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Led by coach Joey August and individual titlists Carl Maxey and Eli Thomas, the “Battlin’ Bulldogs” boxing team brought home Gonzaga’s only NCAA team championship in April of 1950.

Anniversary Activities & Events

(All events open to the public unless otherwise noted)

Chihuly: Tradition and Transformation April 5 – July 31

Exhibition of glass works and drawings from artist Dale Chihuly.

Dr. Jane Goodall April 9, 2013

Service learning is an essential part of the Gonzaga experience Learning through service to others is an essential part of the Gonzaga experience. It takes many forms and can be found all over campus – in classrooms, residence halls, club gatherings or even on the quad – and thousands of miles beyond. “Service is a key component of the Jesuit way of learning and the Jesuit way of living,” said Sima Thorpe, assistant dean of students and former director of the university’s Center. “It’s at the very heart of what we’re all about at Gonzaga.”

Presidential Speaker Series features famed primatologist and conservationist.

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The Pursuit of Justice Conference April 18-20, 2013

Students, faculty and staff provide more than 75,000 hours of volunteer service annually. Some of that happens in far-off places, from Montana to Mississippi, but most occurs much closer to home. The Campus Kids program brings children from Spokane’s neighborhood schools onto the GU campus one day a week for one-on-one tutoring and mentoring by Gonzaga students. Launched in 1994 by Thorpe and a handful of student volunteers as outreach to a single elementary school, Campus Kids now serves hundreds of children from nine elementary schools and three middle schools and is hailed as a national model for effective afterschool initiatives. Campus Kids “Campus Kids is successful on so many levels,” said Pat Lynass, retired principal of Logan Elementary, the first school to participate in the program. “First, kids who really need some extra help academically and socially are getting it through the tutoring and mentoring from the Gonzaga students. Because of that, they’re able to experience success. Beyond that, it opens a whole new world for many of them – and for their families as well. It’s important to understand that these are children growing up in some of the poorest neighborhoods in the state. For many of these kids, as well as for their parents, Campus Kids provides a first taste of college. It makes college real to them. They start to see it as something that’s not just abstract but that is very much a possibility for them.”

Understanding hatred. Confronting intolerance. Eliminating inequality.

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Gonzaga ranks No. 1 among small universities nationwide for producing Peace Corps volunteers.

Shakespeare (and others) in the Material World April 21, 2013 Dr. Heather Easterling, Associate Professor of English, presents “Transformation Café” talk.

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Graduate Shirley Johnson receives Nobel Peace Prize

4 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

The Yellow Wallpaper April 11, 12 & 13, 2013

comment StAFF DIRectoRY PhoNe: 509-325-0634 ted s. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

What is your favorite book?

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

eDItoRIAL Jacob h. fries (x261) EDITOR

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Eric Sandstron

Treasure Island is one of my favorites. Why that book? I don’t know, just because ... it’s just something I’ve read ever since I was a little kid. And I just like the story behind it. It’s awesome.

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amy alkon, andy borowitz, annemarie C. frohnhoefer, robert herold, Jim hightower, e.J. iannelli, Michael Mahoney, Jo Miller, scott renshaw, Jordan satterfield, stephen schlange

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The Partner by John Grisham. Why? It just starts out so intense, you know like, just how he has to fake his own death to get away and he’s got all this money and he can just go somewhere and live a whole different life. Do you read a lot? I used to. I haven’t had as much time. I have kids.

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I have so many favorite ones, but I like Magic Mountain. What makes for a good book in general? I really like historical novels, and I like ones that have not only substance about human nature, but also about the political state of the world.

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Holy crap, that’s hard … Alright I’m gonna go conventional here and I have to say right now it has really been the Hunger Games. Why that book? I love young adult fiction. It’s the kind of stuff I like to write and that one is just so feminist and it has such a strong female character.

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M

ayor Condon has decided to beef up security at City Hall. Instead of a $15-anhour contract employee signing visitors in, we will now be “welcomed” by a uniformed police officer — a lieutenant no less, reportedly making $130,000 a year. This isn’t the first such effort to tighten security. In years past we didn’t check in at all. Also, we could enter City Hall directly from the skywalk that crosses from the River Park Square parking garage. The trend line seems to be heading in the direction of City Hall as a version of the Baghdad Green Zone. While Spokane has had its share of weirdos — people who might be semi-out of control — it is only in the past decade that we have come to view mayhem as a permanent condition of public life. And what happened a decade ago? Sept. 11 happened. And it spawned the War on Terror, which replaced the Cold War. And as with all “wars,” we did what we usually do: create a new bureaucracy. We called this one the Department of Homeland Security. Our new agency seeks to answer the threat question — terrorism, not so much as a place or a person but as a tactic. It’s easy enough to get the public on the same threat page when the war is real, as it was with World War II, but it’s more difficult when the war is hypothetical and doesn’t involve a nationstate. And when the battlefield is the “homeland,” the situation gets more complicated, if for no other reason than the need to bring in the locals. They must accept that the threat — according to Washington, D.C., i.e., Security HQ — is their threat, and the War on Terror is their war.

B

ut here’s the downside: More often than not, when this scenario is played out, we find ourselves plunging into a morass of unintended consequences, which often redirect resources that are needed for real threats to public safety. Put another way, national strategies and tactics often aren’t all that relevant to our particular circumstances. Street crime? It gets

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e have passed from the Cold War State to what one writer terms the National Security State, with branch offices throughout the country. I refer to the boost in security at City Hall. Do we need more security at City Hall? Well, according to the War on Terror manual we do. Even though an argument can be made that here the unintended consequences outweigh the intended consequences. Could it be, however, that we invite the unintended consequence by failing to go after local crime, because we are spending so much money walling off a Green Zone at City Hall? And does it not follow that if diminishing real threats to our public safety is what we need most, shouldn’t we start with more police presence — maybe directly across the street from City Hall? Would this not be more relevant to our “threat” circumstances? n

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short shrift in the War on Terror. When considering public policy, we must try to anticipate the unintended consequences; alas, we seldom do. Our history is replete with examples: We build an interstate highway system to expedite connectivity and improve flow of commerce (and support “civil defense”), but along the way we succeed in creating suburban sprawl. We build public housing to replace the row-house ghettos and create high-rise ghettos. We reduce taxes on the wealthy on the premise that lower taxes will actually increase revenue, then watch as the national debt doubles — and then doubles again. We applaud “No Child Left Behind” and then spend the following years trying to explain to ourselves why it isn’t working.

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t’s our most ubiquitous sign of the times — that guy you see on the street every day, staring intently down into his phone. Or the two ’tween girls walking together at the mall, each studying their own phones separately. Every time I see them, I think, “What are you hoping to find in that little screen of yours?” One of my favorite books is The Seekers by Daniel Boorstin, a review of world philosophy. “We are all Seekers,” Boorstin wrote. “We all want to know why.” His panorama runs from Aristotle’s wandering, powerful mind to Jefferson’s balancing of the individual and society to Henri Bergson’s stream-of-consciousness take on human evolution. I’d love to know what the Frenchman Bergson would make of the smartphone. We literally have the world at our fingertips. For those with an Aristotelian mind, you can voraciously surf an endless sea of knowledge. Jefferson — a tech junkie in his time — would love how connected the Internet can make us. As we connect, as the barriers of language and distance fall away, we become like a great web of shared consciousness. And our chance at enlightenment — the central goal of Jefferson’s time — improves. Send comments to But to Bergson, human progress — evolution, editor@inlander.com. even — is the byproduct of free will, mobility of the mind and that creative human spark nobody can quite explain. I am sure that a screen connected to everything would have thrilled him. Maybe it can help fill that percentage of our brains we don’t use. Maybe it can create better people. Maybe it can help us realize peace on Earth. So what are all those people seeking in their screens? It’s basic human instinct — yes, we are all Seekers. They want to know more, which is why Wikipedia just might be the greatest wonder of the modern world. They want to connect and fit into society, just as Jefferson hoped. An Instagram to a friend is, in fact, a social building block. And Bergson believed we are all hard-wired to grow and make progress, individually and communally. But before you start telling everyone that staring into your phone is actually quite good for you, consider that to Bergson the crucial piece in the puzzle of humanity is personal experience — to feel the world, to live the emotions, to take in the reality of it all not through a tiny screen, but through your own eyes. And for that, you need to put your phone down and take a look around you — especially when you’re cutting into my lane while chuckling over your latest tweet. 

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APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 7

COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

The pope washes the feet of women, upsetting Catholic traditionalists. Thoughts?

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GUEST EDITORIAL

JACK OHMAN CARTOON

Monetizing Nature BY EMILENE OSTLIND

W

e take so many of the West’s open spaces for granted — the private ranches and agricultural lands that provide invaluable resources for us all — from clean air and water, wildlife habitat and crop pollination, to scenic vistas, hunting opportunities, and so much more. But landowners are rarely compensated for the far-reaching benefits they provide, and they face intense pressure to sell out their land for development. Yet finally, some landowners are starting to get reimbursed for what they’ve freely provided for decades. “With scarcity comes value,” says Story Clark, author of A Field Guide to Conservation Finance. “A lot of work is going into figuring out the cost of natural capital, (defined loosely as intact ecosystems), and what will be lost if we lose it. On the reverse side, we need to be able to pay for it to keep it.” So far, in most cases, the money to restore habitat or keep landscapes in a natural state has come from the government or from donations made by conservation-minded individuals and organizations. But as Clark sees it, this “system, fueled almost entirely by philanthropy … will never get ahead of the bulldozers.” She urges landowners to look in a new direction, by turning their gaze to the world of for-profit financing, using the expertise of bankers, lawyers, accountants and financiers to protect their land. Such tools can connect people who benefit from conservation — such as city dwellers who want to drink clean water from their taps — with those who provide those benefits, including the ranchers who steward riparian areas. Usually when people think about paying to conserve a valuable quality that lies on someone else’s private land, they think in terms of

conservation easements, where philanthropists and the government give landowners money or tax breaks in exchange for development rights to their land. Market-based conservation finance seeks ways to transfer money from the people who enjoy conservation benefits to those who actually provide the benefits. Clark offers a couple of examples: Salt Lake City residents pay a dollar extra on their water bills each month to protect watersheds in the mountains above the city, saving money that would otherwise be spent transporting and cleaning water. Or a developer who paves over a wetland buys mitigation bank credits from a landowner who protects that type of wetland on private property. “There are so many ways you can think about monetizing values on a piece of land,” Clark says. “I have found hundreds.” That’s why Clark was invited to appear at this week’s Forum on Conservation Finance in Casper, Wyo. Experts –– including Clark –– describe how market approaches can help finance conservation. “We’re looking for ways to connect to market-based, long-term, sustainable funding for landowners and communities involved in conservation,” says Andrea Erickson Quiroz, Wyoming state director for The Nature Conservancy. “We want people to say, ‘Hmmm, maybe this is something we could try.’ ” “This is really exciting stuff. This is worldchanging,” Clark adds. “If we can monetize natural capital, we won’t lose it. We’re already seeing it happen.”  Emilene Ostlind is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org).

ASKELON KELN: Maybe the limited writings available don’t mention Jesus washing women’s feet — but then there are so many things we all do that aren’t in the Christian canon as being things Jesus did or taught others to do.

Do you think it’s the right time for the Supreme Court to rule on samesex marriage? ANDREW BIVIANO: It is the perfect time. I would have preferred sooner, but the country wasn’t ready. And there is no reason to wait any longer for equal treatment. DANIELLE BOUCHER: I don’t know how it is even an issue... freedom for all people all the time!!! ALEX JOHNSON: Why not just civil unions? Gay marriage is forcing a belief on others that goes against two millenniums of practice in society. LISA MCCRACKEN BEAR: I feel all unions should be civil and then have a church “bless” it if that is what they wish. DAVID JETER: The Supreme Court justices need to decide which side of history they will be on, because it is obvious which one will be accepted culture in the future. At one point the majority wrote a brief that had the phrase “separate but equal.” I doubt this court makes that mistake. 

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comment | satire

Kim Jong-un to Take Weekends Off S by andy borowitz

aying that he could “no longer keep up the punishing pace of sabre rattling seven days a week,” North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un said today that he will take weekends off from vowing to incinerate the world. After the official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) released a revised April Threat Schedule showing that Kim’s declarations of war and doomsday ultimatums would be limited to Monday through Friday, North Korea’s Supreme Leader explained his decision to make his weekends threat-free: “Dad always told me that you have to pace yourself in this job. The biggest danger isn’t the United States — it’s burnout.” Kim said that he made his decision over the past weekend, after he issued his 49th statement threatening to engulf the U.S. in a nuclear Armageddon: “I was in the middle

of saying ‘infernal sea of fire,’ and I kind of realized, hey, I’m just phoning it in. And I never want to be that guy.” By resting his violent rhetoric on weekends, Kim said, “On Monday through Friday I’ll have the insanity and unmitigated rage necessary to do this job right.” Referring to his streak of 352 consecutive days in which he threatened to destroy the world, Kim said, “I’m proud of it, sure.” Kim began the month of April with a fresh round of threats, announcing today that North Korea had blocked South Korea on Pinterest. n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

comment | wall street

Too Big To Jail S by jim hightower

ome consider it un-American to like those “namby-pamby” European nations, but still: Let’s hear it for the Swiss! In a March referendum, the mild-mannered, pacifist-minded Swiss people rose up and hammered their bank executives who’ve been grabbing rip-off pay packages. Two-thirds of voters emphatically shouted “Yes!” to a proposal requiring that shareholders be given the binding say on executive pay. Violators would sacrifice up to six years of salary and face three years in jail. That’s hardly namby-pamby. Indeed, it’s America’s lawmakers and regulators who’ve been squishy-soft on banksterism. None of the Wall Street titans who enriched themselves with rip-off pay packages have even been pursued by the law, much less put in jail. It’s no surprise, then, that they’ve gone right back to scamming and grabbing rip-off pay. Hardly a week goes by without another revelation of big-bank fraud, yet the culprits skate free. Forget too big to fail; banks

have become “too big to jail.” Our nation’s top prosecutor, Attorney General Eric Holder, recently conceded that financial giants are being given a pass: “It does become difficult for us to prosecute them,” he testified, “when we are hit with indications that… if we do bring a criminal charge — it will have a negative impact on the national economy.” Meanwhile, just four giants — Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and Wells Fargo — put nearly $20 million into last year’s elections, mostly to back Republicans promising to weaken the few feeble restraints we now have. Our lawmakers and regulators want to coddle the big bankers — with such Keystone Kops overseeing them, why would any Wall Streeter even think of going straight? n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 11

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E

Fighting for Felts How much does the control tower at Felts Field — slated for closure next month — matter? BY HEIDI GROOVER

very day just northeast of downtown Spokane, dozens of engines rumble to life and roll down the asphalt and grass runways of the nearly century-old Felts Field. Among hobbyists’ Cessnas are first-time fliers getting lessons, air ambulances rushing to emergency scenes and border protection agents. Pilots look out at the runway ahead, but count on another set of eyes to help them navigate the air above them. Inside a control tower that looms over patched asphalt runways, control operators have radar technology that gives them a comprehensive view of the airspace around the field — a luxury most pilots of small planes don’t have. Earlier this month, Felts Field made a list of places where the Federal Aviation Administration plans to close control towers like this one, ending that type of assistance for pilots. The FAA operates the towers on contracts and announced it will close 149 of them to save money in the wake of federal budget cuts known as sequestration. Since the announcement, officials at Felts have been fighting back, equating the control tower to “a pair of glasses” for pilots and asking the FAA to reconsider. When that failed and the FAA gave Felts a May 5 tower closure date, Spokane Airports filed a petition for review with a U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. Since then, four other airports have filed similar cases, asking courts to review the FAA’s decision to close the fields. If they’re successful, the closures could be put on hold. The tower closure is just that — it won’t shut down the whole field — but officials worry it will compromise safety. While commercial air-

lines have radar technology to detect where other planes are, most small aircraft like those that use Felts Field don’t. So without control towers, pilots are left to determine through communication with other planes where it’s safe to fly. It’s possible, but not ideal. Spokane is a complex airspace, officials say, where flights in and out of Felts, Coeur d’Alene’s Pappy Boyington Field, Spokane International and Fairchild Air Force Base all crisscross. Felts alone is home to about 52,000 takeoffs and landings each year.

A

t Spokane International Airport, commercial flights run on time because smaller aircraft are operating at Felts instead of in the midst of bigger planes, says Spokane Airports CEO Larry Krauter. He’s a cautious, gray-haired man who repeatedly emphasizes how out of character the decision is for the usually thoughtful FAA, and wonders if the national speculation is true — that these cuts are one of the Obama administration’s ways of stirring up anger over the sequester. Krauter likens the cuts to removing street lights at intersections to save money and being surprised when accidents happen. “It is a system, and I think that’s what people need to remember,” he says. “There is an interrelatedness of decisions. If you make a change somewhere, there’s an impact on the system. I can tell you the FAA is, as of this day, unaware or completely uncertain as to what that impact might look like.” Felts, then known as the Parkwater airstrip, opened to air traffic 100 years ago, and operations there first picked up with the arrival of the National Guard and airmail in the 1920s. In 1929, a pair of pilots set ...continued on next page

Felts Field opened to air traffic 100 years ago. Young Kwak photo

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 13

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“FIGHTING FOR FELTS,” CONTINUED... records when they stayed in the air for 120 hours we think enriches the opportunity to really do in their “Spokane Sun-God” on a flight from well here,” Krauter says. “[Felts’] history is its Felts Field to New York and back, refueling 8,000 future.” feet in the air. Felts remained Spokane’s primary ddison Pemberton, a commercial airport until traffic picked up so much in the pilot, has been flying out of Felts years leading up to World War II that Spokane since the mid-1990s and owns an International was built. aerospace instrument company in Liberty “This is where aviation was Lake. He is worried about the cuts too. In a born in this area,” Krauter says. Send comments to Today, Felts, which is owned editor@inlander.com. national disaster, Felts could provide crucial support for the National Guard, he says. As by the city and county and operatthe base of Northwest MedStar, it could be ed by the Spokane Airport Board, the starting point of a life-saving mission. An acciremains one of the nation’s oldest airfields still in dent, on the other hand, could ruin its reputation. operation and is at the heart of a plan to revital“If we end up with a horrific accident right ize the neighborhoods around it. Advocates are over Millwood, that could compromise public fundraising for a 23,000-square-foot military and opinion of the airport, which would be a travaerospace museum they hope will attract tourists esty,” Pemberton says. and new businesses. Krauter is careful to say he and others aren’t “Certainly we can do those things with or “fearmongering.” They have a “respectful dread” without a tower, but having a tower is something

LETTERS

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Register online at BT5K.org 14 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

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• First century ride of the season • 15, 25, 50, 66, 100 miles • All levels of riders are welcome • Course is monitored • Rest stops along the course • End of ride baked potato feed with all the fixin’s for all riders to enjoy

There is also a tri-athlete secured bike corral for those who want to do a 5K run after the 100-mile ride.

Proceeds support Local and International Rotary Projects. Google Lilac Century Ride for more information.

Felts Field CEO Larry Krauter, left, speaks about the sequester as Spokane Turbine Center CEO Dennis Elrod looks on. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO of the tower closure contributing to accidents or economic decline, he says, but the concern is measured. Dennis Elrod, CEO of Spokane Turbine Center, which works with groups like the Moody Bible Institute to train missionaries to fly, says he worries the closure of the tower could contribute to accidents or a pilot shortage. But it won’t end Felts. “Those who are current pilots are resilient,” Elrod says. “They’re going to fly. They’re going to figure out a way.” Even Northwest MedStar isn’t panicked. The air ambulance service averages 1,200 takeoffs and landings at Felts each year and frequently has been cited as one of the biggest losers if the tower closes. But many of the airfields their pilots use in remote locations in Idaho, Washington and Oregon don’t have control towers. “More don’t than do,” says director Eveline Bisson. Even at Felts, the tower is closed overnight, when emergencies often happen. Bisson says she’s talked with the company’s pilots, and they don’t expect major changes. “We always would prefer to have the tower,” she says, but “for us it’s normal business [to not have access to a control tower]. We’re prepared.” 

STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMUNITY MEETINGS Spokane County Fire District 8 needs your help. We are in the process of updating our “Strategic Plan” to help guide our efforts to meet the needs and expectation of our community. As part of this process, we will be holding several community meetings to solicit input from residents, community and strategic partners throughout our response area. The Fire District serves portions of Spokane’s Upper South Hill and the communities of Moran Prairie, Hangman Hills, Valleyford, Mica, Freeman, Ponderosa, Painted Hills, Bella Vista and Saltese.

The meeting times and locations are as follows:

1. Wed, April 10th, 2013 • Fire Station 81 • 6117 S. Palouse Highway • 1:00pm or 7:00pm 2. Thurs, April 11th, 2013 • Fire Station 85, 3324 Linke Rd • 1:00pm or 7:00pm

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 15

news | digest

need to know

The Big News of the Past Week

TAXES THE COST OF A COOKIE S

elling cookies is supposed to teach Girl Scouts valuable skills of goalsetting, customer service and money management. This year, Girl Scouts in Idaho also got a lesson about the politics of tax legislation. Idaho is one of just two states that charge sales tax when you stock up on Thin Mints, Samoas and Tagalongs. (The other is Hawaii, where each box costs a national high of $5.) The regional Girl Scout council based in Boise lobbied for a tax exemption this year, and Girl Scouts and their troop leaders watched from the gallery as the Idaho House of Representatives passed the bill on March 19. But the state Senate was less supportive, and the bill failed to get out of committee before the regular legislative session concluded at the end of

March. Each of the country’s 112 councils sets its own price for a box of cookies — $4 is typical this year, though a box still goes for as little as $3.50 in some places. The Idaho tax means Girl Scouts in the Boise area get much less from each $3.75 box they sell. In North Idaho, which is covered by the same council as Eastern Washington, it means the price with tax — a total of $4.25 — is the highest in the continental U.S. The money not going to taxes goes toward programs like summer camps, leadership conferences, scholarships and, yes, the merit badges. Cookie sales continue in this area through April 14, and you can find a nearby booth at cookielocator. littlebrownie.com. — LISA WAANANEN

Money goes to ... Eastern Washington

$4.00

North Idaho

$4.25

South Idaho

$3.75

... cookies and program costs

... regional Girl Scouts council

... girl and her troop ... tax

1.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee released his first state budget proposal last week, outlining new funding for education and extending several taxes previously set to expire.

2.

Washington State University instructor David Warner, 41, was hospitalized over the weekend after being found beaten in a parking lot near the Pullman campus. Investigators were seeking several college-age suspects in the case.

3.

State lawmakers have split over a bill requiring medical insurance to cover abortions. Despite support from Gov. Jay Inslee and passage in the House, the bill remains stuck in the Senate’s Health Care Committee.

4.

Authorities in Cheney continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding an apparent murder-suicide Saturday. Officials say a 46-year-old woman was killed and a 66-year-old man committed suicide.

5.

North Idaho school officials have offered an $11,000 reward to determine who is making repeated bomb threats. The Boundary County School District has reportedly had nine threats since October.

On inlander.com What’s Creating Buzz

digits

10,000

$

Estimated amount Idaho lawmakers cost taxpayers each extra day they hold session in Boise.

683

Estimated wolf population of Idaho. A new wildlife report shows the state’s total wolf population decreased by 11 percent in 2012.

