80 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

fri 5pm-2am monn Su & t 9am-4am sa

Sing the Greys Frightened Rabbit rolls a wee bit of Scottish melancholy in on a tour bus BY LAURA JOHNSON

E

ither he’s lying, or Andy Monaghan really does like wheeling around the world on a tour bus. This is a helpful attribute, as that’s what his band Frightened Rabbit has been doing for the past year. Last week during a phone interview, Monaghan — who plays guitar, bass and keyboards for the indie rock band — was on a bus, cruising out of Atlanta where they opened for melancholic rock act The National. Since January, there’s only been one week that Frightened Rabbit got to go home to Scotland to rest. Other than that, it’s been a ceaseless barrage of promoting the new album Pedestrian Verse. “Once you’ve been on the road for a while, you get into the swing of things,” Monaghan admits. In order not to go totally bananas being somewhere new every night, always living in hotels, Monaghan makes it a priority to find out a little bit about the culture of the city where the band is playing. “It’s important to hit up a good taco place or bowling place or art gallery,” Monaghan says. “Anything that says something about the town.” In a way, Monaghan has always just been along for the ride. A decade ago, Scott Hutchison convinced his brother Grant to play drums for a project he was working on. At that point, the hottest group in Scotland was Franz Ferdinand. While there were plenty of emulators, a backlash against the Glasgow scene’s eclectic pop movement also emerged. Along with the likes of We Were Promised Jetpacks and The Twilight Sad, Frightened Rabbit led the charge. With a sound fusing the sadness of singer-

songwriter Damien Rice with Snow Patrol if they went more folk, Scott wrote lyrics that read like diary entries, letting music be the place he let go of his emotions. The frontman acted as the band’s lead songwriter until Pedestrian Verse. “We did that to just mix it up a bit,” Monaghan explained. “There’s a lot of pressure on Scott to come up with stuff, and dividing up the task takes a wee bit of the pressure off of him. It makes everyone feel a part of the band.” The new album was written over the course of three years, with so much music composed that an EP with three new songs, Late March, Death March, was released this month to accommodate the spillover. But 2008 was the defining year for the band, as Monaghan, already a member of the group Piano Bar Fight, was asked to join over more than a few pints. “Scott got really drunk one night and asked me to be a part of the band,” Monaghan recalls. “The next morning I wouldn’t let him go back on his word.” The album Frightened Rabbit had just completed, The Midnight Organ Fight, had too many guitar parts recorded, so the band needed to add another guitarist for the tour. Success came gradually. They opened for Death Cab for Cutie in the UK while the album received accolades from Pitchfork and A.V. Club. Two years later, Atlantic Records called. “When I first joined the band, my dad was skeptical of what I was doing,” Monaghan recalled. “But the last time we played in Glasgow, he was there and he was so proud.” ...continued on next page

Frightened Rabbit raises a glass next Thursday at Knitting Factory. PAUL STEVENSON PHOTO

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 81

MUSIC | INDIE ROCK “SING THE GREYS,” CONTINUED... Friends were a different matter; they were on board since the beginning. “Everyone is very supportive — the scene in Glasgow, all the bands are in it together,” Monaghan says. “My friends live through me. They want to know all the stories from the road.” For most Americans, it’s a challenge to understand what someone from Scotland is saying — subtitles would be helpful, as the brogue is thick. Many English acts sound American when they sing, but Scots can’t seem to kick the accent (check out the recent Frightened Rabbit single, “The Woodpile,” for an example). So after traveling around this country, is there anything Monaghan thinks Americans do well? “Coleslaw and pizza — my mind just directly went to food,” he confirms. “Also, Game of Thrones. We’ve watched every single

episode while on tour.” Rolling into Spokane next Thursday for a show, perhaps the band will take in the MAC’s latest installation or munch on tacos at Atilano’s beforehand. Either way, a couple of things will go down onstage: Augustines, who recently changed their name from We Are Augustines and moved from Brooklyn to Seattle — “they’re such beautiful men,” says Monaghan — will open and Frightened Rabbit will surprise. “We’ve been mixing it up every night,” he says. “Who knows what will happen? n lauraj@inlander.com Frightened Rabbit feat. Augustines • Thu, Sept. 26 at 8:30 pm • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • $16 • All-ages • sp.knittingfactory.com

11TH Annual

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82 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

MUSIC | VENUES

Out of the Blue A tragic act of violence and the family business caught in its wake

THE QUEERS

& TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET

THE COPYRIGHT | THE SISSIES ALL AGES | 7PM | $12 ADV

T

om Chavez directs a stern look at a young kid who has just plopped into a seat on the patio, casually puffing on a cigarette. “What are you doing? How old are you?” he asks. The kid looks like he’s been caught stealing. “Eighteen,” the kid says. “How long you been smoking?” “Since I was, like, 15? I can show you my ID.” Chavez scoffs and shakes his head. “I don’t care about your ID, it’s that habit, man,” he says. “You gotta stop smoking, it’ll kill ya.” It’s the kind of thing that Chavez — a 50-something Navy retiree most everyone calls “TC” — has become known for in the past three years as the owner of the Hop!, an all-ages music venue just north of the Monroe Street Bridge. The club, usually open seven days a week, is one of the only places in Spokane to host shows for the under-21 set. Under the eyes of Chavez and his sons, the Hop! has never been known for violence. So Chavez was shocked when he got a late night phone call on Sunday, Sept. 8, that someone had been shot and killed in the parking lot behind his venue. Spokane police say it was the first time officers had needed to respond to an incident at the venue. “We pretty much went from zero — on the violence scale — we went from zero to 10 in five seconds,” he says. The Hop! was scheduled to host an afterparty that night for the fans of San Francisco rapper Messy Marv, slated to perform at nearby Lincoln Center. The rapper was never supposed to appear at the Hop!, according to Chavez — it was just an afterparty. When Messy Marv failed to show at Lincoln Center and word spread that he might be at the Hop! event, Chavez says his staff noticed the crowd seemed tense. But the Hop! was full of familiar faces — including Kalen

SEPT 24 | 7PM

THE CENTER

BY LEAH SOTTILE

RA THE RUGGED MAN

SEPT 27 | 7PM

ILLEST UMINATI | DIRTY SAVAGE | KAGAN KING SCRUB | SOUNDCAST | PEST | JAY 5 ALL AGES | 7PM | $13

THE CENTER

NATTY VIBES THE STEPPAS | FACEDOWN ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS | $10 ADV

THE CENTER

The Hop! is just north of the Monroe Street Bridge. Bedford, Carlos Fuentes and Julian Morrison — who had been to events there before. According to a Spokesman-Review report, Morrison exited the Hop! into the parking lot east of the venue and was met by Bedford and Fuentes and a flurry of bullets. When the smoke cleared, Morrison was dead. Spokane Police took Bedford and Fuentes into custody last Wednesday. The two face charges of first-degree murder and first-degree assault. Police issued a press release stating that “detectives believe that the shooting incident is gang related and that both the victim and the suspects are gang members.” The Hop! has long been known as a place where anyone — from Juggalos to gothic DJs — can play. But Chavez says this event has put him on edge. “It makes us more apprehensive about doing certain types of events,” he says. “I’m going to be looking at my calendar and I already know a couple I’m probably going to cancel.” “I don’t want to sound like I’m blaming any particular crowd,” he says. “I want everything to settle down a bit. I’m doing that kind of for the whole picture. I’m doing it for us and our relations with the city.”  leahs@inlander.com

SEPT 29 | 7PM

RED FANG ALL AGES | 7PM DOORS | $12

OCT 17 | 7PM

THE CENTER

THE CENTER TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: THECENTERSPOKANE.COM 6425 N. LIDGERWOOD

Free Family

Saturday at

the MAC

September 21, 2013

Sponsored by

Group Health will display its “Blood & Guts” mini-science exhibit kicking off its Whooping Cough (pertussis) immunization campaign with this interactive/hands-on activity. Three major topic areas: drug/alcohol/tobacco safety; human body; healthy food choices. Wheel Sport will be on site doing bike safety checks and helmet fittings. Ride your bike to the MAC! Local Hip-hop group Lilac Lingustics & and graffiti artist Mario de Leon will perform 12-3PM.

