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OVER KILL Susan Stuckey told Prairie Village police to shoot her. Records show she didn’t have to wait very long. b y S t e v e Vo c k r o d t

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OV ER K I L L Susan Stuckey told Prairie Village cops to shoot her. Records show that she didn’t have to wait very long. B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

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News

days between stations Ju s t in K e nd a l l By

KCUR’s Elana Gordon leaves for WHYY.

ast week, Elana Gordon started her new gig at WHYY 90.9. After nine years in Kansas City — six of those working the health beat for KCUR 89.3 — Gordon, a native New Yorker who studied at Barnard College, headed back East to join the Philadelphia public-radio affiliate’s health and science team. If the move seemed out of nowhere for the local NPR affiliate’s lone health reporter, it was. “It’s been crazy,” Gordon says. “It happened pretty quickly. The opportunity presented itself, and I was really excited about it, and one thing led to another. It was just a really wonderful thing that I’m excited about, but at the same time it’s sad to leave KCUR. But people have been really supportive of me there, and I’m definitely planning to stay in touch and hope to stay connected with folks.” Last year, The Pitch named Gordon the city’s “Best Reporter.” As we wrote then: “She has crafted story after story around the sometimes deeply moving narratives of patients and health workers, all of whom she treats with sensitivity and dignity. And her work on covering a proposed federal physician database last winter was no less memorable, despite being about, well, a federal database.” We’re sad to see her go, so we called her up for an exit interview. The Pitch: Elana, why are you leaving us? Gordon: This was just a really exciting opportunity. I’m from New York, so it’s nice to be close to my immediate family. KCUR is fantastic. I love the station, and I love Kansas City. It’s home in a lot of ways. What I’m excited about at WHYY, they’re experimenting a lot in their health-science desk. So it’s a chance to join a team of reporters, and they’ll be launching a show in the fall. There’s a huge healthcare landscape in the Philadelphia area, a lot of pharmaceutical companies. And you’re right between Delaware and New Jersey. What business are you leaving unfinished? In a lot of ways, having this move happen pretty quickly, it feels like a lot is unfinished. I hope it’s not something that I’m leaving behind, but I’m hoping to continue with those connections and everything else. How exciting is it to now work with a team of health reporters? It’s really exciting. I really thrive in team environments, and KCUR is a fantastic team environment. And, in some ways, it’s been great to own a certain area of focus. It’ll just be a new experience to see what it’s like to have some other folks who are also focused on other aspects of health and science. What stories are you looking to tell in Philly?

B r o o k e Va n d e V e r

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Gordon doesn’t live here anymore. Health is such an intimate topic. It affects us all. Without health, what do we have? And there are so many different dynamics that influence and affect that, so at the core of things is that. So sometimes when you get more into the realm of policy and politics, it can get a little more abstract, but trying to make those connections in terms of what are some of the policies here, and what are the issues that are in turn affecting the way that we get and access health care. Looking at interests of aging and women’s health and pharma is really big here, and so I’m really excited to learn more about that. I think that part of it, too, will be some of the challenge, but what’s exciting is figuring out and finding my niche because I’m not totally sure what I’m getting myself into. With that comes a certain sense of excitement, getting out of your comfort zone, seeing things with fresh eyes. What sold you on WHYY? It’s in the public-radio network, and again, it’s having the chance to work with a healthscience team that sold me. It just seems like a great place for me to grow, and I’m excited about that. I’m excited about getting to know the health landscape of a different part of our country. To learn more in that realm about health and policy and health access are all things I’m very, very fascinated with. So getting a chance to see how things work somewhere else is really exciting to me. WHYY as a station is exciting to me in that it’s a bigger newsroom; it’s a bigger operation. They have a lot going on with their website. There’s some TV, also, with the Delaware affili-

ate. And so it’s just a really exciting chance to work with some new people and find out what another station looks like and how it works, and really delve in and use my creative and reporting skills in a new and different way. That’s not to say KCUR doesn’t have a lot of that going on. It does. It’s a fantastic station. How did you sell yourself to WHYY? People know in the public-radio network about KCUR. And so reporters coming from there are well-respected. I think in this day and age, with all the complexities of health care especially, having that area of focus and interest really gave me a boost in their eyes. There’s just so much going on in that beat, and it takes a certain kind of person to be interested in that. For me, the way radio tells stories or the way that we as people tell that story, how you find that story, how you find that character, how you really find that personal connection, and being creative about the ways that you tell stories — I think those are some of the things that I bring to a place, or hope to. You say character, and I immediately think about your story on Midtown Superman. Who’s faster, you or him? We didn’t race. I’m sure that he’s faster. He, by far, has more endurance than I do. He runs every day, for hours on end, so he’s got many more years under his belt, but he’s got the psychology to it. It’s not just the physical endurance but the psychological. He’s in the zone. I’m a runner, informally. I try to run in the morning, but if I get two miles, I’m really happy for myself. But there’s, like, that voice that comes in my head around that time that’s like, “Just stop, stop.” Where he’s like, “Keep going, keep going.” Have you practiced your new sign-off?