POT: The state’s new pot consultant has his doubts about plans for the coming recreational marijuana market. For one, he doesn’t think it’ll be as profitable as we’ve been told. Details on the blog. JOKES: We rounded up some of the Internet’s best April Fools’ pranks, including one of our own from 1998 that we’re still hearing about.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Smoking Police? Spokane City Council may empower police to crack down on smokers; plus, Cathy McMorris Rodgers makes news in India Cigarette Cops

In the more than seven years since the state-wide BAN ON SMOKING inside or within 25 feet of public places took effect, no one has been able to enforce a huge chunk of the law in Spokane. The initiative tasked local health departments with enforcing the ban on businesses, but left ticketing individuals up to local law enforcement. Without a city ordinance giving them the right to enforce it, though, cops’ hands have been tied, city officials say. In the coming weeks, the Spokane City Council will hear an ordinance giving Spokane police authority to cite people smoking too close to public places. “I don’t think anybody knew” about the gap in enforcement, Council President Ben Stuckart says. The issue came to light after the Spokane Regional Health District and the Downtown Spokane Partnership brought it to the city’s attention. The Health District employs one person to educate and cite businesses under the ban, but she hasn’t been able to write tickets to smokers standing too close to bars, apartment buildings or other public spaces. “It’s not a desire to have every officer be tobacco enforcement agents,” says Downtown Spokane Partnership

President Mark Richard. “But when people congregate, they begin to block sidewalks and maybe intimidate people trying to pass,” he says. “This provides officers with one more tool be able to discourage that behavior.” — HEIDI GROOVER

Mann Meeting

Back in 2010, the future of the vacant JOE MANN ARMY RESERVE CENTER in Hillyard seemed clear. The school district planned to take it over and use it as office space — maybe eventually as an alternative high school. But over last fall and winter, vandals destroyed most of the building’s interior, and the district backed out of the deal, worried that renovations would be too expensive. That left the building and $1 million worth of damages in the lap of the Spokane City Council. This Thursday, the council will hold a public meeting looking for suggestions on the best use of the building. The meeting is Thursday, April 4, at the Northeast Community Center from 6-8 pm. — HEIDI GROOVER

Visa Trouble

It’s tricky enough for politicians like Rep. CATHY McMORRIS RODGERS to navigate American politics — but now she’s under fire from politicians in India. According to the Indian Express, McMorris Rodgers was part of a group who met with Narendra Modi, the chief minister of a state in western India. Modi is a controversial figure in the country, in part because critics say he didn’t do enough in 2002 when Send story ideas to Hindu riots killed 1,000 Mustips@inlander.com or lims. Modi’s previously been call the tip line at denied a U.S. visa, but the group (509) 325-0634 ext. 264 that included McMorris Rodgers told him they’d help him get a visa to America. A State Department spokesman has responded, in a Reuters article, saying that “an invitation from a U.S. lawmaker has no bearing on any decision regarding potential visas.” McMorris Rodgers’ press office could not be reached by press time, but Rep. Aaron Schock, who traveled with her, has denied any impropriety. — DANIEL WALTERS

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A Gonzaga University 125th Anniversary Event “Father Peter De Smet or Father Joseph Cataldo: Who is the Founder of Jesuit Education in the Pacific Northwest?” An Illustrated Lecture by Dr. Robert Carriker Dr. Carriker is the author of Father Peter John De Smet: Jesuit in the West (University of Oklahoma Press) and “Joseph M. Cataldo, S.J.: Courier of Catholicism” in Churchmen and the Western Indians (University of Oklahoma Press). He is the Alphonse and Geraldine Arnold Distinguished Professor of the College of Arts and Sciences at Gonzaga University.

Wednesday, April 10 7 p.m. Wolff Auditorium in the Jepson School of Business

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This presentation is free and open to the public

18 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

Brendon Kaluza-Graham, 25, was killed in northeast Spokane while allegedly stealing an SUV parked in a driveway.

A Time to Kill

KXLY PHOTO

Two fatal Spokane shootings reveal the fuzziness of self-defense law BY JACOB JONES

F

ew people oppose the right to self-preservation. Even the Florida attorney representing the family of slain Trayvon Martin in the nation’s most controversial self-defense case acknowledges an individual’s legal right to protect him or herself. Through legislative sessions and court rulings, each state has developed its own standards — sometimes complex and contradictory — to define the fuzzy line between self-defense and murder. Legal justifications hang on “castle” doctrines, duty-to-retreat rules and “Stand Your Ground” laws. Civil rights lawyer Benjamin Crump, the lead attorney in the Martin case, says self-defense laws have long protected residents inside their homes or under other dire circumstances. But he fears the spread of more permissive laws may promote vigilantism or increased street violence. “You have laws that encourage people to take the law into their own hands,” he says. “We don’t want it to be like the wild, wild West.” Two recent fatal shootings in Spokane illustrate the high stakes and ethical nuances of Washington’s self-defense law. Cases may hinge on which side of a doorjamb someone was standing on, a shadow through tinted glass or a frantic split-second decision. Marty Hayes, president of the Washingtonbased Armed Citizens’ Legal Defense Network, argues the state’s self-defense standards have become increasingly vague in recent years, as policies have been pieced together from case law and statutory codes. “We no longer have a clear-cut self-defense law,” he says. “Everything is as clear as mud right now.”

W

ashington state law says a person may commit justifiable homicide in self-defense when that person fears “a design on the part of the person slain to commit a felony or to do some great personal injury to the

slayer or [another person].” The state Supreme Court has held that a person must believe there is an “imminent danger” of injury or death before using deadly force. State law also allows someone to use deadly force to protect his or herself within their home, a legal defense commonly known as the Castle Doctrine. Washington does not have a specific “castle” law, but it does have very similar language extending the right to protect one’s self and others in a residence. In recent years, much of the national debate on self-defense law has centered around so-called “Stand Your Ground” laws that allow a person to hold fast when attacked in public and fight back instead of fleeing. Supporters argue the law protects law-abiding citizens from becoming victims. Opponents say the law promotes half-cocked street justice. The debate exploded last year with the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. In that case, neighborhood watch captain George Zimmerman pursued and confronted Martin while the unarmed teen was walking home. A struggle ensued, and Zimmerman fatally shot Martin. Zimmerman has argued he fired in selfdefense, claiming his right to protect himself on a public street. Prosecutors initially declined to pursue any charges on the basis of the Stand Your Ground law, drawing public outcry over Zimmerman’s actions and the response from law enforcement. (He was later changed with second-degree murder and is awaiting trial.) While Washington does not have an explicit Stand Your Ground law on the books, the state Supreme Court has repeatedly upheld similar wording in case law, emphasizing a person can stand and fight. “The law is well settled that there is no duty to retreat when a person is assaulted in a place where he or she has a right to be,” the court states in a 2003 opinion.

The national Association of Prosecuting Attorneys lists at least 37 states that have Stand Your Ground-type rules extending selfdefense justifications to circumstances outside of the home. The list includes both Washington and Idaho.

I

n the past month, two fatal shootings have renewed local concerns over a citizen’s right to use deadly force in self-defense. Both highlight distinctions in state law. On March 6, 28-year-old Marshall Balduff was shot and killed in north Spokane while allegedly trying to force his way into a home with a knife. Investigators say witnesses reported Balduff had made several threats and repeatedly ignored the homeowner’s orders to leave. Homeowner George Wallace, 44, fired one shot at close range, killing Balduff after he had climbed through a dog door into the home. In another shooting, on March 25, Brendon Kaluza-Graham, 25, was killed in northeast Spokane while allegedly stealing an SUV parked in a driveway. Investigators say the vehicle owner, 56-yearold Gail Gerlach, saw the vehicle pulling away and followed it on foot. He then drew a handgun and fired one shot through the tinted back window, striking Kaluza-Graham in the back of the head. Detectives say Gerlach reported seeing Kaluza-Graham turn and raise his arm with what appeared to be a gun. Kaluza-Graham, who has a significant criminal record, had shaved keys and tools on him, but no weapon was found. While dramatic, the first shooting has received less public criticism because it involved an armed attacker within a home. The second shooting, however, has ignited considerable public scrutiny as community members have questioned Gerlach’s decision to pursue the fleeing vehicle and his ability to see whether Kaluza-Graham had any weapon. While Crump emphasizes Kaluza-Graham was wrong to steal the vehicle, the attorney says the shooting reflects an unsettling trend of citizens taking extreme measures to protect property instead of calling police. “People are not trained … to take law enforcement-type actions with dire consequences,” he says, later adding, “Certainly when a vehicle is going away from you, it’s hard to argue you were in fear of deadly force.” Hayes, a former police officer, argues Gerlach had every right to pursue the departing vehicle. He says a property owner can yell or try to detain a thief. They can also follow in order to get a better look at the driver to provide a description to police. “He’s got a right to attempt to stop this person from stealing his car,” Hayes says. Once Gerlach has followed the vehicle, Hayes says, if he believes he sees the fleeing man pull a gun, he should then be allowed to defend himself. The Spokane Police Department reports that both cases remain open. Detectives will forward their reports to the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office for consideration of any potential charges. No arrests have been made in either case.

M

any Spokane residents have cheered the actions of the shooters as necessary steps to defend their lives and livelihoods. Online comments and self-defense websites have widely praised the shootings, feeding off a perception of increased crime and low confidence in law enforcement. Stand Your Ground-type laws also continue to receive strong public support. When a Washington lawmaker tried to introduce a bill earlier this year to include a “duty to retreat” in self-defense law, she was overcome with angry phone calls and a few threats. She quickly withdrew the bill. Hayes argues the state needs strong self-defense laws to protect citizens who protect themselves. The biggest flaw, he says, is the inconsistency between some statutory laws and court decisions. He says the state should work to clarify its standards to ensure the system is applied fairly. Crump, on the other hand, says that when people take the law into their own hands, they often dole out capital punishment for insignificant crimes. He says the Stand Your Ground attitude undermines the justice system and feeds into public fear. “Unless we do something about [this trend],” he says, “you’re going to see a lot more deaths.” 

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24 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

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Test drive the robot that’s redefining surgery at Deaconess Hospital and see what all the excitement is about. Come out to this free, fun, family-friendly event to try your hand at operating our remarkable surgical robot. Join us to see its precision firsthand, meet the skilled surgeons and find out more about minimally invasive da Vinci® Robotic-Assisted Surgery. It’s now being used for many procedures at Deaconess Hospital. And it may mean less pain and scarring, a shorter recovery time, and fewer complications when compared to traditional surgery.* Find out more at DeaconessSpokane.com/Robotics.

Test Drive our Robot Friday, April 19 • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Deaconess Health & Education Center 910 W. 5th Ave. *Typical results depend on many factors. Consult your physician about the benefits and risks of da VInci Robotic-Assisted Surgery for your condition.

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“HOTEL SPOKANE” ARTIST RECEPTION Reception for the collaborative exhibition between local artists and writers hosted by Get Lit! and the Spokane Arts Comission. April 5 from 5-8 pm. Free. Chase Gallery at City Hall, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (625-6050) “HOTEL SPOKANE” AUTHOR READING Authors participating in the collaborative art/writing exhibition will present. April 9 at 6 pm. Free. City Hall, City Council Chambers, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (625-6050) ODE Special performance of the play written by EWU professor Jonathan Johnson, based on the romance between English poet John Keats and Fanny Brawne. April 9 at 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Theatre, Cheney Campus (359-2459) YOUTH POETRY SLAM Local youth (ages 5-12) are invited to memorize and present an original poem (in teams or individually) in front of a panel of judges. April 10 at 5:30 pm, registration at 5 pm. Canned food donations requested as entry fee. Kress Gallery, River Park Square, Third Floor, 808 W. Main Ave. (359-7473) TEEN POETRY SLAM Local youth (ages 16-18) are invited to memorize and present original poems (in teams or individually) in front of a panel of judges. April 10 at 6:30 pm, registration at 6 pm. Canned food donations requested as entry fee.

Kress Gallery, River Park Square, Third Floor, 808 W. Main Ave. (359-7473) CHRIS MCDOUGALL The journalist and author of the bestselling “Born to Run” will host a four-mile Bloomsday training run. April 10 at 6 pm. Participants should meet at the Spokane Community College Track, 1810 N. Greene St. Free and open to all levels of runners. A reading with the author will follow at 7:30 pm. Spokane Community College Lair, 1810 N. Greene St. MIDDLE SCHOOL POETRY SLAM Local youth (ages 13-15) are invited to memorize and present original poems (in teams or individually) in front of a panel of judges. April 11 at 5 pm, registration at 4:30 pm. Canned food donations requested as entry fee. Kress Gallery, River Park Square, Third Floor, 808 W. Main Ave. (359-7473) COLLEGE POETRY SLAM Local collegeage students (any age) are invited to memorize and present original poems (in teams or individually) in front of a panel of judges. April 11 at 6 pm, registration at 5:30 pm. Canned food donations requested as entry fee. Kress Gallery, River Park Square, Third Floor, 808 W. Main Ave. (359-7473) KIM BARNES & JONATHAN EVISON Both authors will read from and talk about their latest work. April 11 at 7 pm. $15 (free to students). Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. ticketswest.com

JOHN MARZLUFF “Gifts of the Crow” presentation by the UW wildlife science professor on the relationships between birds and humans. April 11 at 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. (443-5669) PIE AND WHISKEY READING At the event hosted by Sam Ligon (fiction writer) and Kate Lebo (poet and pie baker) 12 festival authors will read poetry, short fiction and flash fiction. April 11 at 9 pm. Ages 21+. Free, donations accepted. Woman’s Club, 1428 W. Ninth Ave. (359-6977) “BEDTIME STORIES” PANEL Conversation and readings with authors Kim Barnes, Shann Ray, Nance Van Winckel and Jim Lynch. April 12 at 9:30 am. Free and open to the public. SCC Hagan Foundation Center for the Humanties, 1810 N. Greene St. “A POET’S EYE” PANEL Poets Robert Wrigley, Maya Jewell Zeller and Gerard Beirne will share their writing process and how they develop their point of view. April 12 at 9:30 am. Spokane Falls Community College, Bldg. 24, Room 110, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. “BRINGING LIGHT TO THE DARK SIDE” PANEL Workshop on creating complex characters in fiction with authors Sharma Shields, Shawn Vestal and Jaimy Gordon. April 12 at 9:30 am. Free and open to the public. EWU, Hargreaves Hall, second floor reading room, Cheney Campus.

“YOUR TRUTH, MY TRUTH, THEIR TRUTH” PANEL Workshop on modern memoir writing with authors Joe Wilkins and Anna Vodicka. April 12 at noon. Free and open to the public. North Idaho College, Molstead Library, Todd Lecture Hall, Coeur d’Alene. JOYCE CAROL OATES The celebrated author will read from and talk about her writing career. April 12 at 7 pm. $15 (free to students). Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. ticketswest.com POETRY SALON The after-hours poetry salon is an informal discussion with six poets about the art and craft. April 12 at 9 pm. Free and open to the public. Rocket Bakery, 1325 W. First Ave. WRITING WORKSHOP “The Art of Revision” workshop with Anna Vodicka. April 13 from 9:30-11:30 am. $20/students with valid ID; $30/public. Pre-registration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (3596447) WRITING WORKSHOP “A Workshop on Process” on the poetry writing with Maxine Scates. April 13 from 9:30-11:30 am. $20/students with valid ID; $30/ public. Pre-registration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447) WRITING WORKSHOP “Creating Evocative Prose” workshop with Joe Wilkins. April 13 from 9:30-11:30 am. $20/stu-

dents with valid ID; $30/public. Preregistration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447) WRITING WORKSHOP “The Voice is a Muscle” workshop on voice in fiction and nonfiction writing with Lidia Yuknavitch. April 13 from 9:30-11:30 am. $20/students with valid ID; $30/public. Preregistration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447) KIDS WRITING WORKSHOP Interactive workshop on sparking conversation and writing. April 13 from 10:30-11:30 am. Free, no registration required. Bring paper and pens. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. PATRICIA MCCORMICK & EMILY DANFORTH The young adult literature authors will read, sign copies of their books and answer questions from the audience. April 13 at 11:30 am. Free. Downtown Spokane library, 906 W. Main Ave. (444-5300) “THE LONG AND SHORT OF STORYTELLING” PANEL Fiction writers Jim Lynch, Sherril Jaffe and Bruce Holbert will share how they create characters and more in their work. April 13 from noon-1:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel, Finch Room, 303 W. North River Dr.

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“EDITING: TAKING THE NEXT STEP” PANEL Learn techniques on editing work to prepare it for publishing with David Shields, Cecelia Hagen and Glenn Stout. April 13 from noon-1:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Corbin Room, 303 W. North River Dr. “PHILOSOPHY & POP CULTURE” PANEL Faculty members of EWU’s philosophy program will share insights on the deep questions of life and how they’re expressed in popular culture. April 13 from noon-1:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Comstock Room, 303 W. North River Dr. THE READING PUBLIC Local writers showcase and open mic segment. April 13 at 12:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Audubon/Manito Room, 303 W. North River Dr. “NEW VOICES IN YOUNG ADULT WRITING” PANEL Panel discussion on young adult writing with Emily Danforth, Michael Harmon and Glenn Stout. April 13 from 1:45-3 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Corbin Room, 303 W. North River Dr. “THE POETRY OF OBSESSION” PANEL Poets Major Jackson, Stephanie Lenox and Maxine Scates share how poetry can be the perfect conduit to express an obsession. April 13 from 1:45-3 pm. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Finch Room, 303 W. North River Dr. JIM LYNCH & JOE WILKINS The two authors will read from their work. April 13 at 2 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Audubon/ Manito Room, 303 W. North River Dr.

LIDIA YUKNAVITCH The author will read from and discuss her work. April 13 at 3 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Audubon/ Manito Room, 303 W. North River Dr. WRITING WORKSHOP “World Building” workshop on creating a setting for characters to thrive with members of the Inland Empire Chapter of Romance Writers of America. April 13 from 3:305:30 pm. $20/students with valid ID; $30/public. Pre-registration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447) WRITING WORKSHOP “Passion of Place” workshop on writing poetry about landscapes and scenes with Carolyne Wright. April 13 from 3:30-5:30 pm. $20/students with valid ID; $30/ public. Pre-registration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447) WRITING WORKSHOP Literary collage technique workshop with David Shields. April 13 from 3:30-5:30 pm. $20/students with valid ID; $30/public. Pre-registration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447) WRITING WORKSHOP Graphic novel workshop with Sean Agriss. April 13 from 3:30-5:30 pm. Ages 17+. $20/ students with valid ID; $30/public. Preregistration recommended. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447) TEEN POETRY SLAM WORKSHOP Learn more about a poetry slam and the history of spoken word poetry with members of Spokane Poetry Slam. April 13 from 3:30-5:30 pm. Free. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. (359-6447)

SHERRIL JAFFE & SHARMA SHIELDS The two writers will read from and discuss their work. April 13 at 4 pm. Free and open to the public. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, Audubon/Manito Room, 303 W. North River Dr. JESS WALTER & SHAWN VESTAL The two Spokane-based writers will read from and discuss their latest work. April 13 at 5 pm. Free and open to the public; $5 suggested donation. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. MAJOR JACKSON & ROBERT WRIGLEY The two acclaimed poets will read from and discuss their latest work. April 13 at 7 pm. $15 (free to students). Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. LOST HORSE PRESS READING The nonprofit press is celebrating its 15th anniversary with an event featuring live music and readings from Lost Horse’s writers and poets. April 14 at 2 pm. Free and open to the public. Davenport Hotel, Peacock Room, 10 S. Post St. REGIONAL MFA READING Grad students from the U of Idaho, U. of Montana and EWU will share their work in various genre and styles. April 14 from 2-4 pm. Free and open to the public. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. REBECCA STEAD The childrens literature author will read from and discuss her latest work. April 14 at 11:30 am. Free to ages 18 and under, and those with a valid student ID. $15/adults. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. INLAND NORTHWEST FACULTY READING Creative writing faculty from area colleges and universities will read from their new works of poetry, fiction and nonfiction. April 14 from 4:30-6:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. 

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34 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

visual arts

Thrown into the Ring What happens when writers and artists who don’t know each other work together? By Leah Sottile

I

t’s less than a week from the opening of a brand-new show at Spokane City Hall’s Chase Gallery, and Karen Mobley admits she doesn’t know what all of the art will look like. She’s seen some pieces. She’s seen sketches of others. But for a few of the pieces in the upcoming “Hotel Spokane” show, all she has are abstract descriptions of the art. She reads one description aloud: “‘... a blend of poetry about intimate human relationship and abstract art in an installation,’” she pauses and smiles, looking up from the paper she’s reading from. “What the f--- does that mean?!” And she starts

laughing hysterically. But Mobley, executive director of the Spokane Arts fund and the show’s organizer, admits that this show — an exhibition that pairs up unlikely artistic bedfellows just to see what happens — isn’t about the final product. “I think this was more about the project than it was about the outcome,” she says. “Sometimes people find this as sort of weird — but I kind of think that a lot of times our job isn’t necessarily to know what the finished project is, but to set up situations where people have a chance to be generative.” In this show, the second of its type that she has organized in conjunction with Eastern Washington University’s Get Lit! Festival, Mobley paired up local visual artists with local writers to collaborate on one piece. There were no directions. No rules. Just an understanding that they would collaborate. “Over the last few years, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about, ‘Well, how do you get people talking to each other? How do you get people working together?’” Mobley says. The teams were initially paired eight months ago, and after brainstorming sessions, all came together with ...continued on next page

Exhibits at “Hotel Spokane” range from Kurt Olson and Nicole Wallace’s tent (top left) to the garage painting (below, middle) that resulted from the combined efforts of Nance Van Winckel and Larry Elingson. Young Kwak photos

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 35

EMMA’S REVOLUTION & SOCIAL CONCERT (FOLKJUSTICE)

CULTURE | VISUAL ART

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Artists Bridget Freeman Wamsley (top), Eva Silverstone (bottom left) and Bradd Skubinna install the pieces they created with help from local writers for the “Hotel Spokane.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

“THROWN INTO THE RING” CONTINUED... Mobley to discuss their directions. might have used in the shower this morning. Mobley says that, sort of miraculously, each Poems collide with mirrors. Words and team seemed to be dealing with similar themes: photographs wallpaper the walls inside a small redemption, safety, solace, reconciliation. Tohouse. There are illustrations and fabric sculpgether, they decided the show’s title tures. should reflect that. They called their “I’d say the art is going to be really idea “Hotel Spokane.” It’s not a real cool,” Mobley says, “But the sociological Send comments to place, but a creative manifestation of editor@inlander.com. experiment of this is a huge part of the the artists’ ideas. An imaginary place fun part of it.”  of refuge. leahs@inlander.com “It’s more than ‘here’s this place and it’s a hotel and it has a front desk, and it has little “Hotel Spokane: Hope in the Midst of Derooms,’” Mobley says. spair” • On display through July 1 • Opening Hotel Spokane, to collaborators Kurt Olson reception: Fri, April 5, from 5-8 pm • Chase and Nicole Wallace, appears as a tent structure Gallery • Inside Spokane City Hall, 808 W. — a nod to the tent city that cropped up along Spokane Falls Blvd. • Hours: Mon, from 8 Riverside Avenue in the mid-2000s. am-9 pm; Tue-Fri, from 8 am-5 pm • Hotel To writer Sharma Shields and artist Bridget Spokane reading: Tue, April 9, at 6 pm • Freeman Wamsley, Hotel Spokane is a story of Spokane City Council Chambers, 808 W. three women who are represented in the exhibit Spokane Falls Blvd. • Free • outreach.ewu.edu/ as three “handmade shampoos” — just like you getlit

LETTERS

36 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER TREASURE ISLAND 901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638

World Relief Spokane Presents

Those are real swords!