MAKE it the MAC

Wed - Sun 10am to 5pm 2316 W First Avenue, Spokane

(509) 456-3931

OPEN

www.northwestmuseum.org An Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 83

MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

AMERICANA STEVE EARLE

PUNK THE QUEERS

ny fans of HBO’s cult series The Wire will recognize Steve Earle as Bubbles’ AA friend Walon — he also lent his talents the version of the Tom Waits song “Way Down in the Hole” in season 5’s opening credits. His stint on that show was far from the most important work in Earle’s decades-long career. His classic debut album Guitar Town put him on the map in the mid-’80s, and he enjoys a cult following among both lovers of country and rock ‘n’ roll. His voice is by no means beautiful, but with brutally honest lyrics to back up his guitar skills, his songs seep into the mind and never let go (see “CCKMP”). After battling addiction in the ’90s, Earle has emerged stronger than ever. — LAURA JOHNSON

A

heir name will get you. How did a band get away with using a homophobic slur as its moniker? That’s what makes them so punk rock, obviously. And with song titles like “F--- the World,” “I Hate Everything” and “I Can’t Stop Farting,” it’s clear the band is ensconced in the extreme immature side of punk; that’s what makes them so much fun. Formed in the early ’80s in New Hampshire, The Queers’ brand of Ramones-esque sound has persevered through the years, even after the death of longtime drummer Hugh O’Neill in 1999. Paired with equally ridiculous bands Teenage Bottlerocket and The Copyright at the The Center, the Spokane show will be out of control. — LAURA JOHNSON

Steve Earle & The Dukes with The Mastersons • Thu, Sept. 26 at 8 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • $39.50 • ticketswest.com • 227-7638

The Queers, Teenage Bottlerocket, The Copyrights, The Sissies • Tue, Sept. 24 at 7 pm • The Center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood • $12 in advance • All-ages • thecenterspokane.com

T

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 9/19

ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Bill Bozly BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn CARR’S CORNER, Chelsey Heidenreich, Raze the City THE CELLAR, Eric Nuehasser J THE CENTER, Dizzy Wright CHATEAU RIVE (795-2030), Ray Wylie Hubbard COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny FORTY-ONE SOUTH (208-265-2000), Truck Mills GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Elektro Grave JOHN’S ALLEY, Worth J LAGUNA CAFE, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, Bodhi Drip, Tone Collaborative RICO’S (332-6566), Palouse Subterranean Blues Band THE ROADHOUSE, Sammy Eubanks SPLASH, Steve Denny THE SWAMP, DJ Aphrodisiac

Friday, 9/20

315 MARTINIS, Jazz Guys BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn

84 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

BOLO’S (891-8995), The Cruizers BOOMERS (368-9847), Johnny Qlueless CALYPSOS COFFEE (208-665-0591), Sea Giant J CARR’S CORNER, Diesto, Rasputin, Bloody Gloves COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Strictly Business, Ron Greene COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Bridges Home THE COUNTRY CLUB (208-6762582), Coyote Rose Band CURLEY’S, Johnny Qlueless FIRST STREET BAR, The Coleman Underground FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Karma’s Circle GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos GRANDE RONDE CELLARS (4558161), Spokane Songwriters feat. Dirk Lind J THE HOP!, Green Jelly, Xingaia, The Horror Within, Thirion X IRON HORSE, Scorpius IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Toney JONES RADIATOR, DJ Lydell J LAGUNA CAFE, Pamela Benton LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kari Marguerite LIBRARY LOUNGE (747-3371), Big Hair Revolution LUCKY’S IRISH PUB (499-9968), Likes Girls

J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Bradford’s Capsoul J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Maxie Ray Mills MOOTSY’S, Table Top Joe NORTHERN QUEST, DJs Ramsin, Freaky Fred NYNE, DJ MC Squared PEND D’OREILLE WINERY (208-2658545), Bill Price J THE PHAT HOUSE, Colby Acuff and Justin Sherfey, Briana Loraine RED LION AT THE PARK (326-8000), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley REPUBLIC BREWING COMPANY (7752700), The Pine Hearts THE ROADHOUSE, The Usual Suspects THE ROCK BAR (443-3796), Armed and Dangerous SERGIO’S (747-2085), Luke Jaxon Band J THE SHOP, DJ Soott SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, DJ Deuce SPLASH, Steve Denny, Bad Monkey SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD (891-0880), Triple Shot TWELVE STRING BREWING (9908622), The StuntCoasters J WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY (7771000), Saint Rich

Saturday, 9/21 315 MARTINIS, Maxie Ray Mills

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BOLO’S (891-8995), The Cruizers BOOMERS (368-9847), Johnny Qlueless BROADWAY BAR (326-5000), Dudley Do-Wrong CARR’S CORNER, Boad Rase Weekend, Oh Snap, Upbeat for Sundown J THE CENTER, Adrenaline Rush (Rush Tribute) CHECKERBOARD BAR, Walking Corpse Syndrome, Damaged Goods, The Khind, Mojave Wizard COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Strictly Business, Ron Greene COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971, Truck Mills THE COUNTRY CLUB, Coyote Rose Band CURLEY’S, Johnny Qlueless FIRST STREET BAR, The Coleman Underground FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Karma’s Circle GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos GREYHOUND PARK (800-828-4880), Rock Hard at the Park feat. Five Finger Death Punch, Halestorm, Sevendust, 10years, Escape the Fire, MissMayI, Gemini Syndrome J THE HOP!, The Last Ten Seconds of Life, Deserters, Kublai Khan, Seeker, Lay the Tarp, RaisedBy-

Wolves, Extortionist IRON HORSE, Scorpius IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Whiskey Syndicate LANTERN TAP HOUSE (315-9531), Cursive Wires, Tyler Aker LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LIBRARY LOUNGE (747-3371), Big Hair Revolution J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Soul Patter Project MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), Plastic Saints J MIRABEAU PARK, Valleyfest feat. Barry Lee White, Men in the Making, Atomic Jive, Spare Parts, The Plaid Cats, Miss Abbey & Her Red Hot Orchestra MOOTSY’S, Brothers ov Midnight NORTHERN QUEST, Kid Rock (sold out), DJs Ramsin, Freaky Fred NYNE, Bushwalla, Hey! is for Horses THE PHAT HOUSE, Oktoberfest Party feat. Left Over Soul RED LION RIVER INN (328-9526), Chris Rieser and Snap the Nerve RED ROOM LOUNGE, Lucrezio, Chelsey Heidenreich, WayWard THE ROADHOUSE, The Usual Suspects J ROCKET MARKET (343-2253), Lyle Morse SERGIO’S (747-2085), Luke Jaxon Band

 THE SHOP, Dirk Lind SPLASH, Steve Denny, Bad Monkey SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD (891-0880), Triple Shot THE WAVE (747-2023), Likes Girls VIKING BAR, Undercard, Beyond Today, Lavoy

Sunday, 9/22

ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Singlewide  BING CROSBY THEATER, Cami Bradley, Taylor Williamson CARR’S CORNER, Saint John THE CELLAR, Pat Coast  THE CENTER, Girl in a Coma, COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. CURLEY’S, Karma’s Circle DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Voodoo Church HOGFISH (208-667-1896), Likes Girls  THE HOP!, The Vibrators, Barnacle Burn, Collateral Damage  MIRABEAU PARK, Valleyfest feat. the Pearl Snaps, Chutzpah, Twisted Bisquit  MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP (208-8828537), Moscow Food Co-op Carnival feat. Runaway Symphony, Tom Drake & Undiscovered Country, Moscow Peace Band  THE PHAT HOUSE, Open mic REPUBLIC BREWING CO. (775-2700), Blake Nobel and Tim Snider SPLASH, Steve Denny ZOLA, Darin Schaffer

Monday, 9/23

BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ (321-7480), Open mic  CALYPSOS COFFEE (208-6650591), Open mic EICHARDT’S, Truck Mills  MOOTSY’S, Jaeda + Half Zodiac, Jonny October, Corina Corina  THE PHAT HOUSE, Still the Sky’s Limit, Mike Forland, Brad Perry PJ’S BAR (328-2153), One Man Train Wreck

