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2013

SUMMER

JUNE 13-19, 2013 | AMERICA’S BEST READ URBAN WEEKLY

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The summer of 2000. I was 6 years old, and I went to Cape Cod with my whole family. Then later on I went to Disneyland. I was 6, so everything was amazing to me.

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The best summer of my life was two years ago when my granddaughter was born. What made that so special? That was it. I was just ready to have that as part of my life.

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comment | congress

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s a former Congressman, I’m as frustrated with our nation’s leaders as the general public. The May 2013 RealClearPolitics average polling showed President Obama with a 47.1 percent approval rating and 48.9 percent disapproval. The May 2013 Pew Research Center poll had Congressional Republican leaders at 22 percent approval and Democratic leaders at 32 percent. Last month’s Gallup Poll approval rating for Congress was 16 percent. All three polls testify to the low opinion most Americans have of representatives in government. Another poll ranked colonoscopies and cockroaches ahead of Congress. Here’s some friendly advice for elected leaders as they work to win back public support and actually try to solve our nation’s problems:

Washington, D.C., instead telling every interest group exactly what they want to hear, never venturing a new opinion — and saying little beyond party talking points. But if leaders want public trust, they should attend major public events at home, especially parades, and be a thought leader. The public will recognize those who care enough to come home. Plus, parades celebrate communities, so personal presence means one respects the community celebration. If leaders don’t show up, it suggests they don’t care.

1.

5.

Most incumbents distribute impersonal mass emails asking constituents how to solve national issues. Elected officials should be more knowledgeable than the public, and express their judgments about what’s best for our country and what we need to do, without relying on polls. Officials worthy of the office they hold should have a finger on the people’s pulse. Don’t ask input only from supporters. Include other views. Everyone likes to be personally asked for advice. Mr. Obama has utterly failed at this.

2.

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Leaders should walk alone, unpretentiously without staff, through the towns and cities of their state or district personally seeking input. Visit small businesses and post offices unannounced, go to church and frequent other public places directly asking constituents for their thoughts about policy issues. Varying opinions and some good ideas will surface, but most of all, voters will know leaders care about doing a good job for all the people they represent.

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July 7

When necessary, stand against Congressional leadership (note again their low approval ratings above) in favor of your constituents. Voters elect leaders to exercise their own best judgments, not to be puppets for their party. I recall the trouble I had with Republican House leadership when I pushed to end 50 years of unilateral American sanctions on Cuba. Yet Eastern Washington farmers needed the Cuban market for products such as apples, peas and lentils. With help from Democrats, other Republicans, farmers and humanitarians, we changed the law and millions of dollars of 5th District products were sold to Cuba. Fighting for constituents may anger Congressional leaders, but it will endear a Congressional representative to people at home.

4. 6 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

Those wanting to simply hold a Congressional job infrequently come home from

Leaders should spend one evening each week going through the phone book, randomly telephoning their constituents at home — just to talk. Some rudeness may result, but a representative will be remembered for reaching out. Former South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond practiced this and was always popular — he genuinely loved his constituents, and they knew it, faithfully returning him to office.

6.

Expect and demand integrity and accountability from federal workers without simplistically criticizing government. The current scandals involving IRS political targeting, Benghazi inaction and Associated Press criminality are outrageous and stain government workers. Yes, government is generally too big and spends too much, but wide swipes at government workers unfairly impugn responsible federal workers who honorably try to serve the public good. Elected officials should periodically stroll through government offices alone, chatting firsthand with workers there to fully understand what they do and how they do it — all will be enlightened.

7.

Adopt an 80/20 or even 60/40 rule for solving problems, not the “I win everything and you win nothing” attitude that now prevails in Congress and the presidency. In spite of interest group insistence on total victory, elected officials serve best with the broadest base — and need to focus most on problem-solving and records of accomplishment. Neither party has a guaranteed corner on wisdom — some meritorious ideas may come from the other side — they vote, too, and like the Cuba example above, someday their vote will be important to your constituents. Citizens are disgusted with self-serving and polarizing conduct of elected officials and resulting inaction on our nation’s unsolved, nagging problems. Americans deserve attentive and wise leaders. n

comment | publisher’s note

Orwell Called It by ted s. mcGregor jr.

T

he revelation that the National Security Agency is collecting phone records in the name of keeping us safe isn’t much of a revelation, really. Sure, the details from whistleblower Edward Snowden published in The Guardian were new, but in 2008 Congress passed laws that indemnified the likes of Verizon and Google from breach-of-privacy lawsuits. Pretty obvious, what they were up to. The silence from our lawmakers has been deafening. There is, however, this nugget: “We must see to it that … all agencies that possess this technology operate within the law and under proper supervision, so that we never cross over that abyss. That is the abyss from which there is no return.” No, that’s not Rand Paul, one of the few critics of the data mining; it was Frank Church of Idaho in 1975. After the nation had been lied to about Vietnam, and after President Nixon was caught breaking the law, Congress got a fire in its belly for reform. Sen. Church took on the CIA, the FBI and the NSA, which had been, collectively, reading our mail, disrupting American peace activists and assassinating world leaders in the name of keeping us safe. The result of Church’s hearings was the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, which put oversight into a system gone rogue. The key word is “foreign,” as the law stipulated that only foreign subjects could be targeted without a special warrant. Now we know that George W. Bush broke that law after 9/11, and Congress undid Church’s work with its FISA rewrite in 2008. Now your government is watching you to a degree Church could never have dreamed of. This brings to mind two questions: Is this practice American? And is it effective at preventing terrorism? Like the Alien and Sedition Acts, we have passed un-American, unconstitutional legislation before. As citizens, we are guaranteed to be presumed innocent and we have a right to privacy. If Congress won’t do anything, we’ll need an opinion from the Supreme Court to settle this. And while we are told the NSA is squashing terror plots, the Boston bombers slipped by despite warnings from Russia and our own agencies. Where’s Frank Church when we need him? He never doubted the need to gather intelligence; he just demanded oversight and constitutional boundaries. President Obama says Congress is supervising all the spying; members of Congress say they are not. The blame game and finger-pointing is pathetic and an insult to all we stand for. Here’s a final thought: If a dictator ever did get his grip on America, Church worried the NSA “could enable [him] to impose total tyranny, and there would be no way to fight back. … There would be no place to hide.” n

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LETTERS

THIS AIN’T WORKING

Your comment, “Rethinking the World,” in the June 6 Inlander was excellent. No president or Congress has yet had the wisdom or courage to change our path from the direction of NSC 68 in 1950. We have directed our resources to the militaryindustrial complex for over 60 years, and we now have a country that: 1) According to a 2012 International Human Rights Clinic study at NYU School of Law, has 50 million Americans — that is one in every six — who cannot afford adequate food. (And nearly 17 million of these are children.) 2) According to a 2009 Harvard Medical School study, has 45,000 people every year suffering a premature death because they can’t afford health care. 3) Has 48 million citizens without health insurance. 4) Has a debt of $16 trillion. (That is $50,000 for every man, woman and child in America.) 5) Has 15 percent of all its citizens and 25 percent of all its children on food stamps. 6) Has come to the point that only the children of the rich can afford college and, in general, only the children of the poor fight its continuous wars.

very healthy model of ethics within the communities in a very basic sense. Is capitalism becoming a large form of predator-ism? It appears it is, and this is not a very healthy model for any community to set. It appears the mayor has limited understanding of how ethics and morals are, as otherwise he should be making statements that are direct to anyone who might overstep this boundary. Otherwise, he is really supporting predators everywhere, to continue their behavior. America seems to be losing its way from teaching as leaders that unity of the nation is the foremost, not the individual meetings behind closed doors. DALE BRIESE Spokane, Wash.

DON’T TURN AWAY

Throughout the past four years, while I have attended Eastern Washington University, I have made numerous trips to Spokane. As soon as I get off the exit, I quickly catch notice of a group of people who appear to be homeless. As the seconds go by while quickly passing the street light, I see karts, garbage bags and ripped clothing mixed with faces of people who display TOM CHARLES expressions and body language of smiles, solitude and Spokane, Wash. despair. Besides walking the streets of Spokane, those are the moments where you either turn away or, for a moment, you feel compassion or consider a solution. Spokane has worked on fixing the problem of the The whole process of electing officials, or even just homeless by providing programs and outreach efforts, putting forth initiatives, has begun to be hijacked to a but I feel a better, more rigorous effort can be made. level of bureaucratic nightmare. Initiatives are supposed Though the numbers of the hometo be an opportunity for individual citizens to less have slightly gone down (Human put forth ideas on a community level, basic Services Department), I believe that and pure. Now I question if they are becoming Send comments to being an entity for bridging the gap another bureaucratic mess. They want to now examine if initiatives are editor@inlander.com. for the homeless is only the first step. A solution worth exploring would be legal or not? Do city elected officials do this for interventions for domestic issues, more everything they vote on, or is it just for the ideas that grants for permanent housing and an overall system of maybe the general public is for? For the one initiative reintegrating the homeless back into society, for good. that they are examining, the one about corporations meeting with elected officials separate than in public JAIRUS E. WOOD meetings, is a model that should be examined by the Cheney, Wash. corporations. It should be examined, as it does not set a

THROW OPEN THE DOORS

LETTERS

SHANNON BAHR ALLERT: If you are doing nothing wrong... why should it bother you? I don’t think the government is all that interested in my candy crush activity, that I am a WSU or Cowboys fan or how many times my mother calls me in a day. TIFFA NEEL: I do nothing wrong, I have nothing to hide, I really don’t care if my calls were looked at. That’s not the point. What they are doing is illegal according to our Constitution, no matter how rosily they try to play it up. ANGEL FALLS-KAINE: Only records of their own, and broadcast on NPR all day on weekends. THOR ERIK KING: I think we should be more afraid of the corporations who are collecting and storing this kind of information than we should be of a government that, from all I’ve been able to read about the issue, seems to be trying as hard as it can to reconcile its Constitutional obligations with the task of ensuring national security. COLLIN DOUGLAS: So-called conservatives are busy trying to repeal Obamacare, and don’t even bother to try and repeal the biggest threat to our freedom: The Patriot Act. CRAIG YOUNG: If I was to start going through your purse or belongings I bet there’d be hell to pay. It’s not about “nothing to hide.” JAMIE BOSANKO: I don’t mind surveillance, or spying, but it has to be highly specific and done so in a way that’s consistent with our values as a just society; that is: with a warrant, probable cause, and as part of a specific investigation into a specific group or individual. 

JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 9

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COMMENT | SATIRE

Verizon’s NSA FAQs BY ANDY BOROWITZ

T

oday, President Obama issued the following letter to all Verizon cellphone customers: Last week it came to light that the National Security Agency has been collecting millions of phone records from you each and every day. Since then, many of you have called the White House with questions and concerns about this new program. To save my time and yours, here are answers to three of the FAQs we’ve been hearing: 1. Will I be charged extra for this service? I’m happy to say that the answer is no. While the harvesting and surveillance of your domestic phone calls were not a part of your original Verizon service contract, the National Security Agency is providing this service entirely free of charge. 2. If I add a phone to my account, will those calls also be monitored? Good news! If you want to add

a child or any other family member to your Verizon account, their phone calls — whom they called, when and the duration of the call — will all be monitored by the U.S. government, at no additional cost. 3. Can the NSA help me understand my Verizon bill? Unfortunately, no. The National Security Agency has tried, but failed, to understand Verizon’s bills. Please call Verizon customer service and follow the electronic prompts. I hope I’ve helped clear up some of the confusion about this exciting new program. But if you have any further questions, please don’t hesitate to call the White House. Joe Biden is standing by. n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | AGRICULTURE

Frankenwheat Crops Up BY JIM HIGHTOWER

B

ob Dylan once sent a twoword lyric to Ben Harper, a talented songwriter he admired. “Well well,” was the lyric, and Dylan challenged Harper to make a song of it. He did! By adding another “well” to the title, Ben wrote “Well, well, well” — a stinging lament about America’s clean-water well going dry, due to waste and greed. I thought of his song when I heard that a wheat farmer in eastern Oregon had gotten an unpleasant surprise in May: Some of Monsanto’s unapproved, genetically manipulated wheat suddenly cropped up in his field. He had never planted any of these Frankenseeds, which have a foreign DNA spliced into them by Monsanto’s bio-tamperers. Field tests of the altered wheat were most recently done in Oregon in 2001, and the seeds never have been cleared for commercial use anywhere in the world. But there they are, sprouting like weeds. Well, well, well. Ever since Monsanto, backed by its political protectors, began messing with the very DNA of our food supply two decades ago, the company line was

that it was all perfectly safe and under tight control. Farmers, however, warned that these corporate and political powers were a bunch of profiteering ignoramuses who knew nothing about such basic realities as pollen drift. Pollen from mutant plants can — and does — move many hundreds of miles across state and national borders to contaminate the crops of farmers living far away. Ninety percent of the wheat grown by Oregon farmers is exported to Japan and other nations that do not let their consumers be lab rats for agribusiness hucksters. So the escape of Monsanto’s wheat into the wild endangers both wheat exports and the purity of organic corps — not to mention human health and our environment. To follow the drift of this story, go to the Organic Consumers Association at organicconsumers.org. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

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Drip, Drip, Drip Why the city of Spokane pumped 4 billion gallons of water it never used last year

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BY HEIDI GROOVER

he pipes are like uncooked spaghetti, Dan Kegley says. They fill with water and then empty, as the ground around them freezes and thaws, but sometimes when they should bend, they snap instead. Of the 1,100 miles of water pipes buried under Spokane, several hundred miles worth are made of a compound called leadite, used only during a blip in the

Crews are currently replacing a water main below Third Avenue near Division Street. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

nation’s history and now catching blame for water leaks and pipe bursts across the country. “Look around Spokane, and you’ll see a lot of ‘50sstyle homes,” says Kegley, interim director of the city’s water department. “Chances are there’s leadite in the main in front [of those].” Leadite, a sulfur cement compound, is also part of the reason about 20 percent of the water the city of Spokane ...continued on next page

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pumps to be used in homes or businesses seeps into the ground before it can ever arrive at a faucet. The leadite pipes are left over from the period during World War II when Spokane and other cities across the country were growing, but the nation’s best building materials, including lead, were being used to make essentials like bullets. Before the war, most pipes were made of cast iron; afterward, with rubber joints that were more flexible. But throughout the war years it was those brittle leadite pipes and joints that helped build Spokane. Most of the railroad hub’s downtown had been developed, but its northern and southern edges were beginning to sprawl, so those are the areas of town with the densest concentration of leadite pipes now starting to leak or break. “Those are the kind of pipes we want to replace,” says city spokeswoman Marlene Feist. “You’re going to see a more aggressive effort to do so.”

L

ast year, the city’s 20 percent leakage rate equated to 4 billion gallons of water, or the equivalent of one house along each mile of the city’s water pipes leaving a garden hose running around the clock. At the minimum water rate charged to residential users, the loss was worth about $1.44 million. And it’s double the 10 percent three-year average mandated by

the state and regulated by the Washington Department of Health, putting the city in violation of state law. Cities have until July 1 to report last year’s leakage rates, but based on the most recent data available, Spokane’s current three-year average of 19.5 percent is far surpassing other cities. Tacoma’s three-year average is 5.8 percent; Vancouver’s is 3.5. Seattle’s and Bellevue’s are both less than 6 percent. “We have a plentiful aquifer, but not a limitless aquifer,” Feist says. “[So] it is a number of concern to us.” A concern, but not the top priority, she clarifies. There’s little enforcement of the standard, though cities operating above it are asked to develop plans to get their leakage down, and it’s not affecting pressure or water supply to Spokane’s homes and businesses. Kegley adds that since the city sits directly over the Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer, leaked water mostly ends up back in the aquifer. Michael Dexel, who oversees these regulations in the Department of Health’s water efficiency program, says it’s not always that simple. Leaks don’t usually happen at the same place where water is pulled from the aquifer, so some water can be lost on its way back through layers of soil to the aquifer or can end up in the river. And pumping lost water is a cost for which cities see no benefit.

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ther factors could be affecting Spokane’s rate, city officials say. Because leakage is calculated as the difference between water pumped and water sold, inaccurate meters or water from hydrants used freely by street crews or firefighters could be skewing the numbers. Utilities Director Rick Romero says while he doesn’t believe those factors are contributing to a majority of the 4 billion gallons lost, his department will be working to identify exactly where the losses are happening for a more accurate picture. Recently, the utilities department has combined funds to try to spend smarter on upgrades that could help decrease the leakage rate and curb costly and damaging water main breaks. They want to start replacing faulty pipes at every chance possible, to find what Romero calls “sweet spots” where a sewer line replaceSend story ideas to ment or other project that requires tearing tips@inlander.com or up a road can be leveraged into a water call the tip line at line replacement. According to the depart(509) 325-0634 ext. 264 ment’s six-year spending plan, it budgeted about $30 million for capital projects, including water line repairs and replacements, last year. Feist says that could double to $60 million this year in an effort to keep up with continually aging infrastructure. It’s a demand that looks unlikely to subside anytime soon. In a study out last week, the Environmental Protection Agency estimated that the country’s drinking water utilities need about $384 billion worth of upgrades — $9.5 billion in Washington state alone — over the next 20 years for “public health, security and [the] economic well-being of our cities, towns and communities.” n heidig@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

PHOTO EYE PRIDE OF WASHINGTON

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

A 35-year-old man died after Spokane sheriff’s deputies used a Taser to subdue him outside of Oz Fitness last Thursday. The Spokane County medical examiner is still investigating the cause of his death.

2.

Investigators are building a case against 29-year-old Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked classified documents about U.S. surveillance of phone call and Internet data to the Guardian and Washington Post. Snowden was said to be in Hong Kong, but his current whereabouts were unknown.

3.

Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales pleaded guilty last Wednesday to murdering 16 Afghan civilians in March 2012. During proceedings at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Bales admitted there was “not a good reason in this world” to justify his actions.

4.

JOE KONEK PHOTO

Participants in Saturday’s Pride Parade, of course, had something new to celebrate: Washington’s gay marriage law, which is allowing Alexis Higdon and Kath’ren Bay (in the truck) to finally marry after being together for 20 years.

DIGITS

400 16 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

The number of jobs Vivint, a Utah-based residential security systems company, expects to create when its opens a new office in Liberty Lake on July 15.

2,098

Late last Tuesday, the Coeur d’Alene City Council adopted an ordinance banning discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people. Coeur d’Alene joins Boise, Sandpoint, Ketchum and Moscow as the fifth Idaho city with an anti-discrimination law.

5.

Idaho Congressman Raúl Labrador last Wednesday dropped out of the so-called “Gang of Eight,” a bipartisan House group working on an immigration reform bill, citing irreconcilable disagreements. The number of complaints filed against Vivint in the last three years, according to the Better Business Bureau, most often for deceptive sales tactics.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Going into Overtime Lawmakers in Olympia are still trying to make a deal; plus, a yet-to-open school hits a snag

BUDGET IMPASSE

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A second SPECIAL SESSION is set to start this week after lawThe new JEFFERSON ELEMENTARY hasn’t even opened yet, makers failed to agree on a new two-year operating budget. but it’s already faced an overcrowding problem. Negotiations between the Republican-controlled Senate and Recently, the school principal sent out a letter announcing that, Democrat-run House stalled over the last 30 days as Republicans due to space issues, the entire “Designated Instruction” program for demanded policy reforms and Democrats asked for new revenue students with disabilities would be moving to Grant Elementary. streams through taxes. Parents were incensed. “Both sides are trying, but have had limited success to reach “They just built a brand new building for Jefferson,” Tami Leitz, some agreement,” says Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane a parent of a girl with Down Syndrome, says. “Now Valley. “But [Democrats] have so far refused to consider they’re saying, ‘Oh, we don’t have space for you.’ … anything but more and more taxes.” This was really poor planning on the part of Spokane Send comments to On Saturday, Senate Republicans approved their own editor@inlander.com. Public Schools.” budget plan in response to the House Democrats’ proposal. Amid growing concern, Superintendent Shelley While both budgets would leave nearly $600 million in Redinger decided to reverse the decision: Thanks to reserves, the Senate plan spends more on public education than the some reworking of classroom space, the DI program could stay at House ($1.526 billion compared to $1.349 billion), but significantly Jefferson. Parents like Leitz breathed a sigh of relief. less on social services ($167 million compared to $353.3 million). But the overcrowding issue remains. School officials say the Sen. Andy Billig, D-Spokane, criticizes the Senate GOP budget, district did spend a lot of time planning, but two things happened: saying it was “not an effort toward compromise.” The district decided to move toward all-day kindergarten, taking “The Senate Republican budget is a bad budget for Spokane,” up another classroom. And a higher number of students decided to Billig says. “It cuts services that so many in our community rely on “choice” into Jefferson. Families not in the boundaries of Jefferson as they work their way out of poverty.” had asked if their children could be sent to Jefferson anyway. The Legislature must reach a budget deal before July 1 to avoid “Maybe it’s the old adage,” Associate Superintendent Mark a government shutdown. Anderson says, “build it and they will come.” — DEANNA PAN — DANIEL WALTERS

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NEWS | CRIME

Calculating Crimes

Spokane Police Department Crime Analyst Tom Michaud looks at a crime hot spot map YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Spokane police say new efforts have slowed the rise in property crime rates, which have increased since 1985 despite national trends BY JACOB JONES AND LISA WAANANEN

A

bout 2,095 vehicles got stolen off Spokane streets in 2012. Records show 3,114 residential burglaries and 713 commercial or non-residential burglaries. At least 675 bicycles went missing. Nearly everyone in the Lilac City can share some horror story — either their own or another’s — about returning home to discover a door kicked in, experiencing the shock of an empty parking space or cursing a broken

18 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

bike lock. Spokane crime rates in 2012 show nine out of every 100 city residents could expect to be victims in a property crime. While thefts and break-ins rarely make headlines, each crime shakes its victims, leaving them feeling violated and frustrated. “If you’ve been victimized, your whole world’s been turned upside down,” says Christy Hamilton, director

of the Spokane Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program. In crime data going back to 1985, Spokane shows a long history of struggling with property crime rates that run against national trends. The numbers vary depending on the time frame: Up 10 percent since 1985. Up just 4 percent since 1987. Up 13 percent since 2000. But the pattern is clear — property crime has gone up or held steady in Spokane while falling dramatically in most major American cities. In 2012, Spokane’s property crime rate ran higher than corresponding rates in Seattle, Portland, Detroit and New York City. City officials and residents have voiced outrage over the increasing rates. After infamously announcing the elimination of its Property Crimes Unit in 2011, the Spokane Police Department has since reversed course, introducing new patrol initiatives, policies and investigation units to crack down on property crimes. So far this year, crime rates remain high, but they have come down from peak rates seen last fall. ...continued on page 21

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PROPERTY CRIME Per 1,000 people

2.5

20

2.0

15

1.5

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’95

U.S. RATE

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’12

’85

’95

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–65%

1985-2012

’85

’95

’05

’12

’85

’95

’05

’12

BOISE Property crime:

–55%

1985-2012

’85

’95

’05

’12

’85

’95

’05

’12

NEW YORK Property crime:

–73%

1985-2012

’85

’95

’05

’12

’85

’95

’05

’12

DETROIT Property crime:

–49%

1985-2012

’85

’95

’05

’12

’85

’95

’05

’12

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JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 19

NEWS | CRIME

PROPERTY CRIME: RISING OR FALLING?

PROPERTY CRIME: LARCENY

Q1 2012: 2,586 Q1 2013: 3,019 1,000

Last year, the number of property crimes in Spokane continued to rise in every category. The numbers were down in the first three months of 2013 compared to the end of 2012, but higher than the corresponding months at the beginning of 2012. Violent crime followed the same pattern.

A

ALWAYS GETTING WORSE In annual Gallup polls since 1996, the percentage of people who say there is more crime than there was a year ago in the U.S. and “in your area”: In the U.S.

60% 50% In your area

30%

’99

’02

’05

800

Q1 2012: 826

Q1 2012: 437

Q1 2012: 239

600

Q1 2013: 877

Q1 2013: 594

Q1 2013: 344

2010

2011

2012

2009

’08

’11

Source: Gallup; the question was not asked in 1999.

The survey was one more example of how the national decline in crime has gone unnoticed: When it comes to crime, Americans persistently believe it’s getting worse. Despite numbers that show crime rates in most places declining or holding steady, more than 60 percent of people surveyed by Gallup in recent years said there’s more crime than there was a year ago. Even in cities with the highest crime rates, only a fraction of citizens will be victims each year. So how do people know whether it’s getting better

or worse? Perceptions of crime are shaped by a combination of personal experience and the media, says Michael Gaffney, the associate director of the Division of Governmental Studies and Services at Washington State University. He says people have a tendency to think of crime as one big concept, fueled by everything from seeing a sensational homicide on the news to hearing word of mouth that a neighbor’s car was broken into. Gaffney has been involved with studies that ask “how much of a problem” various types of crime are, from litter to murder. They’ve found how the question is asked makes a big difference: People are more likely to say serious crime is a problem at the community level than if they’re asked about whether it’s a problem “in your neighborhood.” Closer to home, smaller problems like graffiti are rated as more of a problem. Essentially, people perceive crime as a problem at large, but less so on their own blocks. “I’ve seen that to be the case every time we’ve done that study,” Gaffney says. In Spokane, perceptions of rising crime are not completely off the mark — but hyperawareness is also on the rise. As breaking news teams compete with citizens listening to scanners for minute-by-minute social media updates, law enforcement leaders have made a point to caution people against drawing conclusions from every frenzied crime report. As Spokane News, the Facebook-based community of amateur crime-watchers, has ballooned in popularity this year, its users occasionally express ambivalence about the effects of following every siren. “Heard great things about this site from a friend,” a user posted in February. “Actually, she told me to maybe stay away, it would give me anxiety! LOL.” — LISA WAANANEN

2010

2011

2012

2009

2010

2011

2009

2010

2011

2012

RUNNING THE NUMBERS

A

burglary here, a robbery there — the numbers don’t add up to much unless you can see the bottom line. Someone has to look at the whole picture to find a little meaning, some clue or pattern for predicting future crimes. With thousands of police reports filed each month, crime analysts with the Spokane Police Department constantly review, dissect and map crimes to identify the repeat offenders and hidden trends driving local statistics. Cmdr. Brad Arleth, who oversees the Crime Analysis Unit, says police analysts refine raw reports to pick out the helpful information that can be used to put patrol officers in the right places at the right times. “You can really see what it is that we need to focus on,” he says, adding, “A lot of times, it’s the story behind the numbers.” Under the department’s new CompStat datadriven policing model, the Crime Analysis Unit has taken a central role in providing quick-turnaround intelligence, historical context and emerging pat-

I-9

terns for investigators. “Our main mission is to try to put the most timely, accurate information we can out to the troops on the street,” senior analyst Ryan Shaw says. The unit’s four analysts examine reams of reports to compare locations, times, stolen goods and other details. They can find similarities between multiple crimes or determine whether several criminals might be striking separately. They can also predict what time of day crimes may be more likely to occur or what businesses might be vulnerable to thieves. Analyst Tom Michaud says many crimes simply involve family issues or personal disputes. But analysts try to pinpoint predatory repeat criminals or problem locations that officers can target to put a larger dent in crime rates. “There’s a lot of stuff we go through,” he says, “to try to break it down to what’s the biggest bang we’re going to get as an organization.” — JACOB JONES

0

HOTSPOTS: RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY

HOTSPOTS: VEHICLE THEFT

MAPPING CRIME The Crime Analysis Unit creates “hotspot” maps each week to help set priorities for staffing and patrols in problem areas. These maps show all the hotspots identified in the weekly reports during April and May. Along with location, the unit also looks at factors like time of day. Source: Weekly CompStat reports from the Spokane Police Department

20 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

2012

DIVISION

2009

gainst the backdrop of the national gun debate earlier this year, Pew Research Center asked Americans: Has the number of gun crimes gone up or down compared to 20 years ago? Most people — 56 percent — said it’s up. Only 10 percent said it’s down. (The rest either said it’s the same or did not know.) The kicker is that gun crimes are not only down, they’re down dramatically. The gun homicide rate is half of what it was in 1993, and other violent gun crimes are down 75 percent.

’96

ALL VIOLENT CRIME

200

A MATTER OF PERCEPTION

40%

PROPERTY CRIME: VEHICLE THEFT

400

Source: Monthly crime reports from the Spokane Police Department

70%

PROPERTY CRIME: BURGLARY

“CALCULATING CRIMES,” CONTINUED... “Spokane has a crime problem,” Police Chief Frank Straub says. “I don’t think it’s perception. It’s reality. … [But] I think we’re moving in the right direction.”

B

eginning this year, the Spokane Police Department has intensified efforts to identify repeat offenders and increase officer presence in high-crime neighborhoods. Straub, who took over in September, has reorganized the department around a new data-based policing strategy and ordered the targeting of “hotspots” citywide. Mayor David Condon and police officials have since heralded small-scale successes in targeted areas, pointing to decreases in property crimes in downtown and the some of the northeast neighborhoods, which sit north of the river and east of Division Street. “It’s looking at where those crimes rates are and putting police officers where those crime rates are,” Condon says. “Is it where we want it to be? Absolutely not. … I’m not pleased with where we are yet by any means. But are we tracking the right things? I believe we are.” Local crime rates have dropped this year compared to significant spikes in both property crimes and violent crimes last fall, but the rates remain higher than the first quarter of 2012. It’s too early to tell whether crime will go back up as it typically does in summer months. New citywide crime statistics, released Tuesday, show small increases in overall crime when comparing the beginning of this year against 2012. Total crime incidents went up just 3.7 percent across the city. Property crime remains up 4 percent over last year. Violent crimes have held steadier. Spokane again bucked national trends by Send comments to staying essentially level editor@inlander.com. while other cities recorded dramatic declines since the early 1990s. The 2013 rates have dropped by less than 1 percent compared to last year. Straub pointed to specific reductions in the number of homicides, rapes and robberies against individuals. In recent months, Spokane Police officials have struggled to debunk the widespread community belief that the department no longer cares about property crimes following a stark announcement in late 2011 that the SPD Property Crime Unit had been eliminated and just 5 percent of cases would be investigated. While the previous police administration made it clear property crimes would be a low priority, Straub has since described the 2011 announcement as a clumsy ploy for more funding that has lived on as an “urban legend.” “The Spokane Police Department investigates all crime, property crime and everything else,” Straub says. “We’ve never stopped doing that.” Property crimes now get investigated as part of the Fraud Unit. Straub pointed to a more than 17 percent decrease in property crimes in the downtown area. The West Central region has also seen a more than 10 percent drop in property crime compared to last year. “What the community is seeing is focused, data-driven policing,” Straub says. “We are bringing crime down.”

LETTERS

W

hy does Spokane continue to see property crime rates higher than similar sized cities like Boise or Tacoma? When asked in April about the social factors contributing to local rates, Straub singled out the impacts of poverty and drug issues. He also suggested a need for increased social services and mental health programs. “We have a large part of our population that is below the poverty line,” Straub says. “So clearly poverty is a driver. … We [also] have so many people who have double issues. They have mental health issues and they have drug and alcohol dependency issues. So when we talk about crime phenomena, [those] are driven by those types of societal issues.” Spokane and Kootenai county law enforcement agencies came together in April to announce a joint property crimes task force. Led by the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office, the task force will share information about thefts and suspects to track crimes across multiple jurisdictions. Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich says the unincorporated county has seen a dramatic decrease in burglaries, down 53 percent compared to last

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“What the community is seeing is focused, datadriven policing. We are bringing crime down.” year, after forming a similar task force to target burglaries in 2012. The agencies planned to meet this week to discuss what information and resources each can bring to the table. “It’s moving right along,” he says. Knezovich says several factors contribute to confusion over regional crime rates. He cites the “Crime Check dip” for creating an artificial decline in crime rates from 2005 to 2009 when the Crime Check program shut down for budget reasons, eliminating a popular program for tracking citizen reports. When the program came back in 2009, crime rates started to rise up again dramatically. Knezovich argues the rates haven’t really increased, but have returned to more regular levels previously recorded before Crime Check went away. Authorities all agree collecting the best information on property crimes will help investigators crack down on local thieves. Hamilton, with the COPS program, says even if an officer does not respond to a call, the information still helps provide a better understanding of neighborhood crime. “We really, really encourage people to report because that’s how we know what’s going on,” she says. Officials also encouraged residents to get involved in community policing programs and serve as stewards of their neighborhoods alongside local departments. “We can and will reduce crime,” Straub says, adding, “We’re not going to rest until we start seeing double-digit crime reductions instead of double-digit increases.” 

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Home Field Advantage With major improvements to their stadium, the Indians want to remain the summer’s biggest show BY MIKE BOOKEY

young kwak photos

I

t’s only a week before the Spokane Indians begin their season, but the club’s front office still doesn’t know exactly who will be on their team. They’re finding that out on this sunny Friday afternoon, as an internet stream from Major League Baseball’s amateur draft plays over speakers from a cubicle on the far side of the team’s freshly painted offices. It’s like this every spring. Come June, Indians staff waits patiently for word to come down through the Texas Rangers farm system regarding who will don the Indians’ red-andblue colors for the next three months. But while Indians management doesn’t have much say over which young men will take to the diamond this summer, they don’t have to wait around to get their ballpark ready. This offseason, the Indians, in conjunction with Spokane County, gave Avista Stadium — the club’s home since 1958 — a major facelift to the tune of $3.5 million. Fans might not have realized it, but much of the stadium’s infrastructure consisted of original 1958 buildings. ...continued on next page

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culture | baseball “home field advantage,” continued... The Indians have revamped offices and ticket windows, added a state-of-the-art concession stand, repaved walkways, and built a picnic area and flashy team store packed with Indians apparel that looks anything but minor league. You’ll notice all of this upon walking through the front gates, which also have been spiffed up. This is all part of keeping up with a baseball culture that has, over the years, required stadiums to up their game. No longer can a club — from the minor leagues all the way up to The Show — merely sell tickets, popcorn, watery beer and peanuts, and hope the product between the lines sells itself. Indians senior vice president Otto Klein, entering his 21st season with the organization, knows that he’s not just in the baseball business, but the entertainment business. “You have to believe that you are an entertainment choice, and that you’re not just providing baseball. We’ve understood that for years, but the physical part of the equation, we couldn’t do,” says Klein. “People accepted the fact that there were long lines and the food was pretty average, because the entertainment inside the park was so good it made up for that. Now we’ve put the whole package together.” Professional baseball has been played in Spokane for more than 100 years in one form or another, first at long-paved-over ballparks all but lost to memory. Around for 55 years, Avista Stadium has always been a national leader in attendance for short-season Class A baseball. In a given season, the stadium will be sold out as many as 10 times. The framework of the original 1958 offices remains, though the interiors have been completely redone. During renovation, the club’s history popped up in unexpected ways. After ripping up the floor of one office, workers discovered a safe embedded in the ground. It might have been from the Tommy Lasorda era, back when the Indians were the Dodgers’ AAA affiliate. Klein says they’re not sure what’s in there, but plan to open it up, perhaps even sometime this season. With the polished-up park now able to deliver gourmet cuisine, a bevy of beer choices and entertainment to keep the kids occupied during a less-than-riveting pitchers’ duel, you might wonder if the Indians are looking to step back up into a higher level of baseball. Remember, they are routinely filling a 6,800-seat stadium. That’s not in the cards, says Klein. First off, a longer season in Spokane would be dicey — Avista’s appeal wouldn’t be the same on a 45-degree April evening. Also, Klein says, they’ve got a good thing going here. “We have an awesome model, and why should we fix it when it’s not broken?” he says. “We know what we do well, and that’s provide affordable family entertainment.” n Spokane Indians opening day vs. Everett AquaSox • Fri, June 14 at 6:30 pm • Avista Stadium • 602 N. Havana St. • Tickets at spokaneindians.com

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CULTUrE | DIGEST

RADIO DIAL SURFING I

was just past the airport, whizzing west on I-90 at a carefully calculated six miles per hour over the posted limit, when I realized I’d left my iPod at home. I checked the glove box to find just one CD, but it had been broken in half by an unknown vehicular force. It was going to be a long drive to Seattle. There was little initial alarm at first, however, as a rerun of “Car Talk” played on Spokane’s own KSFC (91.9 FM) and I smirked at a few puns about distributor caps before the program dissolved into static somewhere near Ritzville. From there, I began surfing through the airwaves, haphazardly looking for listenable radio outside of the comfort of my preset hometown stations. I came across that same episode of “Car Talk” two more times on other stations throughout the drive, along with a baffling number of songs either a) in Spanish or b) about Jesus. It’s entirely possible some of those Spanish songs were about Jesus, too. Then, typically on the far right end of the dial, there were guys talking about Jesus. One of these guys said

901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638

that Jesus would be disappointed by the harm big banks have done to our economy. This notion seemed perfectly reasonable, but the radio producer then ironically proclaimed that his followers invest in gold and silver as a path to salvation. Around Cle Elum, I found KEYG (98.5 FM) a classic rock station that plays Queen, Led Zeppelin, David Bowie and, at least while I was listening, exactly zero Eagles. Near the top of Snoqualmie Pass, Seattle stations began poking over the mountaintops and I tuned into the rock station of youth, The End (107.7 FM) before tuning into the legendary 710 AM for a few scoreless innings of postDave Niehaus Seattle Mariners radio. The return trip was more of the same: NPR, Jesus, Spanish, Jesus, country music, classic rock and plenty of static. You should try this on your next road trip. Leave the iPod at home and rediscover your radio dial. If anything, it’s a crash course in American culture. — MIKE BOOKEY

For Your Consideration BY LEAH SOTTILE

ALBUM | Hush all your talk about the death of good music and go pick up a copy of QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE’s newest record, ...Like Clockwork. I’m hardly alone in arguing that Josh Homme and friends make the sexiest rock ‘n’ roll on the market, and this album — the band’s first in six years — only proves that. It’s full of the swaggering, lip-curling rock ‘n’ roll that Queens fans have come to love, and also features the return of the unmistakable Dave Grohl behind the kit. And there is nothing sexier than a man who knows how to hit his cymbals.

ZINE | When you meet someone like Taylor Weech, it reinvigorates your faith in young people. The local woman helmed the Youth Sustainability Council (and won an Inlander Peirone Prize for it), and now has started her zine and blog called TRUTH SCOUT, which is devoted to understanding the Israel-Palestine conflict. Weech recently traveled to the West Bank with the Interfaith Peace-Builders delegation to see the truth for herself. She’s also producing a documentary with her findings. Follow her travels or order a zine at truthscout.com.

FUN TIME | Seattle might no longer be the center of the rock ‘n’ roll universe, but the labels that boosted the scene back in the ’90s are still alive and kicking. Sub Pop Records celebrates its 25th anniversary on July 13 in Seattle with the SUB POP SILVER JUBILEE: a free concert featuring Built to Spill, Mudhoney, J Mascis, Greg Dulli, Shabazz Palaces, Shearwater, Father John Misty, Pissed Jeans, the Baptist Generals, King Tuff, Chad VanGaalen, METZ, clipping, Brothers of the Sonic Cloth, Endino’s Earthworm and more. Awesome.