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hristopher Wooley loves pirates. He loves them so much that he got a pirate girl tattooed on his forearm. And that was before he learned that he’d be directing the Spokane Civic Theatre’s staging of Treasure Island. “I got that tattoo about six months before I found out I was going to be directing, but now I gave her a Treasure Island map,” says Wooley. Perhaps that made Wooley, just 27, a perfect candidate to take the helm of the Civic’s production of Ken Ludwig’s adaptation of the classic Robert Louis Stevenson novel. The play, which opens on Friday, April 5, features a cast of just 16 to man the performance’s many parts with some actors playing as many as five different roles. Wooley has worked as the Civic’s sound engineer for the past three years and made his directorial debut with last year’s Catfish Moon on the Civic’s Studio Theater stage. Along with the help of set designer David Baker,

JENNIFER DEBARROS PHOTO

Wooley presents a high-action version of Treasure Island replete with a multi-level, rotating set that plays host to sword fighting, gunplay, a mechanical parrot and a Long John Silver with a convincing peg leg. “I don’t think a set like this has been done in Spokane,” says Wooley. Much of the cast has spent the weeks building up to opening night honing their stage combat skills with the help of Bryan Durbin, who made sure the play’s action lived up to what we’ve come to expect out of Treasure Island. “And yes, we are using real swords on stage,” assures Wooley. — MIKE BOOKEY

Beatles Tribute Band | April 5, 2013 | 6:30pm

A Bicycling Movie | April 6, 2013 | 7:00pm | $5

MAD MEN

Treasure Island • April 5-21: Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm • $18-$24 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard St. • spokanecivictheatre.com

For Your Consideration

Special 2 hour Season 6 Premiere. A Fundraiser for the Spokane Preservation Advocates.

April 7th | 8pm

BY LEAH SOTTILE

A FUNDRAISER FOR THE SELWAY-BITTERROOT FRANK CHURCH FOUNDATION

$14 - GENERAL ADMISSION | $12 - STUDENTS ALBUM | Kinda like with Jason Bateman or Neil Diamond, if something has the name Mike Patton associated with it, you can count me in. Of all of the Faith No More frontman’s projects, Tomahawk (with Helmet’s John Stanier, the Jesus Lizard’s Duane Denison and Mr. Bungle’s Trevor Dunn) and is consistently my favorite — and the band’s newest album ODDFELLOWS does not disappoint. Like always, the band delivers fast, quick rock jabs, like the song I can’t stop playing on repeat, “Stone Letter.”

BOOK | The beginning part of the title might sound like a college textbook, but it’s the rest of it that matters. Unlike your textbooks, in WORKS CITED: AN ALPHABETICAL ODYSSEY OF MAYHEM AND MISBEHAVIOR, University of Idaho creative writing professor Brandon Schrand had us hooked within 50 words. In that space, he’s already talking about getting handcuffed alongside his friends in the Arizona desert with weed in their pockets. It’s a great first glimpse at a memoir that pairs classic literature with the missteps and mayhem of Schrand’s own life.

TV | I’ve had this argument a couple of times now, and I’ll say it again: I think Nick Kroll’s fantastic KROLL SHOW on Comedy Central is funnier than Chappelle’s Show — and I don’t toss that statement around lightly. But if bizarro sketch comedy is your thing, then I proclaim Kroll your man. In the course of one episode, the comedian might be a Long Island hustler who loves his mom, a ditzy blonde party planner/PR consultant, a guy who loves his ponytail and the world’s most successful pet plastic surgeon. I know it sounds weird. It’s supposed to be.

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APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 37

FIND ART and more this Friday, Venues open 5 - 8 pm unless otherwise noted.

WE ARE PINKING FIRST FRIDAY!

In support of the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure happening Downtown, April 21st, First Friday is turning PINK! Please show your support and be part of a large moving art piece by wearing PINK.

Various venues are offering specials (venues are marked with the Komen ribbon).

ADAMS STREET AREA BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE. Barrister Winery presents “Land & Skyscapes” by Spokane Artist, Valerie Lindberg. Artists’ reception at 5:00pm with Beacon Hill’s Bistro Buffet from 6-8pm. “Lonesome” Lyle Morse plays acoustic blues from 6:30-10pm.

KOLVA SULLIVAN GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST., SUITE A Featuring new works by Spokane artists Garric Simonsen & Jamin Kuhn. Artwork ranges from Kuhn’s hyper-realistic drawings of everyday object and camera kicking video projection, to Simonsen’s mix of printmaking, painting and drawing practices on wood panel. Enter a drawing to win rare original signed serigraphs by Oscar the Grouch. For more details go to DowntownSpokane.net

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery features the functional and sculptural work of Chris Kelsey and Mark Moore.

DAVENPORT HOTEL AND STEAM PLANT AREA* BABY BAR

827 W. 1ST AVE (behind Neato Burrito) Join us at the Baby Bar. Titled show: “Future Racist//White America//Teen Pregnancy// Pornography” by artist Patrick Everman.

THE DAVENPORT HOTEL/PEACOCK LOUNGE

10 S. POST ST. Renowned New York artist, Doug Safranek has offered four of his works to be reproduced for the first time as a fundraiser for the Camp Reed Legacy Endowment. Music by 6 Foot Swing, Jazz & great appetizers & drinks in our Peacock Lounge.

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

707 W. MAIN ST. (Crescent Court Skywalk Level) Featuring member, Sean Ravencraft for the month of April. Exhibit titled: “Inside, Outside, Inside....Animals All”. Sean creates full fur animal costumes and heads. Refreshments and music 5-8:30pm.

BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE

108 N. POST ST. Acoustics by Eric Neuhausser Happy Hour 4-6. Half off all Eats menu 5-8, and Spokane’s BEST Martinis. $1 off all PINK Cosmopolitians Martinis!

BOZZI COLLECTION GALLERY

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

211 N WALL ST. Featuring artist Jeffrey Loyd. Jeffrey’s newest works combine linear design & playful use of vivid color. Music by classical guitarist Carlton Oakes.

HOTEL RUBY & SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

BENNETT BLOCK, MAIN & HOWARD (2nd Floor skywalk level) The Brickwall Gallery will be featuring a group of local photographers who gather monthly under the ruberic of “The Photogs”. Music by The Blue Ribbon Tea Company. For a list of the participating photographers go to DowntownSpokane.net. 10% off if you’re wearing PINK.

906 W. 2 AVE. (across from the Steam Plant) Featuring artist Christina Deubel. Music by Brad Keeler Trio from 7-9pm. Artist Reception. ND

901 W. FIRST AVE. Come in & join us at the Sapphire Lounge. Get an amazing, handcrafted cocktail, fresh squeezed juices & delicious flat breads. Relax & be surrounded by glass art & great music.

STEAM PLANT

159 S. LINCOLN ST. We are featuring multiple artists from the cooperative Avenue West Gallery. Variety of mediums. “PINK” drink & food specials. Plus, sample Steam Plant’s handcrafted brews.

DOWNTOWN CORE AREA ARBOR CREST TASTING ROOM

808 W. MAIN AVE. (River Park Square, Third Level) Come and experience Patsy Pinch Designs! She creates functional and whimsical art pieces from locally gathered river rocks.

downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

BRICK WALL GALLERY

CHASE GALLERY

808 W. SPOKANE FALLS BLVD (use Post St. Entrance after 5pm) HOTEL SPOKANE: Hope in the Midst of Despair – Artist-Writer collaborations. In conjunction with 2013 Get Lit Festival!

DODSON’S JEWELERS

516 W. RIVERSIDE AVE. The oil paintings of Vicki Broeckel, Dusty Washington farmer and artist. The rolling

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

farmlands, area creeks, and open sky of the Palouse. Opening Reception/Meet the Artist.

DONZELL ARTIST STUDIO

120 N. WALL ST. Moon Feather Masks, Native American Spiritual Masks: Whispers in leather by artist Gail Mangum. Live music.

DOWNTOWN SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY

906 W. MAIN AVE. We will be featuring the Spokane Falls Community College Photo Arts Club’s juried photographic art exhibition. Includes works from multiple genres.

KRESS GALLERY/RIVER PARK SQUARE

808 W. MAIN AVE. First Night Spokane Rising Stars Featuring Keiko Von Holt & Spokane Sumi -e artists for the 16th annual Sumi-e/shodo (Japanese brush painting/calligraphy) and silk embroidery exhibit “Colorful Black (Notan)”. 3rd Floor Food Court 5:30-7:30pm Musicians Todd Milne and Marcia Dukes are joined with Japanese percussionists from Spokane Taiko and traditional Japanese style vocalist, Johanna Fuggit for a night of extraordinary music.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

120 N. STEVENS ST. (Main & Stevens) Get PINK this First Friday at Nectar. See the amazing craftsmanship of Brett Bloodgood’s Barrel Room Furniture, made from reclaimed wine barrels. Enjoy music from the incomparable Dan Conrad. Anelare Winery will be on hand with new wine and amazing deals. WEAR PINK and get a complimentary wine tasting and PINK cupcake (quantities limited). Open until 10pm. Call to reserve a table 509.869.1572

April 5th! STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N. HOWARD ST. World-renowned fly tier John Newbury will be showing off his skills at Steelhead! His intricately crafted flies are also displayed as captured by local photographer Tony Roslund. Tony’s incredibly lit Macro photography presents the amazing detail of John’s flies.

STUDIO CAPELLI SALON

707 W. MAIN (skywalk level) We are proud to be hosting the works of Manic Moon & More artists: Graphic art and cards by Linda Malcom, Fiber Art-ToWear by Michele Mokrey, Mixed Media by Melinda Melvin, Vintage Collage by Shanda Woodward, Jewelry by Denise Steen and Joan Eaton. Guitar music by Gary Burris. Refreshments and “Pink” theme promotions!

WHITESTONE WINERY

8 N POST ST., SUITE 8 Please join us this for First Friday. We will be “PINKED”. Live music, wine and local art from 6-9pm. We are featuring art by Tom Norton. Light snacks!

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE

402 W. MAIN ST. 3 Minute Mic - Open Mic Poetry 7:00 8:45 (sign up starts at 6:30) Spokane Poetry Slam favorite Chris Cook hosts. This event provides an avenue for performance and page poetry in a place where both truly belong: a bookstore. All Ages

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS 331 W. MAIN ST. Abstract Expressions exhibit: Original abstracts by emerging artists Michelle Delyse Carkeek, Tina Johnson, Laura Kasdmitter, and Deb Harder. Artists reception.

POTTERY PLACE PLUS GALLERY

203 N. WASHINGTON ST. (main floor of Auntie’s) Guest artists for the month of April, Pat Boyd (mixed media) and Cindy Morris (metal/clay jewelry), will be showing their “Inspiration Unleashed”.

SANTÉ RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

404 W. MAIN AVE. Join us for April. We will be featuring artist Rebekah Littlefield. Her work includes dynamic abstract paintings bursting with color and emotion. Live music by guitarist Joe Caruso.

FIRST AVENUE AREA - WEST END* LUXE COFFEE HOUSE

1017 W. 1ST AVE. “Van-Gogh and Merlot”, an inter-active art event. Enjoy a glass of merlot while you paint! Show your support for the Komen Foundation by “PINKING” your painting.

FIRST AVENUE AREA - EAST END CAT’S EYE

1 S. WASHINGTON ST. In support of the Komen Foundation we are “PINKING” Cat’s Eye. Come check us out and be part of the show by wearing pink!

NORTH BANK AREA CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY

621 W. MALLON AVE. (in the Flour Mill) Featuring the amazing leatherwork of artist Annie Libertini. Music by singersongwriter Tommy G. Enjoy samples of cheese, chocolate & gelato with your servings of music & art. 5:30-8pm

HO HO TERIYAKI CHICKEN

621 W. MALLON AVE. (in the Flour Mill) Featuring the beautiful paintings of owner Ho Lan. Also, try our fabulous menu! 4-7pm.

Hiromi Okumura in the Gellhorn Gallery. Hiromi will be performing her exciting and thrilling art works to the sounds of the talented flamenco guitarist, JP Shields, 5-7:30pm.

RED LION HOTEL AT THE PARK

MARKETPLACE WINE BAR

303 W. NORTH RIVER DR. Acoustic R&B music by Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley from 5:30pm to 8pm. Happy Hour food and beverage specials!

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA BARILI CELLARS

608 W. 2ND AVE. Join Barili Cellars on First Friday from 4-9pm and enjoy current wine releases and fun art. We are featuring advertising posters and other work by Hara Allison, Creative Director at Studio H Advertising & Design. 10% OFF your purchase to anyone who wears or brings in a Komen Race shirt.

CUP OF COOL WATER

1106 W. 2ND AVE. Enjoy the talent and wit of Spokane’s local poets: Dick Warwick, Laurie Lamon, Thom Caraway, Danni ‘Darko’ Kiker-Pruett and Lady Mariposa. Delight in some desserts as each poet share’s their unique perspective and style of poetry.

GINA’S DESIGN CENTER

811 W. 2ND AVE. Come enjoy live music, hors d’oeuvres and the paintings of our featured artist Robert Morrison. His Plein Air and studio painting are richly colored and expressively stated. Music by Suhanna Hamilton.

INTERPLAYERS THEATRE

174 S. HOWARD ST. Not only is it the opening night of “Sirens”, a comedy about mid-life love relationships and crises, but we are also featuring visual artist

32 W. 2ND AVE. Please join us for “Make time for Kids” in conjunction with CASA. One of a kind clocks will be displayed through April.

ROBERT KARL CELLARS

115 W. PACIFIC AVE., Historic Warehouse District (aka SODO) Featuring artist Marilyn Meyer. Using pastels and watercolor, Marilyn catches the heart & soul of horses and wildlife. We will release our Rosé of Cabernet Franc, a PINK wine!

2ND SPACE GALLERY

610 W. 2ND AVE. British artist Michelle Romberger will be displaying her multimedia peaceful paintings of rural England and Whales. Music by flautist Karen Stuart. Artist reception.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

319 W. 2ND AVE. “Garden of the Mind”, a mixed media miniature series of paintings by Felisa Carranza will be on exhibit. Fantasy and imagination play large roles in her works on canvas and in sculpture. Artist’s reception.

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT NEW VENUE! ARTIST TOUCH STUDIO WAREHOUSE SHOWROOM

811 E. SPRAGUE AVE. (Across from Clay Connection) Premiering Edward Gilmore’s “Works of Art on Paper” and introducing Susan Burns’ encaustic panels.

CONTINUED NEXT PAGE

* Located in the Davenport District – DavenportDistrict.org

Create the next Blue Moon Seasonal ad! Submit your artwork at participating locations and try our Agave Nectar Ale!

Over 15,000 used, rare Out-Of-Print bOOks in stOck

Classic Literature Contemporary Fiction Science-Fiction • Sport History • Photography • Children’s • Cookbooks 123 s. Wall st. spokane 509.838.0179 monkeyboybooks.com

V I S I T D O W N T O W N S P O K A N E . O R G / F I R S T- F R I D AY F O R A L I S T O F L O C AT I O N S . downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

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culture | boxing

Swinging for Glory Boxing champion Mikaela Mayer to fight alongside hundreds in national tournament UNIVERSITY DISTRICT cont. CLAY CONNECTION

714 E. SPRAGUE AVE. We will be having a Raku firing and pit firing, lots of food and beverages. FREE kids workshop (limited space, be there by 5pm!).

DEAN DAVIS PHOTOGRAPHY

216 W. PACIFIC AVE., SUITE 102 Spokane Falls Community College Graphic Design Club hosts “Society of Illustrators” from New York City.

DESIGN COLLABORATIVE

204 N. DIVISION ST., SUITE E Featuring artist Jamaali Roberts’ titled show: Huebrus Reflexus. These pieces to speak of the good memories and trying times in our lives. This collection of works focuses on vibrant colors and experimental painting techniques while acknowledging visual space.

MAIN MARKET CO-OP

44 W. MAIN AVE. We are featuring artist Lynn Hanley for April. Her images are influenced by forms in nature and rhythms in music. Music by classical guitarist Michael Volk, 5:30 to 6:30 pm. Refreshments.

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. MAIN AVE. New work by artist Cori McWilliams. This group of work is largely inspired by the Spokane River and surrounding landscapes. Also featuring new work by artist Ryan Desmond.

SARANAC PUBLIC HOUSE

21 W. MAIN AVE. Titled show: ”A Ride with Familiar Faces” by self-taught artist Jose Villa. Reception 5:30-8:30pm.

WEST DOWNTOWN AREA IRIMI ARTS AT THE ODELL HOUSE

2325 W. 1ST AVE. In honor of the April breast cancer awareness events in Spokane, we are “PINKING” the Odell House lights for the weekend. Offering a collection of Mid Century, Art Deco & Folk Art lighting--table, floor, sconces & chandeliers. Folk & blues guitar music by Laddie Ray Melvin.

THE MAC – NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS AND CULTURE

2316 W 1ST AVE. Galleries open First Friday complimentary admission, 5-8pm. Exhibits: David Douglas: A Naturalist at Work, SPOMa: Spokane Modern Architecture and Two to Tango: Artist & Viewer. Please show your support along with our staff & wear PINK!

ROBERTS MANSION

1923 W. 1ST AVE. Join us for complimentary hors d’ oeuvres and tours of the Mansion. Featuring artist Betty Bradley’s watercolor, icons on canvas and wood, acrylic and gold leaf.

40 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

BY JACOB JONES

C

hampion fighter Mikaela Mayer knows well the thrill and the agony of boxing. Enclosed within the ropes of the ring, she has weathered the adrenaline and exhaustion, touching glory and tasting defeat. In her five years of fighting, the Los Angeles native has risen sharply through the world of women’s Olympic-style boxing. She has racked up national and international victories, winning her weight division in the 2012 USA Boxing National Championships last year. Mayer, 22, has returned to the 2013 USA Boxing National Championships this year at the Hub Sports Center at the Northern Quest Resort & Casino. For three days now, she has fought alongside hundreds of amateur boxers, facing off under the bright lights. “You have to fight every day,” she says. “It’s back-to-back. It’s rough.” Boxers may fight four to six bouts during weeklong championships like this week’s tournament. Since Monday, both male and female boxers have worked their way through preliminary bouts. Winners advance to quarterfinal bouts on Thursday while semifinal fights are held between 11 am and 10 pm Friday. The finals to determine this year’s champions are slated for Saturday. As the defending champion and No. 2 seed in the lightweight division, she hopes her training and discipline will carry her through the tournament. “Some girls will go in there and fight with anger and they’re very aggressive,” she says. “That’s what gets them through the fight. Me, I don’t like to go there. I like to stay focused. I like to not get emotional and I’m very technical.” Mayer sits squinting against the harsh afternoon sun. Under her right eye, the subtle ring of a black eye shows through her makeup. She readily admits she was not always so disciplined. “When I was in high school,” she says, “I decided that I wanted to pick up a new sport because I didn’t feel like I was channeling my energy into anything really positive.” An unruly 17-year-old, Mayer turned first to muay Thai, a type of kickboxing. When injury forced her into regular boxing, she quickly fell in love with the “sweet science.” She eventually won a boxing scholarship to Northern Michigan University and met her renowned boxing coach, Al Mitchell. Since then, the blonde former model has taken on the women’s Olympic-style boxing scene. She won the 2011 National Golden Gloves and the 2012 Women’s Continental Championship. She also won a bronze medal in the 2012 Women’s World Championships. She is the No. 1-ranked light welterweight in the world. Mayer has also found broad new exposure after starring in a Dr Pepper “One of a Kind”

commercial. “Some people say boxing is a dying sport, but I don’t think boxing will ever die,” she says. “I think that the women coming into the sport with the Olympics and making a name for themselves, I think it’s going to help to bring boxing back.”

Model-turned-champ Mikaela Mayer The USA Boxing National Championships, usually held in Colorado, moved to Spokane for the first time this year. But officials earlier this spring announced a four-year contract to hold the tournament at Northern Quest through 2016. Despite her many accomplishments in the past year, Mayer has remained haunted by her most recent fight in Spokane, a heartbreaking loss that left her off the 2012 Olympics team. In that fight, Seattle boxer Queen Underwood won out. Underwood also holds the No. 1 seed in the lightweight division that Mayer fights in this week. Returning to Spokane, Mayer sees a new chance to come out swinging. She has prepared for months, spending the past six weeks in an intense training program in Las Vegas. This week’s tournament will anoint new champions for 2013. Young boxers will rise and fall, swinging their way into history. The crowds will howl and the lights will burn bright. Mayer will wrap up her hands, pull on her gloves and strap on her headgear. She’ll slip in her mouth guard and wait for the bell to ring. Every fight is a fresh start, she says, glory or defeat. “It’s hard to stay on top,” she says. n USA Boxing National Championships • Thu, April 4 through Sat, April 6 • Hub Sports Center at Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Road, Airway Heights • $5$40 • northernquest.com • (877) 871-6772.

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Dinner & Barn Dance Saturday, May 18th, 2013 6pm appetizers 7pm dinner Dancing to follow

@ the Spokane County Fair & Expo Center

Take ‘yer turn on the mechanical bull! Be sure to follow us on Facebook for more event information!

Questions? Contact Dee Knight-DuBey at deek@rmhspokane.org Ami Kunz-Pfeiffer at amik@rmhspokane.org APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 41

A typical weekend night at the Satellite Diner, one of downtown Spokane’s late-night favorites. young kwak photo

TRENDS

Downtown, Late-Night In search of burritos, pizza, sushi and breakfast after midnight By Annemarie C. Frohnhoefer

I

t is simple supply and demand — a large late-night population demands a large late-night culture. In cities like Chicago, New York and Miami it is possible to feast on lollipop lamb-chops at 11:30 pm, Mung bean noodles at 2 am or sushi at dawn. But what downtown Spokane lacks in population and lamb chops on sticks, it makes up for in late-night transformations. Some staid

42 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

afternoon businesses dim the lights and serve past 11 pm, some even later. The result is a surprising diversity of dining options; yes, there is sushi.

SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS

During daylight hours, most orders of beer bread, spicy mac and cheese, tomato basil, black bean or any one of

the many soups are ordered for pick-up by downtown workers. But pay attention. That sound system behind the bar really is too good for the likes of Jack Johnson and Ben Folds. So it’s really no surprise that when the restaurant re-opens at 7 pm — and magically becomes Soulful Spirits — the music changes to a heavier beat; the demographic dips younger and even though the beer bread, cheese and soups are served until close, cocktails are the main attraction. Bartender Amy Hille, recently relocated from Los Angeles, says that when she came back to Spokane she was pleased to see Soulful Soups offered options other than “greasy bar food.” Hille continues, “People here care about [the food] when they make it.”

