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Silicon Prairie News breaks ground on Big Kansas City. BY B EN PALO S AAR I

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MARCH 21–27, 2013 | VOL. 32 NO. 38 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Chris Milbourn, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel Editorial Intern Katie Miller

KIND OF A BIG DEAL Silicon Prairie News sizes up local startups with its first Big Kansas City. BY B E N PA L O S A A R I

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A R T

DO YOU WANT TO

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Intern Chloe George

FOR HALF OFF?

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

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WELL ,

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Intorno bakes a little St. Louis style into downtown Lawrence. BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

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C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

LONE STARS

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

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D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

C O P Y R I G H T

Highlights from the music-industry bacchanal known as South By Southwest

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher.

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ON T HE COVE R

QUESTIONNAIRE FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC MUSIC FORECAST NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANWHI LE AT PI TC H. C O M

ILLUSTRATED BY ASHFORD STAMPER

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BOULEVARD’S COFFEE ALE is on shelves this week. MURRAY’S ICE CREAM returns March 20. LAUREN FAUST, queen of the Bronies, is set for KC FilmFest.

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QUESTIONNAIRE

PETE WEBER

Host of National Public Radio’s 12th Street Jump

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Occupation: Professional actor and presentation manager for Theater League’s touring Broadway shows Hometown: Bridgewater, South Dakota Current neighborhood: Merriam Who or what is your sidekick? “Oinks,” my guard pig

“Kansas City needs …” To embrace our slightly renewed identity. The streets don’t roll up at 8 p.m. anymore. The jazz and barbecue are as good as ever, but now the art scene has flourished and there’s a late-night, weekend-getaway or daytime spot closer than you think for whatever your preference. Just look up stuff on your computer thing.

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? Netfl ix. I wouldn’t get to see any TV without it. No Walking Dead? No Portlandia? No, thank you.

CLASSES ENROLLING NOW. CALL FOR A TOUR

Last book you read: The Cheesecake Factory

menu

Favorite day trip: To the Louisburg Cider Mill in the fall for warm apple donuts.

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

Believe the children are our future. We need to teach them well and let them lead the way.

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Yokohama Sushi in downtown Lawrence

“If I were in charge …” You best believe there’d

be more dancing and pizza parties.

Where do you drink? No regular spot, but I like

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

Flying Saucer, the Majestic and Chez Charlie.

What’s your favorite charity? Sea Shepherd

Whale Wars

take up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: The gro-

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Gates and Bryant’s

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Believing the Chiefs are gonna win the

cery store. I love to cook.

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? Happy hour at the Majestic, Hayward’s BBQ for sausage and pork burnt ends, anywhere with live jazz.

Josh Gleeson’s The Birdwatcher

Super Bowl, but seriously … THIS IS THE YEAR.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Gary Busey or Rachel McAdams, for very different reasons

Finish this sentence: “Other than the Kauffman Center, Kansas City got it right when …” It created

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter:

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Cut arts

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Self-serve yogurt stands with trendy

the City Market and all the fantastic weekend mornings that ensued.

funding in KC schools.

@JennyJohnsonHi5 for out-loud laughing

names, and whatever “jeggings” are.

913-341-7286

mitsusatohairacademy.com

Interesting brush with the law? I was the last

surviving member of my unit just trying to connect with friends in Washington, when some local deputies accused me of vagrancy. So I spent weeks evading officers in the north woods using all the fighting and survival skills that I honed in battle. To find me, they called in my old commander, who tried to talk sense and get me to surrender. I explained to him that they drew First Blood.

nsas cit a K ycle s y er rc o

e ic

Jazz, funk and George Carlin bits

I get in my car to leave. As I shut the door, she leans in for a surprise kiss, and I slam the door on her head. She screams and starts to do the awkward “it didn’t hurt” dance as she’s smile-crying.

v

Conservation Society

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? It was our first date. Things went well.

mo t

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Chef

Describe a recent triumph: 12th Street Jump is

now being aired on almost 50 stations around the country. Some of my favorites are Miami, Guam, Portland, and Pittsburgh, but the coolest has to be St. Paul Island, Alaska, which plays our live Kansas City jazz show for ships passing through the Bering Sea.

See 12th Street Jump live, with special guest Joe Sample, at 7:30 p.m. March 26, at UMKC’s White Recital Hall.

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MARCH IS DIFFERENT Not like UGLY DUCKLING different. More like KOOKY uncle different. There’s no fireworks or turkeys or chocolate hearts in March. And there’s also NO RATIONALITY, NO PREDICTABILITY, and NO MONOTONY… Uh uh. Not here. ONLY IN MARCH can the team you’ve never heard of KNOCK OFF the team everyone’s talking about, and then BECOME THE TEAM that everyone’s talking about. March is the little guy in all of us, except this little guy can dunk over the big man like “WHAT?!” It’s 31 days of insane. It’s PERFECT. It’s CONTAGIOUS. And no one’s safe. YOUR BEST FRIEND. Your accountant. Your sister. Anyone who’s willing to travel halfway across the country. A giant cardboard face poster in one hand. A BUD LIGHT IN THE OTHER.

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SILICON PRAIRIE NEWS SIZES UP LOCAL STARTUPS WITH ITS FIRST BIG KANSAS CITY. | BY BEN PALOSAARI

K

ansas City’s days as flyover country are over. Tech startups and funders and entrepreneurs have been landing here for a while now, and the latest high-profile business nexus takes place in an airport hangar. That event is Big Kansas City, the first local iteration in a series coordinated by the Omahabased news organization Silicon Prairie News. The three-day conference and party kicks off March 26 at the National Airline History Museum, with 16 speakers set on the docket to evangelize to KC’s tech and startup community. “It’s about giving a voice and, in many ways, putting these cities in the middle of the country on the map,” says Silicon Prairie News co-founder and CEO Dusty Davidson, whose company has put on Big events in Des Moines and Omaha. “We build an online community throughout the year, every day, and these are the couple of times a year when we can bring that community offline, to interact both with each other and also interact with these speakers.”

Regan Carrizales, community builder for SPN, says Big Omaha and Big Des Moines (formerly Thinc Iowa) have helped raise the region’s reputation in Silicon Valley and beyond, but there’s more work to be done. “On a national level, there’s intrigue,” she says. “They’re definitely interested. They know that something is happening. I think now folks are still learning, but they’re also waiting for us to keep producing those really cool companies.” “We bring in people from the coasts,” Davidson says. “Really, it’s about showcasing to the outside world the great things going on in the region — the great things going on here, the great culture of the region.” Among those taking the stage at Big Kansas City are Alexis Ohanian, Reddit co-founder; Dhani Jones, former Travel Channel host and co-founder of the nonprofit BowTie Cause; and Bo Fishback, the KC-based founder of the social marketplace Zaarly. “They’re not just talking heads,” Davidson says. “They interact. Most of

them are there throughout the whole time, just mingling and meeting with the folks.” Carrizales says social media allows for a lot of networking, but having three or four online conversations going on simultaneously can be distracting. In person, the pace becomes human again. “It’s that intentional interaction, and it’s those beautiful moments that happen unintentionally that connect people,” she says. There was, for instance, the day that Colorado investor Brad Feld ran into Kansas Citian Ben Barreth at Thinc Iowa, the precursor to Big Des Moines. Barreth is the founder of Homes for Hackers, an organization that offers rent-free startup space with Google Fiber access. He and Feld chatted for just a few minutes, and the Homes for Hackers idea stuck with Feld. In February, he announced that he had bought a house in Kansas City, Kansas, and was taking applications from entrepreneurs wanting to live and work in the house, Homes for Hackers style, rent-free.

“Being in a physical space and place and connecting with people makes you be intentional. It makes you be present,” Carrizales says. “And for us, it’s all about being present. It’s being there, being engaged, connecting with people you normally wouldn’t connect with.” Getting the chance to rub elbows and swap Twitter handles with the startup world’s heavy hitters isn’t cheap. Regular admission to Big Kansas City costs $499. (Startup founders and entrepreneurs get in for $299.) But the presentations stream free online, and videos will be available after the conference. Davidson says the price is dictated by the caliber of the speakers and the potential for networking — and because it’s a hell of a party. “There’s an opening party with booze,” he says. “There’s breakfast and lunch each day. There’s a middle party with booze. There’s a happy hour with booze.” And, of course, there’s also a closing party. With booze. And all your new, soon-to-be-successful friends. continued on page 9

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“Definitely one of the better horror films I’ve seen so far this year. Makinov has made

A DAMN FINE FILM.” – Ain't It Cool News

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Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

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FAILING UP FA

Kind of a Big Deal continued from m page 7

DAN MAR MARTELL’S CLARIT Y IS HAVING A BIG MOMENT. Martell believes in failure.

TRAVEL FIX

VAYA B L E M ATC H E S S I G H T S E E R S W I T H S C E N E S T E R S .

T

here’s a long tradition among foreign correspondents who fi le from faraway places. They hire “fi xers” — locals who know the cultural topography of a place (its language and traditions) — to help them slip into a city’s background, the better to fi nd sources. But you don’t have to draw an exotic assignment to use Jamie Wong’s Vayable. The site makes it simple for anyone to fi nd — or become — a fi xer-style tour guide in cities worldwide. On Vayable (pronounced viable), a community resident can assemble a hometown tour and post it to the site, along with a price for conducting the tour. Visitors can use the service to find guides who know the clearest view of monuments, the weirdest area museums, the best-kept dining secrets. Wong says the idea for her company started as a blog she shared with friends, who commented with their own travel experiences and destinationspecific tips. “It became very obvious that there was a huge opportunity for a platform here,” Wong says. She launched the company in April 2011, and it now has guides in 500 cities and 100 countries. (Vayable takes 15 percent of the tour price and charges its users a fee when they book a tour.) KC’s only Vayable guide so far offers a five-hour tour called “Authentic Kansas City.” For $20 a head, it includes stops at Boulevard Brewing and the Roasterie, and at Arthur Bryant’s and the NelsonAtkins Museum of Art. Elsewhere, Vayable guides build their tours around themes: “Underground Wine Experience” (San Francisco) or “Midnight Street Food Crawl” (New York City). In a marketplace where social media’s crowdsourced data has overtaken traditional media, it’s not surprising that travelers are ditching Frommer’s for something more personal. “I think there’s something really magical and transcendent that takes place when people connect with other locals on the ground and are able to peek