RICO’S (332-6566), Open mic

Tuesday, 9/24

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn CARR’S CORNER, KTFO Rap Battles THE CELLAR, Max Daniels  THE CENTER, The Queers (See story on facing page), Teenage Bottlerocket, The Copyrights, The Sissies JOHN’S ALLEY, Open mic KELLY’S IRISH PUB (208-667-1717), Powell Brothers  KNITTING FACTORY, Matt Nathanson, Joshua Radin  MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP (208-8828537), Gypsydawgs  THE PHAT HOUSE, Bebop Jam Session  RED ROOSTER COFFEE (2029138), Open mic  THE SHOP, Blair-Miller Project SPLASH, Steve Denny ZOLA, Dan Conrad and the Urban Achievers

Wednesday, 9/25 BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BISTRO ON SPRUCE (208-664-1774), Truck Mills CARR’S CORNER, DJ WesOne THE CELLAR, TC Tye EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FEDORA PUB, Kosh IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy  KNITTING FACTORY, Plain White T’s  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Andy Rumsey  THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic RED ROOM LOUNGE, Brian Ploeger Quintet SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open mic SPLASH, Steve Denny  SPOKANE ARENA (279-7000), Jason Aldean, Jake Owen, Thomas Rhett SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck ZOLA, The Bucket List

Coming Up…

 BING CROSBY THEATER, Steve Earle & The Dukes (See story on facing page), The Mastersons, Sept. 26 JONES RADIATOR, The Dodgy Moun-

tain Men, Sept. 26  KNITTING FACTORY, Frightened Rabbit (See story on page 81), Augustines, Sept. 26 CARR’S CORNER, J. Lately and J. Good, Sept. 27 THE CENTER, Ra the Rugged Man, Illest Uminati, Dirty Savage, Kagan, King Scrub, Soundcast, Pest, Jay 5, Sept. 27 JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, Brad Richter and Viktor Uzur, Sept. 27 KNITTING FACTORY, Citizen Cope, Sept. 27 MOOTSY’S, Learning Team, Sept. 27 NYNE, Lavoy, Sept. 27 REPUBLIC BREWING CO. (775-2700), Guitars for Kids Benefit Concert feat. The RBC Band, Junkyard Duo, Sept. 27 BABY BAR, Rio Grands, Sept. 28 CARR’S CORNER, Satriarch, Skinwalker, Valley of Nod, Vaginal Defecation, Midnight Mine, Sept. 28 THE CENTER, Beyond Belief, Evolved, Onefall, Helldorado, Stepping on My Soul, Seven Cycles, Sept. 28 GORGE AMPHITHEATER (785-6262), Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson, Rozzi Crane, Sept. 28 THE HOP!, Lei Majors CD Release Party, Sept. 28 JONES RADIATOR, Flaamingos, Mirror Mirror, Sept. 28 KNITTING FACTORY, Elton Jah, Longstride, Gatorloops, Sept. 28 MOSAIC FELLOWSHIP, Dick Hensold, Caridwen and Greg Spatz, Sept. 28 THE CENTER, Natty Vibes, The Steppas, Facedown, Sept. 29 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Gin Blossoms, Sept/ 29 CARR’S CORNER, Haunted Horses, Bloody Gloves, Hooves, Sept. 30 KNITTING FACTORY, Zedd, Oliver, Alex Metric, Sept. 30 CALVARY CHAPEL OF SPOKANE (4672860), Steven Curtis Chapman, Laura Story, Jason Gray, Oct. 3 THE CENTER, The Novocaines, The Copper Gamins, Exile Parade, Oct. 3 KNITTING FACTORY, Hank 3, Oct. 3 BING CROSBY THEATER, The Alliance, Oct. 4

Equinox Art Fair 9.21.13

10am-4pm

Artists • Jewelers • Vintage • Live Music •

South Spokane

3223 E. 57th Suite k

REVEL77.com // 509.280.0518

YOUR DESTINATION FOR GREAT COCKTAILS, FOOD, AND MUSIC HOME OF THE RAINDROP MARTINI

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OCTOBER

get info on speakers, vendors, and tickets at:

BODYSOULPLANET.COM

SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER

9 AM - 6 PM

1009 W. 1st Ave. (next to Scratch Restaurant) 509.456.5656 :: rainspokane.com

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BELLTOWER • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 THE CENTER • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave ��� 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 CURLEY’S BAR & BISTRO • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Hauser • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROTHERS • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 315-8623 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 MOON TIME • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPLASH • 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 85

WORDS DINNER WITH STORYTELLERS

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

FESTIVAL PARTY IN THE VALLEY

It makes sense that lots of exciting things are happening at this year’s Valleyfest, since 2013 marks the 10th anniversary of Spokane Valley being incorporated as its own city. Event goers can find the full map and schedule of events online for the live music, workshops and attractions at the weekend-long festival. Highlights include Friday’s “Heart of Gold” parade at 7:30 pm on the corner of Sprague and University. Saturday events include the car show, Abbey Crawford’s singing, and the hot-air balloon night glow. The Spokane Astronomical Society is bringing telescopes so visitors can take a peek at Saturn, Venus and Mercury, and the petting zoo will give everyone a fix of cute animal cuddles. There’s truly something for everyone. — BETH NOTTURNO Valleyfest • Sept. 20-22, event times vary • Free admission • Mirabeau Point Park and CenterPlace Regional Event Center • 2426 N. Discovery Pl. • Spokane Valley • valleyfest.org • 922-3299

86 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

Take a handful of prominent Northwest writers, add a theme — this year it’s “Pillow Talk” — then top it off with dinner and wine. This is Bedtime Stories, and the writers presenting original works this year are Jess Walter, Sharma Shields, Shawn Vestal and Washington’s poet laureate, Kathleen Flenniken. The dinner and wine part of this event is probably top-notch, but the real draw is clearly more literary than culinary. The annual literary gala has been happening for years in Seattle, and is returning for its second year in Spokane to raise money for cultural education nonprofit Humanities Washington. — LISA WAANANEN Bedtime Stories • Fri, Sept. 20 at 6 pm • $75 • Spokane Club • 1002 W. Riverside Ave. • btsspokane.eventbrite.com

MUSIC RETURN OF THE SYMPHONY

After a summer season away from the The Fox’s stage, the Spokane Symphony’s orchestra members pick up their instruments this weekend to kick off another season of mesmerizing musical moments. After some tumultuous times last season (remember the musicians’ strike?) the Symphony starts anew with its 2013-14 season, aptly titled “Hear the Heart of the City.” The first concert is part of the Classics series, called “Virtuosity Required” because it features some mind-bendingly difficult pieces of music, truly written for virtuosos like award-winning violinist Ilya Kaler, who accompanies the orchestra this weekend. — CHEY SCOTT Classics Series 1: “Virtuosity Required” • Sat, Sept. 21 at 8 pm and Sun, Sept. 22 at 3 pm • $15-$54 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

MUSIC CAMI BRADLEY

It feels like this season of America’s Got Talent has been going on for years on end, but maybe that’s because we’re all so flippin’ excited to see if Spokane’s own Cami Bradley is going to win this jugglers-vs.-family dance teams-vs.comedians-vs.- singers competition. Bradley has made it all the way to the finals, the results of which air on Wednesday night, so you might already know what happens. But either way, Bradley is coming home to Spokane to celebrate her run with two shows at the Bing Crosby Theater (the early one is already sold out, FYI). She’s bringing along fellow AGT contestant Taylor Williamson, who will tell some jokes to warm up the show. — MIKE BOOKEY Cami Bradley, Taylor Williamson • Sun, Sept. 22 at 8 pm (sold out) and 10:15 pm • $20 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • ticketswest. com

