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FREE s Friday, June 21, 2013

ATHLETES OF THE YEAR

Taste of Tacoma B3

SLUGFEST B1

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

CITY SEEKS ADVISORS ON STREET-CROSSING ISSUES By Steve Dunkelberger

do not exist, but they are also making a call for volunteers to serve on a Bicycle and Pedestrian Technical Advisory Group, or BPTAG, to advise the newly created Transportation Commission on bicycle and pedestrian planning, transportation regulation compliance, project prioritization and implementing the city’s mobility master plan including X See ADVISORS / page A4

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY HARALD HOHENDORF

RENEGADE SIDEWALKS. Mysterious “sidewalks” and “bike lanes” appeared downtown,

prompting city officials to threaten prosecution of the vandals but also call for the formation of an advisory task force on pedestrian and bicycle safety.

A recent rash of guerrillaart sidewalk crossings and bike lanes popping up during latenight painting parties around the city has prompted Tacoma officials to take notice. City officials pledge to prosecute those responsible for painting illegal crosswalks where ones

Talk of a tent city is back SHELTERS OVERFLOWING COLLABORATION NEEDED GOOD FOR TACOMA? By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Tacomans are once again discussing a tent city. We had this conversation a decade ago, when street activist Hank Montgomery confronted the needs of homeless people – and all the people who were trying in good faith to meet those needs. It was a caustic experience, though. On the bright side, Montgomery did end up with housing. He is doing well, and is happily married. In the decade since, the people who dedicate their lives to trying to end homelessness have made progress. They have adopted strategies that work for families, teens, veterans, people with disabilities, addicts and those with mental illness. Catholic Community Services took over the decrepit and dangerous shelter run by Martin Luther King Housing and Development Association. Tacoma Avenue Shelter is safe, clean, flexible, and connects guests with the other services they need. Guests with jobs can keep their bunks and come and go to meet their work hours. People waiting to get in have a covered space, with snacks. Security looks out for both guests and neighbors. Coalition to End Homelessness members have brought in money for more programs, more beds. Tacoma Rescue Mission built a family shelter on Adams Street. Associated Ministries runs Access Point for Housing, a central place for people to seek emergency or transitional shelter. MDC and Catholic Community Services are building secure housing for people who have been homeless for years. They attract government, foundation and private attention because their programs

X See TENT CITY / page A4 Dream come true A6 OLYMPIA SUPERGROUP: Mosquito Hawk returns to Tacoma for show at New Frontier. PAGE B5

TOTEM POLE GETS NEW LEASE ON LIFE City arts and landmarks commissions vote to keep civic icon a viable presence By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

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PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

IN JEOPARDY. During a routine examination of the Tacoma Totem Pole last April, structural engineers found that the integrity of the city icon was compromised by rot and insect damage. Deemed a “falling hazard,” the 110-year-old pole was fenced off and braced up while its fate is considered by city officials.

Nate Tenbrink A7

City Briefs ................A2 Pothole Pig ...............A3

Unusual girl B4

Sports ......................A6 A&E ....................... ..B1

he Tacoma Totem Pole in Fireman’s Park seems to be out of the woods. The 110-year-old civic landmark’s ultimate fate was brought into question in April when structural engineers found that the totem pole – which stands over 80 feet above Fireman’s Park – was deemed to be a “falling hazard.” Rot and insect damage had compromised a considerable portion of a cross-section of the log from which the totem pole is made. A fence was promptly placed around its base and a sturdy metal brace was erected to keep the pole standing. A hastily assembled, ad hoc group was formed to consider the problem and make a recommendation to the Tacoma Landmarks Commission. The May meeting touched off something of a crisis with its recommendation that the totem pole be taken down, laid on the ground and allowed to rot

X See POLE / page A5

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Make A Scene ........ B5 Calendar ................. B6

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages

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8\PYRHUK^VYRWSHJLNHYKLUZJVSSPKL By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

We love it when one story bumps into another, and when someone sends us an idea that makes us smile whenever we imagine it. That’s what has happened with our first Tacoma Quirk Contest and our Workplace Garden Challenge. If you will recall, we ran a photo of Tacoma Weekly writer Steve Dunkelberger hugging a large item made

of red plastic. There was a flower on top of it. We knew this was a toughie. Only people with personal knowledge of it, or fond remembrances of state liquor stores, would have a clue. But Patsy Sweeney had a theory, and an answer for each of the questions we asked about the object. “I’m going to guess that this thing is the basket from a cherry-picker truck (designed for a small person),� Sweeney wrote.

City Briefs NIGHT CLOSURES BEGIN ON SR-16

Continuing through mid-August, crews working on the Washington State Department of Transportation’s State Route 16: Eastbound Nalley Valley project will close eastbound SR 16 and some city streets on multiple weeknights to set bridge girders. In total, crews will set 83 girders this summer to build three separate bridges within the project: 1) the new permanent eastbound SR 16 viaduct; 2) the South Sprague Avenue on-ramp to southbound I-5; and 3) the South Sprague Avenue on-ramp to northbound I-5. On June 21, crews will close eastbound SR 16 at South Union Avenue and the on-ramp to eastbound SR 16 at 11 p.m., detouring traffic via South Union Avenue. The lanes and ramp will reopen by 5:30 a.m. on June 22. South Tacoma Way will also be closed during those hours and traffic will be detoured via South Center Street. Similar closures will be announced throughout the summer as this phase of construction is completed. For more information about Nalley Valley construction, motorists can visit WSDOT’s SR 16 Eastbound Nalley Valley project website. Information about highway closures around the South Sound can be found at tacomatraffic.com.

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Preparations are underway as the Daffodil Festival partners with the City of Tacoma to pay tribute to Pierce County’s sizable active duty and retired military population. Together, they will host the first Celebration of Military Service Parade in downtown Tacoma on the evening of Aug. 24. “Joint Base Lewis McChord is the largest military installation on the West Coast, and Tacoma should have an annual celebration to honor our active duty and retired military personnel and their families,� said Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland. “This is a great way for us to express our appreciation and remind the community of all the great things our city has to offer.�

Police Blotter

“Where was it first seen in Tacoma? I suppose it was first seen when something needed to be removed from a high place. Perhaps when they were trying to rescue the dog “Tubby� from the car stuck on the collapsed Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940? “How did you get it? Did one of your enterprising but underpaid staff members find it while reconnoitering at the dump? PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN “What are we using it for )0.9,+ It’s a planter, a Maker’s X See QUIRK / page A5 Mark display and an ashtray.

There are more than 44,000 active duty personnel at Joint Base Lewis McChord, which is Pierce County’s largest employer with a total base population of more than 100,000. The parade will spotlight notable active duty and retired military personnel, and feature marching units, community floats, select high school bands, Reserve Officers’ Training Corps and Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps units, veteran organizations and motorcycle units. Details – including exact times, parade routes and road closures – are still under development, and will be announced soon. The Daffodil Festival has secured financial commitments from three sponsors at this time – Emerald Queen Hotel & Casino, Puget Sound Energy and Washington State Fair. Event updates and application instructions can be found at thedaffodilfestival.org or contact Steve James at (253) 840-4194.

ALLENMORE GOLF COURSE /63+:.9(5+67,505.

The dedication of the Allenmore Golf Course and Events Center and Elks Lodge building will be held on June 22 at 5 p.m. The Elks national president will be the honored guest. The first Tacoma Lodge #174 Charity Golf Tournament, which is open to the public, will be held that same morning. All proceeds will benefit the lodge’s charity fund, and all donations are taxdeductible. Tacoma Elks Lodge #174 has been an active part of the community for more than 120 years. During this time, it has always been the Elks’ goal to support many outstanding community activities. This year alone the Tacoma Elks worked with other community agencies to give Christmas gifts to more than 5,000 children, provided more than $60,000 in scholarships and the Elks have always been staunch supporters of active duty and American military veterans. Tacoma Lodge #174’s goal is to continue and expand such support of the community through charitable activities. To this end, the Tacoma Elks have made changes to reduce expenses and increase their contributions to the community. The new Allenmore Golf Course and Events Center will be open to the public and provide new stimulus to the community. It is located at

2013 S. Cedar St. For more information, call (253) 272-1117.

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In its seventh year, the LGBTQ Community Awards are held as part of Tacoma’s Pride Week. They honor individuals and organizations whose efforts have had a positive effect on the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and allied community of Pierce County. This year’s event will be on July 12 and hosted in the Grand Lobby of the Pantages Theater beginning at 4:30 p.m. This gathering is the night of Paula Poundstone featured at the Pantages and the night before Out in the Park and is free and open to the public. The categories of the LGBTQ Community Awards are as follows: Sapphire Award – Given to a youth organizer for service to the LGBTQ youth community of Pierce County. This award is open to youth ages 14-23. Ruby Award – Given to an individual who is not part of the LGBTQ population, or an organization with a focus not primarily LGBTQ, but whose actions have directly benefited said community. This may be awarded for service in the past year, or for service rendered over an extended period of time. Diamond Hall of Fame Award – Given to an individual for consistent and exemplary service to the LGBTQ community of Pierce County. This award is given for service rendered over a considerable length of time. Anyone can put forth a nomination by submitting the name and phone number of the person making the nomination, the name of the group or individual being nominated and the award category in which they are being nominated. In addition, the nominator should explain why s/he believes this group or individual should receive the award in 500 words or less. Nominations may be e-mailed or mailed to Ryan Mello – Tacoma City Council member, 747 Market St., Suite 1200, Tacoma, WA 98403; Ryan.Mello@CityofTacoma.org. All nominations must be received no later than June 28 at 4 p.m. Contact Mello via e-mail or at (253) 591-5164 with any questions or requests for support. MORE CITY BRIEFS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

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A Tacoma man is a suspect in three robberies. Prosecutors accuse Kashif Oyeniyi of entering the Beer, Smoke and More shop, located in the 3100 block of 6th Avenue, on June 15. He allegedly pulled a handgun on the clerk, grabbed cash from the register and fled. Witnesses saw a man enter a silver car, which drove away. Officers watched surveillance video of the robbery and recognized Oyeniyi. A few hours later, an officer stopped a silver car on Hilltop. A passenger got out and ran, dropping paperwork with Oyeniyiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name on it. The passenger, later identified as Oyeniyi, ran into a house and jumped out a window. He was tracked down and arrested. Detectives are investigating whether he is connected with two other robberies that occurred earlier in the day. They happened in the 1000 block of South 38th Street and the 2400 block of North Proctor Street. A man matching his description robbed the stores at gunpoint.

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Police blocked off both directions of State Route 509 near Interstate 705 for about an hour on June 12. It appeared someone was trying to jump from the bridge. The person was taken into custody.

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An accident on June 9 resulted in injuries to two motorists. It happened at the intersection of North Proctor and North 24th streets. A Mustang and a motorcycle collided. Both motorists were taken to hospitals for treatment of injuries that were not life threatening. The driver of the Mustang was cited for failure to yield right of way.

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VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AT TACOMA FREEDOM FAIR

July 3rd July 4th July 5th July 6th

Set-up for Freedom Fair on Ruston Way Freedom Fair Event on Ruston Way Clean Up and Delivery for Wings and Wheels Wings and Wheels Event at Tacoma Narrows Airport

We want to offer individuals and non-profit groups the opportunity to choose the job you or your group would most like to do. Volunteer positions are available for: } 0S\XbbX^]b CTP\ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Control entry to the venue and accept donations.

} 0RRTbb2^]ca^[CTP\ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Provide a visible presence at venue and control secure access areas.

} >_TaPcX^]b â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sign in/out golf carts and other equipment to identified team members.