C Wong trusts locals over vacation guides. into a world and learn about how people live, rather than being a tourist on the fringe,” Wong says. Travel itself isn’t the thrill anymore, she adds. Visitors to a new place want inside information. “A generation or two ago, if you had the luxury to travel, you’d go somewhere,” Wong explains. “And by pure virtue of it being a different city, it was so different from anything you knew. Now, to really access the parts that are different and beyond the Starbucks and McDonald’s and the airport terminals that all look the same, it does require an extra step, going in deeper. Technology is what’s going to fuel that and make it accessible and safe and easy.” If paying to meet up with strangers who want to show you dark corners of a strange city sends up a red flag, Wong is already ahead of you. She says Vayable vets its guides and requires video interviews. Besides, meeting new people is part of the point. “Anyone who does travel expects to meet strangers,” Wong says. “That’s why they’re traveling. Otherwise, they’d be locked up in a hotel room.”

larity founder Dan Martell says he owes his business to a failure. As a young entrepreneur in New Brunswick, Canada, he started a Web-hosting company and a vacation-rental website. Both went under. His third attempt at a startup was a Web-consulting firm called Spheric Technologies, and it, too, struggled. But just as Martell was on the brink of bankruptcy, a local politician set up meetings for him with three people who were running successful businesses. “Those three people changed my life,” he says. The insights he gained from those contacts led him to turn Spheric into a major success. He sold it in 2008, making enough money to allow a move to San Francisco and a career starting companies. The serial entrepreneur was 28 and on his way to, well, Clarity. “I always joke that I started Clarity for the 18-year-old version of me that had nobody in the tech space as a friend,” Martell says. He calls his latest venture, launched in January 2012, an “eBay for advice.” Experts in various fields create online profiles and set a price for a consultation. Among the nearly 11,000 experts selling their knowledge on the website are industry titans (including Mark Cuban, an investor in the company), tech-sector old-timers and best-selling authors. Clarity has facilitated 13,000 customer calls to date, Martell says. User profiles are ranked on many factors, including customer reviews and how much the experts do to promote themselves on the site. The experts, in turn, grade their advice seekers. The big no-nos: bailing on a scheduled call and making a baitand-switch appointment to look for investment capital. “Don’t pitch me, bro” is one of Clarity’s mottos, Martell jokes. “You can’t be a dick on Clarity.” Martell thought the company would be useful for young startup owners seeking sage guidance from their business elders — people like his imaginary 18-year-old self. But Clarity’s demographics skew older. “Established people are actually a bigger use case than first-time entrepreneurs,” he says. “The reason why is because first-time entrepreneurs are really intimidated or don’t know they should be doing this.” A Big Omaha veteran, Martell says one point he’ll make at Big KC is that nobody goes straight to the top in business. Failure is an important part of an entrepreneur’s career, he says. “Every one of my lessons will be based on a failed story.” continued on page 10

THURSDAYS 7pm 2

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Kind of a Big Deal continued from page 9

BALLER ER

S P HERO RO L L S MOB I L E G A M I NG I NTO T H E R EA L W O R L D.

S

phero, the cueball-looking robot that Adam Wilson invented, looks at first glance like something designed to startle a cat. The app-controlled ball (you pilot it with a smartphone or a tablet) does more than just wig out your pets, though. Wilson’s design brings the touch-screen-gaming plane into the physical realm. Among the 20 apps developed for Sphero so far is Sharky the Beaver, in which the user manipulates a character on the screen and Sphero rolls round in sync. In others, such as a drawing game called Etch-O-Matic, Sphero is the controller and guides what happens on the screen. Wilson and co-founder Ian Bernstein came up with the idea for Sphero while working on other small, phonecontrolled robots. Most of the robots they built were too difficult to create an app for, Wilson says. He then suggested a robot that looked like a marble. “And Ian said, ‘Let’s just make a robot ball,’ ” Wilson says. The Boulder, Colorado, company launched in 2010, and the robots are now sold at Target, the Apple Store and specialty electronic stores. This year, they plan to go international. Anyone can write apps for Sphero. (The company doesn’t take a cut of the profit.) Wilson sounds surprised and giddy about what developers are doing with his robot. “It’s very humbling,” he says. “It’s very exciting. But

it’s also very satisfying. Kind of like the plan is working. You build it, and they get excited.” A favorite third-party app at the Sphero office is a hotpotato game, called Pass the Sphero, Wilson says. “We’ve turned that into a more violent game around the table,” he jokes. Our favorite uses of Sphero so far: • Tipsy isn’t available just yet, but nothing that holds so much promise can stay shelved for long. It’s simple: a Sphero drinking game. Put the robot on a table, add your friends and some booze, then start playing. The loser of a series of mini games has to drink. In this case, it’s probably good that Sphero runs only about an hour on one charge. • YouTube has some pretty amusing videos of Sphero running complex racetracks and obstacle courses. And the footage demonstrates just how tough these little robots are. (In one promotional video, a man stands on one but doesn’t break it.) This isn’t a toy that requires you to be very gentle with it. • Are you shocked that there’s a SpheroCam? This app allows you to control the ball and snap pictures or video using an iPad or iPhone camera — finally, a way to capture every perfect moment of kitty confusion or puppy outrage and share each one with the world.

Sphero is having a ball with app developers, Wilson says.

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com

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25 YEARS FIGHTING AIDS IN KC And there’s still no cure.

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PARTY WITH THE DUDE The Dude has inspired legions of imitators, and Jeff Bridges’ character is the object of public mimicking at The Big Lebowski QuoteAlong, at 8 p.m. at Alamo Drafthouse (1400 Main, 816-474-4545).

F R I D AY | 3 . 2 2 |

T H U R S D AY | 3 . 21 |

LAST DANCE

POURING IT OUT

For reserve-quality culture at a screw-top price, you can’t do much better than the Kansas City Symphony’s Classics Uncorked seMORE ries. Tonight’s program, titled “The Beat Goes On,” puts up a halfT A INE dozen varied pieces ONL .COM PITCH (Beethoven, Saint-Saëns, John Adams, others), then throws in a post-show glass of wine or champagne, for $25. The ticket leaves you something for the weekend, and the music — well, they had us at Adams’ “Short Ride in a Fast Machine.” It’s at 7 p.m. in the Kauffman Center’s Helzberg Hall (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7200). For tickets ($25) and information, call 816-471-0400 or see kcsymphony.org. — SCOTT WILSON

Subtitles, inflatable bats and $5 white-russian specials make the experience extra-wacky. Admission costs $10, and a ticket stub gets you $3 bowling games afterward at Z Strike. For more information, see drafthouse.com/kansas_city.

I

EVENTS

BLOGHER

Jenny Lawson found her voice blogging. The scrappy West Texas native behind thebloggess.com generates about 3 million page views per month. “Most bloggers are emotionally unstable and often awkward in social situations, which is why so many of us turned to blogging in the first place,” she writes in Let’s Pretend continued on page 14

t’s the final season for Kansas City Ballet artistic director William Whitener and ballet mistress Karen Brown. See their work when the Kansas City Ballet performs Whitener’s choreography of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, this weekend and next at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222). Women from the Kansas City Chorale take part, too, with live music by the Kansas City Symphony. Tickets for tonight’s 7:30 show start at $29. Call 816-931-2232 or see kauffmancenter.org. pitch.com

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continued from page 13 This Never Happened, a New York Times best-seller. At 7 p.m., she discusses her “mostly true memoir,” including a chapter titled “My Vagina Is Fine. Thanks for Asking,” at Unity Temple on the Plaza (707 West 47th Street). The $16 admission (plus sales tax) includes a softcover copy of Lawson’s book and an extra guest pass. For more information, call 913-384-3126 or see rainydaybooks.com.

S AT U R D AY | 3 . 2 3 | SATURDAYS OF THUNDER

Much like exotic pets, golf clubs and cars, Soap Box Derby vehicles require upkeep, loving hands and dedication. Before spending upward of $500 on a car kit, take your kid to Rookie Day, sponsored by Kansas City Soap Box Derby. “This is where we open our track to anyone to come out and try racing for free,” says derby director Jeremy Darling. “Participants are taken through different exercises like braking, steering and wheel swap. At the end, they get a derby driver’s license they can bring back and use at any of our events.” Try it noon–4 p.m. today at the 4600 Eastern Avenue track. (Another Rookie Day is scheduled April 13, before the club’s big races April 20–21.) For more details, see kcsbd.com.

Licklider, of the Midwest Alpaca Owners and Breeders Association. “Alpacas tend to regard strangers in the same way that a standoffish cat would, but they seem to be drawn to kids.” Find out more about the hairy, wily ways of the domesticated South American animal at the 10th annual Invitational Alpaca Show at Hale Arena (1701 American Royal Court). Look for nearly 500 of the soft, cuddly animals on display alongside several alpaca-fiber vendors. The show is open 9 a.m.–5 p.m. today and 9 a.m.–noon Sunday. Admission is free. See mopaca.org for more information.

MY PET ALPACA

PROGRESSIVELY ARTSY

Ask Mary Licklider if alpacas are familyfriendly, and she’ll tell you about her experience. “There is some sort of instinctive connection between alpacas and kids,” says

Midtown’s Art Closet Studios (3951 Broadway) is becoming a one-stop shop for arts in the community. It’s an all-ages music venue and arts-education center, and an

F R I D AY | 3 . 2 2 |

GREEN THUMBS

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onah Nelson comes from a long line of gardeners. His grandfather, Ron, opened Family Tree Nursery in Shawnee in 1981 and has stayed in business ever since. This weekend, Jonah Nelson appears at the Greater Kansas City Home Show and Flower, Lawn & Garden Show, which opens at 10 a.m. today at Bartle Hall (301 West 13th Street) and runs through Sunday. For tickets ($10 at the door, $8 online) and information, see kchba.org. During the event’s “Garden Chatter Corner,” Nelson is scheduled to talk mostly about trees. We had a few questions of our own. The Pitch: For people who are intimidated by gardening, what’s a good starting point? Nelson: Gardening is simple. Anyone can put their hands in the dirt, but there is a niche for everyone. Do you forget to water? Try a succulent combination. Do you hate paying weekly for fresh herbs? You can easily and affordably grow your own on your back patio. Once you realize that plants’ needs are very similar to our own — water, air and light — then gardening becomes much less intimidating. 14

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What’s popular in Kansas and Missouri gardening? What are people growing successfully that works with local drought, climate and weather? Colorful annuals for the heat, like Angelonia, coleus or dragon wing begonia. Tough trees like black gum, Blue Atlas cedar or sweetbay magnolia. Some shrubs that are good are Fire Power nandina, Tiger Eyes sumac and Golden Ruby barberry. In the long run, is it better to cut down a tired tree? A tired tree is one that has been damaged to the point at which decay could occur. If that happens, it’s virtually irreversible. If a tree in question is in decline, then it needs to be assessed by a local certified arborist. Long, slow, deep watering is critical. It does not benefit trees or shrubs to water them every day. Once a week is typically a good schedule to get on once the weather turns hot. It is also important to feed your landscape. I recommend an organic fertilizer for most trees and shrubs, but there are many options out there that can be very plant-specific.