For Reservations Call: 509.747.1041 or visit www.hotelrubyspokane.com

JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 25

CULTURE | THEATER

The Black Forest Lake City’s “steampunk” version of Into the Woods lends this dark comedy some welcome bite By E.J. Iannelli

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hen you’re out of the woods, as the expression runs, you’ve made it through a difficult situation with no chance of further reprisals or repercussions. To go into the woods, then, would naturally be the opposite: to enter into a tough situation with an uncertain outcome. And though the latter expression doesn’t really exist as such, that’s precisely the conceit of James Lapine’s and Stephen Sondheim’s 1986 tongue-in-cheek reworking of classic fairy tales, now playing in a self-styled “steampunk” version directed by Troy Nickerson on the Lake City Playhouse stage. With help from the Narrator (Mike Hynes), Into the Woods opens with a recap of the current status quo. The Baker (Andrew Ware Lewis) and his wife (Emily Cleveland) are unable to conceive. Little Red Ridinghood (Madison Rasmussen) has an insatiable appetite for the Baker’s goods and a fear of straying from the forest path on her way to see Granny (Teri Grubbs). Dimwitted, kindhearted Jack (Brendan Brady) wants to care for his desiccated old cow, but his mother (Renei Yarrow) has more practical concerns. Cinderella (Aubrey Shimek) wants to attend the royal festival and stop suffering her stepsisters’ abuse. Though familiar to the characters, this status quo is not a satisfactory one by any means; they collectively express their individual discontentment in aspirational “I wish” lines in Sondheim’s pulsating prologue. The machinations of the equally discontented Witch (Abbey Crawford), who’s secretly hiding her daughter — of sorts — Rapunzel (Christine Mullaly) in a tower, compel the Baker and his wife into the forest, where their paths will intersect with the other wish-seekers. As a metaphor made visual, the woods in

Nickerson’s steampunk version are better suited to the musical than most big-stage offerings. Thin, twisted metallic sheets climb up the walls like vines. Half-visible cogs and exposed mechanics create a cold, menacing environment. The setting feels claustrophobic, foreboding. So when the Wolf (Patrick McHenry-Kroetch) slinks out to seduce Red Ridinghood in his lascivious baritone, his threat and her uncertainty couldn’t be underscored by a more appropriate mise en scène. The factory-and-rag effect also lends this dark comedy a bite that’s missed in most stagings of Into the Woods, which, despite its frequent death and disenchantment, often lose sight of the emotional power of the discrete stories and instead bounce between twee and knowing. That’s partly a shortcoming of the source material — as is the introduction of the unseen Giant, which feels like second-act padding at the best of times. If there’s a single fault with this outstanding Lake City production (well, aside from ear-piercing screams being delivered with am-dram gusto), it’s that the Giant’s arrival doesn’t come off smoothly from either a technical or thematic standpoint. The delight of some of Sondheim’s most nimble wordplay, the lack of pretentiousness in the production’s steampunk theme, along with some stellar ensemble and star performances — Crawford, Rasmussen, Shimek and Ware Lewis all deserve particular mention — make this an excellent finale to a season of high-water marks at Lake City. n Into the Woods • Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm; through June 29 • $9.75-19.75 • Lake City Playhouse • 1320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • lakecityplayhouse.org • (208) 667-1323

culture continues after summer guide

uide

g summer

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

KEEP THE KIDS BUSY PULL OUT & SAVE

28 summer guide june 13, 2013

best summer the

ever!

We’ve done the hard part, assembling the ultimate summer bucket list that will take you on road trips (p. 81), to the movies (p. 58), up mountains (p. 34), down the Hiawatha Bike Trail (p. 52), to art school (p. 38), a music festival (p. 76), the ballpark (p. 70) and eventually across Lake Coeur d’Alene on a stand-up paddle board (p. 62). And that’s just to get you started. We’ve sorted everything into 12 categories (see “Contents”), while also providing the Inland Northwest’s definitive summer calendar (p. 87), with day-by-day recommendations sure to keep you busy. All you have to do is check ’em off!

CONTENTS Kids ................................ 30 Outdoors .....................34 Arts ................................ 38 Urban.............................41 Theater ........................ 45 Bikes .............................. 50 Sports ........................... 54 Film................................ 58 Water ............................ 62 Food .............................. 70 Music .............................76 Road Trips ...................81 Calendar ......................87

SUMMER GUIDE EDITOR Jacob H. Fries ART DIRECTOR Chris Bovey PHOTOGRAPHER Young Kwak DESIGN ASSISTANT Alissia Blackwood CALENDAR EDITOR Chey Scott WRITERS Mike Bookey, Annemarie C. Frohnhoefer, Heidi Groover, E.J. Iannelli, Jacob Jones, Scott A. Leadingham, Deanna Pan, Megan Petersen, Leah Sottile, Lisa Waananen, Daniel Walters

STATEHOOD DAY PARADE

July 3

WALLACE BLUES FESTIVAL

July 12 - 13

ATV JAMBOREE

July 21 - 27

ACCORDION FESTIVAL

August 9 - 11

HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL & 5K WALK/RUN

August 16 - 17

UNDER THE FREEWAY FLEA MARKET

August 31 - September 2

YULETIDE LIGHTING CELEBRATION

December 6 - 7 & 13 - 14

Historic Wallace Chamber of Commerce

208-753-7151

wallaceidahochamber.com JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 29

KIDS

BY DEANNA PAN

EXPERIMENT LIKE A MAD SCIENTIST (a)

Aaron Berenbach just set his hand on the fire. Inside a classroom at the Mobius Science Center on Main Avenue, Berenbach rolls up the sleeve of his flannel shirt, revealing a heavily tattooed forearm. He drips a bubbly mixture of water and dish soap (plus a secret flammable ingredient) into his hand. With a flick of his lighter, a quivering yellow-orange flame bursts from his palm and dissipates in seconds. He smiles; his hand is dry, unscathed. “It’s all about where the energy is flowing,” he explains. “The idea is flame travels, which direction?” Up? “Exactly, so most of the energy is trying to travel up,” he continues. “The other thing [that] is left in my hand is a small amount of water from the outside of the bubbles. Energy will travel wherever it is easy for the energy to travel.” In this case, he’s referring to the water, which just sopped up all the energy from the fire without burning his hand. As the education coordinator at Mobius, Berenbach specializes in a kind of DIY science that enthralls and mind-boggles children. He loves projects that are messy, fun and super-simple, meaning that even you could do them on a summer afternoon with your kids, whether it’s building your own rocket or combining household products to make mad-scientist slime. Here are some of Berenbach’s favorite hands-on experiments that will both impress and inspire the future scientists under your roof. MAKE YOUR OWN GOO. The ingredients you need are likely sitting in your pantry. To make putty, add 1 cup of Elmer’s School Glue to ¾ cup of water. Mix a tablespoon of 20 Mule Team Borax with ¼ cup of water. Combine the two mixtures. “It’s called a polymer, a chain of repeating molecules,” Berenbach explains. “When the Borax mixes with the glue, it causes the glue molecules to all the hook together so you form something like a slime or a putty.” For another lesson in kitchen chemistry, add two parts cornstarch to one part water and create “oobleck.” “It’s what we call a non-Newtonian fluid,” he says. “So it acts like a fluid, but it also acts like a solid, depending on how much energy is interacting with it.” BUILD A ROCKET. On a hot summer day, have handy an old twoliter bottle, a bicycle pump, and an Aquapod water-rocket launcher, which you can buy for about $30 on Amazon.com. “A rocket works on Newton’s third law — for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction,” Berenbach says. “So you need stuff inside the rocket that will go down [that’s the water], and as it pushes down, the rocket will push up into the air.” Stomp bottle rockets are another option. For those, you’ll need a 10-foot-long PVC pipe with a 90-degree elbow fitting, another 2-liter bottle to make the launcher and a lightweight, airtight paper rocket. When you stomp on the bottle connected at the mouth to a horizontal section of PVC pipe, your rocket, snugly affixed to the top of a vertical pipe section, will soar. If you want your kids to actually learn something from these experiments, Berenbach recommends asking a lot of questions. It’s OK if you need to look up the answers together. “These are really cool opportunities to spend time with your kids and do a cool, enriching activity that will make them think,” Berenbach says. “For the parents, it’s a chance to learn, too.”

30 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

(a)

Mobius’ Aaron Berenbach, who doesn’t recommend you try this particular trick at home. STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

(b)

(c)

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BUILD A FORT (b)

Your kids: restless, bored and cranky. You: slowly losing your mind. On rainy days and afternoons indoors, maintain your sanity and build a fort that will entertain your kids for hours. Here’s a blueprint for a simple one; all you need is a big plug-in fan, fitted sheet and something sturdy like a chair or small table. Place the fan near an electrical outlet and tuck the short end of the sheet around it. Make sure the side with the blades is covered. Stretch out the sheet and tuck the other end under a chair. Now plug in your fan, turn it on, and watch your billowy sheet transform into a “no parents allowed” hideout.

DIG FOR FOSSILS (c)

If you’ve ever fancied yourself an amateur paleontologist, investigating crusty stains and mysterious messes, pack a picnic and spend the day with your kids digging for prehistoric remains at the Stonerose Interpretive Center in Republic, Wash. The fossil site is located on an ancient lake bed, where Eocene-era impressions of insects, plants, fish and birds are encased in rock. You can bring your own chisel and hammer, or rent a set from the center. While admission is cheap ($8 for adults, $5 for kids and teens, free for children under 6), the 50-million-year-old treasures you and your kids bring home will be priceless. For hours and membership prices, check out stonerosefossil.org.

GET DIZZY AT SILVERWOOD (d)

Prepare to toss your cookies: The SpinCycle (not pictured) is now open at Silverwood Theme Park near Athol, Idaho. At 104 feet tall, the park’s latest thrill ride is its biggest yet, sending riders spinning and swinging, upside down and right-side up, in a giant purple pendulum for two to three minutes while their legs dangle in the air. If the mere thought of twirling through the sky like a T-shirt in the wash cycle is enough to make you green, take a gentle ride on the brand-new, biplane-themed Barnstormer. Buy your tickets or season pass at silverwoodthemepark.com.

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

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JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 31

KIDS

TRAILBLAZE WITH MUDGY AND MILLIE

Help Mudgy Moose find his miniature friend Millie Mouse in a game of hide and seek! First pick up a copy of Mudgy & Millie, a children’s picture book by Spokane native Susan Hagen Nipp, at Figpickels Toy Emporium in Coeur d’Alene. Starting at the base of Tubbs Hill, follow the book as you and your kids wander down the 2¼mile Mudgy Moose trail. As you make your way along the shores of Lake Coeur d’Alene, through downtown and finally to Independence Point (where — shh! — Millie was hiding all along!), look at out for five life-size bronze statues of Mudgy. Top off your tour of the city with an ooey-gooey peanut butter cup sundae at the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s Dockside restaurant.

Mountain

BIKE

ROUTE of the HIAWATHA CROWN JEWEL of America’s Rails to Trails

ALL DOWNHILL SHUTTLE BACK TO TOP

TICKETS ■ RENTALS ■ SHUTTLES Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area operates the Route of the Hiawatha under a special use permit from USFS

32 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

INFORMATION ■ PICNIC LUNCHES

at Lookout Pass Ski Area

208.744.1301 ridethehiawatha.com

OXARC TRAINING CENTER GREAT MEETING • GREAT LOCATION

DISSECT SQUIDS, BATTLE ZOMBIES, SOLVE CRIMES

➲ Multimedia Classroom ➲ Touch Screen Control ➲ Latest Technology ➲ Plug and Play ➲ Multi-level Comfortable Seating ➲ Reception & Kitchen Area

Calling all aspiring marine biologists, zombie hunters, crime scene investigators and roboticists: This summer, Mobius Science Center and Children’s Museum are offering one- or two-day camps where kids can learn anatomy, physics, chemistry and engineering while still having buckets of fun. While your preschooler tears apart squid innards and writes her name in blue-black ink-sac goo, your older kids can learn how to analyze forensic evidence and program LEGO robots, or how to best bludgeon to death an undead zombie by applying Newton’s Laws of Motion. The cost for each camp varies, but Mobius members will snag slightly better deals. Space is limited, so sign up soon at mobiusspokane.org. n

Call Today to Reserve Space 509.535.7794 | 800.765.9055 4003 E. Broadway | Spokane | www.oxarc.com

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

18th Annual

NOV. 9-10, 2013 8 STAGES AND OVER 100 PREFORMERS!

MUSICIANS, DANCERS, STORYTELLERS, CRAFTERS NEEDED For the 18th Annual Fall Folk Festival November 9-10, 2013 | Spokane Community College

Applications Now Available Online spokanefolkfestival.org Due July 1 Participants should reflect the mission of the festival and the Folklore Society -- to promote a broader community awareness of cultural and folk traditions.

june 13, 2013 summer guide 33

OUTDOORS

BY JACOB JONES

CLIMB A MOUNTAIN

Summer means adventure: Explore new frontiers. Get back to nature. Take on the great wilderness that makes up the beautiful Inland Northwest. How? Go climb a freaking mountain. MOUNT SPOKANE gets most of its attention in the winter, but it continues to serve as an outdoor playground long after the snow melts. At 5,886 feet, it towers over the surrounding countryside. One of the tallest points in the region, the peak anchors Mount Spokane State Park, the state’s largest park at 13,919 acres. That’s a lot of outdoors to enjoy. Park ranger Jerry Johnson says the mountain offers a much-needed escape for many. Just 35 miles from downtown Spokane, the mountain and surrounding state park provide plenty of wildlife, natural beauty and quiet. “You’re not going to see a lot of people,” he says. “You can get out of the hustle and bustle.” Johnson estimates the park gets about 400,000 visitors each year. They take advantage of camping, hiking, fishing and other recreational activities available throughout the park. With granite rocks jutting out of pine and cedar forests, the park serves as prime habitat for deer, moose, bears and a variety of small animals. The park features 100 miles of hiking trails, another 100 miles of horse trails and 90 miles of bike trails. “You’ve got wildflowers and birds and the wildlife,” Johnson says, listing the natural attractions that bring people up the mountain each summer. The park manages eight different campsites with water and restrooms. One group camping location also accommodates up to 60 people. Camping fees start at $12 a night and go up depending on the size of the group or number of vehicles. For a rustic overnight experience, visitors can rent the Quartz Mountain Fire Lookout, a small wildfire lookout post at 5,129 feet with wraparound window views. Be warned: The lookout costs $93 a night and books up fast. Sure the park is pretty, but what about the peak? From the top, Johnson says you can see out for miles across three states. The summit has unparalleled 360-degree vistas of the entire Inland Northwest. “You can see the mountains of Montana,” he says. “You can see the mountains of Canada.” And a road goes all the way to the top if you’re not into hiking. Mount Spokane State Park, like all state parks, requires a Discovery Pass for access. Day passes can be purchased at the park. Ranger Johnson’s last piece of advice: Don’t forget bug spray.

34 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Mount Spokane, and the view from the top.

(a)

GET MUDDY (a)

As a kid, summer usually involved days of running, playing, flailing, getting dirty and mostly just being ridiculous. The Muddy Miles obstacle course basically packs all that into two miles, with an emphasis on the running and getting dirty. Described as “North Idaho’s Muddiest Race,” the Muddy Miles race is July 20 at the Kootenai County Fairgrounds. Tickets cost $26 for an adult, $90 for a family. More information and registration at muddymiles.org.

SHOOT A GUN

Nothing blows off stress like blasting through a couple hundred rounds at the gun range. Hone your aim, have fun and stick it to the liberals. For outdoor shooting, the Mica Gun Range southeast of Spokane offers a long rifle range for public use. The recently reopened Farragut State Park gun range in Idaho also offers several shooting bays. Both ranges cost $5 a day, but have limited hours. Shooters should check ahead on availability and safety rules.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 35

OUTDOORS

scheduled in Eastern Washington, including multiple trips to the Colville National Forest and Mount Spokane. Regional events can be found at wta.org/ volunteer. “Anywhere there are trails, we will go,” she says.

Blaze a Trail (b)

A small army of volunteers gathers each summer to repair broken-down trails. With hundreds of miles of trail crisscrossing Washington, they fix bridges, clear landslides, cut out fallen timber and restore popular hiking routes throughout the state. Feel like getting your hands dirty? For 20 years, the WASHINGTON TRAILS ASSOCIATION has coordinated trail maintenance work parties and backcountry expeditions to repair recreational trails. Spokeswoman Susan Elderkin says almost 2,700 volunteers helped restore 170 trails last year. “It’s really rewarding to give a little back to the trails they love,” she says. “People take a lot of pride and ownership in the trails that they work on.” The association offers a wide variety of volunteering opportunities to fit any outdoor enthusiast with an urge to blaze a trail. Some easy programs involve a day of work on an easily accessible trail while others involve several days of backpacking into remote areas. “We have volunteers who are 10 years old,” she says, “and we have volunteers who are 70 years old.” Many volunteers start with a daylong work event, she says, working an eight-hour day at a trail within easy driving distance. The association provides tools and guidance. No experience is required. One unique program offers “volunteer vacations” that combine daytime work with a more leisurely camping experience in the evenings over a few days. Guides provide fine dining and time for relaxation. More intense volunteers can sign up for a Backcountry Response Team event to hike into the hills for hard-to-reach work. Workers carry their own supplies and tools into the hills for the projects. All trail volunteers receive vouchers they can use to obtain free annual park access passes, including a Discovery Pass. Elderkin says several work parties have been

Hot Dog Hut

Go Off The Grid (c)

Step away from all those emails. Ditch the Facebook statuses and tweets. The Inland Northwest offers many remote areas to escape cellphone service, but remember what it means to be unplugged. Bring a map. Usually, you can find your way with GPS or Google Maps, but you may lose signal in mountainous areas. A printed map will help keep you oriented the old-fashioned way. Be self-contained. Carry a first-aid kit for minor medical issues. Make sure you have a reliable spare tire. Pack repair tools so you can fix things yourself. Look for land lines. Remember those? In steep areas, they may be the only option for getting word out in emergencies. Keep track of where the nearest phone may be and pack a calling card for pay phones.

Keep Learning

Summer school should be fun. Learn how to cook over a campfire, scale a rocky cliff or treat an injury in outdoor classes at local schools and outfitters. REI Spokane has a class on dog first aid scheduled for June 20, with information on canine care. Camp Cooking Basics for Backpackers will be held July 26. Other classes available online. The Post Falls Cabela’s store plans to hold seminars on fly fishing on June 29, July 6, July 27 and Aug. 10. The two-hour course covers equipment, casting and knot tying. The store also holds classes on archery, hunting and boating safety. North Idaho College also offers non-credit courses for the public in rock climbing, kayaking and sailing. Fees and registration can be found at www.nic.edu. n

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Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

Thursday, August 1st

INDIGO GIRLS with Shook Twins Microbrew Tasting

Friday, August 2nd

An Evening with

CAKE

FESTIVAL ATSANDPOINT THE

AUGUST 1-11, 2013

Super Country Saturday August 3rd

ROSANNE CASH with THE GREENCARDS and DEVON WADE Sunday, August 4th FAMILY CONCERT “An invitation to the Dance” Thursday, August 8th

JOHN BUTLER TRIO with ECLECTIC APPROACH Friday, August 9th

STEVE MILLER BAND with MATT ANDERSON Super Saturday August 10th

THE AVETT BROTHERS with

VINTAGE TROUBLE and MARSHALL MCLEAN

Sunday, August 11th

Grand Finale

“Festival Fan Fare”

SPOKANE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Taste of the Stars Wine Tasting

Become a fan of The Festival at Sandpoint on facebook today and follow us on twitter too!

1-888-265-4554 Or order online at:

www.FestivalAtSandpoint.com JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 37

ARTS

BY CHEY SCOTT

LEARN ART SKILLS FROM THE PROS (a)

So one of the things you plan to do this summer is improve your drawing skills, or maybe your oil painting techniques. Painting realistic-looking plant life or drawing the human form can be challenging. Whether you’re looking to become the Inland Northwest’s next big name in the arts or just want to casually dabble in pastels, acrylics, pencil or charcoal, the variety of art classes offered this summer has got you covered. Become a temporary understudy to one of the Inland Northwest’s professional artists in a class at the SPOKANE ART SCHOOL, which offers workshops all summer for kids, teens and adults at its Garland District studio, next door (809 W. Garland Ave.) to the Tinman Gallery. Notable local artists scheduled to teach there this summer include Jery Haworth, Tom Quinn and Ken Spiering. Quinn, a Spokane-based painter whose work you may recall seeing in the massive mural featuring notable Spokanites on the side of a Gonzaga District bar, teaches a class this summer on painting cloud formations in oil paint (July 13, $30, high school to adults), along with workshops on other art techniques in which he’s proficient. Budding artists also can take a peek into the world of Spiering’s Palouse studio. In case you don’t know, his most recognizable piece is The Childhood Express, aka the red wagon slide in Riverfront Park. The two-day workshop (June 21-22, $85, ages 16 and up) aptly titled “Painting Dynamic and Believable Foliage in Watercolor” involves painting naturally growing foliage on Spiering’s 7-acre Valleyford, Wash., farm. During the workshop’s second day, Spiering provides individual attention to students as they paint “en plein air.” Class schedules and registration are available online at spokaneartschool.net. Farther south on the Palouse, visiting and resident professional artists at ARTISANS AT THE DAHMEN BARN in Uniontown, Wash. — about 20 minutes south of Pullman on Highway 195 — pool their skill sets to create a diverse schedule of limited-attendance classes, allowing for one-on-one instruction with students. Dahmen Barn manager Leslee Miller regularly recruits experienced, widely recognized professional artists from around the region to teach art skills at the big, white historic barn surrounded by an eye-catching fence made of more than 1,000 now-rusted metal wheels from every type of farm machinery imaginable. Regional artists teaching classes this summer at the creative arts center — which also includes a gallery, retail shop and artist studios and hosts performance events and live music — include veteran North Idaho painter Diana Moses Botkin and Dahmen resident artist Carrie Vielle, who mostly works in drawing and painting. If you’re planning a big vacation this summer, think about first brushing up on your sketching skills in one of Vielle’s classes on how to maintain a travel sketchbook. In the daylong workshop on July 13 ($75, ages 16+), Vielle plans to teach techniques and tips for sketching on location — the artist has led many trips to Europe focused on sketching art and architecture — along with other creative ways to record the sensory experiences of traveling. Keep in mind that most of the Dahmen Barn’s classes admit a maximum of 10 to 12 students to allow for individualized instruction, so register early if a class this summer sparks your creativity. View the full class schedule at artisanbarn.org.

(a)

(b)

38 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

(c)

GO ON AN EVENING ARTS WALK (b)

In Spokane, we’ve come to expect that new art gallery shows always open on First Friday, taking place this summer on July 5 and Aug. 2. In Coeur d’Alene, residents know that new art exhibits always open for the Second Friday ArtWalk, July 12 and Aug. 9. If you want to break out of that routine, head a little farther out of the metro area to enjoy self-guided art walks in outlying towns, like Sandpoint’s ArtWalk, which features exhibits at downtown galleries all summer, from June 21 through Sept. 6. On the Palouse, the Moscow Artwalk takes place on June 14, though some exhibits stay up for longer than just that evening. The Pullman ArtWalk is set for July 19 and 20, and in the little town of Palouse, an hour and a half south of Spokane, the Palouse Art Walk goes on for a full nine days, from June 21-29.

HEAR THE SOUNDS OF THE SYMPHONY, OUTDOORS (c)

There’s something about sitting on a blanket in the grass, sipping on an ice-cold beer or glass of wine while listening to the melodious sounds of strings, that makes for a perfect summer evening. Every summer during its off-season, members of the Spokane Symphony pick up their bows and don their classic black-and-whites to perform outdoors in two popular concert series. Soiree on the Edge, July 31 and Aug. 7, features the orchestra on the scenic grounds of Arbor Crest Winery, and the Labor Day Weekend at the Parks series, Aug. 31 at Liberty Lake’s Pavillion Park and Sept. 2 at Comstock Park, has marked the official end of summer for the past 27 years.

SPEND AN AFTERNOON AT THE MAC (d)

When it’s 96 degrees out and you don’t have air conditioning — or have AC but just want to get out of the house — there’s one other place we can think of that starts with an M, other than the mall or a movie theater, that offers AC as well as mind stimulation: a museum. The Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, aka The MAC, features five exhibits this summer that are open during regular museum hours, Wed-Sun from 10 am-5 pm. Make sure not to miss “David Douglas: A Naturalist at Work” before it goes away after Aug. 25. Ongoing exhibits open through the summer include “Lasting Heritage,” “Two to Tango: Artist and Viewer,” “SPOMa: Spokane Modern Architecture,” and a new exhibit opening June 30 called “Inland Northwest Narrative: Crossroads and Confluence.” Don’t forget that tours of the Campbell House are included in your museum admission ($5-$7).

(d)

FOOD SPECIALS 5 – 9 PM LIVE MUSIC 6 – 9 PM All you can eat Barbecue Buffet $14 Flight and a pint of featured micros $7

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JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 39

arts URBAN Start slamming — poetry, that is

Sure, it sounds like a mega-hipster hobby, the kind that — if you want to talk stereotypes — attracts angsty teens, troubled writers and modern beatniks wearing all black with chunkyframed glasses, but the fact of the matter is that Spokane’s performance poetry scene is becoming widely recognized and locally celebrated, and for good reason. From Aug. 13-17, SPOKANE POETRY SLAM is sending a team to compete in the National Poetry Slam competition in Boston. It’s very prestigious for a team to even be accepted into the competition, says SPS organizer Isaac Grambo. Only 70 teams from across the U.S. and Canada made the cut, and teams that didn’t can only hope that another team is disqualified or drops out between now and the competition. While it’s too late to get your hopes up about making it to Nationals this year, at least as a competitor, Spokane Poetry Slam has plenty of opportunities all summer long to practice your verses in front of a mic and an audience. Each month, SPS hosts two open-mic poet-

ry slams, BOOTSLAM at Boots Bakery & Lounge (July 7, Aug. 4 and Sept. 1 at 7 pm, all-ages), and the monthly SPOKANE POETRY SLAM at Scout Tavern (July 21 and Aug. 18 at 8 pm). In addition to those monthly events, two other regularly scheduled spoken word openmics that offer a good atmosphere for aspiring slammers to test their skills or listen to more experienced readers are the 3-MINUTE MIC at Auntie’s Bookstore (July 5 and Aug. 2, all-ages) and BROKEN MIC (Wednesdays at 6 pm, allages) at Neato Burrito. Don’t miss the chance to experience the mesmerizing word-manipulating skills of the SPS Nationals team in a special TEAM SPOKANE 2013 SHOWCASE FUNDRAISER (July 12 at 7 pm at Auntie’s) featuring performances by all four of the team’s poets. Find out more at spokanepoetryslam.org. n

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

The Best FREE Music Festival IN WASHINGTON!

Spokane Poetry Slam

July 19 & 20 EPHRATA The Best FREE Music Festival WASHINGTON! The BestIN FREE Music Festival 2013

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Steve Lovitt 3KYDD Design©2013 Steve Lovitt 3KYDD Design©2013 Steve Lovitt 3KYDD Design©2013

                    Saturday ~          downtown ephrata

CAR & CYCLE SHOW Rotary RIM 2 RIM 3 on 3 Basketball  FRIDAY ~ JULY 19 SATURDAY ~ JULY 20 Rotary RIM 2 RIM 3 on9pm 3 Basketball & More!    KIDS ACTIVITIES  HEADLINER 9pm HEADLINER & More! KIDSCherry ACTIVITIESPoppin’ FRIDAY ~Steve JULY 19 SATURDAY ~ JULY 20 9pm HEADLINER Holy HEADLINER 9pm Cherry Poppin’ Daddies This Year’s F Steve N.W. Artist with Holy 7pm Hamilton Loomis 7pm LONELY FOREST Daddies

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21 and Over Event

URBAN

BY DANIEL WALTERS

WATCH FIREWORKS FROM A DOWNTOWN PARKING GARAGE (a)

Worshipers of trees and rivers and rocks just don’t get it. There is beauty in nature, yes. But the cities? That’s where the real wonder can be found. Even a modest city like Spokane is filled with multistory monuments of concrete, celebrations of man’s singular ability to harness strength, steel and a millennia of compound brilliance. Those high-rise parking garages are more than places to dump the Corolla while you jaunt around downtown, shopping local. They’re vantage points. Late in the evening, you can stand on the roof of these garages, look up the night sky, or look down at the city lights below. On one late summer evening, drive or walk to the top of the PARKADE, CITY RAMP, the BANK OF AMERICA parking structure, or even the RIVER PARK SQUARE garage. (After all, your parking meter change is still paying for it.) Chill. Look around. Have a drink. Listen to the sounds of the city. This Fourth of July, Riverfront Park will have its usual Independence Day celebration, with music, square dancing, face-painting, a magician, and of course fireworks. The downtown parking garages can make for an unconventional but memorable viewing spot, a place to set up a lawn chair, gaze down at the city, and watch all the bombs bursting and rockets glaring.

SURVIVE THE ROLLER DERBY (b)

This summer, Spokane’s downtown Convention Center holds anime conventions, church services and merchandising shows. But none of those can match the no-holds-barred, beat ’em up, visceral thrill of roller derby. Head to the Spokane Convention Center to watch our Lilac City Roller Girls — in all their gritty, purple, knee-padded glory — crush the whiney Yakima Wine County Crushers on June 15 and smash the sickly Corvallis Sick Town S.M.A.S.H. on July 27. Both bouts start at 6:30 pm, and tickets are $12 ($10 for seniors/students/military). More info at lilaccityrollergirls.com.

(a)

360 KICKFLIP-TO-INDY AT THE UTF SKATEPARK

The skating community gets mad if we imply the downtown Under the Freeway skatepark is a gritty hellscape, rife with knife fights and bum-ollieing (apparently it’s not), so we’ll just stick to skaterapproved lingo: Hey bro, the UTF, near Lewis and Clark High School, is a totally tubular place for radical dudes to catch gnarly air, grab some grindage, and get down old school. To the XTREME!

(b)

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 41

AQUATIC PROGRAMS FOR ALL AGES Private Swim Lessons

Water Aerobics

One-on-one instruction. Perfect for those new to the water or training for a triathalon and good for all ages.

A great way to build strength and cardio with little or no impact on your joints. All ages and level of activity are welcome.

Group Swim Lessons

Lap Swim

Small classes with lots of individual attention, perfect for children of all ages and abilities, 3 years and up.

Excellent for cross training, basic exercise, and general fitness. Shallow water walking or deep water jogging is also available.

URBAN

Contact: Gary Kessie - 509.777.4246 www.whitworth.edu/aquaticscenter

(c)

POWWOW IT UP AT RIVERFRONT PARK (c)

Whitworth University Aquatic Center

42 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

After being canceled in 2011, the Spokane Falls Northwest Indian Encampment and Powwow returned last year, drawing dancers from all over the Pacific Northwest and Canada. This year, the Aug. 23-24 festivities at Riverfront Park will include an Indian market. It’s held in the middle of the city instead of on a reservation to draw the many Indians who don’t live on a reservation and to meet at the Spokane River, a traditional gathering place for the tribes.

PICNIC UNDER THE RAGING FALLS

There’s a path behind the old Washington Water Power building near Riverfront Park, and a staircase that leads to a downhill path. At the very bottom, you can look out and see the mighty Spokane River falling behind you. Not a bad spot to pull out the ol’ checkered tablecloth, unpack some sandwiches and have a sunshine-drenched summer lunch.

GNAW RAW RHUBARB IN NEWPORT

CLIMB THE LANTERN STATUE

Sometimes city life is best experienced in a tiny town. And in our region, every village gets its day. Reardan has Mule Days, Elk has Pioneer Days, Pullman has the National Lentil Festival. Me? I’m a rhubarb man. Cake, pie, sauce that I drizzle over vanilla ice cream — I’ll do a lot of things and go a long way to get myself some quality rhubarb. So I have my eye on the Rhubarb Festival up in Newport at the CREATE Art Center, June 15 from 10 am to 3 pm.

Local artist Harold Balazs is famous for weaving together abstract sculptures of enamel and steel. You’ll find several of his sculptures throughout Spokane, but perhaps the most iconic is the 20-foot “Lantern” on the side of the Opera House. It can be climbed. It’s meant to be climbed. Go when it’s dark. Hand over hand, climb to the top (at your own risk, of course), read what is inscribed there, and receive Balazs’ wisdom. Go home a wiser, more serene person.

The Spin Doctors

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

The Boxcars

g Band urth Marchin The MarchFo

Moses Lake SUMMER CONCERT & Centennial Amphitheatre, McCosh Park All Concerts and Movies are FREE! All Movies Start at Dusk.

May 26th Free Movie in the Park July 4th Celebration 5pm Community Picnic 8pm The Rhythm Nation 10pm Fireworks

July 12th Free Movie in the Park July 19th Free Movie in the Park July 26th Five Suns Bluegrass Festival 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm

Topstring North Country Kevin Pace & The Early Edition Chris Jones & The Night Drivers The Boxcars

2013

MOVIE SERIES

July 27th Five Suns Bluegrass Festival 4pm 5pm 6pm 7pm 8pm 9pm

Kevin Pace & The Early Edition Open Mic Topstring North Country Chris Jones & The Night Drivers The Boxcars

August 2nd Free Movie in the Park August 3rd Amphitheatre Concert

8pm The MarchFourth Marching Band

August 30th Free Movie in the Park August 31st Amphitheatre Concert 8pm The Spin Doctors

Produced by Moses Lake Parks & Recreation. For more information

Open Daily Memorial Day through Labor Day McCosh Park • 401 W 4th Ave. • Moses Lake, WA 98837

(509) 764-3842 • surfnslide.com • mlrec.com Sponsored in part by: Bud Clary Toyota of Moses Lake, ConAgra Foods Lamb Weston BSW, Sterling Bank, Weinstein Beverage, Grant County Tourism, KBSN/KDRM RADIO, Columbia Basin Herald, A to Z Rental Company, AmeriStay Inn & Suites, Lioness Club of Moses Lake, Chemi-Con Materials Corp., Washington Trust Bank, Zip Truck Lines Inc., Lemargie, Kenison, Wyman & Whitaker, REC Silicon Inc., Moses Lake Clinic, KWIQ Radio, SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, Law Office of Calbom & Schwab, P.S.C., Lad Irrigation Co., Akzo Nobel Pulp and Performance Chemicals, Lil’ Chiefs Child Care Center LLC, Washington State Potato Commission and Signs Now

509.764.3805 www.mlrec.com JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 43

URBAN

(d)

PLAY BOCCE AT MANITO (d)

With parks like Manito and Riverfront in the middle of the city, it’s no surprise that Spokane is a finalist in Outside Magazine’s Best Towns contest. We’ve got a lot of green space, a perfect spot for croquet or a little bit of bocce. Don’t have the balls? Use rocks and pine cones instead, like the cavemen did when they played bocce.

FEED THE GOAT SPOKANE’S LITTER

Environmental concerns like the Earth’s ever-rising temperature have eclipsed simpler concerns like “Give a Hoot, Don’t Pollute.” But summer remains an ideal time to teach your kids that part of being a good person is learning to pick up the messes other people made (a crucial skill for someday living in a college dorm). Go on a walk downtown, searching for discarded paper cups, candy wrappers, plastic bags and other signs of urban decay. Then take the pile you’ve collected and feed it to the hungry metal goat in Riverfront Park. The spirit of Expo ’74 lives.

RUN/ROLLERBLADE/POGOSTICK THE NEW CENTENNIAL TRAIL SECTION

The Centennial Trail is one of Spokane’s coolest features, but it’s amazing how many Spokanites never bother to actually set foot on it. With a whole new section through Kendall Yards due to be completed this summer, it’s a perfect time to try it out. We don’t care how you choose to traverse the trail — walk, run, skip, bike, skate, longboard, Segway, crab walk — summer is about moving and being outside. This summer, let the treadmill and elliptical rest. Go Centennial. n

44 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

theater

By E.J. IANNELLI

Take a vacation — from your comfort zone

Live theater is best, we’re often told, when it shakes us out of our complacency. This summer, individual theater groups and venues across the Inland Northwest seem especially eager to help audiences pry themselves out of their comfort zones with a string of provocative, absurd or unconventional productions. The first is THE MARRIAGE OF BETTE AND BOO at Ignite!, which shows weekends until June 30. Written by Christopher Durang and rooted in his childhood experiences in a devout Roman Catholic household, this award-winning play offers snapshots of the grotesqueries lurking beneath the veneer of the middle-class American family through a series of farcical interconnected scenes. Sure, other dark comedies have pulled the veil from our romanticized notions of family life, but how many of them have stillbirths as a running joke? On the first Friday of every month, the Blue Door Theatre stages SHORT STACKS. This is experimental improv — new material as well as old ideas that need refining — peppered with stand-up comedy, music and anything else that might fall under that umbrella. Or doesn’t quite. Tickets are just $5, so it’s low-risk, and shows begin at the kid-unfriendly hour of 10 pm to reflect the fact that they might get a bit risqué. On the last two weekends in July, Spokane Stage Left will put on David Hare’s STUFF HAPPENS, a “history play” that takes its name from one of Donald Rumsfeld’s countless insouciant witticisms during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Depending on your political leanings, it could either be shocking or déjà vu. When you’ve checked those off your list, you can out your inner queen and lighten the mood at GAY CAMP at Interplayers. Co-starring Ken Urso, who racked up laughs on the same stage earlier this year in boom!, this over-thetop comedy about two “confused” campers promises to have “more innuendo than you can shake a dildo at!” There are just two performances: July 27 and Aug. 3. To close out your summer of anti-complacency, don’t miss BAT BOY: THE MUSICAL, which runs at Lake City Playhouse from July 25 to Aug. 10. It’s not about baseball — it’s about the supposed discovery of a freakish batlike boy that made the front page of supermarket tabloids back in 1992. Outlandish humor and toe-tapping music soften the sting of its unsettling take-home lessons on fear, hypocrisy, scapegoating and prejudice.

Blue Door Theatre (above); Bat Boy and Gay Camp (below).