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I haven’t, but I have been thinking about how it’s W vs. K. East of the Mississippi, it’s W’s, and west are K’s. I like KCUR. KCUR just has such a nice ring to it. WHYY is pretty great, too. I’m pretty excited about those call letters. It’s the one that people recognize with Fresh Air and Terry Gross. That’s how I often identify the station. But there’s a lot more to it than that. What story was the most rewarding for you? It’s hard to say what’s most rewarding, but just being on the health beat and being at KCUR has been such a reward, in and of itself. I was first a listener of KC Currents. I’m KC Currents’ No. 1 fan. So when I got to the station, I was like, “KC Currents, oh my God.” And then I was like, “I can do stories for KC Currents? That’s so cool.” I didn’t think about, when I started at the station, “Wait, I’m going to have to actually talk and be on air. Wait, what?” I didn’t really process that. What are you going to miss most about KC? I’m going to miss morning coffee in midtown. All of KCK. M & M Bakery. Gardens on the West Side. Waking up to Michael Byars. Not literally — you know what I mean. Mardi Gras. The sounds of the trains going through the city. The music venues. I feel like I’ve been really busy this year, and I haven’t been to as many local music shows as I’ve wanted. I didn’t make it to Funkytown before I left. I hear that Philadelphia has a good dance scene, but I don’t think anything can top Funkytown’s dance scene. I’m going to miss the City Market. That’s a big one, especially this time of year with all of the produce starting to come in fresh. Violent weather. It’s funny, when I got here, there was a tornado watch for the greater Philadelphia area. I thought that was really bizarre. I thought I escaped that. The biggest thing is just missing people. On Christmas, I go to my friend’s nana and pop’s for the holidays in Chillicothe. It’s a good time. I haven’t figured out if I’ll make it back for that. Is it too late to keep you here? I’d say it’s too late to get me back right now. I’m excited about what I’m doing. But who knows what will come in the next few years. It’s a one-year position. I’m hoping it grows into something more. And, at the same time, I think that it’s a really great opportunity for me to grow as a reporter and take things from there. It’s entirely possible that I come back to Kansas City.

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com june 27-july 3, 2013

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OVER KI L L

S USAN S TUCKEY TOLD P RAIRIE V ILLAGE COPS TO SHOOT HER . R ECORDS SHOW THAT SHE DIDN ’ T HAVE TO WAIT VERY LONG .

BY STEVE VOCKRODT

S

usan Leslie Stuckey died violently the morning of March 31, 2010, shot three times by a Prairie Village Police Department sergeant who had forcefully entered her apartment. The shooting wasn’t supposed to happen. Though Stuckey, a 47-year-old woman with a long history of mental illness, had told the police officers outside her apartment that she wanted them to kill her, they planned to pin her against a wall and have her involuntarily committed at the University of Kansas Medical Center. That plan became difficult after officers abandoned negotiations and had a hard time getting into the apartment, where they encountered a baseball-bat-swinging Stuckey. Police feared that Stuckey might set her apartment ablaze, a concern escalated by reports that an immobile 90-year-old woman living in a nearby apartment could not quickly evacuate, as other residents of Prairie Village’s Kenilworth Apartments had early that morning. continued on page 8

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Overkill continued from page 7 Byron Roberson, a veteran PVPD officer, entered Stuckey’s apartment fi rst. He said later that she reached for a knife after he took her baseball bat and, after that, a broomstick. Fearing for his life, he said, he shot Stuckey. Bullets entered her neck and back and grazed her right forearm. Stuckey stepped toward a couch. Within moments she was dead. The shooting made headlines and evening newscasts during the spring of 2010 as the Johnson County multi-jurisdictional Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Team (OISIT), composed of members of neighboring police forces, looked into it. The results of that inquiry went to Johnson County District Attorney Steve Howe’s office, which was satisfied that none of the officers had acted incorrectly. The ones who responded that day would face no criminal liability under Kansas law. But Stuckey’s family is now seeking remedies under federal law. Beverly Stewart, Stuckey’s mother, has fi led a civil lawsuit against the PVPD and several individual officers for their roles in what she says was an unnecessary shooting and a violation of her daughter’s constitutional rights. The federal lawsuit comes after Stewart’s attorney, Cheryl Pilate, convinced a Johnson County District Court judge that the PVPD’s records of Stuckey’s shooting should be open to the public. The police in Prairie Village had sought to keep the Stuckey files sealed. With Stewart’s federal lawsuit in its pretrial phase, the now-unsealed records raise a number of questions about the PVPD’s official account of what happened at Kenilworth. Why did the PVPD rely on two patrol officers, untrained in hostage or barricadedsuspect negotiation, to carry out about two hours’ worth of discussions when there were two trained negotiators on the scene not talking to Stuckey? Why did police abandon negotiations after little more than two hours? Officers said during the police investigation that Stuckey had threatened to burn the apartment down, but sworn testimony by

some of the same officers expressed differing accounts about whether she made those threats and when. Stewart’s attorney has raised the possibility that the 90-year-old neighbor, whose safety was a major pretext for entering Stuckey’s apartment without a warrant, was not on the scene. Prairie Village Police Chief Wes Jordan tells The Pitch that he’s unable to discuss the case, citing the lawsuit. Michael Seck, an Overland Park attorney representing the police, was unavailable for comment but supplied The Pitch with a report from a police expert who reviewed the case and who largely endorses how police handled the situation that day. In Kansas, many basic records are often off-limits to the public or difficult and costly to obtain. The story that follows, supported by court filings, evidence and police records obtained by The Pitch through an openrecords request, is a rare look into the investigation of a local, officer-involved shooting.