W E D N E S D AY | 3 . 2 7 |

JCCC 2013 Johnson County Community College joins the global effort to stop violence against women and girls.

A MEMORY, A MONOLOGUE, A RANT AND A PRAYER

WRITINGS TO STOP VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND GIRLS

HOME ON THE PRAIRIE

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o “News From Lake Wobegon” tonight — it’s all tuneage for Garrison Keillor, who brings A Brand New Retrospective to Yardley Hall at Johnson County Community College (12345 College, Overland Park, 913-469-4445). Pop songs, limericks, Tchaikovsky and the blues are fair game. Hear it all at 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $35 and must be bought from the box office. See jccc.edu/performing-arts-series for more information.

art-materials exchange center. Co-founder Mike Moreno has recently taken over Open Fire Wood Burning Pizza, the anchor tenant, and is operating it as ACS’ main source of funding. Support ACS at an art lock-in, with live music, collaborative art and performance art, from 3 p.m. today until 7 p.m. Sunday. The $5 ticket price (paying guests are free to come and go) benefits ACS. Find out more about ACS by searching for it on Facebook.

S U N D AY | 3 . 2 4 | TATTOO YOU

Earlier this month, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign developed an electronic sensor that can be printed directly onto human skin, but it flakes off after two weeks — totally different from the skin art at this weekend’s Real Deal Tattoo Convention. Immerse yourself in the culture, get some new ink or just watch others get theirs when local and national artists converge at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665). Passes for this final day, noon–6 p.m., cost $15. Find more details at uptowntheater.com (click on “concerts”).

OFF-ROAD HEAVEN

The Lawrence River Trail, a nine-mile loop running alongside the Kaw, provides some of the best mountain biking around, with hairpin turns, berms and rolling hills. It’s also particularly awesome because it’s accessible to all skill levels, much like this weekend’s God’s Country Fat Tire Festival. Today’s Mountain Bike Classic includes kids’ events, a grand masters 60-plus class and first-timers division, plus cash payouts, bike support and lots of free samples of Chamois Butt’r. Registration costs $20–$35 and begins at 8:30 a.m. (The Riverfront Park entrance and parking lot are off Eighth Street and Oak, in north Lawrence.) For more information, see cowtowncycling.blogspot.com.

T U E S D AY | 3 . 2 6 | ALL THAT JAZZ

Public-radio listeners from south Florida to Juneau, Alaska, tune in to 12th Street Jump, KCUR 89.3’s weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam. “The outside world still sees KC as a birthplace of jazz,” says 12th Street Jump cohost Pete Weber, “and we are the only feed of the live music that’s still being played in that tradition.” The show is usually broadcast live at the downtown Marriott at midnight Saturdays, but the production moves to UMKC’s White Recital Hall (4949 Cherry, in the Olson Performing Arts Center) for a special show at 7:30 p.m. with jazz-piano legend Joe Sample. “We salute giants of jazz, and quite simply … most have passed,” Weber says. “We reached out to him, and he responded positively.” Tickets cost $11.50. Buy them at 12thstreetjump.wordpress.com.

2 and 7:30 p.m. Sat., March 30 Polsky Theatre, JCCC $5 students; $15 general public in advance, $20 general public at the door Tickets available through the JCCC Box Office, 913-469-4445, or www.jccc.edu/performance

Enjoy a benefit reading featuring a groundbreaking collection of monologues by world-renowned authors and playwrights, edited by Eve Ensler and Mollie Doyle. Directed by Beate Pettigrew, associate professor of theatre, JCCC. Performed by members of the JCCC community. Proceeds benefit:

12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, Kan. 66210 www.jccc.edu

MOMIX – Botanica

8 p.m. Fri. and–Sat., April 5-6 MOMIX Botanica 8Mindp.m. Fri.and andeye-bending Sat., April 5-6

dance Mind- theatrical and eye-bending theatrical dance

W E D N E S D AY | 3 . 2 7 |

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PARENTAL ADVISORY

Mystikal’s “Pussy Crook” and Jay Kelly’s “Nuttin’ in These Bitches” are two of the worst offenders when it comes to misogynist rap. Why are these songs produced? “It fits the cultural narrative,” says arts educator and rapper Stacy “Reach” Smith. “Sex sells, and women are held as commodities in that economy.” Reach has organized “Who You Calling a B----?”, a free hip-hop symposium at the American Jazz Museum (1616 East 18th Street, 816-474-8463). The two-hour panel discussion on rap’s misogyny is part of the “Bebop to Hip Hop” series, curated by Smith and Glenn North, the museum’s poet-inresidence. For more information, search for “Who You Calling a B----?” on Facebook. The event begins at 7 p.m.

www.jccc.edu/TheSeries | 913-469-4445 www.jccc.edu/TheSeries | 913-469-4445

Performing Series Performing ArtsArts Series

E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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S TA G E

COMING AROUND AGAIN

The Living Room’s Carousel takes a spin at the Rep.

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arousel isn’t meant to be blithely uplifting, and the version being staged by the Living Room and the Kansas City Repertory Theatre isn’t. But it’s a happy collaboration, freshening the work without diluting its essential toughness. First produced two years ago by the downtown Living Room Theatre, this Carousel remains stark and sensual. It’s in a larger venue, but the Rep has made itself smaller, replicating the E R MO Living Room’s signature intimacy and casual atmosphere in the Spencer T A INE Theatre. Director Kyle ONL .COM PITCH Hatley, the Rep’s associate artistic director (who also appears in the show, uncredited), has created a theater-in-the-round that puts little distance between audience and actors. Rodgers and Hammerstein based Carousel on the 1909 play Liliom, by Hungarian playwright Ferenc Molnar, but gave the story a more hopeful ending for American audiences of the mid-1940s. The musical’s original setting is late-1800s Maine, a time and place that give context to the dated attitudes toward women. This production is purposely imprecise about its era, but it’s still one dominated by divisions of class and hard economics. And it’s still a mostly sad work, though its upbeat tunes and comic relief make dusk of what otherwise would be midnight. In an effect that underscore’s the material, lots of filament light bulbs hang low over the stage so that actors can manipulate them as they enter and exit. (At the start, the rhythmic on-and-off of the bulbs makes a tuneless overture.) At first distracting, the device ultimately melds with the harshness of the love story at the play’s center, the romance between carou-

STAGE

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sel barker Billy Bigelow (Rusty Sneary) and The cast and chorus bust out together, millworker Julie Jordan (Mollie Denninghoff ). but Sneary (above) walks alone. The flawed but charismatic Billy has a talent man with whom she’s in love. Carrie’s charfor luring customers — especially women — to acter brings needed humor to the show, but the carousel. For them and for him, the merryher side story also serves to emphasize Julie’s go-round is an escape from life’s hard realities, hardship. But life isn’t perfect for her, either. a feeling of what a better life might be like. But A girl who’s in love with any man is doomed to what initially draws Julie and Billy together isn’t completely clear at first. Did you like it weep and wail, Carrie and the townswomen sing in “Stonecutters Cut It on Stone.” when he talked to you today/When he put you on the carousel that way? sings Julie’s friend CarWhen Billy learns that Julie is pregnant, rie (Liz Clark Golson) in “You’re a Queer One, he finally reveals his feelings in “Soliloquy.” Julie Jordan.” Julie responds: I’d rather not say. (Sneary’s rendition is both poignant and athLike Billy, Julie keeps her thoughts to her- letic.) But impending fatherhood drives him self. The two explore their attraction in an earto go in on a moneymaking scheme with his nest but guarded “If I Loved You,” yet when friend Jigger (Nick Uthoff), a whaler whose they sacrifice their jobs to be together, the dedangerous reputation is justified. Jigger plays cision seems to come as much from stubborn- on the vulnerabilities of others, including Billy, ness as from longing. But it’s in keeping with whose fateful decision affects his daughter, their story, one that’s fated by a tragic inability Louise (Daria LeGrand). Yet she, in turn, offers to get through to each other. him a chance at redemption. Sneary, the Living Room’s Hatley has gathered a Carousel artistic director, makes strong, talented local cast, Through March 31 a commanding Billy. His including some members of at Kansas City Repertory work here is mesmerizing — the 2011 Living Room show, a Theatre, 4949 Cherry, edgy and raw. We may not 24-member chorus, and brief 816-235-2700, kcrep.org like this troubled man, but appearances by Gary Neal we feel something for him — Johnson and Charles Fugate. helping us understand Julie’s devotion to him, The stage is sometimes crowded, but Hatley, and why his former boss at the carousel, Mrs. choreographer Steven Eubank and scene deMullin (Natalie Liccardello), another outlier, signers Sneary, Gary Mosby and William R. also wants him. Shinoski make efficient use of the limited Julie fi nds some solace with her cousin square footage. It’s a lively production, with Nettie (Katie Gilchrist), who leads a vibrant simple musical accompaniment onstage (Eryn “June Is Bustin’ Out All Over” with the choBates on piano, with Sean Hogge occasionally rus (the song is an abrupt break in continuity on guitar) and excellent performances. in the middle of Act 1), as well as a tissueCarousel doesn’t deliver a completely happy grabbing “You’ll Never Walk Alone.” In conconclusion, but the ride is absorbing, the reality trast to Julie’s situation is her friend Carrie’s it creates an escape of its own. more fortunate circumstance with Mr. Snow (Matthew McAndrews), an ambitious fisherE-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

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FILM

SOUTHERN DISCOMFORT

In Park Chan-wook’s Stoker, the family

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that slays together stays together.

