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COMMENT | FOREIGN POLICY

BY ROBERT HEROLD

P

resident Obama’s May 23 speech on national security at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C., could develop into something very important. He actually urged that we reconsider what we’ve been doing for these past six decades. Obama suggested that we are now misapplying the word “war.” Today we are dealing with terrorists and threats of terrorism. To meet these challenges we need better intelligence and more effective police work; not so many troops in the field. Obama also spoke to the need for more vigilant and effective diplomacy, and he addressed the question of treatment of prisoners. He spoke about American values, as a people. He once again urged that Guantanamo be closed, but he defended carefully monitored drone strikes.

O

ur post-World War II national security history, and the long shadow it cast, came about in response to the Soviet expansion into Eastern Europe following the end of the war. George Kennan — statesman and twice an ambassador — wrote his famous, 5,000-word “Long Telegram” in 1946. To address the expansion of the Soviet Union, Kennan argued for a policy of containment. Kennan saw containment as a process, situational and reliant on continued negotiation. He did not see it leading to an arms race or military confrontation. Then, in 1950, came National Security Council Report 68 (NSC 68), directed by Paul Nitze. This report translated Kennan’s argument into actual policy. It incorporated Kennan’s containment strategy. However, Nitze’s “containment” relied primarily on an arms buildup. Thus it was that NSC 68 came to usher in the military-industrial complex that Eisenhower warned against as early as 1953, and then again in his more famous warning during his farewell speech in 1961. For the next four decades, NSC 68 remained unchallenged. Had leadership rethought all the premises on which it rested, history might have taken a much different course. Had the perception of monolithic communism been challenged, had the “domino theory” been reexamined, had the widening fissure between the U.S.S.R. and China been explored, had emerging nationalism been more carefully considered — had all or just any one of these premises been critiqued, America’s arms buildup would not have grown as it did. What’s more important, there might not have been a Vietnam War. Fast-forward to Ronald Reagan: He also worked beneath the shadow of NSC 68’s containment and arms buildup strategy. But for Reagan, détente as a form of containment was not enough when dealing with the “Evil Empire.” So Reagan almost doubled spending on defense and national security. After the fall of the Soviet Union, our at-

tention shifted to the Middle East. Still operating within the shadow of NSC 68, George H.W. Bush pursued containment during the first Gulf War. Bill Clinton also adopted a Kennanesque application of NSC 68 — containment plus the pain of sanctions, and a surgical use

of military force. Then, during the 2000 presidential campaign, George W. Bush criticized Al Gore not for being weak on foreign policy, but rather for being too ambitious. Candidate Bush promised a more modest approach, consistent with his “compassionate conservatism” promises. Then came 9/11, and everything changed. Comes the “War on Terror” along with the so-called “Bush Doctrine,” which states that unilateral “preventive war” is sometimes legitimate (e.g. invasion of Iraq). All this military intervention was based on a worldview that, as Andrew Bacevich observed, carried with it “an extraordinary certainty in the righteousness of American actions married to an extraordinary confidence of American arms.”

F

ormer National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, in his book Strategic Vision, describes the Bush presidency as the “demagogically inclined administration [that] spent eight years remaking the United States into a crusader state.” The worst of NSC 68 now was combined with religious fervor. Thus, says Brzezinski, “The ‘war on terror’ became synonymous with foreign policy and the United States, for the most part, neglected to build a strategy that addressed its long-term interests in an evolving geopolitical environment.” Until his speech, Obama hadn’t addressed any of this — not the strategy of containment; not the limits of military power; not American exceptionalism; not preventative war; not the shifting of power into the Executive Branch. Most important, Obama had yet to formulate a new worldview, together with a long-term comprehensive strategy. His speech gives us some clues as to where he stands; it puts him squarely in the Brzezinski camp. Brzezinski argues for “cautious and detached” negotiations, balancing and conciliating alliances, renewed efforts to support secularization, more economic cooperation, but less dependence on large-scale military intervention. Will Obama’s speech be a springboard to an entirely new paradigm? No president has pulled that off since Harry Truman — when George Kennan, George Marshall, Paul Nitze and Dean Acheson were “present at the creation.” 

COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Graduation Advice for the Rest of Us BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

I

t’s graduation season, and from under those mortarboards the future has always felt like jumping off the diving board and being pushed at the same time. It’s exciting, scary and requires finding a soft place to land. I’m always proud when we can hire a young person to their first job. We love experience, but there’s a certain fire you get when you hire the right candidate, fresh off the vine and ready to blaze a trail in the world. When I meet them, I see myself. At 25, I left a perfectly good job at Seattle Weekly to follow my soon-to-be wife, Anne, to Boston for grad school. Like today, the economy of the early ’90s was terrible. In Boston, they were auctioning off Back Bay condos for $150,000; there might as well have been a “Not Hiring” banner over the “Welcome to Boston” sign out on the Beltway. For months, my master’s in journalism got me exactly zero offers. I finally targeted the TAB, a chain of weeklies out in the suburbs; my old boss, David Brewster, knew the owner, Russel Pergament. That was something, at least, so one Friday afternoon I went to the TAB HQ and just plopped down in the lobby asking for a minute with, well, anyone really. No, I didn’t have an appointment. Yes, I could wait. After an uncomfortable hour, an annoyed HR manager came out, and I gave her my pitch. As I dropped the only name I had, who else but Russel Pergament walked through the lobby. I was introduced, he asked me about David and the Weekly and told me to come by Monday to meet one of the editors. A week later, I was out reporting on the annual Town Meeting in Wellesley, Mass. This story is not supposed to be about me. It’s about Russel taking the time to listen. Whenever there’s a young person in our lobby who wants to hand off a resume, my first thought is that I’m too busy. Just have him email me. But then I remember me at 25, and how scared I was and how ready I was to get to work. And I remember Russel. So I make the time. So this isn’t a message for grads; it’s for all of us out in the audience, watching those beaming smiles cross the stage into the future. This is for anyone in a position to give a young person a break. If you can take on another apprentice at the job site, or if your books are looking like you can finally add a new employee, do it. Let’s give this generation a chance. n

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LETTERS

LAWS THAT BEAR REPEATING

ful place, where all people were able to be heard — in The Stuckart, Waldref and Snyder hit piece (“Problem other words, a true Idaho tradition. Planks,” 5/30/13) on the Envision Spokane initiatives This of course is not the case with all who have known as the Community Bill of Rights and the Voter moved up here from Cali, but the ones who have Bill of Rights largely criticizes their unnecessary replicacaptured the Inland Northwest with their simplistic tion of existing law, as though many of our laws are not mind-meld and fear-based lifestyle does spill over and already replicas of other laws. Why then would these impacts everyone else who chooses to live here. It is three care about further, cost-free replication? Why quite sobering. then would dozens of dedicated Spokane citizens work so hard to get these “replicas” codified into city law? JAMES A. Might it be in order to bring scrutiny and enforcement Spokane, Wash. into closer, hands-on focus? Might that be a cause of some discomfort to those who benefit from distant “enforcement” of the rights of our voters and our community? The three Send comments to amigos, I think, protest too much. editor@inlander.com. Your paper of May 9 featured an interview with Congresswoman McMorris Rodgers (“Party Planner”) where she more than MICHAEL POULIN adequately advocated for the Republican agenda. She Spokane, Wash. does her job well, but like most people she chooses her facts selectively. For example, the congresswoman stated the recent “Obama” tax increase enacted and signed was $600 billion. This is true; however, she Thank you for the well-written and insightful article neglected to say this increase occurs over the next about the “California Invasion.” (“The Promised Land,” 10 years. If I divide that number by 10, the amount of 5/30/13). What strikes me as what must be some increase per year is only $60 billion, an amount that internal conflict in these folks, is that they live in a sowill do little to increase the deficit. called “Right to Work” state yet feel no compunction in Additionally, some of this “tax increase” was crecommuting by the thousands daily to Washington state ated by sequester cuts to Social Security and Medicare. for good paying jobs, with benefits and job security; they think nothing of using our international airport and The Bush tax cuts, which were to expire in 2010, should have been allowed to, thus alleviating the cash flow driving the passing lanes out and back at L.A. speeds; problem the federal government is having. Another they make no real connection with the culture, people, item she did not address is when Barack Obama behistory, but instead put their own spin on how it should came president, he moved the cost of the wars in Iraq be. and Afghanistan from off-budget to being part of the I have no issue with individual differences or atbudget. It’s no wonder that his deficits seem so large. titudes, but I simply ask that these folks who love the I find conservatives like our congresswoman are Panhandle “Living Large in Idaho” — I would ask these less than honest. folks to at least be honest with themselves about how they are just another form of extraction industry, only DAVE DAUGHARTY on a “me-first, me-only” basis. There is an underlying Cheney, Wash. domination and makeover of what was once a wonder-

LETTERS

IDAHO EXTRACTS OUR RESOURCES

EXPLAIN YOUR MATH

SCOTT KUSEL: Vigilantism is not necessarily a bad thing. Criminals today have NO FEAR of reprisal. No fear of punishment. They will continue to commit crimes if the fear of reprisal is not blatantly shown to them. No more slaps on the wrist!!! JEANIE HILTON: He was NOT in danger … Maybe his vehicle was, but he wasn’t. Can’t kill someone because they took your property and drove away. No threat to your life or your family!! DEZZYFEZZY MALECHA: If someone was trying to take my only means to support my family I would consider that a threat on my livelihood. ... Certain people and laws think I am wrong? I would do the same freakin’ thing!!!! KAT PANZA: It’s bullshit. They used to shoot horse thieves — same thing. Criminals are the only ones with rights anymore! NICHOLE BURRELL-CROSBY: Well deserved! This isn’t the Wild West. JEREMY WOLLER: So I wonder, should I shoot and kill the person who takes the newspaper off my driveway — it’s stealing and it’s mine, so it should be OK, right? He had no right to kill over a car, period. PAUL SPENCER: WHAT?!?? Such utter bullshit. Gerlach should’ve received a commendation for stopping crime in its tracks. DANNY CRONK: There is nothing heroic or praiseworthy about shooting a man in the back as he’s running away. 

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COMMENT | SATIRE

Freeloader in Chief I BY ANDY BOROWITZ

n the latest scandal to rock the Obama Administration, a leading Republican congressman accused the President of using his position to obtain free government housing for himself and his family. According to Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin), Mr. Obama “has arrogantly exploited the office of President to gain access to a 55,000-square-foot residence that could double as a museum. “While the average American is struggling to pay his bills, President Obama is living in a luxury home, adorned with priceless paintings and antiques as far as the eye can see,” Rep. Ryan alleged. Additionally, the Wisconsin congressman said, the President has availed himself of “sumptuous free meals — breakfast, lunch, and dinner — all on the taxpayer’s nickel.” In keeping with Mr. Obama’s bloated lifestyle, the congressman added, “The President travels with an entourage of highly trained

bodyguards who would put Jay-Z’s posse to shame.” Drawing a line in the sand, the Republican warned Mr. Obama to cut back on his lavish living arrangements “or face possible impeachment. Across America, people are tightening their belts,” Rep. Ryan said. “Obama should not be living like a head of state.” Elsewhere, the House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) called for hearings to investigate why no one has paid any attention to him in the weeks of hearings he has called for thus far. “There is mounting evidence that no one listens to me, not even one little bit,” he told reporters on Capitol Hill. n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | THE IRS

Social Welfare Sham I BY JIM HIGHTOWER

f you’re covered in political stink, it might be prudent to avoid yelling “dirty politics” at others. Lately, a mess of right-wing tea party groups have been wailing nonstop that they have been targeted and harassed by Obamanistic IRS thugs. The groups certainly are right that it’s abhorrent for a powerful agency to run a repressive witch hunt against any group of citizens just because of their political views. Liberals have certainly felt the lash of such official repression by assorted McCarthyite-NixoniteCheneyite forces over the years, and it must be condemned, no matter who the victims. In this case, however, the rightwing groups were not targeted by government snoops and political operatives, but tagged by their own applications to be designated by the IRS as 501(c)(4) “social welfare” groups. This privileged status would allow them to take unlimited bags of corporate cash without ever revealing to voters the names of the corporations putting up the money. The caveat is that 501(c)(4)s are supposed to do social welfare work

and cannot be attached to any candidate or party, nor can politics be their primary purpose. Forget what the rule says, though. Such renowned political players as Karl Rove and the Koch brothers have cynically set up their own pretendwelfare groups, openly using them as fronts to run secret-money election campaigns. Suddenly, hundreds of wannabes were demanding the special (c)(4) designation, brazenly lying about their overt political purpose. Some even asserted that they were engaged in no political activity, when their own websites bragged that they were. It was the groups’ stupidity and audacity that prompted the IRS inquiries, and their current hissy-fit about the agency is really just a PR effort to let them continue their “social welfare” fraud. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

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Reyna Lomeli (left) and Tanner Streicher in the science lab at North Central High School. stephen schlange photo

schools

Specializing Education

A passionate teacher turned North Central High School into a haven for genuine scientific research; now the district wants to do the same with other subjects By Daniel Walters

A

student in a science classroom at North Central High School holds up a monochromatic slip of paper covered in streaks that look all wrong. “I think our DNA’s gone bad,” she says. She’s right. The DNA in the sample has become tangled. “We’re going to solve this,” says Randy James, her ruddy-faced, enthusiastic science teacher. “We’re going to put this into a heat block at 65 degrees, see if you can get a release from the wells.” This is far beyond vinegar, baking soda and papermâché. This is actual science. Rather than dissecting frogs

or fish, James’ classes have gone deeper, deconstructing the DNA of Piedmontese cattle, minnows, bighorn sheep and a nearly 10,000-year-old ancient bison. They’ve investigated bacteria that break down gluten, which could be a lifesaver for those with celiac disease, and examined noninvasive ways to identify hybrids of spotted and barn owls. Today, they’re testing human DNA for transposable elements — segments that can move across the genome, activating or deactivating important traits. Meanwhile, genomics students work on complicated independent projects of their own design.

In the school’s stairways, student-written scientific papers (“A study of Genetic Variation in Richardsonius balteatus (Redside Shiner) within the Latah Creek watershed”) have been blown up bigger than poster board beside student body election flyers. Parents have transferred their students to North Central specifically because of the science program. And when 500 students filled the auditorium in April, it wasn’t to see a comedian or musician — it was to see Leroy Hood, a 74-year-old biologist. Organically, without a statewide mandate or orders from a district committee, North Central has created the district’s only Institute of Science and Technology, with the purpose of producing the next generation of great scientists. Now Spokane Public Schools administrators are examining whether other conventional schools can develop a similar specialization. Lewis and Clark High School is ready to supercharge its engineering program. Rogers is focusing on computer science. And Superintendent Shelly Redinger says someday she could see Shadle Park harnessing its success in business, and Ferris in the arts. “We just are finding, for our community, that we want more options,” Redinger says. ...continued on next page

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 13

News | Schools

Teacher Randy James: “People climb Everest all the time. ... [But] we’ve not solved cancer.” stephen schlange photo

“specializing education,” continued...

Passion Projects The robot “Dreadnought” cost about $5,000, clocks in at 114 pounds and was created entirely to fling Frisbees. For a nationwide competition, the Lewis and Clark robotics club designed the machine, modeled after a skeet shooter. Five years ago, Nate Edmons, then a physics teacher, saw how many students were interested in robotics. That’s when he knew there was an appetite for engineering. “I started to approach engineering companies, [asking] if you could design an engineering class in high school, what would you do?” Edmons says. Today, Lewis and Clark has adopted the Engineering by Design curriculum. Edmons wants his students to tackle real-world issues — and local companies like Triumph Composite Systems and Itron are assisting

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them. Edmons say he was inspired by James’ work at North Central. “He’s doing important research,” Edmons says of James. “There’s no reason we can’t do similar research in engineering here.” The district has given him a team to work with, moving three other teachers with an engineering background over to Lewis and Clark. This fall, he says, the school will launch the first year of a school-within-the-school academy focused on engineering. At Rogers High School, the enthusiasm for computer science also started at a national competition. In the CyberPatriot competition, a squad of

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Rogers students became beleaguered IT professionals, tasked with sitting down at a hacker-compromised desktop computer, plugging security holes, detecting and destroying malware, and repairing damage. Last year, of the 12 open teams competing at nationals, three came from Rogers. With increasing interest, Rogers has filled three intro computer programming classes, and an AP computer science class. Soon, computer science teacher Terry Yeigh says, Rogers may begin offering an after-school cybersecurity and networking course. Most Rogers students come from low-income homes, which has branded the school with a rough reputation. But this competition has offered Rogers a new, positive source of identity. “The CyberPatriot program alone made people stop and think of our school a lot differently,” Yeigh says. “We’re kind of an anomaly. We’re ahead of the curve right now.” He discusses partnering with Eastern Washington University to offer college credit for taking certain computer science courses at Rogers. Neither program is as advanced as North Central’s, but NC had a major head start. James has been building its program for about 15 years. “The first $10,000-dollar grant, I realized I couldn’t buy anything,” James says. “I couldn’t even get catalogs from the true biotech and biochemical companies.” They wouldn’t bother with high schools. But then he approached them with the acronym NCHS — he thinks they mistook it for “North Central Health Sciences.” From there, he struck deals for pricey lab equipment with national companies, haggling for $70,000 scientific lab instruments as if they were antique crock pots at a summer flea market. Piece by piece, he constructed North Central’s lab. Construction begins this summer on a new science wing, featuring a state-of-the-art 40-person laboratory. Summer classes and Saturday courses will begin soon, offering NC science classes to the rest of Spokane. “They’re 40-person labs for a reason,” James says. Besides high school students, he’d like to see grad students and Ph.Ds pursuing their own research there. In his vision, the lights in the laboratory would never go off.

Teacher’s Choice

If all these efforts sound teacher-driven, that’s intentional. “I like programs to develop at the grassroots level,” says Redinger, the superintendent. “We want staff to be passionate about certain areas.” Redinger can envision schools specializing in all sorts of subjects. Every school can’t afford to offer every language course, for example. But Ferris could offer Mandarin, while Lewis and Clark offers Japanese. But giving students more options can challenge the neighborhood school model: What if students living within the Shadle Park boundary want to attend North Central because of its computer science program? Will a school bus take them? Will they be given city bus passes? Or are their parents stuck driving them? The district is still discussing transportation policies, but the new programs face other hurdles. Each of these projects relies on money, community partnerships and, most crucially, at least one indefatigable teacher. The district is aware that without someone like James, the North Central project would struggle. So in an unusual move, the administration tasked a recently hired science teacher to shadow James for an hour a day, team-teaching his class. James doesn’t just serve as a teacher for these students — he’s a motivational coach, in a constant state of pep talk, peppering his words to them with dreams of Nobel prizes and scientific revolution. To him, scientists are the last great explorers, conquering peaks, discovering unknown lands. “People climb Everest all the time. I think eight people summit Everest every day,” James says. “[But] we’ve not solved cancer. We’ve not solved energy. We’ve not solved AIDS.” So in the same way Notre Dame football players tap a “Play Like A Champion Today” sign as they leave their locker room, the students in James’ class slap a goofy sketch of Albert Einstein with the words “You Are the Ones.” His generation already solved all the easy problems, he says. This generation will solve the hard ones. n

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 15

news | digest

need to know

The Big News of the Past Week

Q&A Idaho’s Mike Crapo S

en. Mike Crapo has a dream: thick, creamy Idaho-made Greek yogurt on every school lunch tray in America. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is considering adding strained yogurt to school cafeteria menus nationwide — this after fresh fruit and veggies; see p. 37 — and Crapo is hoping Idaho, home to Chobani’s Twin Falls plant, the largest Greek yogurt production facility in the world, will be one of four states selected for a USDA pilot program as early as next fall. We caught up with the Republican senator for a few minutes last Friday, and while he sampled (and posed with) a cup of blueberry Chobani, we asked him about a yogurt-fueled economy, the perils of acid whey and his favorite flavors.