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everly Stewart says she had a special bond with her only daughter. She was proud of the way a young Susan Stuckey took care of other children around her, loved animals, did well in her studies, and performed as a standout singer and softball player. “Everybody tried to get her on their team,” Stewart tells The Pitch. Stewart recalls happier times in her daughter’s life. “In fact, she used to tell me when she was younger, ‘I’m so happy, Mother,’ ” Stewart says. Sometime in Stuckey’s early teens, though, Stewart noticed a stark change in her daughter. She could think of no explanation for it, and her daughter offered none. “She loved good music and she would be listening to her music, and I could hear her and see her … she would be in the family room and she just looked so sad,” Stewart recalls. “So I would say, ‘Susan, what’s wrong, honey?’ And she would always say, ‘Nothing, nothing.’ ” Stewart contacted her doctor, who in turn referred the family to a psychologist.

and in my house and what she had told me — that he raped her. He admitted it. He admitted it to me.’ ” Stuckey’s depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, Stewart says, stemmed from these events and eventually led to her going on disability in the two to three years before her death. The last month of Stuckey’s life appears to have been among her most troubling periods. Her behavior was by then marked by heavy drinking, run-ins with neighbors, and a fire in her unit that caused smoke and soot damage. An April 1 eviction hearing had been set for her in Johnson County District Court. “She was going downhill fast, very fast,” Stewart says. “She even told me at one time, and I quote this, ‘I’m broken, Mother. I need help.’ ”

A young Stuckey was already burdened. Despite her withdrawal, Stuckey did well at Shawnee Mission West High School, from which she graduated in 1980. From there, she went to the University of Kansas and studied psychology and broadcasting. After graduating from KU, she set out on a successful sales career. It wasn’t until a visit to her mom’s house when Stuckey was 30 that Stewart began to understand what had distressed her daughter for so long. Stuckey revealed that the father of two girls, for whom she had baby-sat in her early teens, had sexually assaulted her. Then the psychologist Stuckey had been sent to raped her as well. Stewart tells The Pitch: “When she left, I called the psychologist’s office, and the receptionist answered the phone, and I said I want to talk to Mr. So-andSo [Stewart declines to identify the psychologist], and she said, ‘He’s with a patient now,’ and I said, ‘I don’t care who he’s with, I’m on the phone. I’m Susan Stuckey’s mother. I demand that I talk to him right now.’ “So I guess he went to someplace private, and I told him my daughter had been there

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n the weeks preceding Stuckey’s death, the Prairie Village police made several visits to her apartment, on the 4100 block of West 93rd Terrace. On March 18, 2010, Prairie Village police officer Benjamin Micheel was dispatched to Kenilworth Apartments when a resident there reported suspicious activity. The man who summoned police told Micheel that, as he was leaving his apartment the previous evening, Stuckey asked him where he was going. She spoke to him from her second-floor balcony. The man, who hadn’t met Stuckey before, told her that he was on his way to a local restaurant. “When you get back here, I’ll be here,” Stuckey told him, according to a police incident report. The man later learned from a neighbor that Stuckey had looked into his windows. “I know he’s in there,” she said, according to the neighbor. Micheel tried to confirm this with Stuckey; she told him to call her lawyer. She provided neither a name nor a phone number. The next day, another Prairie Village officer returned to Stuckey’s apartment. This time, she had called police herself to tell them

“She even told me at one time, ‘I’m broken, Mother. I need help.’ ”

THURSDAYS 7pm 8

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that Kenilworth’s management had stolen her pressure cooker. A manager told police that the pressure cooker had been taken because it was the source of the fire in Stuckey’s apartment. A Kenilworth resident went to the PVPD on March 24, a week before Stuckey’s death, to report that Stuckey had chastised her for parking in a no-parking zone while unloading items from her car the day she moved in. The woman said Stuckey had threatened to call the police while yelling at her and taking cell-phone photos of her as she drove away. On March 29, two Johnson County Mental Health staffers checked on Stuckey, who didn’t open her door until they started to leave. At that point, they reported, Stuckey followed them, yelling and threatening to report them to police. Prairie Village police arrived to speak with Stuckey, but she insisted that she would call 911 if they remained near her apartment. One of the officers warned her that if she kept calling 911 (she had made several 911 calls the week before)‚ they would arrest her for making a false report. The last time Prairie Village officers left Stuckey’s apartment with her still alive was March 30, 2010, the night before her death. A downstairs neighbor had called police, concerned after overhearing Stuckey yelling in her apartment and tossing a bag of trash out her back door. When officers Steve Steck and Craig Caster knocked on Stuckey’s door, she insisted that they were untrustworthy and said she didn’t care to speak to them, according to police records. Stuckey warned Steck and Caster that she had a bat and would knock their heads off. She said the only way she was leaving her apartment was “suicide by cop,” according to the incident report that the two officers filed. Steck and Caster left, only to return after another Kenilworth resident reported that Stuckey had threatened to hit her with a softball. The officers noted in their report that Stuckey was agitated, yelling that Kenilworth was miserable. At one point, she tossed an ironing board out the window. Stuckey told Steck and Caster that she would calm down if they brought her cigarettes. Joy Urich, an assistant manager at Kenilworth Apartments who had some rapport with Stuckey, went to fetch a pack of

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cigarettes. There was no answer at Stuckey’s door when she returned, and Urich left them for her. After about 20 minutes of silence, Steck and Caster left. Their colleagues would be back a few hours later.