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 45

theater

(a)

Go camping (a)

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“In this business of show, you have to have the heart of an angel and the hide of an elephant,” an aspiring actor once said. Theatrical summer camps might not be the place to equip your elementary-aged child or teen with either, but will give them a good grounding in equally important fundamentals — like blocking, costuming, projection or simply memorizing lines. And though camps provide a productive, enriching activity tailored for kids (not to mention a welcome break for parents), wider attendance at the final performances turns it into a rewarding family affair. One of the dozens of camps on offer at the Civic this summer involves the STAR WARS TRILOGY. In the three weeks between July 15 and Aug. 2, children in grades 4-6 will have the opportunity to perform the three classic parts to the intergalactic saga. Visit spokanecivictheatre.com for the full camp lineup. Prefer something less epic and more noir? In collaboration with the MAC, Interplayers offers a MURDER MYSTERY THEATRE CAMP for children of all skill levels in grades 4-8 starting on June 17. The end result will be three showings of the thriller Sorry, Wrong Number. The camp runs two weeks and is conveniently divided into morning or afternoon sessions ($195 each) or full days for $295. Mornings focus on backstage elements; afternoons concentrate on performance. Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre caters to a broader range of ages in its 2013 KIDS CAMPS. For a cool $195, children and teens aged 8 to 19 are guaranteed a full day (9 am to 3 pm) at camp and a spot in Cindy and Her Fella (July 20 to 26) or Little Red Riding Hood (Aug. 10 to 16). Of course, for a lot less money but a little more time investment, you can always show some MICKEY ROONEY/JUDY GARLAND-style moxie and stage a play with the neighborhood kids right in your own backyard.

Take in five plays in two days

On July 12 and 13, the Pend Oreille Players will hold its fourth annual one-act play festival at the Pend Oreille Playhouse. The selections have been penned by moonlighting or professional playwrights from across the country and include: Mom’s Coming for Christmas by John Franceschini of Irvine, Calif., Audition by Jeff Sult of Valley Stream, N.Y., Poof! by Russell Weeks of Seattle, Dog Fight by Donna Barkman of Ossining, N.Y. and The Pub Menagerie by Tim Scheurer of Westerville, Ohio. Tickets are a reasonable $10.50 per day.

THURSDAY • JULY 4TH, 2013

HEADLINE ENTERTAINMENT

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Creating a loving, positive learning experience for children of all ages SINCE 1997

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TRAVEL THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD

(4 weeks required)

Sandpoint Onstage is presenting The Wizard of Oz, L. Frank Baum’s classic book-cum-musical-cum-movie, at the historic Panida Theater in Sandpoint on Friday and Saturday evenings between June 28 and July 14. And for this one, the community theater organization is following the yellow brick road en masse: They’ve assembled a cast of more than 50 local actors plus a full pit orchestra. Ticket prices fall between $12 and $17. Details at sandpointonstage.com or panida.org.

State Pay Welcome Accepting children 4 Weeks - 12 Yrs

8502 N. Nevada, Suite 1 Spokane, WA (509) 465-2710

GET OUT OF THE 9-TO-5 ROUTINE (b)

June is... Idaho Wine Month

48 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

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V Visit idahowines.org idahowin to learn more.

(b)

Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre has rightfully earned a reputation for putting on popular musicals in grand style, although that style comes at a price: Adult tickets cost $42. Their production of 9 to 5 — which runs Thursdays through Sundays from Aug. 15 to 25 — doesn’t necessarily promise to be any more outstanding than the productions of Big River, Mary Poppins and Romance Romance that precede it this season, but it’s a great chance to see a show that hit Broadway as recently as 2009.

Blues Festival FEATU R I NG: SATURDAY Main Stage line-up

11am Bakin’ Phat 1pm Big Mumbo Blues Band 3pm Seth Freeman 5pm Nikki Hill 7pm John Németh 9pm Ian Siegal

Anita Royce & the Highrollers Bakin’ Phat Big Mumbo Blues Brother Music Caden Davis Charlie Butts & the Filtertips Doghouse Boyz Fat Tones Ian Siegal Jim Tilden Brown John Nemeth

Laffin’ Bones Kenny James Miller Band Nikki Hill Robb Boatsman Roberson, BZ & Flores Sammy Eubanks Sara Brown Band Seth Freeman Stacy Jones Band VooDoo Church

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GEO-ADVENTURES! NOW BOOKING FOR 2013

MAY-NOVEMBER: “Is All This Mining Really Necessary?” This geo-adventure is open for field trips and groups of 12 or more, with two options available this year.

ADD TECHNICOLOR TO YOUR LIFE

Adventure #1: Gem Hill dig for crystals and minerals.

There’s a reason Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat — the first-ever successful stage collaboration by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice — has long since become a staple of musical theater: It’s musically rich, visually vibrant and allages-appropriate. This production could justifiably be called camp — but only insofar as it’s staged by the roughly 25 top-notch teens who make the cut for the Civic’s Main Stage Performance Camp. Performances run Wednesday to Sunday, Aug. 9 to 18. More info at spokanecivictheatre.com.

GET SHAKESPEAREAN (c)

(c)

Henry V — the fourth and final part of Shakespeare’s “Henriad” — will get an open-air staging in Liberty Lake’s Pavillion Park on Sunday, Aug. 25 from 5 to 9 pm. The performance grounds are slightly too far away from the lake itself to recall the port of Southampton, where the king embarked on his quest to conquer France, but the outdoor atmosphere definitely will add a little something extra to the mood. n

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learn out of a book. It is something that must be experienced. This course is designed with that specifically in mind, we want you to LOVE what you do!

Adventure #2: Gem Hill dig plus dig for fossils, petrified wood & thundereggs!

June 29, July 28 & Aug 24 Family Dig Days! Open to All!

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JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 49

BIKES

BY HEIDI GROOVER

OUTFIT YOURSELF

You’re looking to get in shape or help the environment. Gas is getting expensive. The price of parking downtown is a downright injustice. Whatever your reason, it’s easier than you think to start biking more. FIRST, THE MACHINE. Whether it’s in your garage, on Craigslist or at a local shop, find one that’s in good shape and fits you. Ask a lot of questions. Make sure you know where the bike came from and consider taking it to a local shop for an inspection before you shell out the cash. Two Wheel Transit co-owner Geoff Forshag says $30 to $45 will buy you the “peace of mind” of an expert at his shop looking the bike over so you know it’s a good buy (and can negotiate price based on any weaknesses). As a basic guideline, a good used bike should run you about half of its original price, Forshag says. Shops can also help you tell if a bike fits you, but as a general rule, stand over the top tube and make sure there’s at least an inch and a half between you and the bike. When you sit and reach for the handlebars, make sure you don’t feel too stretched out. South Perry nonprofit shop Pedals2People sells used bikes, many of which start at less than $100, or will help you build your own. The shop offers certain open hours (check pedals2people.org) when they’ll help you learn to work on your bike. REI Spokane also offers occasional free bike maintenance classes. The next one, specifically for women, is June 27. SECOND, THE RIDING. Get a good helmet and lights. Wear comfortable clothes, but don’t feel the need to buy the most expensive gear out there, says Pedals2People mechanic Erik Solberg. Set goals and find someone else who rides to stay motivated and accountable. If you want to commute, practice your route on a day off to scope out problem areas. Look for riding groups like the women’s group Belles and Baskets, the Spokane Bicycle Club or Two Wheel Transit’s free Thursday and Saturday rides starting and ending at Manito Tap House. THIRD, THE “CULTURE.” When you don’t know how to change a flat or what your brand of messenger bag says about you, it can be scary to walk into a local shop of experts and enthusiasts or to join them for a ride. But remember that most people who are passionate about bikes want you to share their love. “The reason we’re there is we do have that knowledge, but we want to share that knowledge,” Solberg says. “That culture of exclusivity is pretty pervasive throughout bike culture. … [Our] goal is to overcome that.”

Mechanic Dave Mannino repairs a bicycle at Two Wheel Transit. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

50 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

SAY FAREWELL TO THE F---ING BIKE CLUB (a)

(b)

The monthly nighttime rides have been taking to the streets for six years, but the July ride will be the club’s last. Founder Jeff Everett (pictured) says he wants to focus on family and his full-time job as a graphic designer, and while he hopes someone else will continue the tradition in some way, he’s not passing the club on to anyone. The full-moon rides wind from The Swamp in Browne’s Addition through downtown Spokane to a secret destination, usually another bar. While the big group of riders can look like a critical mass (a protest ride where large groups of cyclists often ignore traffic laws), Everett emphasizes that’s not what he’s about. “There is pretty much one rule,” he writes in the club’s credo about following traffic rules. “Don’t be an asshole.” The last rides are June 23 and (tentatively) July 27. Follow FBC Spokane on Facebook for final details.

TAKE OVER THE STREET (b) (a)

(c)

Admission e e r F

34th Ann ua l

Four miles of sweet automobile-free roads isn’t a luxury you get every day. So don’t skip Summer Parkways in the Comstock/

Manito neighborhood June 19 from 6-9 pm. The family-friendly event shuts down the streets and welcomes cyclists, pedestrians and anyone else on “human-powered transportation.” Along the route, there’s free yoga, Pilates, Zumba, gymnastics, dancing, martial arts, jump roping and more than one Hula Hoop. You’re encouraged to bring your own guitar, sidewalk chalk, picnic supplies — really anything you want. Find the exact route at summerparkways.com.

VOLUNTEER AT IRONMAN (c)

We’re not asking you to get yourself in shape to swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 and then run 26.2 — registration is sold out anyway — but you can still get off your ass for Ironman. Sign up to volunteer at bike check-in or check-out, as a pointer helping the athletes stay on course or at one of the five bike aid stations along the way. Parking is a nightmare in Coeur d’Alene during the event on June 23, so ride your bike to keep from going crazy. (If you’re traveling from Spokane, park uptown and bike down.) We promise you’ll feel good about helping, not just bummed about how out of shape you are compared to the Ironmen.

August 28 thru September 2, 2013 Riverfront Park, Spokane, WA

Open Daily 10 am to 11 pm

6B

IG D AYS O F

ENT FOOD & ENTERTAINM

Too Slim and the Taildraggers The Zombies A Thousand Horses The Spin Doctors Et Tu Brucé Dead Winter Carpenters Fruition Randy McAllister Bex Marshall Lake Street Dive Spokane’s Best 2013 Pacific NW Inlander Reader’s Poll Outdoor Music Festival

Always for looking od o F t grea ! Vendors

47 Food Booths • 225 Menu Items • Cheap Prices Great Food • 4 Adult Beverage Gardens 100 Free Concerts on 4 Stages (national, regional and local artists)

Headline Concerts Include Kris Orlowski Folkinception Sammy Eubanks Jim Boyd Band Eclectic Approach Soul Proprietor The Fat Tones Big Mumbo Blues Band The Fat Tones Terrible Buttons

For more information 509.921.5579

www.spokanepigout.com

Hot Club of Spokane Nicole Lewis Dog House Boyz Trailer Park Girls Yellow Dog Steven King Cathedral Pearls and about 75 other bands! Organized by the Six Bridges Arts Association Sponsored in part by: The Spokesman Review, Inland Empire Toyota Dealers Association, Inland Northwest Bank, Budweiser, Centurylink, Northern Lights (No-Li) Brewing, Grant County Tourism, A to Z Rental, Comcast and Ryder Trucks. © 2013, A Burke Event, All Rights Reserved

$8 – General Admission • $ 5 – Students Box Office opens 1/2 hr before curtain

www.spokanefalls.edu/drama

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 51

BIKES HAVE A PICNIC ON THE HIAWATHA (d)

Before the 1990s, the only people following this trail were the rowdy construction workers who built it and the locomotive operators who traveled it in freight trains. But today, the stunningly scenic route has been renovated for hikers and cyclists. Get to the trail at Taft, exit 5, just over the Montana border and cruise down the gentle grade through tunnels and over trestles. (If riding back up sounds less enticing, a shuttle service runs all day.) Bring your own gear — the trail is gravel, so road bikes aren’t recommended — or rent from the Lookout Pass ski area. Everything you need is at ridethehiawatha.com.

GO TO THE FAIR

If all this talk of road bikes and scenic rides isn’t doing it for you, there’s at least one chance this summer to get your fill of grown men on bikes that look way too small for them. The 12-hour “Bikes, Brews and BBQs” extravaganza June 29 at the Kootenai County Fairgrounds focuses on a motocross show, but also will feature BMX demos and a vendor fair. Plus, food trucks, a barbecue competition and craft beer tasting. They had us at “bikes.”

TEACH A KID TO RIDE A BIKE (e)

(d)

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

(e)

All that teetering and wobbling that happens when you don’t know how to ride a bike is only adorable for a little while. Then it’s just sad. Make sure your kid — or nephew or niece or best friend’s little one — doesn’t grow up without learning to ride a bike like his or her Lunchable depends on it. There are lots of teaching techniques, but one universal principle: Keep it fun. Don’t rush; don’t push the kid. Find a flat, paved surface and a bike and helmet that fit the child properly. Remove the training wheels and pedals, and lower the seat a bit so the child can sit on it with her feet on the ground. Start with little bursts of balance. Encourage the new rider to scoot on the bike and then to pick up her feet and coast a little, all to understand how the bike balances. Once the child has mastered those straight coasts, add some turns — try setting up cones to make it a game — and encourage her to look up, not at the ground. Keep working on all these skills until you’ve got a confident tiny rider on your hands before replacing the pedals and working on more momentum. And, of course, braking. 

Stitch the Trauma Bear reminds children to swim ONLY in designated areas.

TM

52 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

YOUR SAFETY PARTNERS

INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAM

BM_Summer 2013_9-3x11_06096-3 JC.indd 1

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 53 5/30/13 1:47 PM

SPORTS

BY SCOTT A. LEADINGHAM

LEARN A NEW SPORT IN FORE! WEEKS

Depending on your perspective, summer is either hot, long and drawn out (for you ski bums) or unfairly short (every student ever in the history of civilization). In either case, there’s time and light enough to occupy your mornings, afternoons or evenings with learning a new sport. You’re not going to master a new sport in just a few weeks, but you can gain enough exposure to it to decide whether it’s worth dedicating more time (and money) in the future. Sure, there are plenty of options: tennis, cycling, running, bocce (that’s still a thing, right?), to name a few. If you want a particularly fun challenge, try golf. Why golf? “I think it’s the greatest game ever,” says Kathy G-Jensen, a teaching professional based at Spokane’s Indian Canyon course. Here’s how to do it in just four (or so) weeks: WEEK 1: Sign up for group lessons. Everything’s more fun in groups (insert your own inappropriate thought here). And G-Jensen agrees. Group lessons really are the best way to learn the sport, says G-Jensen, who was recently named one of three finalists for PGA Teacher of the Year — among 27,000 fellow instructors. She offers Get Golf Ready lessons for groups, with five lessons for $149. Details at KGJgolf.com The Spokane Parks and Recreation department also offers group lessons: $75 for youth, $90 for adults. See SpokaneGolf.org. WEEK 2: Get some gear, but don’t blow your paycheck. You’re just dipping your toes in the pool, not trying to be the next Michael Phelps. Pick up a few used clubs at a garage sale, thrift store or pawn shop. You can decide later if getting a beginner golf set is worth the price. And don’t even think of getting a full, top-of-the line set until you’ve explored. You don’t need a $300 driver when you’re just learning to make contact with the ball. WEEK 3: Hit the range several times. Golf really requires practice understanding the mechanics and physics of the swing. Spending $10 on the driving range is far better than $70 on greens fees before you feel comfortable. And you’re less prone to break clubs over your knee in frustration when you’re on the range. WEEK 4: Get out and play a round, preferably a “teaching round” with an instructor or a willing and patient friend. Don’t use a difficult, expensive course packed with weekend warriors in carts. Find a relatively inexpensive and easier municipal course like Spokane’s Esmeralda. Choose a day and time less busy, when you have time and room to make mistakes without pressure from other groups.

54 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Clint Preston practicing on the driving range at Indian Canyon Golf Course. STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

Gourmet Burgers Sandwiches Premium Steaks JAMES SNOOK PHOTO

HANG WITH THE BOYS OF SUMMER

Yeah, baseball may be “boring” — er, more deliberate — compared to football, basketball or watching paint dry, but it is the great American pastime. Few experiences beat the coming-ofage thrill of going to the ballpark and paying four times more for a hot dog and peanuts than you would anywhere else in modern civilization. God bless America. While seeing a Mariners game in person is always a good reason to visit Seattle, don’t forget about the Inland Northwest’s local boys of summer. Spokane Indians games are affordable, easily accessible and a good way to spend three to nine hours. (Hey, you never know in baseball.) The season opens June 14 at Avista Field. See the full season schedule at spokaneindiansbaseball.com.

Pizza & Pasta Great Kid’s Menu Gluten Free Menu Twice Daily Happy Hour

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 55

2013 Summer PROGRAM

Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center

You don’t know art if you don’t know JACC.

Mellow Out with Marshmallows

THEATER JUNE 13-23 Same Time, Next Year (7:30pm & Sundays at 2pm - $15) SEPT 5-15 Death Trap (A comedy thriller by Ira Levin - $15)

CONCERTS JULY 12 JULY 31 AUG 10

Olivia Brownlee Folk Concert (7:30pm - $20) The Clumsy Lovers (7:30pm - $10) JACC Indie Music Fest (5pm-9pm - $10)

GALLERY JULY 19

KIDS

(Open M-F 10am-5pm)

Textile Art Show (Artist Reception 5pm-7pm) (Space is limited to 25 students per event)

JULY 8-12 JULY 21 AUG 2

Drama Camp (Ages 12-15 / 9am-3pm $100 - includes lunches) Vision Seekers Youth Workshop (Ages 7 & Up / 10am-4pm $15) The Lightning Bug Ball (5:00pm - $25/couple)

COOKING CLASSES JULY 9 JULY 24 AUG 7 AUG 20

sports

(5:30-8:00pm)

Summer BBQ (with Bob Black) Northwest Cuisine (with Chef Adam Hegsted) Colomba Street Foods of Latin America Chocolate & Pastries (with Pastry Chef Bruce Wing)

Sometimes the best sports and experiences are the simplest — and least expensive. Such is the case with marshmallow dodge ball. What’s marshmallow dodge ball, you ask? Do you know what marshmallows are? What dodge ball is? Well, there you go... So when planning your summer beach adventure, church picnic or family campout, don’t forget a few packages of the puffed sugar delights (the big kind — none of this mini-marshmallow crap). Pro tip: Keep away from soggy grass or other wet areas, unless you really want a sticky mess on your hands. And if you’re the s’more-making type of family, be sure to distinguish between marshmallows for consuming and those for playing. Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

405 William Street | Post Falls, Id | 208-457-8950 | thejacklincenter.org

HIGH SPEEDS, TIGHT CORNERS, AND ROAD RASH. VISIT DOWNTOWN SPOKANE FOR BIG CYCLING ACTION.

SATURDAY, JULY 6 4 RACES, 8 DIVISIONS, 5PM–9PM, STARTING LINE ON SPOKANE FALLS BLVD.

2013 LILAC CITY PLUS!

RACE LIKE A PRO! ALL RIDERS WELCOME.

FREE KIDS’ RACE 6:40PM (AGES 9 & UNDER)

7:40PM

CITIZENS’ RAGTAG RALLY

LEARN MORE: WWW.SPOKANESPORTS.ORG/TWILIGHTCRIT

56 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

PRESENTED BY SPOKANE ROCKET VELO

Appleway Florist & Greenhouse GET SPORTY

There’s no excuse for being inside all summer (or any season) in the Inland Northwest. It’s not as if we have the soul-crushingly drab weather of, say, a certain city 278 miles to the west. If sports are your thing, consider participating in, volunteering for or being a spectator at any number of outdoor events. Two suggestions: HOOPFEST: In case you hadn’t heard it the first 367 times, Hoopfest (June 29-30) is kind of a big deal around these parts. An outdoor basketball tournament with 7,000 teams playing on more than 450 courts takes a lot of volunteers (not to mention many thousands of people to cheer on players). Even if you don’t like basketball, the spectacle of it all is reason enough to venture downtown. More at spokanehoopfest.net. SPOKANE TO SANDPOINT RELAY: If the famed Hood to Coast Relay, from Mount Hood to Seaside, Ore., is the most popular running relay in the U.S., Spokane to Sandpoint (Aug. 16-17) may be the most scenic. (Sure, we’re biased.) The 200-mile course winds from Mount Spokane through Riverside State Park to downtown Spokane before jutting through the Idaho Panhandle and along the Pend Oreille River. In short: plenty of opportunities to cheer on runners or help at water stations. Visit spokanetosandpoint.com. 

INTRODUCING DR. RICHARD ZAHN Now offering facial rejuvenation services at Kendall Yards Ask about how to get a FREE birthday massage!

Congrats Graduates!

Visit our Garden Shop

11006 E Sprague Ave, Spokane Valley 509-924-5050 • www.applewayflorist.com Mon - Fri: 8 AM - 5:30 PM • Sat: 8 AM - 3 PM

2012 SEASON SCHEDULE June 15-19 vs. Vancouver Canadians June 25-27 vs. Boise Hawks July 4-6 vs. Yakima Bears July 11-15 vs. Eugene Emeralds July 16-18 vs. Tri-City Dust Devils July 27-29 vs. Yakima Bears August 3-5 vs. Boise Hawks August 11-15 vs. Everett AquaSox August 19-21 vs. Tri-City Dust Devils August 22-26 vs. Salem-Keizer Volcanoes

For Tickets:

343-6886

Call 74-RELAX 1237 West Summit Parkway, Suite A | 509-747-3529 | SpaParadiso.com

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 57

T

FILM WATCH A MOVIE IN THE PARK (a)

August 9 - 18

Musical Performance Camp

Tickets: 509-325-2507

www.SpokaneCivicTheatre.com

If you’re from the Northwest, you’re presented with a problem — summer is the best season for movies, but those movies are screened indoors. And you know that you should be outside as much as possible during the summer months, because before you know it the sun will disappear for six months and this will make you sad. This year, Riverfront Park will allow you to watch movies without enduring the oppression of air conditioning and darkness with the new PEMCO MOVIES AT RIVERFRONT PARK series, kicking off July 17 with a screening of Grease and continuing each Wednesday through Aug. 21. Screening in the park’s Lilac Bowl (where you’ve probably seen some live music over the years), the slate of films is entirely family friendly, as it’s generally considered poor taste to screen Pulp Fiction in a public setting. Other selections include The Lion King, Ghostbusters, The Avengers, The Sandlot and The Princess Bride. Sure, those are all usual suspects in your DVD collection (some might be in VHS form), but there’s more to this series than merely watching a movie. “We can’t show a movie until dusk, so we try to make it a full evening of entertainment,” says Doug Borneman, president of Epic Events, a company that produced outdoor movie events in Seattle and Bellingham before bringing the idea to Spokane this year. “Sure, the culmination of the night is a movie, but we try to do a lot of things to make it more than just a movie,” he says. Those other things include movie trivia, circus performers, food carts and other activities to keep the kids busy before the sun goes down. Tickets are $5 and a schedule of movies is available at outdoormoviesatriverfront.com.

GO TO A DRIVE-IN WHILE YOU STILL CAN (b)

Flexible, fun programs for every age! Camps start June 17 – August 17

Young folks have only a rough, black-andwhite notion of a drive-in movie, and that’s a cultural tragedy. Once commonplace in American society, drive-in theaters have gone the way of the dinosaur, as it’s become increasingly expensive to own a big swath

BY MIKE BOOKEY

of land on which to invite people to park their cars and watch a movie for only a few months a year. Don’t mess around, kids. This is your last summer to experience the Americana of the drive-in. The Inland Northwest’s last example, the AUTO VUE DRIVE-IN THEATER up in Colville, closes its doors — or more accurately, its gates — after Labor Day weekend. The ongoing digital projector upgrade in the film industry has made it financially impossible for the Auto Vue to adapt to the changing technology, so its 60th anniversary this summer is doubling as a farewell party. The theater is open Friday through Sunday nights, with those Sundays costing you only $14 for an entire carload. We’re not sure how liberally they interpret a “carload,” but it sounds like it’s a rule begging to be tested by some brave summer adventurers with access to a minivan. Another fleetingly excellent aspect of drive-ins is the fact that they play two movies — more bang for your buck. That’s also a lot of throwback make-out time with your steady guy or gal. Forgot to mention, kids — your parents probably made out a ton at the drive-in. They may also have gotten into fisticuffs with those greasers from the other high school, but that’s a story for another day.

SEE A MOVIE ABOUT SUMMER (c)

Another summer, another slate of big-budget Hollywood thrillers, most of which are about the world getting really effed up — for example, After Earth, World War Z, Pacific Rim, Elysium, Grown Ups 2. But one downright charming film will make you long for the days when summer wasn’t merely three months out of the year, but a chance to do something outrageous. In The Kings of Summer, we have three boys who flee the drudgery of overprotective parents to build their own compound deep in the Ohio woods. The kids are the stars, of course, but Nick Offerman (pictured; you know him as Ron Swanson from Parks and Recreation) might be the reason you check out this film. He plays a mean ol’ dad. Not surprisingly, he’s hilarious. Spokane is still waiting for its release date, but expect it in the next few weeks.

Choose from one, two and three week camps!

509-325-2507

NEW ONLINE REGISTRATION :

www.SpokaneCivictheatre.com under the “academy” link.

58 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

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FILM

aUgUst 2, 3, 4 2013

miCkey harT banD With thE afRican shOwboyZ daN brUbeck baNd tiEmpo librE • delhI 2 dublIn Plus 12 more greaT bandS kasLo, bc is a 4 hr dRive noRth oF spOkane

KasloJazzfeSt.Com 250-353-7548 caMping avaiLable downTown

(d)

WATCH A CLASSIC WITH YOUR NEIGHBORS (d)

If you’re a South Hiller, you might not even need to leave your neighborhood to catch an outdoor flick. And if you’re from another neighborhood, the people in the South Perry neighborhood will gladly let you join them at The Shop (924 S. Perry St.) for the South Perry Summer Theater. It’s a series of free family movies on Sunday nights to benefit local charities. The selections are an intriguing mix of classics, new movies and cult favorites. For example, the series kicks off June 29 with Rocky III — the one where Rocky gets his ass kicked by Mr. T — but also features Wreck-It Ralph and The Hobbit. And it’s free! Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

REMEMBER THAT WE HAVE AN IMAX THEATER

There’s a gem down in Riverfront Park. It’s an IMAX theater — one of the first of its kind — and it’s still very much in business. Here, you can see films you can’t see anywhere else in a format you won’t find elsewhere. Great White Shark is playing now, and it’s about exactly what you’re thinking. There’s also Rocky Mountain Express and Lewis & Clark, if the whole wildlife thing’s not your bag.

ALL WHEELS WEEKEND

JUNE 14, 15 & 16, 2013 FATHER’S DAY WEEKEND

Dayton, WA

MORE INFO:

509-382-4825

www.allwheelsweekend.com

car show – demo derby – vendors – live music –fireworks – kid’s activities 60 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Give

Blood Help make everyday moments possible for patients in need.

The need for blood doesn’t take a vacation! INBC is the only supplier of blood to area hospitals and needs an average of 200 donors each day. Vacations, nice weather and other activities decrease blood donations in the summer while patient need remains constant.

Make your lifesaving appointment NOW by scanning the QR code with your mobile device.

Give blood at one of INBC’s convenient locations: ● Spokane: 210 W Cataldo Ave. ● Coeur d’Alene: 405 W Neider Ave. ● Lewiston: 1213 21st St. INBC has weekly drives at an area hospitals in Spokane Valley, Moses Lake, Moscow or Pullman and mobile drives through out our community.

GO INDIE

Most of the summer blockbusters are about the end of the world, and that’s really freaking depressing. Take a break from the special effects and Us Weekly coverboys and head to the cozy, friendly Magic Lantern Theatre for some independent, under-the-radar films. There’s Sightseers (opening June 21), a dark British comedy about a couple who accidentally turn into murderers while on vacation. Or you can enlighten yourself, perhaps with a foreign-language biography called Hannah Arendt, about a German writer who covered Nazi war crimes. Maybe a rock documentary? Try A Band Called Death, a flick about a three African-American brothers who started a hard rock band in the early 1970s before fading into history, then resurfaced as indie stars more than 30 years later. Keep an eye on the Lantern this summer because there’s probably something you’d like to see. 

FRIENDLY SERVICE & C LA SS IC C O C K TA IL S

HAPPY HOUR

MON-SAT 5-8 | ALL DAY SUNDAY

926 W. GARLAND AVE

The MAC has something for everyone.

Think. Play. Do.

OPEN ON SUNDAYS Wed - Sun 10am to 5pm 2316 W First Avenue, Spokane

(509) 456-3931

www.northwestmuseum.org An Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution

SUN-THURS 4pm-MI D NI G HT | FRI - SAT 4pm-2am JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 61

Evening of Flight

L THE LOCA BUZZ...

$

350

water

By Megan Petersen

thdays r i B r o F t Grea Lists! & Bucket

TrikeSchool.com July Thru Oct | Appointments Only | 509990.5060

BBQ Competition $5,000 in prize money

Cheney Plaza SR 904 & Betz Rd July10am-6pm 13 & 14 www.pnwba.com

WALK ON WATER

July 6 & 7

10th Anniversary

Saturday

July 6th | 9-5pm Gala Concert Event | 6-9pm

Sunday

July 7th | 10-4pm • • • •

Artists Artisans Growers Food

• • • •

Beer & Wine Live Music Kid Activities Demos

www.povlavendarfestival.com City Park, Newport WA

62 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

The Inland Northwest is home to a lot of large bodies of water, and it would be a shame not to enjoy them. What better way to get out on the water than stand-up paddling (SUP)? SUP developed from ancient Peruvian and African fishing techniques and has been growing rapidly as a water sport in the past couple of years. It combines surfing and canoeing or kayaking: you stand and you paddle. “It is what you make of it: serenity, relaxation, fitness,” says Kym Murdoch, owner of COEUR D’ALENE PADDLE BOARD CO. “It’s very versatile.” And all you need is a board, a paddle and water. You can SUP on oceans, lakes, rivers and even your neighbor’s koi pond with the right gear. Wind, rain, shine, snow or hail aside, paddleboarding is possible all year round with a dry suit. SUP’s growing popularity is clear, given the number of SUP clubs cropping up. The World Stand Up Paddleboard Association puts on training and certification programs for SUP instructors. WSUPA also organizes events like races, festivals and trade shows. Locally, Murdoch leads a SUP club that goes on guided excursions six days a week in the Coeur d’Alene area. SUPers are also adding new twists to traditional SUP with paddleboard fitness. In Coeur d’Alene, Katie Fitzgerald will have you doing the tree pose and the downward dog with paddleboard yoga, starting July 1. Coeur d’Alene Paddle Board Co. will offer an exercise class dubbed Paddle Fit Boot Camp, also beginning July 1. “It’s a little more athletic than the yoga class,” Murdoch says. For those looking to SUP, the region has plenty to offer: Coeur d’Alene Paddle Board Co., Mountain Gear, Northwest Paddleboards and ROW Adventures can all get you what you need to get started.

SUMMER

floor sample

SALE www.HanleyCollection.com

1727 E Sprague Ave • 509-535-1111

Coeur d’Alene Paddle Board Co. owner Kym Murdoch, left, leads a class. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CANNONBALL OFF TUBBS (a)

Cross the border into Idaho to hurl yourself off the rocks at Tubbs Hill in downtown Coeur d’Alene. It’s recreational, we promise. Take your pick of rocks along the hiking trail, and if you’re not up to jumping off rocks, take a breather at one of the beaches along the 2.2-mile trail. Don’t forget to stop and check out the view of the City Beach and the Coeur d’Alene Resort on your hike in. The trailhead is located at the Third Street Docks. Though it’s currently flanked by construction of the new McEuen Park, the trailhead is accessible by foot, and there’s no cover charge.

401 W 1st Avenue • 509-413-1185

1702 E Riverside • 509-209-3954

DROP A LINE

(a)

You’ll have to wait out spring runoff for a few weeks yet, but it’s never too early to start getting ready to fish. Check your lines, tie your flies, harvest your worms and get your polarized Ray-Bans ready for this year’s summer season. Stalk local fly shops for fishing reports — Silver Bow and Swedes are good resources. And make sure to get licensed. Nobody likes getting called out by the fish police.

Ask about our professional in-home interior design program.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 63 45024-06 June 13-Summer Sale-8V.indd 1

6/10/13 7:12 AM

There is always something exciting going on in Downtown Spokane; FREE Horse & Carriage rides, First Friday Artwalk, and fabulous events and concerts! Come join us Downtown for the Summer!

FREE

Horse & Carriage rides every Friday in July & August. 5-9 pm Hop on at Main & Wall!

Visit the

Monthly Artwalk 5-8 pm

Sponsored by

Ce le

Downtown Spokane Calendar of Events at DowntownSpokane.net

Join Us 7 Days a Week On Our Patio Dinner Served Fri-Sat 5pm-Close Now Serving Breakfast, Lunch, Pastries & Espresso 7 Days A Week!

509-624-2253 | 707 W. Main Ave. | www.madeleines-spokane.com

64 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

ating

YE

Authentic French Pastry, Casual French Dining

Beer, Wine & Food Specials Live Music Every Friday Night

br

The Inlander Ad from October 27,

1993

from Boo Radley’s across the carousel

ARS

WATCH FOR OUR CELEBRATION IN AUGUST!

509.456.7479 232 N. Howard

JAN, THE TOY LADY, FONDLY REMEMBERS THE WARM SUMMER EVENINGS OF HER YOUTH:

It's true! Everything old is new again!

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS SPOKANE’S FAVORITE HAPPY HOUR

A casual, yet upscale dining option featuring items made from scratch with organic, fresh and local ingredients.

All Day Mon & Tues Wed-Sat 4-6pm & 10pm-Close LATE-NIGHT

LUNCH

furnishings • household accessories • paper goods

Father’s Day Fun!

MON-THU 11AM-3PM

DINNER

INTRIGUING WINE & SPIRITS

Fair Trade Earth Friendly • Local

MON-THU 3PM-10PM FRI-SAT 3PM-11PM

Open Mon-Sat: 10-5:30

BAR TO 2PM

Downtown • 824 W Sprague Avenue • 509-340-2800 • www.wojoworks.net

1007 W. 1st Ave • Downtown Spokane • (509) 456-5656 501 E. Sherman • Downtown Coeur d’Alene • (208) 930-4762

1009 W. 1st | Downtown Spokane | 456-5656 M-Thu 4 PM - 12 AM | Fri & Sat 4 PM - 2 AM

SCRATCHSPOKANE.COM

35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

Passionate About Taste Bring in this ad and receive 10% off your total purchase On the second level of River Park Square 808 W. Main Ave • (509) 838-7115

Spokane.OilandVinegarUSA.com Oil & Vinegar Of Spokane

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 65

Come Celebrate Diversity with Us!

WATER

We’re “Sharing Our World” at the 19th Annual

GET HOSED (b)

Get back to your childhood with water balloon fights, Slip ’n Slides, squirt gun wars, sprinkler obstacle courses, inflatable kiddie pools and a squishy, waterlogged lawn. While you’re reveling in childish shenanigans, play the hose trick, a timeless prank that never gets old: All you needs is a garden hose and an unsuspecting victim who’s willing to eyeball the hose end to check that the water faucet is properly functioning.

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday August 17, 2013 Riverfront Park

CUT A RUG

The Region’s Largest Multicultural Celebration Family-oriented and FREE

FEATURING: Cultural Villages Interactive Children’s Center

If regular Zumba isn’t enough fun for you, go submerge yourself at the Shadle Aquatic Center. Aqua Zumba is workout dancing in 5 feet of water — the hour-long classes are Saturday mornings starting at 9:30 from June 29 to Aug. 24.

(b)

DELI OPENING SOON!

FIREWORKS STAND

NOW OPEN!

Free K-8 School Supplies (before noon) Job & Education Fair Amerigroup Health Fair Music, Art, Food Performances All Day on the United Healthcare Main Stage

GRAND OPENING CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY

nwunity.org a project of it Come vis our new location!

66 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

JUNE 15TH

• • • • • • • • • •

BBQ Free Hot Dogs & Chips for Customers 25¢ Sodas Inside Store Raffle Prizes Flat Screen TV Fireworks Sale on Tobacco Products $1 Off 305’s, DTC’s & Native’s Trucker Friendly (On & Off Road Diesel) 24 Hour Fuel & Diesel Now Selling Lottery Tickets Discounted Tobacco Products

FIGHTIN’ CREEK MARKET Open every day 5am-11pm Located on the corner of HWY 95 & Elder Rd. | 18 miles South of Coeur d’Alene

12727 W. Elder Rd | Worley, ID | 208.664.7040 | 1.866.51.SMOKE | FightinCreek.com

CANOE THE LITTLE SPOKANE

Conquer the Little Spokane River with morning, afternoon and evening paddles. Hosted by REI and Mountain Gear, these guided trips will take you from the Painted Rocks at Riverside State Park to the take-out at Nine Mile Falls. Take your pick of 15 trips throughout the summer, beginning June 21 and ending Aug. 23. Visit Spokaneparks.org for more info.

825 W. RIVERSIDE SPOKANE 509.747.2085

GREAT FOOD, DRINKS AND ENTERTAINMENT

BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE Offer Expires 06/25/2013

Buy one meal and two drinks at regular price, and get a second meal of equal or lesser value, for free. Must present coupon before ordering. Valid only with the purchase of full entrees and drinks at regular price. Does not apply to alcohol purchases. One coupon per table. Not to be combined with any other offers or promotions. Subject to other rules of use not disclosed here, and to changes without any prior notice. Not valid with dinner specials.

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri

4-7pm at Bar only.

Mon &Bar Tue. only.

With the purchase of one or more non-soft drinks. Bartender´s Choice. Limited to one serving per customer. Not valid with any other offer or promotion.

Off Food total. Valid Mon-Fri., from 4-6 pm. Does not apply to alcohol purchases. Subject to other rules of use not disclosed here. Cannot be used in combination with any other offers, promotions, lunch or dinner specials. Must be 60 or older and present a valid ID.

try ni gh ts10 un co LIVE MUSIC & DJ! $

Buckets of

Corona

The Best Country Music & Drinks in Town. FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS 9PM TO CLOSE

825 W. RIVERSIDE | SPOKANE | 509.747.2085 JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 67

WATER

TAKE IN A RACE

Webb’s Slough Sprint Boat Races are the NASCAR races of the water world, only a little classier. Here’s how it works: Small, brightly colored and extremely aerodynamic boats manned by a driver and a navigator rip through a winding race course dug out of a mud pit in a race against the clock. The high-powered engines will whine, the mud will fly, and when the flag goes down at the starting line, anything can happen. (Roll cages are required on all boats.) Most boats finish the course in a little more than a minute — the fastest time at the Slough races was 57 seconds in 2012. With only 34 teams in three leagues, the United States Sprint Boat Association is very competitive — some 28 teams will compete at Webb’s Slough June 15 and Aug. 24. The Webb’s Slough races are just two of seven races the USSBA will host this summer in Washington and Oregon, the only states that participate in the sport, which originated in New Zealand. The races start at 10 am just outside St. John, Wash. Spectators can admire boats, praise their racing-duo heroes and load up on Slough gear on Friday night before the races at the Show and Shine in downtown St. John. The race course will host a herd of food and retail vendors and two beer gardens. For more details, visit webbsslough.com.

“ rates

Snuggle up to ” you can

horizon for

auto

Loans

BURGERS

Call in or order online www.FIVEGUYS.com 2525 E. 29th, Unit 6 Spokane, WA 99223 Phone: 509-533-1005

Federally insured by NCUA.