NEATO BURRITO

Across from the Davenport and the Knitting Factory, Neato Burrito sees a range of clientele, from the business afternoon crowd to late-night concertgoers. When asked how he readies himself for the change in demographics, server Ben Jennings answers, “Lots of mental prepara-

tion.” The food and ordering process is the same regardless of time of day. Customers line up at the counter and order off the overhead menu. A flour tortilla or a wheat tortilla? Pinto or black beans? Brisket or chicken? These choices may cause pause in a sober diner; try making them at 1 am, when your eardrums are blown out and your reflexes are less than optimal. But have no fear. Jennings and his coworkers have mentally prepared for party-induced slowness. Jennings explains, “You get a lot more freedom to give people whatever you want at night. Mostly people are hungry and they just want something.”

MONTEREY CAFE

This jovial late-night cafe is the realm of happy drinkers and caters to men and women who, according to managers Bart Olson and Chris Skillman, are looking for “Good food, fun environment [and a] good bar. It’s a great last stop before heading home.” The sky-blue exterior paint, the orange-and-yellow interior and the enclosed outdoor patio suggest tropical climes and, yes, happiness. The place is low-key, open to everyone and has its regulars, who know the Monterey for its pizza, calzones, nachos and barbecue, all served until 2 am or later.

WAVE ISLAND SPORTS GRILL AND SUSHI BAR

Probably the most diverse menu, and crowd, is found at Wave. The late-night menu offers everything from lemon chicken, to half-off full-sized sushi rolls, to sautéed mushrooms and French toast sticks. Manager Noel Macapagal notes that latter is one of the best sellers but there is something on the menu for every taste. Unlike other late-night establishments, Wave’s layout changes from day to night and lends itself to a range of late-night diners. The karaoke and DJ are at the front of the house for the partiers, but make your way back to the second room and you’ll find seating for a quieter sit-down meal. Farther back are private dining areas for special events. Wave sets the standard for late-night downtown urban sophistication. But a short jaunt down the street takes you to …

Wave Island Sports Grill and Sushi Bar does sushi even late into the night. chris bovey photo

THE SATELLITE DINER AND LOUNGE

The Old Ironsides of late-night dining, the Satellite is the bookend to a classic night out. Some nights the staff turns off the music because the crowd’s cacophony doesn’t harmonize well with classic rock. During afternoons, when clientele and ambiance are much mellower, the Satellite serves up sandwiches and fries, but after the transition hours (4-8 pm) the staff prepares for the onslaught. Waitress Robin Glenn fondly describes the late-night diners as “Insanity at its best… It’s kind of like a movie — they’re changing the set — and then cue the crowd.” The crowd arrives at 2 am. Dishwasher Justin Baker says the crowd demands breakfast food. “Drunk people order the scramble.” Glenn concurs, adding, “I think they order the scramble because they don’t really want to think about how they want their eggs cooked, it’s all in there: scrambled eggs, hashbrowns, the diced German sausage, the diced ham. You want cheese and gravy?” Glenn continues with her best drunk imitation: “ ‘Ooh, I want the scramble.’ And then they pass out.” n

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 43

FOOD | OPENING

The Menu is the Inland Northwest’s guide for where to eat, drink and celebrate! Featuring some of the best Inland Northwest restaurant menus, organized by cuisine & neighborhood to help you plan your next meal out.

on stands

April 23rd

The Afternoon Breeze, one of the Distric Bar’s signature cocktails. STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

Flavor the Night

Knitting Factory’s District Bar opens for eats and drinks BY JO MILLER

S

mack-dab in the center of Spokane’s entertainment district is a new bar that aims to be the destination of downtown theaterand concertgoers. Matt Judge, general manager of the Knitting Factory, served as project manager for the opening of the District Bar in mid-February. He helped revamp the space next door to the Knit that was once known as Mixx 916. Some do-ityourself touches, such as old desk chairs reupholstered with used leather jackets, give it a relaxed feel to draw in the arts-and-culture nightlifers. A few perks were put in place, too. Anybody attending an event at the nearby Bing Crosby or Fox Theater — each less than a two-minute walk away — can show their ticket for 10 percent off their tab. Those going to a concert at the Knit get early entrance if they first visit the District Bar. At this bar, it is all about the food, Judge says. Executive chef Gary Evans, who has a background cooking at resorts, casinos and hotels, ended up at the District Bar after working at the Davenport Hotel’s Palm Court Grill. The braised pork cheeks served with bourbon butter sauce ($7) on the happy hour menu

are the first item Evans recommends. We tried the fish tacos ($5), also suggested. The three tacos were brimming with pan-seared cod, cabbage and tomatoes and cooled off with cilantro lime sour cream. The regular menu unfolds with meat-filled entrées such as a bacon-wrapped burger ($11.50) and appetizers like faux cheese sticks ($9) made with beer-marinated hearts of palm and ovenroasted tomato. The District Bar is home to 42 different beer selections. That might be daunting at first, but you can bite into the tap list by ordering a beer flight ($6) with your choice of five three-ounce draft beers. The menu of craft cocktails— all made with fresh squeezed juice — will change with the seasons. We tried the Afternoon Breeze ($9). The muddled cucumber mixed with vodka, soda water, and Midori melon liqueur makes it a refreshing bubbly choice for the onset of spring.  The District Bar • 916 W. 1st Ave. • Open Mon-Thu, 3 pm-midnight; Fri-Sat, 3 pm-2 am • spokanedistrictbar.com • 244-3279

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44 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

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FOOD | BREAKFAST

Unlikely Gem Twigs on the South Hill shows how a martini bar can do an amazing breakfast By Mike Bookey

O

ver the past decade, we’ve come to expect some things from Twigs Bistro and Martini Bar, Spokane’s cocktail and fine-dining mini empire. Martinis — 36 of them to be exact, in all colors, shapes and sizes. Cocktails — drinks you can’t get anywhere else. Ambiance — served by the heaping spoonful. Perhaps first thought of as a place to grab a drink, whether in River Park Square, out in the Valley or up north, Twigs has also solidified itself as a fine-dining (but with casual elements, too) restaurant, further broadening its appeal. And with five locations in the greater Spokane area — with another in the Tri-Cities and two more slated to open soon in Seattle and Tigard, Ore. — the chain has become a reliable go-to for a date night. But breakfast? At a martini bar? Yes, Twigs does that, too. “A lot of the time, people come in and say, ‘I didn’t even know you guys serve breakfast,’” says Angie Marinovich, assistant manager at the Twigs on the South Hill, the only one of the company’s locations that does breakfast. She says the location, which also gets a heavy load of dinner Looking for a new place to eat? and cocktail patrons in the eveVisit Inlander.com/places to search ning hours, benefits from being in the region’s most comprehensive a part of the South Hill not exactly bar and restaurant guide. loaded with breakfast options. On a recent Sunday, the spacious eatery was doing a steady business with the after-church crowd. As it warms up, Marinovich says they get younger folks coming to sit on the patio for brunch (breakfast is served until 1 pm), often served with mimosas or bloody Marys. We opted for a classic, the buttermilk biscuits and gravy ($9), a creative take on this old-school option featuring gravy loaded with chorizo sausage over savory, flaky biscuits. Add two eggs and breakfast potatoes on the side and you’re fueled for most of the day. The extensive menu also includes an array of omelets and scrambles (you choose how you want it done) ranging from meaty options like a prosciutto-loaded creation to veggie-friendly items like the mushroom and goat cheese. You can’t go wrong, however, with the crème brulee French toast, a sweet-but-not-too-sweet twist on the familiar breakfast item that will have you forsaking the version you’ve been making at home. It’s the sort of flair you’d expect from Twigs. n

1727 E. Sprague Ave

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509-535-1111

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The seed potatoes are in stock and looking good. Red, White, Blue and Fingerlings too!

restaurant finder

Bare Root Strawberry Plants

Twigs Bistro and Martini Bar • 4320 S. Regal St. • Breakfast Sat and Sun only, 9 am–1 pm • twigsbistro.com • 443-8000

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 45

FOOD | UPDATE

OPEN ENROLLMENT POTTERY CLASSES All Skill Levels & Ages Morning/Evening Classes Fun & Friendly Atmosphere Learn at Your Own Pace Supplies Included

clayconnection.net

714 E. Sprague Spokane | 509-747-6171

An old-time feel and classic cuisine have made Milford’s a Spokane favorite.

Inter Tribal

MILFORD’S FISH HOUSE

719 N. Monroe St. | 326-7251

M

ilford’s is the definition of well-established. This iconic restaurant and bar has led a luxurious life, starting as a tavern in 1911, then a cigar store, market and barber shop. Original cigar cases, an antique mahogany bar, pin-up girls and stamped-tin ceilings exude a dim, masculine atmosphere. The old-timey decor is classic, but the menu is in no way stuck in the past. Start with lush, fresh salads, then maybe split some crab-stuffed mushrooms or escargot bourguignonne (that’s French for delicious, essentially) with your tablemates. The entrée menu features modern yet playful fish

and seafood dishes at a hefty yet justifiable price. Just take your pick of fish — salmon, steelhead, cod, lobster, scallops, you name it. If you or your guest has a fish aversion, maybe you should reconsider your restaurant choice. But if you’re dead set, know that you still have great options. There’s a pesto chicken breast and beefsteak as well. Just try the fish, though. It’s what they do best. It’s only open for dinner and you’ll want to call ahead for reservations.

PLANNING AN EVENT? Get your album finished Get the perfect venue booked Get some skinny jeans GET LISTED.

GET AN AUDIENCE. Send us your info at GETLISTED@INLANDER.COM or submit it at INLANDER.COM/GETLISTED and we’ll help connect you to the right people.

46 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WWW.CHAS.ORG

— KATE DINNISON

FOOD | sampler

MEXICAN ATILANO’S 725 W. Third Ave. | 838-7677 3624 E. Sprague Ave. | 534-7677 12210 N. Division St. | 466-2847 218 E. Appleway Ave., Coeur d’Alene | 208-667-7677 Since its first spot opened in downtown Spokane, Atilano’s has been serving up delicious, largely portioned south-of-the border fare at low costs we can all enjoy. Now, the local Mexican food go-to has four locations around the Inland Northwest, so whenever you’re craving a taco or a burrito — like the Washington burrito, with grilled chicken, potatoes, cheese, guacamole and sour cream — you can hit up the location that’s closest to you. CASA DE ORO 4111 N. Division St. | 489-3630 With its Alamo-meets-the-rainforest aesthetic, Casa de Oro is precisely what you want in casual Mexican food: fast service, generous portions, affordable price and a never-ending procession of chips, beans and salsa. We recommend the classics: burritos, enchiladas, tacos. And muchos chips.

HACIENDA LAS FLORES 510 S. Freya St. | 315-8853 Hacienda Las Flores has everything you’d expect from a family Mexican restaurant. The interior is bright and busy. The custom of passing out chips is taken seriously. The enchiladas, burritos and taco plates are gargantuan. If you still want more, Tuesdays and Thursdays are all-you can-eat tacos for $7. They also have a $5 take-out special and a daily happy hour from 2-5 pm, when you can get two beers for $5 or two margaritas for just $6. CHAPALA 1801 N. Hamilton St. | 484-4534 While Gonzaga students over the years have been watering themselves at Jack & Dan’s, they’ve been feeding themselves at Chapala — just a few blocks north of the GU campus. The family-owned Mexican joint is known for its fajita burrito (exactly what it sounds like) and super-sized Burrito Chapala. They also throw a giant Cinco de Mayo party each year, complete with tons of food and drink specials.

EL PAISA 1801 Lincoln Way, Coeur d’Alene | 208-930-4210 An unpretentious little place, El Paisa serves most of its meals in takeaway tinfoil containers. The Mouth Watering Sweet Pork tends to live up to its name and won’t have a chance to become a leftover. Tacos pastor is a variation on the typical taqueria style of spit-roasting meat associated with Greek gyros. Its tender, spicy bits of pork are served atop two small corn tortillas, heaped with salsa fresca. When you plan a trip to Coeur d’Alene this summer, stop by this eatery and see why so many locals love it. n

entrée

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Why arE

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LOCaL PrESEnTinG SPOnSOr ®

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 47

Big Mechanical Lizards

Grant and the kids, even several shots involving the T. rex and velociraptors involved animatronic versions designed by veteran Stan Winston (the original Terminator, Aliens), not digital creations. Watching Jurassic Park in 3D heightens the sense of what that real-world tactility contributed to the film. The digital dinosaurs were extensions of the animatronic versions—doing the things it wasn’t possible to have a robot do—but it was the existence of the animatronic versions that heightened the sense that they were real. Anyone who has seen the “special edition” E.T. footage of the titular creature CGI’d into a bathtub, or wondered dino-blood extracted from amber-encased mosquitoes what happened to Frank Oz’s puppeteered Yoda in the that set up the premise. The movie in particular would Star Wars prequels, understands the difference between also have to overcome the distracting characterization of paleobotanist Dr. Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern) — who swings a special effect that feels like a genuine inhabitant of the movie’s world and a special effect that’s impressive wildly between competent scientist, finger-wagging femibut somehow false. For this transitional moment, it was nist and “what, little ol’ me know anything about chaos necessary to cling to some of the past of special effects in theory?” bimbo — and the pairing of paleontologist Alan order to enable its future. Grant (Sam Neill) with the grandchildren of park operaSo yes, Jurassic Park is often silly whentor John Hammond (Richard Attenborever its characters open their mouths and ough) so that the child-averse Grant could JURASSIC PARK 3D spout nonsense about Unix systems, and learn an important lesson in paternal care. Rated PG-13 its final hour of nearly non-stop running is But while this week’s 3D re-release Directed by Steven Spielberg at times just as exhausting as it is exciting. of Jurassic Park could have proven merely Starring Sam Neill, Laura Dern, And we’re still allowed to wonder how that a historical curiosity of an era when this Jeff Goldblum barrier the T. rex strides over suddenly beparticular wizardry was still a novelty, comes a vertiginous drop when the car goes rather than de rigueur, it actually offers a over the edge. It’s also still got some terrifically effective fascinating reminder of what distinguishes it from more set pieces, and even 20 years later somehow seems wonrecent CGI-driven adventures. Because while Jurassic Park drous when John Williams’ swelling score introduces us may be memorable for its mainframe-created gallimimus to this wildest of wild animal parks. Part of that wonder herd, or the tyrannosaurus rex that chases down our heroes comes from realizing that the film wasn’t a phenomenon in their car, it was full of practical effects. The ailing triconly thanks to the state-of-the-art stuff, but also thanks eratops the scientists encounter in the park, the dilophosarus to the way we were able to accept it — in part because of that attacks the park’s turncoat programmer Dennis those big mechanical lizards.  Nedry (Wayne Knight), the Brachiosaur that feeds near

Jurassic Park returns in 3D, reminding us of its impact BY SCOTT RENSHAW

I

n June 1993, I stood in line at a Northern California multiplex with my then-roommates, awaiting our showtime for Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park. One of them in particular had been giddy for weeks leading up to its opening, and to him the reason for such anticipation was self-evident. “Big mechanical lizards!” he would intone with a sense of incredulity that there was even anything worth arguing about. “Big mechanical lizards!” It seems like odd choice of words, since much of the build-up surrounding Jurassic Park had nothing to do with mechanical lizards. It was all about the revolutionary use of computer-generated imagery to populate Spielberg’s adaptation of the Michael Crichton novel — about a would-be nature park full of genetically-recreated prehistoric creatures — with dinosaurs. It wouldn’t be the first showcase use of such technology, since James Cameron had beaten him to the punch a couple years earlier with Terminator 2’s liquid-metal T-1000. But it was widely considered a new evolution in the Hollywood blockbuster’s ability to dazzle audiences with things it never could have showed us before. And Jurassic Park was gonna need it. Like the book from which it came, the movie would have to be propulsively action-driven just to get past the techno-babble of

48 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS EVIL DEAD

Like it or not, some production company threw close to $14 million at a remake of  Evil Dead. We have the same cabin in the woods. We have the same rowdy bunch of 20-somethings. But this time, the director replaced Bruce Campbell with approximately 3.5 times as much gore and 2.5 times as many rusty knives. The campy, humor-filled cult classic we all knew and loved has been transmogrified into something more serious and sinister. (Definitely don’t bring the kids to this one.) But fans seem to like it still, and if you can satisfy an  Evil Dead  junkie, I guess you’ve done something right. (SM) Rated R

GATEKEEPERS

This documentary takes an unprecedented look into the Shin Bet, which is basically the CIA of the Israeli government, but perhaps even more secretive. Directed by Israeli filmmaker Dror Moreh, the film features extremely rare interviews with former directors of the Shin Bet who examine the security issues in Israel as they also philosophize about ongoing terrorist acts that plague the country’s conflict with Palestine. (MB) Rated PG-13

JURASSIC PARK 3D

You know this one. The island out in the middle of the ocean that — spoiler alert — is home to a whole bunch of dinosaurs thanks to the ingenuity of an eccentric billionaire and a mosquito trapped in amber. Twenty years after its blockbusting release, Jurassic Park has received an anniversary 3D treatment, bringing those big, gnarly beasts right up into your face. It might feel like a gimmick to see Spielberg’s film rolled back into theaters after so many years, but the 3D reminds us why the film was so impactful upon its initial arrival. (MB) Rated PG-13.

ON THE ROAD

Anyone who has ever wandered, been lost or yearned for either has stumbled across Jack Kerouac’s famous book, On the Road — the bible of the Beat generation. Based on Kerouac’s real life travels across America, OTR is, at least partially, about finding answers, chasing girls and doing drugs. This film adaptation tracks the same storyline: Kerouac’s alter ego, Sal Paradise (Sam Riley of  Control), is fired up by the devil-may-care freedom of Dean Moriarty (Garrett Hedlund of Tron). Together with Dean’s wife (Kristen Stewart), they have a great adventure across 1940s America, seeking answers to life’s great questions. (LS) Rated R

NOW PLAYING ADMISSION

Sometimes a movie just veers too far from its source material, in this case the popular 2009 novel by Jean Hanff Korelitz, about a Princeton admissions officer (Tina Fey) who gets emotionally caught up in the application of a student who might just might be ... well, all those years ago she did give up a baby for adoption. The whole story is about parent-child relationships — the one between Fey’s character and her feisty mom (Lily Tomlin), another between the head of an alternative high school (Paul Rudd) and his adopted son. It’s sort of a comedy; there’s some funny stuff. But most of it falls flat and sinks into blandness. (ES) Rated PG-13

A PLACE AT THE TABLE

This documentary is a punch to the gut of your conscience, a reminder that while you’re bitching about the kale in your salad not being organically farmed, there are millions of people in this country who don’t have enough to eat. Directed by Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbush, the film dives into the complicated that is the food crisis in his country, including farm subsidies, school lunches, federal funding for hunger and nutrition. Jeff Bridges, who in addition to being The Dude, is also the founder of the End Hunger Network, is just one of the insightful interviews pieced between scenes following hungry children in different places around the country. The film isn’t, however, without its faults — it’s disjointed at times and tries to simplify an issue that’s almost impossible to simplify. But hey, the soundtrack by T. Bone Burnett and The Civil Wars just about makes up for that. At Magic Lantern. (MB) Rated PG.

THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT

THE CALL

Girls getting thrown into trunks. Girls kidnapped and killed in their homes. Every time, they call 911. Every time, that 911 call costs them their lives. “It’s already done,” an enraged serial killer whispers as he finished off his next victim. Unfortunately, this particular serial killer underestimates how much of a badass Halle Berry, the 911 dispatcher who takes these calls, turns out to be. (SM) Rated R.

THE CROODS

We kinda have a feeling that The Croods, DreamWorks’ latest animated flick, which chronicles the adventures of a prehistoric cave-people family, will draw attention from all demographics. The plot is simple: a family (did they really have families then?) is forced to leave the only home they’ve known when it’s destroyed during a big natural disaster — the end of the world, maybe? Their journey to a safer place is basically the first road trip of all time, and as you can guess there are lots of unexpected twists and some semiforced family bonding moments along the way. (CS) Rated PG

EMPEROR

Emperor, set in post-WWII Japan, tells the story of General Douglas MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) and his investigation of Emperor Shōwa. In charge of making the decision of whether or not the leader should be hanged is General Bonner Fellers (Matthew Fox), who is involved in an affair with a Japanese exchange student (Eriko Hatsune). You may tell your bros that you liked this movie because it was an intense war flick, but deep down, you ...continued on next page

TEEN WOLF

WED. APRIL 24

BING CROSBY THEATER $

4 MOVIE $ 3 BEER

BEER FLOWS AT 6PM MOVIE SHOWS AT 8PM With an introduction from the Inlander’s Film History department

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APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 49

FILM | SHORTS

SHOWING APR 5 - APR 11

NOW PLAYING

5 story high screen!