Idaho’s senior senator weighs in on a new plan to serve Greek yogurt in schools. stephen schlange photo

INLANDER: If Idaho is selected for the pilot program, what kind of economic impact do you think it will have on the state? CRAPO: The first impact will be that Greek yogurt would be made available for utilization in the school nutrition programs, and that would increase the consumption, I’m sure. It’s a very high protein product and a very nutritious product for our kids. There’s carbohydrates, there’s

digits

169

Copies of a form letter opposing an antidiscrimination ordinance the Coeur d’Alene City Clerk’s office had received as of noon on Monday. The ordinance would protect LGBT people from housing or employment discrimination.

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What, if any, pushback have you encountered regarding this plan? (Modern Farmer, for example, recently wrote about acid whey, an environmentally toxic byproduct of the Greek yogurt production process.) I have not seen any pushback. In fact the only issue I’ve heard was the one you raised with me, which was with regard to the whey and when I checked back — and you would probably have to confirm this with the Chobani people — but they utilize the whey as I understand it in agriculture for consumption or application on the ground. Are you a Greek yogurt gourmand yourself? What’s your favorite flavor? I do eat Greek yogurt. In fact, I am learning to test each of the Chobani flavors and I think that they do a great job. — INTERVIEW BY DEANNA PAN

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fats and there’s protein. So that will increase the consumption of it, which will then necessarily increase the productions needs for our dairymen, and that ripples through the economy. So I believe it would have a financial impact, but I think the even bigger impact is the health impact for our kids and schools.

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Increase in Kootenai County property values this year, the first time they’ve gone up in six years.

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The Spokane County prosecutor charged Gail Gerlach with firstdegree manslaughter. Gerlach, 57, shot and killed a man he said was stealing his SUV in March.

2.

In a short-lived publicity stunt, managers of the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena temporarily renamed it the Bon Jovi Veterans Memorial Arena to honor the rock band’s visit to Spokane in October. After complaints from veterans, they backtracked.

3.

Spokane Valley deputies shot and killed a man over the weekend. Police say the man called to turn himself in on an outstanding warrant, but when they arrived, he refused to drop a large knife.

4.

Federal investigators say the Spokane man charged with mailing a ricin-laced letter to a federal judge may be connected to three other threatening letters sent to the president, the CIA and Fairchild Air Force Base.

5.

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled this week that police may take DNA samples from people arrested in connection with serious crimes. Supporting justices compared the collection to fingerprints or mugshots.

On inlander.com What’s Creating Buzz

FIRST FRIDAY: Check the site Friday (and the first Friday of every month) for our handy First Friday map, which you can use to see who’s got what on display and plan your route.

NEWS | BRIEFS

It’s a Start The Coeur d’Alene School Boards fights bullying; plus, Spokane firefighters fight changes to civil service rules

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Fighting the Bully After months of outcry, committee debates and community discussion, the Coeur d’Alene School Board adopted a new anti-bullying policy during its four-and-a-half hour meeting on Monday. Incoming school board member Christa Hazel, who served on the anti-bullying task force, says the new policy more clearly and precisely defines bullying, harassment and cyberbullying, and what staff and students are expected to do about it. “The procedures will bring into play — which was one of my big concerns — parent involvement sooner,” Hazel says. The district will be bringing in Steve Wessler, a long-time anti-bullying expert from Portland, Maine, to work with staff and students at least twice a year. He doesn’t come cheap, but school board chair Tom Hamilton is confident the district will find grant money and community sponsors to afford him. An anti-bullying curriculum, however, has not yet been chosen, though rigorously tested curricula like the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program are being considered. Hamilton says the new direction will provide consistency of curriculum and consistency of enforcement. “I’m happy with the policy, but that’s only as good as the paper it’s written on,” Hamilton says. To truly reduce the district’s bullying problem, he says, there must be a cultural shift that starts with administrators and parents. “Beyond student bullying, we have issues of parents and staff who don’t behave the right way,” Hamilton says. “What can we do training-wise to protect kids from grownups who don’t act the right way?” — DANIEL WALTERS

Fire Hazard

The union representing Spokane firefighters is mounting a lawsuit against the city over changes to departmental organization and CIVIL SERVICE rules the City Council approved and the mayor signed in April. “The Ordinance’s violation of state law and the city charter is egregious,” write the union’s lawyers in a summons submitted to the city May 17 on behalf of the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 29 and the Spokane Association of Fire Officers. The ordinance created seven new departments within the

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fire department (and six within the police department), giving the mayor the ability to, with council approval, appoint the directors and assistant directors of those departments instead of those jobs being hired through the civil service process. Civil service rules, outlined in the City Charter, mandate certain hiring rules and tests in an effort to prevent nepotism or cronyism. Supporters of the ordinance, including Police Chief Frank Straub, said it would give department heads the ability to promote people they believe are best for certain job, but who may not perform as well on civil service tests. Opponents worried it could encourage the problems civil service was created to avoid. City Spokesman Brian Coddington says the city will be “answering the lawsuit in the ordinary course,” but that he can’t comment on active litigation. — HEIDI GROOVER

Top Cop

Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich recently took over as president of the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, which provides policy recommendations, legislative lobbying and department accreditation for law enforcement agencies statewide. In the next year, Knezovich says the association hopes to help consolidate several intelligence networks and improve its certification procedures. A major priority, he says, will be integrating six separate gang intelligence databases to share information across jurisdictions statewide. The association also plans to strengthen its firearms certification standards and continue work on a jail accreditation process. Knezovich says he hopes to renew a failed 2013 legislative bill to change arbitration rules to allow for the removal of officers found to have committed misconduct. “We’re working on rewriting that bill,” he says. Knezovich rotated into the president position in May after previously serving on the group’s executive board. He will head the board and various projects throughout a one-year term. “WASPC does a lot of great work for the citizens of the state,” he says. “I really am humbled by the fact I was asked to be on the board.” — JACOB JONES

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hen a Spokane County sheriff’s deputy shot and killed 48-year-old Roy Jacobs Jr. on Saturday, the department called in the multi-agency Spokane Investigative Regional Response Team to collect the evidence at the scene. Made up of specially trained detectives from three local agencies — the Spokane Police Department, the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office and the Washington State Patrol — the joint SIRR Team investigates most fatal incidents involving Spokane law enforcement officers. Deputy Craig Chamberlin, spokesman for the Sheriff’s Office, says the SIRR Team provides an independent agency to oversee high-profile cases, reducing the potential for conflict of interest between investigators and any officers under scrutiny. “We want to avoid any appearance of intradepartmental favoritism,” he says. The Spokane Police Department has taken charge of the Jacobs shooting investigation, serving as the third-party agency in the case so the

Sheriff’s Office is not put in a position to investigate the actions of its own deputies. The SIRR Team most frequently investigates officer-involved fatal shootings, but can also take Roy Jacobs Jr. on deadly vehicle collisions involving officers as well as the deaths of suspects or inmates under the custody of local agencies. Authorities say Jacobs had called to turn himself in on an outstanding warrant for unpaid child support. When deputies responded to his Spokane Valley home at about 5:40 am Saturday, a “confrontation ensued” and deputies fatally shot Jacobs. Investigators reportedly found a large knife at the scene, but family members

have disputed whether Jacobs made any threatening movements with the knife. The Jacobs shooting marks at least four times in four months that the SIRR Team has been called upon to conduct an investigation into a fatal police encounter with a local agency. SIRR detectives continue to investigate the May 16 shooting of 21-year-old murder suspect Justin Cairns by Spokane Police Department officers, along with the death of Christopher Parker, 33, on Feb. 24 while in Sheriff’s Office custody at the Spokane County Jail. The joint team also recently reviewed the Feb. 5 shooting of Jacob Dorfman, 52, by a Spokane Police officer during a confrontation on the South Hill. While the Spokane Police Department oversees the investigation into the Jacobs shooting, the Sheriff’s Office leads the investigation on the Cairns shooting by Spokane Police officers. The State Patrol oversaw both the jail death and February shooting cases. Protocols for the use of the SIRR Team explain that calling for a joint investigation is voluntary. Member agencies may still conduct their own investigations or request another agency, but a SIRR Team investigation has become standard for most fatal incidents involving local officers. Investigators first determine the venue agency, which is the department with at least one officer involved in the incident.

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“It’s just basically ensuring the integrity of the investigation.” Another agency must then lead the investigation. If two agencies participated in an incident, the third agency will investigate. “As is so typical in these situations, the amount of personnel and other resources used to investigate them lends itself to the use of outside resources,” SIRR guidelines state. “This protocol allows, and in some circumstances requires, the use of outside personnel to assist in these investigations.” Spokane Police spokeswoman Monique Cotton says the local agencies had conducted joint investigations into incidents at neighboring departments for several years, but the agencies did not officially adopt the SIRR Team agreement until 2009. Cotton says having an independent agency collecting the evidence and interviewing the officers protects the legitimacy of the process. “It’s just basically ensuring the integrity of the investigation,” she says. Detectives in SIRR cases must have specific training, usually in advanced homicide or collision investigation. Those detectives usually get pulled from the Major Crimes units of the Spokane Police and the Sheriff’s Office or the Criminal Investigations Division of the State Patrol. Under the agreement, all departments pay for their own personnel. Special expenses must be paid by the venue agency under investigation. Investigators put together their findings and deliver a report to the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office. Unlike many cases, investigators cannot recommend charges. The Prosecutor’s Office reviews the cases to determine whether shootings were justified or any criminal action was involved in the death. Prosecutor Steve Tucker says the most recent local law enforcement shooting found unjustified involved Spokane Police Officer James Olsen, who shot and wounded a man during a drunken off-duty foot chase in 2006. However, a jury later acquitted Olsen of a first-degree assault charge. The SIRR Team guidelines list ensuring public trust in the investigation of high-profile cases involving law enforcement officers as a primary goal. Cotton says transparency is essential. “You have three agencies that provide checks and balances for each other,” she says. “That’s very important for us.” n jacobj@inlander.com

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Handing Over the Keys A new law in Washington aims to protect your updates, likes and tweets from your employer BY HEIDI GROOVER

A

decade ago, most employers didn’t know Facebook (then thefacebook.com) even existed. Now, some may make potential employees’ profiles on the social media site required reading before hiring. Indeed, worries about your boss seeing your public profile have grown into concerns they might ask for your

509.326.4485 20 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

password or require you to add them as a friend. A bill signed by Gov. Jay Inslee last month ensures employees are protected from such requests, at least as long as their boss has no suspicions about misconduct. The caveat in the bill, which passed unanimously in both the state House and Senate, makes an exception for cases

where employers are investigating allegations that the employee specifically used social media to violate company rules or share proprietary information. The exceptions were added into the law after business groups pressed lawmakers. “Part of the challenge we see … is you might actually be creating an information portal that could be protected if folks — employees — wanted to use it for nefarious activities,” Denny Eliason, a lobbyist for the Washington Bankers Association, told the House Labor and Workforce Development Committee in March. Eliason says because of strict regulations about protecting customers’ financial information, banks were especially worried about losing their ability to investigate unscrupulous employees. Without amendments to the bill, businesses would have had to turn over all tips about misconduct to the police, instead of being able to vet them for a real threat before getting police involved. A lobbyist from TechAmerica, which repre-

to the ACLU of Washington, say the exceptions don’t hinder the effectiveness of the bill to protect innocent employees. “Under existing law, there is just nothing to protect the employee,” says Shankar Narayan, legislative director for the ACLU of Washington. “[This bill] creates an explicit bar.” Washington is the seventh state to put such a law on the books, and similar bills have been introduced or are on governors’ desks in 28 other states. Last March, an Associated Press story about the trend focused on two instances where job applicants were asked to turn over their Facebook login information or friend someone at the company where they were applying. Soon after, two Democratic senators asked Attorney General Eric Holder to investigate whether the practice is legal under federal law and Facebook threatened legal action against companies whose job applications requested Facebook passwords. (The site’s terms of service prohibits users from

Washington is the seventh state to enact such a law, and similar bills have been introduced or are on governors’ desks in 28 other states. sents technology companies to lawmakers across the country, also urged the committee to add the amendments. Alexi Madon, one of TechAmerica’s directors of state government affairs, says it’s a push they’ve been making in other state houses across the country to try to balance privacy rights with companies’ interests. She says bosses worry that without exceptions, their hands would be tied from investigating employees who may be harassing other employees on social media or leaking proprietary information. “These [exceptions] are very certain situations that directly affect a company or its employees in a negative matter,” she says, “not just a business wanting to know what you’re doing in your off time.” Even with the exception, employees have the right to refuse to hand over their information to employers, who could then take legal action. Those who worked on the bill, from lobbyists

sharing their passwords.) “One of the things this bill really highlights is that our laws, in a lot of ways, need to catch up to technology,” says Sen. Andy Billig, D-Spokane, who was a co-sponsor of the bill. Narayan admits there’s been no study of exactly how widespread the problem is and most of the evidence is “anecdotal.” (He says ACLU offices across the country have heard complaints about the practice.) But in the still new frontier of online privacy, activists say doing nothing could give employers unfair expectations about just what they’re entitled to see. “Everyone understands the concept that an employer can’t sit behind you at a bar and listen to your private conversations with friends, or come into your home and look through your photo albums.” Narayan says. “Why should they be able to do that online?” n heidig@inlander.com

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JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 21

generation

screwed The odds are stacked against young people these days, as you’ll read about on the facing page. so, what are local grads planning to do? Photos and stories by Young Kwak

Nicole Estabrooks East Valley High School Graduation hasn’t come easy for Nicole Estabrooks. She ended up leaving Kellogg, Idaho, after disagreements with her father and moved to Spokane where she enrolled at East Valley High School for her senior year. At East Valley, the 18-year-old joined drama and jazz band and began making a new life for herself. But it was Tim Kimberling, a teacher from Kellogg High School, who put her

22 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

on her current path. “He had a quiet passion for history, and it really showed through with all of his teaching,” says Estabrooks, “I had A-pluses in that class all year and loved it so much, and I figured that is what I wanted to do.” She plans on enrolling at the University of Idaho to study history and international relations, with a minor in theater. Long term, she says she wants to pursue a Ph.D. in history. n

They’re uninsured, unemployed and, depending on whom you ask, ungrateful for what they have or unprepared for what’s ahead of them.

Millennials — the teens and twentysomethings now in the process of forging their futures — are called spoiled and unfocused; they’re said to be ruining the housing market, the tradition of marriage and their parents’ pocketbooks. “Lazy, entitled narcissists,” TIME magazine declared. “Who cares about a career? Not Gen Y,” wrote Forbes senior editor-at-large Patricia Sellers. But they also seem faced with losing prospects at every turn — most obviously when they go looking for a job. On one hand, the choice to go to college is barely a choice at all anymore — college graduates continually see better pay and job prospects — but that path is more difficult as tuition rates balloon, resources by heidi groover to help pay for higher education are cut and debt piles on to the extent that, in a 1,400-person Wells Fargo survey, a third of millennials said they regret going to college at all. When they want to break into career fields, young people are increasingly asked to do so for no pay — 93 percent of companies asked by the National Association of Colleges and Employers said they planned to hire interns in 2011 (that number was in the single digits in the 1980s) and about half are unpaid. If they apply for part-time work instead, they often find themselves up against older adults with decades of work experience to their little or none, a trend left over from the recession despite its official end in June 2009. Nationally, about 50 percent of people 16 to 24 were out of work at the height of summer last year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In the next rung, with 25-to-34-year-olds, more than a quarter are unemployed, have gone back to school or have given up looking for work. In 2011, that put the United States atop the list of big, wealthy countries, including France and Great Britain, for “nonemployment.” In Washington state, 18-to-34-year-olds made up just a third of the workforce but 50 percent of the unemployed in 2010. In Idaho, more than a third of people ages 22 to 34 were unemployed in 2011, and drivers license data shows they’re leaving that state at higher rates than ever before.

M

eanwhile, the people with the purse strings are investing elsewhere as the rest of the population ages. The federal government spends eight times as much on Social Security as it does on education, including Head Start and school meal programs. Nationwide, public universities are depending more on higher tuition than plummeting state funding. In Washington state, the State Need Grant, to help low-income students afford college, can’t keep up with demand. The program turns away one in four applicants, up from one in 50 in 2007, reports the Washington State Budget and Policy Center. According to the center, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families benefits have fallen since the ’90s when adjusted for inflation. In Washington, most of the people who use that program are under 30. Michael Mitchell, a state policy fellow at the Washington State Budget and Policy Center, a think tank that brands itself as nonpartisan but promotes spending on social programs, says it’s dangerous to pit the old against the young. “All those things work in tandem,” he says. “At some point every young adult was a kid and at some point, most of them will be seniors.” But in a report the center recently titled “Maybe When You’re Older,” Mitchell writes that state lawmakers have cut programs for ...continued on page 29

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 23

cover story | graduation

David J. Darrow Shadle Park High School

With a few quick welds, 18-year-old David J. Darrow finishes part of a metal starting gate he’s making for BMX bike races. It’s all part of a school project he’s working on with a classmate. Metalwork has interested Darrow since middle school. “It kind of just clicked with me. I’m really good at it. I have fun doing it,” he says. At home, he has his own forge — a hearth used for heating metals — and now that he’s graduating he wants to go to OXARC welding school in Spokane. There’s a five-month-long welding course that costs about $10,000. He works at Safeway and is hoping his parents can help with tuition. “I don’t know when I am starting,” says Darrow. He plans on paying his parents back once he lands a welding position. “My dream job,” he says, “is running my own shop.” n

24 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

Emily Carroll

Post Falls High School

In a way, it’s not surprising Emily Carroll is interested in psychology and working with at-risk youth. During her sophomore year of high school, her best friend took his own life. Weeks before that she learned that her own father, who died in 2004, had committed suicide. She had previously been told he died of a heart attack. “It was a tough year,” Carroll says. She also suffered more than her share of bullying and teasing. During her freshman year at Lake City High School, a boy made fun of her because she has scoliosis. Then came bullying on Facebook and via text messages. Her mother eventually transferred her to Post Falls High School. “I think it has made me more sensitive to people in general,” she says. Looking at her classmates, she noticed some who didn’t have enough clothes and started a nonprofit to help: North Idaho Clothing Exchange (NICE). “I provide gently used clothing and brand-new clothing to foster youth, homeless youth and needy families,” Carroll says. She plans to enroll at the University of San Francisco this fall, eventually earn a Ph.D. in psychology, and wants to work with youth at risk of suicide. One day, she says, “I want to open up my own private practice.” n

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 25

cover story | graduation

Clayton Husk Rogers High School

Two and a half minutes. That’s how long Clayton Husk — a Junior ROTC Cadet Lt. Colonel — holds his plank position during physical training. He eventually wants to hold it for a full four minutes as he prepares for Air Force basic training next April. He wasn’t sure he wanted to join the military until seventh grade. Now he is very sure. He speaks of his grandfather, who fought in the Vietnam War, and a great-uncle who fought in Korea. “There’s a long line of people [in my family] in the military,” he says. “It gives me a sense of pride that I can carry on the lineage.” He wants to be a pilot or work in explosives ordnance disposal, but cyber defense may be his calling. As a freshman, he got a free computer from a computer club at his high school, and as part of JROTC training, “we learn how to defend against Internet attacks.” In 2012, he and his Rogers teammates each won a $1,500 Northrop Grumman CyberPatriot scholarship for their second-place finish in the cyber defense competition. Husk looks at the Air Force as a potential career, but he hasn’t ruled out college at some point. In the meantime, he is looking for a short-term job to earn some money until his basic training begins. n

26 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

Diana Kimmelman North Central High School

Food runs in Diana Kimmelman’s family. Growing up, she’d cook with her grandfather. “He would have me me stay up with him, and we’d make midnight runs to the store and just make random things,” Kimmelman says. The Carson City, Nev., native moved to Spokane a couple of years ago after her mother committed suicide. She says that during middle school she decided cooking would be her career. She’s now in the ProStart class at North Central, which is a national culinary program. “I want to start from the bottom with dishwashing, and then work my way up to busser and all the other stuff so I get a deeper appreciation for cooking,” she says. Though she is living with her father and grandmother in Spokane right now, Kimmelman says she is moving to Elko, Nev., as soon as school is finished. She wants to reconnect with old neighbors and is hopeful one of them can help her land a job, while she looks for a restaurant position. “Chefs are always in demand,” Kimmelman says. “There’s always somebody out there looking for [chefs].” n

cover story | graduation

Dotriann Sewell,

Lewis and Clark High School

Dotriann Sewell quietly works on an algebra assignment at On Track Academy, where she spends half of her day. She spends the other half at Lewis and Clark High School. The 18-year-old senior has struggled with her schoolwork in the past, but is scheduled to graduate this month. “They’re putting a lot of pressure on me,” says Sewell, referring to her family. “OK, OK, I will [graduate]. Just stop pressuring me.” The pressure is all the greater because she will be the first member of her family to graduate from high school. Sewell was 11 when her family moved to the United States from Guam, where she was born, and her family, originally from Micronesia, has made education a priority from the beginning. Now, with plans to enroll at Spokane Falls Community College next winter, Sewell hopes to transfer to Washington State University after a couple of years to major in education. “I just want to be a teacher, because I love kids. That’s what I wanted to be since I was young,” she says. Eventually she’d like to teach in Micronesia, where she says the need for teachers is high. n

28 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

“Generation Screwed,” continued... young people “just when they’re needed most.” “We’re disinvesting in the future of our country,” says Mark Mattke, CEO of the Spokane Area Workforce Development Council. The group studies employment trends in the region and its Generation Zone helps young people find career paths. “We need to do a better job as a community of recognizing the value of young people.” The council uses federal funding and a patchwork of grants to help about 3,000 young people a year. By studying local industries — looking for those that are growing and may be hiring in the future — the group is hoping to help young people beat a bad economy. Caseworkers help them find career paths they’re interested in and entry-level work, guiding everything from getting them an ID or Social Security card to helping them study for the GED or fill out college applications. With federal and state funding dwindling, Send comments to the council struggles to keep editor@inlander.com. doing that work by partnering with other groups and downsizing certain areas. As money poured in from the federal stimulus, the council added a summer employment program, which paid young people’s summer wages at companies that couldn’t hire them but were willing to take them on to help with basic job skills and work ethic. But when the funding dried up, the program fell by the wayside.