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perverse fairy tale ripe with mordant, sexy menace, the campy, playful Stoker is the kind of cinematic whirlwind that typically slips through the public’s fi ngers. Like such baroque wonders as Donald Cammell’s White of the Eye or Paul Verhoeven’s The Fourth Man, it’s almost too kinky for a mass audience. Almost. South Korean director Park Chan-wook, here making his English-language debut, suff uses the film with the dark symbolism and gnarled family roots of classic Southern gothic. E MOR Yet Stoker is equally versed in the remorseless plot labyrinths of T A E IN ONL .COM the so-called Vengeance PITCH trilogy that made Park’s name. A love letter to Alfred Hitchcock, Flannery O’Connor and Charles Laughton, it’s also further demonstration of the director’s own aesthetic, one that keeps the touchstones of his best previous work (Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, J.S.A., the “Cut” segment of Three Extremes). The Stoker clan has its little intrigues, as all families do. But as young India (Mia Wasikowska) and her mother, Evelyn (Nicole Kidman), deal with the tragic death of father and husband Richard (Dermot Mulroney, seen in portentous flashback) — and, perhaps worse, the sudden reappearance of his longlost brother, Charlie (Matthew Goode) — it’s evident that something has been amiss for a long time in this house. What follows is a smooth, rat-poison cocktail of sex, violence, interfamily warfare and murder, with a lulu of a sandbox set piece that plays like Mr. Rogers’ take on Titus Andronicus. Park’s Korean fi lms had begun to move from cool detachment toward flamboyantly stylized melodrama. In Stoker, the butterfly emerges from its wardrobe. Using Hitchcock’s

FILM

Shadow of a Doubt as his template, making explicit what the master barely hinted at — the sexual attraction flickering in the sick Teresa Wright-Joseph Cotten relationship — Park aims for something closer to the hothouse eroticism and stylistic gamesmanship of lateperiod De Palma. As Charlie seduces Evelyn while playing cat-and-mouse with India, every deliriously hyper-symbolic image is charged with multiple meanings; each frame fits into the jigsaw mania of Park’s elaborately splintered design. And yet the performances are as heightened as avant-garde theater, even as Park plays with tried-and-true thriller iconography and

archetypes. Goode gives a fascinating performance, not because his Charlie comes off completely psychotic but because he finds an emotional arc within that psychosis. Wasikowska brings her A game, incarnating a walking bruise with the power of Dolores Claiborne–era Jennifer Jason Leigh. The actress has a gift for keeping her cards close, and her India is a dark-minded, untrusting pragmatist who sees through everything around her, deep into the shadows. Kidman isn’t the star of this particular narrative, but she brings so much nasty relish to the proceedings that it’s impossible to imagine the movie without her. As in The Paperboy, she

Wasikowska can read your mind. again suggests a libido beating like a raptor against its cage. Here she finds a brittle, jittery variation on Tennessee Williams erotomania. This was a project she nurtured and kept close to her Middle Tennessee home — the part of John Cheever country is played by Nashville — and when she hisses venom at her sullen daughter or slinks around like Betty Draper haunting a house, you can see why she wanted the movie, and why Park wanted it, too. Stoker may be the sickest, most twisted film about working through family issues we’ll get this year. And the most fun. ■

OUT THIS WEEK LIKE SOMEONE IN LOVE

T

he cinematic worlds of Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami have always revolved around constantly shifting relationships — between children, between students and teachers, between strangers, between lovers or spouses, sometimes between documentary realism and narrative fancy. This interest has become even more overt in recent years: 2010’s Certified Copy, a perplexing portrait of a man and a woman whose precise relationship appears ever in flux, was some sort of masterpiece. His latest, Like Someone in Love, is more direct than Copy — you could, with a fair bit of confidence, outline its plot to a friend — but it also extends his fascination with tremulous emotional landscapes. Set in Japan (a more natural location for an Iranian director than you might think), Like Someone in Love gives us a young student and

occasional prostitute (Rin Takanashi) who spends an evening with an older professor (Tadashi Okuno), only to have him begin to insinuate himself into her life in ways both welcome and troubling. As in Kiarostami’s

Takanashi is in Love. earlier works, preconception matters a great deal here, both in the narrative and in the way the film works on its audience.

The director relishes dismantling our assumptions about these characters — and their assumptions about one another. In doing so, he weaves a style around things seen and unseen, heard and unheard. Kiarostami’s grasp of technology and technique has never felt less than attuned, but this marks his most sophisticated use of sound yet, both thematically and technically. The early parts of the film are suff used with phone calls and half-heard exchanges and conversations, and later scenes make devastating use of offscreen sound. This isn’t just the director showing off, though; he has instead made something about the tension between external and internal space. Gradually, the collision of these different worlds begins to create something like suspense, leading to a shattering, yet deliciously incomplete, finale.

— BILGE EBIRI continued on page 21

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— SCOTT WILSON

SPRING BREAKERS

W

ell, here it is: the Star Wars of Harmony Korine movies. Spring Breakers is bigger and brighter and pricier than anything the underground writer-director has vomited up before. It takes place in some other galaxy (Florida), and it’s dominated by a forceful Alien (James Franco, playing a rapper and drug lord called Alien). So much press has already been devoted to this grimy little thing’s child-stars-gonewild casting that any assessment of its actual contents is almost beside the point. But for Korine, concept is content, and his ensemble here is, on those terms, a coup worth at least some of the hype: Selena Gomez (the Disney Channel’s Wizards of Waverly Place), Ashley

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an we just start the summer movies now? Bring on The Wolverine and The Lone Ranger. Fill the multiplexes with Hangover and 300 sequels. Anything to staunch the trickle of sad, shrugging mediocrity that finds its way into theaters between awards season and the next wave of blockbusters. Anything to clear the mind of dismal voids like Admission. See if any of these ingredients sound fresh to you: a successful career woman whose suspended maternal instincts may soon thaw, a too-good-to-be-true single dad, precocious kids teaching their elders valuable life lessons, a man-hating ballbuster of a single mother, a horny middle-aged professor with an Eastern European accent, an icy-bitch co-worker. Admission, an attempt at Ivy League-set romantic comedy, offers all this and less. It’s some pretty threadbare tweed, and it suffocates Tina Fey and Paul Rudd — both of whom inspire a not-unearned “I’d watch them in anything” loyalty, which Admission aggressively challenges. As Portia Nathan, a Princeton University admissions officer who’s pushing 40 and growing invisible to her longtime boyfriend, Fey isn’t far from Liz Lemon country. That wouldn’t be an unfair convenience to exploit, if director Paul Weitz could find the Liz in Portia or break past Fey’s 30 Rock brand. But Admission is so indifferently filmed and ineptly edited that no one is able to give a performance. The thing is a lank, ugly wall of reaction shots meeting failed punch lines, set to off-the-rack sitcom music and sub-Cranberries pop songs. Those bad jokes belong to Karen Croner’s screenplay, which turns its source material — Jean Hanff Korelitz’s witty, involving 2009 novel of the same title — into stale farce. If Weitz — whose About a Boy (which he co-wrote and co-directed with brother Chris Weitz) is a model of easygoing best-seller adaptation — knows better, he does nothing to prevent Croner’s clichés and inanities from piling up. The weight of Admission’s generic ideas about parenting, career and gender proves too much for Fey and Rudd (and Michael Sheen and Lily Tomlin, among others), who wince and slouch through their parts. It’s enough to make you almost look forward to World War Z.

s

Not an official mug shot Benson (ABC Family’s Pretty Little Liars) and Vanessa Hudgens (Disney’s High School Musical series), all glued into bikinis and taking drugs and generally in dire need of Jiminy Cricket. (The director’s wife, Rachel Korine, a veteran of her husband’s last feature, Trash Humpers, fits easily alongside the other three leads.) There’s no conscience guiding the bug that finds them, though. Alien, the latest conceptualization by the busy acting hyphenate Franco, lives by the sort of self-styled code known to any self-respecting metal-mouthed, cornrowwearing junior Tony Montana. He’s jacked and well-armed, respected and street-seasoned but still tender enough to plink-plunk the occasional Britney Spears ballad on his terrace’s white grand piano — the perfect muse for four college girls who want to be “hard.” Getting hard means robbing a diner, Greyhounding their way to the beach, and eventually embracing Alien, who bails them out of jail when they’re too slow to flee a propertydestroying party. (Korine talked the owner of a condemned motel into letting his extras tear the place apart on camera.) It’s less a plot than it is a video game, one that throws up increasingly violent challenges as the players move through its levels — and one that progresses down, not up. Cinematographer Benoît Debie makes this plain enough with his brilliantly lighted, post-Nintendo palette — by far the most convincing element of Korine’s mania for junked-out pastiche, and a fair reason to study Spring Breakers — so it’s a disappointment to hear one of the girls say, early on, that the robbery is just a video game. It’s mostly rigged. To the extent that Spring Breakers says anything, it remarks on the indestructibility of this country’s young white women, its former Disney princesses and budding marketplace decision makers. But Korine remains an anti-purpose auteur, and that’s just as well when he asks us to root for his white heroines to kill a bunch of black people. That’s not a spoiler — it’s a warning.

— S.W.