Rocky Mountain Express

FRI & SAT: 1:00, 3:00, 4:00 SUN: 1:00, 3:00, 4:10 WED: 12:15, 1:30, 3:30 THUR: 12:15, 1:30, 3:30, 5:30

Air Racers

FRI & SAT: 12:00, 2:00, 5:00 SUN: 12:00, 2:00, 5:10 WED: 2:30, 4:30 THUR: 2:30, 4:30 OPEN WED-SUN

*(all shows & times are subject to change)

spokaneriverfrontpark.com

Adv. Tix on Sale OBLIVION JURASSIC PARK IN REAL D 3D (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 PM) 700 PM 1000 PM JURASSIC PARK (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(350 PM) EVIL DEAD (R) Fri. - Sun.(150) 510 750 1015 TYLER PERRY'S TEMPTATION (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(140) 420 740 1020 THE HOST (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(100) 440 740 1030 GI JOE: RETALIATION (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(200) 500 750 1025 GI JOE: RETALIATION IN REAL D 3D (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(130) 430 720 955 ADMISSION (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1210 PM) 640 PM OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R) Fri. - Sun.(1250 340) 650 950 THE CROODS (PG) Fri. - Sun.(120) 410 710 940 THE CROODS IN REAL D 3D (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1220 330) 630 900 SPRING BREAKERS (R) Fri. - Sun.(320 PM) 920 PM THE CALL (R) Fri. - Sun.(110) 450 730 1010 OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1200 PM) 1005 PM OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL IN REAL D 3D (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(310 PM) 705 PM

Adv. Tix on Sale OBLIVION EVIL DEAD [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(100 345) 730 1010 JURASSIC PARK IN REAL D 3D (PG-13) ★ Fri.(1245 PM) 700 PM 1000 PM Sat.(355 PM) 700 PM 1000 PM Sun.(1245 PM) 700 PM 1000 PM JURASSIC PARK (PG-13) Fri.(355 PM) Sat.(1245 PM) Sun.(355 PM) THE HOST (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(135) 425 735 1030 GI JOE: RETALIATION [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1250 340) 650 930 GI JOE: RETALIATION IN REAL D 3D (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(120) 410 720 1000 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1220 315) 630 920 THE CROODS [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(115) 400 640 935 THE CROODS IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(130) 415 655 945 OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1215 330) 705 1010 OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 350) 715 1020 ADMISSION (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.725 PM 1005 PM THE CALL [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(140) 405 740 1005 JACK THE GIANT SLAYER IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(145 PM) 430 PM

REALLY,

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK. rivercityred. blogspot.com

Adv. Tix on Sale OBLIVION Big Screen: JURASSIC PARK IN REAL D 3D (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.(100 PM) 705 PM 1010 PM Sun.(100 PM) 815 PM GI JOE: RETALIATION IN REAL D 3D (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1230) 400 715 1020 Sun.(1230 PM) 400 PM 805 PM THE CROODS IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1250) 410 655 930 OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1235 PM) 415 PM 800 PM Big Screen: JURASSIC PARK (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(350 PM) Sun.445 PM Big Screen: EVIL DEAD [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(125) 430 730 1000 Sun.(125) 430 715 955 GI JOE: RETALIATION [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1200 330) 645 945 THE HOST (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(1220 325) 700 1005 Sun.(1220 PM) 440 PM 810 PM OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1245 345) 640 935 THE CROODS [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1210 340) 630 915 OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1205 335) 635 940 ADMISSION (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1255) 405 710 955 IDENTITY THIEF [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(110) 425 720 1015 Sun.(110) 425 705 950 THE CALL [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(120) 435 735 1020 Sun.(120) 435 700 930 SPRING BREAKERS (R) Fri. - Sun.405 PM 925 PM THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(115 PM) 650 PM Times For 04/05 - 04/07

50 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

know it was the love story that stole your heart. (KS) Rated PG-13

G.I. JOE: RETALIATION

The last G.I. Joe movie meant different things to different people. For some, it was a revitalization of childhood heroes. For others, it was a two-hour-long Channing Tatum fest. Now, the G.I. Joes are it again. They have to fight the Cobra. They have to save their paychecks from a President who has attempted to disband them. They have to fly through the air. They have to impart subliminal messages of patriotism and a pro-military agenda. But this time, we have Dwayne Johnson, aka the Rock, and Bruce Willis, the Die Hard, to make the movie that much cooler. (SM) Rated PG-13

THE HOST

When Stephenie Meyer got tired of writing about sparkling vampires, she dipped her little pinky toe into the pool of sci-fi with her novel, The Host. Now, the movie adaptation combines everything Meyer is famous for (love triangles, inter-species romance, hot men) with director Andrew Niccol’s science fiction film career. The results? Humans must fight for survival against an alien race that hosts itself inside the human body, obliterating the human soul with their parasitic existence. Yes, this sounds very “body-snatchers” in both plot and science fiction mechanics, but this time, we have the added benefit of a love story. (SM) Rated PG-13

IDENTITY THIEF

You never suspect the quiet ones. So when Sandy (Jason Bateman) discovers his identity has been stolen, the seemingly harmless Diana (Melissa McCarthy) is a surprising suspect. But  Sandy’s trip to Miami to confront the criminal takes a twist when he discovers that Diana isn’t as innocent as she appears. The loud, annoying woman will do anything she can to avoid losing the luxurious lifestyle she has accrued at Sandy’s expense. Through many a car chase, fistfight and argument,  Sandy  must pull his identity and credit score out of the gutter. (SM) Rated R

INAPPROPRIATE COMEDY

Perhaps you haven’t been offended enough lately. Buy yourself a ticket to see Vince Offer’s InAPPropriate Comedy, then feel your jaw drop. This is a film about an app (like, on an iPad) that creates social mayhem. Yes, you are right: It very well may be the stupidest premise for a movie ever. But with a cast of Rob Schneider, Adrian Brody and Lindsay Lohan, it very well could be the next Idiocracy. No, probably not. (LS) Rated R

THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE

It’s a sweet and funny all ages movie... with an edge. Both the title character (Steve Carell), and his similarly nom de plumed pal Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi) were loners as kids, but were fascinated by magic. A proposed partnership in the craft has led to them being huge old-style stars in Vegas, where after a couple of decades, they’re kinda tired of each other. The edge enters with outrageous Criss Angel-like Steve Gray (Jim Carrey) coming to town and steal-

ing away their crowds. The film features an amazing one-take shot of an illusion called “The Hangman,” designed by David Copperfield. (ES) Rated PG-13

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN

Olympus Has Fallen — about an assault by North Korean terrorists on the White House — had me muttering to myself: “Why couldn’t this have been the latest Die Hard movie?” Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) is a Secret Service agent shipped from a presidential protection detail to a desk job after tragically failing to save the life of the First Lady. Eighteen months later, as tensions escalate in the DMZ, those nasty North Koreans — led by the ruthless Kang (Rick Yune) — storm 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, ultimately taking the president (Aaron Eckhart) hostage. Can Banning save the day? (SR) Rated R

OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL

Despite being a CGI-heavy affair, Sam Raimi’s Oz feels incredibly alive. Fueled by the same gleeful energy that drove Raimi’s earliest work, it not only serves as a worthy tribute to the wonderland conceived by L. Frank Baum but also a celebration of moviemaking itself. This prequel to the 1939 classic fittingly opens with a circus sideshow circa 1905 where the ramshackle wooden structures instantly recall Evil Dead’s shoddy sets. This black-and-white chapter introduces Oscar “Oz” Diggs (James Franco), a low-rung magician/first-rate Lothario, who ends up in a tornado that lands him in a familiar Technicolor landscape where he encounters Theodora (Mila Kunis) and a couple of witches, played by Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz. (CW) Rated PG.

QUARTET

Centered around four musically inclined retirees and starring everybody’s favorite Downton Abbey actress Maggie Smith, this movie melds together our love for music and old people. The drama that ensues at this retirement center threatens the success of the annual gala concert, leaving the audience with one question: will the show go on? (KS) Rated PG-13

SAFE HAVEN

sues, or a fear of commitment, or a history of abuse or something. Alex’s is a widower, can bench press 250 pounds, and is good with kids. They’re both pretty attractive. They run on the beach through the rain and conquer deep-seated emotional issues together. But when our heroine has to get out of town quickly, for some vague and slightly terrifying reason, their true love is tested. Or something emotional and gut-wrenching like that. (SM) Rated PG-13

SIDE EFFECTS

The newest collaboration between director Steven Soderbergh and writer Scott Z. Burns (Contagion, The Informant!) is their best. It’s a twisty-turny mystery-thriller about money, sex, (prescription) drugs, sleepwalking, and lots more. Great writing and direction, every actor is spot-on. At Magic Lantern (ES) Rated R

SPRING BREAKERS

The premise seems simple: A quartet of hot college girls desperately want to head to Fort Lauderdale for spring break. Vanessa Hudgens, Ashley Benson, Selena Gomez and Rachel Korine realize that their collected financial resources aren’t enough to get them to Florida. And that’s when director Harmony Korine (Kids, Gummo) makes his mark: The girls rob a restaurant, get involved with a drug dealer (James Franco) and do anything they need to in order to live a little closer to their fantasy of having spring break last forever. (SR) Rated R

STOKER

If you’re going to get creeped out by a movie, it might as well be pretty to look at, right? And Park Chan-wook’s latest, Stoker, looks to be pretty and substantial — we’re hoping, at least. This time around, Chan-wook — director of the lauded Vengeance Trilogy — follows India (Mia Wasikowska) after the sudden death of her father. When her creepy uncle (Matthew Goode) comes to her mother’s side (Nicole Kidman), India becomes suspicious of his motives. And that’s when things get weird: She gets more intrigued by him instead of more afraid of him. (LS) Rated R 

Prepare yourself for the classic love story by Nicholas Sparks. Katie has daddy is-

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

A Place at the Table

68

Spring Breakers

64

Oz The Great...

54

Jack the Giant Slayer

50

Admission

49

Burt Wonderstone

44

Olympus Has Fallen

41

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

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ONE NIGHT ONLY! APRIL 8 7PM 901 W. SPRAGUE AVE, SPOKANE | 509.227.7638

Fri, April 5th to thurs, April 11th

Madagascar 3 Fri 9:30Am

Mountainfilm brings eight outdoors-focused films to the Bing.

High-Altitude Movies Telluride Mountainfilm rolls back into town

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

Spirited Away

JURASSIC PARK

Fri-sun 12:00pm

PG-13 Fri-Sun (1:25) (4:00) 6:40 9:20 Sat-Sun (10:50) Mon-Thu (4:00) 6:40 9:20

EVIL DEAD

R Fri-Sun (1:40) (3:40) (5:40) 7:40 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:40) Mon-Thu (3:00) (5:00) 7:00 9:00

SPRING BREAKERS

Princess Mononoke

R Daily (3:15) (5:15) 7:15 9:15 Sat-Sun (11:15) (1:15)

Fri-sun 2:30pm

G.I. JOE: RETALIATION

PG-13 Daily 7:00 9:10 In 2D Daily (2:20) (4:40) 9:30 Sat-Sun (12:00)

BY ELI FRANCOVICH

T

he outdoors, in all their cinematic glory, to “love someone as much as they can.” are coming to Spokane. On Wednesday, Right to Play tells the story of Johann Olav April 10, the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Koss, a former speed-skating Olympian, and his Church Foundation brings the Telluride Mounjourney to Africa. Koss uses soccer as a medium tainfilm festival, featuring eight films, all with an to work with children injured by war, and ultioutdoors focus. mately change their lives. “I chose the films based on their messages Moving more firmly into the realm of the and their appeal to the outdoor audiences,” said outdoors, SBFC will present Outside the Box, Eric Melson, SBFC’s program director. Moonwalk, Industrial Revolutions and I Believe I Money from ticket sales Can Fly. The first film is about three go toward the foundation. A world-class climbers training for non-profit stewardship program an upcoming competition and the Visit Inlander.com for complete unexpected weather issues they that serves the 1.3-million-acre listings of local events. Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness encounter. Moonwalk is an artsy, and the 2.3-million-acre Frank scary film about highlining (in which Church—River of No Return Wilderness, the daredevils balance on a piece of rope) with a full SBFC is not an advocacy group, Melson says. moon as a backdrop. Industrial Revolutions mixes Rather, the group focuses on stewardship. mind-blowing stunt cycling and abandoned in“My goals [for the film festival] are that dustrial landscapes. I Believe I Can Fly is a French people walk away feeling inspired to go outside film about crazy French people jumping off high and recreate on their favorite lands and then help things and/or balancing in high places. take care of those areas,” he says. The night ends with Eco Ninja and Blue Melson says that one thing he wants to Obsession, the former a satirical comedy about a facilitate this year is directly showing filmgoers company taking the go-green movement a bit too how their money will support the stewardship seriously — they hire a go-green ninja and it goes program. about how you’d expect. Blue Obsession documents The films will be shown in two time blocks climber Alan Gordon’s attempts to explore and starting at 7 pm. The first hour focuses more on document the Mendenhall Glacier in southeast inspiration, while the second is more about action Alaska before it melts forever.  sports, Melson says. The first film, Love Competition, documents Mountainfilm on Tour • Wed, April 10, at the Stanford University MRI lab’s first ever love 7 pm • $14 (general) $12 (students) • Bing competition. Each contestant has five minutes in Crosby Theatre • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • an fMRI (a machine that monitors brain activity) bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

MORE EVENTS

THE HOST

PG-13 Fri-Sun (2:00) (4:25) 7:15 9:45 Sat-Sun (11:20) Mon-Thu (2:00) (4:20) 6:40 9:00

WARM BODIES Fri-thurs 5:00pm

THE CROODS

PG Daily (2:25) (4:40) Sat-Sun (12:15) In 2D Daily 6:50 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:30)

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN

R Fri-Sun (2:10) (4:50) 7:20 9:45 Sat-Sun (11:40) Mon-Thu (2:10) (4:40) 7:00 9:15

Jack Reacher

THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE

Fri-thurs 7:05pm

PG-13 Daily (2:15) (4:30) 6:45

OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL

PG Daily (3:50) 6:30 9:15 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:10)

IDENTITY THIEF

R Fri-Sun (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:30 Sat-Sun (11:30) Mon-Thu (2:00) (4:00) 6:30 9:00

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

JURASSIC PARK

PG-13 Daily (1:25) (4:00) 6:40 9:20 Fri-Sun (10:50)

EVIL DEAD

Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters Fri-thurs 9:40pm

924 W. Garland, Spokane

509-327-1050

GarlandTHeaTre.CoM

R Daily (1:40) (3:40) (5:40) 7:40 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:40)

G.I. JOE: RETALIATION

PG-13 Daily (2:20) (4:40) 7:00 In 2D Daily (12:00) 9:20

THE HOST

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:25) 7:15 9:45 Fri-Sun (11:20)

TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION

THE MAGIC LANTERN APRIL 5th - APRIL 11th

PG-13 Daily (1:50) (4:20) 7:10 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:10)

SIDE EFFECTS (106 MIN)

PG-13 Daily (1:30) (4:10) 6:40 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:10)

Fri/Sat: 4:30, 8:30, Sun: 3:00 Weds/Thurs: 8:15

ADMISSION

THE CROODS

PG Daily (1:45) (4:00) 6:15 8:30 Fri-Sun (11:30) In 2D Daily (12:15) (2:25) (4:40) 6:50 9:10

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN

R Daily (2:10) (4:50) 7:20 9:45 Fri-Sun (11:40)

THE CALL

R Daily (1:10) (3:10) (5:20) 7:30 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:00)

OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL

PG Daily (1:10) (3:50) 6:30 9:15 Fri-Sun (10:45) In 2D Daily (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:00)

IDENTITY THIEF

R Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:30 Fri-Sun (11:30)

QUARTET (96 MIN) Fri: 5:00, 7:00, Sat: 2:30, 6:30 Sun: 1:00, 5:00, Weds/Thurs: 6:15

STOKER (97 MIN) Fri/Sat: 8:50, Sun: 6:00

AMOUR (127 MIN) Sat: 2:15, 6:15, Sun: 3:30

THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE

A PLACE AT THE TABLE (84 MIN)

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 4/5/13-4/11/13

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

PG-13 Daily (12:20) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:25

Sat: 4:30, Sun: 1:45, Wed/Thurs: 4:30

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 51

IT'S COMING MAY 31 & JUNE 1 2013

THE INLANDER'S MUSIC FESTIVAL

52 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

The Outsiders

Sunstripe (from left): Mike Gebhart, Michael Starry, Schuyler Asplin

A new band called Sunstripe is sweeping young people off their feet with improvised jazz By Kara Stermer

I

t’s a Saturday night, and Boots Bakery is filled with the kind of people Macklemore rapped about in “Thrift Shop.” A group of high schoolers sits on the floor to get a better view of the makeshift stage. The musicians mingle with the crowd. The opening act is a three-piece outfit that’s between names (in fact, the name varies depending on which member you ask). They sound similar to Of Monsters and Men, and the audience claps and sways along to this familiar sound. It’s something that everybody can appreciate. Something that’s undeniably “right now.”

Headlining the night is another local band — the pastime-turned-band of trumpet-playing 18-year-old Schuyler Asplin, 17-year-old bassist Michael Starry, and 20-year-old drummer Mike Gebhart. They’re called Sunstripe. And where their opening act made music that could have been on the iPod of any of the audience members, Sunstripe brings something completely different — music that is reminiscent of the wordless, improvised jazz of yesteryear — to the ears of kids who might not ever take an interest in jazz. Formed from the ashes of several fizzled projects and

kristen black photo

inspired by their very recent experiences in middle and high school band, Sunstripe uses jazz as a “starting point,” helping them develop their own singular sound and make music that is entertaining to play. And it’s music that has surprised young people. At Sunstripe shows, kids sit on the edge of their seats. They flock to the band’s Facebook and SoundCloud pages to hear more. Growing up on the classics and favoring music that isn’t found on the radio, the members of Sunstripe admit they come to popular music as “outsiders,” Gebhart explains. Although their music may appear tame to people who are used to the heavier sound of the Spokane scene, Sunstripe is heavily influenced by local music. From the Flying Spiders to the Strangers, the chaos of every genre melds to create their vibe. “We improvise and fuse music that we like together,” Gebhart says as he describes Sunstripe. While they have sheet music sitting on their stands as they play (much of it original work), they stray away from set-in-stone notes ...continued on next page

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 53

MUSIC | jazz

2 ANNUAL ND

BARRELS & BITES. Friday, April 26th, 2013 • Buy your ticket early.

The Spokane Public Market invites you to attend the 2nd annual tasting event including wine, microbrews, hard cider and spirits. Fine wines will be paired with food available at the market.

TICKETS Tickets available at Spokane Public Market or at www.brownpapertickets.com

THE MARKET IS OPEN ALL YEAR LONG

DOWNTOWN AT 2ND & BROWNE (24 W. 2ND AVENUE) THUR–SAT, 10AM–6PM , SUN, 11AM-5PM SPOKANEPUBLICMARKET.ORG

54 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

“the outsiders,” continued... by incorporating a large degree of improvisation. The neat thing about jazz, Starry notes, is that “you are thinking at the same speed as they are playing.” As a shirtless and macho-looking guy frolicked his way to center stage in the middle of a jam during a show back in January, Asplin put down his trumpet to accept the dance-off challenge. “The song had never, ever gone that way before or after that night,” remembers Gebhart. “Because there is so much improvisation in our group, there is a lot of spontaneity and unexpected things on our end,” says Asplin. Sunstripe only seeks reactions from their audience, hoping that it will affect their music. At their shows, they hand out homemade Easter egg noisemakers, letting the crowd help guide the direction of the songs. Playing in small venues like Boots and Second Space Gallery, Sunstripe’s performances are intimate (minus the occasional dance throwdown). Young audience members soak in the unfamiliar genre and laugh uncontrollably as they watch the guys try to keep up with one another. It’s a sight that keeps people coming back to see Sunstripe. From Starry frantically plucking the strings of his upright bass to Gebhart madly beating on his drums, their performances show Spokane how much fun music should be. Fans desperately search the Internet for the next gig and new songs to download. They drag their friends to every concert and try to help spread the word about Sunstripe. And right now in the Lilac City, the band says that jazz “is more thriving than ever.” n music@inlander.com Listen to Sunstripe at sunstripe.bandcamp.com, and watch for upcoming show announcements at Facebook.com/sunstripe.

MUSIC | singer

Working Man Eric Tollefson won’t give up By Jordan Satterfield

T

he scratchy, aged tone of blues crooner Eric Tollefson is not one that comes without determination — or experience. Where many other blues performers fall flat after a strong start, Tollefson has managed to pull off the opposite maneuver. Tollefson, who most recently hails from Bend, Oregon, is actually from Juneau, Alaska. In case you don’t know where that is, I looked it up. It’s in that tiny part of southern Alaska that should basically be Canada. So when you see the cover of Tollefson’s sophomore record, The Polar Ends, you know that the polar bear isn’t an empty reference. This dude knows what it’s like to be cold. Even the title of the album seems like a thinly veiled reference to Tollefson’s frozen past, though he may not entirely admit it. “I feel like the record displays a varied range of emotional

stances,” Tollefson tells me over the phone. It was exactly the explanation I was expecting, though I didn’t want to believe it. The record, an staunch improvement over his previous effort The Sum of Parts, at times seems to be a reconnection with a string of roots that bizarrely escaped him in previous music. The Polar Ends succeeds in many places where The Sum of Parts fumbled, mostly in the humanity department. “I just wanted to get down and make another record,” Tollefson plainly recounted when asked the story behind The Polar Ends. It’s the response of an honest man who knows he can do better. “It wasn’t my finest work, and I wanted to improve upon it,” he adds. So you can’t blame him for wanting to make this one count, and he spared no expense collecting a team of various friends, pros and session musicians when planning his new sound. Tollefson went as far as hiring pseudo-famous pedal steel guitar player Eric Heywood (Ray Lamontagne, Son Volt) to get the twang just right. What this says to me is that one quality Tollefson is certainly not lacking is determination. Many people might say the same thing about particularly pesky street musicians, with any and all implications, but something about Tollefson is different: He’s not just determined to be heard. He’s determined to get better. n Eric Tollefson • Thurs, April 11, at 8 pm • Zola • 22 W. Main Ave. • $5 • 21+ • 324-2416 • Also on Sat, April 13, at 9 pm • John’s Alley • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 21+ • (208) 8837662

Inland Northwest Film Festival The most fun and filmmaking ever packed into 50 hours.

Competition Kick-Off April 5th @ 7:00PM Magic Lantern Theater (25 W Main)

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 55

music | sound advice

ROCK HALFTONE

J = the inlander RECOMMENDs this show J = All Ages Show

Thursday, 4/4

Big City Saloon (474-0579), DJ Fusion Bigfoot, DJ Dave Bluz at the Bend, Sammy Eubanks Brooklyn Deli & Lounge (8354177), Trickster Fox, Lee Lester Cellar, Riverboat Dave J Chairs Coffee (340-8787), Brick & Mortar Showcase feat. Kathy Kostelec and Dave McRae Coeur d’Alene Casino, PJ Destiny Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos J THE Hop!, Event Horizon, The Finns, Colourflies, The Lion Oh My!, Arrow in Orbit Laguna Café, Just Plain Darin LeftBank Wine Bar, Nick Grow J Luxe Coffeehouse, Dirk Lind Marquee, MCSQUARED Moon Time, Echo Elysium O’Shay’s, Open mic Phat House, The Tone Collaborative, World Bandits Swamp, DJ Aphrodisiac Zola, Cruxie

Friday, 4/5

315 Restaurant, Truck Mills Barrister Winery (465-3591), Lonesome Lyle Morse Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn Big City Saloon (474-0579), DJ Fusion Big Sky Tavern (489-2073), Son of Brad Bigfoot, The Usual Suspects Bing Crosby Theater, Crème Tangerine Bluz at the Bend, Led Foot Deacon Bolo’s (891-8995), Slow Burn Boomers (368-9847), Kozmik Dreamzz Brick Wall Gallery (928-7721), Blue Ribbon Tea Co.