68 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

9502 N. Newport Hwy Spokane, WA 99218 Phone: 509-928-2921

10 N. Sullivan Road Spokane, WA 99223 Phone: 509-927-2840

Hours: 11am-10pm Every Day

(c)

TOUR ALL OF SPOKANE’S CITY POOLS (c)

You’ll need all your foam noodles, beach towels and happy faces to handle the herds of liberated schoolchildren at local pools. Whether you prefer the deep end, the shallow end or the lounge chair, Spokane’s six public aquatic centers can keep you busy this summer. Also, don’t forget to visit one of Spokane’s 18 splash pads, essentially parks with a wet mess of watersquirting devices.

SWIM FOR A CAUSE

Have you ever tried holding your breath while driving across the Long Bridge into Sandpoint? Have you ever succeeded? Why don’t you try swimming the length of it? Get your goggles ready for the Long Bridge Swim, a 1.76-mile voyage across Lake Pend Oreille. Benefits from this annual event, which celebrates its 18th birthday this year, foot the bill for swim lessons for local children and adults. 

COMING SOON TO NORTH SPOKANE! Groundbreaking on the best soccer training facility in the Northwest

REGISTERING NOW!!! • Development Leagues U8-U11! • Best Premier Teams in the state U12-U18! • Year Round Academy Training THE PUNCH CARD! Attend any Academy session and get your card punched! You may purchase a 10-40 punch card that can be used for a full year or until full. The most flexible and reasonable Academy Training ever.

xifasoccer.com 509.879.8933

New Training Facility will include: • Indoor fields • Futsal fields • 2 lighted turf fields • Immaculate grass fields • Pro-Shop • Soccer Education Library and conference center • Homework room • Weight Training facilities • Clubhouse offices for five local clubs

Leases & space available now!

Are you or your company interested in investing in the lives of thousands? Call today and find out how! 509.879.8399 JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 69

FOOD

ANNEMARIE C. FROHNHOEFER

& DRINK

HAVE A DOG AT THE BALLPARK (a)

70 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

AVISTA STADIUM underwent a remodel over the winter. Now, according to Indians promotions coordinator Dustin Toms, you can leave your cash at home and buy your elephant ears, cotton candy, pretzels and everything else at the same window with plastic. Longhorn Barbecue, Bruchi’s and Pizza Pipeline still have their separate venues, but you can also try new-to-the-park items like German sausage corn dogs, French fries, chicken strips, Dippin’ Dots in mini plastic Indians helmets and walking tacos (a bag o’ Fritos with all the fixings and less mess). The healthier-minded have options like black bean burgers or stir-fry, available at the Intentional Wok concessions stand. Then there’s the beer. A total of 20 different draft beers connect, via hoses from the main walk-in cooler, to the stadium’s 80 tap handles. And nothing goes better with draft beer than a ballpark hot dog. Justin Stottlemyre, director of concessions and operations, explains that the Indians’ official hot dog — the all-beef Cloverdale — tastes great fresh off a roll-a-grill because the sear-induced crunch yields to a juicy interior. But what is the best way to eat a hot dog? Ketchup? Mustard? Both Stottlemyre and Toms agree that “the best way to eat a hot dog is at a Spokane Indians game.” Yoke’s Family Feed nights, when hot dogs, soda and ice cream sandwiches run $1 each, are June 15, July 5, Aug. 2 and Aug. 23.

G N I R E D I CONS P? CAM Not all camps are accredited! Learn more at www.CampParents.org

800-428-2267

Bring the family & SEE THE SHOW BEFORE YOU GO TO THE

Fireworks

(a)

Justin Stottlemyre: “The best way to eat a hot dog is at a Spokane Indians game.”

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SIP ON GIN AND (CUCUMBER) JUICE

When temperatures rise, appetites decrease and heat-induced thirst must be quenched with summer cocktails. Although not a gin drinker himself, DRY FLY distiller Patrick Donovan believes gin makes a good summer beverage because of its light, citrusy tones. He prepares the liquor with a vodka base and imbues the grain alcohol with local flavors: apple, coriander, lavender, mint and hops. The result is a Northwest botanical gin that blends well with tonics, berries and simple syrup. It also tastes great neat. Those with a more traditional, dry gin bent should stick with juniper-heavy London dry gins like Bombay Sapphire, Tanqueray or New Amsterdam Straight. For a refreshing cocktail, try mixing these gins with local juices. Better yet, get these gins mixed by local experts at local establishments that utilize local juice. The drink menu at METHOD JUICE CAFE in downtown Spokane features 100-percent organic smoothies and juice blends. While Method manager Amy Robinson thinks mixing alcohol with these painstakingly pulped, juiced and blended fruits and vegetables may negate their positive health benefits, she does concede that they might prove tasty in a cocktail. They do. When BOOTS owner Alison Collins shakes up dry gin, ice and Method’s cucumber juice with a lemon twist, the result is a refreshing, slightly sweet, somewhat melon-tasting citrusy cocktail that will not only cool you down but also cause your ears to tingle in a very pleasant manner. Maybe it’s all the Vitamin C.

Live

THE BING CROSBY THEATER

FUN FOR ALL AGES - THURS JULY 4TH - 7PM TICKETS ON SALE NOW - TICKETSWEST.COM FOR MORE INFO: RAVENSFLIGHTCREATIVE.COM PRESENTED BY RAVENS FLIGHT CREATIVE

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 71

FOOD

 Summer Stories

& DRINK

PLAY BEER PONG AT PONGZILLA (b)

So you dragged the ping-pong table out back and have been playing in the sun. Why not try playing in an arena? Pongzilla, billed as “The World’s Largest Beer Pong Tournament,” offers a $1,000 cash prize. The event is held at Lincoln Center on July 12 and you can register online at thelincolncenterspokane.com. So get practicing. Even if you lose, you still get a Tshirt (and a buzz).

HARVEST FRUIT AT GREENBLUFF

The Ninkasi Summer Variety  Packs are here. Find a collectable “Beer Is Love” sticker in the box!

NINKASIBREWING.COM • BREWED IN EUGENE, OR

(b) Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

Summer food isn’t all hot dogs, grilled meat and mayonaissed potatoes. Every summer the farmers at Greenbluff open their orchards and fields to us urban folk, then throw us a party. Sweet, abundant strawberries wait to be picked during the Strawberry Celebration (June 29-30 and July 6-7). Cherries are ripe and celebrated July 20-27 during the Cherry Festival. For some sweet peach cobbler, ice cream and pie, head on up during the Peach Festival that runs from Aug. 17 through Labor Day.

SUMMER EVENT HIGHLIGHTS JUNE 28..............................Opening Day JUNE 30..............................Summer Celebration JULY 20.................................Mountain Music Festival AUG 4....................................Huckleberry Festival Labor Day Weekend......Fall Fest

Schweitzer offers all kinds of fun under the sun, whether it’s flying down our Zip Line or simply relaxing by the pool. It’s up to you how much or how little you experience. Either way, you’ll enjoy breathtaking scenery that revives both body and mind. This summer, get off the couch and onto a chairlift. Elevate Your Summer.

Escape the heat in town and come up for some fresh, cool air. Stay two nights in the Selkirk Lodge, White Pine Lodge, or any of our condos and your 3rd night is on us!

Only $35 buys you UNLIMITED fun on the bungee trampoline, climbing wall, chairlift & zipline! Plus, one sack of jewels for the Cranky Jennings Sluice Box.

OVER $50 VALUE!

schweitzer.com | 877.487.4643

72 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

THROW DOWN SOME BBQ

Out on the West Plains, they know how to throw down. At the Cheney Jubilee and BBQ Competition (July 13-14), 25 contestants will pursue a $5,000 purse and the opportunity to participate in the World Food Championship in Las Vegas. This is some high-quality barbecue. If you aren’t content to simply enjoy spicy-sweet goodness, there’s still a chance to compete for the prize. The deadline for early registration is July 2; general registration closes July 12. Teams can register at either the Pacific Northwest Barbecue Association (pnwba.com) or the Cheney Jubilee (cheneyjubilee.com) websites.

STROLL WITH TOTO

Four Dorothys walk into Rick’s Ringside Bar — no joke, this has been known to happen at least once a year when the other side of the rainbow is relocated to Garland and North Monroe. On July 20, the street will be decorated with a yellow brick road and Dorothys will monitor a Toto look-alike contest. In terms of food and drink, there are many lemonade stands and one large milk bottle. If you haven’t been to the Milk Bottle lately, then ease on down the road to check out the remodel, partake of Mary Lou’s Homemade Ice Cream and enjoy a burger with your munchkins.

in Grant County, Washington

es Golf at 15 cours

Fish in 140 lakes

Attend concerts at the Gorge

2013 Summer Events, Festivals and Concerts June 1-31 June 6-9 June 6-9 June 7 June 8 June 8 June 8-9 June 15 June 15-16 June 15-16 Jun 21-Aug 2 June 22 June 22-23 June 28-29 July 1-31 July 4 July 4 July 4 July 5 July 5-6 July 6 July 6 July 12-14 July 13

Grand Coulee Dam Laser Light Show Sage-n-Sun Festival Soap Lake Powwow KUBE 93 Summer Jam Dru Gimlin 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament KUBE 93 Summer Jam WDFW Free Fishing Weekend Rock n’ Ride Bike Ride Through George 2013 Washington Bow Fishing Championship Hydro Races – Soap Lake Hydroplane Regatta The MAC GALLERY: RIE PALKOVIC O’Sullivan Sportsman’s Resort Bazaar Jet Ski Races Paradiso Festival 2013 Grand Coulee Dam Laser Light Show Patriotic 4th of July Picnic and Fireworks The Rhythm Nation in Concert Fourth of July Celebration at George All Resorts Golf Cart Parade and Lake Fireworks JamBase Live Legacy Golf Resort Fireworks Smokiam Days- Summer Festival Royal City Summerfest Foot Race – Too Stinkin’ Hot to Run

Grand Coulee Dam Ephrata Soap Lake The Gorge Quincy The Gorge All Grant County Lakes Quincy MARDON Resort Soap Lake Moses Lake Potholes Recreation Area Soap Lake The Gorge Grand Coulee Dam Moses Lake Moses Lake George MARDON Resort/Potholes The Gorge Legacy Golf Resort Soap Lake Royal City Soap Lake

July 19-20 July 20 July 26-27 July 26-27 July 26-27 Aug 1-31 Aug 2-4 Aug 3 Aug 3 Aug 13-17 Aug 24 Aug 24 Aug 29-31 Aug 31 Aug 31 Sept 1-30 Sept 5-8 Sept 14 Sept 13-15 Sept 14 Sept 16-18 Sept 16-22 Sept 28 Sept 28

Surf at the Surf ‘n Slide Water Park

Basin Summer Sounds Music Festival John Mayer & Phillip Phillips in Concert Five Suns Bluegrass Festival Phish in Concert Canyon Run Grand Coulee Dam Laser Light Show The Watershed Festival Hot Desert Night- Golf, Drag Race, Car Show The MarchFourth Marching Band in Concert The Grant County Fair Lake Poker Run & Beach Party Black Sabbath in Concert Dave Matthews Band in Concert The Spin Doctors in Concert Pepsi Night at the Races! Season Championship Grand Coulee Dam Laser Light Show Sunbanks Rhythm & Blues Festival Zac Brown Band in Concert Hot Air Balloon Festival Farmer Consumer Awareness Day MARDON Dock Fishing Tourney George Bluegrass Festival Brewer’s Harvest Expo Maroon 5 & Kelly Clarkson in Concert

Visit Grand Coulee Dam Ephrata The Gorge Moses Lake The Gorge Coulee City Grand Coulee Dam The Gorge Desert Air Moses Lake Moses Lake MARDON Resort/Potholes The Gorge The Gorge Moses Lake Ephrata Grand Coulee Dam Banks Lake The Gorge Quincy Quincy MARDON Resort/Potholes George Ephrata The Gorge

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For More Information

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To u r is m W a s h

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Grant County Tourism Commission PO Box 37 • Ephrata, WA 98823 www.tourgrantcounty.com 1.800.992.6234

The Grant County Tourism Commission has made its best effort to include all Grant County Tourism events. All dates listed are subject to change.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 73

e n a k o Sp l o o h c S Art ectacular

FOOD

& DRINK

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OKANE P S | E V A RLAND 001 509.325.3 809 W. GA

Spokane in Bloom ~ Garden Tour 2013 ~

Birds of a

Feather

flock together

Tickets

10

$

June 15 10am-5pm

Available at the gardens on tour day or at Blue Moon Garden, Gerry’s Trees, Gibson’s, Greenthumb, Judy’s Enchanted Garden, Mel’s, NW Seed, Ritter’s, and Tower Perennials.

Bonus Stops! Garden Vendors, Music, Art, $100 Gift Card Drawing from Gerry’s Trees, 2220 W Strong Rd and Judy’s Enchanted Garden, 2628 W Northwest Blvd!

BIRD’S EYE VIEW 7711 N Panorama HUMMINGBIRD HAVEN 3002 W Trinity

FILL UP ON LENTILS

A 450-gallon pot of lentil chili — that’s one of the things going on down on the Palouse at the National Lentil Festival (Aug. 16-17) on the weekend before WSU’s fall semester begins. And all that chili is free on the first night of the festival. The Lions Club’s lentil pancakes, served on Saturday morning, are just a warmup for the main culinary event, the Lentil Cook-Off. If you thought lentils only go in soup, and not brownies, ice cream and cake, then head down to the Palouse this summer and expand your culinary mind.

ENJOY A SPECIAL PANCAKE BREAKFAST (c)

If lentil pancakes don’t get you excited, how about huckleberry ones at the Wallace Huckleberry Festival (Aug. 16-17)? The breakfast is served from 7 am until 11. So even if you take your time on the morning’s 5K through the streets of historic Wallace, you should make it back in time for a fresh stack. Then spend the rest of the day listening to bands and sampling huckleberry treats. Take a home a pint or two of the fresh, dark berries picked from the surrounding mountains. Interested vendors should contact Alice Price at (208) 556-1037. Interested berry-eaters can find more information at wallace-id.com.

BE A PIG

Summer’s almost gone. Did you make it to Greenbluff? Or, did you make it, but talked yourself out of getting a sack of pumpkin donuts and have now been craving them for the past three weeks? Or perhaps some beer-pong-related injuries prevented you from getting your huckleberry harvest and pancake breakfast on. Never fear. Pig Out in the Park — the 34th annual eat-until-you-can-eat-no-more festival in Riverfront Park — has got you covered from Aug. 28-Sept. 2. There will be huckleberry confections, fruit and berry kabobs, ice cream and pumpkin donuts direct from Greenbluff. And that’s only a sampling of the 225 menu items that will be available from 10 am to 10 pm (not to mention all the live bands playing). Pace yourself, but not too much. It’s your last chance of the year for summer grub. 

FOR THE BIRDS GARDEN 3104 W Trinity

Open To The Public 18 Hole Golf Course Great Breakfast & Lunch

BIRD SONG GARDEN Barbeque Lunch Buffet from 7602 N Audobon

O’Doherty’s BBQ Co. available FEATHERED NEST GARDEN at an additional cost at one of 3001 W Mark the garden destinations.

PEN & CYGNETS CROSSING 3503 W Horizon

Presented by The Inland Empire Gardeners 509-535-8434 See www.tieg.org for photos, details, map, directions.

74 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

509.466.8023

Business Meetings Banquet Facilities Cocktail Lounge Complete Pro Shop Pro Golf Instruction

13700 N. Wandermere Rd. 5 miles N. of Spokane on the Deer Park Hwy | www.wandermere.com |

(c)

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

509.326.4485 JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 75

MUSIC

LEAH SOTTILE

GET DOWN IN PEACEFUL VALLEY

There’s an old snapshot on the KYRS MUSIC FEST’S website from a punk show back in the early 1990s, held outside the Peaceful Valley Community Center on the spacious, green Glover Field. It’s a photo of a band crammed onto a tiny stage. A small crowd stands in front —  arms crossed, hats backward, hands jammed in pockets — listening. The guitar player, with bleached blond hair, yells into a microphone and plays a baby-blue guitar covered in stickers. The bass player — he’s got bleached hair, too — is shirtless and lanky. Behind them, the drummer is moving his sticks too fast for the camera to catch them clearly. They called themselves Greenday then, later Green Day. And much later, they’d become one of the biggest bands in punk-rock history. The expanse of green grass sits mostly unused today — a spot on the bank of the Spokane River in the shadow of the hulking Monroe Street Bridge. So when Lupito Flores and the other organizers of the first KYRS Music Fest — to be held there on July 13 — were brainstorming spots for their first big music festival, they instantly thought of that long-ago Green Day show. “We were just trying to think of a cool place to do a festival and really liked the idea of having it near the river and near the falls, and the Peaceful Valley community is a cool place to live and fits our mission,��� says Flores, station director at KYRS. As an independent, volunteer-powered community radio station, he says KYRS depends on donations from listeners and revenue from events to stay on the air. While the station hosts a number of benefit concerts, speakers and films each year, Flores says the station realized one big event could support the station in a big way that lots of tiny events can’t. “Mainly, we do depend on members to keep [the station] going,” he says. “We do two or three on-air fund drives per year, and we get very small grants. But this could be pretty significant for our budget.” So they pulled out all the stops and planned a huge music festival. The bill is reflective of the radio station’s varied programming: from reggae to blues, folk to surf rock. Portland’s Menomena — which has opened for the National and received a Grammy nomination — will close out the night. The family-friendly festival —  which is completely solar-powered — also will feature a Ninkasi beer garden, a bike corral, a food court, yoga, drumming and Hula Hoop sessions between bands. Flores says KYRS wanted to create an event that becomes a summer institution —  one that people look forward to all year long. And like that Green Day show, maybe they’ll keep talking about it for years to come.

76 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

In a way, Green Day (below) lent inspiration to KYRS’ music festival, which is headlined by Portland’s Menomena (above).

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

KIMBERLEY

DID HER HOMEWORK

before enrolling in an M.Ed. program. When Kimberley Hiatt wanted to become a school counselor, she asked other education professionals what program they recommended. Time and again, they pointed her to Whitworth’s Graduate Studies in Education’s evening program, which let her keep her day schedule while pursuing her dream of becoming a school counselor.

CALL US NOW TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT: • ELL Endorsement (online) • Teaching the Gifted Specialty Endorsement (online) • Principal Certification (limited time on campus) • Elementary and Secondary Education • School Counseling • Special Education Endorsement (a)

ZEN OUT IN TONASKET (a) Close your eyes and picture your best summer ever. If you’re seeing road trips, cold beverages in the sunshine, outdoor music and beautiful scenery flashing through your imagination, then you should be heading to Tonasket’s Conscious Culture Festival from June 21-23. The fourth annual festival, held in the eden of rolling green mountains and picturesque valleys about three hours northwest of Spokane, is a three-day celebration of music, art and the natural surroundings. One $50 ticket gets you access to an entire weekend of performances, as well as free yoga, drumming and hooping workshops. On the main stage, you’ll hear the reggae, dancehall and electronic sounds of bands from across the Northwest, including locals like Real Life Rockaz, Flying Spiders and Half Zodiac (rapper Jaeda with a full band). Hit the road, and be prepared for a weekend of summer bliss.

• Deaf Education Specialty Endorsement • Early Childhood Special Education Endorsement

Enroll Now Visit whitworth.edu/gse or call 509.777.3222.

DO AS THE KIDS DO AT THE GORGE

If you would like to be sufficiently confused by youth culture and feel like an old bastard, then check out the videos on Paradiso Festival’s website. I’m used to seeing the Gorge Amphitheatre littered with Molson cans when Rush plays there, or dripping with hipsters at Sasquatch! But Paradiso changes the scenery: shellacking it in a candy coating of fun colors and glittering lights and youngsters screaming and losing their minds for more pancreas-shaking bass drops. The electronic music festival brings some of the world’s most sought-after DJs — this year Tiësto and Kaskade — to the picturesque Gorge, where kids who told their parents they were just going to have fun with friends will dance nonstop for hours. It’s like Woodstock meets Spring Breakers. See the madness for yourself on June 28 and 29.

Kimberley Hia tt

M.ED IN SCHO OL COUNSELI NG

BASKETBALL CAMPS

VOLLEYBALL CAMPS & MORE EXPERIENCE SUMMER CAMPS AT:

WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY UPPER COLUMBIA ACADEMY NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE THE WAREHOUSE VOLLEYBALL, SOCCER, AND MORE CAMPS AVAILABLE. Camps for boys & girls 6-19 years old.

“As a former camper and coach at NBC Camps, I can’t think of a situation that would be more beneficial for a basketball player than NBC Camps.” Ryan Carr, NBA Scout WWW.NBCCAMPS.COM

800.406.3926 JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 77

MUSIC

wine cellars SPONSORED BY

Cliff House Concerts! Live music every Thursday & Sunday!

Clumsy Love

rs

PLUS: Get your tickets now for our “Peak of the Week” shows!

• Clumsy Lovers Wednesday, July 17 • Grammy-winner Diane Schuur Wednesday, July 24 • Spokane Symphony Wednesdays, July 31 & August 7

GET POLITICAL WITH DEAD PREZ

And: Mark your calendar for our Special Event weekends: Arbor Crest Music Fest: “Stage 2 Stage” Saturday, July 6 • Noon to 8 pm • Non-stop music • Free admission

Annual Art & Glass Fest: Art, Live Music & More! August 17–18 • 11am to 6pm • 50 vendors • Free admission

Diane Schuu

r

For concert and ticket info: arborcrest.com or ticketswest.com Ages 21+ • Cliff House Estate & Tasting Room • 4705 N Fruithill Rd • 509.927.9463

78 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Since the first day Dead Prez made music, they’ve been controversial. Where other hip-hop acts are risqué because of their explicit content, Dead Prez brews controversy with its socialist messages, affiliation with the Black Panthers and Pan-Africanism. They’ve burned money onstage. They’ve thrown fruit out to audiences, preaching healthy eating. After a fan was arrested by police at a 2008 Evergreen State College show, Dead Prez encouraged the crowd to “do something about it.” A riot ensued and cop cars were flipped as the crowd tried to free its arrested fellow fan. Behind all the drama, there’s a hip-hop act preaching a message you’re never, ever going to hear from any other. Catch them July 11 at Red Room Lounge.

Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

BUST OUT YOUR COWBOY HAT

Sometimes great things come from bad things. Case in point: The band Son Volt resulted from a breakup. Not a girl-breaking-a-guy’s-heart kind of breakup, but the creative split of the band Uncle Tupelo and its primary songwriters Jeff Tweedy and Jay Farrar. But that breakup led to two wonderful things: the bands Wilco and Son Volt. Where Tweedy recruited masses of fans with his easy indie rock and playful experimentation, Farrar stayed true to Uncle Tupelo’s alt-country vibe with Son Volt. This year new album Honky Tonk lays the twang on heavy as the band veers in a decidedly more country direction than ever before. Catch them at the Knitting Factory on July 23.

Cherry Picker's Trot

& Pit Spit Thurs, July 18th

5:00pm

Dinner & Live Music

Hot Dogs, Hamburgers & Pie

5:30pm

Cherry Pit Spit

6:00pm

Tot Trot

7:00pm

Race

REGISTER NOW! For more information and to register go to www.greenbluffgrowers.com or call 238-4754

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 79

MUSIC

SUNSET BAY AT NEWMAN LAKE

The waterfront location is special! Following were all new in 1995: The exterior siding, windows, waterlines electrical, drywall maple cabinets, granite counter tops, Elan Cooktop with Broan stainless exhaust fan, Master suite remodeled 2013. There is extensive mill work on the main floor. The second level is open loft with lots of possibilities. Gar. w/12x22 heated guest room above. Two 14x14 decks. All decks are newer composite w/ powered coated alum rails. $

DANCE TO “THE JOKER” IN SANDPOINT

Kind of like eating something deep-fried at Pig Out, or running Bloomsday, you might not be an Inland Northwesterner if you’ve never been to Festival at Sandpoint, which has been running for 31 years now in the Idaho Panhandle. But it’s OK that you’ve waited: This year’s festival could be the strongest year yet. The lineup includes — get ready for it — the Indigo Girls (Aug. 1), Cake (Aug. 2), Rosanne Cash (Aug. 3), John Butler Trio (Aug. 8), Steve Miller Band (Aug. 9) and the Avett Brothers (Aug. 10). Unreal, right? You’ve gotta buy tickets to each individual show, which usually range around $50 — but it’s worth it: At the Festival at Sandpoint, you’ll see some of your favorite bands in a picturesque outdoor setting, and you can even bring your own cooler with wine and grub into the festival. Pack a picnic, lay down on a tarp and stare at the stars, or get up close and dance to “The Joker” with hundreds of your new best friends. Check out festivalatsandpoint.com for all the deets. 

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Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

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ROAD TRIPS

BY LISA WAANANEN

GO EAST: EXPERIENCE REAL AMERICA

Spokane is an excellent jumping-off point for some of the best routes through the Great American West — and you should drive east. Really. Get on eastbound I-90 and don’t stop. Get through the towering evergreens and postcard mountains and enter the wideopen land of eastern Montana and the Dakotas. Anyone who calls this flyover country is missing the point: This land is made for driving through. There’s a reason South Dakota’s official nickname is The Mount Rushmore State, and that doesn’t even begin to do justice to its status as the headquarters of roadside Americana. Yes, it’s worth a stop by MOUNT RUSHMORE NATIONAL MEMORIAL to gawk at the giant president faces. But as far as monuments carved out of mountains go, the one you must not miss is the CRAZY HORSE MEMORIAL outside nearby Custer. After helping with Mount Rushmore, Polish-American sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski accepted the invitation from Lakota Chief Henry Standing Bear to create an even larger monument. Work started in 1948 and Ziolkowski died at the site in 1982; his children continue to oversee the slow progress. The face, completed in 1998, is bigger than all those president heads combined. Not too far off the freeway you can stop at DEADWOOD, where you can pay homage to America’s lawless frontier at the final resting place of Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane, or South Dakota’s beautifully rugged landscapes in the BLACK HILLS NATIONAL FOREST and the BADLANDS NATIONAL PARK. Continue east, after a stop at the legendary WALL DRUG, to the CORN PALACE in Mitchell, which is technically a multipurpose venue. But it was built unabashedly as a tourist attraction in 1892 — the current turreted building was completed in 1921 — and it carries on that mission just as earnestly as a corn-adorned building can. More than 200,000 visitors will stop by between Memorial Day and Labor Day to see this year’s themed murals. “We redecorate and come up with new ideas each year,” says director Mark Schilling. This year’s theme was holidays, with scenes of Christmas and the Fourth of July; the upcoming theme is “Remember When,” with panels for the drive-in theater and other icons of American nostalgia. Inside the border trim of rye and grasses, a small crew of mural artists will work all summer, one panel at a time, to create the new scenes. Last year’s drought caused a shortage of the specially grown corn, particularly the blue color, but Schilling says this year’s supply is going well so far. Turn back west in time to travel with rumbling packs of motorcycles heading to the 73rd annual STURGIS MOTORCYCLE RALLY, this year on Aug. 5-11. You’re just as likely to run into dentists and lawyers as Hells Angels among those who ride from all over the country each year, but every person you meet will have welltraveled suggestions about where to go on your next road trip.

DON HAMILTON PHOTO

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 81

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(a)

GO NORTH: GET AWED IN CANADA

Back before cars and highways, fashionable Europeans crossed the Atlantic on cruise ships and continued by train across most of the continent to admire the beauty of the Canadian Rockies in western Alberta. They were onto something. Drive up through Sandpoint and into the mountains to visit Banff National Park — Canada’s oldest, established in 1885 — and hike around the area’s stunning turquoise lakes before continuing north on the Icefields Parkway, one of Canada’s most scenic routes. Tour the grand, historic Banff Springs Hotel and Chateau Lake Louise, but pitch a tent at one of the area campgrounds to save your cash for gas money. Total miles: 800

GO SOUTH: DRIVE ALL NIGHT

The secret truth about our nation is that it’s not really that big — you can leave Spokane at 6 am and be in Las Vegas by midnight, even with a few short stops. But if you really want to cover ground, leave at noon and take shifts driving all night. There’s nothing quite like the pre-dawn glow of the sun coming up over the desert. Sleep through the hottest part of the day and get ready for a night on the town, or continue on — it’s less than four hours into California for Joshua Tree National Park, or a little more than four to go past the Hoover Dam and into Arizona for the Grand Canyon. Total miles: 1,100 to Vegas

GO WEST: FOLLOW THE COLUMBIA

There’s a lot happening in Portland this summer, but getting there should be half the fun. From the Tri-Cities, cross over into Oregon to drive the Historic Columbia River Highway where it splits off from Interstate 84. The two-lane highway stopped being practical for heavy traffic almost as soon as it was completed in 1922, but its winding turns along cliffs and waterfalls are worth the time for unhurried travelers. (Abandoned stretches of the highway are open as trails for hikers and bicyclists, too.) Stop by Portland for the Oregon Brewers Festival (July 24-28) or Pickathon (Aug. 2-4), then continue to the Pacific and swing up through Mount Rainier National Park (free on Aug. 25) on the way home. Total miles: 900

TRACK YOUR GAS (a)

With average gas prices hovering above $3.50 this summer, it pays off to be discerning at the pump. But we’re all in this together now with crowdsourced apps like GasBuddy, which alerts you to the cheapest gas prices in the area. Help out by submitting the prices you see — you could win prizes, but mostly it’s just modern road etiquette. Before you leave, budget your route with GasBuddy’s trip calculator: Enter your destination and the make of your vehicle, and it tells you where to stop along the way. Other toprated road apps include Trip Cubby, an easy-to-use mileage log, and Where To Wee for the inevitable last-minute bathroom stops.

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ROAD TRIPS

AVOID UNEXPECTED PIT STOPS (b)

You don’t have to know much about cars to know they always decide to break down at the least convenient time, like when you’re admiring the scenery on a remote national forest route or out in the middle of South Dakota. That’s why AAA expects to help almost 150,000 stranded motorists in Washington and North Idaho this summer. They suggest this to-do list before you hit the road: 1. Check fluids: oil, windshield washer fluid, antifreeze. 2. Inspect tires: check the pressure (and don’t forget your spare). 3. Consider your battery: If it’s more than 3 years old, get it tested.

“READ” A CLASSIC

(b)

A dozen hours on the open road — what better time to finally get around to the book that’s been on your reading list since high school? Check out the late Frank Muller’s reading of On the Road by Jack Kerouac or All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy — anything read by Muller, really — or track down Jake Gyllenhaal’s new reading of The Great Gatsby. Or browse for a newer hit at Auntie’s Bookstore or the library: Edoardo Ballerini’s reading of Jess Walter’s Beautiful Ruins just won a 2013 Audie — like the Oscars for audiobooks — or go for something lighter with the new Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls, written and read by humorist David Sedaris.

ROCK AMAZING SHADES (c) Check off the boxes as you complete your bucket list this summer.

(c)

Complete your carefree, wild-open-spaces look with a killer pair of sunglasses — the more outrageous the better. (It’s not like you’re going to see anyone you know.) Trends this summer include geometric shapes — think perfect circles and multi-sided polygons — and thick, translucent frames. Also look for mirrored and metallic lenses, and oversize cat-eye frames in classic colors. 

Kids 18 and under can join us for free during Youth Week (June 17-21).

Celebrate Youth Week (June 17-21) with the Gumshoes, Josh and Josie, as they search for their best friend’s missing money. Read their story at www.stcukids.org and enter to win four tickets to Silverwood.*

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Federally insured by NCUA.

86 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

CALENDAR

page 92

Your complete 12-week guide to everything summer in the Northwest Compiled by Chey Scott

page 88

page 93

!

SUMMERTIME ISSHOWTIME

page 90

All 4 shows for the price of 3

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for tickets visit cdasummertheatre.com or call 208-769-7780 Schuler PAC @ North Idaho College 880 W. Garden Ave.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 87

calendar

ARTS

June

14 Adrienne Milligan and Christina

Marie-Wright, Pilgrim’s Market 14 ArtWalk, downtown Moscow 14 D. Andrew McChesney, South Hill Hastings 14 Linda Beeman, Wallace, Idaho 14 Todd McFarlane, Red Lion Hotel at the Park 15 Artist and author Nora Hengren, Harrington Opera House 15 Chris Carlson, Auntie’s Bookstore 15 Connie Janney, Manic Moon Studios 15 CreativiTEA, Dahmen Barn 15 Linda Beeman, Auntie’s Bookstore 15 Scott Johnson, Auntie’s Bookstore 15-16 Free Family Weekend, The MAC 16 Linda Beeman, Hastings, CdA 16 Spokane Poetry Slam, Scout 19 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

COMMUNITY

15 Aquatic Centers open, City of 15 17 17 19

Spokane Valley Skytona Trike Race, Big Sky’s Tavern Aquatic Centers open, City of Spokane Mobius Monday, Mobius Science Summer Parkways, Comstock/ Manito Neighborhood

Visit Inlander.com or the Events section of every Inlander for ongoing gallery exhibits.

13-19 14 14 15 15

FESTIVAL

13-15 Slippery Gulch Celebration, Tekoa, Wash.

14-16 All Wheels Weekend, Dayton 14-16 Cajun Crawfish Festival, Dirty

Shame Saloon, Tum Tum, Wash.

14-15 Car d’Lane, downtown CdA 14-15 Elk Pioneer Days, Elk Community Park

15 Farm Festival and Garden Tour, Arden, Wash.

15 Goat Show, Spokane County Fair &

Car d’Lane roars into downtown Coeur d’Alene June 14-15.

Expo

15 Lead Creek Derby, Kellogg 15 Medical Lake Founders Day 15 Rhubarb Festival, CREATE Art

FOOD & DRINK

15 Scottish Fest and Highland Games,

14 Meet the Winemaker: Fidelitas

Center

Prosser, Wash. 15 Shrine Circus, Kootenai Fairgrounds 16 Bark-N-Brew, Silver Mountain

FILM

14 Blancanieves, Magic Lantern 14 Reel Paddling Film Festival, Panida 14 The Lorax, Sunset Park, Airway Heights

15, 18 Pulp Fiction, Garland Theater 15 The Future of Food, Sandpoint

Library 19 Suds and Cinema: Office Space, Bing Crosby Theater 19-20 The Croods, Kenworthy 19 Warm Bodies, CdA Library

14-15 Anniversary Weekend, Pend d’Oreille Winery

15 15 15 15 15 19

Wines, Pilgrim’s Market Beer Tasting, Pilgrim’s Market Brewing at Home, Sun People Dry Goods Co. Music and Micros, CdA Casino Summer Kick-Off Luau, Hope’s Memorial Community Center The Pour, Arbor Crest Winery Divas Wine Dinner, Bonsai Bistro, Coeur d’Alene, ID.

MUSIC

14 Flying Mammals CD Release, Knitting Factory 14 Kevin Cole, Kroc Center 14 Limousine, Max at Mirabeau 14 Truck Mills, Seasons of CdA

Yearbook, Blue Door Theatre Teresa Caputo, INB Bada Bing!, Bing Crosby Theater Danceworks Spring Dance Concert, Panida Theater 15 Safari improv, Blue Door Theatre 15-16 The Sound of Music, Pend Oreille Playhouse 16 Ballet Classique, The Bing 16 Same Time Next Year, The JACC 17-18 Spokane Elite Dance Recital, Bing Crosby Theater

SPORTS & OUTDOORS 14-16 Spokane Indians vs. Everett

15 15 15 16 17 18 18 18 18

BOBFest, Riverfront Park Camille Bloom, The Shop Marshall McLean, La Rosa Club Concert Series, CdA City Park Truck Mills, Eichardt’s Angela Marie, The Shop Matti Sand, Moscow Food Co-op TC Tye, The Cellar The Almost, Conditions, Palisades; The Center 19 All That Jazz, The Cellar 19 Five Minutes of Fame open mic, Café Bodega 19 Good ‘n Plenty, Lake City Center

PERFORMANCE

13-16 Big River, CdA Summer Theater 14 McManus & Me, The Lincoln Center 14-15 The Marriage of Bette and Boo, Ignite Theatre

AquaSox, Avista Stadium

15 10-Mile Run, Spokane Falls Community College

15-16 All Gravity Mountain Bike Race, Silver Mountain

15 Color Me Rad, Spokane Raceway 15 Day Hike, Riverside State Park, Bowl & Pitcher

15-16 Friends for Children Softball

Tournament, Medical Lake, Wash.

15 Guided Tour of Manito Park Trees 15 Lilac City Roller Girls, Spokane Convention Center

15 Loreen Miller Bike Ride, Mt. Spokane High School

15 Run into Summer 10K, Soap Lake 15 Spokane in Bloom Garden Tour 15 U.S. Sprint Boat Association races, Webb’s Slough

16 Father’s Day Golf and Barbecue, Circling Raven Golf Club

27th Annual

June 29 & 30, 2013 • 10am ~ 5pm Food • Arts & Crafts Magic & Puppets Music & Dancing Shakespeare Plays Jousting & Sword Fighting

Ticket Prices One Day

Adults/Teens $9 Seniors/Kids (5-12) $7 Under 5 Free

Two Days

Adults/Teens $12 Seniors/Kids (5-12) $9 Under 5 Free

2 Day Family Pass Two Adults Two Kids (5-12) $38

509.783.7727 | yemerriegreenwoodfaire.org 88 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Inlander picks in blue!

20-26

ARTS

22 Ghostbusters, Bing Crosby Theater 22, 25 Robin Hood: Men in Tights,

(Through Sept. 6) 25 Author Allison Milionis, Auntie’s 26 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

25 G-Dog, The Book Parlor 26-27Hotel Transylvania, Kenworthy 26 Oz the Great and Powerful, CdA

20 Author Michael Gurian, Auntie’s 21 Sandpoint Summer ArtWalk

COMMUNITY

22 Over the Edge Rappel, downtown Spokane

FESTIVAL

20 Farm Tour, Bonner County Fair 21-22 North Idaho Quilt Guild Show, Kootenai County Fairgrounds

21-26 Art Walk, downtown Palouse 21-22 Panorama Colville Rodeo, NE

Washington Fairgrounds 21-22 PWRA Rodeo, Newport, Wash. 22 Junk from my Trunk, Newport 22 Spokane Rose Show, Northland Rosarium 22 Strawberry Festival Vintage & Craft Market, Moran Prairie Grange 22-23 Wellness & Beauty Expo, Spokane County Fair & Expo 24-25Coeur d’Alene Airport Fly-In, Pappy Boyington Field

FILM

20-23 42, Kenworthy 21 October Baby, Lidgerwood

Presbyterian Church 21 Shadow Dancer, Magic Lantern 21 Sightseeers, Magic Lantern Theater

23 City Park Concert Series, Coeur 23 23

Garland Theater

23

Library

d’Alene City Park Doobie Brothers, Northern Quest Josh Turner, Clearwater River Casino Miss Abbey’s Red Hot Orchestra, Arbor Crest Machine Head, Knitting Factory Jazz & Blues Concert, The Bing Krizz Kaliko, Knitting Factory The Cave Singers, Mikey’s Gyros Hinder, Knitting Factory Truck Mills, Bistro on Spruce Zach Baker, The JACC

Club 21 Summer Beer Dinner, Lincoln Center 22 Gardens & Grapes, Palouse, Wash.