through to Stuckey. But two trained negotiators were on-site. One was Corp. Jason Kuder, whose role at the scene was shift supervisor. He did not participate in negotiations; in his deposition, he defended his approach: Q: Is there a reason you were not involved in that, given your training within the department and that you’re the only negotiator in the department at that time? A: Right. Everything that I saw that was going on on scene, they had not developed any kind of dialog [sic] with her. And as a negotiator, there is no special training that I had that they didn’t have that was going to magically make me make her talk to me. Q: Was there anything preventing you from going up and engaging her? A: Because I felt my responsibility as the shift supervisor superseded that, yes. Like I just expressed to you, the two of them were trying to get a dialog [sic] going with Ms. Stuckey and had not even begun to that — to do that. And they were doing everything that they could, doing it right, as I was back listening to them or getting updates on the radio or talking to them, as I said earlier, that they were doing everything they can. According to a deposition by Tim Schwartzkopf, a PVPD captain who was at the scene, Kuder provided some oversight of the work that Taylor and Micheel were doing to engage Stuckey. Schwartzkopf could not recall what the department’s other trained negotiator, Darrell Thompson, was doing. The use of untrained negotiators during the standoff with Stuckey is, not surprisingly, being cited by experts hired by both the plaintiffs and the defendants in the civil trial against the PVPD. Vincent Faggiano, a longtime officer with the Rochester, New York, Police Department, writes in his report to Stewart’s attorney: “At best, Officer Taylor should have been engaged in this secondary role with Corporal Kuder as the primary negotiator. The failure to utilize Corporal Kuder in his trained role is not in compliance with accepted police procedures and diminished the opportunity to peacefully resolve this incident.” Steve Ijames, a 29-year law-enforcement veteran used by the continued on page 10

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gt. Byron Roberson slept about five hours before he woke up March 31, 2010, to get his twin sons ready for their day. His routine was interrupted by a phone call from dispatchers telling him that Prairie Village Police Capt. Wes Lovett wanted to talk to him about the latest trouble with Susan Stuckey. Roberson knew about Stuckey because she was frequently on the police blotter. Around 7 a.m., Stuckey had called police in Overland Park and Leawood and said officers were going to have to kill her. Prairie Village officers Micheel and Brian Dennis were the first to arrive at Stuckey’s apartment. She told them to “fuck off ” when they announced who they were, according to Micheel’s interview with the OISIT. While Stuckey directed a line of profanities at Micheel, officer Adam Taylor — who was planning to take crisis-negotiation training — tried to strike up a conversation with her. He told her that he was there to help her, and he offered her cigarettes and coffee, according to a written transcript of police-radio traffic that day. He brought up the upcoming Royals home opener, and the birds Stuckey kept in her apartment. Early in the conversation, Stuckey said, “I want you to kill me.” She later gave police her mother’s phone number. An officer told Stuckey that they had been unable to reach Stewart. Stewart says she didn’t hear from police that morning. Otherwise, the transcript shows that Stuckey remained largely uncommunicative. What comments she made were, for the most part, unintelligible. The patrol-car recording of the conversation starts at 7:07 a.m. and lasts until 9:10 a.m., about a half-hour before the shooting. The transcript indicates no clear threat by Stuckey that she planned to start a fire, and it shows

The scene March 31, 2010 no reaction by Taylor to suggest that she had made such a threat. Taylor testified in his deposition that she made threats about using an iron and a stove to set the apartment on fire, but those came toward the end of the two hours he spent talking to her. Micheel said in his deposition, when asked whether Stuckey had made threats to burn down Kenilworth: “Not that I specifically recall, no.” But Roberson, who was in charge of the Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT), said Lovett told him that Stuckey was agitated, threatening herself and officers, and threatening to burn the apartment down. “[E]n route, that’s why he [Lovett] was a little hurried, because she said, you know, ‘I’ll burn down the place,’ ” Roberson said in an interview with an OISIT investigator. “I said, ‘Well, she’s, you know, if she’s gonna do it, she’d already done it. So have the fire department stand by in case you see something, but I think it’s a threat at this point.’ ” Roberson developed an operations plan with other members of the CIRT. They would split into two groups, with one covering the front door of Stuckey’s apartment and the other her balcony. They would set a deadline for Stuckey to come out peacefully. Short of that, they would enter through her front door, immobilize her against a wall using a shield, and have her taken in for commitment at KU Medical Center’s psychiatric ward. Lovett had decided that Taylor and Micheel, both untrained negotiators, could not get

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Overkill continued from page 9 PVPD’s legal team as an expert, says in his report that a lack of negotiation training wasn’t a critical problem in this case. “[T]he information provided suggests that Ms. Stuckey was affected by mental illness and in a state of agitation that precluded productive dialogue,” Ijames writes. “… [I]t is my opinion that had a trained negotiator been used, their efforts at a negotiated resolution would have had the same negative result as Officer Taylor[’s].” Believing that Stuckey might set her building on fire, police positioned snipers around the apartment complex. The snipers could see into Stuckey’s apartment, and they reported seeing her appear to pour some kind of liquid onto the floor. Police also moved to evacuate tenants. And it was then that a man, never identified in the records, told Lovett that his 90-year-old mother was in an apartment and had medical issues that would make her evacuation problematic. This elderly woman seems to have weighed heavily in police decision making. But Lovett said in a deposition that he was never sure where this woman lived or what her condition was: Q: Did you know if this woman was bedridden? A: I don’t know. Q: On oxygen? A: Don’t know. Q: Did anyone verify that that information was in fact correct? A: No. Q: Did you ever ask anyone to go knocking on doors to see if they could find her and find out what the nature of her infirmity was? A: No. Q: It was your impression that she lived very close to Susan Stuckey? A: Yes.