} E^[d]cTTabCTP\ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Welcome and check in volunteers, provide in formation for assignments, and give directions and coordinate transportation to assignment site.

} ?PaZX]VCTP\ -- Control access to parking areas on Ruston Way } 0RcX^]CTP\ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Deliver and ensure everything gets where it belongs on time. } ;Tb 3PeXb ?XTa â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Welcome and check in VIP quests and help out with the reception. } ET]dT <PX]cT]P]RT -- Keep our venues clean and safe, during and after the event. } I^]T <P]PVTab -- Experienced volunteers to manage main areas of the venue. Please go to our website: www. FreedomFair.com and click on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Volunteerâ&#x20AC;? tab to find the online volunteer application. As always, volunteers will receive a free parking pass, event t-shirt and snacks/beverages during their shift -- and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be right there to enjoy the great event. If you have any questions please contact our new Volunteer Coor-

} 2[TP] D_ 2aTfCTPa 3^f] â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Re move all equipment and resources at end of the day/event. } 5aTTS^\5PXa2[TP]d_2aTf?aT_ for Wings and Wheels â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Return any missed resources, final clean-up of Ruston Way venue, preparation and delivery of equipment to Wings and Wheels venue at Tacoma Narrows Airport.

dinator, Jen at jlinenko@gmail. com , 253-507-9357 and go to our web site at www.FreedomFair.com to submit a volunteer registration form. We look forward to partnering with you! If you know others who are interested please forward our contact and volunteer information.

Thank you for all you do!

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š 5 By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The early days of automotives saw dozens, if not hundreds, of carmakers to the market as former carriage makers shifted from horse-drawn transport to gas-powered vehicles. Each company sought to distinguish itself with personal production of reliability, luxury and comfort. Such is the case of the 1917 Simplex Crane Model 5, with many features of the car coming as special order or custom work specifically for buyers. The LeMay Collection Simplex Crane has a custom body by Brewster & Co. that offered the amenities, comfort and convenience of a 46-horsepower car that cost more than 10 times the average Americanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual salary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To those who demand the utmost in smoothness, flexibility and luxurious comfort, this car is dedicated,â&#x20AC;? a Simplex Automobile Co. advertisement stated, noting that the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s short-lived, top-end model came in racing and touring models, with both offering luxury. It, for example, was outfitted with two bodies, one with an open body for summer touring and a hard top for winter driving. Like the landmark Duesenberg

Conveyance. A 1918 Simplex Crane Model 5 is part of the Rockefeller car collection housed at Kykuit, the family estate and a National Trust Historic Site. This 1918 and LeMayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1917 are the only known surviving Simplex Crane automobiles from the five owned by the Rockefellers. Harold E. LeMay purchased the 1917 car in 1995 at auction in Charleston, S.C. The car was then donated to the namesake LeMay â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museum in 1997 by Harold and Nancy LeMay as one of the early cars in the early days of the effort to build a magnet car museum in Tacoma.

Gardensphereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gabe and Travis Valbert Take Their Garden to the Street kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

You would think a store full of plants, plus chickens, would be enough. Not at Gardensphere, the garden/chicken/art emporium Travis and Gabe Valbert founded at 3310 N. Proctor St. The brothers have packed their store so tight with delights, there is no room for a workplace garden. For that, they step outside and stroll a few yards to the Proctor Street Bridge. They plant the triangle of soil between their shop and the bridge. This year, they are going with lobelia and impatiens, though, Gabe said, they would have preferred vegetables. They tried veggies once, he said, but this is a neighborhood of dogs who misunderstand the purpose of a small vegetable garden along a richly-scented sidewalk. The veggie plants did not grow. If they had, no one would have dared eat them. So the guys do flowers on the ground, and flowers in the air. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is our fifth year doing the hanging baskets on the bridge,â&#x20AC;? Gabe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We call them color

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Are you and your employer up for the challenge of a workplace garden? If so, we want to hear from you. Tell us the kind of space you have, the work you do, and why you think a garden is a good fit. Let us know how you decided the size and form. Are you going raised bed or inground? What is your planting medium? Will you go with food, flowers or a combination? What will you do with the things you grow? Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your position on garden art? Do you fear gnomes? How about clown gnomes? Over the summer, we will share tips and award prizes. Let us know what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re growing at work at kathleen@ tacomaweekly.com.

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

of its day, the Simplex Crane combined high-speed racing engines with luxury design, and were sold for extremely high prices. Anyone who asked for the price obviously could not afford one even with the lifetime guarantee as long as it remained the property of the original purchaser. The LeMay Collectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Simplex Crane illustrates the carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high-brow status. It was specially ordered by John D. Rockefeller, Jr. as a birthday present for his father, John D. Rockefeller, Sr. The giants of industry and politics had owned five Simplex Cranes over the years. In 1937, the Rockefellers gave the four-door car to the Boston Museum of Automotive

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By Kathleen Merryman

Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

bombs.â&#x20AC;? The baskets, like their support of community gardens, their donations and their commitment to local sustainability, are part of their mission to give back to the community. They grew up on the principle, taught by the tireless, and exuberant, example set by their grandmother, Charlotte Valbert of Blueberry Park fame. Gabe and Travis take pride in that legacy of freefor-all blueberries, and in their part in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing chicken culture. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We sell 800 to 1,000 chicks a year, and 10 to 12 tons of really high quality chicken feed a month,â&#x20AC;? Gabe said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One house gets chickens, and soon you will have a whole X See GARDEN / page A4

So. 5th and Sheridan Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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WAdvisors From page A1

wayfinding, project design, connectivity and citizen encouragement. City Manager T.C. Broadnax will select 11 city residents with a goal of having representatives from each of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five council districts. Residents with knowledge or first-hand experience about pedestrian, bicycle, health, parks and Americans with Disabilities Act issues are particularly encouraged to apply. In addition, the city is seeking a youth representative, between the ages of 16 and 18, to serve as part of the group. The formation of BPTAG is the carrot to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal stick concerning the unofficial crosswalk and bike lane markings that have appeared at a few high traffic intersections in recent months, most notably around 6th and St. Helens avenues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We understand and empathize with our citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; desire for more pedestrian facilities, but this form of vandalism is not acceptable and can quickly become a significant resource drain and safety hazard.

WTent city are innovative and collaborative. Funding follows because those programs work. As MDCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Troy Christensen told Coalition members this week, they can at last see the possibility of ending homelessness. The Point In Time Count of people who are living outside shows a drop from 727 to 126 during the last

PHOTO BY HARALD HOHENDORF

DANGER. Anonymous crosswalk painters are making things dangerous for

pedestrians.

The city will pursue legal action against those engaged in this kind of illegal activity,â&#x20AC;? said Broadnax.

From page A1

eight years. Those figures are not exact, but they show a downward trend â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and an unmet need: There are not enough beds. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the refrain from Coalition members, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the reason why many of them are considering the idea of a tent city. The first group to propose a plan has made a rocky start, but its members

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are sincere and flexible. They made the initial mistake of confronting rather than sharing. Now they are eager to collaborate. Their idea has evolved from their participation in Occupy Tacoma, the political encampment in downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pugnetti Park. Since folding their tents, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve met at First United Methodist Church and connected with SHARE, which oversees tent cities in Seattle. Neal Rogers lived in Tent City III in Seattle, camped in Tacoma with Occupy and now lives and works in Tacoma. He presented Tent City Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s case at the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first public informational meeting June 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The shelters have overflowed. Current measures to address homeless concerns are inadequate in number and scope,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A tent

Crosswalk markings create visual emphasis for drivers and guide pedestrians to the best crossing locations. Therefore, city is cheaper and easier to maintain than an indoor shelter.â&#x20AC;? In Seattle, a city of 100 residents requires about $3,000 to $4,000 a month to pay for portable toilets and showers. SHARE gets that money from Federal Emergency Management Agency, plus donations from neighbors and churches. Rogers said neighbors like tent cities, and that crime rates drop around them. Residents have their personal spots, live with their partners and abide by rules that include no drugs, alcohol or open flames. Sex offenders and people with warrants canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live there. Neither can children nor people with some mental illnesses. Everybody helps with group tasks, including cooking, security patrols

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and volunteering. Residents elect leaders. Those basics sound reasonable. But Rogers, in his passion for the project, gave the impression that Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shelters are dangerous and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t accommodate guestsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; job schedules. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shelters are also frequently unsanitary and frequently understaffed,â&#x20AC;? he said. Some force religion onto guests. It is difficult to get from shelters to services, he said. People have no place to store their possessions. The whole system renders the people who use it voiceless and faceless. Residents of Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tent cities are willing to move here to show us how to run one, or two. That, as you might imagine, stung providers who have, for the most part, fixed those issues here. That the allegations are not true matters to a community with services built on facts and accountability. That the attitude is confrontational does not work in a community where services are built on collaboration. That, and telling Tacomans that people from Seattle know best how to

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fix their problems, is just plain nuts. So, yes, it was a bad start. If this were a lesser community, or if the new tent city backers were arrogant and intransigent, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be in for another unproductive spectacle. But Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s providers are resilient, and Patricia Menzies, Marilyn Kimmerling, Woody Evans, Vince Hart, Neal Bernstein and Rogers of the tent city team regrouped on June 18 to reflect on their mission. They took the time to outline their individual visions and found the commonalities: They want a safe, sanitary resource that benefits the people who live in it and the people who live around it. They want the residents to accept responsibility for their lives and have the services they need to succeed. They want residents to have what amounts to a neighborhood where people know and trust each other. They want what the current providers want. No more confrontation, they agreed. No more politics or drama or Seattle know-how. They are eager to collaborate, Kimmerling said. If the Coalition needs people to lobby for mental health care funds, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll lobby. If the Coalition needs advocates for youth services, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll step up. They are ready to be a resource. They are willing to temper their urgency with patience and care. They are ready to talk with, and listen to, Tacomans to determine if we can do better than a tent city, or if not, if it is the best solution. If that is the case, they are willing to collaborate to make it the best possible response to an intolerable social ill. It will be an interesting conversation.

WGarden From page A3

ReSound Digital Vea2

Puyallup:

   Tacoma:

  

poorly located crosswalks lead to safety concerns and the city will continue to act swiftly to remove unofficial markings, he continued. And, of course, the city can get sued if a renegade crosswalk is linked to an accident. Intersections without crosswalks are, apparently, unmarked for a reason. Before creating a new street crossing or designated crosswalk, city staffers use standards from the Federal Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices that concern pedestrian and traffic volumes, street width, traffic speed, sight distance, collision history, traffic control devices and ADA accessibility. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crosswalks may seem no more than simple stripes, but determining where they go takes more consideration than citizens may think,â&#x20AC;? a city statement said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each year, city staff prioritize new pedestrian facilities in an equitable process designed to place improvements throughout the community where they are most needed.â&#x20AC;? Applications should be submitted to the City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office by June 28. To apply, visit cityoftacoma.org/cbcapplication or contact April Larsen at (253) 591-5167, City Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, Room 220, Municipal Building, 747 Market St., Tacoma, WA 98402.

block full of chickens. It is nice to have people see the whole process of compost to harvest to eggs.â&#x20AC;? On July 13, Gardensphere will hold the third Tacoma Urban Coop Tour, which they bill as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the craziest event Tacoma has to offer.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year, visitors will be able to visit eight coops,â&#x20AC;? Travis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The tour hosts will be on hand to share their experiences with chicken care, coop design, maintaining harmony among the chickens, people and other pets, and more.â&#x20AC;? Interested? The selfguided tour will cover the Tacoma urban area and run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $5 per person for people 13 and older. For information, click onto www.gardensphere.biz or call (253) 761-7936.