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Michael Vanwert

Lewis and Clark High School

Michael Vanwert grew up with a mother who, for the most part, raised him and his younger brother on her own, while working two jobs. He calls his mother a “superwoman” for the sacrifices she made to provide for her family. “I had to be very mature at a young age,” he says. “I had responsibilities for taking care of my sibling.” Adversity has been a motivator, though. “I use it to push myself to do more,” he says. Vanwert plans to study at Eastern Washington University this fall. He has seen his family struggle financially and hopes to study electrical engineering — something he chose for practical reasons: stable employment and highpaying wages. His goal, he says, is “to leave college without any debt and to start my career right away.” n

astern Washington regional economist Doug Tweedy, who does surveys of Spokane-area companies to find out about openings and necessary qualifications, says the “No. 1 thing” they’re looking for from applicants is some type of work experience, like a summer job. “[First jobs are] where you learn how to work,” he says, “just to show up and do that work.” But the jobs young people have traditionally depended on for experience are drying up. Clerks and cashiers are being replaced with automated machines, and the areas of the economy that are growing, Tweedy says, aren’t where young people usually look for a first job: health care, manufacturing, scientific and technical fields, finance and insurance, transportation and warehousing. While companies would prefer applicants with experience, they face a dilemma as Baby Boomers retire at quicker rates. Eventually the young applicants will be their only options. Tweedy says science- and math-focused education initiatives are paying off, but it’s not enough. He says high school students are putting off decisions about college and careers “far too long.” He pushes young people toward internships, volunteer opportunities or mentors in fields they’re interested in — as long as those are the growing sectors. Now his department lists areas in decline, spanning everything from teachers and actors to chemists. He encourages them to look for opportunities, like data analysis or insurance jobs, which may only require an associate’s degree instead of four expensive years in college. “There’s a lot of anxiety, but the anxiety, I think, is coming from the lack of direction,” he says. “Young adults have an opportunity here, but they have to be very focused and targeted. … It’s not going to be dropped in their laps. They have to get going.” n

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 29

Stitch the Trauma Bear reminds children to ALWAYS swim & dive with a buddy.

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30 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

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THEATER

Max Demers, who plays Huckleberry Finn (right), and Terence Kelley, as Jim, prepare for Big River at the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre.

Drama by the Lake After more than four decades, Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre has earned its reputation BY MIKE BOOKEY

M

ost of the year, the offices of the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre hum along with five employees. But starting this month, that payroll heads north of 100. Michelle Mendez, a longtime part of CST in her first year as executive director, says that as usual, things are going crazy as the nonprofit theater company

prepares for another season. Many musicals require months of preparation and rehearsal, but given that CST uses actors and crew from all over the country who are coming off other productions, all of that is condensed into two weeks. The tunes are smoothed out, the sets built and the actors find their

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

marks before opening to what have in recent years been full houses. CDA Summer Theatre is a professional theater company — a fact that Mendez says is sometimes overlooked in the Inland Northwest. “Every spring we’re essentially hiring a whole new company,” says Mendez. “People don’t always know that we have such a treasure locally.” Coeur d’Alene Summer Theater began in 1967 and has since produced a 12-week schedule of musicals on the campus of North Idaho College. With a sizable season ticket base, CST’s three-month run brings in as many as 30,000 theatergoers over the course of the summer. The company produces only musicals, four each season. This year, the slate consists of Big River, Mary Poppins, Romance Romance and 9 to 5 (see sidebar for details) and all of those shows feature casts plucked from both the local talent pool and larger cities. Much of this talent is scouted by artistic director Roger Welch, who heads to New ...continued on next page

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 31

CULTURE | THEATER “DRAMA BY THE LAKE,” CONTINUED...

PREMIUM GARDEN SOIL

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York a couple times a year to check out actors, sometimes teaming with other small theaters to hold auditions for the season’s upcoming musicals. Seattle-based stage actor Matt Wade was part of a traveling production of Oklahoma when friends told him about the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre. In 2006, he joined the cast for A Chorus Line and returned for three additional seasons. This year, he’s set up camp in Coeur d’Alene for the summer, appearing in all four musicals. “It has to be one of the greatest regional theaters I’ve ever been in. The production values are tip-top,” says Wade, who takes the stage next week in Big River as Tom Sawyer, a role he’s hoped to snag since childhood. In fact, the musical’s “Hand for the Hog” was the first song he ever performed in public. “The stage itself is overwhelming, and you don’t get that in most regional theaters,” says Wade. The stage and the productions’ other trappings — which this year includes the equipment that enables Mary Poppins to take flight — require some serious funding. Each Visit Inlander.com for complete of this year’s four musicals run at a listings of local events. budget of about $10,000 per night, says Mendez. And Mary Poppins doesn’t fly for free. Sometimes, though, the theater can collaborate with other regional groups to lower these costs. The set for Big River, for example, was designed for a Seattle theater at a cost of $60,000, but CST was able to procure it for a fraction of that price. But with all of these costs in mind, Mendez nevertheless says the theater company prides itself on keeping prices within reach for the region. “Theater is expensive. We are a nonprofit and with that status we get grants and donations. That helps, but our mission is to provide theater for everyone. We work hard to keep the price point available to everyone,” says Mendez. The goal — as it has been for more than 40 years — is to bring people to Coeur d’Alene to see high-quality musicals. So far, it looks like the formula is working. 

MORE EVENTS

COEUR D’ALENE SUMMER THEATRE — THE SHOWS BIG RIVER

A New Evening Accounting Program at Whitworth Downtown • B.A. in Management and Accounting, or CPA prep for those with a bachelor’s degree. • Evening format to work with your daytime schedule • Classes offered downtown in the U-District • Forbes ranks accounting as one of its top three fields for growth and demand.

This musical, which arrived on Broadway in the mid-1980s and became an instant classic soon after, features Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn hitting the river to help free his escaped slave friend Jim. He gets a little help from Tom Sawyer along the way. June 13-22 • 7:30 pm Thu-Sat shows, 2 pm Sun, June 16 and Sat, June 22

MARY POPPINS

An airborne nanny. Singing kids. An affable chimney sweep. You know the story of this classic, which is set to feature high-flying (literally) theatrics as characters take flight above the stage. July 5-14 • 7:30 pm Fri-Sat and Thu, July 11; 2 pm Sun, July 7 and 14

ROMANCE ROMANCE

This lesser-known but nevertheless beloved musical takes place in the Hamptons as two couples looking to spend a laid-back weekend end up dancing dangerously toward an affair. July 25-Aug. 4 • 7:30 pm Thu-Sat shows; 2 pm Sun, July 28 and Aug. 4

9 TO 5

Dolly Parton’s music takes the stage to wrap up the CdA Summer Theatre slate as three working women find a way to get back at their jerk of a boss. Aug. 15-25 • 7:30 pm Thu-Sat shows; 2 pm Sun, Aug. 18 and 25

Enroll Now whitworth.edu/accounting 509.777.3222

32 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

Tickets for all shows are $42/adult, $38/senior, $28/child • Available at cdasummertheatre.com or 208-769-7780 • All shows take place at the Schuler Auditorium Performing Arts Center on the NIC campus, 880 W. Garden Ave.

CULTURE | DIGEST

DRAWING LIVE ART

901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638

FRIDAY, JUNE 7TH | 6PM Art comes alive.

A

rtists bare their souls in their work. That’s as true for a graffiti artist as it was for da Vinci. But rarely, if ever, do we see these artists actually creating their work. Draw Off, a series of head-to-head live art battles hosted by Spokane-based advertising agency Seven2, brings that creative process into the spotlight, while tossing in some competitive spice for good measure. The rules are simple: two teams of three artists each take on an 8-by-8-foot board armed only with black pens or paint. They have two hours to create a piece incorporating a given theme. Spectators decide the winner, donating money to Second Harvest by placing it in their team of choice’s jar. The next Draw Off is slated for Saturday night during Elkfest in Browne’s Addition. A team of local artists made up of Tiffany Patterson, Chris Dreyer and The Inlander’s

TOBIAS HENDRICKSON PHOTO

own Chris Bovey square off with Zach Grassi, Brandon DeLauney and Mitch Davis, all employees of Seven2. “We’ve had a good mix of architects, tattoo artists, street artists, graphic designers, local agencies and art students participate so far,” says Jesse Pierpoint, creative director at the agency. “It’s always exciting to meet so many talented people, and I’m always surprised at what they can paint in two hours.” Things get competitive when the teams are coming down to their deadlines, but nobody has thrown a punch. At least not yet. “No one has come to fisticuffs quite yet,” he says, “but we have had some pretty talented and diverse people go head-to-head at these things.” — MIKE BOOKEY Draw Off at Elkfest • Sat, June 8 from 6 pm to 8 pm • Pacific Avenue at the Elkfest stage

BIG CITY COMEDY DWIGHT SLADE WINNER OF THE BOSTON COMEDY FESTIVAL

KANE HOLLOWAY WINNER OF THE MT. RAINIER COMEDY CAGE MATCH

KELSEY COOK WINNER OF THE WSU LAST COUG STANDING

SATURDAY, JUNE 15TH | 8PM

JUNE 22ND 11AM & 2PM 15

$

INCLUDES ADMISSION TO PLUS A VISIT FROM THE SPOKANE GHOSTBUSTERS

For Your Consideration BY JACOB H. FRIES

FE AT URING: Atomic Jive | Soul Proprietor Sammy Eubanks | Elvis and Dr. Ron Hoye!

APP | We’re obsessed with ourselves more than ever — or at least we’re taking more self-portraits than at any point in human history — so what could be better than a free app like CamME? It allows you to take cellphone photos of yourself — hands-free, from a distance, using simple hand signals that tell the camera to activate a timer and fire off a photo. Finally, we’ve eliminated the need to interact with other people to get the perfect Facebook profile pic.

SPORTS | The San Antonio Spurs are back in the NBA FINALS after a six-year absence, led by 37-year-old big man Tim Duncan and a host of other aging veterans, including Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker. Starting Thursday night, they’ll face the Miami Heat in the best-of-seven series. Early predictions favor the Heat, with force-of-nature LeBron James and his crazy-good supporting cast (Dwyane Wade, Ray Allen, Chris Bosh). But there are story lines aplenty: the Heat are coming off an exhausting full-seven-game series against the Pacers. Plus, this could be Duncan’s last shot at his fifth championship.

TV | The new season of MASTERCHEF (FOX, Wednesdays at 8 pm) has just started, but one thing is already clear: Gordon Ramsay isn’t the biggest asshole on the show this time around. No, the knives are out early in this contest pitting America’s best home cooks against each other — it’s a definite departure from last year, when a sweetheart (and blind) chef won it all. Watch out for the Natasha vs. Krissi battle to heat up, though our early pick for the overall winner is Jordan Roots, who’s got a great story and unbelievable cooking chops.

Thursday, July 18th | 8pm Stay at

Drink at

*A $2 RESTORATION FEE IS ADDED TO EACH TICKET COST.

BINGCROSBYTHEATER.COM

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 33

CULTURE | THEATER

ADAMS STREET AREA

The End of the Affair The JACC is staging Same Time, Next Year, a 24-year love story of brief encounters BY E.J. IANNELLI

M

arina Kalani makes no secret of her belief that theater is a collaborative effort. As the director of the Jacklin Center’s upcoming production of Same Time, Next Year, a 1975 romantic “dramedy” by Bernard Slade, it would only be natural for her to focus on things like overarching vision and underlying mechanics. Instead, she repeatedly emphasizes the people: cast members Dawn Hunter and Doug Dawson, stage manager Steve Jungen, as well as the Lake City Playhouse staff, who lent crucial support with costuming. “I’m a huge fan of my actors,” she says, “so they are equal participants in that creative development. I blush to be working with such a high level of experience.” Dawson was recently named Best Actor at this year’s AACT Regional Festival for his performance in the Civic’s Turn of the Screw. Hunter has been on nearly every professional and amateur stage in the Inland Northwest. “Knowing that those two individuals were available and interested was a big deciding point” to do the play in the first place, she says. The play itself, as well as the JACC’s unconventional space, demand extra reserves of talent. In Same Time, Next Year, Dawson and Hunter play an accountant and a housewife who have a one-night extramarital affair at a California inn in 1951. Over the next 24 years, they meet once annually to reconnect and rekindle their mutual flame; the audience, however, only sees them in five-year intervals. That means the actors have to gradually and credibly age about one-third of a normal lifespan in roughly 90 minutes. “They both go through very dramatic changes. The aging process and making it truly authentic is one of the challenges. They have a very short amount of time to leave in 1951 costumes and hairstyles and get back and be five years older,” says Kelani. The actors also have to maintain a delicate dynamic of comedy, drama and romance. “These two have been working together for something like 15 years. In the play, we experience babies being born and relocations and life changes,” says Kalani, “but as it relates to these two particular actors, they have already lived that experience together through divorces and children. They walked in the door with that history and chemistry.” Because the JACC has few of the usual theatrical amenities — like, say, a wardrobe, or even a curtain — the plays are carefully chosen to suit the space. Kalani says that the simple, static setting of Same Time, Next Year and the “very romantic, very touching” story at its core make it a perfect fit for the venue and its audiences. “I read a quote once: ‘In 10 years, we will be the same people we are today but for the people we meet and the books we read.’ What is it that gets us through the good times, the hard times? It’s the people we hold close,” she says. “This play really places value on the relationships and the people that stand with us through our crazy, changing times. Value the people that make you who you are.” n Same Time, Next Year • June 13-23: Thu-Sun, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $20 ($15 student) • Jacklin Arts and Cultural Center • 405 N. William St., Post Falls, Idaho • (208) 457-8950 • www.thejacklincenter.org

34 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE. Presenting Coeur d’Alene artist, Heather Hofstetter & her exhibit “Newly Native,” an assorted collection of works varying in media. Artist reception, Beacon Hill’s Bistro Buffet from 6-8pm. Music by “Lonesome” Lyle Morse 6:30-10pm. The Urban Garden in the Courtyard is now open!

KOLVA SULLIVAN GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST., SUITE A Titled show “Conglomeration” consists of a variety of artists: Lauren Hammerstrom, Devon Plopper, Megan Finch, Vida Hutchison & Annie Feuerstein.

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY 115 S. ADAMS ST. Featuring the work of Mark Moore & Chris Kelsey from their Spring 2013 Boxagama wood fire.

DAVENPORT HOTEL & STEAM PLANT AREA * BABY BAR

827 W. 1st AVE. Please join us at the Baby Bar for First Friday. We are featuring artist Cori McWilliams.

THE DAVENPORT HOTEL/PEACOCK LOUNGE

10 S. POST ST. Featuring award winning artist Barry DuMaw. His art has been featured in the prestigious Sporting Classics magazine. He does oil & water color paintings of wildlife & landscapes.

FREEMAN BUILDING

170 S. LINCOLN ST. UNIT 500 Please join us in viewing this fabulous residential/commercial condo featuring “Condustrial”, functional artwork with a history by Ron LeMay. “Harmony” is the enchanting feeling intertwining and flowing freely throughout the sound board taken from an old upright piano.

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

906 W. 2ND AVE. Photos in Black & White by Kathy & Bill Kostelec. Music by Brent Edstrom Jazz Trio from 7-9pm. Artists reception.

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

901 W. 1ST AVE. Come in & join us at the Sapphire Lounge. Get an artistic, handcrafted cocktail, freshsqueezed juices & delicious flatbreads. Relax & be surrounded by stained-glass art, amazing chandeliers, great music & warm, romantic vibes!

STEAM PLANT

159 S. LINCOLN ST. The Art of Steampunk: Multiple artists show jewelry, mixed-media, costuming, photography & performance art in the eclectic, Victorian style of Steampunk. Plus, sample Steam Plant’s handcrafted brews.

DOWNTOWN CORE AREA ARBOR CREST TASTING ROOM

808 W. MAIN AVE. (River Park Square) Please join us for First Friday. We are featuring Sumi-e paintings & calligraphy by Olivia Waterman & Keiko von Holt. This form of art dates back to ancient China around 700 AD.

AVE. WEST GALLERY

707 W. MAIN AVE. (Skywalk Level) Featuring member Jeff Harrell’s exhibit “J.D. Designs in Gold and Silver” along with large paintings by guest artist John Mendel. Music & refreshments from 5-8:30pm.

BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE

108 N. POST ST. Featuring Naira Kai, American Cabaret and Tribal Fusion Belly dancer! You will be mesmerized by this amazing artist. Happy Hour 4-6pm, Half price Eats menu and Spokane’s BEST MARTINIS!

BOZZI COLLECTION GALLERY

211 N. WALL ST. Bozzi Collection is proud to feature new works by sculptor Adam Scoggin. Part of his “Ancestors” series, Scoggin’s sculptures have a meditative, serene quality. Music by singer/songwriter Eric Neuhausser.

BRICK WALL GALLERY

BENNETT BLOCK, MAIN & HOWARD (2nd Floor skywalk level) Featuring Scott Lundy’s undersea photography for First Friday. Open until 8:30pm.

INTERMOUNTAIN COMMUNITY BANK

618 W. RIVERSIDE ST. (in the atrium) GRAND RE-OPENING! Please join us & enjoy jazz music by Schauer with Friends, beautiful watercolor paintings by Vicki West, complimentary snacks & cool beverages. The Mayor will be on hand for a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 5:30pm.