$15.99

FILM SPIFF-Y SCREENING

Each fall, organizers of the Spokane International Film Festival host a series of screenings and post-film discussions to get people thinking critically about cinema. The first installment of the series is Pan’s Labyrinth, hosted by Brian Clayton, director of Gonzaga’s Faith and Reason Institute. Pan’s Labyrinth blurs the lines between fantasy and reality. The film’s leading character is Ofelia, a whimsical girl growing up in post-civil-war Spain. Extremely misunderstood by her new stepfather, her mother consumed by pregnancy and sickness, Ofelia becomes ensnared by her own isolation. When a mysterious faun offers to help cure her ill mother, Ofelia finds herself living a fairy tale. Dark imagery and grim circumstance follow in this Guillermo del Toro film. — EMERA RILEY SpIFF Professor Film Series: Pan’s Labyrinth • Wed, Sept. 25 at 7 pm • $7 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • spokanefilm.org • 227-7638

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D's Comedy, 2721 N. Market. (483-7300) MICHAEL GLATZMAIER Musical comedy show. Sept. 19 at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays at 8 pm. Free. Ages 21+. Chan's Red Dragon, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) BEFORE IT'S IN THEATERS Live comedy show based on audience suggestions of movies. Fridays at 8 pm through Sept. 27. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre,

815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) RON WHITE Live comedy show. Sept. 20 at 7:30 pm. $75-$100. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. (481-6700) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows every Sunday at 9 pm. Free. Goodtymes Bar and Grill, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) COMEDY OPEN MIC Stand-up comedy open mic night. Sept. 26 at 6 pm. Free. All-ages. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) LAUGH FOR THE CURE Benefits the E. Wash. affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, feat. comedian Shaun Jones and opener Drew Barth. Oct. 3 at 6 pm. $75. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. komeneasternwashington. org (315-5940)

Artistry in Wood 2013 WOODCARVING SHOW & SALE

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Saturday, Sept. 28th • 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. & Sunday, Sept 29th • noon - 4 p.m.

NEW LOCATION

Salvation Army Campus 222 E. Indiana, Spokane, WA

ADM ISSION• $4.00 with this ad ($5.00 without) • Children 12 & under Free when accompanied by an adult

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OPEN ENROLLMENT POTTERY CLASSES All Skill Levels & Ages Morning/Evening Classes Fun & Friendly Atmosphere Learn at Your Own Pace Supplies Included

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714 E. Sprague Spokane | 509-747-6171

SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 87

RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess GOING CODE TURKEY

I broke up with a boyfriend a few years ago because I wasn’t getting what I wanted from him. I’d give him subtle cues, and when he didn’t respond in the ways I was hoping for, I blamed him for being thickheaded. I’ve ended many a relationship because of this. The dudes didn’t have a chance. I now see that we women can skip years of frustration by getting clear with our partners about what we need from them. UnderstandAMY ALKON ing this now, you’d think it would be simple for me to follow through. Yet, I’m continually surprised at how strong my “have him guess!” impulse can be. Letting a man in on my feelings actually takes a lot of courage and stretches me like nothing else. —Challenged It isn’t hard for a boyfriend to make a woman happy instead of pissed off for days. He just needs the right answer to “Hey, honey, guess what it means when I put my hair in a ponytail and walk out of the room!” A guy gets to the point where he can’t be sure whether he’s in a relationship or a really, really long game of charades. (Either way, it helps if there are occasional breaks for angry sex.) Although men and women are psychologically similar in many ways, studies by social psychologist Judith A. Hall and others find that women are more accurate in sussing out the meaning of nonverbal cues. The problem is, we humans all have a tendency to assume others’ minds work just like our own. So, you conclude that a guy is withholding and mean when he seems to ignore what you think should be obvious — that your left nostril flaring is code for “Tell me you love me right this second!” (Not to be mistaken for the flaring right nostril’s “Take out the trash or I’ll kill myself!”) To your credit, you took a hard look at yourself and admitted that you were wrong. As for why you’re having difficulty putting what you now understand into practice, Yale psychology professor Alan E. Kazdin explained on my radio show, “Knowing doesn’t control doing.” Doing actually takes doing — in your case, repeatedly pushing yourself to express your feelings, despite how uncomfortably vulnerable it makes you feel. Repeating behavior over time actually rewires the brain and, in Kazdin’s words, “locks” the new behaviors in. Eventually, healthier behavior should come more naturally to you — like recognizing, without animus, that the way to get your boyfriend to admire your sexy new haircut is by telling him you’ve gotten one, not by glaring out at him from under the subtly different slant of your bangs. (As every woman needs to understand, his not noticing your new do doesn’t mean he’s stopped loving you; it means you haven’t shaved your head.)

TAKING OUT THE TRASHING

I am online dating and assume people will Google me before we meet. Two years ago, I briefly got involved with a crazy woman. When I realized how nuts she was, I broke up with her. She started an Internet campaign against me, posting horrible things about me online. These are obvious lies and clearly seem to be the rantings of a crazy person, but most are nearly impossible to get taken down. Should I casually mention these in an online chat with potential dates? (“Oh, by the way, if you read anything terrible about me online, it’s written by a crazy person.”) —Maligned Guy A person should get to know you a little before she learns you’re a 300-year-old incubus who poisoned our groundwater and killed the neighbors’ dog and made it look like a suicide. Since ranting crazies tend to sound, as the saying goes, a few balloons short of a parade, a prospective partner’s big worry is likely to be that sick drama is relationship-as-usual for you. The best way to dispel this fear is by letting someone see who you are before seeing who the Internet says you are. Wait until after the first date to reveal your last name. (If questioned, plead online dating prudence.) Create a new email address you use for online dating only so no one can use your regular one to Google your identity. And then, on your date, you could casually mention the nutty former ex — ideally in a way that suggests the experience was very much out of character for you. Assuming you come off solid and balanced, this should help dispel any suspicions that your ex is nuts because you drove her there or that you have some scary tendencies yourself. Although women these days tend to be pleasantly surprised by chivalry, they are always looking to weed out the sort of man who’ll end their evening with a considerate offer like “Can I walk you to my trunk?” n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

88 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMMUNITY

FALL LIBRARY BOOK SALE The annual Friends of the Spokane Public Library's fall book sale fundraiser. Sept. 19-21, Thu-Fri 10 am-5 pm, Sat 10 am-2 pm. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5307) CHARITY DATE AUCTION Third annual event benefiting the Spokane Humane Society. Sept. 19 at 6 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) PARTNERS IN HOPE Annual fundraiser for the organization featuring food, live entertainment, auctions and more. Sept. 19 from 4:30-7:30 pm. $60/person. St. Joseph Family Center, 1016 N. Superior St. sjfconline.org (483-6495) PALOUSE WALK TO END ALZHEIMER'S Three-mile fundraiser and awareness walk along the Bill Chipman Trail. Sept. 19 at 5:15 pm. Starts at Toyota of Pullman, 8683 SR 270. (473-3390) TAKE BACK THE NIGHT The university's second annual campus safety week and Katy Benoit Safety Forum, concluding with the Take Back the Night March. Sept. 19 at 8 pm. University of Idaho, Moscow. (208-882-2777) HIRING OUR HEROES Job fair for veterans, active duty, guard and reserve military members and their spouses. Sept. 20 from 10 am-2 pm. Free, registration encouraged. Spokane air & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. hohworks.eventbrite.com (202-4635807) FROM HELL TO HEALING "From Hell to Healing: One Veteran's Story" presentation by Jason Moon, founder of the Warrior Songs project. Sept. 21 at 7:30 pm. $20 suggested donation, free to veterans. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Ft. George Wright Dr. warriorsongs.org STEP UP FOR DOWN SYNDROME 5th annual Down syndrome awareness fundraiser walk, benefiting Ds Connections Northwest. Sept. 21 at 10 am. $8-$12. Mirabeau Park, 2426 N. Discovery Place. firstgiving.com/DsCNw FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE Book sale offering books, books on tape, DVDs, CDs and more, with proceeds benefiting library programs. Sept. 21 from 10 am-3 pm. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne . (893-8260) FREE FAMILY SATURDAY Complimentary admission to the museum, live music, art demonstrations and more. Sept. 21 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. (456-3931) EQUINOX ARTIST'S FAIR Local vendors, live music, art and more. Sept. 21 from 10 am-4 pm. Revel 77, 3223 E. 57th Ave. revel77.com (280-0518) USED BOOK SALE FUNDRAISER Book sale benefits the LC Journal, one of Spokane's last high school newspapers. Sept. 21 from 9 am-3 pm. Free admission. Community Building, 25 W. Main Ave. lctigers.com (354-7000) COLVILLE CORN MAZE Pumpkin patch, corn maze and more. Sept. 21-Oct. 31. Mon-Fri 4 pm to dusk, Fri 4-9 pm, SatSun 11 am-9 pm. $5-$7. Colville, Wash. colvillecornmaze.com (684-6751) KENDAMA TOURNAMENT Open to middle and high school-aged students. Sept. 21 from 7-9 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612)