24 25 25 25 26 26 26

MUSIC

PERFORMANCE

FOOD & DRINK

20 Summer Solstice Tasting, Spokane

20 Craig Catlett Trio, Arbor Crest 20 Mark Stevens, The Bing 20 The Tone Collaborative, Phat

House 20 Truck Mills, Little Olive Restaurant 21 A Touch of Jazz, Pend d’Oreille Winery 21 Andy Day, Clover 21-23 Concious Culture Festival, Tonasket, Wash. 21 KPBX Kids Concert, The Bing 21 Laffin Bones, The Cellar 21 Light Up the Sky, The Center 21 Matthew Sontag CD Release, Bing Crosby Theater 21 Mike and Shanna Thompson, Coldwater Creek Wine Bar 21-22 Truck Mills, Fedora Pub 21-22 Pigs on the Wing (Pink Floyd Tribute), John’s Alley

June

Don’t forget Jeff Dunham, who comes to Northern Quest Resort & Casino June 20.

22 Holy Broke, La Rosa Club 22 Kari Marguerite, Clover 22 Monarch Mountain Band, Kootenai 22 22 22 22 22 23

River Brewing Co. Nugestock feat. Royal Bliss, The Center Raggs and Bush Doktor, Zola Ray Allen, Coldwater Creek Wine Bar Sunstripe, Moksha, Steve Powers, Chelsey Heidenreich; Phat House Trumpetman, Park Place 1964 The Tribute (Beatles Tribute), Bing Crosby Theater

13-16 Big River, CdA Summer Theater 20-23 The Marriage of Bette and Boo, Ignite Theatre

20-23 Same Time Next Year, The JACC 20 Jeff Dunham, Northern Quest 20 REMIX: Improv & Scripted Together, Interplayers Theatre

21-23 The Sound of Music, Pend Oreille Playhouse

21 Going-Going-Gone! Fundraising Auction, Cutter Theatre

21 Yearbook, Blue Door Theatre 22 Safari improv, Blue Door Theatre

SPORTS & OUTDOORS 20-24 Spokane Indians vs. Boise Hawks, Avista Stadium

20 Trail Maintenance Party, Mt. Spokane State Park

20 Dog First Aid, REI

calendar

21 Basketball Tourney, Kroc Center 21 Little Spokane River canoe trip, Riverside State Park

21-22 Drag Races, Spokane Cty. Raceway 21 Drive for Hope Golf Tournament, Avondale Golf Course

21-23 Group camping and trail ride,

Riverside State Park Equestrian

21 High School All Star Football

Game, Lyons Field, Moses Lake, Wash. 21 Ride the Wall Bicycle Race, Silver Mountain 21 Speed Golf Tournament, Silver Mountain 21 Spokane Shock, Spokane Arena 21-23 Youth Baseball Invitational, Dwight Merkel Sports Complex 22 Classic Car and Bike Show, Sporty’s Bar, Moses Lake, Wash. 22 Kootenai River Run, Bonners Ferry, 22 Lilac City Roller Girls, Roller Valley Skate Center 22 Spokane Shine, Spokane Falls Community College Field 22 Trail Rail Run, Silver Mountain 23 The F---ing Bike Club “Prom” ride, Spokane 23 Ironman Coeur d’Alene 23-24Trail Maintenance Party, Mt. Spokane State Park 25 Barrel Racing, Bonner County Fairgrounds 25-26Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver Canadians, Avista Stadium 26 Spokane Shine, SFCC

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 89

calendar

ARTS

June July

27 Art-Write Workshop, Auntie’s 27-28 Jo Fyfe, Tinman Gallery 30 Inland Northwest Narrative: 3

Crossroads and Confluence, The MAC (Ongoing) Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

FESTIVAL

27-29 Art Walk, downtown Palouse 28-29 Palouse Quilt Show, Palouse

Community Center 29 Battle of the Bulls, Bonner Cty. Fair 29 Bikes, Brews and BBQs, Kootenai County Fairgrounds 29 Hoopfest Saturday Night, The Lincoln Center 29 Old Time Farm Days, North Spokane Farm Museum 29-30 Palouse Empire Appaloosa Show, Spokane County Fair 29-30 Strawberry Celebration, Green Bluff 30 Summer Celebration, Schweitzer 2-3 Northwest Renaissance Festival, Nine Mile Falls, Wash. 3 Kid’s Independence Day Parade, downtown Coeur d’Alene 3 Statehood Day Parade, Wallace

FILM

27-30Quartet, Kenworthy 28 100 Bloody Acres, Magic Lantern 28-29 Rockshow: Paul McCartney and Wings, IMAX Theater

27-

3

28 Thunderstruck, Sunset Park, 29 29 1-3 2 3

Airway Heights Rocky 3, The Shop Scream, Garland Theater Dolphins, IMAX Theatre (thru 7/31) Scream, Garland Theater Up, Pavillion Park

FOOD & DRINK

27 Sandpoint Summer Sampler, Farmin Park

27 Yappy Hour fundraiser, Pend d’Oreille Winery

29 Brewfest, Kootenai Fairgrounds 29 Music and Micros with Deschutes

Fleetwood Mac rocks the Spokane Arena on June 29.

Brewery, CdA Casino

30 Perkins House Ice Cream Social, Colfax, Wash.

MUSIC

27 Doug Webster, Kroc Center 27 Ninjazz, Pend d���Oreille Winery 27 The Grizzled Mighty, nYne 28 Killswitch Engage, Knitting Factory 28-29 Paradiso Festival, The Gorge 28 Strictly Business, CdA Casino 29 Cedar & Boyer, La Rosa Club 29 Eclectic Approach, Zola 29 Fleetwood Mac, Spokane Arena 29 Gypsy Cowbelle, Dahmen Barn 29 Maxie Ray Mills, The Sidebar 29 Monarch Mountain Band, Park Place

29 Stagecoast West, Mix Park, Deer Park

29 Stephanie Hatzinikolis, Clover 29 Strictly Business, CdA Casino 29 Truck Mills, Seasons of Coeur 30 30 1 2 2 3

d’Alene 8 Second Ride, Arbor Crest Concert Series, CdA City Park Clumsy Lovers, The JACC Strictly Business, CdA Casino Downtown CdA Concert Series Chuck Mead, Republic Brewing Co.

PERFORMANCE

27-30, 3 Jack and the Beanstalk, Idaho

Repertory Theatre 28-30 The Marriage of Bette and Boo, Ignite Theatre 28-30 The Sound of Music, Pend Oreille Playhouse 28-30 Bed Ride, Masquers Theater,

Soap Lake, Wash.

28 Benefit: Kick up Your Heels for

Interplayers, Chateau Rive 28-29 The Wizard of Oz, Panida 28 Yearbook, Blue Door Theatre 29 Safari improv, Blue Door Theatre 30 Open House, Ignite Theatre 3-6 Lookout, Mullan or Look Out Mullan!, Sixth Street Melodrama

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

29 Day Hike, Riverside State Park, Bowl & Pitcher

29 Family Open Dig Saturday, Livingstones Rock Ranch

29 Hidden Gardens of Colville Valley, Colville, Wash.

29-30 Hoopfest, Downtown Spokane 29 Jackass Golf Tournament, Silver Mountain

29 Permaculture and Native Plants, Sun People Dry Goods Co.

27 Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver

29 Snake Pit Derby Dames, Coeur

27 Backyard Landscape Design

29 Spokane Rocket Velo Criterium,

27 Bike Maintenance, REI Spokane 28 Little Spokane River canoe trip,

30 Poker Run, Silver Mountain 2 Gardening for Birds & Butterflies,

28-29 Drag Races, Spokane Raceway

2

Canadians, Avista Stadium

workshop, Spokane Valley Library Riverside State Park

d’Alene

Whitworth University

Fairfield Library Spokane Shine, SFCC

Lake Roosevelt is the largest lake in Washington State and it’s just 60 miles west of Spokane via scenic Hwy. 2! 7 Campgrounds 13 Boat Launches Over 200 miles of public beach An 1800’s Army Fort and... The only houseboat vacations north of Lake Shasta While you’re here, get down with the locals! • Hay Days - Sprague, WA July 5-7 • Pioneer Days - Davenport, WA July 19-21 • Lincoln County Fair - Davenport, WA Aug. 22 - 24 • Deutschesfest - Odessa, WA Sept 20-22 • Almira Country Fair - Almira, WA Sept 27-28 • Fall Festival - Harrington, WA Sept 28

90 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Inlander picks in blue!

4-10

ARTS

5 Union Street, Park Bench Café 5-6 The Music of World War II feat.

5 First Friday, downtown Spokane 5 Three-Minute Mic, Auntie’s 5-10 PRIME juried art show, Saranac Art

4 4 4 4 4 4 4

4th of July Celebrations, Colville 4th of July Celebrations, Priest River 4th of July Celebrations, CdA 4th of July Celebrations, Harrison 4th of July Celebrations, Moses Lake, feat. Ryhthm Nation 4th of July Celebrations, Newport 4th of July Celebrations, Riverfront Park

4th of July Celebrations, Sandpoint 4th of July Celebrations, Silver Mountain 4 4th of July Celebrations, Silverwood Theme Park, Athol 4 4th of July Fireworks, Pavillion Park 5-7 Bead Stampede, Kootenai Fair 5-6 Silver Spokes Bike Festival, Silver Valley, Idaho 6-7 Lavender Festival, Newport 6-7 Strawberry Celebration, Green Bluff 9-10 Northwest Renaissance Festival, Nine Mile Falls, Wash.

FILM 5 5

Hannah Arendt, Magic Lantern Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Pavillion Park

5 6 6

The Painting, Magic Lantern Hotel Transylvania, The Shop Mobius Movie: Teenage Mutant Niinja Turtles, The Bing 6, 9 Fight Club, Garland Theater

MUSIC 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5

Daniel Mark Faller, CdA Park, Spokane Six Foot Swing, Tuxedo Junction, Pavillion Park Strictly Business, CdA Casino The Jam Band, Gateway Bar & Grill Twisted Bisquit, Arbor Crest Bridges Home, Pend d’Oreille Winery Paul Grove, Clover Strictly Business, CdA Casino The Jam Band, Gateway Bar & Grill Triple Shot, The Rock Bar

Summer Festivals

PERFORMANCE 4

Wanderlust Circus, Bing Crosby Theater

Cherry Festival July 20, 21 & 27, 28 Peach Festival Aug 17 thru Labor Day Apple Festival Every Weekend Sept 21 thru Oct 27

SPORTS & OUTDOORS 4

Whitewater Rafting Trip, Clark Fork River, Montana 4-7 American Legion Wood Bat Classic, Spokane and Coeur d’Alene 4-8 Spokane Indians vs. Eugene Emeralds, Avista Stadium 6 Drag Races, Spokane County Raceway 6 Lilac City Twilight Criterium, Downtown Spokane 6 Negative Split Half Marathon, Riverfront Park 9 Barrel Racing, Bonner County Fairgrounds

20th Anniversary

6995 Cornwall Drive, Coeur d’Alene ID

GRAND PRIZE $250,000 Home 1st Prize 2nd Prize 3rd Prize 4th Prize

$20,000 Car $10,000 Boat Hanley Ave. $3,500 Vacation $2,000 Shopping Spree

TICKETS $100

ONLY 5,000 sold!

DRAWING www.greenbluffgrowers.com | Just north of Spokane Look for the Greenbluff Growers Signs

Repertory Theatre Safari improv show, Blue Door Theatre 7, 10-13 Lookout, Mullan or Look Out Mullan!, Sixth Street Melodrama 8 A Prairie Home Companion, INB Performing Arts Center 10 Let’s Misbehave: The Music and Lyrics of Cole Porter, Idaho Repertory Theatre

6

Win this House!

on the bluff

Strawberry Celebration June 29 & 30, July 6 & 7

Summer Theatre

5-7 The Mystery of Irma Vep, Idaho

JULY 10, 2013

90

TICKET OUTLETS Lake City Ford NIC Workforce Training Center Open Houses Stein’s Family Foods Super 1 Foods Trading Company Stores Or order online

Highway 95

FESTIVAL

4 4

Lake, Wash.

5-6 The Wizard of Oz, Panida Theater 5-7,10Mary Poppins, Coeur d’Alene

Madellaine Dr.

9

Pennant Run, Avista Stadium Bad Science Friday, Mobius Science Ice Cream Social, Palouse City Park Mobius Science Fun, at select area libraries Mother-Daughter Summer Pajama Party, Riverfront Park, Looff Carrousel

5 Music in Your Face, Blue Door 5 Short Stacks, Blue Door Theatre 5-7 Bed Ride, Masquers Theater, Soap

20th Annual

4 5 7 8

Witness the magic of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix at Pavillion Park on July 5.

Heidi Kuban & Diane Copeland, Circle Moon Theatre 6 Bram Brata, Mix Park, Deer Park 6 D-Why, Red Room Lounge 6 Dan Mills, Clover 6 Mike and Shanna Thompson, La Rosa Club 6 Monarch Mountain Band, Arbor Crest Winery 6 Nicole Lewis, The Garrett Bartley Band; Two Rivers Casino 6 Nu Jack City, Ponderay Garden Center 6 Stage to Stage Music Festival, Arbor Crest 6 Wild Honey Band and Still Vertical, Park Place 6 The Jam Band, Gateway Bar & Grill 7 Bad Company with Paul Rodgers, Northern Quest 7 City Park Concert Series, Coeur d’Alene City Park 7 John Hiatt & The Combo, Knitting Factory 7 Soul Proprietor, Arbor Crest 8 Candlebox, Knitting Factory 9 Downtown CdA Concert Series 10 Concert in the Park, Reaney Park 10 Josh Abbott Band, Knitting Factory

calendar

Northwest Blvd.

Projects (Through July 31) 7 BootSlam poetry slam, Boots 9 Author “Sam” Lien Le, Auntie’s 9-10 All Media Juried Show, Chase Gallery at City Hall (Through Sept. 27) 9-10 CLOSE-IN: Allie Kurtz Vogt, Jundt Art Museum (Through Aug. 15) 10 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

COMMUNITY

July

Sponsored in part by

www.nic.edu/rbr or (208) 769-3271 Raffle proceeds are used to fund scholarships, update classroom technology, and support program needs at North Idaho College.

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 91

July

calendar

ARTS

Gallery (Through Aug. 3)

16 17 17

Lake, Wash.

12-13 The Wizard of Oz, Panida Theater 12-14 Mary Poppins, Coeur d’Alene

County Fairgrounds 12-14 Sandpoint Summer Fest, Eureka Mountain Center 13-14 Cheney Jubilee, Cheney, Wash. 13 Flat Water Regatta, Sandpoint 13-14 Historic Skills Fair, Silver Mountain 13-14 Inland Empire Kennel Association Dog Show, Kootenai Fairgrounds 16-17 Northwest Renaissance Festival, Nine Mile Falls, Wash.

12 Spokane Poetry Slam team

13 14

12-14 Bed Ride, Masquers Theater, Soap

12 Huckleberry Rabbit Show, Bonner

11 Author Craig Johnson, Auntie’s 12-17 Kyle Paliotto, The Art Spirit

12

11-17

Showcase and Fundraiser, Auntie’s Bookstore Second Friday ArtWalk, downtown Coeur d’Alene Fish On! exhibit, Dahmen Barn Cowboy Poetry with Bob Marshall, Dahmen Barn E.E. Charlton-Trujillo, Auntie’s Broken Mic, Neato Burrito Inland Northwest Writer’s Guild, Auntie’s Bookstore

14, 17-20 Lookout, Mullan or Look Out

12 The Little Rascals, Sunset Park,

12 Blue Canoe, Jones Radiator 12-13 Blues Festival, Wallace, Idaho 12 Dead Fiddlers Society, Pend

14 City Park Concert Series, Coeur

17 The Merry Wives of Windsor, Idaho

14 Jazz NW, Coeur d’Alene Cellars 14 Men of Rhythm, Arbor Crest 14 PJ Destiny, Conkling Marina 16 Downtown CdA Concert Series 16-17 Mozart On A Summer’s Eve,

17 The Giver staged reading feat.

16 17 17

12-13 Motocross, Kootenai Fairgrounds 12-14 Trail Maintenance Party, Colville

Dead, Garland Theater

13 The Princess Bride, The Shop 17 Grease, Riverfront Park Lilac Bowl

FOOD & DRINK

12 Pongzilla Beer Pong Tournament, The Lincoln Center

13 Grant County Food & Wine

Festival, Moses Lake, Wash.

MUSIC 11 11 11 11 12

11-14 Chataqua, Chewelah City Park 12-14 Cheney Rodeo 12-14 Classic Boat Festival, Sandpoint 12-14 Early Ford V-8 Show, Spokane County Fair & Expo

Theatre

13 Yabba Griffiths, Ponderay Garden

Airway Heights

FESTIVAL

Children

13 Mobius Extreme Science, the Bing 13 Safari improv show, Blue Door

12 Bagpipes at the Library, Downtown

13, 16 Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s

libraries 12-17 Spy Training, at area libraries 14 Jacey’s Race, Sandpoint High School 15-17 Archaeologist for a Day, at select area libraries 15 Mobius Monday, Mobius Science 16 Pokemon Tournament, North Spokane Library

Oreille Playhouse

12-14 Sherlock Holmes, Theater Arts for

12 A Band Called Death, Magic Lantern Theater

11-12 Mobius Science Fun, at select area

Theatre

12-13 One-Act Play Festival, Pend

The rodeo comes to Cheney July 12-14.

FILM

COMMUNITY

Summer Theatre

12 Music in Your Face, Blue Door

6 Foot Swing, CdA Park, Spokane Dead Prez, Red Room Lounge Paul Grove, Holy Names Center Union Street, Arbor Crest Andy Day, Clover

Spokane Library

12 12 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13

d’Oreille Winery Olivia Brownlee, The JACC Poison & Ratt, Northern Quest Triple Shot, Sullivan Scoreboard Big Red Barn, Mix Park, Deer Park Folk Remedy and Still Vertical, Park Place KYRS Music Festival, Glover Field Locals Live feat. Rock in Paradise, Knitting Factory Monarch Mountain Band, Kootenai River Brewing Co. Robbie French, Clover Spirit Fest Northwest feat. Third Day, Riverfront Park Triple Shot, Sullivan Scoreboard

Center

d’Alene City Park

17 17

Manito Park The Dirty Heads, Knitting Factory Clumsy Lovers, Arbor Crest Winery Concert in the Park, Reaney Park, Pullman Five Minutes of Fame open mic, Café Bodega Irish Rock, Arbor Crest Winery

PERFORMANCE

11-14Let’s Misbehave: The Music and Lyrics of Cole Porter, Idaho Repertory Theatre

Mullan!, Sixth Street Melodrama

Repertory Theatre

Patty Duke, Bing Crosby Theater

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

12 Little Spokane River canoe trip, Riverside State Park National Forest

13 Let’s Climb a Mountain, Riverfront Park

13-14 Loop the Lake, Pavillion Park 13 The Dirty Dash, Riverside State Park

15-17 Spokane Indians vs. Tri-City Devils, Avista Stadium

16 Summer Fun Run Series, U District PT

W E D N E S D AY S

SEATING OPENS @ 7 PM $ 5 • Live Acts • Trivia • fun

movies start at dusk

___________________

MOVIE SCHEDULE

grease JULY 24 the lion king ___________________ JULY 31 Ghostbusters ___________________ AUG 7 the sandlot ___________________ AUG 14 the avengers ___________________ AUG 21 the princess bride JULY 17

___________________

The Lilac Bowl

@

Riverfront g Parkh Spokane.Washington

Connoisseur Concerts Ensemble WITH Susan AND SPECIAL GUEST

Windham, soprano

Zuill Bailey, cello, NORTHWEST BACH FESTIVAL ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Reserved table and lawn seating available for picnics beginning at 5:30pm FULL TABLE RESERVATIONS: $240 for a table for eight ($30 per person) includes gourmet desserts and coffee from Luna. Call Connoisseur Concerts to reserve a full table for eight ($240) (509-326-4942) INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: $30 per person for seating at a table for eight with dessert & coffee LAWN SEATING: $10 per person - no food or beverage service. Bring your own chairs or blankets.

Tickets available NOW at all TicketsWest outlets or

CIRCUS PERF O RM ERS

M OV I E TR I V I A

FO O D T R UC KS

DO G FR IENDLY

CALL 1-800-325-SEAT Online: www.ticketswest.com (key word: Mozart)

OutdoorMoviesatRiverfront.com - Facebook.com/OutdoorMoviesatRiverfront - Twitter.com/OutdoorCinemaNW

Produced by Epic Events • 360.733.2682 • www.EpicEvents.US

92 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

In the unlikely event of rain, the concert will move to St. John’s Cathedral, Grand Boulevard at 12th Avenue

Inlander picks in blue! ARTS

18 Author William Kenower, Auntie’s 19-24 Aaron Cordell Johnson & Jared Shear, Redtail Gallery (Through Aug. 10) 19-20 ArtWalk, downtown Pullman 19-24 Textile Art Show, The JACC (Through Sept. 7) 19 Venerable Thubten Chodron, Morning Light Yoga Studio 20 Author William Pendley, Auntie’s 20 Bill O’Reilly and Dennis Miller, INB Center 21 Spokane Poetry Slam, Scout 21 Vision Seekers, The JACC 23 Author Doug Warrick, Auntie’s 24 Author Don Gilmore, Auntie’s 24 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

COMMUNITY

18-19 Archaeologist for a Day, at select area libraries 19-24 Spy Training, at area libraries

18-24

20-21 Cherry Festival, Green Bluff 20 Garland Street Fair, Garland Dist. 20 Huckleberry Festival, Priest Lake

18 Cherry Pickers Trot & Pit Spit,

Green Bluff 18-21 Rendezvous in the Park, Moscow 18-20 Sidewalk Sale Days, Colville 19-21 NW Biplane Fly-In, Felts Field 19-21 Pioneer Days, Davenport, Wash. 19-21 Rathdrum Days, Lakeland H.S. 20-21 Airport Days & Fly-In, Prosser 20 Art Walk & Wine Gala, Prosser 20 Bull-a-Rama, Newport, Wash.

Concert Series, CdA City Park Downtown CdA Concert Series Son Volt, Knitting Factory Concert in the Park, Reaney Park, Pullman 24 Diane Schuur, Arbor Crest 24 Randy Houser, Knitting Factory

PERFORMANCE

18-20 The Merry Wives of Windsor,

FILM

A Hijacking, Magic Lantern Tangled, Pavillion Park Adventures of Tin Tin, Pavillion Park Mobius Movie: Back to the Future Trilogy, The Bing 20, 23 Demolition Man, Garland 20 Jurassic Park, The Shop 24 The Lion King, Riverfront Park

FOOD & DRINK

20 Bodacious Barbecue, Litehouse Beachhouse

FESTIVAL

21 23 23 24

Golf Course 20-21 KuroNekoCon, SFCC 20 Old Mill Days, Oakesdale, Wash. 20 South Perry Street Fair, Spokane 20-21 Spokane Gun Show, County Fair 23-24Northwest Renaissance Festival, Nine Mile Falls, Wash.

19 19 20 24

MUSIC 18 18 18 18

Chutzpah, CdA Park, Spokane Coeurimba Group, The JACC Jonny Lang, Bing Crosby Theater Spokane Brass Quintet, Arbor Crest 19 Bright Moments, Pend d’Oreille Winery 19 Folkinception, Cursive Wires, The Camaros; Two Rivers Casino

July

Idaho Repertory Theatre

Bill O’Reilly and Dennis Miller hold court at the INB July 20.

19 John Anderson, Clearwater River Casino

19 Karrie O’Neill, Clover 19 Paul Thorn, Panida Theater 19-20 Basin Summer Sounds, Ephrata 20 Evan Denlinger, Clover 20 John Mayer, The Gorge 20 Justin Lantrip, La Rosa Club 20 Masterclass Jazz Orchestra, Mix

18 REMIX: Improv & Scripted

Together, Interplayers Theatre

18-21 The Stinky Cheese Man, Pullman Civic Theatre

19 The Wizard of Oz, Panida Theater 19, 24 The Mystery of Irma Vep, Idaho Repertory Theatre

19-20 Sherlock Holmes, Theater Arts for Children

19-21 Bye Bye, Birdie, CYT North Idaho at the Kroc Center

20 Mountain Music Festival,

19 Music in Your Face, Blue Door 19-21 Stuff Happens, Stage Left Theatre 20 Safari improv, Blue Door Theatre 21, 24-27 Lookout, Mullan or Look Out

20 Nina Storey, Ponderay Garden

21 Let’s Misbehave: The Music and

Park, Deer Park

Schweitzer Mountain Resort Center

20 Peter Rivera, Webb’s Slough 20 Terry Evans, Yellow Dog, Jim

Boyd Band; Two Rivers Casino

21 Big Mumbo Blues Band, Arbor Crest

Mullan!, Sixth Street Melodrama

Lyrics of Cole Porter, Idaho Repertory Theatre 24 Michael Jackson HIStory II, INB 24 The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Interplayers Theatre 24 SuperBen, Interplayers Theatre

calendar

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

18 Aloha Stand-Up Paddleboard

Race Series, Nine Mile Recreation Area 19 Little Spokane River canoe trip, Riverside State Park 19-20 Drag Races, Spokane Raceway 19 Spokane Shock, Spokane Arena 20 Jedermann Gran Fondo bicycle race, Cheney, Wash. 20 Big Kahuna Golf Tournament, Sun Dance Golf Course 20 CHAFE 150 bicycle ride, Sandpoint 20 Muddy Miles, Kootenai County Fairgrounds, CdA 20 Schweitzer Mountain Trail Run, Sandpoint, Idaho 20 SpoKenya, Life Center Church 20 Tiger Tri, Colville, Wash. 20 Vermicomposting, Sun People Dry Goods Co. 21 Gran Fondo mtn. bike ride, CdA 21 Moonlight River Float, Clark Fork River, Mont. 22-24ATV Jamboree in Wallace, Idaho 23 Barrel Racing, Bonner Fairgrounds 23 Gardening for Birds & Butterflies, Medical Lake Library 23-24Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver Canadians, Avista Stadium 23 Summer Fun Run Series, U District PT 24 Gardening for Birds & Butterflies, North Spokane Library

Our Good Nature Come and join us in Colville for Summer Fun! FARMERS MARKETS

August 1

Sat. and Wed. in Downtown Colville Wednesdays at the Fairgrounds June 21-22

Kiwanis Community BBQ

NE WA Fairgrounds - 2 blocks west of Main www.colvillepanoramarodeo.com

Music, Historical Encampment, Craft & Food Booths & Beer Gardens

June 29-30

Bob Haney Memorial Baseball Tournament Colville Airport Fly In and Pancake Breakfast

Panorama ProWest Rodeo & Parade

Colville City Park

August 2-4

Colville Rendezvous Days

Governor’s Cup Walleye Tournament Lake Roosevelt, Kettle Falls Marina

Sat. 7 to 11am Colville Airport

June 29

Car Show Sun. 9 to 5 with awards at 3:30 pm

Tour beautiful gardens sponsored by AAUW Tickets at local nurseries

www.colvillerendezvous.org

July 4

Northeast Washington Fair

Colville Valley Garden Tour

Independence Day Fireworks NE WA Fairgrounds at dusk

July 18-20

Colville Sidewalk Sale and Street Faire

Colville City Park

August 22-25

Entertainment, Displays, Competition, Food & Drink NE WA Fairgrounds – 2 blocks west of Main Street www.co.stevens.wa.us/NE_WA_Fair/ new_fair_home_page.htm

www.colville.com

July 20

Tiger Tri One Quarter Triathlon www.tigertri.com

For more info on these events, contact: Colville Chamber of Commerce 509-684-5973

www.colville.com

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 93

calendar

July

ARTS

25 Poet Linda Kittell, Auntie’s 25 Summer Wine and Art Auction, 26 27 30 31

Silver Mountain Author Sarah Reijonen, Auntie’s Author Seth Holmes, Auntie’s Author Dianna Winget, Auntie’s Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

COMMUNITY

25 Spy Training, Cheney Library 27 Dance Party at City Beach,

Sandpoint 27-28 Lion’s Club Train Rides, Ione 29-31 Indiana Bones, at select area libraries 30 Zombies, North Spokane Library

FESTIVAL

26-27Clayton Rodeo, Clayton Fair 26-27Concrete River Festival, Colfax 26-28 Down River Days, Ione, Wash. 26-28 Gem Faire, Spokane County Fair 26 Hot Neon Nights Car Cruise, Priest River, Idaho

26-28 Julyamsh Powwow, Greyhound

Park 26-27Liberty Lake Days 26-28 Old Time Picnic, Harrison, Idaho 27-28 Cherry Festival, Green Bluff 27 Crazy Days Sidewalk Sale, downtown Sandpoint 27 Glass on Grass Car Show, Riverfront Park

Adult: Groundbreaking Reads

Tweens & Teens: Beneath the Surface

Youth: Dig Into Reading

Inlander picks in blue!

25-31

27 Timberdays, Priest River, Idaho 27 Tri County Settler’s Day, Deer Park 25-28Canyon County Fair, Caldwell

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

25-27 ATV Jamboree in Wallace, Idaho 25-27 Trail Maintenance Party, Colville

FILM

National Forest

26 Brave, Mirabeau Meadows Park 26 Hugo, Pavillion Park 26 One Track Heart: The Story of

Krishna Das, Magic Lantern Theater 27, 30Encino Man, Garland Theater 27 Rise of the Guardians, Sunset Park, Airway Heights 27 Wreck It Ralph, The Shop 31 Ghostbusters, Riverfront Park Lilac Bowl

FOOD & DRINK

25 Yappy Hour fundraiser, Trinity at

City Beach 27 Chardonnay Vertical Party, Pend d’Oreille Winery 28 Ice Cream Social, 1912 Center, Moscow, Idaho

MUSIC

25 The Spare Parts Trio, Arbor Crest 25 Table Top Joe, CdA Park, Spokane 26 Monarch Mountain Band, Pend d’Oreille Winery

26 Peter Frampton, Northern Quest 26 Strangled Darlings, Mootsy’s 26-27Phish, The Gorge 26-27Five Suns Bluegrass Festival,

Moses Lake, feat. The Box Cars

25 Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver Canadians, Avista Stadium

25 Aloha Stand-Up Paddleboard Race Series, Nine Mile Recreation Area

Check out the Julyamsh celebration at Greyhoud Park on July 26-28.

27 27 27 27 27 27 28 28 28 28 30 30 31 31

Palouse Music Festival, Palouse BonTaj, Ponderay Garden Center Chelsey Heidenreich, Clover Donna the Buffalo, The Center Holly McGarry, La Rosa Club Palouse Music Festival, Palouse City Park Bones, Bolan & Nelson, CdA Cellars Concert Series, CdA City Park Royal Fireworks Concert, Riverfront Park Sammy Eubanks, Arbor Crest Cedar & Boyer, Trinity at City Beach Downtown CdA Concert Series Concert in Reaney Park, Pullman Spokane Symphony, Arbor Crest

PERFORMANCE

25-26, 28 The Merry Wives of Windsor, Idaho Repertory Theatre 25-28The Stinky Cheese Man, Pullman Civic Theatre 25-26, 28, 31 The Complete Works of Shakespeare, Interplayers

SUMMER READING

25-28Bat Boy, Lake City Playhouse 25-28Romance Romance, Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre

26-28 Bye Bye, Birdie, CYT North Idaho at the Kroc Center

26-28 Big Bad, Liberty Lake Theatre 26-27Murder Me, Murder Me Not, Cutter Theatre 26 Latin Comedy Jam, The Bing 26 Music in Your Face, Blue Door 26-28 Stuff Happens, Stage Left 27 Let’s Misbehave: The Music and Lyrics of Cole Porter, Idaho Repertory Theatre 27 Safari improv show, Blue Door 27, 31 SuperBen, Interplayers Theatre 27 Gay Camp, Interplayers Theatre 28 Lookout, Mullan or Look Out Mullan!, Sixth Street Melodrama 31 Mining Madness at the Mill or A Big Bang for Bunker Hill, Sixth Street Meoldrama

Riverside State Park

26-28 Chili’s Kootenai County Tennis Classic, Coeur d’Alene

26-27Drag Races, Spokane Raceway 26 Spokane Shock, Spokane Arena 27-28 Deer Park Amateur Golf Tournament

27 The F---ing Bike Club “Birthday” ride, Spokane

27 Foam Fest, Mt. Spokane State Park 27 Liberty Road Race No. 2, Spangle 27 Lilac City Roller Girls, Spokane Convention Center

27-28 Silver Hoops Basketball

Tournament, Silver Mountain

28 Bare Buns Fun Run, Kaniksu Ranch 28 Family Open Dig Saturday, Livingstones Rock Ranch

28 Race the River, Coeur d’Alene 28 Spokane Valley Cycle Celebration, Mirabeau Park

28-29 Zak! Charity Open, Northern

Quest and Spokane Country Club

30 Summer Fun Run Series, U District 31 Spokane Indians vs. Salem-Keizer Volcanoes, Avista Stadium

presents 2 brand new events in Spokane Valley

JULY 28th

at your library kicks off in June! A diverse collection of programs for everyone — adults, families, children, tweens & teens. Topics and events include, history, concerts, murder mystery, gardening, crafts, anime, writing, and much more!

26 Little Spokane River canoe trip,

anD Sept 22nd

Visit our website for details or grab a program guide from your nearest library location.

TRIATHLON

509.922.3299 | www.ValleyFest.org | 94 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

1-7

Throughout The Summer SILVERWOOD, Athol, Idaho, open daily at 11 am PIRATES OF THE COEUR D’ALENE FAMILY CRUISE, CdA Resort, daily at 1 pm and 3:30 pm PIRATES OF THE COEUR D’ALENE ADULT CRUISE, CdA Resort, Fri-Sat at 6:30 pm LAKE PEND OREILLE CRUISES, Sandpoint, open daily ST. JOE RIVER CRUISE, Coeur d’Alene Resort, Sunday 11:305:30 pm SIERRA SILVER MINE TOUR & GHOST TROLLEY, Wallace, Idaho, open daily RIVERFRONT PARK IMAX THEATRE, open daily from 12:30-7 pm RIVERFRONT PARK SPOKANE FALLS SKYRIDE, open daily at 10 am HORSE & CARRIAGE RIDES, downtown Spokane, July-Aug., Fri from 5-9 pm GAISER CONSERVATORY, Manito Park, open daily from 8 am7pm FLYING IRISH RUN, Red Lion River Inn, Thu at 5:45 pm IMPROV COMEDY, Blue Door Theater, Fri and Sat STAND-UP COMEDY, Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, Thu at 8 pm 

ARTS

4

Aug. 31) 1-7 Forest Friends, Entree Gallery (Through Aug. 31) 2 First Friday, downtown Spokane 2 Three-Minute Mic, Auntie’s 2-7 Bradd Skubinna and Hanna Koeske, Saranac Art Projects (Through Aug. 31) 2-7 The Grimm Brothers Invitational, Tinman Gallery (Through Aug. 31) 4 BootSlam poetry slam, Boots 4 Watercolor Exhibit, Dahmen Barn 7 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

MUSIC

1-7 Birds, Gallery Northwest (Through

COMMUNITY

1-2 Indiana Bones, at select area

libraries 2 Bad Science Friday, Mobius Science 2 Lightning Bug Ball, The JACC 3 1910 Fireman’s Blowout Ball, Wallace, Idaho 5-7 Songs of the Trail Oregon, at select area libraries 7 Spy Training, Otis Orchards Library 6 National Night Out Against Crime, Spokane

FESTIVAL

2-4 Art on the Green, North Idaho College, CdA

2-4 Coeur d’Alene Street Fair, CdA 2-4 Colville Rendezvous Days, Colville 2-4 Hillyard Festival, Spokane

Toby Keith is at the Gorge for the Watershed Festival on Aug. 3.

2-4 Kalispel Tribe of Indians Pow Pow, 3 3 4

Usk, Wash. Comancheros Car Show, Pinehurst, Idaho Spokane Highland Games, Spokane County Fair & Expo Huckleberry Festival, Schweitzer

FILM 1

Selkirk International Film Festival, Cutter Theatre 1-7 To The Arctic, IMAX Theatre (Through Aug. 31) 3 Beetlejuice, The Shop 3 Mamma Mia!, Pavillion Park 3, 6 Tank Girl, Garland Theater 5-7 Free Summer Movie: Rise of the Guardians, Garland Theater 7 The Sandlot, Riverfront Park

FOOD & DRINK 3

Brewsfest, Silver Mountain

Aug.

PERFORMANCE

Vintage Spokane Food & Wine Affair, Northern Quest Casino

1 1 1 1 2 2 2

calendar

1-3 The Complete Works of William

Shakespeare, Interplayers Theatre

Indigo Girls, Festival at Sandpoint Isaac Walton Duo, Arbor Crest Island Soul, CdA Park, Spokane Paul Grove, Clover CAKE, Festival at Sandpoint Dan Mills, Clover Moses Willey, Panhandle Polecats, Student Loan, Jim Faddis & One More Ride; Two Rivers Casino 2 Strictly Business, CdA Casino 2-4 Kaslo Jazz Festival, Kaslo, B.C. 2-4 Watershed Festival, The Gorge 3 Heartbreak Pass, Student Loan, Pearl Snaps, Jim Faddis & One More Ride; Two Rivers Casino 3 Japanese Taiko Drummers, Ponderay Garden Center 3 Men of Rhythm, Mix Park, Deer Park 3 Rosanne Cash, Festival at Sandpoint 3 Strictly Business, CdA Casino 3 Will Foster, La Rosa Club 4 Concert Series, CdA City Park 4 Jazz Conspiracy, Arbor Crest 4 Spokane Youth Orchestra, Festival at Sandpoint 6 Downtown CdA Concert Series 7 Concert in the Park, Reaney Park, Pullman 7 Spokane Symphony, Arbor Crest

1-4 Bat Boy, Lake City Playhouse 1-4 Romance Romance, Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre

1-4, 7 Mining Madness at the Mill or A Big Bang for Bunker Hill, Sixth Street Meoldrama 1-3 Music, Magic & Mayhem, Circle Moon Theatre 2 Short Stacks, Blue Door Theatre 2 You Need a Hero, Blue Door 3 SuperBen, Interplayers Theatre 3 Gay Camp, Interplayers Theatre 3 Safari improv show, Blue Door

SPORTS & OUTDOORS 1

1-4 2 2-3 2-4 2-4 3 3 3 3-4

Aloha Stand-Up Paddleboard Race Series, Nine Mile Recreation Area Spokane Indians vs. Salem-Keizer Volcanoes, Avista Stadium Little Spokane River canoe trip, Riverside State Park Drag Races, Spokane Raceway Northwest YogaFest, Eureka Mountain Center, Sagle, Idaho Trail Maintenance Party, Colville National Forest 8 Lakes Legs Ache, Spokane Long Bridge Swim, Sandpoint Midnight Century Ride, The Elk Public House Spike & Dig, Dwight Merkel Sports Complex

800-838-3006 Sales | Rentals | Lessons

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Paddleboard Yoga classes July-Sept

512 E. Sherman Ave. | 208.292.4156 | CdaPaddleboard.com

June 15 & August 24

july 20

ego-free

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Peter Rivera

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Show & Shine Friday night downtown St. John Saturday gates open at 9 & racing starts at 10

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calendar

ARTS

Aug.