KRESS GALLERY/RIVER PARK SQUARE

808 W. MAIN AVE. First Night Spokane Rising Stars – Inland NW Drawing School - Annual Art Show: Students ranging in age from 6 to adult will exhibit more than 100 drawings of multiple works. 3rd Floor Food Court – 5:30-7:30pm Students from the Lewis & Clark Jazz

band will perform smooth rhythmic patterns & big band sounds in this great night of Jazz music.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

120 N. STEVENS ST. (Main & Stevens) Come & experience art that heals the human heart. Priscilla Barnett will evoke your emotions & electrify your senses with a varied display of acrylic, oil, & mixed media creations. Music by Dan Conrad, 6:30pm. Northwest Cellars winery will be on hand introducing several new wines for the night as well. Reservations 509.869.1572.

SPOKANE TRIBE HISTORICAL EXHIBIT & INFORMATION CENTER

211 N. WALL ST. (skywalk level) Please join us this First Friday at our extensive Historical Exhibit & Information Center. Learn more about the Spokane Tribe’s privately funded STEP development that will provide 5,000 local jobs. Entertainment & refreshments.

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N. HOWARD ST. Please join us for June’s First Friday & view the wide range of photos by Jenny Lange, from beautiful serene close-ups of local, wild flowers to colorful graffiti from Spain.

WHITESTONE WINERY

THE LIBERTY BUILDING

402 W. MAIN AVE. Please join us at the Liberty Building this coming First Friday. Our building will be filled from top to bottom with food, music, art & more! This is your one stop First Friday event! (Casa Partner Benefit Night! 20% of art sales donated to Casa Partners.)

8 N. POST ST., SUITE 8 You don’t want to miss Whitestone Winery’s Tasting Room on First Friday! It’s always a great time with live music, amazing artists & a nacho bar! Featuring artist Andrea Parrish. Music by Chelsey Heidenreich, 6-9pm.

MAIN LEVEL: AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA

3 Minute Mic: Open Mic Poetry hosted by Michael Schomburg with guest poet Jonathan Potter. Everyone welcome! Starts at 7:00, sign-ups at 6:30.

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS 331 W. MAIN AVE. Featuring Rogers High School AP Digital Photography/2-D Studio Art Program. These photographs are produced by the talented students in this year’s Rogers High School Advanced Placement Digital Photography/2-D Studio Art program.

POTTERY PLACE PLUS

LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N. WASHINTON ST., SUITE 105 Please join us for wine tasting by Stemilt Creek from Wenatchee, photography by Robert Heagy titled “Spokane the Beautiful”, & music by Stephanie Hatzinikolis.

707 W. MAIN AVE. (skywalk level) Featuring works of Manic Moon & More artists: Ron Yorke- digital media art, Oana Barac-Matel - digital art collage, cityscapes, paintings & sketches, & Linda Malcom- graphic art, paintings & mosaics. Guitar music by Gary Burris

Wood & metal works by Jason Sheldon, acrylics by Joseph Drumheller & vintage collage art by Shanda Woodward.

DESIGN SPIKE

Paintings by local artist Karen Mobley.

LIBERTY BUSINESS CENTER

Danscape Photography, woodwork by Sammy’s Rustics, paintings by Christina Deubel & handcrafted pens by Ammohead Design.

3RD FLOOR CHAS:

Sironka will be displaying his Batiks & doing a demonstration throughout the evening. Private art collection on display.

Featuring guest artists: “EARTH TREASURES” - Mary Gayle Young (Earthwear Ecodesigns) & Jennene Reagor (Highgloss paintings). Mary uses gemstones, recycled items & elements from the earth to create wearable riches. Jennene uses acrylic high gloss on tiles, granite & marble. Artists’ reception 5-9pm

SEVEN2

Featuring large scale acrylics & bold watercolors by artist Megan Broughton.

LUXE COFFEE HOUSE

SANTE RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

224 W. MAIN AVE. The Spokane Falls Graphic Design Club’s Monstrous ‘13 Graphic Design Portfolio Show will be on display for the June First Friday. Come see the talents of the next generation of graphic artists.

FIRST AVE. AREA - WEST END

UNCLE’S GAMES

1017 W. 1ST AVE. “Van-Gogh & Merlot”, an inter-active art event. Enjoy a glass of merlot while you paint!

MEZZANINE LEVEL:

FIRST AVE. AREA - EAST END

Comic book & pop culture paintings by Nathan OBrien on display. Come view our new local talent. The Spokane Falls Community College Fine Art Program graduating class will be showing their work. Music by Bobby Kirl, 5-7pm. Photo Booth hosted by Danscape Photography 6:30-7:30pm.

STUDIO CAPELLI SALON

2ND FLOOR ATRIUM:

CAT’S EYE

1 S. WASHINGTON ST. Experience the healing power of humor. Come do a project.

GRAND STAIRCASE:

Featuring two mixed-media artists, Melissa Cole & Nikai Birchler.

Jenny Lange at Steelhead Bar & Grille

Continued on next page

* Located in the Davenport District – DavenportDistrict.org

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Agave Nectar Ale Grilled Chicken Salad

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6 oz. Blue Moon Agave Nector Ale 1/4 cup of honey 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard 1/4 cup diced red onion 2 tbsp olive oil 1/4 cup lemon juice

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We’ve got you covered.

4 skinless bonelss chicken breasts 1/2 red bell pepper (diced) 1 avocado (diced) 1 head of romaine lettuce Orange slices as garnish

Find the whole recipe at www.bluemoonbrewingcompany.com downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership & Spokane Arts Commission

FIND ART & more this Friday, June 7th! Venues open 5 - 8 pm unless otherwise noted. MARKETPLACE WINERY

NORTH BANK AREA CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY

621 W. MALLON AVE. (in the Flour Mill) Featuring artist Tom Quinn’s oil & acrylic “nonsense illustration”; realistic pictures with an ironic twist. Music by acoustic duo String Theory. Enjoy samples of cheese, chocolate, & gelato with your servings of music & art. 5:30-8pm.

HO HO TERIYAKI CHICKEN

621 W. MALLON AVE., (in the Flour Mill) Featuring the beautiful paintings of owner Ho Lan. Also, try our fabulous menu! 4-7pm.

RED LION HOTEL AT THE PARK

303 W. NORTH RIVER DR. Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley will be performing acoustic patio music for all ages, young and old! 5:30-8pm. Happy Hour food & beverage specials!

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA BARILI CELLARS

608 W. 2ND AVE. From 4-9pm. Current wine releases & fun art. Featuring Ona Jacobson. Ona’s exhibit is titled “A Study of Flowers & Nature” with acrylic on canvas, watercolor, glass painting & painted utility pieces.

ECHO BOUTIQUE

176 S. HOWARD ST., SUITE A Come celebrate Echo Boutique’s one year anniversary. Josh Wing shows a world of vivid imagination through his mixed media work & Christina Marie Courtney has an uncanny knack for deconstructing the beautiful in her watercolors. Also showing local jewelers, Jody Steensland, Union Studio Metals, & Allison Kalloway.

39 W. 2ND AVE. Please join us in our NEW LOCATION across the parking lot form the “old” wine bar! We are featuring the color paintings of Debbie McCulley & music by Kari Marguerite & the Seventy-Six.

RED DRAGON DOWNTOWN

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT

WEST DOWNTOWN AREA

1900 & GESTALT STUDIO

THE MAC – NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE

114 W. PACIFIC AVE. Showing charcoal figure drawings from Cheney artist David Vaughn. David’s work features a variety of models in classical, discreet poses on larger canvases.

1406 W. 3RD AVE. Museum quality Historical life sized portraits of my family cira 1920 China (Few photographs of this time period still exist today). Belly dancing in the Red Lantern Lounge starting at 5pm.

CLAY CONNECTION

ROBERT KARL CELLARS

44 W. MAIN AVE. Please join us for the June First Friday. We are featuring various Artists from the TriCounty Art Association PLUS Real Life Rockaz performing from 5-7pm. Don’t miss their blend of reggae, hip hop, soul, jazz & more.

115 W. PACIFIC AVE. Historic Warehouse District (aka SODO) Enjoy Colin Wintz’s paintings while tasting the newly released 2010 Claret.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

319 W. 2ND AVE. Please join us for an enjoyable evening of art & wine! Featuring metal sculptor Paul Kuhlmann’s wine bottle holders & pourers, metal wall decor, & metal flower pieces. Our latest wine release “MPV” 1:30-8pm.

TRANSITIONS/WOMEN’S HEARTH

920 W. 2ND AVE. Our True Colors Shining Through: The Healing Power of Art. A show featuring the art work of the Women’s Hearth Participants. Art will include masks made as part of a trauma recovery activity, water colors, black-light wall art, knit and crochet items and much more..

714 E. SPRAGUE AVE. We will be having a Raku firing & pit firing, lots of food & beverages. FREE kids workshop (limited space, be there by 5pm!).

2316 W. 1ST AVE. 5 galleries full of exhibits on Plateau Tribal Cultures, extreme NW explorer – David Douglas, Spokane modern architecture & art from the MAC collections. Free admission.

MAIN MARKET CO-OP

nYne

232 W. SPRAGUE AVE. For the June First Friday we are featuring abstract impressionist work by artist Tiffany Malia.

Tom Quinn at Chocolate Apothecary

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. MAIN AVE. We are featuring two mixed-media artists this month; new members Mariah Boyle & Jon Faulks.

URBANNA NATURAL SPA.SALON

168 S. DIVISION ST. We pride ourselves on delivering only the finest natural products crafted by Mother Nature, for a uniquely sensational journey through the photographic soul of our existence to “The Quintessential Image” by Linda Kemmerer.

DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX EVERY FRIDAY

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Fresh and Free

A school program proves that kids really will eat their fruits and veggies By Lisa Waananen

T

he Rogers High School cafeteria had a problem: Students who weren’t buying lunch kept taking fruits and vegetables from the salad bar. They didn’t know better. A few years earlier at Shaw Middle School, these kids had been part of a pilot program to offer students healthy snacks throughout the school day, and they had picked up the habit of snacking on as much free produce as they wanted. The kitchen manager decided not to stop them. “They were so used to doing that in middle school,” says Doug Wordell, food services director for Spokane Public Schools. Now the program is in selected elementary schools around the nation, including in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene. Some days the kids pick up familiar apple slices or baby carrots. Other days it’s jicama with lime, or even more exotic offerings — kumquats, figs, pomegranate seeds, blood oranges. “It’s just great to offer students fresh fruit and vegetables during the school day,” Wordell says. In some schools the snacks are distributed to each classroom; in others, students walk to the hall or cafeteria for a break between lessons. But the concept is the same: If you give kids free

produce, they’ll eat better now and make better nutrition decisions later on. It’s all part of the federal Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program, which provides money — $165.5 million in the coming school year, to be exact — for elementary schools with the highest percentages of low-income students. In Idaho elementary schools that made the cut for next year, at least 62 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. In Washington, the threshold has typically been at least 70 percent. A national study of the program published earlier this year found that kids have been eating more fruits and vegetables without an impact on overall calories they consume each day. But a more significant dif...continued on next page

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 37

FOOD | education

Plan Your Tee Time.

FUNDING FOR FRESH SNACKS Funding for the federal Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program expanded for three years, and is now growing with inflation. For the coming school year, Washington gets $5.46 million and Idaho gets $2.06 million. Elementary schools are selected based on the percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.

$166 $158 $164 $150 million

In millions:

$110 $100

$73 $49

$50

Source: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

’08-09 ’09-10 ’10-11 ’11-12 ’12-13 ’13-14

“fresh and free,” continued...

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38 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

ference was the enthusiasm — students in participating schools were more likely to agree that they like trying new fruits and vegetables. “For fruits, students in FFVP schools were more likely than students in non-FFVP schools to agree that they like most fruits and they like to try new fruits,” the report concluded. “There was also greater FFVP student agreement that they liked to try new kinds of vegetables.” Getting kids outside of their apples-and-bananas comfort zone is part of the fun. Idaho state suggestions include mangosteen, persimmon, romanesco, sea beans, cherimoya and ugli fruit. Ed Ducar, food services director for Coeur d’Alene schools, says that around Halloween they’ve served rambutan — a tropical fruit with a hairy-looking red exterior that when cut open resembles an eyeball. “It’s kind of a prickly-looking thing,” he says. But it’s not just about the exotic. Ducar tries to offer fruits and vegetables that kids can easily find at grocery stores and farmers markets, at affordable prices. Cost is a constraint for schools, just as it is for families — fresh blueberries may be delicious and touted as a “superfood,” but they’re also expensive. In the study, schools cited cost as the main reason for not serving fruits like cherries, mangoes and berries. Pineapple spears are a student favorite in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene schools, but they’re too expensive to offer frequently. Some vegetables are a harder sell — Brussels sprouts, asparagus, zucchini and squash, for example — but the program is overwhelmingly popular. When it started in Spokane schools, Wordell says, he couldn’t walk into a school without teachers stopping to say nice things about it. And he’s confident the effect will extend beyond the classroom. “In 20 years this will impact the food choices of these students and their families,” he says. n

FOOD | UPDATE

FOOD | OPENING

Old Favorite Spokane Valley’s Bangkok Thai adds some new flair to the local mini-chain By Annemarie C. Frohnhoefer Owners Yvonne Archer and Jeremiah Johnson at The Shop. Jennifer DeBarros photo

Summer Hub

The recently transformed Shop draws in the neighborhood for food and films By Jo Miller

T

he Shop, an earthy coffeehouse in the Perry District, was essentially a man cave a year ago, with walls decked out in movie posters and license plates. That was until Yvonne Archer and her fellow co-owners got their hands on it. Archer says she wanted to transform the atmosphere into a cozy, inviting gathering place. It appears she was successful, judging by the friendlylooking clan sipping beers around a worn wooden table and the man strolling in with his dog and treating it to one of the free “pup cakes,” all amidst the metallic-vintage-meets-DIY-garage-hangoutmeets-cabin-in-the-woods milieu. It was March of last year when Archer and her two friends bought The Shop on a whim from its previous owner, who ran it as simply a coffeehouse for more than a decade. But for Archer, just a coffeehouse wouldn’t do. So she carted in the food. “I’m a foodie, so all the food recipes are mine,” Archer says. There are homemade breakfast cookies, quiches, quinoa salads, sandwiches, veggie burgers and locally made ice cream, among other offerings. Archer zeros in on serving healthy and largely allergen-free food. Most of the desserts are glutenfree and vegan, as are many of the items in the cold case, such as the truly dreamy “dream bar” ($3.25) made with rice flour and topped with goodies like

coconut, peanut butter, maple syrup and vegan chocolate chips. It’s hard to think of anything The Shop lacks in the beverage department. Of course there’s coffee, but there’s also beer (including a gluten-free brew), wine (with organic and sulfite-free options), mimosas and honey-sweetened lemonade. The fridge is even stocked with probiotic coconut water and kombucha. Archer says people thought she was a “nut bar” for bringing the latter two items in, but the drinks actually turned out to be top-sellers. With year-round trivia nights and live music, The Shop becomes even more of a neighborhood nucleus when summer hits. Its parking lot hosts the South Perry Farmers Market every Thursday from 3 to 7 pm. And once the sun sinks on Saturday nights starting June 29, a few hundred people from the neighborhood will snuggle in the lot for the annual outdoor South Perry Summer Theater and watch a flick projected on the brick side of Casper Fry. Included on the ticket for this summer: Wreck-It Ralph, Rocky III and the ever-popular Princess Bride. n The Shop • 924 S. Perry St. • Open Mon-Wed, 6 am-8 pm; Thu-Fri, 6 am-10 pm; Sat, 11 am-11 pm; Sun, 7 am-8 pm • 534-1647

S

ue Ounpikul and her daughter May received the blessing of Bangkok Thai founder Kay Chidaprist when they opened the restaurant’s newest location two months ago on the corner of Argonne and Sprague, in what used to be Thai Grill. The women oversaw a total renovation. Bangkok Thai’s signature deep-colored walls and sandstone-hued replicas of Hindu-influenced wall sculpture now surround the diners, who linger at their tables, chatting with one another as servers replenish water glasses. The restaurant provides an intimate setting for quite possibly the most unrushed lunch crowd in the Spokane area. That could change once word gets out. The price of a lunch combo is the same at all three locations; a mere $9 allows you to sample three entrées, two mini-spring rolls and a generous helping of jasmine rice. The chicken pra ram — steamed chicken atop blanched spinach — is ladled with a tasteful amount of peanut sauce. Bright-green spinach curls against tender chicken tenderloin, with the jasmine rice picking up any of the remaining lip-smackingly nutty sauce. The chicken pad Thai’s tender rice noodles and crunchy alfalfa sprouts are complemented by the slightly tart sauce, while the gang daeng kai’s red curry paste imparts spicy zest to bamboo shoots, coconut milk and bell pepper. Servers readily answer questions about spiciness and adjust the levels of burn (on a scale of 1 to 5) to suit the patron’s palate. Other favorites include tom kha kai (chicken coconut soup), curries in all colors (green, yellow, red) and — from the dinner menu — crab fried rice ($17), ginger duck ($19) and pineapple chicken ($18). After receiving their steaming entrées, several diners commented on the similarity between Bangkok Thai’s locations. If you’ve been to the South Hill or Riverwalk locations, you won’t find anything surprising on the menu at the newest venue on Argonne in Spokane Valley. Kay Chidaprist’s menu features — and Bangkok Thai enthusiasts will swear to this — some of the best Thai cuisine in Spokane, so why change things now? n Bangkok Thai • 101 N. Argonne Rd., Suite E, Spokane Valley • 315-9943 • Mon-Thu, 11 am-9 pm; Fri, 11 am-10 pm; Sat, noon-10 pm; Sun, noon-9 pm

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JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 39

THE NEW

FOOD | UPDATE

Steaks, burgers and pasta are the standbys at Crickets. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CRICKETS RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR

424 Sherman Ave. | Coeur d’Alene 208-765-1990

B

efore there was an Applebee’s or Denny’s — family-friendly places offering a bit of this and that — Coeur d’Alene had Crickets. Steaks, salads, pasta, burgers, seafood, sandwiches, appetizers and anything else you’d want. Something for everyone, seven days a week, lunch through late night, with a full bar (best Bloody Marys in town) and four distinct dining areas: the main restaurant, a front and back patio and lounge area. But if that was all, Crickets wouldn’t have been around since 1985 as a Sherman Avenue fixture. The economic roller coaster, a 2011 change of ownership and even

recent road closures for nearby McEuen Park construction haven’t slowed it down. It’s still a great place to take the family, relax after ArtWalk or meet the gang for red beer and crispy calamari, pizza or its trademark oysters, which are always fresh. Look for weekly specials and a new menu rolling out this month. Or stop by on Wednesday nights for an acoustic open jam session from 6 to 9 pm, and dig the scene that’s been a big part of downtown Coeur d’Alene for nearly 30 years. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

LIGHTEN UP FOR SUMMER!

On Stands Now! With expanded coverage of health, news, parenting, cooking and more. Get your copy at hospitals, medical offices and select Inlander rack locations.

Now Serving at

159 S. Lincoln | 509.777.3900 steamplantspokane.com Dine with us and we’ll pay for your parking in our lot ½ block N. on Lincoln!

40 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

FOOD | SAMPLER

BAKERY PETIT CHAT VILLAGE BAKERY 9910 N. Waikiki Rd. | 468-2720 After three years of success baking bread in their Whitworth-area location and selling it in grocery stores, owners Brenda and Kevin Gerhart expanded their store in 2012. The spacious 2,000-square-foot dining area has booths, long tables and benches, bistro tables and comfortable chairs perfect for readers. The menu has been expanded, too. Petit Chat’s chocolate croissants ($3.50) have a semisweet chocolate interior and a light and flaky exterior. Their savory croissants ($4.75) are stuffed generously with Swiss cheese and thick-sliced ham. SWEET FROSTINGS BLISSFUL BAKESHOP 15 S. Washington St. | 242-3845 Everything about Sweet Frostings Blissful Bakeshop could be described with some sort of sugary adjective. When you walk in it feels like you’ve just entered The Food Network. Brightly colored walls, cute decor and bubbly workers put customers in a good mood while the amazingly delicious scent of the freshly made goodies makes mouths water.