CHILDREN'S RENAISSANCE FAIRE Culture festival featuring costume activities, storytelling, games, music and activities. Sept. 21 from 11 am-2 pm. Free. Manito Park, east of Duncan Gardens, off Tekoa St. thefriendsofmanito.org (456-8038) RALLY FOR EDUCATION Dinner, auction, scavenger hunt (1 pm) and more to fundraise for the CdA Charter Academy. Sept. 21 from 3-9 pm. $2-$3 admission, $10-$40/dinner. $60/vehicle for scavenger hunt. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. cdacharter.org (208-676-1667) CO-OP CARNIVAL 40-year celebration featuring a local beer garden, games, food, vendors, kids activities and more. Sept. 22 from 5-8 pm. Free. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. Fifth St. moscowfood.coop (208-882-8537) WOMEN & MINORITIES CAREER FAIR First annual nontraditional trades career fair featuring hands-on workshops. Sept. 24 from 9 am-2 pm. Free. Spokane Community College Apprenticeship Training Center, 2110 N. Fancher Way. (279-1211) DAY OF REMEMBRANCE FOR MURDER VICTIMS Vigil in observance of National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims including a shoe donation drive to memorialize victims. Sept. 25 from 5:30-7:30 pm. Public Works Bldg, County Commissioner's Hearing Room, 1100 W. Mallon Ave. (477-7195) COAL TRAIN RALLY & HEARING Rally opposing the proposed coal export facility in Longview, Wash., that would increase the number of trains moving through Spokane. Sept. 25 from 3-3:30 pm. (Wear red clothing). Rotary Fountain in Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. Hearing to follow at 5 pm, Spokane Convention Center. landscouncil.org

ETC.

THE BEAUTIFUL MEDICINE OF BEES Lecture on the health benefits of honey bees, from honey to venom. Sept. 19 from 6:30-8 pm. Free. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) DINNER AMONG FRIENDS Fashion show and lasagna dinner. Sept. 19 from 5-7 pm. $18. Spokane Events & Catering, 10512 E. Sprague. (238-9187) WOUNDED WARRIORS TOUR Veterans are invited to sign the car, a Shelby Mustang GT500, and the event features information about the nonprofit Wounded Warriors. Sept. 19 from 3-6 pm. Free. Gus Johnson Ford, 8300 E. Sprague. highfivetour.com WOODEN BOAT SHOW 38th annual International Wooden Boat Show and meeting hosted in Coeur d'Alene. Sept. 20-22. Coeur d'Alene Resort, 115 S. Second Ave. (208-765-4000) IMPERIAL COURT OF SPOKANE CORONATION "A Starlight Stroll Through the Imperial Garden" coronation for the Imperial Soverign Court of Spokane. Sept. 20-22. Coronation Sept. 21 at 5 pm. $45-$60. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. Other events Fri-Sun at nYne Bar. imperialsovereigncourtofspokane.com (489-2399) PACIFIC NW BONSAI CONVENTION Event featuring bonsai artists, awards, vendors and more. Sept. 20-22. The Davenport, 10 S. Post St. (991-2099) PLANE PULL Teams of up to 20 people compete to see who can pull a Boe-

ing 727 aircraft 12 feet, benefiting the Special Olympics of Washington. Sept. 21 from 10 am-4 pm. $30/participant. Spokane International Aiport, 9000 W. Airport Dr. specialolympicswashington.org (299-7177) INLAND NW RAIL MUSEUM GROUNDBREAKING Site tours and groundbreaking ceremony for the Lee Tillotson Conservation & Restoration Center of the Inland NW Rail Museum. Sept. 21 at 1 pm. Two miles west of Reardan on Hwy. 2. inlandnwrailmuseum.com WALKING WITH ANCESTORS "Remembering the Iron Horse Era of Spokane" hosted by the Eastern Wash. Genealogical Society. Sept. 21 from 10 am-3 pm. Greenwood Cemetery, 211 N. Government Way. (328-0786) CRAFT BAZAAR Vendors selling arts, crafts, textiles and more. Sept. 21-22 from 9 am-4 pm daily. Free. Peaceful Pines RV Park, 1231 W. First St., Cheney. (235-4966) SUSTAINABLE PREPAREDNESS EXPO Training sessions on survival techniques, vendors and more. Sept. 22. $9-$12. Spokane Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. sustainablepreparedness.com (208-290-6219) SMAC RALLY Move to Amend Barnstorming through Washington, hosted by Spokane Moves to Amend the Constitution. Sept. 22 at 5:30 pm. Spokane City Hall, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (235-1585) HEALTHCARE THINK & DRINK Program hosted by Humanities Washington on the topic "Ills, Pills and Bills: Why Does American Health Care Cost So Much?" Sept. 25 at 7:30 pm. Free. Lindaman's, 1235 S. Grand Blvd. humanities.org/ programs (206-682-1770)

FESTIVAL

DEUTSCHESFEST 43rd annual German heritage celebration featuring live music, food, activities, vendors and more. Sept. 20-22. Odessa, Wash. deutschesfest.com (982-0049) VALLEYFEST Community festival featuring live entertainment, beer/wine and food vendors, parade, hot air balloons, activities and educational events and more. Prices for events varies, admission to most is free. Sept. 20-22. Mirabeau Point Park and Centerplace Event Center, Spokane Valley. valleyfest.org (922-3299)

FILM

BLUE JASMINE Screening of the new Woody Allen drama. Sept. 19-21 at 7:30 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First St., Sandpoint. (208-255-7801) MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Screening of the romantic comedy adapted from Shakespeare's play. Sept. 19-22, times vary. $3-$6. Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-4127) FILM AUDITIONS Open call audtions for a local web series sitcom "Almost… Not Quite." Sept. 22 starting at 11 am. Free, audition scheduling recommended. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. facebook.com/almostnotquite (SpokaneCreative@gmail.com) FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL Screening of "Rust and Bone" on Sept. 24. 7 pm. $4. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-4127) GASLAND II Screening of the Oscar-

nominated documentary on the negative effects of natural gas drilling. Sept. 24 at 7 pm. Free. The Bing, 901 W. Sprague. (999-5785) SPIFF PROFESSOR FILM SERIES Screening of "Pan's Labyrinth" hosted by Brian Clayton of Gonzaga University. Sept. 25 at 7 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) AGE OF CHAMPIONS Film about the National Senior Olympics, hosted by the Senior Assistance Fund of Eastern Wash. Sept. 25 at 9:30 am and 2 pm. $7. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (458-2509)

FOOD

NW BREWERY SHOWCASE DINNER Five-course dinner featuring pairings from local Inland Northwest breweries. Sept. 20 from 6-10 pm. $55/person. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. (327-8000) WINE TASTING Sample wines from Bronco Wine Co. Sept. 20 at 3:30 pm. Free. Pilgrim's Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. (208-676-9730) HEIRLOOM GARDENERS WEEKEND Wine, cheese and heirloom tomato tastings, garden tours, historical tours, live music and more. Sept. 20-22. Dayton, Wash. heirloomweekend.com (382-4825) NO-LI PINT NIGHT Tastings, food, growler fills and more, including the first meeting of the newly formed Idaho chapter of Girls Pint Out!. Sept. 20 from 6-8 pm. Free admission. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls. Corkjoy. com (208-457-9885) FERMENTATION WORKSHOP Learn to make kimchi, a fermented vegetarian dish, in a hands-on class. Sept. 21 from 11 am-1 pm. $22, preregistration required. Sun People Dry Goods Co, 32 W. Second Ave. (368-9378) WINE 101 Wine tasting and wine education class for beginning wine ethusiasts. Sept. 23 from 5-7 pm. $30. Blue Table Kitchen, 3319 N. Argonne Rd. (206-832-6743)