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Q: How close? A: I don’t know. Q: First floor? A: I don’t know. Q: Same building? A: Same building. The OISIT canvassed the area after the shooting. Their report makes no reference to a disabled elderly woman who was immobile. Stewart’s lawyers note, in a recent court filing, that there was a 90-year-old woman living on the first floor of Stuckey’s building but she had “readily” gone to a neighbor’s apartment at 8:30 that morning an hour before the CIRT arrived. Even so, the fire threat was serious enough to short-circuit discussion of getting a warrant before entering Stuckey’s apartment. Roberson said in his OISIT interview: “There was some talk about the warrant but because of, I think, the exigent circumstances of when she made the threat about burning the place down, I think that kind of took it to another level. I think we probably would have handled it more like a barricade and trying to negotiate a lot longer. Maybe even use some gas, which we had on the scene. But it didn’t seem like that was gonna be something that we were gonna be able to wait for.” After Stuckey’s death, police did obtain a warrant to go through her apartment and collect evidence. The CIRT arrived around 9:30 a.m., more than two hours after officers initially arrived at the scene. A few minutes later, officers deemed that negotiations were fruitless and decided to enter Stuckey’s apartment, after giving her a final two-minute ultimatum to get out on her own. Faggiano, the New York police veteran providing an expert opinion for the plaintiffs, writes in his report that ultimatums in barricaded-suspect situations are bad ideas, short of what’s known as a “triggering event” — something that requires an immediate response.

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Stewart wants to know what happened. Ijames, the expert for the police department, acknowledges in his report that deadlines are discouraged but maintains that the officers’ handling of the plan was reasonable. Lovett has denied issuing an ultimatum. But other officers, including Roberson, were under the impression that a two-minute deadline was part of the plan. Roberson’s team approached Stuckey’s second-story apartment. Officer John Olson had the shield, Officer Dan Stewart was behind him, and Roberson was behind Stewart. Trailing them was Officer Seth Meyer, who carried a breacher to knock down the door. Roberson told Taylor to let Stuckey know that she had two minutes to come out of her apartment. He said her response was more banging on the door and more threats to kill officers. Roberson started counting down the first minute on his watch, then notified dispatch that they were going in. In front of the door, the shield went up, and Officer Stewart put a key in Stuckey’s lock. Stuckey had chained the door, but officers could see her swinging a bat. Roberson said in his interview that she had a look like “nobody’s home.” He went on: “And it wasn’t like somebody you maybe be able to calm down and talk nicely to and

get her to calm down. She didn’t, she didn’t appear to be reasonable.” Lovett said in his OISIT interview that Stuckey’s voice had changed markedly from the time he was at her apartment the night before. The morning of March 31, he said, she sounded almost like a man. Another member of Roberson’s team worked to take the door off its hinges until it dislodged at an angle. Roberson could now see Stuckey from the waist up. He stood in the doorway while the officers around him told Stuckey to put down her baseball bat. He held a Taser gun in his right hand, sizing up whether to use it to temporarily debilitate her. The presence of that Taser contradicts the police officers’ reported belief that Stuckey had created a fire hazard in her apartment. A Taser gives off an electrical charge and its use is discouraged near flammable liquid. Roberson managed to take Stuckey’s bat from her while fi ring a Taser round at her. He saw the Taser prongs hit her; the weapon had no effect, he said later. People hit with a Taser don’t usually remain on their feet for long. Stuckey fetched a broom handle while Roberson reloaded. The second Taser shot also proved ineffective. (Stuckey’s autopsy report indicated that the Taser prongs never pierced her skin.) Roberson said he watched her reach for a shiny object and realized that it was a knife. Roberson claimed that she had her arm cocked as though she were preparing to throw it at him. He was wearing riot gear but told investigators that he felt threatened. “Oh, absolutely,” Roberson said in his OISIT interview. “I feared if she throws it and it’s a lucky throw and it hits me right in the face, that’s the end of a knife. You know, if I get hit in the vest, probably be all right, but in the face, where she was it was a pretty good chance, and I thought, if I don’t kill her, she’s gonna kill me.”

Radio traffic picked up an officer telling Stuckey not to pick up the knife. Two seconds later: three gunshots. Roberson reported that Stuckey threw the knife, which bounced off his helmet or vest. At that point, other officers entered the apartment. One told Roberson to holster his weapon. Based on Roberson’s account, Stuckey hardly seemed to react to the bullets that entered her neck, her back and her arm. He said she walked to a couch in her apartment. Johnson County Med-Act was told that shots had been fired. Roberson was sent out of the apartment. Officers Meyer and Taylor went into Stuckey’s apartment. They found her slouched on the sofa and unresponsive. They moved her to the floor and applied pressure to her wounds with a towel but couldn’t get a pulse. Stuckey’s memorial service took place April 3, 2010, in the Wesley Chapel of the United Methodist Church of the Resurrection.

K

ansas law says police can use lethal force if they reasonably believe that it could prevent death “or great bodily harm to such officer or another person.” Johnson County District Attorney Steve Howe reportedly said Stuckey had drugs and alcohol in her system. An autopsy reveals that there was alcohol, and that the drugs were painkillers, muscle relaxants and antidepressants. (Beverly Stewart tells The Pitch that her daughter suffered pain from spinal stenosis, a condition resulting from a narrowing of the spinal canal.) Dave Bernard, a retired Ka nsas City, Missouri, Police Department officer who has investigated officer-involved shootings, tells The Pitch that there’s no gray area when it comes to the use of force against someone armed with a knife. “A person armed with a knife and they’re threatening you, it can become a deadly encounter,” he says. But why and how officers approached and entered Stuckey’s apartment make up the basis of the lawsuit against the PVPD. “There’s a strong focus on how the situation developed to begin with,” Pilate says. James Greenstone, a 35-year police veteran in Texas whose background includes experience as a crisis negotiator, reviewed some of the police records from the Stuckey shooting. He tells The Pitch that the shooting itself may have been justified under the law if Stuckey indeed threatened an officer with a knife, but he questions why trained negotiators were not the ones talking to Stuckey. He also wonders why negotiations didn’t persist; Greenstone says he has been part of crisis negotiations that lasted for 40 hours.