The bakery, in the heart of the downtown Spokane, offers morning pastries, whoopie pies, cheesecakes and French macarons, along with a few signature items — like cake truffles (also called cake pops). SWEET DREAMS BAKERY 3131 N. Division St. | 747-6900 The bakery’s raison d’etre is wedding cakes, but nuptials aren’t the only reason to stop by: Deep, resonant chocolate frosting tops delicate chocolate cupcakes. Macaroons have a toasty sweet outer edge and a light, fluffy interior. The coconut frosting shot (yes, shot glasses full of frosting are available for purchase in the cupcake lounge) contains shreds of coconut saturated in the creamy flavor of coconut milk. Sweet Dreams owner and baker Susie Bowen is a self-confessed “ingredient snob” who uses only real vanilla, real sugar and whatever other non-artificial ingredients the recipes call for. LOVE @ FIRST BITE DESSERTS 11305 E. Sprague Ave. | 891-2501 We tried the Cookies & Cream — served every Wednesday at this Valley bakery — which contains crispy cookie bits baked into the cake, and we’ve got to say it’s our

favorite. Another popular treat, a gnarly chocolate mountain called the Chocolate Explosion, was actually born from a batch of cupcakes gone wrong. Composed of chocolate cake, toasted chocolate cake bits and a whole lotta ganache, this creation has gained a devoted following and can be enjoyed every Thursday. All cupcakes are $2.75 and they’re enormous (some would even say the biggest in town). Wash them down with a tall cup of black coffee, which is free depending on which day you visit, and you’re good to go. ROCKWOOD BAKERY 315 E. 18th Ave. | 747-8691 The Rockwood is less of a coffee shop and more of a community hub. Nestled in the neighborhood just east of Manito Park, the warm, open-air spot — stuffed with heavy wood tables and cozy chairs — is always a day brightener. It’s just one of those places that makes a beautiful day nicer and a rainy day cozier. And nothing we’ve eaten there is anything short of delicious. 

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The MAC has something for everyone.

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JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 41

Knock, knock...

Fright Night Ever wonder what would happen if nothing was illegal? BY MARYANN JOHANSON

M

aybe it’s implausible. Ten years from now, America is a veritable paradise: unemployment is at a mere 1 percent and crime is virtually nonexistent. And it’s all thanks to The Purge, an annual 12-hour free-for-all during which all crime, including murder, is legal. That’s the premise of The Purge, which doesn’t seem to quite hold up against human nature. Would a few hours every year be enough to satisfy the urges of the most violent among us and keep them in check for an entire year? Wouldn’t crimes of passion still be a problem? How could this possibly work in the real world? It’s entirely possible that it doesn’t actually work even in the world of The Purge. For we experience everything here — Purge Night 2022 — through the eyes and ears of the charming, all-American Sandin family, who live very sheltered lives in an upscale, gated suburban neighborhood. The news flows into their tastefully decorated McMansion via their TVs, broadcasting material that appears to be almost wholly under the purview of a leadership called the “New Founding Fathers,” espousing

42 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

a philosophy that could be called pious only in an Old Testament sort of way. Paradise America is under some form of fundamentalist Christian dictatorship, and if we can’t believe what we see on TV now, how likely is it that TV is telling the truth in this twisted 2022 USA? THE PURGE Plausible or not, with this Rated R conceit writer-director James Directed by James DeMonaco DeMonaco has found a prism Starring Ethan Hawke, Lena through which to do something Headey, Max Burkholder extraordinary with the genre. It’s the sort of thing horror movies should do but rarely manage: instead of indulging our baser natures, The Purge makes us question the human propensity for violence; instead of reveling in blood and gore, The Purge forces us to explore our relationship with violence, both as individuals and as a society. It also makes us look anew — and askance — at conventions of cinematic horror. Unlike other home-invasion flicks, which count on our overwhelming sympathy for the victims because what they are enduring is just so

wrong, that’s not a factor here. Not only is what happens to the nice, handsome, wealthy Sandins not random, it’s sanctioned. All horror movies assure us, on a deep, unspoken level, that it’s “OK” to enjoy the murder and mayhem they present us with, so it’s distinctly uncomfortable when a film explicitly states: “This is allowed. This is permitted. This is even good and decent and patriotic.” The Purge is hardly a deeply thoughtful film, but there is some discussion among the Sandins about the difference between legality and morality, particularly between mom Mary (Lena Headey) and preteen son Charlie (Max Burkholder from Parenthood), whose typical pubescent poutiness in this world extends to not liking the idea of being able to kill people with the blessing — in this case literally — of the powers that be. And this is when The Purge starts to get really interesting, by adding layers of startling satire of America’s culture of violence. Purge Night is an extreme extrapolation of the peculiarly American notions of “security” and “self-defense” — the Purge is “a lawful outlet for American rage,” a TV announcer tells us, and it is “our duty as Americans” to participate or at least to support it (as the Sandins do). Dad James (Ethan Hawke) has earned the family fortune by selling home-security lockdown systems like the one that protects — supposedly — their own home. When James squawks that “things like this are not supposed to happen in our neighborhood,” it’s not just the bleat of a terrified victim clueless enough to believe that money and a nice house protect you from bad things. It’s part of the film’s direct confrontation with American violence and anger, privilege and delusion. 

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS THE INTERNSHIP

Two obsolete oldies find themselves without jobs, falling straight into an internship at Google with a shot at employment — that is if they prove themselves to be the best of the best amongst a mob of interns straight of out college. Now, they must compete against techsavvy, bright young people or face the rough waters of unemployment. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson star in a battle between old and young that will surely end in a comedic fiasco, hopefully proving that the aging generation hasn’t lost their pizzazz. (SM) Rated PG-13

FRANCES HA

Frances is a young New Yorker, hoping to apprentice at a dance company and follow her lifelong dreams. The problem? She’s not a dancer, and she doesn’t live in  New York. She has a best friend, but doesn’t really talk to her anymore. As her dreams and ideal life dwindle into dust, the world tells Frances she must face the cold hard truth of reality. Her next problem? She’s happy, and there’s nothing that’s going to stop that, even an impossible journey to obtain so much more life than she already has. (SM) Rated R

BLANCANIEVES

The story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves is about to get twisted, set in 1920s Seville, Spain, and focusing on the story of a female bullfighter. As a tribute to silent films and shot completely in black and white, we follow the story of a girl who never knew her mother, who was hated by an evil stepmother, and who followed in the footsteps of her valiant father after running away with a troop of dwarves to become a performer.  (SM) Rated PG-13

The Internship

IN THE HOUSE

A young, talented boy starts writing stories about what goes on behind the walls of his friend’s house. An estranged teacher picks up the work of the young student, encouraging the boy to write more with his wife’s encouragement. As the teacher and student grow in their writing together, questions begin to surface. What is real and what is just fantasy? What are the bounds of healthy preoccupation? This sophisticated comedy discusses the healthy bounds of obsession and passion, and where and when lines are crossed. At Magic Lantern (SM) Rated R

THE IRAN JOB

The documentary, directed by Till Schauder, follows an American basketball player, Kevin Sheppard, to Iran’s Super League where his team is both the newest and youngest in the league. They must make the playoffs, or the American will be shipped home. Along the way, he learns a lot more about Middle Eastern culture than he does about basketball. At Magic Lantern (AC) Not Rated

THE PURGE

Maybe it’s implausible. Ten years from now, America is a veritable paradise: Unemployment is at a mere 1 percent and crime is virtually nonexistent. And it’s all thanks to the Purge, an annual 12hour free-for-all during which all crime, including murder, is legal. But then a rich guy played by Ethan Hawke and his family are attacked by masked bandits and are on their own to fend for themselves because, hey, it’s The Purge. (MJ) Rated R

NOW PLAYING AFTER EARTH

So one day you’re out on a routine spacecraft journey with your dad and the next thing you know, you’ve catapulted onto an alien planet where giant beasts keep trying to eat you. Except the alien planet isn’t really alien at all. Rather, it’s Earth 1,000 years after humanity was forced to escape. So now you’re sitting here, your dad’s dying from injuries sustained on the crash landing onto this abandoned planet, and you have to man up and kick some butt before every living thing in 10 square miles eats you alive. Will Smith stars with his son, Jaden Smith. M. Night Shyamalan directs, so you know it’s going to get a little crazy. (SM) Rated PG-13.

THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT

DECEPTIVE PRACTICE: THE MYSTERIES AND MENTORS OF RICKY JAY

Ricky Jay started his magician’s apprenticeship at age 4, continuing the magic throughout his lifetime. Even the hardest audiences and the most difficult to impress have been flabbergasted at his work. But what about the real Ricky Jay? The guy who has bounced around between mentors, influences and mysteries? For those who are die-hard fans of Jay, this movie will provide insight into the man behind the curtain. For those who have never heard about Jay in your life, this movie will highlight the influence of one of the most talented performers in the universe. (SM) Not Rated ...continued on next page

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JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 43

FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING EPIC

Adv. Tix on Sale MAN OF STEEL Adv. Tix on Sale MONSTERS UNIVERSITY Adv. Tix on Sale WORLD WAR Z Adv. Tix on Sale MONSTERS UNIVERSITY IN REAL D 3D Adv. Tix on Sale WORLD WAR Z IN REAL D 3D

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44 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

It’s that time of the year when the garden patch of children’s summer movies begins to ripen for the picking — in 3D! You can brace yourself for a lot of tomfoolery, some wholesome family messaging and approximately three hundred dire situations in which quirky characters must work together to save the world. This time around, a teen falls into a mystical forest world where a battle between good and evil will decide the fate of the entire freaking universe. All bets are on, but we can assume that good’s going to win out with this one. (SM) Rated PG

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But who’s counting? The wildly successful film series about a team of men and women who love to drive fancy cars really fast and, oh, yeah, steal lots of money, takes on a Bondian feeling when FBI agent (the Rock) asks for their help in tracking down a stolen computer chip and the bad guys who took it. This entry also gives team leader Vin Diesel a second chance with Michelle Rodriguez, the love of his life who was “killed” a couple of films back. The action isn’t quite nonstop, as there’s some quiet talk and goofy banter. But when that action roars back, it’s breathtakingly exhausting. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE GREAT GATSBY

Will the fifth time be the charm? The fifth adaptation of the 1925 Fitzgerald novel (the others were in 1926, 1929, 1974, and 2000) has it over its predecessors because it sticks closest to the source material, in both storytelling and spirit, and because director Baz Luhrmann is a visionary stylist. He takes the tale of selfish, wealthy rich folks in the 1920s, most of whom think they deserve everything they want, casts it perfectly (Leo DiCaprio and his smile were made for the role of the mysterious Gatsby), then goes over the top with swooping 3D cameras, fast editing, and a nutzoid musical score. (ES) Rated PG-13

HANGOVER PART 3

We loved the first  Hangover  for the quirky adventures in Las Vegas. We sort of loved the sequel, Hangover Part 2, for the missing ears and jaunt through missing appendages and face tattoos. What sort of shenanigans is the gang going to get into this time in the third installment of the Hangover jamboree? There’s no wedding, and therefore no bachelor’s party, so there’s no saying what’s going to go down. All we know for sure is that there’s a journey to a mental hospital, a kidnapping, and the Wolfpack is back in action. (SM) Rated R

THE ICEMAN

Some guys get sneaky and play video games behind their family’s back. Some hide a drug and drinking habit. But Richard Kuklinski hid the biggest secret of all — he operated as a contract killer until his arrest in the ’80s. Biggest kick? His wife and daughter didn’t know about his penchant for sneaking out in the night and mercilessly murdering hundreds of people for the mob. Based on a real life story with real life people, take a theatrical sneak peak into the life of one of the

sneakiest and also deadliest dudes in the killing business. At Magic Lantern (SM) Rated R

IRON MAN 3

So, there’s this pretty obscure movie that a lot of you haven’t heard about. It’s called Iron Man and it really never got popular. They made a sequel, which didn’t do well in box offices either and definitely didn’t amass a huge fan base or anything. A third one is coming out this week. So, I guess, if you feel like it, go and see a movie that didn’t get big and support some struggling actors like Robert Downey Jr., Guy Pierce and Gwyneth Paltrow. The movie is about a man who makes a metal robot suit. There’s an evil villain. The guy has to save the world most of the time and stuff. We’re kidding, this thing is outrageous and, of course, very popular. (SM) PG-13

MUD

Two teenagers stumble across a ruggedly handsome fugitive (Matthew McConaughey) hiding in the Deep South from bounty hunters and the law. The boys decide to take matters into their own hands, making a pact to keep the dashing criminal hidden from hungry killers and help reunite him with his long lost love.  It’s nice to see McConaughey  continue his habit of appearing in movies that aren’t, by and large, romantic comedies. Let’s hope he keeps it up. (SM) Rated PG-13

NOW YOU SEE ME

It was only a matter of time before magicians figured out that illusions could be applied practically in the form of bank robbery. But Interpol and the FBI aren’t impressed with these magic tricks. Now, a battle royale breaks out between the cops and the magicians who steal for spectacle and sport. Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman gear up in this movie as magic trick debunker and bank’s financial backer. Jessie Eisenburg, Dave Franco, Isla Fisher and Mark Ruffalo sprinkle their acting talent throughout the movie as illusionists and the cops out to get them. (SM) PG-13

PEEPLES

First, Wade Walker crashes a family reunion without permission. Next, he shows up to the Peeples family’s fancy-shmancy

house in the Hamptons. After that, Wade asks Dad Peeples to marry the most precious and beautiful daughter out of the batch. Dad Peeples ain’t having nothin’ to do with that business. Not only is this a recipe for disaster, it’s also a recipe for a loving and quirky romantic comedy. Girls, drag your boyfriends to this one while he whines and complains all the way to the theater. Guys, prepare for some old-fashioned antics of love, as well as a cancerous growth spurred on by the complete inanity that is this movie. (SM) Rated PG-13 RETURNING

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES

A circus performer/motorcycle badass/ thief/new father (Ryan Gosling) turns to robbing banks to support his brand new baby son and chip-off-her-shoulder lover. A rookie, idealist cop (Bradley Cooper), complete with hopes and dreams, tries to stop the robberies in an attempt to move up the ranks in a corrupt police department. Who is right? Who is wrong? Does the love for your family, or rather, the love of the law win out in the end? Watch the 15-year-long journey of two people as their stories entangle, altering their lives in heavy ways. (SM) Rated R

RENOIR

Do you know what Americans like? Oil painting, pretentiousness, and the French.  Renoir, a period piece, follows Impressionist painter Renoir’s decline into the throes of old age, arthritis withering away his hands and geriatrics eating at his spirit. Renoir’s son has just returned from World War I injured and tired. Now, father and son must convalesce in the French countryside, where a beautiful, 15-year-old redheaded model revives both spirit and artistic talent. (SM) Rated R

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

Director J.J. Abrams has done what every Star Trek fan has been hoping for. He’s upped the ante on everything in the sequel to his 2009 reboot of the franchise. And he’s done so with an eye cocked in the direction of diehard fans, to whom he sends little shout-outs of old Trek references. He also spins a whopping good, action- and effects-filled tale of intrigue and attitudes (and relationships and photon torpedoes and even a cameo by a Tribble). (ES) Rated PG-13 

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he familiar underdog archetype of at his games (until women are banned from atsports movies is not lost within The Iran tending) but Sheppard also supports them as they Job. The documentary, directed by Till discuss their frustration with their government Schauder, follows an American basketball player, and its oppressive laws targeting women. Kevin Sheppard, to Iran’s Super League where The portrayal of Iran provided by the media his team is both the newest and youngand various politicians in video est in the league. They must make clips throughout the movie harshly The Iran Job the playoffs or the American will be juxtaposes these personal relationNot Rated shipped home. ships. In one scene President Bush Directed by Till Schauder But by halfway through the movie, warns Americans against the ever Starring Kevin Sheppard whether they make it or not has little familiar “axis of evil” from the TV consequence to your feelings about screen, in the next Sheppard gives the film. While the basketball thread may carry relationship advice to his teammates or bonds the plot, Sheppard’s relationships with those with a store owner over their shared love of Bob he meets while living in Iran substantiate the Marley. film. He is less of a basketball player than he is Calling himself “the journeyman,” Sheppard a bridge between cultures, genders and political has played basketball around the world, includparties. ing China and Israel. His brave pursuit to find Being the most likeable person on the common ground and friendship within a foreign planet might help Sheppard in that area. Many context is a testament to the power of connecting are drawn to Sheppard’s infectious charm and with, and understanding, the “other.” The Iran Job humor during his stay in Iran. In particular, his will not only have you empathizing with those friendship with three women reveals the struggles you’ve been told are your enemies, but remind and attitudes of the Iranian people. His physical you that something as seemingly insignificant as therapist Hilda and her two friends support him basketball can build a bridge across cultures. 

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Get Down in

Browne’s Elkfest continues to make us swoon By Inlander Staff

chris bovey ilustration

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 TERRIBLE BUTTONS Friday, 4:30 pm

Spokane’s own Terrible Buttons made quite a splash last year after landing on the Inlander’s Bands To Watch list, and they’re still going strong. The heavy, swaggering folk-rock band — which

has toured more than once in Alaska and has torn up the road from here to California —  will undoubtedly be showcasing plenty of the fresh new material from its upcoming record RUNT, which is due this July. (JORDAN SATTERFIELD)

AAN

Friday, 6:30 pm

It’s no wonder the last time Spokane heard Aan, it was opening for rock guitar virtuosos Built to Spill. Like BtS, Portland’s Aan makes music that’s complicated and layered: plinking guitars, march-

ing drums, howling and echoing vocals. It’s indie folk with a frantic pulse —  the kind of stuff you could listen to while you’re running along High Drive. And alongside a thousand or so of your Elkfest best friends, Aan makes music you can dance along to. (LEAH SOTTILE) ...continued on next page

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 47

“get down in browne’s,” continued...