-YPKH`1\ULÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

From page A1

WQuirk From page A2

now? Steve D. seems to be holding a little tree that he intends to plant in this vessel. I think this is a red herring, because the tub probably has no hole in the bottom for drainage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; needed in Tacoma with all the rain we get. Without a drainage hole, it would be hard to tip it to release excess moisture. Perhaps this would be less of problem if you position it under an awning (if you have one). You might better use it as a wishing well where people like Debbie Friedman could deposit small

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

BRACED. Once damage was detected, the city moved to secure the totem

pole with braces and a fence.

of civic brand or sign â&#x20AC;&#x201C; almost as an advertisement to boast Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s superiority over rival Seattle, the up and coming city of the Sound. It was not made as a spiritual object as is the case with traditional, authentic Native American totem poles. Once in place, the Tacoma Totem Pole became one of the distinctive icons that gave Tacoma part of its identity as a vibrant metropolis of the Northwest. It was a major tourist attraction and appeared on all manner of Tacoma memorabilia. Originally the totem pole was located near the Tacoma Hotel and Sheardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curio

flat stones inscribed with their dreams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Does it, heaven forfend, have siblings? As for sibs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; there are/were a lot of cherry pickers in this area, so I would say, cautiously, yes, but transporting them would be difficult.â&#x20AC;? Given the challenge, one correct answer out of five is worth two tickets to the Rainiers. The image of Dunkelberger trying to rescue Tubby from Galloping Gertie is worth two more. She gets to pick her game. One of our enterprising staff members did, in fact, find it while reconnoitering at a neighborhood cleanup, which is the next best thing to a dump. It was in the back of

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Jenice Glassmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pick up truck. Sweeney used it as planter-yard art for years after rescuing it from the waste stream at a state liquor store. It, and a lower matching piece (the sibling) were displays for Makerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mark whiskey. They mimic the red wax seal on the bottle cap. She was happy to rescue it, one more time, from that waste stream, and give it to an enterprising reporter/ gardener. We are using it as a planter, and as an ashtray. The Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smokers drop their cigarette butts down a hole under the flower pot. It beats the old jar they had. The sibling will soon

shop. It survived the 1935 fire that claimed the Tacoma Hotel. The pole was later moved a block from its original location to Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park, where it stands today. Since the May ad hoc meeting, cooler heads have had a chance to prevail. On June 4 the Tacoma Arts Commission met to consider whether or not to officially deaccession the totem pole from the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public art collection. Such a move would have been the first step in removing the pole from its current location and sending it to a museum or laying it down on the ground to be claimed by the elements. Either way, be planter in our workplace garden. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve delayed the actual implantation because someone has been dropping by on the weekends and evenings and taking home the other cool stuff we got at that neighborhood cleanup â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a garden cart, a drawer full of flowers, an ammo box, a tool box/stepping stool. Given that history, we believe they will make off with an attractive bright red planter filled with nasturtiums. To prevent that, we are working on an anti-theft system: We have been training our garden snakes to nap in it. This is the happy spot where this story bumps into our Workplace Gar-

Transforming Emotions i n t o w i s d o m t h ro u g h m e d i t a t i o n Fr i d a y, J u n e 2 1 s t , 6 p m - 8 p m Â&#x2021; $  p u b l i c  m e d i t a t i o n  c l a s s  w i t h  L h o p p o n  R i n p o c h e Â&#x2021; 5 H V L G H Q W  t e a c h e r  o f  M i p h a m  S h e d r a ,  B o u l d e r  C o l o r a d o Â&#x2021; $ W  t h e  C e n t e r  f o r  S p i r i t u a l  L i v i n g  2 0 6  N . J .  S t re e t Â&#x2021; 5 6 9 3  s o n g r i t a r @ y a h o o . c o m  $ 2 0  d o n a t i o n  a p p re c i a t e d !  1Ronewillbeturnedaway!

den Challenge: Glassman is the daughter of the late and greatest Charlotte Valbert, the community heroine who rescued Blueberry Park from oblivion and led the effort to turn it into a unique free public U-pick (and U-maintain) treasure. Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandsons, Travis and Gabe Valbert,

own Gardensphere with its workplace garden and chicks in the Proctor District. The photo of the big red planter thing struck terror into Gabeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tasteful heart, though he thinks Travis might secretly covet it. You can read their story on the opposite page.

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(gracefully) back into the earth. That recommendation ignited a firestorm of criticism as Tacomans came forward to rally around the pole. Local media and social media have been abuzz with discussion of the history of the pole, with ideas on what to do with it and musings as to what the totem pole means to us as citizens in a city where it was made and kept standing for more than a century. If nothing else, the conversation has become a â&#x20AC;&#x153;teachable moment,â&#x20AC;? an opportunity for the people of Tacoma to pay some attention to something that we often overlook and take for granted. We have been forced to contemplate the fate of this venerable icon and ponder its place in the story of our city. We learned that the Tacoma Totem Pole was commissioned in 1903 and was erected at South 10th and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Streets (then later moved to South 9th and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Streets) just days before a visit by Theodore Roosevelt. It was reportedly carved by two men from an Alaskan or Canadian tribe where totem poles are part of the culture (the local Salish peoples do not have a totem pole tradition). Some claim that the carvers were Haida but this is a point of uncertainty. The totem pole was commissioned by Chester Thorne and William Sheard as a way to brand Tacoma as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gateway to Alaska.â&#x20AC;? It was meant to outdo Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 60-foot totem pole (that was ignobly cut down and stolen from its Alaska home) and erected a few years prior to Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pole. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s totem pole was built as a kind

A C H I L D N E E D S Y O U T O D AY !

WPole

the totem pole would cease to be a living part of the ongoing life of the city. The Arts Commission, however, recommended that the totem pole be kept as part of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public art and that it should be protected and restored. The recommendation was accepted at the Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s June 10 meeting. A June 12 meeting of the Tacoma Landmarks Commission directed the city to come up with a plan to restore the totem pole and to keep it in place in Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park. Crisis averted. It remains to be determined whether the pole will need to be removed for repair and restoration or whether this can be done while it is standing in place. The city seems to have a habit of taking its art treasures into storage for one reason or another and keeping them there. Did you know that Tacoma has an edition of the Statue of Liberty that is kin to the one at Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alki beach? Ours, however, went into storage decades ago and there it remains. Thomas Morandiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sun Kingâ&#x20AC;? sculpture was removed from its location for the remodeling of the Hotel Murano and has remained in storage for the past five years. When â&#x20AC;&#x153;Water Forestâ&#x20AC;? was damaged it was put in storage until it could be reengineered and it did not see light of day for seven long years. For the time being, at least, the totem pole will remain at Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park at the corner of South 9th and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Streets. It is still powerful and charming despite the fence and the new metal brace. If nothing else, we can thank the May ad hoc group for stirring up the controversy that highlighted the role that the totem pole has played in the lives of Tacomans while it has stood watch over our City of Destiny for the past 110 years.

Sports

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SI DE

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

MAX BEATTY OVERCOMES CANCER TO REALIZE DREAM

Former PLU pitcher drafted by Padres

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

BEATT-ING THE ODDS. Pacific Lutheran

CHAMBERS, SCHWAN ARE ATHLETES OF THE YEAR TAC honors local athletes at year-end banquet By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

A

fter dominating throughout the season and earning state titles in their respective sports, Foss’ Marcus Chambers and Bellarmine Prep’s Courtney Schwan added some more hardware on June 17. In a room full of accomplished athletes, the duo was named the Tacoma/Pierce County High School Student Athletes of the Year at the Tacoma Athletic Commission year-end banquet at Bellarmine Prep High School. “It means a lot,” said Chambers, just over three weeks removed from winning the state titles in the 200 and 400-meter dashes at the state track meet. “There are a lot of great athletes for every sport here…to be known as the athlete of the year for this group of guys is an honor.” Not only did Chambers defend his state title in the 400 this year, he set the best time in the nation during his championship run with a time of 46.36 seconds, and will run on scholarship at the University of Oregon next year. Just as impressive as his accomplishments on the track were his accolades in the classroom, as he carried a 3.66 grade point average in taking International Baccalaureate classes. “I’m just disciplined, and that’s a big part of my mom,” Chambers said. “She helped me throughout the first couple years of high school to learn that process and be organized. I just took it from there.” He also volunteered at Foss special education classes and helped coach the Foss Special Olympic Soccer Team. Chambers is eyeing a spot on the United States 19-and-under track and field team, as he was preparing for a chance to qualify in the 400 on June 21 in Des Moines, Iowa. Should he make it, he would join the national team to compete in Puerto Rico in early July. Along the same lines, Schwan was recently chosen as one of 16 girls to qualify for the U.S. Junior Olympic Volleyball Team, as she will travel to Anaheim on July 8 to train with the Women’s National Team. “It’s just a great opportunity,” said Schwan, a senior-to-be who is committed to play volleyball at the University of Washington. “It’s a long process, and I’m so excited and I hope it all goes well.” While also starring in fastpitch this spring, Schwan is coming off a volleyball season last fall in which she led the Lions to the 4A state title and garnered the Narrows 4A MVP and the 4A state player of the year, among other accolades. Her dominance was evident in her 488 kills, 281 digs and 74 blocks as the X See ATHLETES / page A8

TOP PHOTO BY JEREMY HELLING / BOTTOM PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

TOP HONORS. (Top) Foss’ Marcus Chambers (left) and Bellarmine

Prep’s Courtney Schwan (right) pose with their Athlete of the Year trophies on June 17. (Middle) Schwan displays a powerful game on the volleyball court with her powerful spikes. (Bottom) Chambers nears the finish line in the 200-meter dash at the state track meet in late May.

starting pitcher Max Beatty overcame testicular cancer to dominate on the mound for the Lutes this spring, and was recently drafted by the San Diego Padres. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

The last few weeks have been a whirlwind for Max Beatty. And he’s loving every moment of it. The former Pacific Lutheran University ace pitcher – who overcame testicular cancer to return to the baseball field a year ago – achieved his ultimate dream when he was drafted by the San Diego Padres in the 32nd round of the Major League Baseball draft on June 8. “It’s been something I’ve been looking forward to (for) forever,” Beatty said. “It really is just a dream come true. I just took a step toward getting paid to play baseball.” Beatty was back in his hometown of Vancouver watching the draft with family and was in communication throughout the process with the Padres, who had hinted at taking him earlier. “They told me ‘hey, maybe these next couple rounds,’” Beatty said. “The next couple rounds went, and I started to sweat a little bit. (But) in the back of the mind I knew it was going to be the Padres.” Beatty was on the phone with the Los Angeles Angels in another room of the house when he heard his family erupt in cheers after the Padres selected him with the 958th overall pick. It was a quick turnaround, as Beatty signed on June 10 and flew down to extended spring training in Arizona with the Padres’ rookie league team, in preparation for their opening game on June 20. And while he will have to work his way up through the chain to make it to the pros, Beatty certainly is up to the task of hard challenges. Beatty was considered one of the top prospects in Division III after his sophomore season at PLU in spring 2011, but began noticing some health changes in the summer and fall. “I was just seeing signs of stuff,” Beatty said. “I noticed something a while before that but didn’t think much of it. It kind of kept getting a little bit worse.” It was on Christmas break in 2011 that he was diagnosed with testicular cancer. But instead of letting it discourage him, Beatty tackled the two-month round of chemotherapy – five days a week – with his eyes set on returning to the field. Despite missing the 2012 season at Pacific Lutheran, Beatty got a clear diagnosis that summer and joined the summer-league’s Corvallis Knights in June 2012. “My mindset was, ‘Let’s get this done with and get back to it,’” Beatty said of the cancer treatment. “It was awesome. It’s finally over, I’m healthy and back here doing the thing I love.” Beatty recently completed his junior season for the Lutes and was dominant, putting up a 7-5 record with a 2.48 earned run average in 87 innings, with 90 strikeouts and just 13 walks. While his career at Pacific Lutheran is done, he certainly hasn’t taken the friendships he has made for granted. “My team at PLU was so supportive,” Beatty said. “Those guys are family, we have a really tight-knit group.” Beatty now has his sights set on cracking the starting rotation for the Arizona League Padres, and is also aiming to advance to the Single-A Eugene Emeralds, who began their season on June 14. “It’s all starting to kick in,” he said. “One of my goals is to pick as many brains as I can and critique myself. (I want to) improve every day as a ballplayer.”