MUSIC

SPOKANE SYMPHONY GALA Champagne reception, dinner and auction celebrating the Symphony's "Heart of the City" 2013-14 season. Sept. 21 from 5-7:30 pm. $150, concert ticket included. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. (624-1200) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Classics series: "Virtuosity Required" and the season opening concert. Sept. 21 at 8 pm, Sept. 22 at 3 pm. $15+. The Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. (624-1200) A GRAND INTERLUDE Piano and voice concert feat. EWU music program faculty and local musicians. Sept. 22 at 4 pm. Admission by donation. Harrington Opera House, 19 S. Third St. harringtonoperahouse.org (253-4719) JASON ALDEAN Country music concert also featuring Jake Owen and Thomas Rhett. Sept. 25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (325-SEAT) SPOKANE SYMPHONY ENSEMBLES Special performances by members of the Spokane Symphony. Sept. 25 at 7 pm, Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. Oct. 3 at 7 pm, Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom St. Oct. 5 at 2 pm, Cheney Library, 610 First St. scld.org (893-8200)

THE CONTENDERS Guitar concert featuring music from the '50s, '60s and '70s. Sept. 25 at 7:30 pm. $3-$5. University of Idaho, Moscow. uidaho.edu

SPORTS

pm and 7 pm. $5-$15. St. George's School, 2929 W. Waikiki. sgs.org (464-8818)

VISUAL ARTS

ROLLY WILLIAMS CLASSIC Golf tourney benefiting the North Idaho College golf program. Sept. 20 at 1 pm. $75/ person, $300/team. Avondale Golf Club, 10745 N. Avondale Loop, Hayden Lake. (208-769-3348) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB The club meets on Sundays from 4:30-7 pm and Wednesdays from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. info@spokane.northwestbadminton.org (448-5694) LILAC CITY ROLLER GIRLS Women's flat track roller derby bout, featuring the Lilac City All Stars vs. TBD. Sept. 21 at 6:30 pm. $10-$12. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. SLAMMA JAMMA PICKLEBALL TOURNAMENT Mens, womens and mixeddoubles brackets with 8 games guaranteed. Sept. 21-22 from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. $5-$20. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. (927-0602) BLAZING SADDLES BIKE RIDE Cycling event featuring Century, Metric Century, 40-mile and 20-mile fully supported routes hosted by the Rotary Club of Colville. Sept. 21 at 6:45 am followed by a chili cook-off at noon. $35-$60. Colville. blazing100.org (684-5829) TOUR DE ROCK Mountain bike race fundraiser benefiting the 49 Degrees Ski Patrol feat. live music, barbecue and hiking. Sept. 22, starts at 10 am. $25-$35. Departs from Chewelah City Park. ski49.com (937-4922)

PALOUSE PLEIN AIR Fourth annual outdoor painting festival and competition hosted by the Moscow Arts Commission. Painting runs through Sept. 20, artist reception and awards ceremony Sept. 20 from 5-7 pm. $20/ participant. Third Street Gallery, 206 E. Third Ave. (208-883-7036) MADE IN THE USA: ROSENQUIST / RUSCHA Pop art exhibtion featuring the work of James Rosenquist and Ed Ruscha. Sept. 20-Dec. 14. Gallery hours Mon-Sat from 10 am-4 pm, Thu 10 am-7 pm. WSU Museum of Art, Pullman campus. (335-6150) WOOD & WATERCOLOR SHOW Exhibition featuring works in both media. Sept. 20-Nov. 8. Artist reception Sept. 20 from 5-7 pm. Gallery hours Mon-Fri 10 am-5 pm. The JACC, 405 N. William. (208-457-8950) MELISSA COLE Solo artist show. Sept. 20-Oct. 16. Artist reception Sept. 20 from 5-9 pm. Free. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. (413-9101) PENNY'S PALETTE ART SHOW Artist exhibition featuring the work of Penny Cannon. Sept. 21 from 5-9 pm. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (535-4606) MAPPING THE SPOKANE RIVER Gallery installation and community project featuring photos, stories, samples of river water from community members and more. Sept. 23-Oct. 18. Lecture and reception Oct. 18 at 11:30 am. SFCC Fine Art Gallery, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org

THEATER

WORDS

BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS Broadway comedy by Neil Simon. Sept. 19Oct. 12, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, except Sept. 27 at 6:30 pm, Sat matinees at 2 pm on Sept. 21, 28 and Oct. 5, 12. Sun at 2 pm. No performances on Oct. 3, 4. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard. (455-7529) LES MISÉRABLES Stage musical adaptation of the Victor Hugo novel. Sept. 20-Oct. 20, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $26-$33. Benefit performance Sept. 19 at 7:30 pm, benefiting the OffBroadway Family Outreach. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST Performance of the Oscar Wilde play. Through Sept. 29, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union, Newport. (671-3389) THE ODD COUPLE Female character version of the Neil Simon play. Through Sept. 22, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$14. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. ignitetheatre.org SPOKANE CIVIC THEATRE GALA Catered dinner and dessert preceding the opening night performance of Les Misérables, as well as an auction and no-host bar. Sept. 20 at 6 pm, show at 7:30 pm. $20-$400. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. (325-2507) THE BOX PRODUCTION: ASYLUM Drama. Sept. 20-22 at 7 pm. $5-$10. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines Rd. (995-6718) THE FANTASTICKS Dinner theater performance. Sept. 20-21. Fri at 7 pm, Sat at 2

GONZAGA HATE STUDIES LECTURE "How Could We? Regret and the Pursuit of Humanity" lecture by Seattle U. School of Law professor Steven Bender. Sept. 19 at 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-3665) BEDTIME STORIES SPOKANE 2013 Second annual literary gala featuring readings of new short works by local authors, created for the event and following the theme "Pillow Talk." Sept. 20 at 6 pm. $75. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. (206-682-1770) SCOTT ELLIOTT Reading and signing with the author of "Temple Grove." Sept. 21 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie's, 402 W. Main Ave.(838-0206) LOCAL AUTHOR SATURDAY Featuring authors Dale Maron, Aziz Makhani, Bill Lipe, Mike Bullard and Jordan Hanssen. Sept. 21 at 10 am. Free. BookPeople, 521 S. Main St., Moscow. (208882-2669) BANNED BOOKS WEEK Event hosted by author Chris Crutcher, who is listed as one of the most challenged authors of the 21st century. Sept. 23 at 7 pm, Spokane Valley Library. Sept. 25 at 7 pm, North Spokane Library. scld.org (893-8200) RAFIA ZAKARIA LECTURE "Drones & Terrorism: The Ultimate Miscalculation.” Sept. 23 at 7 pm. Whitworth University, Weyerhaeuser Hall, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-4937) 

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Lee Apartments

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Northeast Apts

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1 bd $450, 2 bd $550, w/storage unit & carport. Call Jane 483-3542

sales@inlander.com Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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MOISTURE IN YOUR WINDOWS?

Zola’s Candy -- Moto Chic at Zola’s Friday, September 6th. I was with my dancing partner but managed to steal a few moments talking to you. I gave you my cell number and am kicking myself for not getting yours. Would love to buy you a coffee. Travis

we do reconnect we can start up where we left off. I’m indecisive, we don’t always have much to say, but just being is enough for me. Your company keeps me going. I may not climb every tree you do, but count on me to catch you if you fall.

to thank you for everything you tried to do for me. I wanted more than anything to be able to accept everything you offered me, I couldn`t find a way to say yes, due to my fear. I wasn`t myself at that time, I hope you know that, but since then, day by day, I grow sorrowful beacuse it`s another day I can`t grow with you by my side. I have so many regrets, you are always on my mind and in my heart.