56 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

W

hen we’ve seen the Spokane art and music scene at its best, it’s at the times when the scene — as a whole — has just gotten scrappy: when art events take place in alternative spaces, when concerts pop up on streets and in boxing rings, and when groups form to support the arts. A group of students is doing just that with the new Halftone event: an art auction and live music event that will benefit the EWU Design department. And for their first Halftone, the kids have brought out some of Spokane’s finest to entertain: surf-rockers BBBBandits, Matt Mitchell from Folkinception, Octo from the Flying Spiders and new indie/psych band Bias. — LEAH SOTTILE Halftone feat. BBBBandits, Matt Mitchell, Octo, Bias • Fri, April 5, from 5-9 pm • The Porch • 1804 W. Broadway Ave. • $8 • Allages • theporchspokane.org • 326-2385

ROCK ORGANS

Brooklyn Deli & Lounge (8354177), Lee Lester Carr’s Corner, The Fail Safe Project, Amadon, Evolved Cellar, Brad Perry, Bones Bolan & Nelson Checkerboard Bar, American Catapult, Tommy G and the Nug Jug Band Coeur d’Alene Casino, Echo Elysium, Ryan Larsen Band Coeur d’Alene Resort, Coeur d’Alene Blues Festival feat. The Doghouse Boys, Bakin’ Phat, Royce-Govedare, The High Rollers Coldwater Creek Wine Bar (208263-6971), Michael Lewis Curley’s (208-773-5816), Sucker Punch Eichardt’s, The Nefftones Fedora Pub, Bill Bozly Fizzie Mulligans, The Vibe Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos J the Hop!, Electric Playground

Hot Rods (534-4061), DJ Dave Iron Horse, The Jam Band Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy J Kave (290-1038), Broadway Calls, Storm Normandy, Pretty Arcade, T-180, STOE Knitting Factory, Electo Factory 3 feat. DJs Ryle, Daethstar, MCSQUARED, Eric Thorne, Felon Laguna Café, Pamela Benton LeftBank Wine Bar, Karrie O’Neill J Main Market Co-op (458-2667), Michael Volk Marquee, Likes Girls, MCSQUARED Max at Mirabeau (922-6252), Radioface Mezzo Pazzo Wine Bar, Michael Robinson Michael’s OP (509-447-3355), Bad Monkey J Mootsy’s, Lex Loser, Casey Rogers, Rice Queen J nYne, Liz Rognes, DJ Mayhem Pend d’Oreille Winery (208-265-

I

f you like your rock big, loud and fuzzy, you’ll enjoy New York City band Organs, rolling into Spokane this week. The three-piece, which formed in 2008, is sort of a perfect mash-up of Mississippi blues, jangly 1950s rock ‘n’ roll and a whole lot of punk-rock sass — like Sid Vicious, John Lee Hooker and the Black Keys rolled into one super-loud package. The band is the definition of DIY punk: since forming, they’ve released a laundry list of tapes, 7-inches and EPs, not to mention gone on massive tours around the country. — LEAH SOTTILE Organs with Duck Duck Suckerpunch • Thu, April 11, at 10 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • $5 • 21+ • 838-1570 8545), Dan Lavoie J Phat House, Czar, Blackwater Prophet, Lb.! and Pro-Abortion Red Lion River Inn (328-9526), Chris Rieser and The Nerve Revel 77 (280-0518), Chelsey Heidenreich Roadhouse, DJ Camo Rock Bar (443-3796), Triple Shot Shop, DJ Wax808 Splash (208-765-4000), The Hitmen Stir Eatery & Lounge (466-5999), Stephanie Hatzinikolis Swaxx (703-7474), Lafa Taylor, Nico Luminous, Jaeda, MC Sake One J The Porch (326-2385), Halftone (see story above) feat. Matt Mitchell, BBBBandits, Bias, Octo Twelve String Brewing Co. (9908622), Maxie Ray Mills J Ugly Bettie’s, Flying Spiders, The Staxx Brothers

Saturday, 4/6

Belltower, Silent Theory, Fail Safe Project Beverly’s (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn Big City Saloon (474-0579), DJ Fusion Bigfoot, The Usual Suspects Blue Spark, DJ Darkside Som Bluz at the Bend, Led Foot Deacon Bolo’s (891-8995), Slow Burn Boomers (368-9847), Kozmik Dreamzz J Boots Bakery & Lounge, Soul Brunch with DJ Darkside Som Carr’s Corner, Blackwater Prophet Cellar, Bones Bolan & Nelson Checkerboard Bar, Forest Friends Coeur d’Alene Casino, Echo Elysium, Ryan Larsen Band Coeur d’Alene Cellars (208-6642336), Eric Neuhausser Coeur d’Alene Resort, Coeur

d’Alene Blues Festival feat. Voodoo Church, Roberson & BZ, Lloyd Jones, Duffy Bishop, Charlie Musselwhite, Ty Curtis Curley’s (208-773-5816), Sucker Punch Fedora Pub, Bill Bozly Fizzie Mulligans, The Vibe Gibliano Brothers, Dueling Pianos J THE Hop!, Invasive, Nixon Rodeo, Vial 8, Midnightmine Hot Rods (534-4061), Scorpius Iron Horse, The Jam Band Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy John’s Alley, Sugarcane Jones Radiator, American Catapult, Dead Mans Pants Kenworthy (208-882-4127), Quarter Monkey J Knitting Factory, Hells Belles, Hot Box La Rosa Club (208-255-2100), Open mic Lincoln Center (327-8000), Chase Marquee, Likes Girls, MCSQUARED Max at Mirabeau (922-6252), Radioface Michael’s OP (509-447-3355), Bad Monkey J Mootsy’s, Terrible Buttons, Midnight Salvage Co., Tyler Aker

get listed!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. nYne, DJ Mayhem Red Lion River Inn (328-9526), Chris Rieser and The Nerve Republic Brewing Co. (775-2700), Little Jane and the Pistol Whips Roadhouse, DJ Camo Saddle Inn (747-0347), The Bobby Bremer Band Seasons of Couer d’Alene (208664-8008), Truck Mills Splash (208-765-4000), The Hitmen Stir Eatery & Lounge (466-5999), Chelsey Heidenreich The Grail (208-665-5882), Wicked Stitch, Somatic, GMS The Shop, Marty Gomez Vintage Vines (227-9463), Stephanie Hatzinikolis

Sunday, 4/7

Cellar, Steve Ridler Coeur d’Alene Resort, Coeur d’Alene Blues Festival feat. The Spokane Community Gospel Ensemble Daley’s Cheap Shots, Open mic Geno’s (487-9541), Eddie Haskell Jazz Trio John’s Alley, Casey Donahew Band Marquee, Likes Girls, DJ D3vin3 J Northern Quest Casino, REO Speedwagon Ugly Bettie’s, DJ Dave Zola, The Bucket List

Monday, 4/8

Bon Bon (413-1745), DJ Darkside Som

J Calypsos Coffee (208-6650591), Open mic Eichardt’s, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills Red Room Lounge, Bakin Phat Rico’s (332-6566), Open mic Soulful Soups & Spirits, DJ Duece Ugly Bettie’s, Open mic Whiskey Dick’s (474-9387), DJ Dave

Tuesday, 4/9

Bing Crosby Theater, Tommy Dorsey Orchestra Cellar, TC Tye J Chairs Coffee (340-8787), Open mic Hot Rods (534-4061), DJ Dave John’s Alley, Open mic Knitting Factory, Tech N9ne, Krizz Kaliko, Brotha Lynch Hung, Kutt Calhoun, Ces Cru, Rittz, Knothead J Luxe Coffeehouse, Trickster Fox Moscow Food Co-op (208-8828537), Greg Hodapp Rico’s (332-6566), The Underground Blues Band Roadhouse, Luke Jaxon J Washington State University (Library Road), Youngblood Hawke, Vacationer, Pacific Air Zola, Dan Conrad and the Urban Achievers

Wednesday, 4/10

Big City Saloon (474-0579), DJ Fusion Bigfoot, DJ Dave Blue Spark, Writers Cup Emcee Competition with DJ Darkside Som Cellar, Max Daniels Eichardt’s, Charley Packard Fedora Pub, Kosh Geno’s (487-9541), Open mic J THE Hop!, The Realla Gorilla & The Grusome Gorillas release party Irv’s (624-4450), DJ Prophesy La Rosa Club (208-255-2100), Miah Kohal and Ray Allen Marquee, Likes Girls, DJ D3vin3 Mezzo Pazzo Wine Bar, Evan Denlinger Mootsy’s, Highlight Bomb, Diamond Speedboat, The Estafets Phat House, Kenny B Ripples (326-5577), Dru Heller Trio Roadhouse, Last Chance Band Sundown Saloon (208-765-6585), Sam Platts and the Kootenai Three

Coming Up…

J Baby Bar, White Mystery, Rice Queen, Normal Babies on April 11 J Mootsy’s, Organs (see story on facing page), Duck Duck Suckerpunch on April 11 J nYne, Elkfest Launch feat. The Real Life Rockaz on April 11 J Zola, Eric Tollefson (see story on page 55) on April 11 Carr’s Corner, Bullets and Balloons, Bandit Train, The Cypus Experiment on April 12 THE Hop!, Suffocation, Exhumed, Jungle Rot, Rings of Saturn, Admirion, Lord of War, Zingaia on April 12 John’s Alley, Eric Tollefson Band

on April 13 Knitting Factory, Awolnation, Blondfire, Mother Mother on April 15 Jones Radiator, The Finns, Brite Lights, Strange Mana on April 18 Mootsy’s, Hillstomp on April 18 Boots Bakery & Lounge, Josh Hedlund, Chris Staples, Cedar & Boyer on April 19 Mikey’s Gyros (208-882-0780), Maps & Atlases, Young Man on April 19 MOOTSY’S, Tweak Bird, Hooves, 66beat on April 20 Carr’s Corner, A God or An Other, SubRosa, Eight Bells on April 21 Red Room Lounge, Rahzel on April 26

Carr’s Corner, Ivan & Alyosha, Jay Nash, Cursive Wires on May 5 Knitting Factory, Tyler, The Creator, Earl Sweatshirt on May 8 Knitting Factory, MGMT, Kuroma on May 14 Bing Crosby Theater, Pokey Lafarge, Cursive Wires on May 18 Northern Quest Casino, Jewel on May 31 DOWNTOWN SPOKANE, Volume, the Inlander’s Music Festival on May 31 and June 1 Red Room Lounge, Dead Prez on June 6 Knitting Factory, Pigs on the Wing (Pink Floyd Tribute), 6/22 Fox Theater, Old Crow Medicine Show on July 2

BEER BREWED HERE Some of the nation’s top beers are brewed right here. Pick up the Nightlife Issue for an in-depth look at our local breweries.

NIGHTLIFE ISSUE on stands April 25th

For advertising details, contact 509.325.0634 ext. 215 | Sales@Inlander.com

music | venues 315 restaurant • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 avenue Pizzaria • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 baby bar • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 the belltower • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 bing Crosby theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 bigFoot Pub • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 blue sParK • 15 S. Howard St. • 838-5787 bluz at the bend • 2721 N. Market • 483-7300 boots baKery & lounge • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 Carr’s Corner • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 the Cellar • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 the Center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 742-7879 the CheCKerboard bar • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 Coeur d’alene Casino • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 daley’s CheaP shots • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 eiChardt’s • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 Fedora Pub • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 Fizzie Mulligan’s • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 Fox theater • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 gibliano brothers • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 the hoP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 iron horse • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 John’s alley • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 Jones radiator • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 Knitting FaCtory • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 laguna CaFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 luxe CoFFeehouse • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 Marquee • 522 W. Riverside Ave • 838-3332 Mezzo Pazzo wine bar • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 Moon tiMe • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 northern quest Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 nyne • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 o’shay’s • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 the Phat house • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 red rooM lounge • 521 W, Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 roadhouse Country roCK bar • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 sergio’s • 825 W. Riverside Ave. • 7472085 the shoP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 soulFul souPs & sPirits • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 the swaMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 ugly bettie’s • 211 N. Division • 747-8940 zola • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 57

PRESENTATION INTO AFRICA

Tanzania’s Gombe chimpanzees live in a world geographically isolated from humans, nestled in one of the country’s smallest national forests off of the shore of Lake Tanzania. But the remote existence of these chimpanzees mirrors our own lives in other ways: socially, politically, scientifically and behaviorally. Fifty years ago, anthropologist and primatologist Jane Goodall set foot into this jungle, embarking on the most groundbreaking chimpanzee behavioral studies of the century. Today, Goodall brings listeners into the heart of Africa through talks about her research and experience working with these primates, touching upon the importance of humanity and animals — and how we can make simply living better for all species. — SARAH MUNDS Making a Difference: An Evening with Dr. Jane Goodall • Tue, April 9, at 7 pm • $15-$45 • Gonzaga’s McCarthey Athletic Center • 801 N. Cincinnati St. • gonzaga.edu/goodall • 3133572

58 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

MUSIC BLOCK ROCK

MUSIC HELP FROM YOUR FRIENDS

Elkfest Launch Party feat. the Real Life Rockaz • Thu, April 11, at 8 pm • nYne • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • $5 • 21+ • 474-1621

World Relief Spokane Benefit featuring Creme Tangerine • Fri, April 5, at 6:30 pm • $12 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave.

There are a few things that say Spokane’s summer isn’t far off: pasty dudes riding little bikes without shirts on 50-degree days, ladies in bikini tops at the downtown bus plaza. And, of course, the best part: Elkfest’s big spring kickoff party for their summer music extravaganza. At this week’s launch party, the brains behind the festival roll out their complete lineup for the early June music fest. Each year the planning committee ups the ante, booking bigger regional indie and rock acts to play Spokane’s coolest neighborhood. Guesses for this year’s headliners? — LEAH SOTTILE

World Relief Spokane has a long track record of helping refugees from war- and poverty-stricken countries start a new and prosperous life in our community. To help with those efforts the organization is raising some funds with this Friday-night show from Beatles tribute act Creme Tangerine, a Seattle-based band that’s known for putting more emphasis on sounding like the greatest band on earth than looking like them. Go ahead, sing along and know that you’re lending a helping hand along the way. — MIKE BOOKEY

get listed!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

THEATER SHIPWRECKED RELATIONSHIPS

In ancient Greek mythology, sirens lured sailors to certain death with their melodious voices, charming personalities, and rockin’ bods. Homeric hero Odysseus strapped himself to his ship’s mast in order to keep from being lured by the sirens’ seductive calls. Three thousand years later, this phenomenon apparently is still happening on cruise ships, at least in the play Sirens. This time, a husband flings himself over the side of his cruise liner’s rails in chase of a mystical and legendary seducer of men. His wife, who had enough wit to stay on the ship, pursues her high-school sweetheart instead. The results are a conversation about long-term relationships, the agony of several decades of marriage, and mythological creatures. — SARAH MUNDS Sirens • April 4-20 • Show times and dates vary • $12-$28 • Interplayers Theatre • 174 S. Howard St. • interplayerstheatre.org • 455-7529

VISIT YOUR LOCAL SPRINT PREFERRED RETAILER pullman 409 ne Stadium Way

Spokane 506 n Sullivan Road Ste B 4750 n Division Street Ste 2026 2118 n Ruby Ste B 2915 e 29th avenue Ste 1 9327 n newport Highway

iDaHo 560 W kathleen avenue Ste. H, Coeur d’alene 1956 W pullman Road, moscow

DANCE SERIOUS CELTIC STEPPING

Attendees of this weekend’s Michael Flatley-produced Celtic dance extravaganza shouldn’t expect anything less than awe-worthy. In case you didn’t know, Flatley is the guy behind Riverdance and holds a Guinness world record for having his legs insured for $40 million, as well as multiple records for being the world’s highest paid dancer. Irish dancing is a pretty serious pastime, and we’re betting that the dancers in the touring production of Lord of the Dance — a 21-scene love story told through dance — have spent the better part of their lives training to land roles in shows like this one, which has been described as mesmerizing, fascinating and entertaining. — CHEY SCOTT Lord of the Dance • Sat, April 6, at 8 pm • $25-$65 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000

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APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 59

EVENTS | OPEN MIC

Monday

MUSIC | BLUE SPARK, 15 S. Howard MUSIC | CALYPSOS COFFEE, 116 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene MUSIC | EICHARDT’S, 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint MUSIC | RICO’S, 200 E. Main St., Pullman MUSIC | UGLY BETTIE’S, 211 N. Division

Tuesday

MUSIC | CHAIRS COFFEE, 133 W. Indiana Ave. MUSIC | THE HOGFISH, 1920 E. Sherman Ave, Coeur d’Alene

Wednesday

MUSIC | IRON HORSE, 407 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

SPOKEN WORD | NEATO BURRITO, 827 W. First Ave. MUSIC | SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, 117 N. Howard

Thursday

MUSIC | O’SHAY’S, 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Dr., Coeur d’Alene COMEDY | NEATO BURRITO, 827 W. First Ave. (second and fourth Thursdays)

Sunday

MUSIC | DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, 6412 E. Trent Ave. Visit Inlander.com/events for complete listings of venues hosting karaoke, trivia and open mics.

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market. (483-7300) POETS UP! Improv comedy show featuring rhyming, lyrics and even miming. April 5-26, Fridays at 8 pm. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) WAYNE BRADY Live stand-up comedy show as part of WSU Mom’s Weekend events. April 13 at 7:30 pm. $49.50. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand Ave., Pullman. (800-325-7328) BILL O’REILLY AND DENNIS MILLER On-stage show featuring the Fox news host and radio personality. July 20 at 8 pm. $55+. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000)

COMMUNITY

FEED THE NEIGHBORHOOD Free meals provided every Thursday from 4-6 pm. Free. (Volunteers also needed to cook meals) 7th and Catherine Ave., Post Falls, Idaho. (208-661-5166) FREE TAX ASSISTANCE If you worked in 2012 and have a low to moderate income you may qualify to get your taxes done free at one of the Spokane County Tax Sites. Through April 15. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. Appointments and walk-ins accepted. (358-3526) HOST FAMILIES NEEDED Volunteer host families needed for Face the World’s fall 2013 semester home-stay programs for international high school students from

Enter. Rejoice. Come In. All Are Welcome Here.

Subs crib!e

now

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 and 11

33rd season announced April 9! You will love the familiar and new plays! Great Stories!

455-7529 www.interplayerstheatre.org TicketsWest.com 174 S Howard Street, Spokane

Do not miss the May 26th Early Bird Deadline Call or visit the Box Office or TicketsWest Renewals and new subscription packages are available now!

60 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

more than 15 countries. Deadline is June 15. facetheworld.org (888-389-1006) CONNECT WITH THE ELECT Connect with Inland Northwest mayors David Condon (Spokane), Tom Towey (Spokane Valley) and Steve Peterson (Liberty Lake). April 4 from 7-9:15 am. Free. GSI, 801 W. Riverside Ave. bizstreetspokane.com (321-3632) BAD SCIENCE FRIDAY “Ancient Aliens”themed activities on the techniques used to build ancient structures like the pyramids. April 5 from 10 am-6 pm. $7$10. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (443-5669) MOBIUS PLANETARIUM SHOW See planetarium shows scheduled all day. April 5 from 11:30-3:30. $9-$12. Children under three are free. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (321-7128) FRIENDS OF HREI SOCIAL Social to thank the organization’s supporters and to announce winners of the Eva Lassman Memorial Writing Contest. April 5 at 6 pm. Free. Human Rights Education Institute, 414 W. Mullan Rd., CdA. hrei. org (208-292-2359) BAMBINO BUDDY-BALL BENEFIT Fundraiser event featuring drinks, dinner, and dancing to benefit the Bambino Buddy-Ball League of Spokane. April 5 at 6 pm. $25-$55. Dance Street Ballroom, 443 W. Dean. (326-9545) THE CLOTHESLINE PROJECT Women affected by violence can express their emotions by decorating a T-shirt to be hung on the clothesline to be viewed. Shirts on display by local community members April 6-28. River Park Square,

808 W. Main Ave. (747-8224) GIRL SCOUT COOKIE RUN 1-mile or 3-mile fun run and walk, cookies, prizes and more. April 6 at 9 am. $15-$20. Dwight Merkel Sports Complex, 5701 N. Assembly St. (327-3808) HOLOCAUST OBSERVANCE CERMONY In observance of National Holocaust Remembrance Day. April 7 at 7 pm. Temple Beth Shalom, 1322 E. 30th Ave. (536-7745) SPOKANE SWING DANCE CLUB Social dance featuring beginning West Coast swing dancing; lesson preceding the dance. April 7 from 6-10 pm. Lesson from 6-7 pm. $5-$8. German American Society Hall, 25 W. Third Ave. spokaneswingdanceclub.org (954-2158) STUFF THE BUS DIAPER DRIVE 4th annual supply drive hosted by Inland NW Baby. April 7-13. Drop-off bins at all area Walgreens stores and other locations throughout Spokane. Inlandnwbaby.org OUR KIDS OUR BUSINESS LUNCHEON Author Robin Karr Morse will speak at the event about the connection of trauma during pregnancy and early childhood to long-term mental illness. April 10 from 11:30 am-5 pm. $35/lunch only, $50/lunch and training. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ourkidsspokane.org (838-6581) GREEN BUILDING SLAM Second annual event featuring 10 local architects/ designers/engineers showcasing an innovative green building project in 10-minute presentations. April 10 from 5:30-7:30 pm. $10-$15. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. spokanegreenbuildingslam.bpt.me (624-1050)

BIG BANG BENEFIT Breakfast to benefit programs, scholarship and outreach opportunities for Mobius Kids and Mobius Science Center. April 12 from 7-8:30 am. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (321-7128) SAFETY RALLY Young adults with developmental disabilities are invited to learn principles of personal safety to help prevent sexual abuse and other exploitation. April 12 from 11 am-1 pm. Free and open to the public. STA Plaza, 701 W. Riverside Ave. (747-8224) D.E.A.R. Drop Everything and Read event as part of National Library Week and a celebration of children’s author Beverly Cleary’s birthday. April 12 from 3-5 pm at the Downtown, Shadle and South Hill library branches. spokaneli-

brary.org (444-5331) AN EVENING OF HOPE Dinner and silent auction benefiting the American Childhood Cancer Organization Inland NW, featuring keynote speaker and threetime brain cancer survivor Michael Moyles. April 12 at 6 pm. $50. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. (9249000) LANDS COUNCIL DINNER AND AUCTION The local nonprofit’s 18th annual dinner and auction is its largest fundraiser of the year and features a silent auction, three-course dinner, live auction and more. April 13 at 5 pm $65. DoubleTree Hotel, 322 N. Spokane Falls Ct. landscouncil.org (209-2851) HAWAIIAN CLUB LUAU Cultural event

hosted by the Whitworth Hawaiian Club. April 13. $12-$22. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (808-345-2465) HOPE RUN SPOKANE 5K, 10K and kids run benefiting the American Childhood Cancer Organization of the Inland Northwest. April 13 at 9 am. Children of the Sun Trail at Farwell Elementary, 13005 N. Crestline St. hoperunspokane. com MOBIUS OPEN HOUSE Check out the 65 hands-on science exhibits and other live science demonstrations at Mobius. April 15 from 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free admission. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main St. (443-5669) SEND A FRIEND A GOAT 8th annual fundraiser event benefitting the Wish-

ing Star Foundation. April 15-19 from 9 am-3 pm each day. $50 to send a baby goat to a friend or colleague in the Spokane area. Wishing Star Foundation, 139 S. Sherman Ave. wishingstar.org (7443411) LET FREEDOM RING 57th annual event honoring men and women serving in the military, featuring keynote address by Captain Scott Smiley. April 17 from 7-9 am. $30. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. greaterspokane.org (624-1393) WOMEN’S SHOW Vendors, demos, booths and more. April 19-21; in conjunction with the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure on April 20. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanewomensshow.com

ATTITUDINAL HEALING WORKSHOP Following the April 19 lecture by Jerry Jampolsky and Diane Cirincione, attend a two-day workshop to learn the steps of attitudinal healing. April 20-21. $55$65. Unity Spiritual Center, 2900 S. Bernard St. Register at ahinlandnorthwest. weebly.com (838-6518) DISCOVERING RESILIENCY Rally to celebrate survivors of child abuse and their caregivers. April 26 from 5:30-7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. (7478224)

GET LISTED!

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APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 61

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62 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

BEADED BRACELET CLASS Learn tips on creating beaded jewelry and more in this hands-on class to make a bracelet, and learn skills to make more. April 6 from 1-3 pm. $30. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd. clymergallery. com (893-8260)

ETC.