-YPKH`1\UL‹tacomaweekly.com‹:LJ[PVU(‹7HNL

5(;,;,5)9052(++:73,5;@ 6-;(3,5;;69(050,9:

Utility man embracing role in first year with Tacoma By Karen Westeen

athletic. They followed me from the draft and were told I was athletic enough to play multiple positions. Third base is my natural position, but now everything is more comfortable because I can call any position my natural position. Centerfield is new to me but I’ve enjoyed making routine plays there.

Correspondent

Nate Tenbrink is another newcomer on the Rainiers this season. A utility man par excellence, Tenbrink has played every position on the team except pitcher and catcher. Drafted by Seattle in 2008, he worked his way up through the lower minors over the past six years. He recently talked to Tacoma Weekly baseball correspondent Karen Westeen about his career.

TW: Do you feel you contribute more to the team with your offense or your defense? NT: Defense, but swinging the stick good always helps out too. I take pride in whatever I can do to help the team win. A good thing about my situation is that it keeps me busy. I’ve always been a hard worker.

TW: You’re a native of Kansas. Do you still live there? NT: Yes. I live in Olathe, Kan. with my wife. We were married in January. She’s here right now. TW: Have any other members of your family gotten to see you play here? NT: No, but the team played in Oklahoma City this year and my family got to see us there. They’ll be up here in the end of August. TW: You attended Kansas State University for three years. What was your major? NT: Business. TW: Did you finish? NT: No, but I took a few

classes when I was rehabbing from my back surgery last year. I’m hoping to finish up before my career’s over.

TW: You were drafted six

years ago. Where were you on draft day? NT: I was asleep at home when I got the call from my agent. Everybody was at work, and I was all by myself. We threw a little party that night.

TW: You spent your first professional season in Everett. What was that like? NT: It took a little bit to get adjusted to playing every day, coming off a college season.

PHOTO BY RICHARD TRASK/TACOMA RAINIERS

04769;(5;70,*, Nate Tenbrink has played seven different

positions with the Rainiers this year, and leads the team with 64 games played and 40 walks.

TW: The next season you

went to Clinton, Iowa, which is a whole lot closer to Kansas. NT: Yeah it’s about eight hours away so my (future) wife could come visit. I spent the whole year in Clinton, and was an All-Star that year.

TW: You’ve spent quite a bit of time on the disabled list. Talk about that. NT: In 2010 I got hit in the back of the head by a pitch and I was out for about two months with that. In 2011 I was out with back and elbow problems at the same time. I was coming back from my

elbow problems and my back gave out. There were two fractures in my back, and I was out with that the second half of 2011, and the first half of 2012. I missed quite a bit of baseball at that point but I’m feeling healthy now.

TW: You’ve played seven positions this year with Tacoma. What did you play in high school and college? NT: Shortstop and third base, third probably the most. I feel most comfortable over there, but it opens millions of opportunities if you’re able to play more positions. Lots of coaches and upper management knew I was pretty

TW: You have seven home runs--third on the team--along with 67 strike outs, which ranks second. How would you describe yourself as a hitter? NT: I’ve got a good approach up there – take my hits when I can get them and take my walks when I can get them. Being able to walk quite a bit helps your on-base percentage and I think that’s the most important stat in baseball. (Tenbrink is first on the team with 40 walks.) Brownie (former Rainiers’ manager Daren Brown, now coaching third base in Seattle) had me hitting leadoff because he trusted me to get on base. TW: This is your first year at Triple-A. What’s been the biggest difference, besides travelling on airplanes instead of buses? NT: I think the pitchers are more experienced, they can read your swing a little bit better, see holes in your swing, and they definitely will take advantage of it. If you don’t make adjustments pitch by pitch it’s going to hurt you. TW: Is there a specific hitting coach for the Rainiers? NT: Howard Johnson, but the most important coach is probably

yourself, knowing your ability and your swing. It’s good to have a coach that will help you make little adjustments in your swing, but you have to be able to know the type of swing that you have.

TW: Is there a place where you train in the offseason? NT: I own my own indoor facility, where I train myself in the mornings and kids in the afternoons. TW: And this could be a future career? NT: Definitely. It’s been good to basically work at two jobs at the same time. When kids smile and their eyes open up there it definitely makes my day. TW: What was your first impression of this stadium when you first got here? NT: It’s awesome. It’s a tough place to hit. Overall the surroundings are beautiful, with the trees and Mt. Rainier, and the renovations have been amazing. I heard about the old stadium but I never got to see it. And the weather now has been unbelievable. TW: What do you like to do here on an off-day? NT: I picked up my wife at the airport the other day and we went to Seattle, spent the day at the market and aquarium. It was good to get out and see new places. TW: What has been the highlight of your career so far? NT: I’ve had a couple good years and a couple of down years. I played in the 2009 Midwest League All-Star Game, and had one at bat and an RBI. Also playing in the Arizona Fall League in 2010, and coming back from major back surgery successfully. TW: Anything else you’d like the fans to know about you? NT: Just that I’m the guy who plays multiple positions.

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`1\UL

WAthletes From page A1

Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; go-to player. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very happy and very blessed,â&#x20AC;? said Schwan of the award. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m blessed with supportive parents and supportive familyâ&#x20AC;Śitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great honor.â&#x20AC;? Schwan will compete for one of the 12 final spots on the junior national team in Anaheim, and will travel to compete in Thailand on July 28 should she make the squad. The Athletes of the Year for spring sports were also honored by the TAC, with Chambers gathering the top honor for boys track and field. Bellarmine Prep junior Hannah Derby â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the three-time state champion in the girls 400-meter dash â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and Curtis senior Kennadi Bouyer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a two-time winner in the 100- and 200-meter dashes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; shared the top honor for girls track and field. Charles Wright senior outfielder Nate Mondou, the Nisqually 1A MVP who will play at Wake Forest University next year, earned the top honor for baseball. The Tarriersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Teddy and Phillip Grenley were honored for boys tennis after winning the 1A doubles title on May 25. Annie Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Samantha Weeks, who finished sixth in the girls 1A singles tournament, was honored as the girls tennis Athlete of the Year. Curtis grad and University of

PHOTO BY JEREMY HELLING

:7905.:;(5+6<;: The Athletes of the Year from spring sports pose with their awards. Local honorees included Annie

Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Samantha Weeks (top, second from left), Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Marcus Chambers (top, third from right), Curtisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kennadi Bouyer (top, second from right), Bellarmine Prepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hannah Derby (top right), Charles Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nate Mondou (bottom left) and Charles Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Philip and Teddy Grenley (bottom, second and third from left).

Kansas standout Andrea Geubelle was honored as the 2013 Dick Hannula Amateur Athlete of the Year along with Orting grad and Oregon State University wrestler Taylor Meeks. Geubelle won both the long jump and triple jump at

the 2013 NCAA Indoor National Championships on March 8-9, as her mark of 46 feet and six inches in the triple jump is the second-best indoor mark ever by an American female athlete. She is a three-time All-American in the triple jump,

ment award, recognizing his tremendous impact on the community. Stortini went on to teach and coach in the Tacoma School District at Wilson and Mount Tahoma from 1955 to 1975, and later coached football at Puget Sound.

and was a three-time state champion in both the triple and long jump while at Curtis. Former Lincoln and University of Puget Sound baseball standout Joe Stortini was honored with the Doug McArthur Lifetime Achieve-

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B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PHOTOS COURTESY NORTHWEST TREK

MOLLUSK MADNESS! This weekend, Northwest Trekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Slug Fest will pay homage to the Pacific banana slug, a slimy critter found in West Coast forests,

BANANA SLUGS RULE! from Alaska to California. Activities will include human slug races.

(No, really, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re kind of cool) By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Hey! Stop salting those slugs, you sickos! And knock it off with the garden beer traps while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at it; IPAs are meant for drinkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, not drowning gullible, slow-moving critters. The Northwestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slimiest inhabitants have gotten a bad rap; and this weekend Northwest Trek aims to rehabilitate the little guysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; image during its 30th annual Slug Fest, two days of family friendly activity that will take over the local wildlife park, which is located at 11610 Clay City Rd. in Eatonville. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just kind of a fun celebration of a creature that a lot of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t normally think about,â&#x20AC;? said Northwest Trek spokeswoman Kris Sherman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It started in 1982, and then kind of officially became a festival in 1983. Back then they actually had slug races with real slugs. They had a huge board that they created, a little slug race track called Slime Acres. They had a little grandstand for the slugs and a lounge, and

weigh-ins.â&#x20AC;? These days, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;slugsâ&#x20AC;? are a lot bigger â&#x20AC;&#x201C; peoplesized, to be exact. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the years we evolved from using animals to having humans do the races,â&#x20AC;? Sherman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take as long, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better for the animals not to ask them to race.â&#x20AC;? Participants wrap themselves in tarps and squirm their way down what amounts to a giant, soapy Slip â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n Slide, no hands allowed. Races are open to ages 5 and up with start times at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 and 3 p.m. There will also be a 50-foot-long slug replica that families can tour and naturalists on hand to talk about the star du jour, Ariolimax columbianus, a.k.a. the Pacific bandana slug, a brightly colored species found crawling along West Coast forest floors, from Alaska to California. Yeah! Slugs! And just to get you pumped up for this weekend, Tacoma Weekly has compiled a few fascinating facts out this massively misunderstood mollusk: The Banana Slug is the second largest slug and can reach a length of 25 cm.

The name, of course, comes from the slugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bright yellow coloring and its resemblance to a banana. But they can be found with green, brown, or white bodies, and their coloration can change based on their diet and the amount of moisture in their environment. They use a muscular foot for locomotion and can reach lightning speeds of 6 ½ inches per minute. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re detritivores, or decomposers, which means they munch on leaves, animal waste and dead plant material and turn it into soil humus. They also have a thing for mushrooms and spread seeds and spores as they eat. Slugs are hermaphrodites and reproduce by exchanging sperm with their mate. They produce up to 75 translucent eggs, which are laid in logs or on leaves.

30th annual Slug Fest

12+(Y&e&Lg-h&e&$Bmf]**Yf\*+  Fgjl`o]klLj]c$)).)(;dYq;alqJ\&$  =Ylgfnadd] )1&/-Y\mdl_]f]jYdY\eakkagf  )0&*-k]fagjk$)*&*-qgml`$Y_]k  -lg)*$1&*-ca\kY_]k+Yf\,$  ^j]]^gjaf^YflkY_]*Yf\qgmf_]j!  +.(!0+*%.))/gjooo&folj]c&gj_ They usually live one to three years, but some can live up to seven. (But when you move that slow, it probably feels more like 70.) The second coolest college mollusk mascot in the country is the fighting banana slug of University of California Santa Cruz. You probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it in the Final Four any time soon, but look closely and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see the logo on John Travoltaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s T-shirt in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pulp Fiction.â&#x20AC;? The coolest mollusk mascot? Evergreen State University Geoduck. Duh!