9 Second Friday ArtWalk, CdA 9-11 Artist Studio Tour, Sandpoint 9-14 Robert Grimes, The Art Spirit Gallery (Through Sept. 7)

14 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

COMMUNITY 8

Songs of the Trail Oregon, at select area libraries 9-10 Relay For Life, Newport, Wash.

FESTIVAL

9 Palouse PRIDE, 1912 Center 9-11 Accordion Festival, Wallace, Idaho 9-11 Gold Rush Days, Murray, Idaho 10 Kids Day, Riverfront Park 10-11 Lacey Days, Foxwood Tea House, Newport, Wash.

10-11 Sandpoint Arts & Crafts Fair, City Beach, Sandpoint

10 Wings Over Sandpoint Fly-In, Sandpoint

13-14 Grant County Fair, Moses Lake 14 Benewah County Fair, St. Maries

FILM

8-9 Free Summer Movie: Rise of the Guardians, Garland Theater Here Comes the BOOM, Sunset Park, Airway Heights 9 Star Trek, Pavillion Park 10 Oz the Great and Powerful, The Shop 10,13 Spice World, Garland Theater

9

Museums

8-14

10 The Goonies, Pavillion Park 12-16 Free Summer Movie: Hotel

Transylvania, Garland Theater

14 The Avengers, Riverfront Park

MUSIC 8 8 8

Alan Jackson, Northern Quest Devon Wade, Arbor Crest John Butler Trio, Festival at Sandpoint 8 Leon Russell, Bing Crosby Theater 9 Karen Hunt, The JACC 9 Steve Miller Band, Festival at Sandpoint 9 Too Broke to Rock feat. Saliva, Knitting Factory 9-11 Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival, Medical Lake, Wash. 9-11 Rockin’ the River rock music fest, Three Forks, Mont. 10 Safari improv show, Blue Door 10 David Raitt & the Baja Boogie Band, Ponderay Garden Center 10 Evan Denlinger, Clover 10 Indie Music Fest, Post Falls Kiwanis Park 10 Sara Brown, Mix Park, Deer Park 10 The Avett Brothers, Festival at Sandpoint 11 Concert Series, CdA City Park 11 David Raitt & the Baja Boogie Band, Arbor Crest 11 Kosh, Coeur d’Alene Cellars 11 Spokane Symphony, Festival at Sandpoint

11 ZZ Ward, The Center 13 Downtown CdA Concert Series 14 Seryn, The Bing

PERFORMANCE

8-10 Bat Boy, Lake City Playhouse 8-11, 14 Mining Madness at the Mill or A Big Bang for Bunker Hill, Sixth Street Meoldrama 9 You Need a Hero, Blue Door 9-11, 14 Joseph and the Technicolor Dreamcoat, Spokane Civic Theatre

SPORTS & OUTDOORS 8

Aloha Stand-Up Paddleboard Race Series, Nine Mile Recreation Area 9 Little Spokane River canoe trip, Riverside State Park 10 Challenge for Charity Golf Tournament, Priest River, Idaho 10 Coeur d’Alene Triathlon and Duathlon, Coeur d’Alene 10 Hardhat Classic Golf Tournament, Palouse Ridge Golf Club, Pullman 10 Lilac City Roller Girls, Spokane County Fair & Expo 10 Snake Pit Derby Dames, CdA 10 Spokane Rocket Velo Time Trial, Deer Park 10-11 UClimb rock climbing, Q’emlin Park, Post Falls 10-11 Bass Fishing Contest, Nine Mile Recreation Area 12 East Fork Peak Hike, Sandpoint

Rockin the Rivers is partnering with Operation Never Forgotten and bringing their Freedom Sound Off to the festival. Go to www.freedomsoundoff.org for more information

BIRD AVIATION MUSEUM AND INVENTION CENTER, 325 Bird Ranch Rd. Sagle, Idaho. Open Mon-Fri, 8 am-4 pm. Call for reservations. birdaviationmuseum.com (208-255-4321) BOUNDARY COUNTY MUSEUM, 7229 Main St. Bonners Ferry, Idaho. Open Tue-Sat, 10 am-4 pm. bonnersferrymuseum.org (208-267-7720) CHENEY HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 420 First St., Cheney, Wash. Open Thu-Sat, 11 am-3 pm. cheneymusuem.org (235-2202) JUNDT ART MUSEUM, 502 E. Boone Ave. Open Mon-Sat, 10 am-4 pm. gonzaga.edu (313-3890) LIVINGSTONE ROCK RANCH MINING AND MINERAL MUSEUM, 4216 Saltese Lake Rd. Greenacres, Wash. Call for reservations. livingstonesrockranch.com (270-9076) MOBIUS KIDS CHILDREN’S MUSEUM, River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. Open Tues-Sat, 10 am-5 pm, Sun 11 am-5 pm. mobiusspokane.org (624-5437 MOBIUS SCIENCE CENTER, 811 W. Main Ave. Open Tues-Sat, 10 am-6 pm, Sun 11 am-5 pm. mobiusspokane.org (443-5669) MUSEUM OF NORTH IDAHO, 115 Northwest The MAC Blvd. Coeur d’Alene. Open Tue-Sat, 11 am-5 pm. museumni.org (208-664-3448) NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD DEPOT MUSEUM, 219 Sixth St. Wallace, Idaho. Open daily, 9 am-7 pm. visitidaho.org (208-752-0111) NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS AND CULTURE, 2316 W. First Ave. Open Wed-Sun, 10 am-5 pm. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) OASIS BORDELLO MUSEUM, 605 Cedar St. Wallace, Idaho. Open Mon-Sat, 10 am-5 pm, Sun 11 am-3 pm. visitidaho.org (208-753-0801) PEND OREILLE COUNTY MUSEUM, 402 S. Washington Ave. Newport, Wash. Open daily, 10 am-4 pm. pocmuseum.org (477-5388) SPOKANE LAW ENFORCEMENT MUSEUM, 1201 W. First Ave. Open Tue 10 am-4 pm. spokanepolice.org/volunteers/museum (477-6449) SPOKANE VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM, 12114 Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley. Open Wed-Fri, 11 am-4 pm, Sat 11 am-5 pm. valleyheritagecenter.org (922-4570) WSU MUSEUM OF ART, Washington State University, Pullman, Wash. Open Tue-Fri, noon-4 pm. museum.wsu.edu (335-1910) 

Share Summer Fun!

3 Augusnet ar9Th,1re0e,1Fo1rk2s, M0on1tana

At the Bridge

2013 Line-Up:

TESLA \\ Warrant \\ Firehouse \\ Trixter \\ Rick Springfield \\ Black Stone Cherry \\ Saving Abel \\ Saliva \\ Jackyl \\ Sweet \\ Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band \\ Peter Rivera (Original Lead Singer/Drummer of Rare Earth, 69-75)

800-555-8989 / 406-285-0099 www.rockintherivers.com

96 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

Mukogawa’s Weekend Homestay Program

M

ukogawa Fort Wright Institute is an intensive English Language Program for University students from Spokane’s sister city, Nishinomiya, Japan. We are currently accepting applications for host families.

An MFWI host family is responsible for a homestay experience for just one weekend in the term! New host families receive information and orientation materials to make their first homestay a successful and memorable weekend for everyone. Summer Homestay Weekend is August 16-18 with an orientation on August 11. Please call us today to get involved at:

(509) 232-2071 or visit our website:

www.mfwi.edu/homestay

15-21

Aug.

17 The Hobbit: An Unexpected

Journey, The Shop 19-23 Free Summer Movie: Ice Age: Continental Drift, Garland Theater 21 The Princess Bride, Riverfront Park

MUSIC

15 Angela Marie Project, Coeur d’Alene Park, Spokane

15 Big & Rich, Coeur d’Alene Casino 15 Miss Abbey Trio, Arbor Crest 15 Randy Travis, Clearwater River Casino

Sammy Hagar plays Northern Quest Resort & Casino on Aug. 17.

ARTS

15 Author Julian Guthrie, Auntie’s 16-18 Artist Studio Tour, Sandpoint 17 Local Author Saturday, BookPeople of Moscow

18 Spokane Poetry Slam, Scout 21 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

COMMUNITY

17 Strides for Strong Bones, Medical 17 17 18 20

Lake, Wash. Welcome Back Up All Night, Washington State University Community Garden Tour, Spokane Ride the Bases Motorcycle Ride, Lone Wolf Harley-Davidson Zombies, Spokane Valley Library

FESTIVAL

15-17 Grant County Fair, Moses Lake 15-18 Benewah County Fair, St. Maries 15-18 Pend Oreille County Fair, Cusick 16-18 Goodguys Great Northwest

Nationals, Spokane County Fair 16-17 Huckleberry Festival, Wallace 16-17 National Lentil Festival, Pullman 16-18 Performance Boat Regatta, Harrison, Idaho 16-18 Vintage Trailer Campout, Newport, Wash. 17-18 Coeur d’Alene Wooden Boat Show, Coeur d’Alene Resort 17-18 Cusick Rodeo, Pend Oreille County Fairgrounds 17 Hispanic Heritage Festival, Riverfront Park

17-21 Peach Festival, Green Bluff 17 Runway Renegades, Garland

District 17 Unity in the Community, Riverfront Park 17-18 Wallace Huckleberry Festival, Wallace, Idaho 21 North Idaho Fair & Rodeo, Kootenai County Fairgrounds 20-21 Bonner County Fair, Fairgrounds

FILM 16 16 16 17

Bolt, Pavillion Park The Act of Killing, Magic Lantern The Hunt, Magic Lantern Theater Hotel Transylvania, Mirabeau Meadows Park 17, 20 Night at the Roxbury, Garland

16 Jean Mann, Pend d’Oreille Winery 16-17 The Coffey Twins, Circle Moon Theatre 16 Union Street, Park Bench Café 16-17 The Jam Band, CdA Casino 17 Bright Moments, La Rosa Club 17 Cruise Control, Ponderay Garden Center 17 Karrie O’Neill, Clover 17 Robert Cray Band, Pavillion Park 17 Sammy Hagar, Northern Quest 18 Angela Marie Project, CdA Cellars 18 Concert Series, CdA City Park 18 Sara Brown Band, Arbor Crest 20 Downtown CdA Concert Series 21 Five Minutes of Fame open mic, Café Bodega

PERFORMANCE

15-18, 21 Mining Madness at the Mill or A Big Bang for Bunker Hill, Sixth Street Meoldrama

calendar

15-18 Joseph and the Technicolor

Dreamcoat, Spokane Civic Theatre 15-18 9 to 5, CdA Summer Theatre 15-18, 21 Church Basement Ladies, Interplayers Theatre 16-17 The Hunt for the Pend Oreille Paddler, Panida Theater 16 You Need a Hero, Blue Door 21 REMIX: Improvers & Scripted Actors, Interplayers Theatre

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

16 Little Spokane River canoe trip, Riverside State Park

16-17 Rodeo, Bonner County Fairgrounds

16-20 Spokane Indians vs. Hillsboro Hops Avista Stadium

16-17 Spokane to Sandpoint Relay 16-17 Jet Car Finals Night of Fire, Spokane County Raceway

18 Moonlight River Float, Clark Fork River, Montana

18 West Plains WunderWoman, Medical Lake, Wash.

20 Sawtooth Mountain Hike, Sandpoint

21 Barrel Racing, Bonner County Fairgrounds, Sandpoint

21 Spokane Indians vs. Tri-City Dust Devils, Avista Stadium

Inlander picks in blue!

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 97

calendar

ARTS

Aug.

22 Author Katie Quirk, Auntie’s 24 An Evening with Coaches vs.

Cancer Featuring Dana Carvey, The Fox 28 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

COMMUNITY

25 Doggie Dip, Comstock Aquatic Ctr. 25-26 Paws in the Pool, Valley Mission

Pool 26 Doggie Dip, Shadle Aquatic Center 27 Doggie Dip, Hillyard Aquatic Ctr.

FESTIVAL

22-28

Inlander picks in blue!

24 The Wizard of Oz, Pavillion Park 26-30 Free Summer Move: The Lorax,

PERFORMANCE

FOOD & DRINK

22-25 9 to 5, CdA Summer Theatre 22-25, 28 Church Basement Ladies,

Garland Theater

25 3rd Annual Brews Cruise, Saranac 28 Pig Out in the Park, Riverfront Park

MUSIC

Kootenai County Fairgrounds

22-25 Northeast Washington Fair, NE

Wash. Fairgrounds, Colville 23-24Airway Heights Festival 23-25 Clayton Community Fair, Clayton 23-24 Indian Encampment and Powwow, Riverfront Park 24-25 Outdoor Quilt Show and Folk Art Sale, The Buggy Barn

FILM

23 Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Pavillion Park

23 Little Giants, Sunset Park, Airway Heights

24, 27 Starship Troopers, Garland 24 The Avengers, The Shop

Sixth Street Meoldrama Interplayers Theatre

22-24Hamlet, Moscow Art Theatre Too 23-25 Lost in the ’50s, Pend Oreille Playhouse

22 Ottmar Liebert and Luna Negra,

23-24The Hunt for the Pend Oreille

22 Nude Pop, CdA Park, Spokane 22 Ron Greene, Arbor Crest 23 Mike & Shanna Thompson, Pend

23 You Need a Hero, Blue Door 24 Bill Cosby, Beasley Coliseum 24 Mobius Extreme Science, the

23 Robbie French, Clover 23 Sara Brown Band, Big Mumbo

24 Safari improv show, Blue Door 25 Shakespeare in the Park,

Bing Crosby Theater

d’Oreille Winery

22-24Bonner County Fair, Fairgrounds 22-28 Peach Festival, Green Bluff 22-25 North Idaho Fair & Rodeo,

22-25 Mining Madness at the Mill,

Blues Band; Two Rivers Casino 23-24Coffey Twins, Circle Moon Theatre 24 Bakin’ Phat, The Fat Tones, Sammy Eubanks; Two Rivers Casino 24 Black Sabbath, The Gorge 24 Chelsey Heidenreich, Clover 24 Dan Lavoie, La Rosa Club 24 Thom Shepherd, Ponderay Garden Center 25 Concert Series, CdA City Park 25 Moses Willey, Coeur d’Alene Cellars 25 PJ Destiny, Conkling Marina 25 The Chop Tops, The Center 25 Tuxedo Junction, Arbor Crest 27 Downtown CdA Concert Series 28 Pig Out in the Park, Riverfront Park feat. Too Slim, Spin Doctors

Paddler, Panida Theater

Bing

Pavillion Park

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

22-23 Spokane Indians vs. Tri-City Dust Devils, Avista Stadium

23 Little Spokane River canoe trip, Riverside State Park

24 Poker Paddle, Newport, Wash. 24 5-10K Dwight Merkel Dash 24 Family Open Saturday Dig, 24 24 25 25 25 28

Livingstones Rock Ranch Priest Lake Triathlon Sprint Boat races, Webb’s Slough Deer Park Family Golf Tournament Mt. Spokane Climb, Mitcham’s Barn Ross Creek Falls Hike, Sandpoint Spokane Indians vs. Everett AquaSox, Avista Stadium

Get Your Bike On! S ept ember 0 8, 2 013

6 th

A n n u a l

Register Online at:

SpokeFest

1 - MILE PARK LOOP • 9 - MILE SPOKANE FALLS LOOP 21 - MILE CLASSIC RIVER LOOP • 47 - MILE FOUR MOUNDS LOOP

98 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

farmers markets BONNERS FERRY FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Oct. 5 from 8 am-1 pm. Corner of Hwy. 95 and Kootenai Street, Bonners Ferry, Idaho. bonnersferryfarmersmarket.org (208-267-7987) CHENEY FARMERS MARKET, Tuesdays through Sept. 24 from 2-7 pm. Cheney City Hall Parking Lot, 609 Second St. cheneyfarmersmarket.com (235-2225) CHEWELAH FARMERS MARKET, Fridays through Oct. 18 from 11:30 am-5:30 pm. City Park, 600 N. Park St., Chewelah, Wash. chewelahfarmersmarket.blogspot.com (936-4353) CLAYTON FARMERS MARKET, Sundays, June-Oct. from noon-4 pm. Clayton Fairgrounds, 4616 Wallbridge Rd., Clayton, Wash. (5903353) COEUR D’ALENE FARMERS MARKET, Wednesdays through Sept 25. from 4-6 pm, Fifth Street and Sherman Avenue. Sunday market from 10 am-4 pm, Sixth and Sherman. Coeur d’Alene, Idaho kootenaifarmersmarkets.org (208-772-2290) COLVILLE FARMERS MARKET, Wednesdays through Oct. from 12-5 pm. Stevens County Fairgrounds, 317 W. Astor Ave., Colville, Wash. (732-6619)

DEER PARK FARMERS MARKET, Thursdays through Oct. from 4-7 pm. 412 W. Crawford, Deer Park, Wash. (979-1051) HAYDEN FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Oct. 19. from 9 am-1:30 pm. Corner of Hwy. 95 and Prairie Ave., Hayden, Idaho kootenaifarmersmarkets. org (208-772-2290) LIBERTY LAKE FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Oct. 12 from 9 am-1 pm. 1421 N. Meadowwood Ln., Liberty Lake, Wash. llfarmersmarket.com (879-4965) MILLWOOD FARMERS MARKET, Wednesdays through Sept. 25 from 3-7 pm. Millwood Community Presbyterian, 3223 N. Marguerite Rd. millwoodpc.org (924-2350) MOSCOW FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Oct. from 8 am-1 pm. Friendship Square and Main St., downtown Moscow, Idaho. moscow.id.us (208-883-7132) NORTHEAST WASHINGTON FARMERS MARKET, Wednesdays and Saturdays through Oct. from 9 am-1 pm. Under the clock tower on the corner of Main & Astor, Colville, Wash. (517-414-0399) PEND OREILLE FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Sept. from 9 am-1 pm. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave., Newport, Wash. (509-671-3389) PULLMAN FARMERS MARKET, Wednesdays through Oct. 16 from 3:30-6 pm. Spot Shop parking lot, 240 NE Kamiaken St., Pullman, Wash. pullmanchamber.com (509-334-3565) RATHDRUM FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Oct. 5, from 9 am-3 pm. City Park off Hwy. 53, Rathdrum, Idaho. rathdrumfarmersmarket.org (208-687-3293) ROCKFORD FARMERS MARKET, Satur-

days through Sept. 7 from 9 am-3 pm. Rockford Park, First Street and Hwy. 278, Rockford, Wash. (291-3146) SANDPOINT FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Oct. 12 from 9 am-1 pm; Wednesdays, from 3-5:30 pm. Farmin Park, Third Avenue and Oak Street, Sandpoint, Idaho. sandpointfarmersmarket.org (208-597-3355) SOUTH PERRY FARMERS MARKET, Thursdays through Oct. from 3-7 pm. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. Spokane, Wash. thursdaymarket.org (720-8449) SPOKANE FARMERS MARKET, Saturdays through Oct. 30 from 8 am-1 pm; Wednesdays from 8 am-1 pm, starting June 12. 20 W. Fifth Ave. Spokane, Wash. spokanefarmersmarket.org (995-0182) SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET, ThursdaySaturday, year-round from 10 am-6 pm; Sunday from 11 am-5 pm. Spokane Public Market, 24 W. Second Ave. Spokane, Wash. spokanepublicmarket.org (8423544) ST. MARIES FARMERS MARKET, Fridays through Oct. 4 from 3-6:30 pm. Downtown St. Maries, Idaho. (208-245-4381) TUESDAY GROWERS’ MARKET, Tuesdays through Oct. 8 from 4:00-6:30 pm. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. Fifth St., Moscow, Idaho. moscowfood.coop (208882-8537) VERADALE FARMERS MARKET, Tuesdays through Sept. 24 from 2-6 pm. Spokane Valley Eagles, 16801 E. Sprague Ave. (990-3683) WEST CENTRAL MARKETPLACE, Tuesdays, June 18 through mid-Oct. from 3-6 pm. Cannon Park, 1920 W. Maxwell Ave. (521-0606) 

Aug. Sept. 29-

4

calendar

MUSIC

29 Big Red Barn, CdA Park, Spokane 29 Rob Rigoni, Arbor Crest 29-2 Pig Out in the Park, Riverfront Park feat. Civilized Animal, Sammy Eubanks

30-1 Dave Matthews Band, The Gorge 30 Ninjazz, Pend d’Oreille Winery 30 Stephanie Hatzinikolis, Clover 31 Martina McBride, Northern Quest 31 Monarch Mountain Band, Kootenai River Brewing Co.

Sammy Eubanks plays Pig Out on Sept. 2.

ARTS

31- 1 Art At The Lake, Entree Gallery 1 BootSlam poetry slam, Boots

FESTIVAL

29- 2 Peach Festival, Green Bluff 30-1 Tumbleweed Music Festival, Richland, Wash. 31-1 Affair on Main Street, Metaline Falls, Wash. 31-1 Coaster Classic Car Show, Silverwood Theme Park

31-2 Fall Fest Microbrews, Schweitzer 31-1 Funky Junk Antique Show & Crafts Market, Big 2

Red Barn, Sandpoint Bob’s Car Show, Newport City Park

FOOD & DRINK

29-2 Pig Out in the Park, Riverfront Park 29 Yappy Hour fundraiser, Evans Brothers Coffee Roasters

31 Canning 101, Sun People Dry Goods

31 Nu Jack City, Ponderay Garden Center 31 Spokane Symphony, Pavillion Park 31 Too Slim & The Taildraggers, Two Rivers 1 1 2

Casino Meet Revolver (Beatles Tribute), Arbor Crest Those Jazz Guys, CdA Cellars Spokane Symphony, Comstock Park

PERFORMANCE

29-31, 1 Church Basement Ladies, Interplayers 29-31 Hamlet, Moscow Art Theatre Too 30-1 Murder Me, Murder Me Not, Cutter Theatre 30 You Need a Hero, Blue Door 31 Safari improv show, Blue Door

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

29-30 Spokane Indians vs. Everett, Avista Stadium 29-2Drag Races, Spokane County Raceway 30-1 Coeur d’Alene Diamond Cup hydroplane race, Silver Beach, Coeur d’Alene

31-1 7 Adult Soccer Tournament, Plante’s Ferry

Inlander picks in blue!

Tumbleweed Music Festival Labor Day Weekend

August 30 - September 1, 2013 Howard Amon Park | Richland WA

FREE

Music, Dance, Workshops www.tumbleweedfest.com Artwork by Suzi Vitulli

JUNE 13, 2013 SUMMER GUIDE 99

event contacts Check THE INLANDER every week — in the paper or at Inlander.com/events — for the latest summer events listings. 1912 Center, 1912center.org, 208-669-

Entree Gallery, entreegallery.com, 208-

Magic Lantern, magiclanternspokane.

8 Lakes Leg Aches, lcsnw.org All Wheels Weekend,

Festival at Sandpoint,

Manic Moon Studios,

2249

allwheelsweekend.com City of Airway Heights, cawh.org Arbor Crest Winery, arborcrest.com, 927-9463 Art on the Green, artonthegreen.org, 208-667-9346 Auntie’s, auntiesbooks.com, 838-0206 BellTower, belltowerpullman.com, 509334-4195

Benewah County Fair,

benewahcountyfair.com

Big Sky’s Tavern, 489-2073 Bing Crosby Theater, bingcrosbytheater. com, 227-7638 Blue Door Theatre, bluedoortheatre. com, 747-7045 Bonner County Fairgrounds, co.bonner. id.us/fairgrounds

BookPeople of Moscow,

bookpeopleofmoscow.com, 208882-2669 Boots Bakery & Lounge, 703-7223 Canyon County Fair, canyoncountyfair. org, 208-455-8500 Car D’Lane, cdadowntown.com, 208667-5986 Chase Gallery, spokanearts.org, 3219614 Chateau Rive, 795-2030 Circle Moon Theatre, 208-448-1294 Clearstory Gallery, clearstorygallery. com, 327-4422 Clover, 487-2937 Coeur d’Alene Airport, cfdn.org, 800568-8924 Coeur d’Alene Casino, cdacasino.com, 800-523-2464

Coeur d’Alene Chamber of Commerce,

cdachamber.com, 208-664-3194

Ironman, ironmancda.com Coeur d’Alene Resort, cdaresort.com, 208-765-4000

Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, cdasummertheatre.com

Coeur d’Alene Triathlon & Duathlon, cdatriathlon.com Colville Chamber, colville.com

Concrete River Festival,

concreteriverfestival.com Conkling Marina, 208-686-1151 CREATE Art Center, createarts.org 447-9277 Cutter Theatre, cuttertheatre.com, 446-4108 Dahmen Barn, artisanbarn.org, 2293414 City of Deer Park, cityofdeerparkwa.com Deer Park Golf Club, deerparkgolf.com, 276-5912 Dirty Dash, thedirtydash.com Dirty Shame Saloon, 276-5163

100 summer guide JUNE 13, 2013

443-2001

festivalatsandpoint.com, 888-2654554 Fox Theater, foxtheaterspokane.com

Funky Junk Antique Show,

funkyjunkantiqueshow.com Gallery Northwest, gallerynw.com Garland Street Fair, garlanddistrict.com Garland Theater, garlandtheater.com, 327-1050

Gorge Amphitheatre,

com, 209-2383

manicmoonandmore.com, 413-910

Manito Park, manitopark.org, 625-6200 Masquers Theater, masquers.com, 246-2611

Max at Mirabeau, 924-9000 Medical Lake Chamber of Commerce, medical-lake.org, 565-5000

Midnight Century, midnightcentury.com Mobius Science Center, mobiusspokane. org, 443-5669

Grant County Fairgrounds,

Mootsy’s, 838-1570 Moran Prairie Grange,

Green Bluff, greenbluffgrowers.com Greyhound Park, gpeventcenter.com,

Morning Light Yoga Studio, 447-5549 Moscow Art Theatre Too,

gorgeamphitheatre.net, gcfairgrounds.com 800-828-4880

Harrington Opera House,

harringtonoperahouse.org, 509253-4594

Harrison Chamber of Commerce, harrisonidaho.org

Hoopfest, spokanehoopfest.net Idaho Repertory Theatre, uidaho.edu, 208-885-6465

INB Performing Arts Center, inbpac.com, Interplayers Theatre, interplayerstheatre.org, 455-7529

Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center,

thejacklincenter.org, 208-4578950 John’s Alley, alleyvault.com, 208-8837662 Jundt Art Museum, gonzaga.edu/jundt, 313-6611 Kaniksu Ranch, kaniksufamily.com, 233-8202

Kenworthy Performing Arts Center,

kenworthy.org, 208-882-4127 Knitting Factory, sp.knittingfactory. com, 244-3279 Kootenai River Brewing Co., 208-2674677

Kootenai County Fairgrounds,

northidahofair.com, 208-765-4969 Kroc Center, kroccda.org, 208-667-1865 Lake City Playhouse, lakecityplayhouse. org, 208-667-1323 La Rosa Club, 208-255-2100 Lavender Festival, povlavenderfestival. com, 509-671-0295

Let’s Climb a Mountain,

letsclimbamountain.com Lincoln Center, thelincolncenterspokane. com, 327-8000 Lions Club Train Rides, lionstrainrides. com, 877-525-5226

Livingstones Rock Ranch,

livingstonesrockranch.com Long Bridge Swim, longbridgeswim.org

Loreen Miller Bike Ride,

cancerpatientcare.org, 456-0446

moranprairiegrange.org, 443-2263

moscowarttheatretoo.com Moscow Arts Department, ci.moscow. id.us/art, 208-883-7000 Moscow Chamber, moscowchamber. com, 208-882-1800

Moses Lake Chamber of Commerce,

moseslake.com, 509-765-7888 Mt. Spokane, mtspokane.com, 2382220 National Lentil Festival, lentilfest.com Neato Burrito/Baby Bar, 847-1234 Nectar Tasting Room, drinknectar.com, 869-1572

Newport Chamber of Commerce,

newportoldtownchamber.org, 509-447-5812 North Spokane Farm Museum, 466-2744

Northeast Washington Fairgrounds, 684-2585

Northern Pacific Depot Museum, npdepot.org, 208-752-0111

Northern Quest, northernquest.com, 242-7000

Northland Rosarium,

northlandrosarium.com, 448-4968

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Peter Frampton lights up Northern Quest Resort & Casino on July 26.

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Pullman Chamber of Commerce,

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Pullman Civic Theatre,

pullmancivictheatre.org, 509-3328406 Red Lion at the Park, 326-8000 Redtail Gallery, redtailartgallery.com, 208-946-8066 Rendezvous Days, Colville, colvillerendezvous.org Rendezvous In the Park, Moscow, rendezvousinthepark.com Riverside State Park, riversidestatepark. org, 465-5064 Sandpoint Airport Fly-In, 208-255-9954

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Spokane Indians,

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Spokane Parks and Recreation,

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Spokane Poetry Slam,

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Spokane Symphony, spokanesymphony. org

Spokane to Sandpoint Relay,

spokanetosandpoint.com

SpoKenya Run, spokenyarun.org St. Joseph Family Center, sjfconline.org, 483-6495

Summer Parkways, summerparkways. com

Sun People Dry Goods,

sunpeopledrygoods.com, 3689378 Sunset Park, cawh.org Tekoa Chamber of Commerce, tekoawa. com The Art Spirit Gallery, theartspiritgallery. com, 208-765-6006

The Heart of Spokane,

theheartofspokane.com, 443-4799

Silverwood Theme Park,

The Hop!, 368-4077 The MAC, northwestmuseum.org,

Sixth Street Melodrama,

The Shop, 534-1647 Tiger Tri, tigertri.com Tinman Gallery, tinmanartworks.com,

Spokane Civic Theatre,

Two Rivers Casino, two-rivers-casino.

921-5579

Spokane Club, spokaneclub.org Spokane Convention Center,

208-676-9730

Spokane County Fair and Expo Center,

Unity in the Community, nwunity.org Valley Girl Triathlon, emdesports.com Wallace Chamber,wallaceidahochamber.

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Pavillion Park, pavillionpark.org, 7556726

Pend Oreille County Fairgrounds, povn. com/pocofair

Pend Oreille Playhouse,

pendoreilleplayers.org, 671-3389

Pend Oreille Winery, powine.com, 208265-8545

Pig Out in the Park, spokanepigout.com, Pilgrim’s Market, pilgrimsmarket.com, Ponderay Garden Center, 208-255-4200 Prichard Art Gallery, uidaho.edu/caa/ prichardartgallery

Priest River Chamber of Commerce, priestriverchamber.com

silverwoodthemepark.com, 208683-3400

sixthstreetmelodrama.com, 208752-8871 Spokane Arena, spokanearena.com spokanecivictheatre.com, 325-2507

spokanecenter.com, 279-7000

spokanecounty.org, 477-1766 Spokane County Libraries, scld.org

Spokane County Raceway,

spokanecountyraceway.com, 244-3333

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509-325-1500

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Washington State University, 335-8443 Washington Trails Association, wta.org Whitworth University, whitworth.edu, 777-1000

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102 SUMMER GUIDE JUNE 13, 2013

CULTURE

| COMICS

e f i L c i Com

s Farlane return c M d d o T , U W E raduating from g r e ft a s e d a c be baseball y a m d n Three de a fe li , talk Spawn to the school to BY SARAH MUNDS

N

ext week, Todd McFarlane is going to wake up in a hotel 1,400 miles away from home. At age 50, he’s going to don a cap and gown, climb onto Eastern Washington University’s stage during its 2013 commencement ceremonies, and speak. He’s probably not going to make an outline or write anything down before addressing several hundred Eastern graduates. He also hasn’t written a speech for his lecture at the Red Lion scheduled for the day before. “I’m just going to go up there and say ‘Hey, I’m Todd. At 16, I started taking an interest in… sports and in drawing. Let me walk you through 15 to 50. It’s far from being a straight line,’” McFarlane says. Thirty years ago he graduated from Eastern, as the class of 2013 will do this week. Today, McFarlane owns one of the highest grossing independent comics of all time. He’s the driving force behind America’s fifth-largest action figure production company. He helped direct a TV miniseries and had a hand in the creation of his own movie — all a tribute to Spawn, his own original character dreamed up in high school. Two decades after Spawn was first printed in comic-

book form, McFarlane is coming back to speak about his successes and his journey. It’s nothing formal, but he plans to share the transformation from teenage athlete to business entrepreneur. At 15, he doodled into the late afternoon, walked hand-in-hand with his childhood crush, and dreamed of professional baseball. At 50, he’s still with his middle school sweetheart, but he’s in a different sort of major leagues. For McFarlane, business and baseball go hand in hand. “Being an athlete added a lot. As an athlete, there’s a lot of time when it’s just you and the pitcher,” McFarlane says. “When I played sports, it was tunnel vision — ‘Today, I’m going to be the best guy on the field.’ But every day I stepped on the field, the delusional sort of self-arrogance that we entrepreneurs have never thought I was going to fail at sports… I never accepted it until they said I wasn’t going to play professional ball.” The same arrogance, ego, and rashness that drove him to push for the big leagues powers McFarlane’s entrepreneurial experiments, failures and successes. So what did he do when his baseball career came to a screeching halt after playing at EWU? McFarlane’s wiring as an en-

June 16th

trepreneur made him focused — and a little bit delusional, he says. The baseball rejection meant nothing after leaping into the ocean of his second passion, cartooning. That’s where McFarlane’s journey took a hard right, because starting at point A and winning at point B isn’t a straightforward journey. A 15-year-old Todd would never look at 50-year-old Todd and guess that this was a part of the plan. There was no plan when McFarlane started out after college. But he slowed down, paid attention, and hit the balls that life pitched to him. “It’s OK if you don’t reach your goals by 25, 30, 35. It’s a good, long life, and I don’t even know if I want [college kids] to get everything they want by 26, because then they’re going to be on the back side of the bell curve. It’s OK to take it easy and give yourself more time to see opportunities.” It’s fine to go back to the drawing board and it’s OK to be rejected, he says. Take criticism and reassess where you’re going and where you think your priorities lie. “Sometimes when the critics say you’ll never make it, they’re actually right. But us stubborn — and to some extent immature — entrepreneurial kinds, go ‘Oh yeah! I’ll show you!’ Sometimes we’re not that good at what we do. But I took all my rejections as being something to make me hunch over the board and grind it harder, so some day I can go and say ‘I think you’re wrong.’ ” For McFarlane, it’s not about the control, the caution, and the calculation. It’s about getting up on stage without note cards, turning to a crowd of several hundred people, and winging a speech about what it’s like to jump into the world feet-first after getting that college degree. “It could be something really good or really bad,” he says. “I won’t know until I’m done with the last word.”  Road Trip to Creative Autonomy: An Evening with Todd McFarlane • Fri, June 14 at 7 pm • Red Lion Hotel at the Park • $15, free for EWU students

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Y

Moss and Culture Tribal elders work to sustain tradition in Wellpinit BY ANNEMARIE C. FROHNHOEFER

A Camas lily field in the Centennial Marsh Wildlife Management Area in Idaho near Hill City. CHARLES KNOWLES PHOTO

ellow school buses slow down as they pull off a dirt road, their tires coming to a gritty halt in a field three hours north of Spokane. Kindergarteners through high schoolers disembark; most are from the Wellpinit school district but other buses have traveled from Idaho and places farther north and south. The students gather with a group of older folks — tribal elders, parents with young children, middleaged friends and neighbors — for a total of 350 people here to dig white camas root from the dry ground. The camas root, both white and brown varieties, has been a part of the Spokane diet for centuries, but the knowledge of its harvest, preparation and consumption hasn’t had a clean line of descent from one generation to the next. The first and most destructive disruption was the arrival of Anglo-Americans and the systematic removal of Indians from their native land and harvesting places. This was followed by the reeducation of Indian children at boarding schools and a resulting disconnect from native culture. A tribal descendant and member of Generation X recalls her mother’s preference for Wonder Bread and all things related to 1960s mainstream culture. It seemed that the community’s taste for roots and tamarack moss had to be reacquired. Roughly 20 years ago, Peter Campbell, then student advisor of Native American studies at Eastern Washington University, met with tribal member Louie Wynne (both have since passed away) and Richard Bailey, an archeologist with the Bureau of Land Management, to investigate the possibility of reopening traditional harvesting lands for the Spokane Tribe. Fewer than 30 people showed up for the first harvest, but that number increased tenfold this spring as young and old went out into the fields with digging tools (shovel-handled metal bars with pointed tips and a low cross-piece for leverage) and bags to collect the radish-sized white root that has a peculiarly airy texture and slightly minty-sweet flavor. Once taken from the ground, the tops of the plants are turned over and tamped down into the depressions left

by the roots, so that seeds can germinate and provide a harvest for the next year. Many roots are given to the elders; the rest are taken home to be dried and preserved for soups and stews throughout winter. Brown camas root is harvested later in the spring. On a particularly windy day, elementary school students with digging tools (accompanied by teachers, parents and tribal elders) collected the black-licorice flavored vegetable. These roots will be baked later this week in ground pits that are prepared annually as part of the Spokane Tribe’s Culture Week. Marsha Wyncoop, tribal elder and cultural advisor, recalls the early days of camas digs. Campbell and Wynne sought out elders who gathered and shared as much information as they could about harvesting and cooking techniques. After three years of trial and error — of digging pits and noting how moisture levels and temperature affected the amount of time needed to bake roots and tamarack moss — the techniques were perfected. Wyncoop laughingly remembers one year: After digging the pits, cleaning the roots, placing them in muslin bags, heating rocks and layering the pit, one man teased, “Well, that’s not the way my mom would have done it.” There are non-food events at Culture Week: beading, tipi setup, stick games and sweat houses. Not every child finds an interest in everything, but many make their way to the baking pits and adjacent meat-smoking area, where Shannon Hubert and her husband Al burn cottonwood and turn pieces of elk, deer and salmon, evenly drying out the meat as it captures the fragrant smoke.