A COURSE IN MIRACLES Theological study group. Thursdays at 7 pm. Love Your Life Center, 1111 E. Sherman Ave. Coeur d’Alene. (208-777-1996) COUNTRY SWING LESSONS Learn country-style swing dancing with The Swinging Boots. Thursdays from 7-9 pm. $5. The Roadhouse Country Rock Bar, 20 N. Raymond Rd. (413-1894) ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS Lessons for newcomers are free on Monday and Thursdays at 6 pm. Club Corazon, 2117 E. 37th Ave. spokanetango.com (688-4587) COWBOY BALL Dinner, drinks, dancing, live and silent auctions, live music and more benefiting the North Idaho Fair Foundation. April 5 at 5 pm. Ages 21+. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, CdA. cdacowboyball.com (208-772-5471) SPOKANE HOME & GARDEN SHOW Vendors, demonstrations, information and more. April 5 from noon-8 pm; April 6 from 10 am-8 pm; April 7 from 10 am-5 pm. $8 admission, kids under 12 free. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanehomeandgardenshow.com LILAC CITY VOLKSSPORTS The local organization hosts day trips to regional destinations to explore a new place on foot. April 6 trip to the TriCities. Car pool meets at 8 am at Fred Meyer at Third Ave. and Thor St. lilaccityvolks.com CHAKRA CLASSES Learn about the chakras and how they relate to spiritual healing and more with facilitator Karen Briar. Weekly classes start on April 6. $20 donation/class. Classes held at 4233 E. 11th Ave. (535-8156) MULE DEER FOUNDATION BANQUET Event celebrating the organization’s 25th anniversary with a dinner, live and silent auctions and more. April 6 at 4 pm. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane. com (216-4302) SEED PELLETS WORKSHOP Learn to make various kinds of seed pellets for planting. April 6 from 1-4 pm. $5-$15. Pine Meadow Farm Center, 10425 S. Andrus Rd., Cheney. (448-3066) SHARE THE DHARMA DAY Learn about Buddhism during this regular event. April 7 from 9:45 am-3 pm. Donations accepted. Sravasti Abbey, 692 Country Lane, Newport, Wash. sravasti.org (447-5549) CONTRA DANCE Dancing and a concert by Ruff Shodd. April 7 from 2-4 pm. $5-$7. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St. Bonners Ferry, Idaho. (208-610-2846) CMTV ORIENTATION Learn more about the classes and offerings at Community-Minded Television at a monthly orientation. April 9 at 5:30 pm. Free. Community-Minded Enterprises, 25 W. Main Ave., Ste. 310. communityminded.org (209-2617) GENEAOLOGY WORKSHOP Learn how to find information by searching

online birth, marriage and death records. April 9 and 11 from 6-9 pm. $21. CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place. (279-6027) VERMICOMPOSTING WORKSHOP Learn how to use worms for composting. April 9 from 3-5 pm. $5, preregistration required. Sun People Dry Goods Co., 32 W. Second Ave. sunpeopledrygoods.com (368-9378) COLLEGE INFO NIGHT Learn about applying to and attending college at a CCS Campus in Spokane. April 10 from 6-8 pm. Free. SCC Student Services Bldg., 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8020) MEMORIZATION TECHNIQUES Workshop for seniors interested in memorization skills and techniques. April 10 from 10 am-1 pm. $45, registration deadline April 5. Interplayers Theater, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre. org (455-7529) ALZHEIMER’S GALA & AUCTION Masquerade ball and auction for the 13th annual Nancy Rockwell Alzheimer’s Gala. April 12 at 5:30 pm. $100. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. (473-3390) CIVIL WAR READ-IN PROJECT Train to participate in a Read-In event on Washington territory’s experience with the Civil War to create a permanent, online, searchable database in honor of the 150th anniversary of the war. April 13 from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Washington State Archives, Eastern Region Branch, 960 Washington St., Cheney. (235-7500) NW AUTISM ANNIVERSARY The organization is celebrating its 10th anniversary with dinner, a live and silent auction and more. April 13 from 5-9 pm. $60-$100. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. (328-1582) SCC SPRING FLOWER SHOW Third annual show “Swimming in Flowers.” April 13 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Spokane Community College Lair, 1810 N. Greene St. (624-3457) NATIVE PLANTS Presentation on native plants for use by Spokane-area gardeners, hosted by the Friends of Manito. April 13 at 10 am. Free and open to the public. Manito Meeting Room, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org (456-8038) LILAC CITY VOLKSSPORTS The local organization hosts day trips to regional destinations to explore a new place on foot. April 15 trip to Ritzville. Car pool meets at 8 am at Fred Meyer at Third Ave. and Thor St.

FILM

STUCK Screening of the documentary on the international adoption process. April 5 at 7 pm. $16; RSVP required. Village Center Cinemas, 12622 N. Division St. and AMC River Park Square 20, 808 W. Main Ave. stuckdocumentary. com (212-843-9355) 50 HOUR SLAM Third annual film competition and festival open to all filmmakers in the Spokane-Coeur d’Alene area. Kick-off on April 5 at 7 pm. Magic Lantern Theater, 25 W. Main Ave. (3703449) REVEAL THE PATH Adventure film on using a bicycle to explore and discover new places, presented by SANE. April 6 at 7 pm. $9. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater. com (227-7638) REEL MOVIES FOR REEL NEEDS Families with special-needs children are

invited to see a movie as part of a new program designed to better accommodate such children. Movies shown the first and third Sundays in April (April 7 and 21) at 11 am. $6/adults; kids under 14 free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) MAD MEN PREMIERE Watch the season 6 premiere of the show in a fundrasier for Spokane Preservation Advocates. April 7 at 8 pm, drinks before the show at 7 pm. $5 minimum donation. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) FORREST GUMP Screening of the classic Tom Hanks film. April 8 at 7 pm. $5. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) TELLURIDE MOUTAIN FILM FEST Screening of films celebrating the environment and the human spirit, hosted by the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation. April 10 at 7 pm; doors open at 6 pm. $12-$14. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) IN WHICH WE SERVE Screening of the film as part of the library’s “Hollywood Goes to War” series. April 10 at 5:30 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. (444-5336) RACING THE REZ Documentary on five teens living on tribal reservations as they prepare for a state championship track meet. April 10 at 10:30 am. Free and open to the public. SCC Hagan Foundation Center for the Humanities, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-7045) MISS REPRESENTATION Screening of the documentary on challenging the media’s portrayal of women. April 12 from 6-8 pm. Free and open to the public. North Idaho College, Meyer Health Sciences Bldg., 1000 W. Garden Ave. akaplan@nivpc.org BACHLORETTE, 34 Screening of a film about the pressure society places on women to get married. April 16 from noon-12:40 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, Cheney campus. (359-2898) THE INVISIBLE WAR Screening of the Oscar-nominated documentary about sexual violence in the military, hosted by Lutheran Community Serivces NW. April 17 at 5:15 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. (747-8224)

FOOD

SPRING COOKING Learn new gourmet recipes for spring from chef Bob Black including a rack of lamb and salmon dish. April 4 at 5:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. Williams St. Post Falls. (208-457-8950) EAT HEALTHY ON A BUGET Learn how to prepare a shopping list, navigate the store and cook simple, nutritious meals and how to get the most for your dollar. April 4 from 6:15-8:45 pm. $17. Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, 8441 N. Indian Trail Rd. (279-6027) BEER TASTING Sample and learn about new brews and seasonal releases including barley wines, hop-forward pale ales, lagers and IPAs. April 5 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) ORGANIC VEGGIE GARDENING Learn how to grow a garden without using chemicals. April 6 from 11 am-1 pm. $15, pre-registration required. Sun People Dry Goods Co., 32 W. Second Ave. sunpeopledrygoods.com (3689378)

GARDEN HERBS Learn how to cultivate and use medicinal herbs. April 6 from 3-5 pm. $15, pre-registration required. Sun People Dry Goods Co., 32 W. Second Ave. (368-9378) SAUSAGE FEED Meal of smoked sausage, mashed potatoes, vegetables, sauerkraut, applesauce and dessert. April 7 from 11 am-3 pm. $5-$10. Sprague Community Center, 3rd and C St., Sprague, Wash. (257-2806) MIXOLOGY MONDAY Learn how to make cocktails and why certain cocktail drinks are made the way they are. April 8 at 7 pm. $15. Tickets only online. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls. corkjoy.com (208-457-9885) FREE CONE DAY 34th annual “free cone day” with a one-scoop cone or cup. April 9 from noon-8 pm. Free. Ben & Jerry’s, River Park Square food court, third level, 808 W. Main Ave. (455-8500) SOUTH AFRICAN WINE Sample and learn about a lineup of wines from South Africa. April 12 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) WINEMAKER’S DINNER Proceeds from the event will benefit the planned St. Luke’s Stroke Rehabilitation Center of Excellence. April 12 at 6:30 pm. $200/ person. The Club at Black Rock, 18168 S. Kimberlite Dr., CdA. festivalofwineandflowers.com (473-6370) MAD MEN COCKTAIL PARTY 1960s-style party featuring cocktails inspired by the popular “Mad Men” series. April 13 from 7-11 pm. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls. Corkjoy.com (208-457-9885) GLUTEN FREE COOKING Learn to make easy-to-prepare dishes without wheat or gluten as a main ingredient. April 16 at 5:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. Williams St. Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) WINES OF NORTHERN ITALY Learn about and taste wines from some of Italy’s renowned northern regions. April 19 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (3432253) FESITVAL OF WINE 22nd annual event benefiting St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute featuring tastings of premium Washington wines with hors d’oeuvres, silent and live auctions and more. April 20 from 6:30-10 pm. $125-$200. Manito Country Club, 5303 S. Hatch Rd. festivalofwineandflowers.com (232-8131) DRY FLY DINNER Dinner featuring Dry Fly pairings mixed by a local bartender; dinner benefits the Steelhead Coalition. April 21-22. $60. Santé, 404 W. Main Ave. (315-4613) BARRELS & BITES Second annual tasting event featuring wine, microbrews, hard cider, spirits, food and more. April 26. $40-$50. Spokane Public Market, 32 W. Second Ave. spokanepublicmarket.org (624-1154)

MUSEUMS

SPOMA SPOMA: Spokane Modern Architecture 1948-1973 is an exhibit that tells the story of Spokane’s groundbreaking modern architecture legacy. March 2-Nov. 3, 2013. Museum open Wed-Sun from 10 am-5 pm. $5-$7. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) MUSEUM OF NORTH IDAHO “Shaping the Handle: Idaho Territory 1863-1890” exhibit commemorating the 150th anniversary of the creation of Idaho Territory. The museum is now open TuesSat from 11 am-5 pm through October

31. Admission $1-$7. Museum of North Idaho, 115 NW Blvd. museumni.org THE RITE OF SPRING AT 100 Multimedia celebraton of the Igor Stravinsky ballet presented by composer Donivan Johnson. April 13 at 3 pm. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. (456-3913)

MUSIC

COEUR D’ALENE BLUES FESTIVAL Annual blues music festival and “blues cruises” featuring performances by national and local musicians and more. April 5-7. $15-$37. Times and locations vary throughout Coeur d’Alene and at the Coeur d’Alene Resort. cdabluesfestival.com (208-765-4000) HALFTONE A night of art, music and de-

sign, featuring live music by Matt Mitchell (Folkinception), BBBBandits, Bias, Octo and more, plus the sale of art and design pieces by students of EWU. April 5 from 5-9 pm. $8. All-ages. The Porch, 1804 W. Broadway Ave. (326-2385) BENEFIT CONCERT Concert featuring performances by Whitworth students to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank. April 5 from 7-8:30 pm. Admission is a canned food donation. Whitworthy University HUB, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (290-9094) CRÈME TANGERINE Concert by the Beatles tribute band to benefit World Relief Spokane. April 5 at 6:30 pm. $12. All-ages. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. worldrelief.org/spokane (484-9829) REO SPEEDWAGON [SOLD OUT] Rock

concert. April 7 at 7:30 pm. $60-$80. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. (481-6700) WHITWORTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Spring concert. April 7 at 3 pm. $5-$7. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony. org (624-1200) INLAND NW HARP FESTIVAL Harpists of all ages will perform a concert conducted by Leslie Stratton Norris of the Dayton (Ohio) Symphony. April 7 at 3 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. (208-618-9992) FRIENDS OF A CHORAL INFLUENCE Concert performed by Spokane Choral Artists. April 7 at 4 pm. $10. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. spokanechoralartists.com (251-6296) MUSIC IN HISTORIC HOMES Classical

concert performed by musicians of Allegro, Baroque & Beyond. Concerts April 9-10 at 3 pm, 4 pm, 6 pm and 7:30 pm. $25. Mack-Kane House, 734 E. 23rd Ave. allegrobaroque.org (455-6865) COEUR D’ALENE YOUTH MARIMBAS African rhythm melodies performed on wooden xylophones by 15 local students ages 9-18. April 12. $5. The Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208457-8950) DAVID ROTH Concert. April 12 at 7:30 pm. $15. Unity Spiritual Center, 2900 S. Bernard St. unityspokane.org (8386518) MICHAEL BOLTON Concert. April 12 at 7:30 pm. $45-$65. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6700)

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November 16, 2013 November 17, 2013

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SymPhoniC danCeS from weSt Side Story

PiCtureS at an exhibition

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APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 63

relationships

Advice Goddess Will You Flash Mob Me?

amy alkon

I’m going to propose to my girlfriend, and it seems there’s this trend of doing crazy, elaborate things to ask a girl to marry you. I know I can’t compete with the guys like the New York City dude I just read about who threw down $45,000 to pop the question. But even if friends help me out for free, I don’t know whether I can make my proposal cool enough to go viral like the Portland guy who had his choreographed and filmed.  —Don’t Want To Disappoint

“Will you marry me?” is a pretty powerful question. Asking this of a woman who loves you can provoke tears, and not because you didn’t hire Beyonce to sing “Put A Ring On It” and spend a year training a humpback whale to swim by at exactly the right moment and shoot the ring out its blowhole. Regarding the proposals you mention, the New York guy is 27-year-old online marketing company honcho Josh Ogle. He wrote on reddit.com that he actually spent around $13K on a lavish proposal evening, starting with his popping the question to Nataliya Lavryshyn on a Manhattan hotel rooftop, decorated for the event with pages of Pablo Neruda’s poetry. This price included $3,500 for a professional “proposal planner” and a $1,500 post-proposal private dinner cooked by a celebrity chef. (Media outlets came up with the $45K proposal cost by adding in the $21K custom-made ring and the $10K post-engagement European “honeymoon.”) As easy as it is to mock the guy for outsourcing his proposal, Ogle is reportedly a self-made multi-millionaire (apparently, after growing up poor while his dad was in prison), so for him, $45K probably spends like $45 does for the rest of us. The Portland guy, actor and theatrical director Isaac Lamb, pulled together 60-plus friends and family members in an elaborate (and wildly adorable) lip-synched song-and-dance routine to Bruno Mars’ “Marry You.” His girlfriend, choreographer Amy Frankel, listened to the song on headphones from the tailgate of a Honda CRV pulling her slowly down the street while everyone danced in formation behind it. Lamb then got down on one knee and said to Frankel, “You have already given me a lifetime of happiness. Will you let me spend the rest of my life trying to give you the same?” (Not surprisingly, she said yes.) Although the trend toward extreme proposing is surely the lovechild of reality TV and social media, it has something in common with the mythic quest — an epic mission a man would go on to prove his love and worth to a woman. Of course, these days, the most dangerous journey a man can usually take for a woman is a trip to 7-Eleven on bald tires. So, conspicuous romancing can act as a stand-in proving ground — an extravagant display that a man’s “all-in” and somebody the woman can count on…to keep life exciting and to call a singing, dancing, plumbing flash mob whenever the garbage disposal’s broken. That said, you’re asking a woman to grow old with you, not auditioning for “America’s Got Proposal Talent.” If you are “all in,” you probably show your girlfriend that in a lot of little ways every day. Keep in mind that Ogle’s and Lamb’s proposals reflected who they are and will likely continue to be — a really rich guy and an artsy, creative guy, respectively. Your proposal likewise needs to reflect who you are and tell your girlfriend that you get who she is — starting with whether she’s someone who’d be horrified to have an intimate moment like a marriage proposal take place on the Jumbotron. The truth is, there’s no need for Jumbotrons or trying to hire away the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse from some Bar Mitzvah gig they picked up. Even if every one of Lamb’s dancers stayed home in bed, his proposal would have been extremely moving simply because of the words he spoke. Put your effort into telling your girlfriend why you always want to be there to hold her hand, even when it gets all wrinkly. Couple that with an essential element from the elaborate proposers — delighting a woman with the element of surprise. You can do this by planning your proposal around something your girlfriend once said (and will be amazed you remembered) or just by serving her toast a slightly different way: with a heart cut in the middle with the ring inside it. This sort of proposal sends a message — “I love you and want to spend the rest of my life with you” (not to be confused with “Bet I can get more YouTube hits than that big dog teaching the puppy to go down the stairs!”). n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

64 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

events | calendar Futureman Roy WootenConcert featuring Roy Wooten and The Black Mozart Ensemble. April 12 at 7:30 pm. $12-$18. SFCC Music Bldg. No. 15, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3741) Colin HayAn evening of music and comedy from the singer from the band Men at Work. April 13 at 8 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. Sandpoint, Idaho. panida.org (208-263-9191) Spokane SymphonyClassics Series: Schumann’s Rhenish Symphony. April 13 at 8 pm and April 14 at 3 pm. $14+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) KPBX Kids ConcertBob Dylanthemed concert featuring Carlos Alden, Sidetrack and Jenny Edgren. April 13 from 1-2 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) Gonzaga Wind SymphonyClassical concert. April 16 at 7:30 pm. $8$10, free to Gonzaga students. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org Spokane SymphonyChamber Soiree performed by members of the Symphony; wine and appetizers served. April 16 at 7:30 pm and April 17 at 7:30 pm. $45. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.com (624-1200) Pamela BrownleeJazz concert. April 19 at 7:30 pm. $15-$20. The Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) Spokane SymphonySuperPops Series: Pirates of Penzance. April 20 at 8 pm. $25+. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) Ugandan Orphans ChoirMembers of the choir will sing and dance in traditional costumes accompanied by African music. April 21 at 9 am and 10:45 am. Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. childcareworldwide.org (533-6800) Spokane Youth Symphony“Love is in the Air” spring concert. April 21 at 4 pm. $13-$17. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) Spokane Symphony ChoraleDuruflé’s Requiem. April 21 at 7:30 pm. $10-$25. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) Don WilliamsCountry music concert. April 22 at 7:30 pm. $40-$58. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200)

Performance

Lord of The DanceCeltic music and dance show. April 6 at 8 pm. $25-$65. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (2797000) An Dochas and the Haran Irish Dancers Celtic music with traditional Irish dancers. April 7 at 3 pm. $18-$30; WSU students free. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand Ave., Pullman. festivaldance.org (208-883-3267) Sesame Street Live“Can’t Stop Singing” musical performance. May 1 at 10:30 am and 6:30 pm. $13-$26. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000)

Sports & Outdoors

The Flying Irish RunWeekly 3-mile run. Thursdays at 6 pm. Free. Red Lion River Inn, 700 N. Division. flyingirish. org USA Boxing National Championships Preliminary rounds April 1-4 at HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo, Liberty Lake. Semifinal and final rounds April 5-6 at Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. $5-$40 or $100/ event pass. (481-6700) Backpack SchoolLearn to be confident and comfortable in the backcountry during a seven-week course on gear, clothing, navigation, safety, first aid and more. Class starts April 5 at 6:30 pm and runs through May 27, Fridays from 6:30-9 pm. Pre-registration required. $35 plus membership dues. Spokane Mountaineers, spokanemountaineers.org (939-2644) Spokane Table Tennis ClubPingpong club meets Saturdays from 1-4 pm. $2/visit. Northeast Youth Center, 3004 E. Queen Ave. (456-3581) Spokane Table TennisPing-pong club meets on Saturdays from 1-4 pm and Mondays and Wednesdays from 7-9:30 pm. $2/visit; open to the public.

weekend countdown

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North Park Racquet Club, 8121 N. Division. (768-1780) Spokane ShockSeason opener arena football game vs. Arizona Rattlers. April 12 at 7 pm. $14-$35. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokaneshock.com (242-7462) Open HouseMeet reps from fitness brands, free seminars and more. April 12 from 5-8 pm. Free. Fitness Fanatics, 12425 E. Trent Ave. fitfanatics.com (922-6080) Spokane Bike SwapDonate unused cycling equipment, trade it or buy new or used cycling gear at the event, which also raises money to benefit efforts by Friends of the Centennial Trail. April 13-14 from 9 am-3 pm each day. $5 admission; ages 12 and under free. Spokane Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokanebikeswap.com

Theater

On Golden PondDrama. Through April 14. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $21. Spokane Civic Theater, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) Over the River and Through the Woods Comedy. Through April 7. Thurs-Sat. at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $11-$17. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. (208-667-1323) SirensComedy. April 4-20. Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm and select special showings on April 10 and 17 at 7:30 pm and April 13 and 20 at 2 pm. $15-$28. Cheese and wine tasting before the performance on April 17, $40. Chocolate and wine tasting on April 10, $35. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayers.org (455-7529) Treasure Island Benefit Performance Perfomance of the adventure

play to benefit the Liberty Park Child Development Center. April 4 at 7 pm. $25. All-ages. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. libertyparkkids.org (534-0957) Treasure IslandAdventure. April 5-21. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $18-$24. Spokane Civic Theater, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) The GraduateComedy/drama. April 5-5, 11-13 at 7:30 pm; April 7 and 14 at 2 pm. $10-$15. Recommended for mature audiences. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. (332-8406) Northwoods Unleashed14th annual dinner theater show presented by Northwoods Performing Arts. April 5-6 and 12-13. $10-$25. Dinner at 6:30; show at 7:30. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy. 211 off Hwy. 2, Newport, Wash. (208-448-1394) Harvey Comedy. April 5-6 and April 12-13 at 7:30 pm. Also April 6 and 13 at 2 pm. $8-$10. WSU Jones Theatre, Pullman campus. (335-8522) The Ugliest DucklingPuppet show presented by Tears of Joy Puppet Theater of Portland, Ore. April 6 at 2 pm; puppet-making workshop at 3 pm. $7/ show only; $20 show and workshop. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) After-School Scene StudyClass on building theater skills for ages 13-16. April 8-May 20, Mondays from 4:30-6 pm. $95/student, registration deadline April 5. Interplayers Theater, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre. org (455-7529) Flashdance Musical as part of the Best of Broadway series. April 11-14. Show times vary. $33-$73. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) Hello Dolly!Musical comedy. April 11-13, 17-20 at 7:30 pm and April 13, 2021 at 1:30 pm. $10-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand Ave., Pullman. rtoptheatre.org (334-0750). Alice in WonderlandAdventure. April 12-28. Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Orielle Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave., Newport. pendorielleplayers.org (671-3389) I Hate HamletComedy. April 12-29. Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. April 18 performance at 7:30 pm. $15-$20. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. ignitetheatre.org (795-0004) How I Became a PirateChildren’s musical comedy. April 13 and April 20 at 1 pm and 4 pm. $5-$10. Spokane Civic Theater, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) Spank! The 50 Shades ParodyParody musical based on the bestselling “50 Shades of Grey” book trilogy. April 15-17 at 8 pm. $30. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spankshow. com (227-7638) Out of the ShadowsOne-woman show on the life of Joy Davidman Lewis, the wife of writer C.S. Lewis, presented by Moody Radio Northwest and The Lion’s Share Theatre. April 21 at 3 pm. $10-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. lionaround.org (327-1113)

Visual Arts

Hotel Spokane“Hope in the Midst of Despair” artist-writer collaboration

events | Trivia

Monday

Press, 909 S. Grand Blvd. Valhalla, 1000 N.E. Colorado St., Pullman

Tuesday

www.spokanehomeandgardenshow.com

Picnic Pines, 9212 S. Silver Lake Rd., Medical Lake Scout, 1001 W. First Ave. Soulful Soups, 117 N. Howard St. Valhalla, 1000 N.E. Colorado St., Pullman