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www.yayasbistro.com www.landingeateryandpub.com

www.oldhoofandhorn.com

www.providence-kc.com 22

THE PITCH

M A R C H 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

www.antonskc.com pitch.com

www.thejacobsonkc.com

www.brooksiderbarandgrill.com

CAFÉ

HILL COUNTRY

Intorno bakes a little St. Louis style into downtown Lawrence.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Intorno • 801 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-856-1625 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday–Saturday • Price: $$–$$$

O

ne of the first things I learned as a new Kansas Citian, back in 1984, was that the locals believed real Italian cuisine had been influenced more by St. Louis than by Rome. That pretty much sums up KC’s inferiority complex. I grew up in a comparably sized Midwestern city, a place where restaurateurs from Italy or New York City judged one another strictly by the quality of their marinara (never called “red sauce”) and their meatballs. Nobody had ever heard of “The Hill” and the apparently famous restaurants located there, and St. Louis was as foreign to most of us as Rome. (I had relatives in E R MO St. Louis, but they were from my mother’s side and not Italian. Worse, T A INE ONL .COM my father told me, they H PITC were vulgarians who put mayonnaise on everything.) St. Louis continues to cast a culinary shadow over this city — or, anyway, Michael Garozzo does. The larger-than-life St. Louis native has served that city’s style of Italian food at his various namesake venues for nearly 25 years, attracting a big and loyal following. Some talented local chefs have studied and cooked in Italy, but unless they — like Garozzo and another recent import, Michael Del Pietro (of Sugo’s Spaghetteria) — have some connection to the Gateway City as well, diners here somehow fail to be impressed. Four months ago, cucina St. Louis became one of the dining draws on Lawrence’s Massachusetts Street, when chef Jim Vaughn and his wife, Leslie, took over the former Round Corner Drugstore space, last occupied by chef Robert Krause’s Esquina restaurant. Vaughn is a St. Louis native and a former chef at one of that city’s iconic Sicilian-American restaurants, Charlie Gitto’s. He spent three decades working for the Gitto family. Charlie Gitto’s is the same restaurant where Garozzo launched his career, and, perhaps in homage, both Garozzo and Vaughn serve the ice-cold, heavily dressed salad that’s a signature of the Gitto repertoire. (Vaughn adds roasted red peppers and cherry tomatoes.) Esquina had trouble finding an identity. (It opened as a “Nuevo Latino” taqueria in 2010 but eventually hopped the Atlantic to become a Mediterranean bistro.) But the Vaughns appear to be on more solid footing. There’s no mistaking Intorno as anything but the St. Louis–style Sicilian-American restaurant it’s meant to be. That means spaghettini and meatballs (made of memorably tender beef) and garlicky, cheese-and-prosciuttostuffed chicken spiedini. The succinct but well-rounded menu is heavy on shellfish and a little stingy on meatless options, but Vaughn is playing to his strengths: His calamari appetizer and crab cakes are the best I’ve tasted in the Lawrence-KC area. The Vaughns originally left St. Louis to open

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

Vaughn prepared his f luffy, house-made black-pepper gnocchi with vegetable stock rather than chicken stock. (The simple sauce was rich with garlic and asiago cheese.) a restaurant in Topeka last fall. “We had family I snagged a hunk of my friend’s chicken there,” Vaughn tells me. “It seemed like a good idea.” But Esquina became available, and the spiedini to take home with me: It was divine. timing was right. “I knew Robert Krause and I Even cold, at 3 a.m., the pounded bird breast rolled around a filling of salty prosciutto, Provel knew he wanted to take a different direction,” and fresh tomatoes. I wish I had bought a piece Vaughn says. “We love the location.” of Vaughn’s cheesecake to eat along with it. The couple hasn’t made dramatic changes On my second visit, I was ravenous enough to the décor of this long, narrow storefront to consider asking for every starter on the space, but the room is now perfumed by the menu (except the toasted wood, mostly oak, fueling ravioli, which isn’t Italian an oven that’s usually full of Intorno but Appalachian). But I came hearty, meaty lasagna. (The Calamari provenzale ...........$11 to my senses and settled on version here comes layered Crab cakes ...........................$12 calamari provenzale, which with the cheese most closely House salad (half) ...............$8 turned out to be a substanassociated with St. Louis — Linguini Monte Mara .........$18 tial portion. With a salad and the cheddar-provolone-andBaked lasagna .....................$13 slices of the crusty Wheatswiss combination called Tiramisu .......................... $7.50 Fields baguette served here, Provel — and ricotta.) It’s a the saucy squid would make seductive smell. As soon as a perfectly satisfying main course. Vaughn the server was done filling my water glass, I flash-fries the calamari, rendering it crunchy impulsively ordered some food. and delectably light. It comes tossed with I’m resistant to the allure of manicotti — it’s the Topher Grace of Italian cuisine — and shiny green Kalamata olives, ribbons of red most of the linguini choices here are smoth- and green peppers, celery and onion, in a simple dressing of olive oil, herbs and a few ered in shellfish. I was in the mood for neither drops of aged balsamic vinegar. on my first visit, which I’d decided to make a “Don’t order the stuffed portobello,” meatless one. My server, Jordy, assured me that the kitchen would accommodate my re- whispered Chris, the snappy, attentive server who guided me this visit. “The crab quest for something else, and she was right.

Sambuca gives Intorno’s tiramisu an extra jolt.

cakes are so much better.” He was right. The jumbo lump crab cakes I sampled were nearly the size of handballs, with no perceptible binding fi ller — “We only use a tiny amount of breadcrumbs, parmesan and egg to hold the cakes together,” Vaughn says — and fried in olive oil and butter. The finished patties get a discreet squiggle of fiery adobo sauce and a soothing dill dressing, which add up to a striking but not overbearing kick. Chris directed my friend to a bowl of linguini, which arrived with a borderlineridiculous load of sautéed shrimp, clams, scallops and mussels. After that aphrodisiac festival and the inevitable sambuca-scented, house-made tiramisu, my dining companion was flirting with every waiter in the room and even a couple of the customers. A silver pot of French-press coffee returned her to sanity. “I knew better than to order that cocktail special before eating something,” she said. (Manhattans cost $5 on Mondays.) “They make me a little giddy.” Giddy is, as they say in Palermo, perfettamente naturale. They might say it that way in St. Louis, too, but I’d rather hear it in Lawrence. A little misbehaving is completely acceptable after a full-bodied meal at Intorno.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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FIBER ART

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

Making bagels with Rachel Rolon.

R

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M A R C H 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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achel Rolon doesn’t want to sell you just one piece of her art. She’s hoping you take three, six or even a dozen at a time — and then butter them. The Kansas City Art Institute graduate, who has a fiber studio near 15th Street and Oak, is perfecting her new medium: bread. “It’s a really similar process to dyeing fabric,” Rolon says. “It’s a time process. All the ingredients are based on percentages. You’re just adding dye or flour or yeast to make it reactive. I think that’s why I like [baking] bread.” On a recent Monday, Rolon, 23, arrives at The Pitch offices after running deliveries: dropping off bagels, bagel balls (the size of dinner rolls but without a hole, and infused with herbs and cheese) and beer bread, all baked that morning in the kitchen of her midtown apartment. She’s wearing a KC baseball cap from the Boulevard Brewing Co. store and a T-shirt she made herself. On the shirt are the letters I and U, separated by an illustrated bread loaf. It’s her company’s name: I Loaf You. “I love Kansas City,” Rolon says. “The arts community is really supportive, and I realized how much the food community is involved with the arts. People are willing to help each other out. I lived in New York, and I don’t think I would ever fi nd that there.” After some Internet research, Rolon began experimenting with bagel baking in August 2011. By the end of the year, friends were clamoring for her creations, and word began spreading in a seriously bagel-starved town. She worked out trade deals with fellow artists, bartering her baked goods for an end table here or a waffle iron there. Her fi rst such deal was with Garnet Griebel, the co-owner of Scarlett Garnet Jewelry, for a pair of earrings. Griebel suggested that Rolon sell her baked goods at Griebel’s Gypsy Market in the West Bottoms. I Loaf You’s fi rst retail incarnation — Black Dog Bread, named in homage to Rolon’s dog, Meatball — was born. “I think art is about making a world and creating a space where people can have a connection or experience,” Rolon says. “With bread, you can do the same thing as a video piece. At the Gypsy Market, I got to interact with people through my bread.” In February 2012, Rolon also began working in hospitality at Boulevard, tending bar for special events and leading the occasional tour. The company’s beer proved to be the catalyst that her baking needed. Soon she had worked out recipes for a jalapeño-andcheese bread made with IPA; an Amber Ale– and-nut bread made with almonds, walnuts and flax seeds; and a Dark Truth Stout loaf. “The beer is all bottle-conditioned, and that really helps with the bread,” Rolon says. “The yeast in the bottle helps give it flavor.

Rolon loafs Kansas City. The Bully Porter whole wheat has a nice malty quality, and the hops bring out a nice saltiness. The wheat beer bread [made with Boulevard’s Unfiltered Wheat Beer] has a slight citrus taste and a crackery bite from the wheat.” Rolon boils her bagels, but they’re otherwise untraditional. Instead of malt water, she uses Boulevard’s Bully Porter. The result is a slightly denser bagel that delivers an agreeably chewy crust. And she steps further outside the circle with her ingredients. Monday’s delivery included coconutalmond bagels (more nutty than sweet), with those elements mixed into the dough rather than dusted on top. (“You get the ones with every thing on it, and then you have everything on you,” she says.) Her richly f lavored bagel balls — this day’s batch matches up brie and rosemary — were a hit this past December when she took them to a City Arts membership drive. Rolon has about 30 regular customers so far, enough that she’s spending most of her Sundays proofing, kneading and shaping loaves, and then baking them in her oven, two at a time. This weekend, she’s testing a commissary kitchen in a local shop, which would let her ramp up production. She says her breads should soon appear at the Filling Station and at Soho Bakery. “With art, there are so many things you make, and you wonder if people consume them properly,” Rolon says. “With bread, I can make something that is beneficial, that gives them sustenance. It’s an object without any aftermath.” I Loaf You sells weekly, biweekly and monthly memberships. Bread and bagels are delivered or can be picked up Mondays at the Smile Salon (801 West 47th Street). See iloafyou.com.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pi tch.com

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M A R C H 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

25

MUSIC

LONE STARS

W

e’re just back from a week in Austin for the 2013 South By Southwest conferencefestival-endless feast of Lone Star pounders and twice-a-day tacos. Not quite enough time has passed for a proper reflection on everything that transpired. But let’s give it a try.

COOL THINGS SEEN Chris Cohen

Fact: Three quarters of the performers at SXSW this year were either Canadian electropop acts or sorta-pissed garage-punk acts. Those are OK things to be, but fatigue sets in quickly. So it was nice to wander inside Hotel E MOR Vegas on Friday and catch a short, mellow, melodic set by Chris T A E IN ONL .COM Cohen. Friends had recPITCH ommended Overgrown Path, his 2012 album, a few months back, but for whatever reason, I never listened to it. I am a fool; Cohen is my best discovery from the fest. (Last year, it was Haim, and now that group is touring with Mumford and Sons.) A singing drummer, Cohen was joined by a guitarist, a bassist and a keyboard player. In addition to Deerhoof and Cass McCombs, Cohen has played with Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, and there’s a little of Pink’s warped AM pop to his sound. But he’s not quite as far out there. What Cohen’s songs sound like is something Todd Rundgren would have done in the 1970s. Which is to say, Oh baby, I dug the vibe. He closed the set with a surprise instru-

M US I C

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mental, a dissonant, crashing acid-jazz thing. There wasn’t a huge crowd watching him, but the ones at the front were super into it. Next time, I will be one of those guys at the front.