Cave Singers

CAVE SINGERS

Friday, 8:30 pm Seattle band Cave Singers were part of the first wave of PNW folk revivalists back in the midaughts. Born from the ashes of a number of notable hardcore and punk bands, including Pretty Girls Make Graves and Cobra High, their high-lonesome campfire harmonies have matured over the course of four critically acclaimed albums. Their latest, Naomi, finds them in a bit sunnier mood than previous efforts, blending their signature moody folk with a more fleshedout, electric sound. Have no fear, though — their headlining set Friday night will be chock-full of intimate sing-alongs and delightful melodies. (GAWAIN FADELEY)

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 THE LONGNECKS

Saturday. 2 pm Perennial electric blues favorites The Longnecks open Saturday’s festivities with their rock-solid take on true-blue, beer-soaked blues rock. Playing a mix of originals and classic covers, they’ve kept many a dance floor packed with shaking hips and spilled beverages since 2007. Get Saturday started right with righteous guitar playing and airtight grooves from these local veterans. (GF)

FLYING SPIDERS

Saturday, 4 pm Yes, local hip-hop collective Flying Spiders are a band, but they’re also a giant, static community of respected and eclectic Spokane musicians. Their smooth samples and booming live percussion have been drawing crowds for years, and what better place to see them than Elkfest? (JS)

Flying Spiders

48 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

The Grizzled Mighty

THE GRIZZLED MIGHTY

Saturday, 6 pm Here’s why we love the Grizzled Mighty: they play rock music with balls. The Seattle duo — Ryan Granger on guitar, Whitney Petty on drums — makes a huge sound for being just two people. The Grizzled Mighty’s songs are full of badass, distorted guitar solos and cymbal slamming. They’re probably the heaviest band at Elkfest this year, and will be a welcome sound for those looking to headbang a little. The Grizzled Mighty does not f--- around. (LS)

BATTLEME

Saturday, 7:30 pm If you’re like me and can’t resist the antics of Jax Teller and the Sons of Anarchy crew, then you’ve heard Battleme, the musical moniker of singer Matt Drenik. Several of Battleme’s songs have been on the show’s soundtrack, including a cover of Neil Young’s “Hey Hey, My My” — a risky song to cover that surprisingly turned out totally awesome. The rest of Drenik’s work is acoustic songs about everything from growing old to fighting in the car. It’s not just heart-on-his-sleeve music — Drenik serves up his emotions on a silver platter. (LS)

THE BUILDERS AND THE BUTCHERS

Saturday, 9 pm The dreary, evocative folk rock band from Portland known as The Builders and the Butchers have made their fair share of fans in Spokane. While other bands of a similar nature come from a mindset that is contrived or phony, The Builders’ jaded yet accomplished folk strikes a nerve around these parts. Though it’s not fair to compare them, The Builders possess a manic spirit reminiscent of experimental rockers Man Man and the alcoholic shanties of fellow Portlanders

The Builders and the Butchers

Folkinception

Bryan John Appleby

The Decemberists. The Builders also have a new record hitting shelves in July, so be prepared to get a taste of what we can expect when it washes ashore. (JS)

— drumming on the body of the guitar — and his native country’s didgeridoo to create his signature sound, and audiences have been eating it up since his arrival stateside. A festival favorite, he’s graced the stage at NW Folklife, the Washington State Fair, and Seattle’s Triple Door. If you’re a fan of instrumental guitar music, a la Rodrigo y Gabriela or Tommy Emmanuel, this is a can’t-miss set. (GF)

SUNDAY, JUNE 9 FOLKINCEPTION

Sunday, 2 pm The fact that their name features a musical genre gives you some immediate insight into this Spokane-based acoustic act. With several vocalists chipping in on heartwarming harmonies, Folkinception adds a thick mix of piano, strings (including cello!) for a sound that can get loud if it needs to. You’ll be able to dance to it, if that’s what you’re wondering. (MIKE BOOKEY)

THE RUSTICS

Sunday, 4 pm Emerging from a six-month creative bender in Hawaii, this co-ed folk duo seems poised for big things. With an intimate sound and undeniable chemistry, Ryan Miller and Mackie Hockett (of Old Bear Mountain) fill the stage with their gorgeous collaborative harmony and songwriting. They’ve played only a handful of shows, so local music fans are hungry for more, and their set Sunday will surely introduce them to a wider audience. (GF)

BLAKE NOBLE

Sunday, 6 pm A singular talent with a unique take on a common instrument, Seattle-by-way-of-Australia multiinstrumentalist Blake Noble plays what’s called ‘percussive guitar,’ using the natural resonance of his 12-string to conjure sounds heard nowhere else. He combines a heavy-handed picking attack

Blake Noble

BRYAN JOHN APPLEBY

Sunday, 8 pm Maybe it’s fate or just damn good planning, but Seattle-based folk musician Bryan John Appleby will likely start his Sunday set just as the sun begins to set. The cloudy pink-and-orange sky would be the perfect backdrop to his lush arrangements and melodic play, which are typically just this side of uplifting but toy with melancholy. If Appleby’s previous record, the terrific Fire on the Vine, is any indication, he could very well put the entire crowd into one big, communal trance. Plus it’s a solo show, which means we get the man all to ourselves. (JS)

PICKWICK

Sunday, 9 pm A couple years ago, this was just another bearded, folky Seattle act. No more. Pickwick has hit its stride after adopting a soulful (actual, real, oldschool soul music) sound that combines bouncy, echoey guitar licks with the buttery vocals of frontman Galen Disston. The band released its debut LP, Can’t Talk Medicine, earlier this year and has been gaining the sort of critical praise its accessible sound and adorable stage presence truly deserves. (MB) n Elkfest • June 7-9 • The Elk • 1931 W. Pacific Ave. • Free • All-ages • wedonthaveone.com

Pickwick

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We Came As Romans

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n 2008, the members of We Came as Romans knew they were at a crossroads. Their debut EP Dreams was either going to get the band off the ground, or the band was going to crash and burn, and the group members would get on with their lives. It did what it was supposed to. And these days, that sort of uncertainty doesn’t surround We Came as Romans anymore. With two successful full-length albums, 2009’s To Plant a Seed and 2011’s Understanding What We’ve Grown to Be, they’ll release their third, Tracing Back Roots, next month. In fact, the metalcore band now grounds its entire existence in certainty — as a band, but also as they preach happiness and selfassuredness in their songs. “We had a really good start with To Plant a Seed,” guitarist Joshua Moore said in a recent phone interview. “But once you start, you have to sustain and you have to be moving forward.” That album was about establishing themselves, he says. “It was our first full length, and we had to, I guess, really appeal to people. ... And with Understanding What We’ve Grown to Be, we really focused more on establishing a sound that is our band, that if someone were to hear it and not be able to see what was playing on the iPod, they would hear it and say ‘Oh, that’s We Came as Romans. I know their sound.’ ” The album carries forward many of the stylistic elements of the two earlier releases. The group employs the tag team of gravelly screamed lyrics from vocalist Dave Stephens and Kyle Pavone’s smoothly sung vocals. It’s a mix of mayhem and melody, rumbling between grinding, lower-register guitar parts and slightly lighter, more melodic sections.

What also defines We Came as Romans is the positive messages in their songs — something that’s fairly rare in the metalcore/ aggressive rock genres. Their message starts at the album title. “[Understanding What We’ve Grown to Be is] about figuring out how to be happy with the life that you’ve chosen, trying to be the person that you want to be and figuring out how to be happy with that and how to retain that happiness, how to not constantly be searching for a different thing that’s going to make you happy based on the day of the week,” Moore says. “You need to figure out how to be happy with your life, not live it day by day, trying to see how the days go. It’s about making solid changes in your life and really realizing, as the title says, understanding the person that you are, who you’re growing to be and who you are at that moment.” Moore said he has no doubts that fans of We Came as Romans recognize the positive messages in the songs, even if the band’s aggressive style of music might suggest the dark issues the lyrics seek to resolve. “To our fans, I think the lyrics are something really important,” he says. “I think that’s part of the reason why they really grab onto the band and really stick and support us. I think that they kind of find a breath of fresh air in the lyrics, something different than a lot of bands are doing. And I think it’s really important in teenagers’ lives.” n We Came as Romans with Like Moths to Flames, Upon a Burning Body, Crown the Empire, Set It Off and Ice Nine Kills • Thu, June 13, at 6 pm • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • $16.50 • All-ages • ticketweb.com

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TRIBUTE ONE MORE TIME

J = the inlander RECOMMENDs this show J = All Ages Show

Thursday, 6/6

Arbor Crest Winery (927-9463), Stephanie Hatzinikolis Big City Saloon (474-0579), DJ Fusion Bigfoot Pub, DJ Dave Bucer’s (208-596-0887), Open Jazz Jam Cellar, All That Jazz Coeur d’Alene Casino, PJ Destiny Cruisers (208-773-4706), Anita Royce Daley’s Cheap Shots, Copper Mountain Band Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos J THE Hop!, Loss Monstarz, Whurlwind Entertainment Iron Horse (CdA), Phoenix Jones Radiator, Jesse Weston Trio J Laguna Café, Just Plain Darin LeftBank Wine Bar, Truck Mills Marquee, MCSquared Monarch Mountain Coffee (208265-9382), Open mic Moon Time, Alex Nawman Big Band O’Shay’s, Open mic Phat House, The Tone Collaborative Red Rooster Coffee (202-9138), Open mic Roadhouse, Sammy Eubanks Splash (208-765-4000), Steve Denny Swamp, DJ Aphrodisiac The Viking (315-4547), Nate Ostrander Ugly Bettie’s, Real Life Rockaz Zola, Cruxie

Friday, 6/7

Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn Big City Saloon (474-0579), DJ Fusion Blue Spark, DJ Mark Thomas Bolo’s (891-8995), Nova Brooklyn Deli & Lounge (835-

52 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

W

hy would you go to a Daft Punk tribute concert? Because electronic crowds are kinky. Because we all know you secretly jam to “Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger” when you brush your teeth. Because Daft Punk has rocked the electronic scene for the past 20 years, and they’re getting cooler and cooler by the moment with new titles like “Get Lucky” and “Doin’ It Right.” With local DJ Daethstar — who has rocked the dark-room-and-neon-glow-stick scene for a while now — opening, come armed with tubes of black-light paint and an appreciation for the nerdiest electro-rock in the area. — SARAH MUNDS One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk featuring Daethstar • Sun, Jun 9 at 8:30 pm • Knitting Factory • 911 W. Sprague Ave • $10 • All-ages • 244-3279

ROCK RED LINE CHEMISTRY

4177), Starlite Motel Bucer’s (208-596-0887), Far Far Mountaineer Carlin Bay Resort (208-6677314), Scorpius Carr’s Corner, The Cold Hard Cash Show Cellar, Brad Perry, Max Daniels Trio Clover (487-2937), Paul Grove Coeur d’Alene Casino, Karma’s Circle, Kosh Coldwater Creek Wine Bar (208263-6971), Ron Kieper Jazz Trio Country Club (208-676-2582), The Ryan Larsen Band Cruisers (208-773-4706), Anita Royce Curley’s (208-773-5816), Protocol J Elk Public House (363-1973), Elkfest (see story on page 47) feat. Terrible Buttons, Aan, The Cave Singers Fedora Pub, Flying Mammals

Fizzie Mulligans, Slow Burn Gateway Marina (208-689-3902), Triple Shot Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos Grande Ronde Cellars (4558161), Brent Edstrom Jazz Trio J the Hop!, Vultra, One Fall, Framework, Freak System, Crytikal Mass Hot Rods (534-4061), DJ Dave Impulse (242-7000), DJ Ramsin Iron Horse (CdA), Kozmik Dreamzz Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy LeftBank Wine Bar (315-8623), Stephanie Hatzinikolis Marquee, Likes Girls, MCSquared Max at Mirabeau (922-6252), Cliff Park Mezzo Pazzo Wine Bar, Maxie Ray Mills J Mootsy’s, Diamond Speedboat, Drag Like Pull, Death By Pirates nYne, DJ Mayhem Pend d’Oreille Winery (208-265-

T

here were so many great things about 1990s rock ‘n’ roll. And yet for every great thing, there seems to have been a so-so thing, or even a bad thing, that modern music can’t seem to get rid of. Case in point: rap-metal. Please die forever. Hard rockers Red Line Chemistry formed after the decade was over, and evoke a version of the style of rock that dominated the airwaves in the 1990s. If you’re the type of fella who is known to rock a Stone Temple Pilots CD while you iron your collection of Tapout tees, or the sort who has consoled your broken heart with Puddle of Mudd’s “She Hates Me,” then you’ll be among friends at this show. — LEAH SOTTILE Red Line Chemistry with Gemini Syndrome and Thirion • Sat, June 8, at 7:30 pm • Knitting Factory • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • $14 • All-ages • 244-3279

8545), Steve Neff Phat House, Pamela Benton Red Lion Hotel at the Park (326-8000), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley Red Lion River Inn (328-9526), Chris Rieser and The Nerve Roadhouse, Luke Jaxon Shop, DJ Wax808 Silver Fox, The Usual Suspects Soulful Soups & Spirits, DJ Deuce Splash (208-765-4000), Steve Denny Splash (208-765-4000), Shiner Swamp, Swampfest feat. Flying Spiders, Benny Blanco The Viking (315-4547), Stepbrothers Twelve String Brewing Co. (9908622), SpoCats Ugly Bettie’s, Sweat Shop Union CD Release feat. Mark Shirtz

Satuday, 6/8

315 Martini Bar, Maxie Ray Mills Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn Big City Saloon (474-0579), DJ Fusion Blue Spark, DJ Darkside Som Bolo’s (891-8995), Nova Bucer’s (208-596-0887), Justin Lantrip Carlin Bay Resort (208-6677314), Scorpius Cellar, Max Daniels Trio J Center, Groove Troopers 2 feat. DJs Snuggs, Heavyweight, Beauflexx and others Chaps (624-4182), Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston Clover (487-2937), Evan Denlinger Coeur d’Alene Casino, Karma’s Circle, Kosh Coeur d’Alene Cellars (208-6642336), Steven Harris

Coldwater Creek Wine Bar (208263-6971), Devon Wade Country Club (208-676-2582), The Ryan Larsen Band Curley’s (208-773-5816), Protocol J Elk Public House (363-1973), Elkfest (see story on page 47) feat. The Longnecks, Flying Spiders, The Grizzled Mighty, Battleme, The Builders and the Butchers Fedora Pub, Flying Mammals Fizzie Mulligans, Slow Burn Gateway Marina (208-689-3902), Triple Shot

get listed!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. J THE Hop!, Pest, True Justice, Krown Royal, Spindlem So Sicc Northwest, Daniel Stickney, Epik Impulse (242-7000), DJ Ramsin Iron Horse (CdA), Kozmik Dreamzz Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy J Knitting Factory, Red Line Chemistry (see story on facing page), Gemini Syndrome, Thirion La Rosa Club (208-255-2100), Open mic LeftBank Wine Bar (315-8623), Charles Tappa & Fly Right Lightning Bar, The Usual Suspects J Luxe Coffeehouse, Union Street Marquee, Likes Girls, MCSquared

EASTERN

WASHINGTON

Max at Mirabeau (922-6252), Cliff Park nYne, DJs C-Mad, Hype Phat House, Moksha World Fusion, Spokane Taiko, The Yes! Reflex, B Radicals, SpoFlow Red Lion River Inn (328-9526), Chris Rieser and The Nerve Roadhouse, Luke Jaxon J Rocket Market (343-2253), Ron Greene Saddle Inn (624-1228), Bobby Bremer Band J Scoop (535-7171), Tina & Her Pony J Shop, Tommy G Splash (208-765-4000), Steve Denny Splash (208-765-4000), Shiner Ugly Bettie’s, DJ One

Sunday, 6/9

Arbor Crest Winery (927-9463), Bakin’ Phat Cellar, Steve Ridler Coeur d’Alene Casino, Echo Elysium Daley’s Cheap Shots, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J Elk Public House (363-1973), Elkfest (see story on page 47) feat. Folkinception, Rustics, Blake Noble, Bryan John Appleby, Pickwick J Geno’s (487-9541), Eddie Haskell Jazz Trio J Knitting Factory, One More Time (Daft Punk Tribute) (see story on facing page), DJ Daethstar Marquee, Likes Girls, DJ D3vin3

UNIVERSITY

Monday, 6/10

Blue Spark, Open mic J Calypsos Coffee (208-6650591), Open mic Eichardt’s, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE Hop!, Thou Shall Kill, Funeral Age Red Room Lounge, Bakin’ Phat Rico’s (332-6566), Open mic Soulful Soups & Spirits, DJ Fusion Ugly Bettie’s, Open mic

Tuesday, 6/11

Cellar, TC Tye J Chairs Coffee (340-8787), Open mic Kelly’s Irish Pub (208-667-1717), Powell Brothers Rico’s (332-6566), The Underground Blues Band J Rocket Market (343-2253), Kari Marguerite J Shop, Dave McRae The Viking (315-4547), AG/CP

Wednesday, 6/12 Bistro on Spruce (208-664-1774), Truck Mills Blue Spark, DJ Darkside Som Cellar, Ron Criscione Eichardt’s, Charley Packard

Fedora Pub, Kosh Fizzie Mulligans, Kicho J Geno’s (487-9541), Open mic J the Hop!, Serianna, With Life in Mind, Adaliah, Leaders, Verbera, Hexxus Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy JJ’s Grill (467-4267), Chris Rieser and The Nerve Marquee, Likes Girls, DJ D3vin3 Mezzo Pazzo Wine Bar, Evan Denlinger Phat House, Clipper Anderson, John Hamar, Kevin Woods, Mike Miller J Revel77 (280-0518), Chelsey Heidenreich Roadhouse, Last Chance Band Sullivan Scoreboard (891-0880), Cliff Park Sundown Saloon (208-765-6585), Sam Platts and the Kootenai Three

Coming Up…

J Knitting Factory, We Came as Romans (see story on page 50), Set it Off, Ice Nine Kills, Like Moths to Flames, Upon a Burning Body, Crown the Empire on June 13 Knitting Factory, Flying Mammals CD Release feat. Goodnight Venus, The Static Tones, BBBBandits and more on June 14 Riverfront Park, BOBFest feat. 12 local high school bands on June 15 Center, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Bass Drum of Death on June 16 Bing Crosby Theater, Matthew Sontag CD Release feat. The Lion Oh My on June 21

PRESENTS

ROAD TRIP T O C R E AT I V E AUTONOMY an evening with

Saddle Inn (624-1228), The Two Dudes Splash (208-765-4000), Steve Denny Ugly Bettie’s, DJ Dave Zola, The Bucket List

Todd McFarlane 

From his humble beginnings at Eastern Washington University to budding baseball player to comic book artist and business entrepreneur extraordinaire, Todd McFarlane has a wealth of experience in the world of entertainment. Hear from the Spawn creator as he returns to the Northwest for this special speaking and autograph engagement. • $15 (includes limited-edition Spawn comic book with EWU Grad special cover) • Space is limited – RSVP today to alumni.ewu.edu/mcfarlane FREE for EWU Students

Only EWU students with a current Eagle Card ID are admitted free. Advance registration is required and IDs will be scanned at the door.

For information: EWU Office of Alumni 509.359.4550

JUNE 14, 2013

7-8 P.M. Speaking engagement 8-8:30 P.M.  Autograph session   Red Lion Hotel at the Park – Spokane 303 W. North River Drive

music | venues 315 restaurant • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 AVENUE PIZZARIA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 BaBy Bar • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 tHe Belltower • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 Bing CrosBy tHeater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BigFoot PuB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 Blue sPark • 15 S. Howard St. • 838-5787 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 Carr’s Corner • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 tHe Cellar • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 tHe Center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 tHe CHeCkerBoard Bar • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 Coeur d’alene Casino • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 daley’s CHeaP sHots • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 eiCHardt’s • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 Fedora PuB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 Fizzie Mulligan’s • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 Fox tHeater • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 giBliano BrotHers • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 tHe HoP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 iron Horse • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 JoHn’s alley • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 Jones radiator • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 knitting FaCtory • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 laguna CaFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 Marquee • 522 W. Riverside Ave • 838-3332 Mezzo Pazzo wine Bar • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 Moon tiMe • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 nortHern quest Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 nyne • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 o’sHay’s • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W, Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 roadHouse Country roCk Bar • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 sergio’s • 825 W. Riverside Ave. • 7472085 tHe sHoP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 soulFul souPs & sPirits • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 tHe swaMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 zola • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 53

MUSIC LIKE A FINE WINE

Tony Bennett only gets better with age. Today he sounds at least as good as he did more than 50 years ago when his hits first starting coasting the radio waves. With more than a half-century of performance behind him, there is little left to say about the 86-year-old crooner. Bennett’s career is perhaps best defined in numbers: 16 Grammy Awards, two Emmy Awards and more than 50 million records sold worldwide. — JEFF RUTHERFORD Tony Bennett • Thu, June 13 at 7:30 pm • $86-$151 • All-ages • Pend Oreille Pavilion at Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-6700

get listed!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

54 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

PARADE Pride

Since last year’s Pride parade and celebration, Spokane’s LGBTQ community has had some things to celebrate — namely the passage of a same-sex marriage law in the state last November. This year, OutSpokane is honoring this societal progress with a week of events culminating in Saturday’s parade through downtown Spokane. But Pride Week features other events, too, including a cruise on Lake Couer d’Alene, a Queer Prom, a comedy night and more. Visit outspokane.com for a full schedule. — MIKE BOOKEY 22nd Annual Pride Parade • Sat, June 8 at noon • Downtown Spokane • outspokane.com

EVENT EXPERIENCE DINOSAURS

There are few downsides to living in the year 2013, one being the lack of dinosaurs. Whether collecting little figures of the ancient creatures or obsessively watching Jurassic Park, some of us consider ourselves pretty crazy about these long-extinct, giant reptiles. When Discover the Dinosaurs passes through town, take your dino obsession to the next level by riding animatronic beasts, going on a scavenger hunt and viewing incredibly detailed, life-size replicas. Kids also have a chance to enjoy the fun-filled, hands-on event, which offers carnival-like attractions — KARA STERMER Discover the Dinosaurs • Fri, June 7-Sun, June 9; times vary each day • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • $12-$20 • 279-7007 • discoverthedinosaurs.com

VISUAL ARTs HIP TYPE

It’s possible that putting on a typography show at a motorcycle shop is just an excuse for creating a kick-ass poster. But with work from 10 of the area’s most prominent and innovative young designers and artists — including Jesse Pierpoint, Joel Barbour and Karli Ingersoll — the Blackletter Typography Show is sure to be more than that, even for folks who don’t care about lettering and typefaces. There also will be beer, with money from drinks and poster sales going to local refugee nonprofit Global Neighborhood. — LISA WAANANEN Blackletter Typography Show • Fri, June 7 at 7 pm • Free • STEX Motorsports • 123 E. Sprague Ave. • 474-1456

CELEBRATION PARK CENTENNIAL

One of the best parts of living in the Inland Northwest, as many of us know, is the great variety of outdoor activities available just outside our back door, including exploring nature at local state parks. This weekend, join a celebration of Washington State Parks and Recreation’s 100th birthday at an all-day party at Riverside State Park. The Spokane Tribe will lead a blessing of the park, and visitors can participate in hikes, geocaching, a bike rodeo, or a whitewater rafting trip down the river. It’s also a Discovery Pass “free day.” — CHEY SCOTT Centennial Celebration • Sat, June 8 from 11 am-6 pm • Free, except whitewater rafting ($49) • Riverside State Park, Bowl & Pitcher • 4427 N. Aubrey L. White Parkway • riversidestatepark.org • 465-5064

events | calendar

Comedy

Stand-Up Comedy Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (4837300) Yearbook Live improv comedy show based on audience suggestions of yearbook “sentiments.” June 7-28, Fridays at 8 pm. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) Short Stacks Blue Door Theatre Players try out new skits or ideas on the audience, including stand-up, sketch, music and improv comedy. June 7 at 10 pm. (First Fridays of the month). $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045)

Safari Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre. com (747-7045) Live Comedy Live stand-up comedy shows every Sunday at 9 pm. Free. Goodtymes Bar and Grill, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) Bada Bing! Live stand-up comedy show featuring Dwight Slade, Kelsey Cook and Kane Holloway. June 15 at 8 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) Jeff Dunham Live comedy show. June 20 at 8:30 pm. $30-$60. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. northernquest.com (481-6700)

JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 55

relationships

Advice Goddess Ennui Go!