Camas bulbs are used in soups, stews and other dishes. ABE LLOYD PHOTO Al laughs about how some kids just grab a few pieces and run while others stick around, asking questions about smoke, fire and the process of drying meat. Shannon’s favorite part of Culture Week is the end of the day, when the couple continues smoking meat throughout the night and community members join them for storytelling, drumming and singing. Wyncoop says that the point of Culture Week is to teach culture, not to teach about culture. Her granddaughter Maya Severson confesses that she thought the brown camas root dig was boring and too windy. She and some classmates ate lunch on the school bus to escape the weather. Yet when she follows her grandmother through the site, she can’t stop asking her questions — about the baking pit, about the firewood, about the stones, about the pit house. The children who ask about the baking pit, who want to learn about wood smoke, the ones who listen to elders tell stories as they work tamarack moss into edible form — these children aren’t asking questions about history. They are asking questions about their world, the world they live in now. Thanks to the elders, the past has joined with — and will continue to be — part of the living world. n

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FOOD | MEXICAN

Guilty Pleasures Baja Mexican Restaurant dishes out old-school burritos in Medical Lake BY ANNEMARIE C. FROHNHOEFER

W

ord on Lefevre Street in Medical Lake is that Baja Mexican Restaurant has some humongous burritos. It does. But one look at its equally humongous five-page menu will show that there’s quite a bit more — from cheese nachos ($5.50) and fajita quesadilla ($9.50) appetizers to standard entrées like carne asada ($12.75) and smaller combination plates that place tamales, enchiladas, chimichangas, burritos and tacos side by side ($9.25-$12.95). Then there are some not-so-run-of-the-mill menu entries like the massive Vegi-Macho Burrito, stuffed with mushrooms, carrots, zucchini, broccoli, baby corn and white rice, or the seemingly misplaced steak and lobster with a side of fries ($25). No word on how many — or with what frequency — people order the lobster, but every customer gets a basket of tortilla chips, a spicy bowl of tomato salsa and a slightly cooler bowl of shredded-cabbage-and-cilantro salsa. In the comfort of one of the restaurant’s numerous booths, while munching down on some cabbage and trying to determine the age of the Polaroid shots affixed to the corkboard sign titled

“Birthday Amigos,” my mind jumps to thoughts of establishments that serve cilantro-flavored tortillas wrapped around seared chicken and chipotle-seasoned steamed rice, and I think that I might rather be there, making healthy and wise culinary decisions. But once my taco-enchilada combo arrives, I know that there are days when you just want a hard-shell taco stuffed with so much seasoned ground beef that the shell’s inverted arch gives way with one crunch, shattering orange-imbued corn tortilla and shreds of iceberg lettuce into the sea of refried beans located on the plate below. The ever-expanding melty strings of cheese are the true thematic glue that holds the rice, beans, beef, lettuce and corn tortilla collage together. Some days, that’s just how you want it. Because really, who goes to a traditional American-style Mexican restaurant for the lobster?  food@inlander.com Baja Mexican Restaurant • 116 S. Lefevre St., Medical Lake • Open Mon-Thu, 11 am-9 pm; Fri-Sat, 11 am-10 pm; Sun, 11 am-9 pm • 299-2875

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When Abigail Franklin wanted to take her career to the next level, she took her studies to the MBA program at Whitworth University. Consistently ranked among the top 10 regional master’s-level universities in the West*, Whitworth’s evening, accelerated-format program gave Abigail the flexibility to study in the evening, while she kept her day schedule intact. Join Abigail and embark on a new direction today.

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106 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

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FOOD | OPENING

Red Rooster reopened near Gonzaga earlier this spring. JENNIFER DEBARROS PHOTO

Family Feel

The neighborhood gathers at Red Rooster to spill their souls and drink coffee BY ANNA CLAUSEN

W

hen Red Rooster Coffee Co. reopened last week with an “Opening Open Mic of Openness,” Amanda Maule took to the stage to recite her wedding vows in front of 15 or so strangers, in a tiny house, with her husband working behind the counter. As the cafe’s manager, it’s obvious Maule is passionate

EASTERN

WASHINGTON

about the Rooster. After Red Rooster closed down, Maule’s husband Gabe Ehrnwald approached the owner and offered his assistance in its reopening. Together, the husband and wife run the coffee shop that they hope will moonlight as a hub of creativity and expression.

UNIVERSITY

PRESENTS

ROAD TRIP T O C R E AT I V E AUTONOMY an evening with

Last week, their efforts were hardly in vain. The creative spirit was alive as the audience witnessed everything from acoustic opera to a spoken fiction short story. Some were so nervous their papers shook in their hands, while others spoke with a confidence and volume that made the walls vibrate. Also a drive-through, Red Rooster is located in a rustic country house on Hamilton Street. Framed coffee bags from around the world line the walls and the furniture looks as if it was taken from your grandma’s place. Maule wakes up early every morning and bakes everything from scratch. No machines are involved in the menu of quiche, soup, and various baked goods like apple cinnamon muffins. While I got a vanilla latte, I didn’t get the memo about the chocolate malts until after I ordered. Everyone else seemed to be enjoying the frozen treats, perfect for the hot night. Maule and Ehrnwald hope that the Red Rooster will be “not just about a cup of coffee.” Both have taught or written, and plan to lend an ear to fellow artists. Red Rooster will continue hosting events like open mic and be a place where artists can “feel celebrated.” If you’d like to share your writing with others, bring your work to open mics at Red Rooster on Tuesdays. You’ll be welcomed with open arms.  Red Rooster Coffee Co. • 1718 N. Hamilton St. • Mon-Fri, 7 am-9 pm; Sat, 8 am-9 pm; Sun, 9 am-5 pm • 321-7935

Todd McFarlane 

From his humble beginnings at Eastern Washington University to budding baseball player to comic book artist and business entrepreneur extraordinaire, Todd McFarlane has a wealth of experience in the world of entertainment. Hear from the Spawn creator as he returns to the Northwest for this special speaking and autograph engagement. • $15 (includes limited-edition Spawn comic book with EWU Grad special cover) • Space is limited – RSVP today to alumni.ewu.edu/mcfarlane

JUNE 14, 2013

7-8 P.M. Speaking engagement 8-8:30 P.M.  Autograph session   Red Lion Hotel at the Park – Spokane 303 W. North River Drive

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JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 107

Third time is even more of a charm.

After the Loving

makes the film resonate so deeply. Unlike either of the previous two films, Before Midnight spends time on Jesse and Celine interacting with other characters — the host and other guests at the Greek villa where they’re vacationing — as well as on their extended duologues. Time, it seems, is the unacknowledged third principal character of these films. In much the same way that it worked in the similarly transcendent Toy Story trilogy, Before Midnight wrestles with the passage of time as a fundamental part of the connections between people. Even as Jesse and Celine get a glimpse of the other directions their lives might have taken had they lived in a different era, this trilogy is grounded deeply in who these people are at this moment in their lives. The often-tense it to go, yet still feels like a revelation. Nine more years exchanges find them struggling with the reality of their have passed since Jesse missed a plane in Paris at the lives together as it emerged from an idealized sense in the conclusion of Before Sunset, but this time Jesse and Celine previous films of what it might be. In their performances, have spent them together. A vacation in Greece has Delpy and Hawke seamlessly capture the core of the allowed Jesse to spend part of the summer with his son characters as we’ve already seen them, as well as the from his first marriage, but the boy’s return home is a strain of years on the starry-eyed dreamers they were 18 point of tension between Jesse and Celine — still unmaryears ago, and perhaps wish they could be again. ried, but raising twin daughters together. So it’s not simply nostalgia that fuels the magnificence Like the films that preceded it, Before of Before Midnight, no matter how wonderBEFORE MIDNIGHT ful it is to be spending another two hours Midnight includes plenty of time just spent Rated R following Jesse and Celine as they walk with Jesse and Celine; if anything, it’s the and talk, or drive and talk, or sit in a hotel Directed by Richard Linklater exact opposite. Here is what it looks like Starring Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy room and talk. Conversation has been a when people who have idealized a longfundamental part of this trilogy, and the ago idea of one another settle into the hard familiarity between Hawke and Delpy makes for interbusiness of being with another messy, fallible person. play that’s often caustic and prickly, but also considerably Before Sunrise was about romance; Before Sunset was about funnier than in either of the previous two, thanks to the longing and regret. What Before Midnight reveals is that, terrific script by Linklater, Hawke and Delpy. for the first time in the series, we’re seeing a story about Yet it’s not just familiarity with the characters that love. 

Before Midnight turns Jesse and Celine’s reunion into a stunning story of love and time BY SCOTT RENSHAW

T

here’s no point attempting to separate one’s response to director Richard Linklater’s third visit with Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) from those that came before — and indeed, it misses the point of what’s so extraordinary about these films if you try to do so. In 1995, Before Sunrise introduced us to the pair as dreamy twentysomethings whose chance meeting on a train led to a single wildly romantic night in Vienna; in 2004, Before Sunset found them reuniting in Paris as slightly more hardened adults, in a way that completely reframed the events that occurred nine years earlier. Before Midnight arrives not just as a sequel; it arrives as a sequel to perhaps the most brilliantly conceived sequel in modern movie history, and a sequel to the story of two characters who have become deeply and profoundly real to movie lovers who have followed them. So yeah, no pressure. What’s so extraordinary about Before Midnight is that in a sense, it goes exactly where you might have expected

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FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS BEFORE MIDNIGHT

In 1995, Before Sunrise introduced us to the pair as dreamy twenty-somethings whose chance meeting on a train led to a single wildly romantic night in Vienna; in 2004, Before Sunset found them reuniting in Paris as slightly more hardened adults, in a way that completely reframed the events that occurred nine years earlier. Now, the third installment in Richard Linklater’s story features our couple (Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy) now very much together raising twin daughters as they vacation in Greece. (SR) Rated R

MAN OF STEEL

The reboot of the reboot of the Superman story is brimming with both fight and flight scenes, lots of self-doubt, a bit of humor, the problems of actually being a stranger in a strange land, and a moving, heartfelt look at father-son relationships. Henry Cavill is slightly earnest in the lead, Amy Adams gives Lois Lane the right amount of feisty toughness, Russell Crowe shows the stoic side of Jor-El, Kevin Costner is a wise and kindly Jonathan Kent, and Michael Shannon manages to mix malevolence with pride as General Zod. Visual effects are excessive, but writer David S. Goyer and director Zack

Snyder make everything balance out just right. (ES) Rated PG-13 In the aftermath of the May ’68 protests in Paris, disheartened teens cling to the revolution that was squelched by the government. Gilles (Clément Métayer), an aspiring painter, gets caught up in the rebellious antics of students in France trying to stick it to the man. Like most teenagers, he struggles with trying to figure out who he is and what path in life he should take. It’s all sex, drugs, and rock ’n roll in this coming of age film in French with English subtitles. At Magic Lantern (MN) Not Rated

THIS IS THE END

Who would’ve thought that a party at James Franco’s house could lead to catastrophe? Playing themselves, the allstar cast includes Seth Rogen, Danny McBride and Jonah Hill, among others, all of whom are trapped in Franco’s house as the Apocalypse unfolds. As supplies dwindle, they must take on the outside world, dodging sinkholes and blue lights that snatch people away. (AC) Rated R

NOW PLAYING AFTER EARTH

So one day you’re out on a routine spacecraft journey with your dad and the next thing you know, you’ve catapulted onto an alien planet where giant beasts keep trying to eat you. Except the alien planet isn’t really alien at all. Rather, it’s Earth 1,000 years after humanity was forced to escape. So now you’re sitting here, your dad’s dying from injuries sustained on the crash landing onto this abandoned planet, and you have to man up and kick some butt before every living thing in 10 square miles eats you alive. Will Smith stars with his son, Jaden Smith. M. Night Shyamalan directs, so you know it’s going to get a little crazy. (SM) Rated PG-13.

BLANCANIEVES

The story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves is about to get twisted, set in 1920s Seville, Spain, and focusing on the story of a female bullfighter. As a tribute to silent films and shot completely in black and white, we follow the story of a girl who never knew her mother, who was hated by an evil stepmother, and who followed in the footsteps of her valiant father after running away with a troop of dwarves to become a performer. At Magic Lantern (SM) Rated PG-13

DECEPTIVE PRACTICE: THE MYSTERIES AND MENTORS OF RICKY JAY

Ricky Jay started his magician’s apprenticeship at age 4, continuing the magic throughout his lifetime. Even the hardest audiences and the most difficult to impress have been flabbergasted at his work. But what about the real Ricky Jay? The guy who has bounced around between mentors, influences and mysteries? For those who are die-hard fans

THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT

SOMETHING IN THE AIR

of Jay, this movie will provide insight into the man behind the curtain. For those who have never heard about Jay in your life, this movie will highlight the influence of one of the most talented performers in the universe. (SM) Not Rated

EPIC

It’s that time of the year when the garden patch of children’s summer movies begins to ripen for the picking — in 3D! You can brace yourself for a lot of tomfoolery, some wholesome family messaging and approximately three hundred dire situations in which quirky characters must work together to save the world. This time around, a teen falls into a mystical forest world where a battle between good and evil will decide the fate of the entire freaking universe. All bets are on, but we can assume that good’s going to win out with this one. (SM) Rated PG

FAST & FURIOUS 6

But who’s counting? The wildly successful film series about a team of men and women who love to drive fancy cars really fast and, oh, yeah, steal lots of money, takes on a Bondian feeling when FBI agent (the Rock) asks for their help in tracking down a stolen computer chip and the bad guys who took it. This entry also gives team leader Vin Diesel a second chance with Michelle Rodriguez, the love of his life who was “killed” a couple of films back. The action isn’t quite nonstop, as there’s some quiet talk and goofy banter. But when that action roars back, it’s breathtakingly exhausting. (ES) Rated PG-13

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JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 109

FILM | SHORTS

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THE MAGIC LANTERN JUNE 14TH - JUNE 20TH THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (140 MIN- R) Fri/Sat: 8:15, Sun: 1:30 THE COMPANY YOU KEEP (115 MIN-R) Fri/Sat: 5:45, Sun: 4:00 THE IRAN JOB (93 MIN -NR) Fri/Sat: 4:00, Sun: 6:15, Weds/Thurs: 5:00 BLANCANIEVES (105 MIN PG-13) Fri/Sat: 6:30, Sun: 3:00, Weds/Thurs: 6:45 THE ICEMAN (104 MIN -R) Fri/Sat: 8:30, Sun: 6:45 SOMETHING IN THE AIR (122 MIN -R) Fri/Sat: 4:15, Sun: 12:45, Weds/Thurs: 6:30 DECEPTIVE PRACTICE: THE MYSTERIES AND MENTORS OF RICKY JAY (90 MIN) Sat: 2:30, Sun: 5:00, Weds/Thurs: 4:45 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

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FRANCES HA

Frances  is a young New Yorker, hoping to apprentice at a dance company and follow her lifelong dreams. The problem? She’s not a dancer, and she doesn’t live in New York. She has a best friend, but doesn’t really talk to her anymore. As her dreams and ideal life dwindle into dust, the world tells Frances she must face the cold hard truth of reality. Her next problem? She’s happy, and there’s nothing that’s going to stop that, even an impossible journey to obtain so much more life than she already has. (SM) Rated R

THE GREAT GATSBY

Will the fifth time be the charm? The fifth adaptation of the 1925 Fitzgerald novel (the others were in 1926, 1929, 1974, and 2000) has it over its predecessors because it sticks closest to the source material, in both storytelling and spirit, and because director Baz Luhrmann is a visionary stylist. He takes the tale of selfish, wealthy rich folks in the 1920s, most of whom think they deserve everything they want, casts it perfectly (Leo DiCaprio and his smile were made for the role of the mysterious Gatsby), then goes over the top with swooping 3D cameras, fast editing, and a nutzoid musical score. (ES) Rated PG-13

HANGOVER PART 3

We loved the first  Hangover  for the quirky adventures in Las Vegas. We sort of loved the sequel, Hangover Part 2, for the missing ears and jaunt through missing appendages and face tattoos. What sort of shenanigans is the gang going to get into this time in the third installment of the Hangover jamboree? There’s no wedding, and therefore no bachelor’s party, so there’s no saying what’s going to go down. All we know for sure is that there’s a journey to a mental hospital, a kidnapping, and the Wolfpack is back in action. (SM) Rated R

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110 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

Some guys get sneaky and play video games behind their family’s back. Some hide a drug and drinking habit. But Richard Kuklinski hid the biggest secret of all — he operated as a contract killer until his arrest in the ’80s. Biggest kick? His wife and daughter didn’t know about his penchant for sneaking out in the night and mercilessly murdering hundreds of people for the mob. Based on a real life story with real life people, take a theatrical sneak peak into the life of one of the sneakiest and also deadliest dudes in the killing business. At Magic Lantern (SM) Rated R

THE INTERNSHIP

Two obsolete oldies find themselves without jobs, falling straight into an internship at Google with a shot at employment — that is if they prove themselves to be the best of the best amongst a mob of interns straight of out college. Now, they must compete against techsavvy, bright young people or face the rough waters of unemployment. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson star in a battle between old and young that will surely end in a comedic fiasco, hopefully proving that the aging generation hasn’t lost their pizzazz. (SM) Rated PG-13

THE IRAN JOB

The documentary, directed by Till Schauder, follows an American basketball player, Kevin Sheppard, to Iran’s Super League where his team is both the newest and youngest in the league. They must make the playoffs, or the American will be shipped home. Along the way, he learns a lot more about Middle Eastern culture than he does about basketball. At Magic Lantern (AC) Not Rated

IRON MAN 3

So, there’s this pretty obscure movie that a lot of you haven’t heard about. It’s called Iron Man and it really never got popular. They made a sequel, which didn’t do well in box offices either and definitely didn’t amass a huge fan base or anything. A third one is coming out this week. So, I guess, if you feel like it, go and see a movie that didn’t get big and support some struggling actors like Robert Downey Jr., Guy Pierce and Gwyneth Paltrow. The movie is about a man who makes a metal robot suit. There’s an evil villain. The guy has to save the world most of the time and stuff. We’re kidding, this thing is outrageous and, of course, very popular. (SM) PG-13

MUD

Two teenagers stumble across a ruggedly handsome fugitive (Matthew McConaughey) hiding in the Deep South from bounty hunters and the law. The boys decide to take matters into their own hands, making a pact to keep the dashing criminal hidden from hungry killers and help reunite him with his long lost love. It’s nice to see McConaughey continue his habit of appearing in movies that aren’t, by and large, romantic comedies. Let’s hope he keeps it up. (SM) Rated PG-13

NOW YOU SEE ME

It was only a matter of time before magicians figured out that illusions could be applied practically in the form of bank robbery. But Interpol and the FBI aren’t impressed with these magic tricks. Now, a battle royale breaks out between the cops and the magicians who steal for spectacle and sport. Michael Caine and

Morgan Freeman gear up in this movie as magic trick debunker and bank’s financial backer. Jessie Eisenburg, Dave Franco, Isla Fisher and Mark Ruffalo sprinkle their acting talent throughout the movie as illusionists and the cops out to get them. (SM) PG-13

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES

A circus performer/motorcycle badass/ thief/new father (Ryan Gosling) turns to robbing banks to support his brand new baby son and chip-off-her-shoulder lover. A rookie, idealist cop (Bradley Cooper), complete with hopes and dreams, tries to stop the robberies in an attempt to move up the ranks in a corrupt police department. Who is right? Who is wrong? Does the love for your family, or rather, the love of the law win out in the end? Watch the 15-year-long journey of two people as their stories entangle, altering their lives in heavy ways. (SM) Rated R

THE PURGE

Maybe it’s implausible. Ten years from now, America is a veritable paradise: Unemployment is at a mere 1 percent and crime is virtually nonexistent. And it’s all thanks to the Purge, an annual 12hour free-for-all during which all crime, including murder, is legal. But then a rich guy played by Ethan Hawke and his family are attacked by masked bandits and are on their own to fend for themselves because, hey, it’s The Purge. (MJ) Rated R

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

Director J.J. Abrams has done what every Star Trek fan has been hoping for. He’s upped the ante on everything in the sequel to his 2009 reboot of the franchise. And he’s done so with an eye cocked in the direction of diehard fans, to whom he sends little shout-outs of old Trek references. He also spins a whopping good, action- and effects-filled tale of intrigue and attitudes (and relationships and photon torpedoes and even a cameo by a Tribble). (ES) Rated PG-13 

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METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Before Midnight

96

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73

Place Beyond the Pines

68

42

62

Man of Steel

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Fast and Furious 6

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FILM | REVIEW

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BY ED SYMKUS

C

omic books have become the go-to place for cinematic source material, so it should be no surprise that Iron Man 3 is still in theaters as Man of Steel begins its run. All of that metal, and all of those fans who are as divisive as Democrats and Republicans when it comes to being fans of DC or Marvel. The differences between the two comic giants and the differences between the two movies are palpable. DC’s Superman and Batman stories are serious, with light moments. Marvel’s Iron Man and Spider-Man stories are serious, with goofy moments. DC often features touches of angst in its characters. Marvel usually overflows with it. Superman, of course, has always been the heartbeat of DC, with Batman running a close second. Man of Steel was co-produced by Batman director Chris Nolan, and his fingerprints are all over it. But it was directed by a different sort of visionary: Zack Snyder, whose résumé includes 300, Watchmen and Sucker Punch. The special effects in Man of Steel are excessive, but that’s not a complaint. When they’re done right — as they are in the final act, in which Metropolis takes a shellacking that would make Godzilla proud — I’ll gobble up as much as Snyder wants to dish out. You know the story. The distant planet Krypton is about to explode. Leader Jor-El (Russell Crowe, playing it stoic) and his wife can only

save their newborn baby by shipping him off to Earth, where atmospheric conditions will give him super powers. After all hell breaks loose, the infant Kal-El is soon zooming through the universe, en route to the farmland of Jonathan and Martha Kent (Kevin Costner and Diane Lane). From that point on, Snyder and screenwriter David S. Goyer (Batman Begins, Dark City) go the nonlinear route. There’s a daring sea rescue led by a strong young man named Clark (Henry Cavill), which cuts to a younger Clark at school where he’s labeled a freak, which cuts to a reporter named Lois Lane (Amy MAN OF STEEL Adams) working Rated PG-13 on a story and Written by David S. Goyer; proving that she’s Directed by Zack Snyder tough, feisty and With Henry Cavill, Michael Shaninquisitive. non, Russell Crowe, Amy Adams, Yes, the action Kevin Costner, Diane Lane becomes relentless, pushed forward by Hans Zimmer’s propulsive, percussive score (some of which is credited to his “drum orchestra”). But this is a great film because it smartly and effectively examines some fascinating issues while things are roaring around them. The film’s central concern, though, is heartfelt father-son relationships — the one between Jor-El and his son Kal-El, and the one between Jonathan Kent and his stepson Clark. 

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T How avoiding the spotlight actually helped Unknown Mortal Orchestra find it BY SETH SOMMERFELD

SECRET AGENTS

his is the hyperinformation age. Most questions can be answered in seconds by typing an Internet search into a mobile phone. We feel closer than ever to celebrities, musicians, and just about anyone else thanks to social media tools like Twitter and Facebook. You can even figure out the title and artist of almost any song by holding up your phone and using the Shazam app. So when Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s first song “Ffunny Ffrends” hit the web in 2010 and set the indie blogosphere on fire, it was an exciting anomaly: everyone loved the song, but nobody knew who made it. The track was lo-fi psychedelic rock at its best — teeming with a mix of washed-out garage rock aesthetics and a notable sense of pop melodicism. Despite praise from modern tastemakers like Pitchfork, the song’s creator stayed in the shadows. And that’s just how Ruban Nielson wanted it. Nielson created Unknown Mortal Orchestra in his basement and released it without credit as a way of actively objecting to the interconnectivity of the modern music machine. “The Internet cheapened the way bands promote themselves and damaged the mystique,” says Nielson. “Musicians were becoming their own marketing teams, and that was gross, and my refusal to do that ended up being what attracted people to it, I think. I felt the song was strong enough to stand on its own anyway.” In Nielson’s opinion, the initial mystery surrounding “Ffunny Ffrends” offered something that seems alien in a world increasingly defined by complex interconnectivity: simplicity. ...continued on next page

JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 113

MUSIC | ROCK “SECRET AGENTS,” CONTINUED...

We’re building a healthier community for you and your family. Come see how on June 27. Introducing the Deaconess Health & Education Center An Open House Event The Deaconess Health & Education Center provides our community specialty physician offices, classroom facilities, and advanced services including cardiovascular and gastroenterology. We invite you for a firsthand look at how we’re working together to build a healthier community. Join us for our fun, free open house. There will be guided tours of the facility, information booths for clinics, Senior Circle and Healthy Woman programs, meet-and-greets with physicians and more. Thursday, June 27 • 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. Deaconess Health & Education Center, 910 W. Fifth Avenue Tours start every half-hour from 5 – 6:30 p.m. Physician lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. Light snacks provided. To RSVP, visit our website at DeaconessSpokane.com.

114 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013 70743_DMC_DHECoh_7_4x11c.indd 1

6/10/13 1:43 PM

“To be honest, I think it was a kind of relief. This song came along and it was only giving you something. Not requiring you to give it anything more than a listen in return,” he says. Nielson, a Portland resident and New Zealand native, acknowledges that his enigmatic status probably helped fuel the initial round of buzz surrounding Unknown Mortal Orchestra. Because technology puts everything a mere click away, that mystery became an actual commodity. “The fact nobody knew about me was part of a bigger aspect of the music. I was literally making the whole album in secret. Not even my closest friends or family knew I was doing any music at all at the time,” he says. “My whole attitude at the very beginning was based around what I thought was a healthy reluctance.” All the hype surrounding Unknown Mortal Orchestra would’ve been for naught if the story ended at “Ffunny Ffrends,” but Nielson continued to deliver more critically acclaimed psychedelic rock. Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s self-titled debut album arrived in 2011, and the follow-up II dropped this past February. While Unknown Mortal Orchestra now exists more in the land of the known, success hasn’t impacted Nielson’s detached process. “I’m just like that anyway; kind of secretive. I made II in my basement by myself for the most part. Just pulling all-nighters, the way I did with the first album. People knowing what my name is and knowing what my face looks like didn’t change anything, because the point of being unknown was that I felt the songs and the sound had its own power that didn’t need any crutches or props,” he says. “That’s why the albums have no text on the covers and have such blank, functional names. Because I know they’re already worth people’s time.”  Unknown Mortal Orchestra with Bass Drum of Death • Sun, June 16, at 7 pm • The Center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • $12 • All-ages • thecenterofspokane.com • 433-7328 • Also on Mon, June 17, at 8 pm • The Belltower •125 SE Spring, Pullman • $10-12 • Allages • belltowerpullman.com • (509) 334-4195

MUSIC | ROCK

Born of Fear The Almost tackles trepidation with faith and alt rock BY JO MILLER

A

aron Gillespie and his wife were expecting their first son when they learned the baby might be born with Down syndrome and a malfunctioning heart. Gillespie, frontman of alternative rock band The Almost, was writing his band’s new album when the couple got the news two years ago. “It was a really rough time,” Gillespie says from his current tour stop in Denver. “We kind of didn’t know what to expect before he was here. So the whole time it was a very stressful time of prayer.” The songs on that album, Fear Inside Our Bones, paint a picture of a person teetering on the edge of giving up and deciding to push through. It’s set to gritty rock and intermittent bluesiness. The new album is an honest piece of music, he says — honest about the members’ lives and faith. It’s also honest about the band’s sound. Emerging from the album’s somewhat rough sound and dark lyrics is a gleam of hope that Gillespie says stems partly from his belief that a person isn’t unique in having pain and fear, and that his religious faith can show him the only way out. The band members define The Almost as a Christian band, but they’re not always in sanc-

tuaries singing “Hallelujah” (although Gillespie is also a worship leader). He says The Almost functions similarly to Underoath, the Christian metalcore band Gillespie drummed and sang for. You’re more likely to find the band hammering on their instruments in dim nightclubs than plucking away for a congregation. “We feel our audience is not predominantly Christian folks,” Gillespie says. “So I think if Christ was here today, he would be in bars. He would be in places where people are. That’s kind of our whole thing. We are a Christian band, but we’re a little different than your average Christian band.” The way to help people is to let your dirt show and let people see hope and God through your life, he says. That’s what Gillespie does when he melds his personal struggles to his music. And as for his new baby boy? “He’s perfect,” Gillespie says. “He’s 19 months old, healthy and happy.”  music@inlander.com The Almost with Conditions and Palisades • Tues, June 18, at 7 pm • The Center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • $15 • All-ages • thecenterofspokane.com • 433-7328

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JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 115

MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

PUNK DEADKILL

I

f you like your punk rock exploding and in your face, played with balls-to-the-wall abandon, then scrounge for change at the bottom of the washing machine and go see Seattle’s Deadkill this week. The band recently stated its intentions to the punk world with an excellent demo on Good to Die Records: four tracks of blissful rock ‘n’ roll/punk fusion that recalls the golden era of classic punk bands like Black Flag and the Germs. Deadkill members have earned their stripes in bands like Absolute Monarchs, Himsa, The Meices and Whiskey Tango (among others). So what I’m saying is, you need a head check if you miss this one. — LEAH SOTTILE Deadkill with Cold Blooded and Dislich • Thu, June 20, at 10 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • $5 • 21+ • 838-1570

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 6/13

ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Maxie Ray Mills BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BIG CITY SALOON (474-0579), DJ Fusion BLUE SPARK, DJ Darkside Som BUCKHORN (244-3991), Texas Twister CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny, Shiner COUNTRY CLUB (208-676-2582), Last Chance Band CRUISER’S (208-773-4706), Dragonfly CURLEY’S (208-773-5816), The DBC Band DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Blue’s All Stars FORTY-ONE SOUTH (208-265-2000), Truck Mills GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Major Forces singing competition JOHN’S ALLEY, John Park Whipple J KNITTING FACTORY, We Came as Romans (see story at Inlander. com), Set it Off, Ice Nine Kills, Like Moths to Flames, Upon a Burning Body, Crown the Empire LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR (315-8623), Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind MARQUEE, MCSquared MOON TIME, Douglas Cameron J NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Tony Bennett NYNE, Pamela Benton O’SHAY’S, Open mic PHAT HOUSE, The Tone Collaborative RICO’S (332-6566), Palouse Subterranean Blues Band ROADHOUSE, Bakin’ Phat ROCK BAR (443-3796), Armed & Dangerous

116 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

LOCAL BOBFEST

W

ith only one fully functioning all-ages music venue in Spokane, there’s not a lot of support for young bands here. But the YMCA — bless ’em — hosts BOBfest, a battle of the bands competition, each year for the area’s young, aspiring rockers. Last year the title went to a folk-pop outfit called Bung Campo (pictured), and this year the styles are wide-ranging — drawing bands from as far as Bonners Ferry, Idaho. There’s the “High-Flying Country Rooted Acoustic” of Acuff & Sherfey, the indie rock of Manta Ray, Of Wind and Folly’s basement rock, punk rockers The Camorra and Christian pop-rock of The OtH3R Music, among others. — LEAH SOTTILE BOBfest • Sat, June 15, from noon to 6 pm • Riverfront Park Clocktower • Free • All-ages • ymcaspokane.org • 777-9622

SPLASH (208-765-4000), Steve Denny SWAMP, DJ Aphrodisiac VIKING, Echo ZOLA, Cruxie

Friday, 6/14

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BIG CITY SALOON (474-0579), DJ Fusion BIGFOOT, The Usual Suspects BLUE SPARK, DJ Mark Thomas BOLO’S (891-8995), The Vibe CARLIN BAY RESORT (208-6677314), Bruiser CELLAR, Brad Perry, Bury Me in the Ground CLOVER (487-2937), Robbie French COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Bright Moments COUNTRY CLUB (208-676-2582),

Truck Stop Betty CRUISER’S, Triple Shot CURLEY’S (208-773-5816), Bad Monkey FIZZIE MULLIGANS, The Coleman Underground GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Xingaia, The Drip, Autolycus IMPULSE (242-7000), DJ Ramsin IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Clumsy Lovers J KNITTING FACTORY, Flying Mammals CD Release feat. Goodnight Venus, The Static Tones, BBBBandits, Son of Brad, Bagdad and more LEFTBANK WINE BAR (315-8623), Truck Mills MARQUEE, Likes Girls, MCSquared MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), Limousine MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Nick Grow

MICHAEL’S O.P. (447-3355), The Cruizers MOOTSY’S, Fox & Woman, Split Screens NECTAR TASTING ROOM (869-1572), Starlite Motel NYNE, DJ C-Mad PEND D’OREILLE WINERY (208-2658545), Erin & The Projects RED LION AT THE PARK (326-8000), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley RED LION RIVER INN (328-9526), Chris Rieser and The Nerve ROADHOUSE, Last Chance Band J SHOP, DJ Soott SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, DJ Deuce SPLASH (208-765-4000), Steve Denny, The Hitmen SPOKANE EAGLES (489-3030), Chris Ellenberger VIKING, The Bucket List WHITESTONE WINERY (647-5325), Pamela Benton

ZOLA, Fiasco

Saturday, 6/15

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BIG CITY SALOON (474-0579), DJ Fusion BIG SKY’S TAVERN (489-2073), Cliff Park, Bobby Bremer Band BIGFOOT, The Usual Suspects BOLO’S (891-8995), The Vibe BROADWAY TAVERN (326-5000), Dudley Do-Wrong CARLIN BAY RESORT (208-6677314), Bruiser CELLAR, Bury Me in the Ground J THE CENTER, The Rustics, The Strangers, The Revision Scheme, Andy Rumsey J CHAPS (324-4182), Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston CLOVER (487-2937), Karrie O’Neill COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho

COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Tom Gantt COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Truck Mills COUNTRY CLUB (208-676-2582), Truck Stop Betty CURLEY’S (208-773-5816), Bad Monkey FIZZIE MULLIGANS, The Coleman Underground GATEWAY MARINA (208-689-3902), The Jam Band GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Sangre, Jackhammer, The Khind, Mautam IMPULSE (242-7000), DJ Ramsin IRON HORSE BAR (926-8411), Joel Brantley IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Clumsy Lovers LA ROSA CLUB (208-255-2100), Marshall McLean LARIAT (466-9918), Texas Twister MARQUEE, Likes Girls, MCSquared MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), Limousine MICHAEL’S O.P. (447-3355), The Cruizers

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. J MOOTSY’S, Brothers Ov Midnite NYNE, DJ Hype PEND D’OREILLE WINERY (208-2658545), One Street Over PHAT HOUSE, Steve Powers, Moksha, Sunstripe, DJ WONF RED LION RIVER INN (328-9526), Chris Rieser and The Nerve J RIVERFRONT PARK, BOBFest feat. 12 local high school bands (see story on facing page) ROADHOUSE, Last Chance Band J ROCKET MARKET (343-2253), Mark Ward J SHOP, Camille Bloom SPLASH (208-765-4000), Steve Denny, The Hitmen SPOKANE EAGLES (489-3030), Chris Ellenberger UGLY BETTIE’S, DJ One VIKING, Jack and Jill ZOLA, Fiasco

Sunday, 6/16

ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Garrett Bartley Band BLUE SPARK, HipGrass CARR’S CORNER, Abadawn, DMLH, Gepetto, Diction One, DJ Wels CELLAR, Steve Ridler J THE CENTER, Unknown Mortal Orchestra (see story on page 113), Bass Drum of Death COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium CURLEY’S (208-773-5816), Phoenix DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J GENO’S (487-9541), Eddie Haskell Jazz Trio MARQUEE, Likes Girls, DJ D3vin3 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Protoje and The Indiggnation, Gappy Ranks and the 7th Street Band SADDLE INN (624-1228), The Two Dudes SPLASH (208-765-4000), Steve Denny ZOLA, The Bucket List

Monday, 6/17

J BELLTOWER, Unknown Mortal Orchestra (see story on page 113), Bass Drum of Death BLUE SPARK, Open mic J CALYPSOS COFFEE (208-66505914), Open mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RICO’S (332-6566), Open mic SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, DJ Fusion UGLY BETTIE’S, Open mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 6/18

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn CELLAR, TC Tye J THE CENTER, The Almost (see story on page 115), Sugar Glyder Palisades J THE HOP!, Psychosomatic, Vicious Circle, Crytikal Mass, Dank Submission, Over Sea Under Stone JOHN’S ALLEY, Abadawn, DMLH, Gepetto, Diction One, DJ Wels KELLY’S IRISH PUB (208-667-1717), Powell Brothers J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Trickster Fox J MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP (208-8828537), Matti Sand

Wednesday, 6/19

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BLUE SPARK, DJ Darkside Som CAFÉ BODEGA (208-263-5911), Five Minutes of Fame open mic CELLAR, All That Jazz EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FEDORA PUB, Kosh FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho J GENO’S (487-9541), Open mic J THE HOP!, Elektro Grave IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Tracorum LAKE CITY CENTER (208-667-4628), Good ‘n Plenty Band MARQUEE, Likes Girls, DJ D3vin3 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Joe Caruso PHAT HOUSE, Jesus and Beer ROADHOUSE, Luke Jaxon SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open mic ZOLA, Island Soul

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July 7

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120 E. Sprague Ave.

J MOOTSY’S, Deadkill (see story on facing page), Dislich, Cold Blooded on June 20 BING CROSBY THEATER, Matthew Sontag CD Release feat. The Lion Oh My on June 21 MIKEY’S GYROS (208-882-0708), The Cave Singers, The Kitchen on June 25 NYNE, The Grizzled Mighty, The Maldives, Marshall McLean Band, The Blakes on June 27 FOX THEATER, Old Crow Medicine Show on July 2 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Dead Prez on July 11 THE HOP!, FAUS, Black Mask, Laid Up, Raised by Wolves, Jake Jerome on July 12 NORTHERN QUEST, Poison & Ratt on July 12 GLOVER FIELD, KYRS Music Fest feat. Menomena, Finn Riggins, Jonathan Warren & The Billy Goats, Real Life Rockaz, Cathedral Pearls, BBBBandits on July 13

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MUSIC | VENUES

RED ROOSTER COFFEE (202-9138), Open mic J ROCKET MARKET (343-2253), Darin Hilderbrand J SHOP, Angela Marie VIKING, Cross My Heart ZOLA, Dan Conrad and the Urban Achievers

WIN TICKETS

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315 RESTAURANT • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 AVENUE PIZZARIA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BELLTOWER • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 BLUE SPARK • 15 S. Howard St. • 838-5787 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 THE CENTER • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROTHERS • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MARQUEE • 522 W. Riverside Ave • 838-3332 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 MOON TIME • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W, Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 SERGIO’S • 825 W. Riverside Ave. • 7472085 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 THE SWAMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 117

MOVIE DRINK WITH FLAIR

We’re back at it again. The second installment of The Inlander’s Suds and Cinema series features the classic 1999 film Office Space, which taught us all about the importance of TPS forms, how blowing off work could get you a raise and that fax machines really are the worst damn thing ever. This time around, Spokane’s own Iron Goat Brewing will provide $3 pints of their excellent brews and we’re giving you an intermission to refill your cup. So, if you could just go ahead and make it to the Bing on Wednesday night, that would be great, ohhhhkaaaay? — MIKE BOOKEY Suds and Cinema: Office Space • Wed, June 19 • Doors open and beer begins flowing at 6:30 pm; film at 7:30 • $4 admission; $3 beers • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave.