Jim James

The My Morning Jacket frontman recently released his debut solo album, Regions of Light and Sound of God, and he smartly used SXSW as a tool to spread its gospel. I saw James three times during my stay: once from backstage at Auditorium Shores, an outdoor park where he performed in front of thousands; once in a conference room, where he gave a fascinating, life-affi rming, hourlong interview to MTV’s Bill Flanagan (see my post at Wayward Blog for details of that); and once at the Hype Hotel, which is basically a parking garage that had been converted into a music venue for the festival. At the latter, James bounced onto the stage at 1 a.m., and as an eerie synth line rose in the darkness, he stood with his back to the audience for about a minute, like a monk. Then came the opening piano notes of “State of the Art (AEIOU),” the first track on Regions. It’s a beautiful song: hopeful, soulful, confused. Soul sounds have been creeping their way into the past few My Morning Jacket albums, but the influence is most pronounced on Regions. There are soul-revival acts going that replicate the sounds of the past — Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears. James borrows ideas from soul music, but he puts his weird, modern artistic stamp on it. The result is something totally brave and fresh and new.

pitch.com

Highlights from the music-industry

BY

bacchanal known as South By Southwest

D AV ID HUDN A L L

I could write all day about James. The man is a powerhouse, one of America’s great musical treasures. As far as the performance: His five-piece band is all pro and tight as hell, and when the drums finally kicked in and he sang, I use the state of the art, it was glorious. They ran through a good chunk of the songs on Regions. And if 2 a.m. is closing time in Austin, they definitely broke the curfew.

White Lung

A few industry types I spoke with in Austin were raving about White Lung, a Canadian quartet that plays blasting, visceral punk. So I went to Bar 96 to see what all the fuss was about. The reason that people are talking about them is obviously because of their magnetic frontwoman, Mish Way. “My voice is gone. I’m trying my best,” Way told the crowd at the outset, but she sounded pretty great to me. Way has a little Karen O in her, and a little ’90s riot grrrl, too. She wore red lipstick and had a commanding, no-nonsense, mechanically authoritative presence. She is in charge, and she is utterly confident in the role. I am sometimes suspicious of bands with hot women in them, so I close my eyes and pretend that the singer looks like Billy Powell from Lynyrd Skynrd. Are they still a good band then? With White Lung, the answer is, probably, yeah. I’m not the first person to say it, but Way is a star in the making. She’s fierce as shit.

Ups and downs with buzzy acts White Lung (left) and Mac DeMarco sturdy songs. I was a big fan of 2, the album he released last year, and I’ve been working backward to catch up to his first release, Rock and Roll Night Club. (DeMarco and Cohen are both on Captured Tracks, which is one of the most reliably good indie labels — DIIV and Wild Nothing are also on the roster.) DeMarco’s band rocked a sleazy look: dirty snap-back hats, ill-fitting shirts, selfadministered haircuts, cigarettes dangling from mouths. I dig their style, and I dig their music, which is a kind of loose glam rock with a little ’50s crooner in it. DeMarco opened with “I’m a Man,” from Rock and Roll Night Club, then went into “Cookin’ Up Something Good,” a 2 highlight. On one song, he and his guitarist cozied up to each other and jammed together, and toward the end of it, DeMarco gave him a gentle peck on the mouth. Later, the guitarist and the bassist kissed at length while playing. It was the guitarist’s birthday. “I am so drunk,” he said, and stared at us with some nice comic timing. They closed with “Together,” during which DeMarco stage-dived. Then he climbed onto the bars holding up the stage tent and hung upside down, still singing into his microphone. You can’t ask for a whole lot more from an act.

Majical Cloudz Mac DeMarco

Probably the biggest draw at Hotel Vegas on Friday was Mac DeMarco, a grimy-looking, gaptoothed 22-year-old who writes surprisingly pitch.com

One of the unfortunate things about SXSW, and festivals in general, is that a lot of acts don’t fully translate under the harsh light of the sun. Morose synth pop continued on page 28 M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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THE PITCH

27

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

MARCH:

21: Alejandro Escovedo 22: An evening with

Jimmy Webb

singer & songwriter

By the time I get to Phoenix, Wichita Lineman, Galveston, The Highwaymen

with special guest Bob Walkenhorst, Jeff Porter & Danny Cox

of the Turnpike Troubadours all together one night only

continued from page 26 is one genre that requires the cover of darkness. I caught Montreal duo Majical Cloudz at a day party thrown by Spin, and band’s intense sadness — Morrissey meets James Blake — didn’t work. But Saturday night at Mohawk, in a packed room with low lights, it was easier to appreciate its virtues.

Nick Cave (above) basks in the darkness; Jakob Dylan shines a headlight. was forgiven. Phosphorescent played mostly soaring, electric alt-country tunes from its excellent, just-released new album, Muchacho. It reminds me of some of the best work of the recently deceased Jason Molina, aka Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co.

Nick Cave

24: Ana Popovic 25: The Pines 26: Old You 27: Hamilton Loomis @7pm $12 in advance 28: Bleu Edmondson

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

28 2 TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH

SXSW purists gripe that the fest used to be about discovering talent, but now it’s all industry types jostling to see Prince, Justin Timberlake and other established big-name acts. They are not wrong. Nick Cave is not exactly an up-and-comer, and his set at Stubb’s on Wednesday was highly anticipated. But I had never seen Cave before or really understood his appeal. So the fact that his set pretty much blew me away qualifies as something of a discovery. I was probably 300 feet from the stage but still totally mesmerized by many of the songs, particularly the opener, “Higgs Boson Blues,” from this year’s Push the Sky Away. He slithered around the stage, pounded the piano, growled the names Robert Johnson, Miley Cyrus and Hannah Montana. He is one sexy motherfucker of a performer, and the brooding theatricality of his music really comes through in a live setting.

Trapper Schoepp & the Shades

Phosphorescent

CELEBRITY SIGHTINGS

Matthew Houck, frontman of Phosphorescent, was wearing orange-tinted sunglasses and spent more than a half-hour on a sound check at Hype Hotel on Wednesday night. “Is this dude kind of a prima donna?” I asked my companions. But then he took the stage and redeemed himself. He gave a shout-out to the sound guys for working under such stressful conditions. And he apologized for wearing sunglasses indoors at night. “I feel like an asshole, but I have a medical condition,” he said. All

1 - 2 7, MMOANRTCHH X2X–X X , 2200103 X pitch.com pitch.com

By Sunday afternoon, SXSW had officially ended. I drank champagne and grapefruit juice outside a bar called Yellow Jacket Social Club, then headed to Freedmen’s, a fancy cocktails-and-BBQ joint near the University of Texas. There, I tasted better brisket than I’ve ever had in Kansas City (so thick and fatty and succulent) and caught Trapper Schoepp & the Shades, a country-rock band (think Lucero or Gram Parsons) from Milwaukee. At the end of the set, they brought up a special guest: Jakob Dylan. Dylan’s band, the Wallflowers, had opened for Eric Clapton at the Frank Erwin Center earlier in the day. Together, they performed the Band’s “The Weight” and Dylan’s “One Headlight.” It was very casual, very loose. The place wasn’t crowded at all. It felt like a good cap to the week: friendly musicians — some more famous than others — having fun, jamming out, eating barbecue.

• Adrian Grenier, at Mohawk Saturday night. He had his hair done up like Tom Cruise in Magnolia. A beautiful man. • Daryl Hannah, at Freedmen’s Sunday night. She has had quite a bit of work done, and the guy who appeared to be her boyfriend had (possibly fake) tattoos on his face. • Eugene Mirman, at Stubb’s for Nick Cave, and later at Mohawk for Local Natives, Wednesday night. Pretty regular-looking dude.

• Jared Leto, on the street near the Austin Convention Center, Thursday night. Technically I didn’t see him, but my friend said he walked right past us.

LOCAL REPRESENTATION Radkey’s pop-punk won the attention of The New York Times, which covered the St. Joseph group on its ArtsBeat blog. Local singersongwriter David George is currently a touring guitarist for John Fogerty, who performed at ACL Live at the Moody Theater Saturday evening. John Velghe and the Prodigal Sons were part of Alejandro Escovedo’s closing party at the Continental Club, which also featured Peter Buck and Rosie Flores. And dozens of KC and Lawrence bands set up at Shangri-La, on the east side of town, and played the MidCoast Takeover showcase. On Saturday, there was a line out the door, down the street.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

#8 – The Pitch – 03-21-2013

•A LITTLE SLICE OF IRELAND• IN DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY

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THE PITCH

29

3/13/13 3:21 PM

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, M A R C H 21 Animal Collective, Dan Deacon: 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

F R I D AY, M A R C H 2 2 Ali Harter, O Fidelis, I Heard a Lion: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Major Lazer, Lunice, Wynter Gordon: 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Texas Hippie Coalition, Quietly Violent, Drek, the Furious Bros: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Jimmy Webb with Bob Walkenhorst, Jeff Porter & Danny Cox: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Mike Zito & the Wheel: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, M A R C H 2 3 Chris Knight, Cody Canada and Evan Felker: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S U N D AY, M A R C H 2 4 Ana Popovic: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

M O N D AY, M A R C H 2 5 The Pines with Jeff Porter: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Lindsay Sterling: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

T U E S D AY, M A R C H 2 6

Alejandro Escovedo

Less than a week after South by Southwest wraps, the Austin music scene’s unofficial mayor hikes up to Kansas City for an evening at Knuckleheads. Alejandro Escovedo — formerly of Rank and File and the Nuns, now a beloved Americana singer-songwriter — is performing with his acoustic band, the Sensitive Boys. He also has a good many musician friends here in KC, so a few surprise appearances from local players wouldn’t be totally surprising. Thursday, March 21, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

She’s a Keeper

In a town (and world) increasingly flooded with rustic folkie bands, She’s a Keeper stands out due to its youth — I’m pretty sure some of its members are teenagers — and what seems to be a natural gift for harmony and arrangement. To my ears, the group’s use of

banjos, mandolins and cello is less evocative of Mumford and Sons than it is a gentler, less offensive folk act like Nickel Creek — though it’s possible that nobody in the band is old enough to even remember that group. Saturday, March 23, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

Arlo Guthrie

Woody Guthrie would have turned 100 last year. To celebrate, his folk-singer son, Arlo Guthrie, is touring the country playing old Woody Guthrie favorites. Expect plenty of storytelling and probably a good 20 minutes’ worth of “Alice’s Restaurant.” Sunday, March 24, at Yardley Hall, Johnson County Community College (12345 College Boulevard, Overland Park, 913-469-4445)