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE

FIVE TOUR DE PIERCE

BEING EARNEST In Oscar Wildeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Importance of Being Earnest,â&#x20AC;? dashing menabout-town John Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff pursue fair ladies Gwendolen Fairfax and Cecily Cardew. Matters are complicated by the imaginary characters invented by both men to cover their on-the-sly activities â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not to mention the disapproval of Gwendolenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother, the formidable Lady Bracknell. Suitable for the whole family, it plays until July 14 at Lakewood Playhouse, Fridays & Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2. See Tacoma Weekly writer Steve Dunkelbergerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full review at www.tacomaweekly.com.

TWO CARNIVAL OF MADNESS Raise those devil horns, metalheads! The Washington State Fair will crank up the

SHINEDOWN

volume on Sept. 18 with the Carnival of Madness, which will bring Shinedown, Skillett, In This Moment and We As Human to the Washington State Fairground grandstand in Puyallup. The show will kick off at 5 p.m. that day, and tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. on June 22, with prices ranging from $35 to $45. Check out the full fair concert schedule online at www.thefair.com/concerts.

THREE DRAKE Canadian rapper Drake is headed to Tacoma, promoter Live Nation announced. The multiplatinum selling artist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; known for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Started From the Bottomâ&#x20AC;? and other hits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; will kick off his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Would You Like a Tour?â&#x20AC;? tour at Portlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rosegarden on Sept. 25, followed by a Sept. 26 stop at the Tacoma Dome. The show is scheduled for a 7 p.m. start, and up-and-coming R&B singer Miguel will open. Drake will be out in support

of his forthcoming album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing Was the Same.â&#x20AC;? Tickets for the Tacoma show will go on sale on June 21 with prices ranging from $47 to $97. Find the most up-to-date ticket info at www.ticketmaster.com.

FOUR URBAN SKETCHING This is your invitation to join urban sketchers Tacoma. Join a meet and greet at 10 a.m. outside Tullyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Broadway then disperse with the group to go sketching at the Broadway Farmers Market. At 12:30, its back to Tullyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to be part of the Urban Sketchers group photo. For those who wish to do so, you are welcome to lay out your sketchbooks (on a table, ledge, ground) to share your efforts for the day. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great fun seeing all the different ways of sketching. Check out www.flickr.com/ groups/urbansketches/pool.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tour de Pierce with a new rest stop and special refreshments. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s June 30 date will include 30-and 50-mile marked routes. The 12-mile route is designed for families or for those new to biking. All routes include maps and cue sheets, map my ride QR codes, a rest stop with refreshments, and rest rooms. The ride starts and finishes at the Washington State Fairgrounds Gold Parking lot, South Meridian & 9th Ave S.E., Puyallup. The fee, paid the day of event, is $18 per rider or $54 for a family of four from the same household. A limited supply of Sport Tek Competitive shirts are available for purchase for $20. For more information contact Pierce County Parks and Recreation at (.253) 798-4177 or www.piercecountywa.org/parks.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;¢ Page 2 â&#x20AC;¢ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;¢ Friday, June 21, 2013

Your Guide to local

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, June 21, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

Taste of Tacoma

FILE PHOTOS

By John Larson

jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

E

merald Queen Casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taste of Tacoma is a highlight of the summer festival season. Cuisines ranging from Caribbean to Cajun to Greek will be represented among more than 50 food booths at Point Defiance Park from June 28-30. A new attraction this year is The Taste Cooks! It will feature chefs from some of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite restaurants. Each day a demonstrator will showcase a variety of skills. For example, on June 28 Gil Turturici of Boathouse 19 will make the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dungeness crab cakes. On June 29 Adrienne Kuehl of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma Foodieâ&#x20AC;? will discuss the best ways to shop for locally grown produce. Selected chefs will compete in a cooking contest in which they will be given three mystery ingredients and a small pantry of cooking staples. The audience will judge the entrees they create. Other chefs will do interactive cooking demonstrations. Cindy Stohr is media director of Festivals Inc., which organizes Taste of Tacoma. She said that in the past few years the festival has lacked the involvement of many Tacoma chefs because they are so busy running their restaurants. This is understandable, given the popularity of waterfront establishments with decks during the summer, as well as catering obligations for weddings, high school reunions and other special events. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is hard for them to commit to three days of the festival,â&#x20AC;? Stohr said. The Taste Cooks! will be emceed by Amanda Westbrooke. She is a host on CityLine, a weekly program

Demonstrations from local chefs a new addition to annual event

on TV Tacoma. Each year a few festival organizers are interviewed on CityLine prior to the event, which is how they got to know Westbrooke. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted someone who is fun and familiar,â&#x20AC;? Stohr said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was the perfect choice.â&#x20AC;? Sessions will begin at the top of the hour from noon to 6 p.m. on June 28-29 and noon to 5 p.m. on June 30. They will go for 45 minutes. On June 28 it will have Hudson Slater of Maxwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Dustin Joseph of Art House CafĂŠ, Bette Anne Curry of The Gourmet Niche and Turturici. The competition will have Kris Blondin of Stink facing Patricia Kerth of Old Milwaukee CafĂŠ. Scheduled for June 29 are Tom Pantley of Toscanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Turturici, Famous Dave of Famous Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Kuehl. Geoffrey Yahn of Dirty Oscarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annex will do a cocktail demonstration. Slater will face Aura May in the competition. June 30 will have Slater, Chriselda Schell of Rosewood CafĂŠ and Anthony Shipman of Chambers Bay Grill. This is the fifth year the festival has joined up with Hope Heart Institute for Hope Heart Right Bite. Participating restaurants will create a healthy option. These will include grilled salmon over salad with pomegranate

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dressing from Blue Elephant and red Cossack potatoes with lemon parsley dill sauce from Kaleenka. Just a Bite items will be smaller portions of popular items for $3.75 per serving. These include steamed barbeque pork bun from Delicious Asia Grill and tzatziki salad from Dancing Zorba. Discounted meal tickets were offered in past years, but not in 2012. Stohr said many attendees last year asked for their return. They will be sold at the front of the park. A book of 20 $1 tickets will go for only $17. Rock the Bowl is back for its second year. It will offer a taste of all the summer fun Metro Parks has to offer. Activities will include zip lines, obstacle course and art projects. It will take place in the bowl area at the entrance of the park. Each day from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. is happy hour. Save $1 on beer in the beer garden during this time, or $3 off a wine tasting starter package in the wine garden. There will be many popular cover tune bands on the music stages. But Stohr noted there will be more singer/ songwriters and indie rock bands than in the past. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There will be a different selection of bands that people will appreciate,â&#x20AC;? she said, ranging from 1980s cover tunes to new original material. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We struck that balance well.â&#x20AC;? Stohr noted the festival is made possible by title sponsor Emerald Queen Casino and presenting sponsor BECU. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to thank them for their support.â&#x20AC;? Due to limited parking at Point Defiance, attendees are encouraged to take the free shuttle busses. They will run continuously from the transit center at Tacoma Community College to Point Defiance from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. on June 28-29 and from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on June 30.

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Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 21, 2013

Bennett shows CYNDI LAUPER DELIVERS OFFBEAT, why he is still SPONTANEOUS PERFORMANCE the consummate ‘soul man’ By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

He’s the reigning king of the crooners, he’s loved by old timers and hipsters alike and he’s got Lady Gaga on speed dial. You wish you could be as cool as Tony Bennett who, at 86, still possesses a strong, expressive voice and effortless charm, both on display Saturday night as the 17-time Grammy winner headlined a benefit for Broadway Center at the Pantages Theater. Backed by a stellar four-piece band that included Lee Musiker on piano, Marshall Wood on upright bass, Harold James on drums and Gray Sargent on guitar, Bennett kept a near capacity crowd spellbound with big hits from his six decades in show business, from the melancholy “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” to the dreamy, nostalgic “I Left My Heart in San Francisco.” Many of the songs were standards, selections from the Great American Songbook that we’ve heard countless times – in movies, as Muzak. But what seemed remarkable was the amount of soul Bennett could pour into such familiar material; songs he’d sung maybe thousands of times were delivered with an earnestness that was quite moving at times, and not a moment of Saturday’s performance felt cynical or contrived. Especially affecting were Bennett’s delivery of Lee Adams’ and Charles Strouse’s tale of lost love, “Once Upon a Time,” and the disarmingly optimistic one-two punch of Charlie Chaplin’s “Smile” and “When You’re Smiling” toward the end of the set. As if those weren’t piercing enough, the iconic singer continued his tradition of performing one of his songs without amplification. He lowered his mic and finished with “Fly Me to the Moon,” accompanied by Sargent’s elegant strumming. “Shall I keep going?” the singer had inquired a couple of times earlier, the crowd erupting in enthusiastic affirmation each time. Had he asked again, there was no way fans would have let him walk off after a performance like that. But then again, how would he top it? Between songs, Bennett told stories from his early days. He joked that he and Rosemary Clooney were “the original ‘American Idols,’” having been discovered on “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts” radio show. And he recalled how comedian Bob Hope had bestowed him with his stage name after deeming his real one, Anthony Dominick Benedetto, too long for the marquee. Oh, and about the Lady Gaga connection. He dedicated “The Good Life” to Mama Monster, who he’s recording an entire album with following their collaboration on “The Lady Is a Tramp” for his chart-topping “Duets II” album from 2011. “She’s a beautiful singer,” he said. “I can’t wait to do it.” For those who didn’t get enough, the Grand Cinema will host two screenings of the documentary “The Zen of Bennett” at 2 and 6:30 p.m. on July 2. Learn more at www. grandcinema.com.

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD/BILLBUNGARD.COM

FLASHBACK. Cyndi Lauper performed all the songs from her breakthrough album “She’s So Unusual” during a spontaneous but sometimes sloppy two-hour set at the Pantages Theater. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

C

yndi Lauper had plenty of reasons to party on June 16 when she headlined the Pantages Theater. For starters, her Broadway musical, “Kinky Boots,” just racked up a whopping six Tony Awards, putting her just one movie gig away from going full EGOT (she also has Grammys and an Emmy, but no Oscar – yet.) Also, her 59th birthday is coming up on June 22, as acknowledged by several “happy birthdays” shouted during the early part of her set; not that she seemed AARP-eligible, sporting crimson dreadlock extensions, a leather jacket and leopard print pants as she twirled around the stage and occasionally broke into the “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” dance. But the reason for the occasion was the 30th anniversary of the singer’s 1983 breakthrough “She’s So Unusual,” among the most enduring pop albums to emerge from the Reagan era. Not that anyone should have expected Lauper, one of Gen-X’s most beloved oddballs, to sleepwalk through her signature album like a typical nostalgia act; her two-hour set was fittingly offbeat and spontaneous, sometimes with awkward results. Much of the show felt like a taping of “VH1 Storytellers,” with the singer providing detailed back stories for her most iconic material. Lauper’s tales sometimes meandered, with some twice as long as the song she was introducing. But her offbeat humor, her quirky Queens accent and lots of insider tidbits kept fans engaged as she recalled her past streaking exploits, lyrics inspired by gay porno mags and the time, during the “We Are the World” shoot, she creeped out Ron Wood. (Exactly how weird do you have to be to freak out a guy who hangs out with Keith Richards?) There was a chaotic undercurrent throughout, with a variety of technical glitches, set list changes and fan exchanges adding to and detracting from the show. One of the night’s more enduring images was when a fan bolted onstage, her arms outstretched during Prince’s “When You Were Mine.” Lauper intervened with a quick hug before her admirer was hauled offstage; and later