My girlfriend and I love each other, but we feel we’re becoming numb to hearing it from each other. We’ve been together three years, so I assume that time is what’s put a damper on the “three little words.” I suggested that when we are about to say “I love you,” we come up with something more personal and meaningful. This, sadly, was difficult and lasted about a day. Now we’re back to expressing affection the rote way. Yes, we could have a amy alkon bigger problem, but beneath this is a bigger worry — that —Same-Old, Same-Old the relationship will get old, too.  The pressure to be original in love can be pretty trying. Imagine Shakespeare tentatively mumbling to a woman “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” and hearing back, “Ugh, Will…for the third time this week?” Likewise, the first time you heard “I love you” from your girlfriend, you probably thought, “Wow, she loves me! Hot damn!” But once a relationship gets going, sometimes “I love you!” wells up from the bottom of the heart and sometimes from the need to say something a little more feel-good than “Gotta get you off the phone so I can clean up this cat vomit.” Sometimes, one partner is needy and says it constantly so they can hear it back constantly. (If not for somebody being there in their life to respond, they’d be standing for days on end yelling it into the Grand Canyon.) So, yes, it’s probably time for a little rationing of “I love you” if it’s become shorthand for everything short of “pass the salt.” But there’s actually research by Dr. Sara Algoe and others showing that expressions of appreciation seem to keep a relationship alive, keeping partners from taking each other for granted and feeling taken for granted. This doesn’t necessarily require blithering on in detail about your partner’s great qualities, especially not when you both know what you’re really saying with a laughing “I love you!” is “You are simply the greatest for coming over and resting your boobs on my head while I’m stuck writing these boring reports.” Of course, one of the best ways to make “I love you” more meaningful is by showing it — ideally, at least once a day — just by thinking about what would make each other happier and less stressed and doing it. This could involve small kindnesses like getting up to refill your girlfriend’s drink when you’re eating dinner or somewhat bigger (and ickier) kindnesses like telling her to stay put while you clean up after her puking cat. Any guy can go through the romantic motions — say “I love you” on Valentine’s Day with $50 worth of chocolate truffles and a suspiciously funerary flower arrangement — but it takes a truly loving guy to say it on a random Tuesday with a rag full of cat vomit.

Getting Over The Frump

Is there a nice way to tell your girlfriend that you really don’t like what she wears to come hang out with your friends? My girlfriend can look so cute in certain outfits, but whenever we’re seeing my friends, it seems she dresses more conservatively, and often, she really looks kind of frumpy. I’m not looking for her to look like a stripper. I just want her to look as good as she does when she’s out with her friends or we’re out together. —Holding Back A woman can go a little too far in trying to avoid crossing the border from sexy to slutty — all the way over to “sturdy Amish woman about to churn butter.” Chances are, your girlfriend thinks she’s protecting you — keeping you from looking bad in the eyes of your friends or from worrying that she’s covertly shopping for your replacement. Unfortunately, women don’t always understand the workings of competition between men. Basically, it’s good to get the girl. It’s even better if your guy friends and any passing male strangers hate you a little for it. To get your girlfriend to dress a little more “Mad Men” than Ma from “Little House on the Prairie,” pose a question to her with a compliment folded in: “Hey, can I ask you something? You dress so cute when it’s just us hanging out. It seems like you feel the need to dress more conservatively when we’re out with my friends.” Explain that she really doesn’t have to do that, and add, “I just want everyone to see how gorgeous you are.” The compliment will rise to the top, and she should get the message: You aren’t asking her to to wear something that will have drunks trying to slip dollar bills in her bra, just something more in keeping with a night likelier to end in a game of poker than a plague of prairie locusts. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

events | calendar

Community

Summer Reading SignupKids are invited to sign up to track the minutes or books they read over the summer, and when they finish 15 hours or 15 books will receive a free book from the summer giveaway collection. Any Spokane Public Library branch, more info at spokanelibrary.org (444-5336) Summer Parkways Volunteers Volunteers are needed to help set up, tear down and monitor intersections during the Summer Parkways block party in the Manito/Comstock neighborhood, on June 19, from 6-9 pm. Visit summerparkways.com for information. CASA Program VolunteersVolunteers (at least 21 years old) are needed to independently investigate children who are alleged to have been abused, neglected or abandoned and make recommendations to the court. Next training session is July 10. For more information call 477-2469. Bad Science Friday“Dowsing and Dead People”-themed activities on the ideomotor effect. June 7 from 10 am-6 pm. $7-$10. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane. org (443-5669) Discover the DinosaursInteractive dinosaur exhibit featuring lifesize habitat replicals, a dino dig, rides, kids activities and more. June 7-9. Fri noon-9 pm, Sat 10 am-8 pm, Sun 10 am-7 pm. $15-$20. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. discoverthedinosaurs.com Parade of Paws10th annual 2- or 4-mile dog walk benefiting the Spokane Humane Society. June 8 at 10 am. No entrance fee; participants are asked to collect pledges from friends and family. Spokane Humane Society, 6607 N. Havana St. spokanehumanesociety.org (467-5235) Demo Day and Wellness FairA community information fair offering live demonstrations, resources, kids activities and more. June 8 from 10 am-2 pm. Free. Fire Station No. 92, 3801 E. Farwell Rd. (466-4602) Contra DanceGender neutral contra dance, hosted by the Spokane Folklore Society and featuring music by Ebb and Flow. June 8 from 7-10 pm. $5. Westminster UCC, 411 S. Washington St. spokanefolklore.org (747-2640) Science CaféCreate science projects using food. June 11 from 3:30-5 pm. $10. Open to all girls grades K-12. Girl Scout Program Center, 1404 N. Ash St. gsewni.org (800-827-9478) Feed the NeighborhoodFree meals provided every Wednesday from 4:30-6 pm. Free. (Volunteers also needed to cook and serve meals) 7th and Catherine Ave., Post Falls, Idaho. (208-661-5166) Skytona Trike RaceAnnual fundraiser benefiting Cancer Patient Care. June 15. Big Sky’s Tavern, 5510 N. Market St. bigskystavern.com (489-2073) Mobius MondayThe community is invited to explore Mobius for free at a once-monthly event. June 17 from 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (321-7208) Summer Parkways Community members are invited to walk, cycle, skate or jog a four-mile course closed to cars, featuring booths, entertain-

ment and more. June 19 from 6-9 pm. Free. Comstock/Manito neighborhood, Spokane. summerparkways. com

Etc.

A Course in MiraclesTheological study group. Thursdays at 7 pm. Free. 1042 W. Mill Ave., Ste. 207 Coeur d’Alene. (208-660-7687) Country Swing LessonsLearn country-style swing dancing with The Swinging Boots. Thursdays from 7-9 pm. $5. The Roadhouse Country Rock Bar, 20 N. Raymond Rd. (413-1894) Argentine Tango LessonsLessons for newcomers are free on Thursdays at 6:45 pm. Club Corazon, 2117 E. 37th Ave. spokanetango.com (688-4587) Kalispel Boat TourChartered boat trip hosted by Francis Cullooyah, Kalispel Tribe elder, and author Jane Fritz on the Kalispel’s traditional way of life on Lake Pend Oreille. June 6 at 5:30 pm. $30. Leaves from Kramer Marina, 46820 Hwy. 200, Hope, Idaho. (208265-8323) Fire on the RunwayLocal firefighters and models walk in an annual fundraiser fashion show event for the Red Cross. June 7 from 7-10 pm. $50. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. redcross.org (326-3330) Downton Abbey Tea PartyThis summer fundraiser for the JACC features a croquet tournament, card games, dancing and an Englishthemed tea. June 8 at 2 pm. $35-$250. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) Vintage Bike SwapOpen to all bikes from the 1800s-1980s. June 8 from 9 am-3 pm. The Swamp, 1904 W. Fifth Ave. (458-2337) Ties to the LandLandowners in Pend Oreille and Bonner counties can learn how to transfer land ownership to family members in a WSU Extension workshop. June 8 from 9 am-5 pm. $35. CREATE Arts Center, 900 W. Fourth St., Newport, Wash. forestry. wsu.edu (208-683-3168) Plastic Model Build-OffPlastic model build-off contest hosted by the Spokane Scale Auto Builders, Spokane Chapter of the International Plastic Modelers Society. June 8 from 9 am-2 pm. $1-$5. White Elephant, 12614 E. Sprague Ave. spokanescaleautobuilders.com (768-1603) Women Warriors Retreat Fundraiser A fundraiser supporting the Women Warriors Retreat, hosted by the Cowgirl Co-op for female combat veterans, including a horseback ride, catered lunch and concert by Juni Fisher. June 9, events starting at 10:30 am. $15-$65. Cowgirl Co-op, 20424 N. Dunn Rd. cowgirlco-op.com (9361069) Inland Northwest Freethought Society Secular social group, meets on the second Sundays of the month at 2 pm. Free. Shari’s, 320 N. Sullivan Rd. infreethought.org (216-4788) Spokane Moves to Amend the Constitution The local activist group meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. Next meeting is June 11 at 6:30 pm. Free. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Ft. George Wright Dr. (844-1776) Data for DollarsLearn to use

census data for grant writing in a workshop teaching where to find detailed socioeconomic data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau. June 11 from noon-1 pm. EWU, Senior Hall, Rm. 306, Cheney Campus. (359-2419) Long Island Medium Teresa Caputo The star of TLC’s “Long Island Medium” will talk about her ability to communicate with the dead. June 14 at 8 pm. $36-$85. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) An Eclectic CollectionArts and crafts show featuring local artisans offering handmade wares. June 15 from 10 am-5 pm. Free admission. 2729 E. Bruce Ave. (325-4809) Spokane in Bloom13th annual garden tour hosted by The Inland Empire Gardeners, featuring six Northside gardens. June 15 from 10 am-5 pm. $10. Locations throughout North Spokane. tieg.org (535-8434) SCRAPS Open HouseOpen house to highlight construction plans for the new countywide animal shelter, including a motorcycle ride fundraiser, facility tours, vendors, adoptable pets and more. June 15 starting at 9 am. Free and open to the public. Future SCRAPS site, 6815 E. Trent Ave. scrapshopefoundation.org (477-2984) Buffalo Soldiers Moto Club FundraiserAnnual dance and fundraiser benefiting the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club featuring live music, raffle and more. June 15 at 8 pm. $10. Black Diamond, 9614 E. Sprague Ave. buffalosoldiersmcspokanewashington.com Dog First AidLearn how to provide first aid to your dog in the outdoors. June 20 at 7 pm. Free, registration requested. Attendees are asked to leave their dogs at home. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) Over the EdgeRappel down the side of Spokane’s tallest building — 20 stories and 264 feet — in the annual Special Olympics Washington fundraiser. June 22 from 8 am-5 pm. Fundraising required to participate, free to watch. specialolympicswashington.org (2997117)

Film

Swan LakeLive broadcast of Swan Lake performed by Russia’s Mariinsky Ballet. June 6 at 6:30 pm. $12.50. Regal Cinemas Northtown and Regal Cinemas Riverstone (CdA). fathomevents.com The Big WeddingComedy. June 6-9, showtimes vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) G-Dog Screening of the documentary on Father Boyle, a priest who worked with East L.A. gang members. June 7 and 8 at 7:30 pm. Panida Theater, 300 W. First, Sandpoint. Panida.org (208263-9191) Full Draw Film TourArchery film festival. June 7 at 6 pm. $11-$14. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) Bill W.Documentary screening of the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, Bill Wilson. June 10 at 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (209-2383) LifeboatScreening of the film as part of the library’s “Hollywood Goes to War” series. June 12 at 5:30 pm. Free.

Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5336) Place Beyond the PinesDrama/action. June 13-16, times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) The CroodsAnimated family film. June 19 and 20 at 1 pm. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) Suds and CinemaScreening of Office Space as part of The Inlander’s Suds & Cinema film series, featuring beer from Iron Goat Brewing Co. June 19 at 6:30 pm. $4/movie, $3/beers. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com

Food & Drink

Balanced Summer NutritionLearn dietary guidelines to reduce inflammation and other discomforts of the summer season. June 6 from 6:30-8 pm. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) Meet Your Local ProducerMeet Deer Park dairy farmer Stephanie Littrel as part of the “Meer Your Local Producer” series for June Dairy Month. June 7 from 10 am-2 pm. Free. Yoke’s Fresh Market, 9329 E. Montgomery Rd. (425672-0687) Commellini’s Open DinnerThe estate event center opens to the public, offering dinner from its traditional Italian menu. June 7 from 5-9 pm. Prices vary, reservations required. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. (466-0667) Fermented FoodsLearn basic fermentation techiques and the benefits of fermented food to the diet. June 8 from 10 am-noon. $15, reservations required. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) Pig in the ParkCommunity barbecue featuring barbecued pork, live music, craft fair and more. June 9 from 11 am-3 pm. Craft fair until 6 pm. $5-$10. Harrison City Park, Harrison, Idaho. (208699-2228) Homemade CroissantsLearn to make croissants. June 12 from 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy, SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) Greens for Healthy LivingLearn how to incorporate greens into your everyday diet. June 13 from 6:30-8 pm. $15, reservations required. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) Meet the WinemakerTaste wines from Fidelitas Wines with winemaker Charlie Hoppes. June 14 at 3:30 pm. Free. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-6769730) The PourA gourmet winemakers’ dinner and auction benefiting programs at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital and Holy Family Hospital. June 15 from 5:3010 pm. Arbor Crest Winery, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. thepour.info (474-2819) Beer TastingSample beers by Firestone Walker Brewing Co. June 15 at noon. Free. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) Managing Food AllergiesLearn how to create a safe food environment for children with food allergies. June 15 from 2-3:30 pm. $15, reservations required. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth

St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208676-9730)

Music

Jazz EnsembleA concert performed by 15 students ages 9-18, of the CdA Charter Academy. June 6 at 7 pm. $5. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) Eric TaylorConcert by the singersongwriter who’s appeared on Austin City Limits, Late Night with David Letterman, NPR and more. June 6 at 7:30 pm. $20. Private residence, 1514 S. Cedar St. (879-1871) Jennifer RussellMusic by the spiritual coach and singer/songwriter. June 9 at 9 am and 11 am. Unity Spiritual Center, 2900 S. Bernard St. unityspokane. org (838-9518) SFCC Symphony OrchestraConcert. June 10 at 7:30 pm. $2-$5. SFCC Music Bldg. No. 15, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3592) SFCC ChoralConcert. June 11 at 7 pm. $2-$5. SFCC Music Bldg. No. 15, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3720) Portatos Accordion BandConcert. June 11 at 7 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) Tony BennettConcert. June 13 at 7:30 pm. $86-$151. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. northernquest.com (481-6700) Jazz ConcertConcert. June 13 at 7:30 pm. $2-$5. SFCC Music Bldg. No. 15, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3592) Top Dog PerformerSinging contest with proceeds donated to Major Forces, a new nonprofit assisting community dog owners and their pets. June 13 at 8 pm. All-ages. $6. Performer registration deadline June 10. The Hop!, 706 N. Monroe St. majorforces509@gmail.com Kevin ColePiano and vocal performance of songs from the Great American songbook. June 14 at 7:30 pm. $15$75. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. (208-391-2867) BOBFest Annual music competition featuring eight Spokane-area high school bands, hosted by the YMCA. June 15 from noon-6 pm. Free. All-ages. Riverfront Park Clock Tower. bobfestspokane.org (777-9622 x. 315)

Sports & Outdoors

The Flying Irish RunWeekly 3-mile run. Thursdays at 6 pm. Free. Red Lion River Inn, 700 N. Division. flyingirish.org Spokane Table TennisPing-pong club meets on Saturdays from 1-4 pm and Mondays and Wednesdays from 7-9:30 pm. $2/visit; open to the public. North Park Racquet Club, 8121 N. Division. spokanetabletennis.com (7681780) Spokane ShockArena football game vs. Jacksonville Sharks. June 8 at 7 pm. $14-$35. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokaneshock.com (242-7462) Bird WalkA walk around the lakes to view spring birds in their plumage. June 8 from 8-11 am. $5. Turnbull Wildlife Refuge, 26010 S. Smith Rd., Cheney. (498-9295) State Parks CentennialCelebration of the state parks’ 100th anniversary,

featuring family activities, river rafting, demos, vendors, live music and more. June 8 from 11 am-6 pm. Free, Discover Pass not required. Riverside State Park, Bowl and Pitcher, 4427 N. Aubrey L. White Parkway. parks.wa.gov/events Wash. State Parks Free DayVisitors to any Washington state park do not need a Discover Pass to enter the park, as part of National Get Outdoors Day. June 8 and 9. Free. Riverside State Park and Mt. Spokane State Park. parks. wa.gov The First Tee of the Inland Northwest Golf activities for kids and adults including a putting green, hitting nets and more. June 8 from 11 am-5 pm. River Park Square, First Floor, 808 W. Main Ave. thefirstteeinlandnorthwest. org (879-7304) Spokane Table Tennis ClubPingpong club meets Wednesdays from 6:30-9 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (456-3581) Camp Cooking BasicsLearn to make easy meals at a camp, including what to bring and how to set up an outdoor kitchen. June 13 at 7 pm. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (3289900) Loreen Miller Bike RideAnnual fundraiser for Cancer Patient Care including a 5-mile fun run or bike ride. June 15. $10-$120. Mt. Spokane High School, 6015 E. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. cancerpatientcare.org (456-0446)