Blue Spark, 15 S. Howard St. Eagle’s Pub, 414 First St., Cheney Fieldhouse Pizza, 4423 W. Wellesley Ave. Valhalla, 1000 N.E. Colorado St., Pullman

Friday

Wednesday

Saturday

Eagle’s Pub, 414 First St., Cheney Sidebar, 1101 W. Broadway Ave. Valhalla, 1000 N.E. Colorado St., Pullman

Flamin’ Joe’s, 7015 N. Division, 2620 E. 29th Ave. and 11618 E. Sprague Ave. Morty’s, 5517 S. Regal St. Valhalla, 1000 N.E. Colorado St., Pullman

Picnic Pines, 9212 S. Silver Lake Rd., Medical Lake Stella’s Café, 917 W. Broadway Valhalla, 1000 N.E. Colorado St., Pullman

Thursday

The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. Valhalla, 1000 N.E. Colorado St., Pullman

nYne, 232 W. Sprague JJ’s Grill, 8801 N. Indian Trail Rd. group show, a reprise of a similar 2011 exhibition, and held in collaboration with the Get Lit! Festival. April 1-June 28. Artist reception April 4 from 5-8 pm. Chase Gallery at City Hall, 808 W. Main Ave. spokanearts.org (321-9614) Renaissance Fair PostersPosters from past fairs will be on exhibition through April 26. Gallery reception April 4 from 5-7 pm, including the revealing of this year’s poster. Third Street Gallery, 206 E. Third St., Moscow. (208883-7036) Space, Energy and MovementAbstract painting exhibit by Hiromi Okumura. Artist reception April 7 from 1-3 pm. Exhibit runs through April 28. Dahmen Barn, artisanbarn.org (229-3414) Art SamplerStudents will explore different materials to create art inspired by famous 20th century artists. Fridays from 4-5:40 pm. $15/class. Ages 8-12. Spokane Art School, 809 W. Garland Ave. (325-3001) Tradition and Transformation in Glass “Chihulys from the Collection” exhibition of glass work and drawings from the museums collection by Dale Chihuly. April 5-July 31. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6611) First FridayNew art exhibits open at galleries across downtown Spokane and beyond. April 5 from 5-7 pm unless otherwise noted. See a complete listing of events on page 38 or visit Inlander.com/ FirstFriday for an interactive map. MFA Thesis ExhibitionArt exhibition. April 5-May 4. Artist reception April 5 at 6 pm. Museum of Art/WSU, Pullman campus. museum.wsu.edu (335-6282) Let’s PaintCreate a project while exploring color mixing, drawing and

Sunday

famous artists. Tuesdays from 1-2 pm. $10/class. Ages 4-7. Spokane Art School, 809 W. Garland Ave. (325-3001) Carolyn DoeBatiks and watercolors inspired by nature. Artist reception April 12 from 5-6:30 pm. Show runs April 12May 8. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. Fifth St. (208-882-8537) Local Artist ShowcaseThe new exhibition features the work of 13 artists including Harold Balazs, Morse Clary, Mary Farrell, Mel McCuddin, Sister Paula Turnbull and others. April 12-May 4. Arist reception April 12 from 5-8 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave., CdA. (208-765-6006)

Words

Sherman AlexieThe local author will present “Without Reservations: An Urban Indian’s Comic, Poetic and Highly Irreverent Look at the World.” April 4 at 7:30 pm. $12-$20; free for WSU students. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand Ave. Pullman. (335-3525) Patrick McManusThe author will talk about his writing and sign copies of his books, including his newest title to be released April 1. April 4 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) Faith and Reason Lecture Series Series of lectures on “Biology and the God of Abraham.” Part one of series is April 4-5; part two is April 16-18. Times vary. Free and open to the public. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. Jess Steven HughesThe local author will sign copies of his book “The Sign of the Eagle.” April 5 from 3-8 pm. Free. Shadle Hastings, 1704 W. Wellesley Ave. (327-6008)

Three Minute MicPoetry reading open mic event hosted by Chris Cook and featuring Dennis Held reading Vachel Lindsay’s poetry. April 5 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) Tom I. Davis MemorialCelebration of the late poet and writer with music, poetry and memories. April 6 from 3-5 pm. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (325-6283) Jess Steven HughesThe local author will sign copies of his book “The Sign of the Eagle.” April 6 from 1-7 pm. Free. Moscow Hastings, 2230 W. Pullman Rd. Julie LilienkampThe author will read from her poetry collection “Clips in Time.” April 6 at 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) Holocaust Remembrance Day “What Does the Holocaust Mean to You?” lecture by Judaic scholar Andrea Lieber. April 7 at 5:30 pm. Keynote lecture “Reconfiguring Jewish Female Space in Judaism” April 8 at 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6788) BootSlam Poetry slam event hosted by Spokane Poetry Slam. April 7 at 8:30 pm. $5. All-ages. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) Get Lit!15th annual literature festival featuring events and presentations by authors Joyce Carol Oates, Jaimy Gordon, Major Jackson, Robert Wrigley, Kim Barnes, Jonathan Evison, Christopher McDougall, David Shields and others. April 11-14. $15-$45. Locations and times vary. outreach.ewu.edu/getlit/ Jane Goodall“Making a Difference: An Evening with Dr. Jane Goodall,” as part of Gonzaga’s Presidential Speaker Series for the University’s 125th Anniversary. Dr. Goodall will discuss her behavioral research on chimpanzees and more. April 9 at 7 pm. $15-$45. McCarthey Athletic Center, 801 N. Cincinnati St. gonzaga.edu/goodall (313-3572) Women and the Wage GapApril 9th is Equal Pay day, meaning women’s earnings catch up to men’s earnings for the prior year; to recognize this symbolic event, the Women’s Studies program will host a workshop to negotiate wage skills and more. April 9 from 1-2:30 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, Cheney campus. (359-2898) The State of K-12 EducationWashington State Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn will be present. April 9 at 5 pm. Free and open to the public. WSU Compton Union Building, Pullman campus. education.wsu.edu Bonita GilbertThe local author and history instructor will talk about her latest book “Building for War.” April 10 at 5 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 720 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) Adam JohnsonThe novelist and short story writer will read from his work and sign books. April 10 at 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. University of Idaho, Menard Law Bldg.,(208-885-6259) The Death Penalty Debate“The Death Penalty: Do the Ends Justify the Means?” presented by GU Law Federalist Society featuring presentations and a debate. April 10 from 7-9 pm. Free. Gonzaga University Law School, 721 N. Cincinnati St. (313-3700) n

April 5 6 7 37th Annual

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APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 65

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68 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Cheers

STA Plaza March 25th. I was standing in the wheelchair ramp looking out the window. I was wearing grey slacks and a black fleece jacket. You were wearing army fatigues with a few pins on them. You came up to me and offered to shake my hand, and I declined. Then you tried to strike up conversation and I was remarkably rude. You told me about how people don’t really talk to you on facebook, and about your grandma in the hospital in Seattle. It wasn’t until the conversation was over and you caught your bus that I realized how rude I was, and more than that, how much it looked like you needed a friend. I’d be happy to chat with you on facebook. So I hope you read the Inlander and see that people do care.

high school with honors, attending college full time, and working your butts off to support yourselves in your own place now!! Here is a young man who is smart, hilarious, handsome, respectful and has an amazing big heart!; and here is a young woman who is beautiful, intelligent, funny, and loving! Together they are couple who’s love for each other will withstand any obstacle life puts in their way. Your father and I love you two with all our hearts and are so proud of you that we want everyone (at least those who read the Inlander lol!) to know just how much! And I am so blessed to have an amazing big brother/ role model for my kai-bear to have in his life. Love you two and your new hedgehog too! Lots of love, “Us”

always go downtown for the parade day shenanigans, and have a blast! This year was no exception. Just wanted to send out a quick thank you, and wow to you bartenders and bouncers at both locations. You guys are always great, but when we finished out the night at UB, and heard the D.J. say they had been working for 16 hours straight! Holy cow you guys, never would have guessed it. You were all smiles, and having fun with the crowd, unbelievable. Plus, we watched one of your door guys get punched in the face and still walk around the bar laughing and smiling, and handling people with kindness. Needless to say, impressed! Thanks again, and we’ll be seeing you on our next Saturday night outing.

you, and that sexy smile that I love, gap and all. Little did I know I’d bump into you again, and look at us now! I can’t believe we are engaged! I just wanted to remind you how much I love you and how grateful I am every day to have you! You are the spot to my dalmatian, my everything, and I can’t wait to spend the rest of my life with you! Scriggles tonight? Love, your boo

Downtown To the pixie girl who stole my heart. You have short black hair, and the most beautiful blue eyes I have ever seen. You were wearing a long white and black coat when I saw you last weekend downtown. You were hanging out outside of the Davenport and you smiled at me. I was too shy to come say hello. Coffee sometime? You can email me at pixiegirlcoffee@ yahoo.com

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1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

Bowling At Rosa’s You were bowling and I came and talked to you. You said you were from China and live in LA. You were wearing really cool white clothes. I came back and was gonna see if you wanted to bowl, but you had already left. I wish I had given you my phone number, you were really cool and I hope you read this because I would really like to talk to you some more!

Cheers Coolest Aunt Ever Charlotte you have taught us all how to be thrifty. You are a great person to talk to and to just be around. You are also way to giving, to certain people, but that just shows what a kind of heart you have. I also like our simple conversations from just calling to letting me know what’s on sale at the local grocer, to our discussions on family and past events. I love you. P.S. I have $20 in my pocket, let’s pop some tags. Banana & Chocolate Pudding The kids and I just want to thank you for the awesome items you handed down to them. He loves his Leap Frog and she has already slept in the Princess tent downstairs. We hope to see you all again one summer night with chocolate pudding and a banana to eat it with. Love and Peace

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” What A Beautiful Day Good morning everyone. Rise and shine, let’s have a happy day today! Remember to smile at a stranger today! And tell someone you love them! Forever! You are the perfect date. Let’s hang out again every day for the rest of our lives. My Friend Brandon You and I have been friends for over 12 years. On many occasions when we hung out it was during times of struggle in one of the others life. We would discuss our issues, our loved ones, personal pitfalls, or our faith. We listened and shared trying to encourage or impart wisdom. It’s funny how you think you’re just going to get coffee and through divine intervention of some kind you end up remembering those moments for years to come. This April, you, Melissa and the kids are going to be moving to Juno Alaska. Of course it was exciting news yet at the same time a huge change for your family and I guess for me, it would mean another stretch of time without really getting to spend time with my good friend. Brandon, you are a good man, husband, father and friend. May you be blessed in Juno Alaska and remember you have many people here in Spokane who love and care for you guys. Daniel.

Sasquatch! I saw you at Sasquatch! music festival, 4 years in a row. We spent many good times together there over the years. Now you are my love, and although this year will be our first year not going to the beautiful George amphitheater for the Sasquatch! festivities, we will have many more great adventures this summer!! Love you lots! To My Momma I am so blessed to have a mom like you. You have had to struggle all your life raising us girls on your own and I know it must have been hard. You have always been there for us whenever we needed you for anything. You show me how to be a good mother and I don’t know what I would do without you. You are my daily inspiration to keep going no matter how difficult life may get. You are the rock that keeps me steady. Thank you for never giving up even when I was a defiant jerk face teenager. You’re my best friend and I love you mom. Co-Worker Buck Knives Co-worker. I want to send out a very special Thank You. You are a great co-worker to work with, you try your best. You are a wife, mother of 2 beautiful young ladys and most of all a friend. Thank you for understanding me and being there for me.

Inlander’s 17 Lives Story Cheers to the Inlander for publishing the article “17 Lives”. That is such a great story to read (especially when the world has so many terrible things going on). I pick up the Inlander every week and never has a story touched me that much. It brings me to tears just thinking about it. My heart goes out to the family of that young lady, but I would also like to say that I’m glad she lives on and has helped so many people along the way. I think everyone should be an organ donor, Why not give what can help someone else in their time of need. Cheers, cheers, cheers and another big cheers to Lorissa Green and her family... “You give but little when you give of your possessions. It is when you give of yourself that you truly give”. Kahlil Gibran To My Foxxy Lady Thank you for taking a broken heart and making it beat again. Thank you for taking a broken person, and making them live again. You are the most beautiful human being I have ever had the pleasure of knowing. The love I feel for you is unlike any other, the love I feel from you is unlike any other. I’m in no way perfect, nor do I want to be. But you make me want to be the best person I can be every single day. I love you more than the word means, and look forward to showing you every single day that the universe allows. My heart is your’s forever.

Jeers Along For The Ride I freak when I see kids in those bicycle trailers. The kid is right at the level of a car’s bumper, for crying out loud. There’s no helmet to protect against that one, and Mom or Dad don’t have eyes in the back of their heads,

Ginuwine What an awesome show! Thank you so much for returning my faith in R&B live shows. Jagged Edge was so disappointing which made me hesitate to try again. It was a packed house and your interaction with the audience made the show that much Charles D. is this week’s winner more fun! 43 and Delicious. of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! I’m ginuwinely gratified!

WINNER!!

Send in your CHEERS so

you too can be enChippy It’s not everyday that tered to win 1 dozen you find your soul-mate. I never expected to find the love of my life “Cheers” cupcakes at St. Patty’s Day Outing I’ve been right under my nose. Who knew meaning to write this since St. Celebrations Sweet To Ty-Bear & Mishka Mishka We Patrick’s Day! Cheers to the staff a typical trip to your store to visit Boutique. want you to know just how proud at Ugly Bettie’s and Revolver! We a friend would bring me to you. we are of you two! Graduating I remember the first time I saw “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Jeers

Jeers

Jeers

Lack of Reading Teenagers don’t read anything, newspaper or otherwise. And that’s because with each generation we grow increasingly stupid. The school system has failed because parents no longer take part in educating their kids and because we simply don’t pay teachers enough. You can’t survive on a teacher’s salary.

mph in a 65 zone it doesn’t matter. If you are running 85 mph in a 65 zone, it does not matter, get out of the left lane when a vehicle is approaching you from behind. If a car is passing you on the right, you are in the wrong lane! For you folks who think you are so exceptional at multi-tasking that you text, talk on your cell, paint your nails, eat your breakfast, etc. You are not multitasking as well as you tell yourself you are. If your conversation is that important, by all means, pull over and complete the call.

Hand It Over To the piece of human garbage that destroyed my basement window, just so you could reach your filthy hand into my home and steal from the top of my freezer. I truly hope you enjoy the use of my personal property. In fact I hope you enjoy it over and over again. Also, if you happen to start getting sores inside your mouth, that would be Karma. I was diagnosed with Hand, Foot and Mouth disease a couple days ago. It’s very painful, and the medication was pretty spendy. Oh and one more thing. You left your knife behind. You know, the one you used to cut out my screen? I turned it over to the County Sheriffs. But I’m sure if you can describe it to them, they’ll give it back.

either.

Plug It In There are those that are predicting the death of DVD’s. CD’s eliminated LPs, DVDs eliminated VHS, Broadband and delivery of video has its appeal, but I like stuff, tangible stuff, I want to touch it, collect it and own it. Safe Neighborhood? I thought I lived in a nice area of town. There hasn’t been any crime in our neighborhood until this weekend. I had a camera stolen out of my car. No, my car wasn’t locked, because I thought I lived in a safe neighborhood. I told myself that the thief most likely would have broken a window if I had locked my car. I knew it would be a waste of time to call the police, thieves and criminals can do whatever the hell they want. Drunk Driver You were driving south on my street and took my neighbors trash can off the damn sidewalk! Dark blue SUV. You could have killed one of my neighbors. Asshole! Wake up before you wake up in jail. PC’s I enjoy my computer, but I disagree with parents putting PCs in the bedroom of a teen while they are off doing their own thing. Parents are not participating in their kids lives. I am a single mom with the computer in the living room. I always want to know what my teenager is doing and who they were speaking to. Don’t leave your vulnerable teenager to a PC. Bad Neighbor What does a neighbor say to another neighbor when you have a yard that’s kept immaculate and you have several other neighbors that are the same way, but then you have this one neighbor who thinks car parts are considered yard art? Rules of the Road “To those of you who either insist the rules do not apply to you or those who are simply oblivious to what is going on around you, this one is for you. The signs on the highway that read, “”slower traffic keep right”” indeed do apply to you. If you are going 65 A T B E S T

O P A L

Airlines You are going to let people carry knives on the airplanes again, that is so wrong. Pay Attention Last Wednesday I saw a woman blow through two stop signs without even looking in the parking lot of Home Depot at the Y. Guy in a big truck told her off for being stupid. Kudos to him. LOL at the woman’s “road rage” comment. Not only are you a stupid driver who’s going to get someone killed one of these days, but you have an ego to boot. Seriously, spend less time sucking your coffee and more paying attention. This message is also to the other sacks of stupid who came to the dumb woman’s rescue. One guy, “don’t yell at the lady, man!” And another saying, “she wasn’t going that fast anyway!” First, why should anyone be exempt from being told to pay F’ing attention to what the F they are doing just because of gender? Second, she was going fast enough to hurt or even kill someone. What if it were your kid walking where she wasn’t watching? Time to pull your heads out of your asses, folks. Sticker Shock To the asshat in Pullman who took the University of Washington sticker off the bumper of my Jeep when I stopped for lunch on my way back to Spokane. I know I only spent two dollars on that sticker, but the fact that you’re that much of a child is pathetic. I’d return the favor but I like to act my age. Not So Neighborly Jeers to our neighbors for constantly taunting our dog, try learning some common courtesy, please and thank you!

T D S S A G B C R U E E U S S I A R Y E T N P A R T I S A S T S I T R A I M C E T O A N T I D G C A M S D L U A E M T I C O ’S N E U R M U S THIS WEEK! R A S S S T R R E A S T B ANSW I D Y T D P E N E A R S U N I T E Y O U I O C A A P E X E L B A S K I S H A E L Y O N A L E A D F O R M E E N K E W E O D S U N U P M A N I A V E S L E P T L S Y A S EWE KNEE

S A Y S N O

D O C

Car Burglars To the assholes who robbed me on Monday night: You are a bunch of f’ing theives and karma will come back to you in the worst way possible. I was gone for 45 minutes and you took my stuff. Get a f’ing job and buy your own s&$@. Get a f’ing life and stop messing with mine.

A T E O U T

Memories I saw you the other day, the girl I’ve been friends with since 7th grade, and I cried. I remember lending you my new bathing suit top so you could wear it to the foam party when I couldn’t go because I was in a cast. I remember picking up your broken pieces after every break-up like you did with me. Being so jealous because you were beautiful, and in Running Start, and had a job! You stood by my side as a friend and defended me when no one else would. You were an amazing boxer, with so much potential and promise. Now you’re just a shadow of what you were, 17, dirty hair, on the streets, and addicted to heroin and meth as a result of being in an abusive relationship. You are better than that and worth so much more! He stole your dog and I tried to help you get her back. I offered for you to stay at my place to get on your feet because you said you wanted to get clean, but instead you ran back to him to get your dog back. I gave you bus fair because even though we have been through some $h!t...you will always be my best friend from high-school Scumbag Jeers cannot begin to describe the disgust I have for the scum that shot my cat Sockett on Sunday 3/24. He was shot by a pellet gun while sitting on my patio, across from Centennial Middle School. He had to undergo emergency surgery and almost died! Sockett is part of my family and a great friend and will have health issues for the rest of his life because of this. The scum who thought it would be fun to take aim at him is the lowest kind of human filth. There is a reward for information that leads to the scum that hurt Sockett. Parents, if your child has a pellet gun I hope you teach them that hurting an animal for fun is not acceptable. If they did it once they will do it again. hrdnbrk@yahoo.com Your Chance To Atone! To the person who took the NextDay Dry Cleaning green bag from our porch on the South Hill (hanging from a hook on our front door): Although there were many expensive Thomas Pink shirts in the bag that you stole, one item was an heirloom that has been in our family for years - a hand embroidered tablecloth. Please, please, return the items, they can’t mean that much to you. Restore our faith in humanity, yours too, I truly believe you will be glad you did.

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2nd Annual Spokane Fitness Center

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APRIL 4, 2012 INLANDER 69

Sweet Tradition

Matt Turley serves up locally produced ice cream at a Pullman institution. Jacob Jones photo

The WSU ice cream shop is changing, but the important things are staying the same By Lisa Waananen

O

lder alumni remember the original Ferdinand’s Ice Cream Shoppe in Troy Hall, and I have vague memories of the painted panels telling the beloved children’s story of Ferdinand the Bull. But for most of my life I’ve known Ferdinand’s at its current location, tucked away near the edge of the main campus, where it relocated in 1992. An expansion is underway at the Washington State University landmark to add more seating and improve the flow of customers. The shop is still in its cocoon phase of renovation: Ducts poke from the unfinished ceiling, and large plywood boards are up where the new windows will be. Much of the work was done over spring break, and the rest will be finished after graduation. It’s staying open in the meantime, however, and was bustling during the warm afternoon last Friday. A few visitors

70 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2013

were stocking up on the signature cans of Cougar Gold cheese, but most came for the ice cream: vanilla, blackberry ripple, Apple Cup Crisp, one scoop chocolate with one scoop peppermint. It’s a fitting tradition for a university born as a landgrant institution — a “cow college” — and, well, something had to be done with the milk from the school’s Holsteins. In the early years a private company processed the milk for dining halls and sales, but the school took over in 1948 and put students to work. The dairy counter started out selling white milk, chocolate milk and just three flavors of ice cream. My grandparents have lived in Pullman forever, and when I was young there was a reliable pattern to campus visits: We would go see the bears in their pen at the base of Grimes Way, and then we would get ice cream

at Ferdinand’s. Before choosing a flavor, we would run up the steps to the observation room overlooking the large, bright facility where cheese is made. Students still work in the creamery, and the milk still comes from the school’s cows. Now, as an alumna, it’s my role to be wary of change. The grand new stadium entrance is foreign concrete; the new dorms rise up suspiciously like weeds. Where is my favorite ugly tree and the cracked sidewalk I crossed so many times? Renovations are done in the summers and semester breaks, and each incoming class begins fresh; no controversy lives more than four years. I imagine it is true that every isolated university town has a Brigadoon quality to it — a timelessness and steadfastness that sets off the changes in sharper relief — but this is the one I know. At Ferdinand’s, at least, there is no reason for alarm. A generous waffle cone is still $2.25, and the flavors still rotate with the seasons. The black-and-white checkerboard floor has been extended, and the counters are rearranged to make the line move more quickly when they’re slammed — Mom’s Weekend this month will be the first big test — but the essentials are the same. The huckleberry ripple is still abundantly rippled, and it still tastes like sunny afternoons when my greatest care was a dripping cone. n

APRIL 4, 2013 INLANDER 71

l i r p A n i y a d Every Thurs Starting April 1st Recieve one drawing ticket for every 500 points earned on machine play. April 4th • 11th • 18th | 1 – 7 pm 24 contestants receive $100 EPC and a turn to race their way into the grand drawing on the 25th. Contestants will race remote control cars.

April 25th • 7 pm A total of 16 contestants have their chance at $1,000 or the grand prize of $5,000 and $35,000 credit towards their dream car.* *Car must be from Dave Smith Auto.

1 8 0 0 5 2 3 -2 4 6 4 | CDAC A SI N O . COM |

/CDAC A SI N O R E S O RT

25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58


Inlander 4/04/2013