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

118 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

PERFORMANCE TALKIN’ TO SPIRITS

COMEDY BADA BING!

The Theresa Caputo Live Experience • Fri, June 14 at 8 pm • $36$85 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000

Bada Bing! Comedy Series • Sat, June 15 at 8 pm • $15 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • bingcrosbytheater.com

You might want to consider staying indoors next weekend, seeing as Theresa Caputo, star of TLC’s hit show Long Island Medium, is known to walk up to complete strangers and tell them how she spoke with their dead loved ones. Caputo is a medium, meaning she can speak with those passed away or someone’s “spirit,” as she calls it. This energetic Long Island mom is visiting Spokane to give readings and talk about her life. Even if you’re a skeptic when it comes to this stuff, you’ll at least find that she is pretty funny. — MYCHAELA NICKOLOFF

Laughs, alcohol, and pizza are all great on their own, but put them together and your night is complete. Enjoy some beer and wine at the Bing Crosby Theater while three award-winning comedians — Dwight Slade, Kelsey Cook, and Kane Holloway — aim to make you pee your pants or spray beer out your nose. Take your ticket stub to Fire Artisan Pizza to redeem a free pepperoni pizza for up to 30 days after the show. The event isn’t recommended for children, so we know you’re already intrigued. — ANNA CLAUSEN

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If you’ve got a green thumb, go for the inspiration. If you’ve got the magical ability to instantly kill all plants in your care, go for the vicarious enjoyment of someone else’s hard work. Either way, the Inland Empire Gardeners’ annual Spokane In Bloom garden tour has something for everyone — rich colors, creative landscaping and personal touches that bring out this year’s theme, “Birds of a feather, flock together.” And there’s more than plants at the six featured gardens in the Nine Mile area — one has a model train running through, another has vintage cars, and there will be artists, musicians and vendors throughout. — LISA WAANANEN Spokane In Bloom garden tour • Sat, June 15 from 10 am–5 pm • $10 • various locations • 509-535-8434 • Tour map at tieg.org

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While it’s a few days before the actual summer solstice (June 21), Spokane’s Summer Parkways street party is just as much an official kickoff to all things summer-related. Right around the time kids are free from school for the summer, one Spokane neighborhood — this year Manito-Comstock — closes off four miles of streets to auto traffic. The only way you can get around to block party events like dancing, Zumba and martial arts demos is via humanpowered transportation, i.e. your feet, a bike or other non-engine mode. This year, participants are encouraged to participate in an inaugural bike decorating contest at 7 pm. Better break out those streamers! — CHEY SCOTT Summer Parkways • Wed, June 19 from 6-9 pm • Free • Comstock/Manito neighborhood, Spokane’s South Hill • summerparkways.com

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (4837300) YEARBOOK Live improv comedy show based on audience suggestions of yearbook “sentiments.” Through June 28, Fridays at 8 pm. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre. com (747-7045) BADA BING! Live stand-up comedy show featuring Dwight Slade, Kelsey

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Cook and Kane Holloway. June 15 at 8 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638)

COMMUNITY

ENTERTAINMENT IN THE PARK Summer entertainment series featuring live music and performances. Thursdays through July 11 at 7 pm. Free. East City Park, Moscow. (208-8837036) MAC FAMILY FREE WEEKEND Free admission to the museum in celebration of Father’s Day, sponsored by STCU and featuring special exhibits and programs. June 15-16. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. (456-3931)

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess BEATING THEM ABOUT THE HEAD WITH A SHTICK

AMY ALKON

I’ve always made people laugh with my self-deprecating humor, but I was complaining about not having much luck with the ladies recently, and my buddy told me that my humor is a problem. He said I come off as kind of a downer to women. Other guy friends told me not to listen to him; women love a man with a sense of humor. So, who’s right? —Overweight, Poor, And Ugly

Self-deprecating humor works best when a man seems to be kidding, not confessing: “Hey, ladies! Look who’s barely holding it together over here!” So, the question is, exactly how much of a self do you have to deprecate? Evolutionary psychologist Dr. Gil Greengross sees self-deprecating humor as a social version of conspicuous consumption (outlandish spending implying that a person has so much money, he could use packets of dollar bills for firewood.) Poking fun at yourself can suggest that you have so much personal and emotional capital that you not only don’t need to sweat to impress a woman, you can laugh at what a loser you are. (This works especially well if you’re a loser like George Clooney.) Greengross cautions that it’s risky to shine a spotlight on actual flaws, so if there’s a ring of truth to “Overweight, Poor, And Ugly,” avoid opening with “Hey, babe, how bout I sell my plasma and take you to dinner?” But say what you lack in looks and money you make up in confidence. You could show off how cool you are with that uncomfortable moment of hitting on a woman with “Hi, I really wanted to talk to you. Can we talk about the weather while I’m thinking of something to say?” And instead of mocking who you are, you’re probably safer poking fun at something you’ve done, like, oops, splashing beer down the cleavage of the woman you’re hitting on: “They usually just slip my water dish into my cage so these sorts of things don’t happen.” Still, although some humorous self-condemnation can be fun, a constant barrage of it may make a woman’s ears try to coerce her arms and legs into a suicide pact. Also, it’s easy to fall into the habit of using humor as a force field so you never have to open up and get real. This tends not to go unnoticed or go over with the ladies. So, sure, disarm a woman with humor, but after she’s disarmed, see that you actually talk to her, person-to-person, not comedian-to-person. Your goal should be finding out things about her that resonate with you and responding to them and seeing whether there’s a connection there. It’s connecting with a woman that will make her stick around — and for far longer than if you just try to hammer her with jokes until she loses consciousness.

THE CARPAL TUNNEL OF LOVE

I’m a screenwriter with a job-job, so the early morning is the only time I have to write. When my girlfriend stays over, she’ll come in and start talking to me as I’m trying to work. I love her and don’t want her to feel ignored, but these interruptions really pull me out of my thoughts. —Scribe Writing and solitude tend to go together. Just think about it: Where was Thoreau’s girlfriend? Bottom of the pond? Writing often looks dignified in movies, but in real life, it’s a grubby business that tends to involve some sobbing into the keyboard and humiliating attempts to bribe God in exchange for a working plot twist. In between, however, there are moments of what’s called “flow,” a term by psychologist Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi describing the blissfully productive state where you get so single-mindedly immersed in some activity that time and everything else fall away. Interruptions, no matter how well-meaning, are the death of flow, and not exactly fantastic for lesser states of concentration, either. Explain this to your girlfriend so she can understand that your need for solitude isn’t a form of rejection and that, when you’re writing, the sweetest and most supportive thing she can do is act like she’s not speaking to you (but without the door slammings and mumblings of “remorseless turd!” that usually come with). Block out a few hours in the morning as “do not disturb” time (which she should feel free to ignore whenever she catches fire). And when you aren’t blackening pages, maybe make an effort to be extra-affectionate in addition to expressing appreciation for her support. This should help keep her from feeling bad and acting out, and you, in turn, from rebelling against any such rebellion and, say, revising your pet name for her from “Sugarbooger” to “Writer’s Block.” n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

120 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION “Developing Community Through Education” 3rd annual event featuring live music, food, entertainment and more. June 15 from 1-5 pm. Free. Liberty Park, 502 S. Pittsburg. inwjc.org EVERY WOMAN CAN FUNDRAISER Fourth annual yard sale fundraiser benefiting Inland Imaging’s “Every Woman Can” foundation, funding free screening mammograms. June 15 from 6 am-2 pm. 4115 E. 37th Ave. everywomancan.org (363-7799) MOBIUS MONDAY The community is invited to explore Mobius for free at a once-monthly event. June 17 from 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free. Mobius, 811 W. Main Ave. (321-7208) HEART WALK FUNDRAISER Barbecue and fundraiser night benefiting the American Heart Association’s Heart | Stroke walk and run, hosted by Premera. June 18 at 5 pm. $20. SYSA Bingo, 2230 E. Sprague Ave. (536-1500) SUMMER PARKWAYS Community members are invited to walk, cycle, skate or jog a four-mile course closed to cars, featuring booths, entertainment a bike decorating contest and more. June 19 from 6-9 pm. Free. Comstock/Manito neighborhood, Spokane. summerparkways.com DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PANEL Panel and discussion hosted by the Neighborhoods Matter Governance Council. June 19 from 6-8 pm. Free, with childcare and a light dinner provided to registered attendees. Emmanuel Family Life Center, 631 S. Richard Allen Ct. (324-1666)

ETC.

DATA FOR DOLLARS Learn to use census data for grant writing. June 11 from noon-1 pm. EWU, Senior Hall, Rm. 306, Cheney Campus. (359-2419) THERESA CAPUTO The star of TLC’s “Long Island Medium” will talk about her ability to communicate with the dead. June 14 at 8 pm. $36-$85. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) SPOKANE IN BLOOM 13th annual garden tour hosted by The Inland Empire Gardeners, featuring six Northside gardens. June 15 from 10 am-5 pm. $10. Locations throughout North Spokane. tieg.org (535-8434) SCRAPS OPEN HOUSE Open house to highlight construction plans for the new countywide animal shelter, including a motorcycle ride fundraiser, tours, adoptable pets and more. June 15 starting at 9 am. Free and open to the public. Future SCRAPS site, 6815 E. Trent Ave. (477-2984) BUFFALO SOLDIERS FUNDRAISER Annual dance and fundraiser benefiting the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club featuring live music, raffle and more. June 15 at 8 pm. $10. Black Diamond, 9614 E. Sprague Ave. buffalosoldiersmcspokanewashington.com GUIDED TOUR OF MANITO TREES Walking tour with Master Gardener Ed Lester. June 15 at 10 am. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org (456-8038) MASTER GARDENER PHYLLIS STEPHENS Gardening presentation and Q&A session. June 18 at 5:30 pm. $10. Empire Theatre, 126 S. Crosby St., Tekoa, Wash. (284-5173)

FESTIVAL

ALL WHEELS WEEKEND Car show featuring hot rods, roadsters, muscle cars, a demolition derby, live music, food and more. June 14-16. Downtown Dayton, Wash. allwheelsweekend.com (800-882-6299) CAR D’LANE Classic car show, auction, poker run and more. June 14-15. Downtown CdA. (208-667-5986) GOAT SHOW Animals, exhibits and more. June 15 from 7 am-9 pm. Free. Spokane Fair and Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. (796-5292) MEDICAL LAKE FOUNDERS DAY Basketball tournament, street music, softball tournament, food and drink, craft bazaar and more. June 15 from 8 am-3 pm. Medical Lake. medical-lake.org (565-5000) SHRINE CIRCUS Family circus. June 15 at 4 pm and 7 pm. $12. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene. (208-765-4969) SLIPPERY GULCH CELEBRATION Family dances, fishing derby, tractor shows, family evens, vendors, food and drink and more. June 15-16. Downtown Tekoa, Wash. tekoawa.com

FILM

PLACE BEYOND THE PINES Drama/action. June 13-16, times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER Free teen movie. June 13 at 5 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) REEL PADDLING FILM FESTIVAL Paddling sport film festival. June 14 at 7 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191) THE LORAX Screening as part of the Summer Moonlight movie series. June 14 at dusk. Free. Sunset Park, Airway Heights. cahw.org (244-4845) PULP FICTION Screening as part of the summer movie series. June 15 and 18. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) THE FUTURE OF FOOD Documentary screening hosted by GMO-Free Idaho. June 15 at 1 pm. Free. Sandpoint Library, 1407 Cedar St. (208-660-9169) THE CROODS Animated family film. June 19 and 20 at 1 pm. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) SUDS AND CINEMA Screening of Office Space as part of The Inlander’s Suds & Cinema film series, featuring beer from Iron Goat Brewing Co. June 19 at 6:30 pm. $4/movie, $3/beers. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com

FOOD

GREENS FOR HEALTHY LIVING Learn how to incorporate greens into your everyday diet. June 13 from 6:30-8 pm. $15, reservations required. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. pilgrimsmarket.com (208-676-9730) MEET THE WINEMAKER Taste wines from Fidelitas Wines with winemaker Charlie Hoppes. June 14 at 3:30 pm. Free. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. (208-676-9730) BELGIAN BEER EXPERIENCE Sample and learn about different styles of

Belgian beer. June 14 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) RHUBARB FESTIVAL Bake sale, vendors, demonstrations, entertainment and more. June 15 from 10 am-3 pm. CREATE, 900 W. Fourth St., Newport, Wash. createarts.org (509-447-9277) THE POUR A gourmet winemakers’ dinner and auction benefiting programs at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital and Holy Family Hospital. June 15 from 5:30-10 pm. Arbor Crest Winery, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. thepour.info (474-2819) MANAGING FOOD ALLERGIES Learn how to create a safe food environment for children with food allergies. June 15 from 2-3:30 pm. $15, reservations required. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St., CdA. (208-676-9730) MICROBREWING AT HOME Learn the process, ingredients, equipment, recipe formulation and more in a hands-on workshop with brewer Bryan Krueger. June 15 from 3-5 pm. $15, pre-registration required. Sun People Dry Goods, 32 W. Second Ave. (368-9378) MUSIC AND MICROS All-you-can eat barbecue buffet, live music and beer. June 15. Food from 5-9 pm, live music from 6-9 pm. $14 buffet. CdA Casino, 37914 S. Hwy 95, Worley. cdacasino. com THE POUR A gourmet winemakers’ dinner and auction benefiting programs at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital and Holy Family Hospital. June 15 from 5:30-10 pm. Arbor Crest, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. thepour.info (474-2819) BARK-N-BREW Dog-friendly beer festival. June 16. Silver Mountain, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg (208-783-1111) SALMON SEASON Learn how to select, clean, prepare and store the fish for best cooking results. June 17 at 5:30 pm. $39, registration required. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. (328-3335) WOK STIR FRYING Learn to cook with the versatile wok and how to make three stir-fry dishes. June 18 at 5:30 pm. $39, registration required. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. (328-3335) SOUTHERN COOKING Learn to cook several traditional southern dishes including fried chicken, pulled beef, catfish and more with chef Steve Geving. June 19 from 10:30 am-1:30 pm. $25, reservations required. (208-4370426) MARGARITAVILLE Cooking class on making tacos and margaritas. June 19 from 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy, SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141)

MUSIC

TONY BENNETT Concert. June 13 at 7:30 pm. $86-$151. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. northernquest.com (481-6700) JAZZ CONCERT Concert. June 13 at 7:30 pm. $2-$5. SFCC Music Bldg. No. 15, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3592) TOP DOG PERFORMER Singing contest with proceeds donated to Major Forces, a new nonprofit assisting community dog owners and their pets. June 13 at 8 pm. All-ages. $6. Performer registration deadline June 10. The Hop!, 706 N. Monroe St. majorforces509@ gmail.com

KEVIN COLE Piano and vocal performance of songs from the Great American songbook. June 14 at 7:30 pm. $15$75. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. (208-391-2867) BOBFEST Annual music competition featuring eight Spokane-area high school bands, hosted by the YMCA. June 15 from noon-6 pm. Free. All-ages. Riverfront Park Clock Tower. bobfestspokane.org (777-9622 x. 315)

SPORTS

CAMP COOKING BASICS Learn to make easy meals at a camp, including what to bring and how to set up an outdoor kitchen. June 13 at 7 pm. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) SPOKANE INDIANS Season home opener vs. Everett AquaSox. June 14-16. Avista Stadium, 404 N. Havana St. spokaneindiansbaseball.com (535-2922) LOREEN MILLER BIKE RIDE Annual fundraiser for Cancer Patient Care including a 5-mile fun run or bike ride. June 15. $10-$120. Mt. Spokane High School, 6015 E. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. cancerpatientcare.org (456-0446) ALL GRAVITY SERIES Downhill mountain biking race. June 15-16. Silver Mountain, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) COLOR ME RAD 5K paint-splatter fun run. June 15 at 8 am. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. colormerad.com U.S. SPRINT BOAT RACES U.S. Sprint Boat Association Jet Sprint Races. June 15 and Aug. 24 at $15-$20. Webb’s Slough, St. John, Wash. webbsslough. com (648-3393) AMAZING RACE SPOKANE Teams solve clues and challenges while navigating downtown Spokane via foot or bike, in an Amazing Race-style, benefiting the Spokane Guilds’ School. June 15 at noon, registration at 11 am. Downtown Spokane. active.com, keyword “Oz.” LILAC CITY ROLLER GIRLS Bout featuring the Lilac City Violet Riot vs. the Wine Country Crushers. June 15 at 6:30 pm. $10-$15. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ticketswest. com BOATER SAFETY Officers from the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office Marine Patrol Unit will discuss requirements for boat operation, waterway rules and safety. June 19 at 6 pm. Free. Hayden Community Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612)

THEATER

BIG RIVER Musical based on The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, performed by the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre. June 13-22, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $32-$47. NIC Schuler Auditorium, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasummertheatre.com (208-769-7780) NEW WORKS FESTIVAL Nine original plays are debuted in a benefit for the SFCC Revelers. June 13-14 at 7:30 pm. $5-$8. SFCC Spartan Theater, Bldg. 5, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (5333592) THOSE WERE THE DAYS Dinner theater performance. June 14-15 at 6:30 pm. June 11 at 7:30 pm (no dinner). $25/ dinner and performance, $10-$12 show only. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy. 211 off of Hwy. 2, Newport. (208-448-1294) THE MARRIAGE OF BETTE AND BOO Sat-

ire/comedy. June 14-30. Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, also June 20 at 7:30, June 23 and 30 at 2 pm. $15-$20. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. ignitetheatre.org (953-0442) MCMANUS AND ME Comedy performance based on the stories of Patrick F. McManus, performed by Tim Behrens. Book signing to follow. June 14 at 7:30 pm and June 16 at 5 pm. $23-$63. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane.com (327-8000) THE SOUND OF MUSIC Musical. June 1530. Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Orielle Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave., Newport. (671-3389) SAME TIME NEXT YEAR Romantic comedy performed by members of The JACC’s Theater Troupe. June 16 and 23 at 2 pm, June 20-22 at 7:30 pm. $10-$15. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. (208-457-8950)

VISUAL ARTS

MAN’S BEST FRIEND Artwork celebrating the love of dogs featuring a coinciding pet food drive. Through June 29. Artist reception June 27 from 5-7 pm. Free. Pacific Flyway Gallery, 409 S. Dishman-Mica Rd. (747-0812) CONNIE JANNEY “Spirit Animals at the Moon” mixed-media exhibition. June 14-July 12. Reception and book signing of the children’s book “Most Extraordinary Farm” June 15 from noon-8 pm. Free. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. (413-9101) MOSCOW ARTWALK Self-guided tour to partipating businesses and galleries showing artwork by local and regional artists. June 14. Downtown Moscow. (208-883-7036) PALOUSE WATERCOLOR SOCIUS Watercolor paintings selected for the Regional Juried Exhibiton. June 14-Aug. 3, artist reception June 14 from 5-8 pm. Free. Gallery hours Tues-Thu 1-6 pm, Fri 1-7 pm, Sat 9 am-3 pm. Free. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main, Moscow. uidaho. edu (208-885-7251) PASTEL WORKSHOP Pastel workshop taught by visiting artist Diana Moses Botkin; open to all skill levels. June 22 from 11 am-4 pm. $72, registration due June 15. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. (229-3414)

WORDS

TODD MCFARLANE The creator of the Spawn comics and McFarlane Toys, of EWU’s class of 1984, will present “Road Trip to Creative Autonomy.” June 14 from 7-8 pm. Free to EWU students, $15 public, registration required. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. alumni.ewu.edu/mcfarlane (359-6335) SCOTT JOHNSON “The Wolf and the Watchman: A Father, a Son and the CIA” signing and reading by the former Newsweek foreign correspondent. June 15 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM Monthly performance poetry competition. June 16 at 8 pm. All-ages. $5 suggested donation for performers/audience. Scout Tavern, 1001 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org 

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ACROSS 1. Inductee at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995 6. Emulates a llama 11. Underwear letters 14. Expression 15. Ute hostel? 16. Island garland 17. “Evita” Tony winner 19. It’s often framed 20. Ave. crossers 21. “____ everything you’d hoped for?” 23. Assassination victim of 2007 28. Ape 30. It wasn’t permitted to be read in the U.S. until 1933 31. Asian cartoon style 32. Underling in “Peter Pan” 34. Oscar nominee for “Auntie Mame” 41. One-time Soviet news agency 42. Actress Shire

122 122 INLANDER INLANDER JUNE JUNE 13, 13, 2013 2013

43. Acquire information about 48. Activity on a range 49. “In My Dreams” Grammy winner 52. Investigate 53. “Are you a man ____ mouse?” 54. “Esq.” titleholder 55. “Alice’s Restaurant” singer 63. Unimpressive grade 64. Omega rival 65. Elton of the NBA 66. Initials in fashion 67. Unexpected change 68. Alphabet quintet showcased 1) at the start of the clues and 2) in 17-, 23-, 34-, 49- and 55-Across DOWN 1. Energy 2. Org. mentioned on some toothpaste tubes 3. Olive ____

4. It may let off steam 5. Athos, to Porthos 6. Early automaker Harry C. ____ 7. Its ads have featured Britney Spears and Michael Jackson 8. One can take stock in it: Abbr. 9. End of a boxing referee’s count 10. “Understand?” 11. Excellent times 12. It’s the truth in France 13. “I second that” replies 18. Exam for a future D.A. 22. E.U. member 23. It’s performed by a mohel 24. “At Wit’s End” author Bombeck 25. Advent song 26. Ones with regret 27. Azul, across the Pyrenees 28. Equal footing 29. Abril to Abril, e.g. 32. Utter mess

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33. OB/GYNs, for example 35. “Am ____ late?” 36. Use a swizzle stick 37. It’s a wrap in “Slumdog Millionaire” 38. Inventor Whitney and others 39. Architect Maya 40. Interval 43. Inheritance 44. Overacts 45. Import since 1870 46. Alternative to seven-grain 47. Atl. is one of five in it 48. Essen woman 50. Angler’s supply 51. Insider’s vocabulary 56. Opposite of FF on a VCR 57. Ovid’s 52 58. Unfilled, in TV listings: Abbr. 59. Otto I’s realm: Abbr. 60. Aishwarya of “Bride & Prejudice” 61. Italian diminutive suffix 62. End of a school Web address

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1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Cheers

Spokane Comicon You were cosplaying catwoman and I just wanted to point out the fact that you did a swell job you might not have recognized me because I didn’t have the gut to talk to you, but bravo.

doomed and silly ideas. Thank you for patching up scrapes, bruises, and broken hearts. Thank you for your words of advice and warning, for being our friends/teachers/ parents, and for always having our backs. We have a lot to learn, but we couldn’t have asked for a better start. As one of our fine teachers always says, ‘You are Awesome, You are Appreciated, and You are Loved’. Cheers, HS Graduating Class of 2013

nice comments and support, he is really helpful to me and we see that we create a few smiles to all of you guys too. I am in the Hotel/Restaurant program and am looking for some work this summer, I know this is a strange place to ask, but I am thinking outside the box, lol, again, thank you for all your patience and look me up. Have a great summer!

improving the quality of living for his family. He had to miss Sunday Mass for that, and that’s quite a sacrifice.

Your Place I met you at your place, and immediately fell in love with your animals. My friend helped your friend fix your AC. I helped you make a bouquet. We sat and talked about our trip across the seas to Europe. We talked about our hair; yours has been, and can be, every color. I was too embarrassed to ask for your number, so I’m taking the chance now. I enjoyed your company and would like to get together. Discovery Park You: the cute girl in shorts and work boots, working on the landscape looking so cute and I was there with my class so I could not talk to you, but I just could not keep my eyes off of you. I have not been able to get you off my mind. Would love to meet for coffee or and drink sometime. Hope to here from you. Weekend Meetings Hi Lisa, I see you weekends at the meetings (Best Ave). I really what to go out with you, just can’t find the right time to talk to you. Seems like every time I want to approach you, you’re busy talking with someone. This is probably a shot in the dark, but just thought I would try!

Cheers

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124 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

School Teachers Cheers to the School Teachers of Spokane. From pre-school through twelfth grade you have taught us 50-95% of what we know as we graduate high school. And we’re not just talking about math and English here, but also equally important life lessons. You teachers are the people we have seen most often in professional situations, and you have shown by example how to take both compliments and criticism with grace and dignity. So maybe we didn’t all always get along, teachers can’t possibly love all students and we all certainly have not adored all of our teachers, but we learned from you how to respect the people you may not get along with, and how to work with differences in a mature and intelligent manner. So thank you, for the endless patience on what seemed like endless days in nonair-conditioned classrooms when all we wanted was recess. Thank you for weathering the temper tantrums, the rude outbursts, the hormonal rages (trust me, those aren’t much fun on our side either). Thank you for supporting our failed projects, our early choral and instrumental ventures, and our

Thank You! I just want to thank all of the people near Audubon Park that have helped find my (all too often) runaway puppy in the neighborhood, time and time again. He is like a child to me, and like a child, he has a curiosity too big for his own good. To all of you that have been fortunate enough

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” to meet him and know this, you can see what I am talking about. I am lucky to live in a neighborhood full of such wonderful dog loving people, and I hope that one day I can return the favor. I could not thank you enough. Cheers! To 21 years of being everyone’s favorite butthead. Happiest of birthdays to my little cherub, my, how you’ve grown. Now go, spread your soon to be drunken wings and have a phenomenal time in your 21st year. I loveth thee Leaving Spokane Cheers to our friends and neighbors, the Inlander (especially Cheers and Jeers), KPBX,(especially Verne Windhamhe is national treasure), KSPS, the South Perry district, our favorite barista Joe at The Shop, city parks, state parks, the Centennial Trail, The Columbia Plateau Trail, the Spokane River and the falls, small local breweries, Washington wines, Mt. Spokane xc trails and those that maintain them, lilacs and all that is beautiful and good about this city. TC I’ve never met anyone as amazing as you are. You are the most amazing guy I have ever met, hands down. To me, you’re perfect. You are like sunshine! I know we haven’t known each other long but it’s been real and I can’t wait to see where this summer takes us, just saying! Xoxo, Jazzy

So Proud I am proud of you for riding your bike to work. Good job bunny. It gives me some motivation My Handsome Man You are the love of my life and my best friend. We’ve been together for more than three years and it is the happiest I have ever been. I love that we bicker like an old married couple and we have never yelled at each other. I’m the luckiest girl alive to be with someone that is so crazy, funny, and smart. I always remember falling in love with you when you danced acrossed the room for me. I love you my cuddle buddy. Love always, your pretty lady. Time After Time I saw you again and again and again. It’s like I can’t keep my eyes off you. You know that’s because when everything is everything, you remain more than everything, time after time, my mirror, my clay. Thank you will never quite express the depth to our knowing. Angy l We are proud of you for doing good in school. There have been some struggles, but for the most part you did wicked good! We love you so much. And also, you are doing so good at riding your bike. Now you can show jk how it’s done ha ha. Good job girl, love mom, Dad, jj and tofu. Annalisa We love you, girl. Customer Service Cheers to the guys and gals at Spokane Art Supply. You always are such a great help with the answer to any project needs I have often with a cheaper alternative too. Thanks for all the years of support.The Badger

Happy 40th Lovely Man! Cheers Gorgeous on your big day. Eat your cake, steak, play guitar, and drive your pretty car. Be Happy. Maybe next year, walk you on a rocky beach and fly your kites. Love you so, so much. Kisses & kisses and rainchecks. Love forever, Perpetua. Savanna (Sweetpea) I’m so proud of you. You’ve accomplished A lot. And now you have a job that you love and we can’t wait to see you. Looking forward to the trip over there. We love you. Love mom, jay, jj, angy and your adorable fat lazy sweet tofu. Good Samaritan Cheers to the kind man and his son who helped me at Lowe’s to find a part to repair my swimming pool. He went out of his way and was very kind. Hats Off to the staff at Dolly’s! You guys are awesome! With your warms smiles and friendly attitude you guys make my experience well beyond my expectations. The food is absolutely amazing (great job cooks) and the atmosphere is so warm and inviting you can’t help but want to pull up a stool and stay awhile. Thank you from the Waffle Girl. My Love To the man I love more than life itself. I am sorry that I am emotional and out of control right now. I can’t express to you enough how much you mean to me. You’re my best friend and you’re always there for me. You understand me like no one ever has. You make my days brighter and my nights hotter. In August it will be a year since I saw you next door to my house and feel in love with you. I love our life. To My Fellow Motorists who have the good sense to drive with their lights on. Yes, daytime, too! I’m an older driver and see you much better when I can see your lights. Thanks!

D Just wanted to let you know that I think you are amazing! You are interesting and enjoy life to its fullest and I admire that about you. You give what ever you can and never Ashley M. is this week’s winner expect anything in of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! return. I am so honored Send in your CHEERS so to have met you and to you too can be enhave you in my life. I love your smile and laughter, keep it tered to win 1 dozen up, it looks good on you! Hope “Cheers” cupcakes at this makes your day! RS

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Celebrations Sweet

Boutique. My Fellow Students To all my For His Family Cheers to the fellow fellow students at SCC, Blake and who spent this Sunday feeding his I wanted to thank you for all your livestock, mowing the lawn, and “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

You Made My Day On 6/11 around 7:30 am I was running down the Centennial Trail and came across a group of runners going the opposite way. Every single person in that group said Good Morning to me. That small act of kindness made my day! Thank you mysterious running group for showing kindness to a stranger!

bartender will prioritize the demands on his attention in a way that best suits his own interest. Of course screaming at a customer is never acceptable, but I understand and even appreciate his reluctance to let anyone into his garnish tray. If you find this odd, just read back through a few months of old jeers. There are guys out there who not only don’t wash up after using the restroom, they’re so proud of their questionable hygiene they feel compelled to write letters about it. (I just wish they’d wear button or something to identify themselves so I’d know whose hand to avoid shaking). Again, I wasn’t there so what do I know? My guess is both parties could have been more open minded and understanding of each other. Cut a working stiff some slack and you might not need to write Jeers. That would leave more room for karmic threats aimed at car thieves and inconsiderate pet owners. Win/win?

specifically, so give it to them! It’s your job to fulfill their needs and they are paying for a service so it should be however they want. If you think your preferences are more important than the people who assist in paying your bills you should not be in customer service. Also, you wouldn’t risk being fined if you correctly did your job. I think your ego is clouding your judgment my friend.

My Mom I am a teenage boy who shares a very special bond with his mom. I know it is childish, but in all seriousness, she really means the world to me. The two of us have been through a lot together, from picnics in the park to (her) teaching life lessons at home, from long nights of sports to vacation, we have done it all. She has given me so much, more than she can imagine, and when I grow up, part of me hopes to be as great of a parent as she has been, but the other part knows it is not possible. I wanted to put this in the Inlander as a shout out for her, as something special that I can do. I want her to know that she is the most important thing in the world to me and. To another great summer. Lots of love, t

Jeers RE: Birthday Celebration As a former long time bartender I thought I’d share a few thoughts on your recent jeers. Now I wasn’t there and your bartender may indeed have been an ass, but based on your letter I’m not yet convinced that this is the case. First off, a lime comes with drinks containing tonic. That’s about as close to a garnish absolute as you’re going to find in the bar business. And while it’s true that many like lime and salt with their shots of tequila, the percentage of those who do drops drastically as the quality of the tequila rises. The attitude that good tequila doesnt need the extras is out there and it’s growing. I’ve actually had customers give me grief for even asking. The bottom line is, if you want lime and salt, ask for it. That being said, I have to wonder, did your friend leave him a tip? Im not saying that stiffing him justifies his ignoring you, but keep in mind that a server’s wages are often taxed based on a percentage of their sales because the state just assumes they’re getting tipped. Under such a system, a poor tip isn’t just disappointing, it’s costly. Throw into this mix the drinkers who expect a big pour, the boss who insist on a measured one, and the requirement to smile and be polite to even the rudest and most obnoxious customers and it’s understandable how a busy

Dear Spokane I am your turn signal. Try using me 100 ft before you turn. Contrary to what you apparently think, I am not as effective during or after this driving maneuver. Dear Spokane, I am a gas pedal. Try using me to accelerate at green lights. Turns out, I make your car move forward. Dear Spokane, I am a brake pedal. I work best when you gradually apply pressure, not when you slam your foot on me when you are 2 inches from another car. Dear Spokane, I am a posted speed limit. Try using me as a gauge to determine how fast you should be going. Chances are, I don’t mean 15 when I say 30 mph nor do I mean 50 when I say 35 mph. Dear Spokane Drivers, I am common sense and common courtesy, I don’t believe we’ve met. Leaving Spokane Jeers to dark, grey winter days, the condition of the city’s streets and those that cause it (the city and people who use snow tires), Spokane drivers that speed, ignore pedestrians and bikes, and run stop signs, local TV reporting, our poor excuse for a newspaper, rude people and negative people. Goodbye. RE: Birthday Celebration I think this whole thing is quite funny. Someone paid you for a service, asked for a specific beverage (which was super easy and within means as a bartender) and you persist to be rude to them, twice? And it was their birthday Shame on you, this says a great deal about you as an individual. Was it really too hard to fork over a lime? Your preferences are irrelevant, a customer ordered something

B V D S P I T S Z A P P A L E I E E P E T I D I O M A R T E P O N P A T T I L U S I T A W S T S T T O U H B B E N A Z I R S E S S Y L U P A R R O T ’S S M E E THIS WEEK! A N I M E L L E S S S U R R E D ANSW R O S A L I N T A L I A T A S S F I R I N G L E A R N O F R R I S A H U O E M M Y L O R A G O S E E E O G U T H R I L R A A T T D N A R B S E I K O C E E I O U E A T S I T W Y S L AZIR BEN

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To The Drivers of Spokane who are either in a hurry or are too selfish to notice that when it says walk and a pedestrian is in the the middle of the street, on the crosswalk, you should stop and wait until you can safely turn. This is the second time in a month that I’ve been inches away from getting hit when it’s my turn to walk across the street. I’m not speaking for those who walk across no matter what the little sign says. I’m speaking for those pedestrians who DEFINITELY have the right to cross because they do everything right. At least the second guy to almost hit me realized his mistake when another driver honked to alert him. The first guy got all pissed off and flipped me off. I’m sorry I have places to be, too. Sorry I hit that little button and crossed the street when it said ‘WALK.’ And yes, I did look out for cars before I crossed.

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Re: StopObamaHealthcare It should be called Congresscare. They are the ones who held up Obama’s healthcare plan, then bastardized it into the plan that exists today. Congress has the best healthcare plan in the country and they are the ones who didn’t want to share with the 99%. Idiot Idaho To the jerk who blocked two cars in the 4th street Ace Hardware parking lot on Saturday. At first I thought you were a gentleman asking if you had blocked my car. When I said yes, you went ahead and went into the store anyway. You didn’t buy anything, but returned as I was starting up my car. The neighboring vehicle had a 4 year old boy who was trying to climb back into his truck with an inaccessible back seat. I was waiting for him to get in, not anxious to scrape my car, the neighbor’s car or injure the boy. You’re the one who tried to close the door on his right foot, because you wanted me out of my parking place. Both you and his dad missed that detail as well as the detail that the door wasn’t closed. I merely asked that you let the dad know that the door was not closed; I guess I saw some potential danger in that for the young boy. No need to insult me or tell me I needed medication. Your insult to me escalated the situation, scared the boy, upset the dad as well as me in the other car. You are no gentleman, sir. A gentleman would have been kind to a lady old enough to be your mother, recognized the boy needed assistance and would have parked accordingly in the first place.

TM

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JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 125

R.I.P. Spokane

Welcome to Spokane, S.D., long abandoned — and for good reason.

Exploring the Spokane of South Dakota — left for dead long ago BY JOE O’SULLIVAN

O

ne day last month, I drove down a back road in Custer County, South Dakota, threading through the low mountains of the Black Hills and along a cliff. They named the county after George Armstrong Custer, the cavalry commander who discovered gold here and died soon after forcing Lakota Sioux natives off their sacred grounds. I pull off the road and walk a quarter mile up a wide, flat path. A house comes into view first, its empty windows staring like blank eye sockets. They are welcoming me, unblinking, to Spokane. This isn’t your Spokane. This is the Spokane that didn’t make it, the mining camp-turned-ghost town.

G

old always turns a profit, but the miners who staked out Spokane during the great Black Hills gold rush found silver and lead — metals that rise and fall with the whims of the market. Between 1891 and the early 1940s, Spokane lived and died and lived according to commodity prices. There were some good years, like 1927, when the mine shipped $114,742 of metals in today’s dollars, according to one account. It was enough for the town to hold a flow of miners and build a school. After all, towns

126 INLANDER JUNE 13, 2013

like Deadwood, not far to the north, prospered. But like many fever dreams of wealth, reality disappointed. “There wasn’t enough workable material to produce any decent profit,” says Ken Stewart, historian with the South Dakota State Historical Society. The mine closed in 1940. But like an old man lingering on life support, Spokane clung to hope a little longer. In the 1950s, a few “fly-by-night companies” tried to revive the mine, according to Stewart. One of the mine’s later owners used it as “an illegal dump site for hazardous chemicals.” At some point, the mine buildings burned down, and the U.S. Forest Service later burned down several other buildings in the name of safety, according to Stewart. A watchman lived there until the mid-1980s, Stewart says. And then Spokane took its place among the officially deserted.

E

xploring a ghost town is like standing inside the skeleton of a giant, prehistoric mammal, something large and distant that makes you feel like you’re both trespassing and paying homage. I felt like a

JOE O’SULLIVAN PHOTOS

grave robber, a pilgrim and an explorer, often all at once. What remains? The schoolhouse, leaning at a 15-degree angle, a collection of rickety wooden slats for walls and ceilings. The house with the empty window. Another house that has collapsed onto itself. A root cellar carved into a hillside, replete with empty, cobwebbed shelves. The foundations of larger buildings, their stone etched into the ground like chalk body outlines. Near the edge of the woods sits a pair of junked cars. The robin’s-egg-blue paint on one is slowly losing a war against grime and rust. On its open passenger door is stenciled “The Beast.” I tiptoed into the abandoned schoolhouse — it will collapse any year now — and my heart leapt as a board beneath my foot snapped. I panicked when I stared down into the black vacuum of an open water well. If I fall, who would save me? Who would even hear me? No one. I looked into the edges of the forest and around the foundation remains for hints of the town: another building, a personal memento left behind, traces of the Lakota Sioux natives who came before the miners. I found nothing but the occasional hint of modern life. A line of utility poles ferried electricity from somewhere more important to somewhere still inhabited. An abandoned campfire with rusted food and beer cans. The cars, nestled against the tree line like ships run aground. But other than me, no people. Is this what my home, Rapid City, will look like in 100 years? Is this what Spokane, Wash., will look like in a thousand years, long after it’s been left behind? And who will take up this search, looking for us when we’re gone? n Joe O’Sullivan, a former Inlander staff writer, is now a reporter at South Dakota’s Rapid City Journal.

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JUNE 13, 2013 INLANDER 127


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