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The Star BarI don’t know your name and we’ve never spoken, but I’ve seen you at The Star Bar doing karaoke a few times. You’ve got ivory skin, dark hair just above your shoulders, probably mid 20’s and the most amazing smile I’ve ever seen on a woman. You glow and light up any room you walk into. I just want to talk to you but you’re always with people and it’s kind of intimidating. You really are so beautiful. Please never stop smiling. I’ll keep admiring from a distance. If I ever get the guts I will ask for your number some time.

To The Amazing Staffat Liberty Lake McDonalds! Almost every morning for the past 3 years I have came thru and ordered my 12/12 coffee and I just want to say that it’s a high light of my day! You are the only ones to actually put 12 cream and 12 sugar in my coffee lol! But I admit that it’s all of your friendliness and awesomeness that brings me back every time! You guys rock and you are appreciated beyond words Love the12/12 coffee girl

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Stepping Out Of A Large White Van and my heart skipped a beat. You must be the only other Indian in this town besides me. You were dashing, wearing a pair of maroon pants and still looking manly. I always dreamed that I would meet an Indian boy here and now I’ve seen one - an attractive one at that! I was that girl in the blue sundress, with the long dark hair, staring deep into your eyes. If you read this, would you consider going out for coffee? I’ll be at Calypso’s on Saturday.

You Saw Me RE: InterestedLovely smile. Maybe it’s the same I remember. Write me with the color of your eyes and where you saw me smiling back at you. huckleberrysmile12@gmail. com

Cheers

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My Dreamis to be with you. Please bring our love to light. I want nothing more than to be able to reach out to you, but, I`m afraid I don`t know how to do that, I pray for us Your Company Here’s to what has, is, and could be. Here’s to the memories we’ve created, the laughs we’ve enjoyed, and the friendship we’ve grown. Time may pass and we find ourselves going different directions, but nothing keeps us apart for long and when

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I Love Youyou’re an Aries, I am a Libra. I am white, you’re black. You’re much older then me, but somehow we click. We find what we need in each other. I am so lucky to have a man who loves me, because I love you, my partner in crime. Good Talk PodcastTo the dapper shark studios good talk podcast. You guys rock my socks! The Tech issues you talk about saved me from dumping money into a less user friendly operating system

To connect

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” that would have cost more to my already strained budget, Keep talking nerdy to your adoring fans! The next round is on me! Customer Service Cheers and thanks to the ladies at Sport Clips in the Valley! I brought my two teenage boys (and myself) for a haircut during one of your busiest times during the week before school started. Not only did I get fast, warm, smiling service, the haircuts were excellent. It was busy in your place, but I felt like an individual, and we were treated with the utmost kindness and professionalism. Way to go, Sport Clips! To The Beautiful little German barista at The Little Garden Cafe. I saw you 5 years ago for the first time. I married you 3 years ago and I look forward to seeing you every day for the next 60 years. Du bist mein Schatz. Ich liebe Dich Schatzy! DiscernmentFourteen years is hard to ignore, although revenge will never resonate in my heart when it comes to you. I recognize that it can be difficult to relate within a visceral perimeter, however it is imperative that you understand that it is discernment, not fear, that guides my heart and actions. I proceed with caution in order to preserve and protect the love that I believe in. I haven’t, nor will ever block you. There is purpose in everything, and for that reason I will never stop believing for growth.

To K&Smy fave personal chef-tobe and the sexiest fashion blogger around: I feel lucky to have met you while living in Spokane and I’m so thankful for the friendship we’ve made. I’ve loved our talks, drinks and laughter. It’ll suck having to say goodbye! Thanks for letting me invade the awesome bond you have. I can’t wait to see where the fitness-nutrition-photographyblogging world will take y’all (to Austin please, ASAP!) Here’s to future adventures and visits. Ciao for now, your girl on TV. Thanks Thanks for making me soooo happy. You’re the best, Bean. Flash MobIt was just another day last week when all of a sudden five demonstrators broke out into a flash mob in the middle of the downtown Apple store singing a version of “Stop! In the name of love” urging Apple Corporation to pay its taxes. While these people might not be winning any Grammies for their performance anytime soon, they are right. As a former Apple employee, I know that Apple should stop gaming the tax code to evade paying billions in taxes that would go to invest in our country. Nothing like that has happened here before and I’m glad that some people, including the sign waivers outside, have the courage to stand up for the greater good. Happy Birthday! Baby Girl on September 15, 1961. This world is blessed with your beauty and presence. You are my love and life! Love Yyou!

Tow Truck DriverTo the tow truck driver that helped me out with getting off a keyed lug nut after my lug nut key was stolen and got a flat. I was stuck in a gas station lot downtown at night with everywhere being closed and no way to get the flat off my car, you saved my day. Thank you! Miss You DadDad, another birthday without looms. I wish you could see your grandson and his beautiful family. The boys have your sparkle in their eyes. I keep your memory alive by telling them the stories you told me, and the fun we had together as a family. You are real to them. They have a picture of you in your uniform, I tell them you were a member of the “Greatest Generation.” To me, you were Dad. Love and Mmiss you.

Jeers Tailgating To the white male in his 20’s driving on I-90 on Sunday, September 8th, approx 1:10 pm, right before crossing into WA from ID driving a white van with a rooftop cargo container. I, a white female in her 30’s with a child and a small dog in my green Ford Explorer. I was in the left lane and could not get over, yet you thought you would ride my tail following about a foot behind me. When I could get over and put my signal on and started to get over, you cut me off, causing me to swerve back into the left lane. If that wasn’t enough, after I was so upset I gave you the bird, you tried to hit my car with yours and then drive me off the road. Had it not been for my catlike reflexes, my family and I could have been dead right now. In trying to save our lives I missed getting your

Humble Hero! Cheers to the sweetheart who left a note on my windshield on Tuesday September 10th, containing the information of the jerk who backed their truck up into my car, leaving Tina M. is this week’s winner a nasty dent. Thanks to you they caught the guy. of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! I thank you so much for Send in your CHEERS so being so kind. I owe you big you too can be entime, so if you are ever in need tered to win 1 dozen of a beer, or whatever you are into, you know where to find me. “Cheers” cupcakes at

WINNER!!

I Adore You!This wonderful man who set my soul on fire. I want

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“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Jeers

Jeers

Jeers

license plate and so I and followed you off the exit, where you illegally changed lanes and fled from me. I did file a police report and, unfortunately for you, I’m a PI. I will hunt you down. I got most of your license plate digits, and you will be punished for this. Any witnesses please come forward if you have helpful information. Thanks.

now harder for you and also for the amazing dads out there who take care of their kids financially and lawfully as well as with their hearts! You cannot hurt us anymore and now all we feel for you is sad pity that you refuse to move on and let bitterness go, for that I am truly sorry.

a resolution? Did we not come from other countries who were enslaving us from our freedom where we were silenced by the actions we made, and as a choice, we the people, set aside our own animosities we had against each other, and worked together to try and be equal? Can we not learn to grow and move past one’s trespasses, and if it still bothers us confront them directly, instead of taking the cowardly way out? Can we not learn to pick and choose our own battles wisely, and maturely? I’ll admit, I am not perfect, nor do I pretend to be, but to hold onto these grudges seems wasteful, and hurtful to the one’s who are actually writing them.