F O R E C A S T

30

Clockwise from left: Alejandro Escovedo, Arlo Guthrie and Pinback

Pinback

Mid-’00s contemporaries Modest Mouse and Death Cab for Cutie broke through to the mainstream playing a similar kind of cold, earnest rock, but no such luck for Pinback. The San Diego act is maybe a little too unassuming for the masses — no monster hooks, no sexy back story — but the dynamic interplay between core members Rob Crow and Zach Smith has resulted in some very smart, fresh, mathy (in a good way) rock songs over the years. And they’ve cultivated a loyal fanbase: A herd of enthusiastic, lyrics-reciting emo dudes packed the Riot Room for Pinback last spring. Given that the band has just released Information Retrieved, its fi rst album in five years, that should be true this time around as well. Friday, March 22, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

K E Y

............................................................................................... Pick of the Week

................................................................................................. Folk Revivalism

........................................................................................................... Cult Hero

................................................................................................ Locally Sourced

........................................................................................................... Austinite

...........................................................................................................Nepotism

....................................................................................Schlubby-Looking Guys

........................................................................................................Old Hippies

..........................................................................................Thinking Man’s Emo

................................................................................................... Protest Songs

THE PITCH

M A R C H 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

pitch.com

William Beckett, Jillette Johnson: 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Ben Rector, Alpha Rev: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Yarn: 11 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

W E D N E S D AY, M A R C H 2 7 Masta Killa: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Signal Path, Electric Theory: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Turnpike Troubadours, Mike & the Moonpies: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

FUTURECAST THURSDAY 28 Bleu Edmondson: Knuckleheads Saloon R5, Taylor Mathews & Alex Aiono: The Granada, Lawrence

APRIL TUESDAY 2 Adrenaline Mob: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino WEDNESDAY 3 Awolnation, Blondfire, Mother Mother: Liberty Hall, Lawrence THURSDAY 11 David Allan Coe: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino SATURDAY 13 Bon Jovi: Sprint Center THURSDAY 18 Katey Sagal: An Evening of Music and the Cast of Sons of Anarchy: The Midland SUNDAY 21 Josh Ritter and the Royal City Band, Martin Sexton: Liberty Hall, Lawrence Tate Stephens: The Midland MONDAY 22 Weird Al Yankovic: Uptown Theater

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to events editor Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Karaoke with Debbie Z, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

T H U R S D AY 21

EASY LISTENING

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Derek Jones, 7 p.m.

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Problems, Pullman Standard, Root and Stem EP release. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Torn the Fuck Apart, Enter the Sinner, Absence of God, Bloodgeon, Obliterate the Apex, 8 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Sweet Ascent, Stric-9, Foxxy Cloxx, Queen Anne’s Revenge, Suckertrain, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. David Hasselhoff on Acid, Elixir on Mute, Cast Pattern, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. RLT, Jenny Dalton, Daymoths, 2nd Hand King, 10 p.m., $7. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. ThinkNoThink, Wolvie, the New Cosmopolitans, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Gypsyhawk, Mothership, Brimstone Crow, Merlin, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Katie Guillen Trio, 7:30 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Ladies’ Night with DJ Soulnice. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Rich Berry. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jimmie Bratcher, 7 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Damon Parker, 7 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS PBR Big Sky Bar: 111 E. 13th St. Ricky Lee Tanner, 9 p.m.

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Team Bear Club’s Goomba Rave, 11 p.m. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. DJ Jolly. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Think 2wice Thursdays with Brent Tactic and friends. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Tequila Bear. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Playe, 10:30 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Ken Lovern with Molly Hammer, 7 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Shay Estes Duo, 6 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brandon Draper, 7 p.m.

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Bryan Callen, 8 p.m.

E X P E R I M E N TA L Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The UFO Show with Pat Hopewell, 10 p.m. The Midland: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Animal Collective, Dan Deacon, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Free Form Free For All Open Mic with Teague Hayes, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Blues, Country and Classic Rock Jam with Rick Eidson and friends.

REGGAE Afrobeat: 9922 Holmes, 816-943-6333. Reggae Rockers, 10 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Alejandro Escovedo and the Sensitive Boys with John Velghe & the Prodigal Sons, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

F R I D AY 2 2 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Appropriate Grammar, Rev Gusto, the Revival KC. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Two Cow Garage CD-release show with Instant Empire and Sky Smeed, 6-9:30 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Texas Hippie Coalition, Quietly Violent, Drek, the Furious Bros, 7 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Pinback, JP Inc., 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Jason Vivone and the Billybats, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Mike Zito & the Wheel, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Allied Saints, the Nace Brothers, 7 p.m., 6 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS PBR Big Sky Bar: 111 E. 13th St. Ricky Lee Tanner, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Neva, E100, 6-9 p.m.

COVERS

DJ

The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. The Transients, 8 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Gov’t Cheez, 10 p.m.

Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DCal. Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Jungle Gold with DJ Sam Blam. The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. Tiberias. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. I <3 Gusto. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ JT Quick. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Fabowlous Fridays with DJ Nuveau, 9 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke. The Bunk House: 17965 Hwy. 45 N., Weston, 816-640-0000. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. Fatso’s Public House and Stage: 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-865-4055. Electro Therapy Thursdays. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 8 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Mac’s Place: 580 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville. Karaoke. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials.

32

THE PITCH

M A R C H 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

HIP-HOP The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Dolewite, 9 p.m.

The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Laura Chalk Trio, 8 p.m. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

COMEDY Skylight Restaurant and Sports Bar: 1867 S.W. State Rt. 7, Blue Springs, 816-988-7958. Mike’s Comedy Club, 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Bryan Callen, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

COVERS The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Lost Wax, 10 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Trivia, 6 p.m. Club Rain: 8015 Troost, 816-361-2900. Happy hour, 5 p.m. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Dead Girl Derby’s Ugly Prom, 10 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke with Monique. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

EASY LISTENING Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Jenny Dalton, RLT, Daymoths, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus, 5:30 p.m.

ELECTRONICA

SINGER-SONGWRITER Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jimmy Webb with Bob Walkenhorst, Jeff Porter & Danny Cox, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Ali Harter, O Fidelis, I Heard a Lion, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Alyssa Murray, 8 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 3 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Deco Auto, Pescivito, Red Kate. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Home & Away, Crush, Hillary Watts Riot, Electric Lungs, Travel Guide, 8:30 p.m., $7. Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Bad Cracker. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Camp Harlow, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Phil Neal & the Wornalls, 7 p.m., free; Katy Guillen Trio, Universe Contest, Dark Satellites, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Radar Defender, Drop Jaw, Ebony Tusks, 5-9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Think No Think, Wolvie, Dead Bed Bad, Not A Planet, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mike Smith and the Kings of Sax; Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Ellie Smith and the Commotion, the Monarchs, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonesome Hank. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Danny McGaw Band, 9 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Olassa, Paul Santos & Tim Dingus, Monzie Leo & the Big Sky, David Lord, 8 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Drew6, 10 p.m.

JAZZ

pitch.com

HIP-HOP The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Dolewite. Qudos Cigar & Cognac Bar: 1116 Grand, 816-474-2270. Grown & Sexy Saturdays.

ACOUSTIC The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. City Music with M-Bird, 8 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Everette DeVan with Lori Tucker and Kelly Gant, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio, 7 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Grand Marquis, 10 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Rich Wheeler Quartet, 8 p.m.

WORLD The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Irish Roots Café with Uncountable Kings, Stewart Ray, Five to Midnight, Vaness Park, the Walltalkers, Tell the Others, Josey Milner, Porkchop & the Big Ditty, Collapse the Masses, 4:45 p.m.

COMEDY

The Midland: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Major Lazer, Lunice, Wynter Gordon, 7 p.m.

ACOUSTIC

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with BMW, 5:30 p.m.; Matt Otto Quintet with Shay Estes, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jimmy Dykes & the Blisstonians, 7 p.m.

The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Kid Twist. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Superb! Bass Party with Brent Tactic, NMEZEE, DJ B-Stee & DJ Archi. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Suite Saturdays with DJ Eric Coomes. Johnny’s Tavern: 6765 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-451-4542. DJ Dave Step, 9 p.m. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. DJ Ashton Martin.

DJ Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. We Love Techno, 10 p.m.

pitch.com

Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Bryan Callen, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

COVERS The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. KC Groove Therapy, 9 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Maryoke, 9 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. The Kick Comedy Theatre: the Kick-Off Improv Comedy Show, 8-9:30 p.m.

EASY LISTENING All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church: 4501 Walnut, 816531-2131. KKFI’s Coffeehouse Radio Show with Jeff Black, 2 Bit Palomimo, Alan White and Friends, Doc Fuller Laura Lisbeth, Kasey Rausch & Gerry Monks, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton.

FOLK Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. She’s a Keeper, Spirit Is the Spirit, Dots Not Feathers, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Coyote Bill open jam, 5:30 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open Blues Jam with Earl Baker, 4 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Chris Knight, Cody Canada and Evan Felker, 9 p.m.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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S U N D AY 2 4 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Story So Far, Man Overboard, Tonight Alive, Citizen & the American Scene, 6 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Bulletproof Tiger, Meganaut, Hidden Objectives, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sharp Weapons, Moire, the Slowdown, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Pat Recob and the Confessors, 6-9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Ana Popovic, 8:30 p.m.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Johnny Switchblade, the Plug Uglies, Four Arm Shiver, Evan Marshall, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Glass Fields, Real Sugar, Lion, 7 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Victory Lane service industry night, 10 p.m.

JAZZ

The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. Radstar Glitters Gold. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ G Train on the patio.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Pam Watson, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Thollem Electric, Eddie Thomas & the Locals, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Karaoke. The Fox and Hound: 10428 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-6491700. Poker, 7 & 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Mary’s Drag Brunch, 11 a.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m.; karaoke, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rich Berry. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Chill with Phil. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Bob Harvey, 6 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Phil and Gary, 8 p.m.

FOLK Yardley Hall at JCCC: 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, 913-469-8500. Arlo Guthrie, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m., free; Back Room Jam, 1-5 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 5 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. Singer-Songwriter Sundays.

2

CLASSICAL The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Lindsay Sterling, 7 p.m.