the pop icon descended into the good seats where she sang part of “Shine,” her uplifting Internet release from 2001, surrounded by fans. Lauper was not worried about staying on script as she added the obviously unrehearsed “Good Enough” during the encore, much to the chagrin of her confused backing band. “I didn’t want to do this because we did it last year. Then I realized we never come here,” she explained, by way of apology. The arrangement was sorted out one awkward huddle later and the song – a fan favorite first featured in Steven Spielberg’s “Goonies” – paid huge dividends. But the whole thing got off to a shaky start, with Lauper audibly micromanaging her band’s blocking and clearly distracted by technical issues. She sounded fine but briefly quit singing during “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” as she fiddled with her wireless mic transmitter, a passing disappointment for fans who paid up to 120 bucks to hear a treasured song from their childhood. Later, she was focused and delivering with more gusto, dancing and revealing more of her vocal range through cuts like “Yeah Yeah” and “Sex is in the Heel” (the latter from “Kinky Boots”). Sure, she had wasted “Girls” early, but she saved her best song for last, singing an emotional rendition of “True Colors” accompanied only on keys. Fist raised, she encouraged her fans to embrace “acceptance, tolerance and working together for the greater good” before making her exit. It was not a perfect show, by any means, especially if you paid top dollar for tickets; but it was, at least, testimony to the enduring power of Lauper’s brand of pop. Maybe, now that she is in the midst of a major comeback, she will start being mentioned again in the same breath as her 1980s peers, Madonna, Michael and Prince. Set list: “Money Changes Everything,” “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” “When You Were Mine” (Prince), “Time After Time,” “She Bop,” “All Through the Night,” “Witness,” “I’ll Kiss You,” “He’s So Unusual” (Helen Kane), “Yeah Yeah.” Encore: “Shine,” “Sex is in the Heel,” “Good Enough,” “True Colors.”

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

BLACK SABBATH MEETS THE BEATLES IN MOSQUITO HAWK

Friday, June 21, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

LOCAL GUITARIST NOLAN GARRETT WILL RELEASE HIS DEBUT ALBUM, “ALL THE TIME,” ON JUNE 21 AT JAZZBONES. THE ALL-AGES SHOW BEGINS AT 8 P.M. WITH AN OPENING SET BY VIVIDAL. COVER CHARGE WILL BE $10.

PHOTO BY BRIAN KASNYIK

THE BUZZ. Mosquito Hawk is (left-right) Jerry Ziegler, Sean McCoy, Jon Merithew and Olivia Love. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma Weekly caught its first glimpse of Olympia hard-rock quartet Mosquito Hawk back in March at Hilltop party house the Dwell Hole, a cozy setting that could scarcely contain the band’s frenetic, stoner jams. With a little research, we learned they’re kind of an Oly super-group; and with their next T-town gig rapidly approaching – June 28 at the New Frontier Lounge. We rang up Olivia Love, the band’s swaggering front-woman, to learn a bit more. Seasoned indie vets: The band formed in 2012. But collectively, Love estimates the band has 80-plus years of experience rocking South Sound venues in other bands. Love is an alumnus of both Rodeo Kill and all-female Black Sabbath tribute band Black Betty; guitarist and backup singer Jon Merithew is also half of C-Average; bassist Sean McCoy has played with Bacchus and Electric FalMUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (107 MIN, PG-13) 6/21: 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 6/22-6/23: 11:30am, 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50, 6/24-6/27: 1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:50 THE EAST (116 MIN, PG-13) 6/21: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30 6/22-6/23: 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30 6/24-6/27: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30 BEFORE MIDNIGHT (108 MIN, R) 6/21: 2:05, 4:25, 6:45 6/22: 11:35am, 2:05, 4:25, 6:45 6/23: 11:35am, 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:10, 6/24-6/27: 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:10 KON TIKI (118 MIN, PG-13) 6/21-6/24: 3:30, 8:30, 6/25: 3:30 6/26: 3:30, 8:30, 6/27: 3:30 MUD (130 MIN, PG-13) 6/21: 5:45, 6/22-6/23: 12:45, 5:45 6/24: 5:45, 6/25: 9:00, 6/26: 5:45 -no screenings on THU 6/27THE BEYOND (87 MIN, NR) Fri. 6/21-Sat 6/22: 9:09 AN OVERSIMPLIFICATION OF HER BEAUTY (93 MIN, NR) Tue. 6/25: 1:45, 6:45

TWELVE MONKEYS (129 MIN, R)

Thur. 6/27: 6:45

FRIDAY, JUNE 21

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com

MONDAY, JUNE 24

EMERALD QUEEN: Gold Digger (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

cons; and drummer Jerry Zeigler moonlights in Hartwood, Fitz of Depression and Demon Dogs. Black Sabbath meets the Beatles: Mosquito Hawk tends to dwell on the heavier end of the rock spectrum, but they’re not afraid to show their sentimental sides with a faithful rendition of “Dear Prudence.” Of their eclectic sound: Love said, “Each musician has come from kind of a different background. Phil (original bassist, Heinze), who helped us write a lot of the first songs, that we still play, is very much a metal guy. While Jon and Jerry are both into metal, I’d say Jon comes from more of the blues and classic rock aspect and Jerry comes in from more of the punk and thrash-metal side of music. “And I grew up listening to the Beatles and the Mamas and the Papas and the Rolling Stones. I was firmly ensconced in classic rock and earlier. I really liked Nirvana but, honestly, I wasn’t really tuning into the Seattle scene as it was happening very much. Two decades before I was born

– that’s where my musical preferences lay.” Debut disc: The band recorded its self-titled EP last year with Seattle super-producer Jack Endino (Nirvana, Soundgarden, Mudhoney). The disc, which includes set staples “Tyranny,” “Whet,” “Evacuation” and “Letdown,” is available through iTunes and BandCamp.com. What is a mosquito hawk, anyway?: “It’s an insect,” Love explained. “The female of the species lays her eggs on mosquitoes, I believe, and when the larvae hatch they eat the mosquitoes alive. They’re also known as a crane fly or a mosquito eater, I believe.” (Creepy! After Googling it, though, we wonder why it’s not called “hawk mosquito” – and if they make repellent for ‘em.) Show details: Mosquito Hawk will share a bill with Electric Falcons with music starting after 9 p.m. You must be 21 or older to enter the New Frontier, which is located at 301 E. 25th St., Tacoma; (253) 572-4020 or www. thenewfrontierlounge.com for further details.

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C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz, 8 p.m. DAWSON’S: Steve Cooley & the Dangerfields (Blues) 9 p.m. EAGLES LOUNGE: Darrell Data (Vocals/guitar) 6 p.m. GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: Paper Bird, Shenandoah Davis, Elk & Boar, 8 p.m., $16, AA JAZZBONES: Nolan Garrett, Vividal, 8 p.m., $10 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE: Cody Foster’s Army, the Plastards, Blanco Bronco (Rock) 8 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Ghost 211, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: TBA, 9 p.m. SWISS: The Hipsters, 9 p.m. TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (Jazz guitarist) 5 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Gravenloch, American Wrecking Company, Dirgeera (Metal) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Gary Cook (Jazz guitarist) 5:30 p.m., NC, AA

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 JAZZBONES: Heartless (Heart tribute) 8 p.m., $8

C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz, 8 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN: Gold Digger (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Chapter 5 (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Aury Moore Band, Alan White, Roger Fisher (Rock) 8 p.m., $20-25, AA MAXWELL’S: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: TBA, 9 p.m. SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Snootch

SUNDAY, JUNE 23 UNCLE THURM’S: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 3 p.m., NC, AA

ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. CLIFF HOUSE: Robyn Dalynn & the Trio of Three (Jazz) 6:30 p.m. DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: (Bluegrass jam) 3 p.m. SPAR: T-Town Aces (Blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman & All-Star Band, 8 p.m. SWISS: Puget Sound Music For Youth Association (Jam session) 2 p.m., AA UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller, Randy Hansen, Seth Freeman Band, Dixon Boots, Jane’s Sanction, Flashback, Subvinyl Jukebox, 1 p.m., $5

SWISS: Steve Cooley & the Dangerfields (Blues) 8 p.m.

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke, 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (Blues jam) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Bill Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (Blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, JUNE 25 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m. LOUIE G’S: (Acoustic open mic) 6 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: (Open jam), 9 p.m., NC UNCLE THURM’S: Blenis/Ely Band (Blues jam) 7:30 p.m., AA

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (Jazz guitarist) 5 p.m.

A RHAPSODY IN BLOOM: Watch the Sky, 7 p.m. CLIFF HOUSE: Sarah Tweet & South Side Stew (Jazz) 6:30 p.m. DAVE’S OF MILTON: Rubber Band (Jam session) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. GIBSON’S (STADIUM DISTRICT): Ephraim Richardson (Open mic) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Dave Nichols, 9 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, JUNE 27 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC EAGLES LOUNGE: Biff Moss (Ukelele/guitar) 6 p.m. JAZZBONES: Kry (Rock covers) 11 p.m., $7 ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lafferty (Open mic) 8:30 p.m. STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (Jam) 9 p.m. SWISS: Barley Wine Revue, 8 p.m. TOWER BAR & GRILL: Denny Foreman (Jazz)

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 21, 2013

FRI., JUNE 21 BROAD HORIZONS BOOK CLUB ETC – Join this futuristic book club reading feminist speculative fiction! June’s selection is “Alif The Unseen” by Willow G. Wilson. Books are available for purchase at King’s Books. The group meets at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www. kingsbookstore.com.

SAT., JUNE 22 BREW FIVE THREE BEER AND BLUES FEST HAPPENINGS – This new beer lovers’ block party – organized by Broadway Center and the Beer Essentials – will take over Broadway, between South Ninth and 11th streets, from 1-10 p.m. Tacoma Brewing, Engine House No. 9 and other local brewers will serve up the suds, with music provided by T-Town Aces, Chris Stevens’ Surf Monkeys, Snake Oil Elixir All Stars and the godfather of Northwest blues, Bill Engelhardt, and his latest version of Little Bill & the Bluenotes. Tickets are $30. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org.