“The thing that rips through my head is, if they were negotiating with her, they already knew she wasn’t going to kill herself. She wanted the cops to kill her and she was ranting and raving with the cops for at least two hours,” he says. “Why didn’t they just keep doing what they were doing?” In a legal filing, Stuckey’s family casts doubt on whether or when Stuckey made threats to burn the apartment. The arson risk was the primary reason that the police used to justify entering her apartment without a warrant. But the filing says a sniper on the scene told members of the CIRT that Stuckey was pouring liquid from a bottle of liquid detergent — an indication that she was not necessarily preparing to set her place on fire. The family’s lawsuit also asks why a bean bag shotgun or a flash-bang device to stun Stuckey — available at the scene — was not considered as part of the CIRT plan. The filing goes on to say that the 90-yearold woman cited by police as a safety concern may not have been at the scene. (An apartment manager at Kenilworth Apartments, who didn’t work there when the shooting happened, tells The Pitch that she cannot disclose the names of residents who lived there at the time.) Stewart’s lawyers have already won once in court. Last year, Stewart’s attorneys filed a lawsuit to obtain Prairie Village and Overland Park police records pertaining to Stuckey after both departments denied their open-records requests, giving the explanation that they were criminali nve st ig at ion re cord s, which are exempted from disclosure under the Kansas Open Records Act. A Johnson County judge ruled that the records were indeed open to the public. The records became the basis upon which Stewart would take her case to federal court. The Pitch sought the identical records that had been ordered opened in Johnson County. That request was initially met with a price tag exceeding $1,000. Stewart’s federal lawsuit seeks no less than $2 million in damages. The case is set for trial on April 7, 2014. “Beverly’s overarching goal in this case is to find out what happened that day,” Pilate says. Ijames, the expert for the police department, says Prairie Village officers acted properly considering the circumstances. In a deposition, Roberson said he had received a commendation for valor during a roll call after the shooting.

“Why didn’t they just keep doing what they were doing?”

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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CLOSED MONDAYS

WEEK OF JUNE 27–JULY 3 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

17

PAG E

ART Sherry Leedy goes metal.

SATUR

DAY

6 . 29

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PAG E

er e Mak Join th t n e . movem

FILM

MAKING IT

Scahill doesn’t drone on in Dirty Wars.

Were rockets, robots, circuit boards, alternative-energy vehicles, Tesla coils or bicycles sent to society by the gods? No, dummy — they are all things people made. This weekend’s Maker Faire recognizes the creative process and its results when more than 200 exhibitors converge on Union Station (30 West Pershing Road, 816-460-2020) for the family-friendly event, which runs 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $10 for an adult day pass and $7 for a youth (ages 3–12) or a senior (65 and older) day pass. See makerfairekc.com.

28 PAG E

MUSIC Shake your booty at the Riot Room.

T H U R S D AY | 6 . 2 7 | FULL WEEK

We’re in the middle of 1 Week KC, the six-day celebration aimed at making the Paris of the Plains America’s most entrepreneurial city. As they say, it’s “a time to come together, get inspired, learn and connect.” And there’s a lot to do in the next 48 hours. Play in Union Station’s Digital Sandbox (30 West Pershing Road) today from 3 to 6 p.m. and celebrate the fifth birthday of the Social Media Club of Kansas City at Boulevard Brewing Co. (2501 Southwest Boulevard) from 5 to 9 p.m. On Friday, start the day with waffles and conversation at Think Big Partners (1800

Baltimore, fourth floor) at 8:30 a.m. Not a morning person? Join the KC Startup Crawl 2.0 at 4 p.m. and tour the KC Startup Village, the Kauffman Foundation and more. Need a beer? End the night with free drinks on the roof of Drunken Fish (14 East 14th Street) from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. See 1weekkc.com for a full schedule of events. — JUSTIN KENDALL

F R I D AY | 6 . 2 8 | HE’S FRESH

There’s no rest for Kyle Hatley this weekend. The Death of Cupid: A Whiskey Musical — a work he wrote and directed — is being performed at the Living Room (1818 McGee,

816-533-5857). And Sunday, Hatley presents new material from a work-in-progress titled Master of the Universe, at the Fishtank Performance Studio (1715 Wyandotte, 816-809-7110). “I will be attending most performances of Cupid during its run at the Living Room in order to continue learning how best to rewrite it,” Hatley tells us, “so I will also have time to work on other projects.” Hatley’s reading at the Fishtank is part of that theater’s Summer Shorts series of staged readings on Sundays. “A lot of playwrights in KC are directors but some aren’t,” says Heidi Van, Fishtank artistic director. “I wanted to hear the play with the playwright’s raw intent, eliminating any lost-through-trans-

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lation moments.” Hatley’s Master of the Universe is a retelling of Georg Büchner’s final, unfinished play, Woyzeck, a story of a solider overcome with jealously. Before creating his next piece, Hatley has to get through The Death of Cupid. “It’s an insanely complicated story and takes everyone’s involvement, focus, talent and physical energy to pull it off,” he says of the bluesy retelling of Aristophanes’ Lysistrata. “The Death of Cupid is something I hope to revisit every five years or so throughout my career and life. Like the songs in the show, it’s the kind of story that must adapt with the times in which we are living.” The Death of Cupid: A continued on page 14 june 27-july 3, 2013

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FRIDAY

6 . 28

t Faur a Amjad Hand le Invisib

continued from page 13 Whiskey Musical runs through July 14. Tickets cost $15–$25; see thelivingroomkc.com for a full schedule. Master of the Universe starts at 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $10; see drunkenshorts.brownpapertickets.com. The Fishtank series continues through July 14.