RE: Perplexed RE: Perplexed\\ nYou did not help your case. Probably, no actually you made it worse! Ex-Wife I understand bitterness and pain and hurt, most of us who have ever loved understand. But where all respect or admiration that was once thought of you, is now a path we all walk on! You have belittled, taken advantage of, and selfishly disrespected single mothers everywhere. Not only did your ex-husband (and myself as well) pay full child support (enough to pay all the bills including the house mortgage so the kids could grow up in the house they’ve always known!) to you, you instead put all the money away including your own income and with our hard earned money you took extravagant trips and vacations (only one with the kids btw) and otherwise used the money meant for the children for your own selfish needs and feelings. What you spent on medical for them you only did out of pure vindictiveness in hopes of trying to financially f#@k us again! Do you realize that all the single mothers out there who would be ecstatic to have an ex that paid even a quarter of what we did! And how cooperative we were?! To think that I defended you and your actions not only to your ex but to your kids as well when they were upset at you?! I truly feel like an absolute dumba$$ for doing it now and any respect I had (and I had a lot for you!) is now gone like a puff of smoke! You’re the one that has to live with yourself and fortunately we don’t so the favor is on our side, but I deeply apologize to all the single moms out there struggling with dead beat dads and exes because women like the one I am writing too has made it

Jeers On Me!to the driver of a black motorcycle Wedneday, September 11th at LC right after school. Me: red sports car picking up my kid. I let my technology distract me and almost hurt you. No excuses or explanations, completely my bad. I even used to ride. I know better. My apologies. My kid suggested a Jeer for your language, but as a former motorcycle rider, I totally get it. All the jeers on me and my sincerest apologies. I truly do hope you see this. RE: Bus Riders To the person sending in the comment/Jeers regarding bus riders. Hold the Milk Truck, I often ride the bus and it is unclassy of you and unfair of you to put all bus riders in a group and assume things.Have you ever riden a bus? Do you know how difficult it is to walk across a road or in this case a highway with groceries? Maybe that person has a large family to support and has but no choice to buy “all that stuff without thinking about it”. Ever think of that? Also, just because one rides a bus by no means makes them dirty or grimey. Nor will a bus rider using a cart leave said cart any more or less grimey than anyone else, such a statement out of your mouth just shows how undereducated you are. Get on a bus, buy some groceries and you try getting them home, it is not easy! And then tell us how it is, I pray that those judgements will be replaced by compassion. Really!? Here is something to ponder to all those who jeer and complain. Are we really that unfortunate as a society to instead of saying something to that person directly about one’s actions, we decide to sit here and hide behind a keyboard, or pen and paper as

G R R M E M O S A T H L O O A N I T I N D O I T S A Y E S W E E T D T E T U B S D P L U W O S T E P W T P O L E O C E N E S A G S G T S ’s G R I T S I R M THIS WEEK! A R I D A D A S R E T F E I S ANSW D E M K T E L I N N S B E E B G I A S S O S U N F U R L B P A T H R E E A M P G A A R E P O D T O A N T E S U N I M F O U R R U M D R U N K T O N S I U S E A L I A S R U D D S E E S Feist

P R O P

L O N E

To Losing A FriendAll of us in this community and the world lost a good friend last week. I’m not going to go into how he died or why, but I can tell you that he was a huge part of being a catalyst for Spokane’s Music/Entertainment/ Art and community. The last time I saw him was at Elkfest 2013 shining bright in the midafternoon sun on stage with his talented crew, The Flying Spiders. Since I heard the news of his apparent suicide I can’t stop listening to his and his bands latest album, “Sexy Intelligent EP: Villaging Trilogy”. It’s a solid album and is funky and well crafted by his creative cast. It really hit hard to try to remind us all in our great city to always take time to say “hi” or spend a minute with someone in our tight knit art and music community. I myself struggle with depression and anxiety and at times I think we forget how fragile and emotional creative minds are. As I write this on the anniversary of 9/11, I want to remind all of us artist, musicians, painters and writers that you all have so much courage and light that you bring to the world and to never quit or get discouraged. Sometimes maybe we need to realize why we all do what we do and to not chase the sometimes elusive fame/fortune/ respect theories and to do it to “inspire, to free your soul, to create beauty, to make people smile, and to make true human connections.” These being the only things that really matter in this f@#*ed up world. So next time you see a lonely soul playing his saxaphone downtown, or a painter painting under a railroad bridge or some sweat soaked guitarist that just melted everyone’s face at some dive bar, say “What’s up?” and “thank you” in this often times “thankless” vocation. God Rest Your Soul Som - Much love!

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INLANDER 93

A Long Road Indeed Walking into the heart of the heart of the mountains By Shann Ray

W

hen you return from walking certain roads into the night in order to see what we can see. The night you find you are never the same again. is long and the path uneven and often precarious, but on In an America often brimming with cynithe other side light awaits. In the pre-dawn blackness the cism, one wonders where is the evidence of the other great fortresses of rock are ominous and ever present, side? while forests shroud the land in silence. When the sun Where is the evidence of hope? begins to light the world, the mountains are not unlike Is there still hope in nature, and wilderness, and the a strange and otherworldly cathedral, filled with air and wilderness that exists inside people? refracted light and towering sculptures of stone carved as Contrary to the hyper-speed of the contemporary if from a great excess of materials. Above and to the west, age, there are those who walk quietly toward the dawn, the red sky burns on the jagged edge of the earth, and having traversed the night’s darkness and emerging when the sun finally breaks the horizon to the east, our unafraid. bodies tilt and our faces turn gold. Here, we are returned With the current ugly rate of financial, personal, to the world with gratitude. emotional and familial deficit, and with a war economy And ten miles west of Wisdom, Montana, there are equaled only by what Mother Teresa once miracles of human friendship and good will called America’s spiritual poverty, where do to marvel the miracles of the sky. Consider we look to find a sense of hope if, in fact, hope Robbie Paul, a modern-day Nez Perce woman Send comments to is what we need? Mother Teresa’s indictment editor@inlander.com. who knew the depths of atrocity her people exwas even more barbed than we might imagine: perienced. Consider her story, a woman whose She said America is the poorest country in the family had suffered great loss, and who discovworld because America’s poverty is a spiritual poverty. ered the only road out was to pass through an honest and Hope. heart-wrenching encounter with the history of genocide We find it in the least likely places. At dusk when the endured by her people. Consider also that she knew she sky’s burden moves from blue to black. At dawn when, needed to walk that road hand in hand with her father. as if from far below, the vault is filled with light. Or In this, a time fraught with violent upheavals in the perhaps we find hope down one of those high country nation and across the globe, we can listen to Robbie’s roads we knew we needed to walk but were afraid to for story, and let her lead us to a place of right feeling again. fear of what we might find. Ten miles west of Wisdom, In a world harried by human atrocity, waste and war, Montana, in the far northern corner of the state, there there are people who speak a deep and meaningful truth. are miracles of topography painfully beautiful to the eye. Robbie Paul, Nez Perce, is a descendant of Chief Joseph, The Rocky Mountain front runs north to south in a place the man who spoke his words of irrevocable gravity on the Blackfeet called the Backbone of the World. In late the trail of tears: “I will fight no more forever.” Robbie autumn, if we have the courage, we might walk together Paul is Nez Perce, a people of uncommon tenacity in the

letters

94 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

unfolding of United States history. Robbie Paul is Nez Perce, a member of a sovereign nation who now holds reconciliation ceremonies at the site of the Big Hole Massacre, ten miles west of Wisdom, Montana, where little more than a century ago, Nez Perce men, women, and children were massacred by U.S. Cavalry. Unimaginable if it weren’t for the fact that it’s true, today the descendants of those who were massacred meet with the descendants of the Cavalry who committed the massacre. A ceremony of peace is performed. The Nez Perce invite reconciliation. People confront their interior fears, and emerge stronger and more capable. Despite every right to be hateful or violent, the Nez Perce forgive, and draw the human race into the heart of a necessary encounter with our own darkness. They take the veil from our eyes and let us see. They touch our brokenness and make us whole again. Robbie Paul, a scholar with a doctorate in leadership studies from Gonzaga, lives in the Spokane area just north of Deer Park and is a professor at Washington State University. In her research she traced five generations of Nez Perce leaders in her own family, from the advent of first white contact to today. In her research she found the resilience, reconciliation and power of her people. She also found in her people the road to healing, even in the face of genocide and dislocation. A long road indeed, the road of reconciliation, and one that requires our most vital will. At the end of this road she took her father’s hand and walked with him into the heart of the heart of the mountains, where she sat down together with him and with the descendants of those who had massacred her people and her father’s people. There she did not offer cynicism or contempt, revenge or ruin. She and her father with her offered peace. And when they looked to the rim of the world, the sun shone like fire. n Shann Ray is a professor of Leadership Studies at Gonzaga University. He is the author of Forgiveness and Power in the Age of Atrocity: Servant Leadership as a Way of Life; American Masculine: Stories; and Balefire: Poems, forthcoming from Lost Horse Press.

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Inlander 9/19/2013