Theater

Grease 1950s rock ‘n’ roll musical. Through June 16. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $11-$29. Spokane Civic Theater, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are DeadComedy based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Through June 9. ThursSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8. SFCC Humanities Bldg. No. 5, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (998-7515) Into the WoodsDark comedy/musical. Through June 29. Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene. lakecityplayhouse.org (208667-1323) Mark Twain: One Man and His World A one-man show featuring Jerry Hardin. June 6-8 at 7:30 pm, June 9 at 2 pm. $12-$28. Interplayers Theater, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre. org (455-7529) Staged Play ReadingsStaged reading of two plays by the theater’s coplaywrights-in-residence, Bryan Harnetiaux and Sandra Hosking. June 7 and 8 at 7:30 pm. $5. Spokane Civic Theater, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheater. com (325-1413) Those Were the DaysDinner theater performance. June 7-8 and June 14-15 at 6:30 pm. June 11 at 7:30 pm (no dinner). $25/dinner and performance, $10-$12 show only. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy. 211 off of Hwy. 2, Newport, Wash. (208448-1294) Big RiverMusical based on The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, performed by the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre. June 13-22, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $32-$47. NIC Schuler Auditorium, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasummertheatre.com (208-769-7780) The Marriage of Bette and BooSat-

ire/comedy. June 14-30. $15-$20. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. ignitetheatre.org (953-0442) McManus and MeComedy performance based on the stories of Patrick F. McManus, performed by Tim Behrens. Book signing to follow. June 14 at 7:30 pm and June 16 at 5 pm. $23-$63. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane.com (327-8000) The Sound of MusicMusical. June 1530. Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Orielle Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave., Newport. pendorielleplayers.org (671-3389) Same Time Next YearRomantic comedy performed by members of The JACC’s Theater Troupe. June 16 and 23 at 2 pm, June 20-22 at 7:30 pm. $10$15. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter. org (208-457-8950)

Visual Arts

Sit, Stand, FlySpring-themed fiber work collection. Through June 15. Manic Moon and Moore, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. (431-6857) Blackletter Typography ShowA typography art show featuring work by 10 local artists, with proceeds from drinks and poster sales benefiting the nonprofit Global Neighborhood. June 7 from 7-11 pm. STEX Motorsports, 123 E. Sprague Ave. (474-1456) Catherine EarleExhibition of 30 new paintings by the Sandpoint-based artist. June 7-July 6. Artist reception during ArtWalk, June 7 from 5-8 pm. Free. Gallery hours, daily from 11 am-6 pm, Fri 11 am-8 pm. The Art Spirit, 415 Sherman Ave., CdA theartspiritgallery.com (208765-6006) Coeur d’Alene ArtWalkParticipating galleries stay open through the evening to display new artwork and exhibitions. June 7 from 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. Visit ArtsInCdA.com for participating gallery information. (208292-1629) First FridayGalleries and participating businesses display new art exhibits with live music and refreshments offered at some locations. June 7 from 5-8 pm. Free. For a map and complete list of participating locations, visit Inlander. com/FirstFriday or see page 34. Landscapes WorkshopArtist Wes Hanson leads a workshop on drawing and painting landscapes in watercolor. June 8-9 from 10 am-4 pm. $132. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown, Wash. artisanbarn.org (229-3655) Moscow ArtwalkSelf-guided tour to partipating businesses and galleries showing artwork by local and regional artists. June 14. Downtown Moscow, Idaho. ci.moscow.id.us/arts (208-8837036)

Words

Jennie Shortridge “Love Water Memory” book reading and signing. June 6 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks. com (838-0206) T.W.I.N.E. Teen Writers of the Inland Empire is a monthly writing group for grades 6 and up. Meets June 6, July 11 and Aug. 1 at 4 pm. Free, snacks and supplies provided. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. scld.org (893-

8400) Venerable Thubten ChodronThe Buddhist leader of Sravasti Abbey, in Newport, Wash., will discuss her commentary “Don’t Believe Everything You Think.” June 7 at 6:30 pm. Free. Morning Light Yoga Studio, 1319 N. Government Way, CdA. (447-5549) Three Minute MicOpen mic poetry night featuring guest poet Jonathan Potter. June 7 at 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (8380206) Jim Morrison“To See Another Sunrise: How to Overcome Anything One Day at a Time” book reading and signing. June 8 at 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks. com (838-0206) Lee Kessler“White King and the Battle of America: The Endgame” book reading and signing. June 8 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) D. Andrew McChesney“Beyond the Ocean’s Edge: A Stone Island Sea Story” book signing. June 8 at 4 pm. Free. Hastings, 1704 W. Wellesley Ave. (3276008) The Road to Statehood“Mining in Idaho: Today and Yesterday” lecture by Tom Blanchard as part of the 150th anniversary of Idaho Territory. June 12 at 7 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208769-2315) J.R. Rain“Samantha Moon Rising” book siging and reading. June 13 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) Linda BeemanReading from “Wallace, Idaho.” June 14 at 2 pm at Northern Pacific Depot Museum, Wallace, Idaho and June 16 at 1 pm. Free. Hastings, 101 E. Best Ave., Coeur d’Alene. (208-6640464) Book SigningAdrienne Milligan, author of “The Gluten-Free Way: My Way” and Christina-Marie Wright, author of “Get Real Vegan Desserts” will sign copies and sample recipes. June 14 from noon-3 pm. Free. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) D. Andrew McChesney“Beyond the Ocean’s Edge: A Stone Island Sea Story” book signing. June 14 at 2 pm. Free. Hastings, 2512 E. 29th Ave. (535-4342) Todd McFarlaneThe creator of the Spawn comics and McFarlane Toys, of EWU’s class of 1984, will present “Road Trip to Creative Autonomy” with an autograph session to follow. June 14 from 7-8 pm. Free to EWU students, $15 public. Registration required. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. alumni.ewu.edu/mcfarlane (359-6335) Poet Linda Beeman“Wallace, Idaho” book reading and signing. June 15 at 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (8380206) Chris Carlson“Medimont Reflections” book signing and reading. June 15 at 4 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (8380206) Scott Johnson“The Wolf and the Watchman: A Father, a Son and the CIA” book signing and reading by the former Newsweek foreign correspondent. June 15 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (8380206) n

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Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Valley MallYou work in a hair care products stand. I have walked by your booth hundreds of times, and even walked past each other and smiled when you were going for a soda. I was always too shy to stop by your booth. You have georgeous dark hair, beautiful eyes, and a lovely smile. Our eyes have met on numerous occasions. I have walked by alone, and with my two children. Maybe I will stop by and have you show my daughter some of your products to break the ice. Would love the chance to get to know you.

talked a little bit and had the same view on marriage. I think you’re an awesome chick. I’m sure there is no chance you will read this but if you do, you said if I met you around town you would talk with me. Let’s make that happen!

me except wherever you are. It’s really day 5 for me everyday, but I’m pretty sure that glunk doesn’t even begin to explain how I find the answers in your kisses that I didn’t even know there was questions to. I totally belong to you hella sick with it. If this 60 is any indication of what’s to come, I’m positive I’ll die before I get home to you. These next 66 are gonna be the death of me FML. I’m truly stoopid crazy falling in love with you, the most incredible woman I’ve ever met. You are the reason I’m alive.Yours Forever Fresh

isle and as such, I’m due a little grace. Luckily you enlightened my uncultured self before I fell into a sea of endless ponder and worry that someone will surely set their ceiling ablaze. I hate to pry into the personal matters of strangers (not really) but I must now know how the plot unfolded! It seemed that of one of those romantic comedies where the female lead follows lofty dreams with whimsy while a trail of summer scarves and scent of biological clock begs her to slow her pace. Meanwhile the male lead sips some sort of pungent, deep yellow liquid, planning his next golf excursion to include an exotic dancer who is likely named Amber or Mercedes. I fear mentioning your name may leave you without believable evidence of coincidence. So, did the plot thicken or perhaps someone named Bunny-Lyn is polishing your clubs?

Zola’s You had a white top with a black skirt. I was at the bar by myself in the blue polo, unable to summon the courage to intoduce myself. So I’ll take the belated chance here. I’d enjoy a chance to get to know you over a coffee.

Walgreens You were buying magazines and junk food. Spending the night in? I probably looked unfriendly, but I was trying to figure you out as I walked by. Something fascinating about you. Trader JoesHandsome man from T Joes: You, tall, bearded and incredibly handsome, come into my coffee shop and order a quad macchiato. When you come into the shop, you make my day. Your smile is contagious and your wit captivating. I would love to get to

Cheney Dollar TreeTo the cute woman that needed my help to reach a few table cloths and I was more than happy to help. Maybe Put a non-identifying email someday you can help me get address in your message, like something I can’t reach? “petals327@yahoo.com” — not

To connect

Main MarketIn the checkout line at Main Market on Sunday June 2nd, you mentioned the I Saw You section. So, I figured this was worth a shot. Let me know if I can buy you a cup of tea or coffee sometime. I’d love to know if there’s a beautiful mind behind such a beautiful face.

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Virgin Mobile Store You were a beautiful lady at store with your daughter, wearing an adorable brown jacket and the most beautiful jacket, this past Wednesday. We chatted about biking and smartphones. I thought we really hit it off and hope we cross paths again one day! Lonely ClimberTo the amazing girl who was scrambling solo on June 1st at Rocks of Sharon. Gotta say that meeting you totally made my day and I’d love to see you again sometime. Just tell me when and where, It willl keep me from giving blood to every bank in town trying to find you in person. (No pressure, I only *kinda* saved your life) Northside TargetYou were looking at bath towels, we made eye contact, we smiled at each other as we passed the connection lasted. I had to speak to you so I could hear your voice. So I asked a quick question “are you smiling at me because you’re a Seahawk fan?” You responded “Ya Right” Whiskey Dick’sI was out with the guys Saturday night. You were one of the first girls that caught my eye and had my eye the entire night. I forgot your name but you also had me distracted, obviously. We

“j.smith@comcast.net.” know you better. Coffee sometime? Tall blond from the coffee shop down the way.

Cheers Humbled - Thank youThank you if you did indeed write about me. What a compliment! I am privileged that people share their lives with me! I am honored that human beings tell me of their despair, joy, angst, love and in such an open, naked, truthful manner. Wish I’d coined it, be kind to everyone, we’re all fighting a battle. And you my friend that takes note of kindness and love, I fervently hope that your heart never harden. Lest I think I am a healer, I remember that I am one of the patients. With So Much Love Making choices with you always seems to lead to good things. I can’t wait to share our lives together forever. Miss Your Presence I saw you every Friday morning for quite awhile. I looked forward to our conversations about Elementary over your french toast, scrambled eggs and bacon. The seasons last show came and went, but you didn’t! Where have you gone? Hope everything is good and that this post finds you in good health. If in fact it does, come by and say “Hi” Okay?. SexyFace Here I am. I’m all the way in. You have made my life absolutely complete. There is nowhere else for

Echo FoxtrotSup girl! It’s been rough saying farewell and goodnight to our 6 week long adventure. Rough. I just wanted you to know I think you’re a beautiful human with the biggest of hearts. I miss our mornings of laughter and Wham! before midday breakfast (aka old doughnuts and e cigarettes). I will never forget our secret kisses, theater naps, walking that turns into cabbing, bacon and Lysol, or a very well deserved high 5. I will always be one of your biggest fans, and I will look back at our time together with a stupid smile on my face. That being said I hope I set a bar for you like you did for me. Thank you. So much. November Zulu Always Friendly!Cheers to Philly Steak Girl & Garden Guy. Every time you come in, you greet us with a smile! People are always in such a hurry, it is a rare treat to have customers who will chat it up with ya. Keep on being the awesome, friendly people you are! It makes everyones day better. Glad you like our jamz! To My BoyfriendWhy do you love me? I love you for moving back home, keeping me sane, putting up with me, reading my sticky notes, and already telling me my birthday present! World Market Northside. Me, killing time. You, wandering with an entertaining blend of sarcasm and bitterness. A few weeks ago you approached me in the candle isle and asked for advice in picking out a gift for your girlfriend. I was of no assistance by suggesting a weed eater (knowing it would be of no use and offensive for the occasion). You selected ‘sealing’ wax all on your own as I stared blankly, puzzled as to why someone would apply wax to their ceiling. We were in the candle

Kev! You are a wonderful person and I am so glad I found a way into your life. You show nothing but respect and love towards me, even in my darkest moments. You have the biggest and most contagious laugh I’’ve ever heard. You have introduced me to some wonderful, wacky, hilarious and loving people who I now call friends. You are a gift from god and I am thankful everyday to have you! I appreciate you so much. Love you. Love, Beautiful buns. Love Is You and Me!Love is me and Love is you. So when you smile, I smile too. When you’re around the skies are blue. Its like being happy times two. Love is sweet and Love is grand, sometimes Love is just holding hands. It’s a feeling inside, it’s a smile in your heart, it keeps us together when we’re apart. Love is fun! It’s feeling free! Love let’s you be who you want to be. Love will catch you when you fall, Love is the greatest gift of all. It’s just us two without a care, it’s what we give and the times we share. Love wipes

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Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

away the tears, sends our troubles along, Love is the place where you always belong. And we’ve got Love, me and you. We’re sticking together, we’ll see it through. And wherever we go, Love will always be, because Love is you and me!

speed limit and I saw you from almost 4 blocks away speed up on her, then because she wasn’t doing 50 mph like you, you laid on your horn and flipped her off while yelling out the window. Disgusting behavior from someone well old enough to know better. You, Lady, are a real class act.

Feeling Stuckand feeling used so much by the man I love. I don’t even know if he loves me back! He yells and flys off the handle most of the time! I feel so sane around a crazy person! I dont know what to do I feel so stuck!

Farm Chicks TicketsCheers to the group of ladies who gave a free ticket to The Farm Chicks show on Sunday! That was very kind of you! There are not many people today who possess such unwavering kindness such as yourselves. I hope the good karma you put forth today returns to you in the fullest. Best wishes. N2I hope you are making your own luck. Here’s to ski days, lazy days, hot days, sad days, lost days, days together and days apart. Get it, and make each experience the best it can be. Happy 22nd Birthday. K Big Cheers! To the very kind person(s) who left a bottle of fantastic barbeque sauce on the hood of the Diamond Cowboy & Reactions Bus in front of the URM in the valley on May 29th. Thank you sincerely! You made my entire day! Love doing random acts of kindness and its great to know that other people are doing the same things! I never expected it to do the full circle. Thank you for your gifts. Charlie 4 Dogs. P.S. this barbeque sauce is by far the best! Wow! You are too kind! RE: I Miss You TooAhhhhh, it looks like my reply from last week didn’t get printed. Just the title did. Hmmm? Anyway, I don’t think the “I Miss You Too” was actually intended for me then because I still haven’t heard from you. I was hoping it was you though. So whoever you were responding to I think there has been a miscommunication. Oops. I still miss YOU anyway, not YOU though. Adolph Happy B-Day! Have a shining like a lighter @ a rockshow day! Keep on swerving for butterflies! Love Harriet

Jeers Really? 5/1, beautiful brunette woman driving a white “classy” looking car. You flew by us on Francis just before Alberta screaming and flipping us off, for slowing down and going into the suicide lane? In case you hadn’t noticed, Francis has a posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour. My elderly Mother was driving while my two young children were in the back seat. She was driving the

If Your Dog Bitesnips or growls aggressively at other dogs or people, don’t take it to the dog park. How hard is that to grasp? Socialize your fur-baby in familiar settings before you expose well raised animals in a foreign one. I get it, my dog is a rescue as well. The pride you’re feeling about saving a life doesn’t mean I won’t punt your dog off of mine and call animal control about your savage little prince or princess. RE: Birthday CelebrationArguably, good tequila is traditionally enjoyed without lime or salt. This may be why people refer to them jokingly as “training wheels”. But you’re the idiot that is willing to pay for Patron, so it would make sense that you would not want to enjoy it. Secondly, it is a health hazard to have people reaching in fruits and bars DO get fined for it. Elevatory MusicHi I’’m beep and I’m an addict, unfortunately a clean addict and therefore unable to drug myself numb into a blackhole of emotion. That being said, I’m writing this to thank you for allowing me to experience feelings of shame, anger, sadness, regret, happiness, and love again. I am genuinely grateful. Before you, I’d only been in relationships based on lies and lust. However, that does not excuse my actions in our relationship or the pain that ensued. For that I am truly sorry. Ironically, all the respect you must have lost for me over the course of our relationship I have inversely gained for you. I admire you for breaking up with me despite how much you care because your wellbeing was suffering. You are the best thing that’s ever happened to me. I am finally aware of how my actions affect others and the importance of honesty. I hope you end up with someone that makes you the happiest man in the world, maybe even me someday. Cheers to you my love! Stop Obama HealthcareDid you know 2014 if an employer cuts your hours to less than 30 a week and you don’t have healthcare you are the one who is subject to the tax penalty.

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Looking For Mr. RightI’m getting very tired of looking for Mr. Right! Although I have standards and expectations, I’m not expecting perfection. Dating after age 45 sucks enough but, then add the Prince Charmings that the world has to offer and it really blows! I even turned to my friends and family to help me. Where the hell are the real men that are looking to invest some time in getting to know each before jumping into bed (or as a couple of men put it the back of their car)! I’m not going to give up hope that he’s out there somewhere and we’ll find each other. Just needed to vent! Feel better already! Lol p.s. if someone reads this and knows a man that feels this way, pass it on to him.

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I Think I’ve Had It!“I sit here and wonder what I did to deserve this. I’ve been with you for 3 years and nothing has changed from when we started. I cry often and hard trying to find away for my heart to release all you’ve done. I can’t shake it, it’s like no matter what you do. I always some how forgive. I want a love, that everyone is jealous of. I want a love, that just with a simple kiss on the cheek everything is perfect. I want someone to love me as much as I love them. I would never do that to you! I would never hurt you because you don’t hurt those you love! You don’t hurt people you care about, you don’t act like that. If you want to be single then be single, don’t drag me along for the ride. Yet although through all the pain and tears, I stay! Why do I stay with someone who clearly doesn’t love me? Why am I staying with someone, who doesn’t appreciate all I do, and how much i love him! I’m scared of what could happen, but I’m to scared to let go! I can’t picture my life without you, but now I’m stuck with the decision of being without you, or being miserable waiting for you to look me in the face and truly love me without anything holding you back. Does Misery Love Company?I live in a larger apartment building. Everyone is just so anti social. I can’t begin to tell you how many times I have passed many of my so called “neighbors” going down the corridor, stairs, picking up my mail or in being in the laundry facilities and just have said “hello” or “how ya doing?” to some of these people, only to be completely ignored. It’s as if these people were raised in the desert somewhere. Really how unpleasant is it to say “Good Afternoon” or “Enjoy your day” “Have a good night” or even make eye contact and just smile. You should think about it, the next time someone politely says something pleasant to you. It may help you get out of your “rut” Are you that unhappy? miserable? lonely?

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Ear Candy

Scenes from last weekend’s Volume music festival photos by Young kwak, mike mccall, Jennifer debarros & joe konek

N

o joke: On Monday night, two whole days after the last guitars were unplugged at Volume — The Inlander’s two-day, eight-venue music festival last weekend — my ears were still ringing. Loudly. But it was worth it. Alongside hundreds of other local music fans, I saw a speaker-busting set by Moscow electronic band Psychic Rites, heard the swampy blues rock of local act Blackwater Prophet and got a gut-punch of emotions from Missoula’s King Elephant. I witnessed a man in Seattle’s Haunted Horses play a guitar with a drill and heard locals FAUS scream a punk-rock version of the Pledge of Allegiance. There were folk bands and acoustic musicians and dance parties I missed — because it’s impossible to be everywhere at once at Volume, Spokane’s only all-city music spectacle. If you missed out on the party this year, don’t fret. We’ll be ready to rock you all again next year, too. — LEAH SOTTILE

more photos

Find this story on Inlander.com for even more photos from Volume.

62 INLANDER JUNE 6, 2013

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JUNE 6, 2013 INLANDER 63


Inlander 6/06/2013