LAWRENCE FINAL-FRIDAY ROUNDUP

Henry’s Coffee Shop (11 East Eighth Street, 785-331-3511). The only unifying theme of the Pocket Trade Party is precision, when 25 local artists show their works on 5-inchby-5-inch canvases in the downtown coffee shop. Tonight’s opening reception goes from 6 to 9 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center (940 New Hampshire, 785-843-2787). Look for new paintings by Jack Collins, new ceramic work from the LAC’s 2012–13 Artist-in-Residence Monika Laskowska, and String Theory 13, an installation of more than 40 different “strings” made by more than 70 local artists and community groups. “In the last few decades, string theory has emerged as the most promising candidate for a microscopic theory of gravity,” says Ben Ahlvers, LAC exhibition director. “It attempts to provide a complete, unified and consistent description of the fundamental structure of our universe.” Tonight’s reception runs from 5 to 9 p.m. See lawrenceartscenter.org. Invisible Hand Gallery (846 Pennsylvania, 785-393-6544). Photographer Amjad Faur uses shots done with 8-by-10 black-andwhite film to explore his relationships with European art and the Middle East. His show, Future Ruins, opens tonight with a reception from 5 to 9. To learn more about Faur’s work, see amjadfaur.com.

FOR THE CHILDREN

Give your TV, A/C and DVR all a rest tonight. Entertain the fam for free at the fourth and final week of this year’s Hyde Park Children’s Festival (36th Street and Gillham 14

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Road) from 7:30 until 10 p.m. A musical performance by area youth-rock band Bentt precedes an 8:30 showing of Oz the Great and Powerful. Supervised kids’ activities allow for plenty of solo blanket time, if desired. For more information, call 816-753-6719.

S AT U R D AY | 6 . 2 9 | DRAMA TURD

Old Comedy, as it was written by Aristophanes around 420 B.C., was generally heavy on obscenities and vulgar jokes but shrouded in references to news, gossip and literature of the day, which makes it even more arduous to translate and perform. KC’s Gorilla Theatre tackles one of these ancient works each year and performs it on the south steps of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak) a little after sunrise, complete with costumes, choreographed movements and original live music. Today and tomorrow, the company takes on Aristophanes’ The Knights, a satirical look at social and political life in Athens. Parental guidance is suggested. The performances go from 7:30 to 9 a.m. today and Sunday. Search “Gorilla Theatre” on Facebook.

THE BRITISH ARE COMING

Much like barbecue, jazz, fountains and a crumbling infrastructure, mixed martial arts is also becoming one of those “KC things.” This week, the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000) hosts its first MMA event, the Global Warrior Challenge. Billing itself as “the British Invasion,” the 12-bout card features matches between U.S. and U.K. fighters. Tickets start at $37 and can be bought at sprintcenter.com or by calling 888-929-7849.

S U N D AY | 6 . 3 0 | IN LIVING COLOR

Joanne Greenbaum and Jackie Saccoccio, two of New York City’s emerging abstract

painters, are featured in the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art’s newest exhibit, Polychrome Fiction. The large-scale modernist works with fantastical color are on display through September 8. The Nerman is located on the Johnson County Community College campus (12345 College Boulevard, Overland Park, 913-469-3000). See nermanmuseum.org.

M O N D AY | 7. 1 | LOCALLY SOURCED LAUGHS

“The Kansas City comedy scene is flooded with quality talent constantly looking for stage time and show opportunities,” Norm Dexter tells us. An elder statesman of the scene, Dexter hosts two open-mic nights a week: Wednesdays at Michael’s Lakewood Pub (811 Northeast Lakewood Blvd, Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300) and Mondays at the Uptown Arts Bar (3611 Broadway, 816-960-4611). “At the Arts Bar, we have created a comedic habitat, where comedians can feel comfortable performing, interacting, writing and networking with colleagues,” Dexter says. Show up to the free event at 10 p.m. See uptownartsbar.com.

SOUTHPAW SUDS

Branded with a print of a red left hand, Colorado’s Left Hand Brewing Co. produces about 50,000 barrels of beer a year and distributes to 26 states, including Kansas and Missouri. Five of its selections — Ambidextrous Maibock, 2009 St. Vrain Tripel, 2013 St. Vrain Tripel, 2010 Chainsaw and the Milk Stout Nitro — are the subjects of Beer School at Barley’s Brewhaus (11924 West 119th Street, Overland Park, 913-663-4099) at 6 p.m. For $12 (call Barley’s to purchase tickets), get schooled in the intricacies of the award-winning brews; see lefthandbrewing.com for more info.

T U E S D AY | 7. 2 | SPORTS STATE

Established in 1985, the Show-Me State Games are the largest state games in the nation, with more than 30 sports featuring

“Dollar General” by Joanne Greenbaum in Polychrome Fiction participants of all ages and ability levels. The amateur Olympic-style competition takes place July 19-21 and July 26–28 in Columbia, but the event could use spectators from all corners of the state. For the first time in a decade, the Show-Me State Games bring back the Torch Run today at noon, at Shelter Insurance (4901 Northeast Lakewood Way, Lee’s Summit, 816-795-6800). Experience the thrill of sportsmanship when the torch is lighted. Athletes will be on hand for photo ops and questions. See smsg.org.