COMING EVENTS

HAPPENINGS – “Collections”

is Dance Theatre Northwest’s combined spring concert and annual school recital at 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. in two performances featuring dynamic classical and contemporary ballet, jazz, tap and musical theater styles. Choreographed, glamorously costumed and staged by Artistic Director Melanie KirkStauffer, “Collections,” includes a group of vibrant classical ballet pieces to Beethoven symphonies. Inspired by a combination of the music and the performers, dynamic dance, alongside student works by Associate Artistic Director Vadne Domeika, the performance also features excerpts from “Swan Lake” to the music of Peter Tchaikovsky, “Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Guys & Dolls.” Info: (253) 778-6534. SENIOR PROM The fourth annual Senior Prom, “Some Enchanted Evening,” will be held from 6-9 p.m. at Stadium High School for anyone 55 or better. Welcomed back is Route 66, a 16-piece big band that wowed the crowd at last year’s Senior Prom. Kick up your heels or simply come to listen. This big band plays sounds from the swing era and has been providing great music in the Puget Sound region for more than 25 years. Their repertoire consists of the classic and authentic big band hits by such greats as Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole and Count Basie. The lovely and very talented vocalists, Cindy Solvang and Ingrid DuMosch, add a special touch of glamour and excitement to the music. Route 66 has a very large and loyal following earned from years of appearances at many corporate, civic and private functions all over the Puget Sound area, and they make the Senior Prom a very special occaHAPPENINGS –

production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

THE BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE, GARDENS AND MUSEUMS ARE NOW OPEN EVERY SATURDAY FROM 1-4 P.M. THROUGH NOVEMBER. TOUR THE 1903 COTTAGE AND VIEW THE NEW EXHIBIT IN THE BASEMENT MUSEUM CALLED “DASH POINT SINCE 1906” – A COLLECTION OF OLD AND NEW PHOTOS AND FUN ARTIFACTS CELEBRATING THE DASH POINT COMMUNITY. VISIT THE HISTORICAL VIGNETTES IN THE BASEMENT INCLUDING KITCHEN, SEWING ROOM AND OLD-FASHIONED SCHOOL. ALSO ON THE GROUNDS IS THE BOATHOUSE MUSEUM THAT HOUSES A REPLICA COAST GUARD SURFBOAT, INFORMATION ON ITS CONSTRUCTION AND A COLLECTION OF ANTIQUE TOOLS. VIEW THE ORIGINAL LIGHTHOUSE BELL, AND VISIT THE RECENTLY RESTORED JERRY MEEKER REAL ESTATE OFFICE ON THE GROUNDS. THIS IS THE ORIGINAL 1906 OFFICE FROM WHICH JERRY MEEKER SOLD HYADA PARK BUILDING LOTS. THE PARK IS A GREAT PLACE TO PICNIC, FLY A KITE, BEACHCOMB AND MORE. ADMISSION IS FREE. GREAT FOR ALL AGES. LIMITED ENTRANCE TO PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES (STAIRS). GROUP OR SCHOOL TOURS MAY BE ARRANGED BY CALLING THE MESSAGE PHONE (253) 927-2536. LOCATION IS IN THE BROWNS POINT LIGHTHOUSE PARK AT 201 TULALIP ST. N.E. LIMITED PARKING OR ACCESS THE PARK THROUGH THE ADJACENT BROWNS POINT IMPROVEMENT CLUB PARKING LOT. INFO: HTTP://WWW.POINTSNORTHEAST.ORG OR (253) 927-2536.

bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www.pdza. org/zoom. VALUE VILLAGE DONATION DRIVE HAPPENINGS – Visit the University Place Value Village, 6802 19th St. W. and proceeds from all donations of quality, reusable clothing will benefit The Arc of Washington. The organization helps to empower individuals with disabilities. There will be a drawing for a $50 gift certificate, as well. Info: www.valuevillage.com. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC MUSIC – Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach. org.

HAPPENINGS

‘COLLECTIONS’

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater

TW PICK: BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE

WHEELS TO MEALS – Join the eighth Wheels to Meals, an annual fundraiser. Wheels to Meals is a fundraising bike ride for the St. Leo Food Connection, which operates a number of emergency food programs. Cyclists can choose from six routes through the Puyallup Valley and surrounding area (10-75 miles) and are asked to raise a minimum of $100. There are bike mechanics and sag wagons along the routes, numerous rest stops and a finish line party featuring food, music, beer and soft drinks. Choose from six rides through the scenic Puyallup Valley and surrounding areas. Riders are asked to raise a minimum of $100 to support the Food Connection’s emergency food programs. All six courses start and end at Washington State University’s Puyallup Research & Extension Center, located at 7612 Pioneer Way E. Info: http://www.wheelstomeals. org.

Promote your community event,

sion. Tickets are $5 each, and can be purchased online at www.franktobeyjones.com, or at the door. SLUGFEST AT NORTHWEST TREK Slug Fest reigns supreme as one of the zanier weekends of the year at Northwest Trek Wildlife Park. Celebrate all that is silly and slimy about the Pacific Northwest’s most valuable and misunderstood mollusk, the yellow-greenish banana slug. Enjoy a wet and wacky weekend during our slug extravaganza. Back by popular demand will be the always entertaining human slug races as well as up-close slug specimens and hands-on crafts and activities for kids. Along with Northwest Trek’s naturalists’ presentations about slugs. Everyday questions about slugs and gardening also can be answered throughout the weekend. You will not want to miss this slug celebration. Activities are free with admission to Northwest Trek. The festival takes place June 2223. Info: http://www.nwtrek.org HAPPENINGS –

SUN., JUNE 23 TACOMA STREET SCRAMBLE – Starting from the Washington State History Museum, located at 1911 Pacific Ave. in downtown Tacoma, scour this historic area looking for as many checkpoints as you can find in 90 minutes or three hours! Discover many of Tacoma’s landmarks and neighborhoods like the waterfront along Ruston Way, Thea Foss Waterway, Tacoma Dome, Commencement Bay and Old Town. Have fun while exploring this great city. The event starts at 12:30 p.m. Info: http://www. streetscramble.com. HAPPENINGS

TUES., JUNE 25 CAPES AND COWLS BOOK CLUB ETC – Join this book club adapted to mutants, aliens, technogeeks and puny humans who like to read superhero comics. June’s book is “Uncanny X-Force: Apocalypse Solution” by Rick Remender. Books are available at King’s Books. The club meets at 8 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www. kingsbookstore.com. VEGAN BOOK CLUB ETC – Join the Vegan Book Club, coordinated by The South Sound

Vegan Meetup Group. The book club is open to anyone interested in a vegan diet, vegans and vegancurious alike. The book for June is “Extra Virginity” by Tom Muller. Books are available at King’s Books. The group meets at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

WED., JUNE 26 FOOD JUSTICE BOOK CLUB ETC – Join the new Food Justice Book Club organized by the Pierce County Gleaning Project, focusing on fiction, non-fiction and memoir around the topics of food justice, gleaning and food security. June’s book is “Rebuilding the Foodshed” by Philip Ackerman-Leist. Books are available at King’s Books. The book club meets at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

THURS., JUNE 27 PILL JUNKIES READING ETC – Joshua Swainston, author of the novel “The Tacoma Pill Junkies,” will be joined at this special reading by Titus Burley and Melissa Thayer. “The Tacoma Pill Junkies” follows the lives of working-class, 20-something pill addicts as they find out what trouble success can bring. The event starts at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www. kingsbookstore.com.

SAT., JUNE 29 BILL BARCLAY TALK ETC – King’s Books welcomes Bill Barclay as he discusses “The Failure of Neoliberalism: Financial Panic, Economic Stagnation and What We Can Do About It.” Barclay was in financial services for 22 years before retiring in 2004. The event starts at 2 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

the creatures that live there. The zoo’s Explore the Shore programs are set for June 26, July 7, July 22 and Aug. 20 at Owen Beach in Point Defiance Park. All are timed to take best advantage of the low tides that reveal many of Puget Sound’s most interesting shoreline creatures. The events and programs are free and open to the public and reservations are not required. Bring sunscreen and wear shoes and clothing appropriate for walking on rough beach terrain. Zoo naturalists accompany participants on low tide beach walks, where kids and adults will learn to identify tide pool animals and record their presence and location for addition to the scientific Nature Mapping database (www.naturemappingfoundation.org). Participants will learn about the biological diversity of local beaches and better understand how to protect them. For more information about Explore the Shore, go to www.PDZA.org or call (253) 404-3665. T-TOWN SWING – Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m. is $5. The atmosphere is super laid-back and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long! In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday.

HAPPENINGS

BULLETIN BOARD

BALLROOM DANCING HAPPENINGS – The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/star or (253) 404-3939.

EXPLORE THE SHORE HAPPENINGS – Explore the Shore will provide hands-on learning about sea creatures and train participants how to be citizen scientists. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff will teach children, adults and families more about Puget Sound’s beaches and

ZIP LINE NOW OPEN HAPPENINGS – Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log

HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. CHARITY BOOT CAMP ETC – Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday morning at 8:15 a.m., benefiting Campfire USA. These drop-in classes are $10 apiece, with all proceeds going to charity. Info: www.tacomabootcamps.com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums. bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE ETC – The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 8481134, or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 2723211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic. com.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com

Friday, June 21, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping

Food & Beverage Businesses

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

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Evergreen Commercial Brokerage FOR RENT

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4 Sale with Owner Contract

HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE $130,000 High trafic Count location. VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/ DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for $150,000. Cash/ terms. GREEN PUP SPORTS BAR & GRILL (famous for its pizza) $199,000, cash. LOCAL HIGH GROSSING POPULAR BAR & GRILL $220,000, terms negotiable, ngcap. endiseating 74, great kit.p PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location. VERY SUCCESSFUL/ PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR e $320,000 Terms Business is Forpr Sale icfor reduced are avail. LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood. Excellent lease with contract terms. price $36,000 reduced LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $565,000 (R.E. $525K) Bus. $40K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $35,000 Cash. Call Angelo, price d reduce (253) 376-5384. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WARestr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, price laundromat. duced re

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

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5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056 New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600 New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

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Web Developer & IT Technician Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along ZLWKRXUĂ DJVKLSSXEOLFDWLRQWKH7DFRPD:HHNO\ZH SXEOLVKWKH)LIH)UHH3UHVV0LOWRQ(GJHZRRG6LJQDO DQG3X\DOOXS7ULEDO1HZV3&&1*LVLQQHHGRID :HE'HYHORSHU ,77HFKQLFLDQ Â&#x2021;$QXQGHUVWDQGLQJRI WEB DEVELOPER SKILLS 6RFLDO1HWZRUNLQJDQG NEEDED/PREFERRED KRZWRPDUNHWZLWKLW Â&#x2021;([SUHVVLRQ(QJLQH Â&#x2021;:LQGRZV;3  Â&#x2021;3+3M4XHU\-DYDVFULSW management and repair Â&#x2021;0\64/ VNLOOV Â&#x2021;'RPDLQ KRVWLQJ Â&#x2021;0DF26;   management management and repair Â&#x2021;*RRJOH$SSV VNLOOV NICE TO HAVE Â&#x2021;$ELOLW\WRPDQDJHURXWÂ&#x2021;:RUNLQJNQRZOHGJHRI HUVVZLWFKHVDQGFDEOH $GREH&UHDWLYH6XLWH modems ,Q'HVLJQ3KRWRVKRS Â&#x2021;([SHULHQFHPDQDJLQJ ,OOXVWUDWRU

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Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

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BOOKKEEPING

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Looking for 20 hr. per week. Contact ralphhunter@outlook.com

PAINTING

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253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, June 21, 2013

NOTICES

VOLUNTEERS

CITY OF EDGEWOOD PLANNING COMMISSION VACANCY

The City of Edgewood is soliciting applications from its residents to serve on the Planning Commission. This Commission serves as the principle advisory body to the City Council with responsibility for providing guidance and direction for land use policy, pursuant to the authority granted by RCW 35.A63.020. Each member of the commission must be a City resident. If you have any questions or wish to obtain an application, please contact the Deputy City Clerk at (253) 9523299 or bonnie@cityofedgewood. org. Applications are also available on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www. cityofedgewood.org. Deadline for VXEPLWWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUĂ&#x20AC;UVWUHYLHZ is 5:00 p.m., Monday, July 22, 2013. Applications will continue to be accepted until vacant positions are Ă&#x20AC;OOHG<RXULQWHUHVWLQRXUFRPPXQLW\LV greatly appreciated. Published in the June 28, 2013 edition of Signal.

TO: Byron Lyle Fryberg In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Byron Lyle Fryberg Case Number: PUY-FH-SHELL-2013-0015 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 13th day of August, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585.