COVERS Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The LaDeDahs.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Monday Mancave: sports, drink and food specials. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m., free. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia, service industry night. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Karaoke. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Moxie Bar & Grill: 4011 N. Oak Tfwy., North Kansas City, 816455-9600. Beer Pong Mondays with DJ E-Rock. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam Club Karaoke with Scary Manilow, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Pines with Jeff Porter, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Songwriter’s Scene Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton open mic and jam session, 8 p.m.; comedy open mic, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 6 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. William Beckett, Jillette Johnson, 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Old You, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Kink Alfred, Dr. Flash, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. SW/MM/NG, Oils, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Mime Game, I Am Nation, Rosedale, 7 p.m., $5. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

M O N D AY 2 5

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

ROCK/POP/INDIE

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Hudspeth and Shinetop, 7-10 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Experience.

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Dojo for Crooks, cKenzi, Spencer Ward, 7 p.m.

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ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco with Dead Ven, 7 p.m., free.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.

DJ

JAZZ

Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Dan Bliss. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m.

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DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Bring It Back Tuesdays with DJ G Train & DJ Tip, 10 p.m., no cover.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Hamilton Loomis, 7 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Turnpike Troubadors, Mike & the Moonpies, 7 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Casey Donahew Band, 7 p.m.

JAZZ

DJ

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Shay Estes Duo, 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Cream with KC/DC. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Elegant Knock with Approach, 10 p.m.

AMERICANA The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Yarn, 11 p.m.

COVERS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rock, Paper, Scissors, 7 p.m., free.

ACOUSTIC Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m.

WORLD

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Geeks Who Drink Trivia, 8 p.m. Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Bingo. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. MORE Double-feature movie night. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-5691747. Team Trivia with Teague S G Hayes, 7 p.m. IN LIST E AT Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, N I L N O M Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-390-0363. PITCH.CO Poker night. The Drop: 409 E. 31st St., 816-7563767. Brodioke, 9:30 p.m. Duke’s on Grand: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m., free. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Ladies’ Night. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Bingo. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night upstairs, 7:30-10 p.m.; karaoke, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

COMEDY

CLUB

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Ben Rector, Alpha Rev, 7 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 2 7 ROCK/POP/INDIE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Uncountable Kings, Perelandra, PlanetRAWK, Clover Noir, 6 p.m; Pocket Vinyl, Good Time Charley, Rooms Without Windows, Is Paris Burning, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Gornography, the Vile Impurity, Torn the Fuck Apart, Byleth, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.; Heavy Figs, the B’Dinas, Ned Ludd Band, 10 p.m.

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Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Artie Fletcher, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, 8:30 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 8 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Bike night; karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Karaoke. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. Humpday Comedy Night, 9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke. Qudos Cigar & Cognac Bar: 1116 Grand, 816-474-2270. Red Cup Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-4214201. Karaoke with DJ Jason, 8 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open mic. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge, 7:30 p.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night with Matt Shoaf. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Piano Time with T.J. Erhardt, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brandon Miller, 7 p.m.

ELECTRONICA The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Signal Path, Electric Theory, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Bourbon & Bands Open Jam. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with host Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground.

RAP The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Masta Killa, 8 p.m.

M A R C H 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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33

S AVA G E L O V E

GERBILS? AGAIN? Dear Readers: I’m off this week. To tide all of your hot and/or kinky and/or sore asses over, here’s a column I wrote 15 years ago. Some newer readers might’ve missed this column when it originally appeared — some of you who were still in grade school, diapers or amniotic sacs back in 1998 — so I’m rerunning it now because I still get questions on a daily basis about “gerbiling.” — Dan

Dear Dan: We were having a little office debate about “gerbiling.” How does it work? Do all gay men do this? Does Richard Gere? Does the animal get shoved up the anus with a toilet-paper roll only to suffocate seconds later? Is it the scratching or the act of killing an animal that gets people off ? Why? Can’t this cause serious damage? What gives?

Curious Co-workers Dear CC: Every day, my mail contains at least

three questions about “gerbiling.” In the eight years I’ve been writing this column, I have never addressed the gerbil issue, but now, this week and this week only, I’m breaking my silence. Clip and save this column, for I will never discuss gerbils again. Ahem. To begin, I would like to make a controversial statement: I have never had a gerbil in my ass. This statement is not controversial for the reasons one would hope: It isn’t controversial in the “Hey! That’s uncalled for!” sense, like, say, a woman at a dinner party announcing that she doesn’t have a hedgehog in her vagina. That would be uncalled for because no one would suspect her of concealing a hedgehog. But being a gay man or Richard Gere in America means always having to reassure people that you don’t have a gerbil in your ass — at dinner parties, during family reunions, at funerals, on CNN, at passport control, wherever! While gay men and, I assume, Richard Gere don’t put gerbils in their asses, not a day goes by that someone — usually a straight 13-year-old boy — doesn’t try to shove one in, figuratively speaking. Hundreds of thousands of men and women in this country, my fellow Americans, leave high school convinced that gay men put gerbils in their asses on a semiregular basis. Unlike our hypothetical dinner-party guest — the vaginal hedgehog stuffer — my denial of stuffing gerbils is necessitated by the accusation. If it were widely believed that women stuffed hedgehogs into their vaginas, then women would have to deny “hedgehogging.” Some background: Gerbil stuffing is a sexual practice that straight teenage boys in general, and Howard Stern in particular, suspect gay men in general, and Richard Gere (who is not gay) in particular, of engaging in. It works like this: Hold a gerbil in your left hand. Using pliers with your right hand, rip off the gerbil’s lower jaw. With the blunt side of the pliers, knock out the teeth in its upper jaw. Pull all four of its legs off. Leave the tail. Set aside. Take a cardboard paper-towel roll, grease it up, and insert it into

34

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your rectum. Tie a string to the gerbil’s tail. Nudge the gerbil into the outside end of the paper-towel roll. If for no other reason than to get away from the person who knocked its teeth out, the gerbil leglessly scampers up the wet paper towel roll. When the gerbil drops into the anal cavity, remove the wet paper-towel roll, leaving the string you’ve tied to the gerbil’s tail hanging out of your ass. The gerbil, now trapped inside your anal cavity, thrashes around, desperate for air. It is this thrashing that provides pleasurable sensations. Once the gerbil is dead, remove it by pulling on the string. Repeat. OK, three things: 1. The type of straight person who believes that gay men engage in “gerbiling” is likely to believe other gay stereotypes: We’re all prissy little swishes, for instance, with clean apartments and extensive collections of original Broadway-cast recordings. Yet the same person who believes that gay men are prim sissies also believes that we’re capable of holding a struggling rodent in one hand while ripping its lower jaw off with the other, and then tearing its legs off (think of the mess!) and stuffing it up our butts — hardly a prim pastime. This is known as cognitive dissonance: the holding of mutually exclusive beliefs. 2. There is nothing intrinsically “gay” about gerbil stuffing. You don’t need two penises — you don’t actually need penises at all — or an original Broadway-cast recording. All you need is one doomed gerbil and one willing butthole (and pliers, lube, tubes and string). Some straight people have a peculiar need to believe that certain sex acts — usually disgusting ones — are practiced only by gay men, despite evidence to the contrary. Fisting, for instance — straight people can and do fist. I have a fi le of heterosexual fisting photos, anal and vaginal, that I’ve pulled off the Internet; I keep them on my desktop to prove to family and friends that, yes indeed, straight people fist. This curious impulse to

BY

D A N S AVA G E

credit gay men with sex acts that anyone can perform extends to sex acts that straight people themselves are the primary practitioners of. Child rape, for instance. 3. Inserting a wet cardboard paper-towel roll into your ass is simply not possible, as anyone who has ever put anything in their ass can tell you. Now I feel I can write with some authority that no one has ever actually stuffed a gerbil up their butt, perhaps with more authority than I can write that God and angels do not exist. I’ve had conversations with hundreds of outrageously kinky people, gay and straight, who’ve told me the craziest shit: I once chatted for an hour with a guy who married his horse. (He was deeply offended when I asked if his horse was a he horse or a she horse. “I am not a homosexual,” the hetero horse fucker informed me.) Both in my professional and personal lives, thousands of guys have freely admitted to doing the most out-there, dangerous, risky, stupid, kinky stuff. But not once in all these years has anyone ever told me that he, or anyone he knows, or anyone anyone he knows knows, has ever put a gerbil in his ass. Like the doomed gerbils themselves, this story has no legs. It is an urban legend. But you don’t have to take my word for it: I have proof. If gay men and Richard Gere stuffed gerbils in their butts, well, then the pet stores that serve the gay and Richard Gere communities would stock gerbils, right? I mean, everything else that a perverse gay man needs is available in your average gay neighborhood, from poppers to butt plugs to bullwhips to sofa sectionals. So if we stuff gerbils up our butts, then pet stores in, say, California must do a bang-up gerbil business. But guess what? In San Francisco’s Castro neighborhood, gay ground zero, the pet store Petpourri, “where professionals answer your every question,” sells only pet supplies — no gerbils — and doesn’t stock cardboard papertowel tubes or pliers, either. Animal Farm in West Hollywood, also a very gay place, sells only dogs and cats (which wouldn’t fit up anyone’s butt, not even Richard Gere’s). And guess what I learned while looking into this? Not only do pet stores in California not sell gerbils, but it’s also illegal for them to do so. According to Marshall Meyers, an attorney at the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council in Washington, D.C.: “California law prohibits the sale of gerbils because of desert conditions in that state. Gerbils were once a desert mammal, and the state was concerned that gerbils could escape and establish themselves in the wild. It is a form of animal control.” It’s not because gay men stick them in their asses? “No, it’s strictly an ecosystem issue.” Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

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THE PITCH

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3239 Broadw 323 Broaadway ayy | Kansas KKa Kan as City CCit City, t y, MOO 64 641 641111 Finannc ncial cial Aid id available vailable to those tho hose who who qua qualify. y. Accredited Member, ACCSC. *Bureeau of Labor Statistics, Statis ics, OOccupational ccupational ationall Em Employment Em mplo ploym oyment ment and and Wa W Wagee Estimates E timates (State (S (Sta Cross-Industry Estimaates), May 20111. VA App Approved ved for EElig ligible g blele Veterans rans in AApproved Appro proved ved Program Programs. For more information about our graduation ggradu ation rrate rates, ates, t s, the th median m media ddiann deb debt btt off students stude students t d who whho completed complete pl t the program, and other important informatio tion on,, please visit ou our w website bsite at www www.conc www.concorde.edu/disclosures. w.concorde.edu/disc oncorde.edu/di orde.edu/ 13-10069_CON_ad_MOMKC-PW_RT_BLS_4x5_4c_[01].indd 1

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The Pitch: March 21, 2013