Volunteer Opportunities at Tacoma Freedom Fair July 3rd Set-up for Freedom Fair on Ruston Way July 4th Freedom Fair Event on Ruston Way July 5th Clean Up and Delivery for Wings and Wheels July 6th Wings and Wheels Event at Tacoma Narrows Airport :HZDQWWRRIIHULQGLYLGXDOVDQGQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W groups the opportunity to choose the job you or your group would most like to do. Volunteer positions are available for: Admissions Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Control entry to the venue and accept donations. Operations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sign in/out golf carts and other HTXLSPHQWWRLGHQWLĂ&#x20AC;HGWHDPPHPEHUV Parking Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Control access to parking areas on Ruston Way Action Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Deliver and ensure everything gets where it belongs on time. Les Davis Pier â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Welcome and check in VIP quests and help out with the reception. Venue Maintenance -- Keep our venues clean and safe, during and after the event. Zone Managers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Experienced volunteers to manage main areas of the venue. Access Control Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Provide a visible presence at venue and control secure access areas. Volunteers Team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Welcome and check in volunteers, provide information for assignments, and give directions and coordinate transportation to assignment site. Clean Up Crew/Tear Down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Remove all equipment and resources at end of the day/ event. Freedom Fair Cleanup Crew/Prep for Wings and Wheels â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Return any missed resources, Ă&#x20AC;QDOFOHDQXSRI5XVWRQ:D\YHQXHSUHSDUDWLRQ and delivery of equipment to Wings and Wheels venue at Tacoma Narrows Airport. Please go to our website: www.FreedomFair. FRPDQGFOLFNRQWKH´9ROXQWHHUÂľWDEWRĂ&#x20AC;QGWKH online volunteer application. As always, volunteers will receive a free parking pass, event t-shirt and snacks/beverages during their shift -- and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be right there to enjoy the great event. If you have any questions please contact our new Volunteer Coordinator, Jen at jlinenko@ gmail.com , 253-507-9357 and go to our web site at www.FreedomFair.com to submit a volunteer registration form. We look forward to partnering with you! If you know others who are interested please forward our contact and volunteer information. Thank you for all you do!

FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Teresa Marie Lenk In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Teresa Marie Lenk Case Number: PUY-CV-T-2013-0006 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 6th day of August, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Dennis Robert Ryan In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Dennis Robert Ryan Case Number: PUY-CV-T-2013-0007 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 6th day of August, 2013 at 10:45 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Richard R. Iyall In the Matter of: Puyallup Tribe vs Richard R. Iyall Case Number: PUY-FH-07-0707-0402 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 6th day of August, 2013 at 11:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT.

Changing Rein Volunteer Orientation & Training Sunday, June 30th, 2013 12pm through 6pm 6204 288th St E Graham, WA 98338 253-370-1429 www.changingrein.org

AmeriCorps Opportunity Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/ student reading proJUDPIRUVWUXJJOLQJĂ&#x20AC;UVW second, and third grade readers. Duties include gathering resources for tutor strategies, recruiting new volunteers, leading in tutor recruitment and retention, helping the Read2Me Coordinators in assessment, tracking student success, and tutoring. Applicants must be 1825 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2013-Jul 15,

2014). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-3833951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information.

AmeriCorps Opportunity Employment Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to serve closely with the employment staff to develop and conduct work-readiness workshops for youth and adult participants. Duties include assisting adult and youth participants with online job search, resumes, and applications, assisting in the planning and execution of workshops, assisting with afterschool tutoring for refugee and immigrant youth, and mentoring youth in the Career Pathways Program. Applicants must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2013-Jul 15, 2014). Contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information.

VOLUNTEERS Help teach English to Spanish Speaking Seniors We need a volunteer to teach ESL to a group of Spanish speaking seniors Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:30-11:30am weekly. Maybe also stay to help translate during the other programs until 2:30 pm. The class is at Portland Ave Community Center 3513 Portland Ave E Tacoma, Contact Bonnie Elliser at 253-5915391. Volunteer with Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful! Make your neighborhood more beautiful and help your neighbors in need! Volunteer with Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful! Apply now as an individual or crew to paint houses of low-income homeowners during the summer of 2013. Learn more at: http:// associatedministries. org/community-mobilization/paint-tacoma-piercebeautiful/volunteer/ Contact Info: Megan Shea at 253-383-3056*142 or megans@associatedministries.org Volunteer needed to teach exercise class for seniors Tai Chi, sails class or yoga. Tuesday & Thursday mornings 10 or 11 AM. Portland Ave Community Center, 3513 Portland Ave E Tacoma, WA 98404. Call and speak with Bonnie @ 253-5915391 South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach.org. Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held in Sumner, WA on Friday, May 17th. For more information visit www. pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with business planning, Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDOVXVWDLQDELOLW\GHcisions, revenue development and quality assurance. Monthly meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett Freshwaters, Chief Financial 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW  Brettf@tacomaparks. com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families with affordable fun. Metro Parks Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www.metroparkstacoma. org/volunteer and signXS WR EH QRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG RI VSHcial event service opportunities. To learn more, contact Roxanne Miles, Volunteer Manager, at 253.305.1068. Roxannem@tacomaparks.com.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and 7KHUDSLHVDQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;WRIfers equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein. org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00 CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no experience or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-5711887. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! Seeking retired or experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy 253-5711887 Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunteers: One Co-coordinator, Friday and Monday; two Callers, Monday; three Packers, Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call 206-727-6250. Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several proJUDP RSWLRQV WR Ă&#x20AC;W \RXU schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 253.396.9630.

PETS

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. They DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HGYDFFLQDWHG and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dollyâ&#x20AC;? Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good girl? Dolly is. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our beautiful and LQTXLVLWLYH)HDWXUHG3HWRIWKH:HHN,W¡VUDUHWRĂ&#x20AC;QGDGRJ with the perfect balance of energy and poise, as Dolly does. The pup inside of her shines when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to play and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll love to run around with you at the park on a sunny afternoon. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as curious as they come and would be the perfect companion to explore new and exciting territories. As youthful as she can be, Dolly understands when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to be calm and can fall asleep in the middle of a crowded room. In a fast paced environment where many pups would be anxious, this one year old Boxer & Chinese Sharpei mix keeps her cool and shows affection to adults and children alike. Dolly is one special girl. Reference #A475247.

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Henry Henry is a super affectionate little boy with tons of love to give his future Forever Family! He is a laid back guy who will get along with pretty much anything.

Sophie Sophie is the most incredible cat! She is a gentle, intelligent, super sweet, and laid back. She is a beauty, although born with a cleft lip, which requires she be fed primarily soft food. Sophie is the absolute perfect companion, a master of purring who enjoys rubs and attention. She truly needs a loving Forever Family to bring her home.

www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Friday, June 21, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV Stephanie Lynch

Doug Arbogast (253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

253.203.8985

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2012

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards 2914 N 30th St $419,000

Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

www.stephanielynch.com

HOMES FOR SALE

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Let me help! Call today.

HOMES FOR SALE

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

For qualifications contact Jen

Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE 723 S. Tyler

3 bed 1.75 bath 2,340 sf. Majestic views. 0RYH LQ UHDG\ PLGFHQWXU\ PRGHUQ 1HDU 3URFWRU 'LVWULFW  5XVWRQ :D\ ZDWHUIURQW Minutes from I-5 for easy commuting. 6WXQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFH JOHDPLQJ KDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  backyard, deck w/ view. MLS# 489114

HOMES FOR SALE $219,000

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Classic Brick home in amazing condition with 3 bedrooms and 1.75 baths. Living rm. with newer pellet stove to keep you warm in the winter months! Retro kitchen w/newer appliances and eating nook, VHSDUDWHGLQLQJUPDQGEHDXWLIXOKDUGZRRGVPDLQĂ RRUEHGURRPV and a full bath. Basement has 1 bedroom and 3/4 bath with space for Ă&#x20AC;QLVKLQJDQDGGLWLRQDOUHFIDPLO\URRP3ULYDWHIXOO\IHQFHGEDFN\DUG with mature landscaping and a sprinkler system! Really great house. Come see! MLS# 391728 &DOO3DP/LQGJUHQ 253 691-0461 for more info or for a private showing! %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV13URFWRU

AFFORDABLE DOWNTOWN LIVING!

1505 S Mason Ave, Tacoma WA 98405

1101 A Street #702, Tacoma, WA 98402 $224,000 MLS # 479914

3 Beds, 1.75 Baths, 2,040 sf Bring your vision and you are set! Lovely roomy 3 bedroom home with formal dining and rec room. Plus, an extra bonus room. Large back yard with plenty of shade; deck off kitchen with hot tub. Imagine your barbecues. Locate on nice quiet street. Good access to bus lines and freeways. Shopping and entertainment just blocks away. Home has a heat pump system for HIÂżFLHQWFRVWHIIHFWLYHKHDWLQJDQGFRROLQJ

Margo Hass Klein

This spacious 1 bedroom, 1 bath condo comes with a Puget Sound & City VIEW! The open floor plan, 11 ft ceilings & expansive windows give a light, airy feeling to your home. Kitchen appliances are included as well as the washer/dryer. The large bedroom has great windows & walk-in closet.

Coldwell Banker Bain

(253) 279-9949 margohassklein@cbbain.com www.margohassklein.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

The Perkins Building features secure access, marble lobby, 24-hour, wellequipped fitness center, central atrium & rooftop deck w/3 party areas. Located in the heart of Downtown Tacoma near shopping, dining, theaters, museums, lightrail & the waterfront.

Call Margo for more information or to schedule a private viewing.

$184,000

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

For Sale

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Lease Also 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

u

Newly Remodeled $1275 7034 S Junett St 3br 2 bath 1250 sf 253.752.9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt 1, 2 or 3 bd w/ Garage On Site 253-565-0343 253-752-9742

Beckenridge Rambler $1,450 9051 Ridgeview Circle W 3br 2 bath, 1557 sqft 253-752-9742

Newly Priced $1500 2429 163rd St CT E 3br 2.5 bath 2256 sqft. 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

For Lease

www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

u

Real Estate Specialist

Office/Warehouse 3875 Steilacoom Blvd, Lakewood From 2500 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REISinvest.com

Office/Retail 7609 Steilacoom Blvd SW Lakewood 1340 sq ft. $12.95 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

206-399-6764 Ralph@johnlscott.com

TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE MLS # 472004

$179,500

3614 Tacoma Ave S - A&B

3614 A A spacious charming Craftsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with 4 %HGURRPVRUEHGURRPVDGHQRIÂżFHZLWK7KLV LQFOXGHVXSVWDLUVPDLQĂ&#x20AC;RRUDQGEDVHPHQW 3614 B A charming mother-in-law unit approximately 64IWZLWKRQHEHGURRPOLYLQJNLWFKHQXWLOLW\ The combined living space is over 3000 sq. ft; located in the historic Lincoln district. And is block away from Lincoln High School, bus and shopping. Both units come with washer, dryer and refrigerator.

Ralph Garlington

For Rent

Mixed Use REO $350,000 4141 6th Ave 1 Comm. unit; 8 res 253-752-9742

Ralph Garlington

206-399-6764

Real Estate Specialist

Ralph@johnlscott.com

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT 1RUWK6DOPRQ%HDFK&RPPXQLW\RQ 7DFRPD1DUURZVIHHWRYHUZDWHU IURQWDJHOHDVHKROGSURSHUW\'HFNZ  parking lot rights. $25,000 &RQWDFW6DOPRQ%HDFK1RUWK Marilyn Jorgenson 253-219-0883

REALTORS

REALTORS

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, June 21, 2013

Billy Gardell

CageSport MMA

Ted Nugent

June 22, 8:30pm

July 6, 7pm

July 19 & 20, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $25, $35, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom, $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom, $35, $45, $60, $65

Randy Travis

Moonwalker

Andrew Dice Clay

August 18, 7pm

August 29, 8pm

September 7, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $30, $45, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom, $10, $20, $35, $40

I-5 Showroom, $25, $40, $60, $65

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 6 21 13 p01