W E D N E S D AY | 7. 3 | THE THIRD OF JULY

Don’t wait until the Fourth to start your Independence Day holiday. Booms and Blooms Festival at Powell Gardens (1609 Northwest U.S. Highway 50, Kingsville, 816-697-2600). The gates open at 9 a.m., but the bedazzlement starts at 7:30 p.m. with the Lee’s Summit Symphony Orchestra, followed by fireworks over the 12-acre lake. Tickets cost $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $5 for kids between the ages of 5 and 12. See powellgardens.org/booms. Legacy Blast Fireworks Extravaganza at Legacy Park (901 Northeast Bluestem Drive, Lee’s Summit). Look for food vendors, live entertainment and inflatables at the free fireworks show, which begins when the sun goes down. Gates open at 6 p.m. See cityofls.net. Liberty 4th Fest on Historic Liberty Square (corner of East Kansas and North Water streets). The beer gardens and food booths for Liberty’s second-annual KC Barbeque Society–sanctioned competition open at 5 p.m. Live music with Neon Blue starts at 7:30. On Thursday, a parade begins at 10 a.m. and a car cruise starts off at 11. Admission is free. See liberty4thfest.com. E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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june 27-july 3, 2013

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S TA G E

TRUE LOVE

As You Like It is all the Shakespeare

BY

you need this summer.

DE BOR A H HIRSCH

BRIAN COLLINS

ast year’s Shakespeare Festival tackled two shows: the ever-delightful A Midsummer Night’s Dream and the weighty Antony and Cleopatra. This summer, the festival has dispensed with a tragic half to concentrate on the season-appropriate As You Like It — flowers, weddings, the love of nature and the nature of love. And what better setting for this diversion than the Summer of Love, the 1967 moment which this production, directed by Sidonie Garrett, borrows from and celebrates. If you think the set looks atypically modern for a Shakespeare play, with its signs about flower power and electronic surveillance, well, it’s just a heads-up. Because when the show begins (after the humorous Shakespearean shtick announcing rules for spectators), Duke Frederick (Mark Robbins) and his courtiers talizes love and parodies it. And here, it’s great (er, henchmen) don shiny, Italian-looking fun, with the wit and spectacle and showmanship turned all the way up. suits, fedoras and sunglasses (those mobster Nestled among the trees, the staging makes scoundrels), and the cast, for the most part, perfect use of the intimate Southmoreland is outfitted in ’60s attire (colorful costumes Park. Act 1’s urban court is cleverly transformed designed by Mary Traylor). It all works. This production is pure en- into the Forest of Arden (scenic design by Gene Emerson Friedman), to which the characters joyment. Cast members, nearly all of them flee or are banished, and well-known local performwhere they idealistically ers, embody a roster of charAs You Like It seek a less politicized, less acters and fluidly deliver Through July 7 complicated life. It’s their Shakespeare’s lines. Yes, at Southmoreland Park, Woodstock, and they’ve gotthere are the usual disguises 47th Street and Oak, kcshakes.org ten back to the garden. In the and cross-dressings, and dark, the rising moon actuthe seemingly complicated ally feels like part of the scenery. plot (about which, more in a minute) doesn’t A nd spea k ing of ’60s music: Greg always make complete sense, but the story is Mackender has composed the melodies for basically a simple one: All you need is love. Well, maybe. As You Like It both sentimen- this production, setting Shakespeare’s lyrics to

BRIAN COLLINS

L

At left: Cordes and Roy stare off. Above: Lanker and Noack stare down. folk-pop tunes (one sounds like James Taylor). Oliver (Matt Rapport), who has inherited his father’s estate, despises his brother, Orlando (Todd Carlton Lanker), and threatens his life. After fighting court wrestler Charles (Taylor St. John), Orlando flees to the Forest of Arden. Likewise, Duke Frederick has usurped the throne of his brother, Duke Senior (John Rensenhouse), who also has fled to the forest with his followers. Duke Senior’s daughter, Rosalind (Carla Noack), this play’s heroine, ends up in the forest with her cousin, Celia (Cinnamon Schultz), Duke Frederick’s daughter, and with Touchstone (Jacques Roy), the court jester. Orlando is hopelessly in love with Rosalind, who dresses as a man called Ganymede. Celia dresses as a shepherdess and changes her name to Aliena. Meanwhile, shepherd Silvius (Jake Walker) is in love with Phoebe (Emily Peterson), who

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june 27-july 3, 2013

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despises him but loves Ganymede (that is, Rosalind). And Touchstone falls in lust with the simple-minded but sexy goatherd Audrey (Mary Glen Fredrick). Another shepherd among them, Corin (Scott Cordes), pops in occasionally to comment on the pastoral life, accompanied by a herd of sheep — a skillfully constructed marionette. Jacques (Bruce Roach), a lord accompanying Duke Senior, is the group’s depressant. Amiens (Nathan Bovos), another lord, is the happy type and likes to sing. And the elderly Adam (Michael Rapport) proves a faithful servant to Orlando. All of the performances are good, and many are standouts. Roy, who appeared as an acrobatic and unconventional Puck in Midsummer, steals his scenes with physical comedy and an outlandish Touchstone, channeling samurais, stand-up comics and Olympic gymnasts. Rensenhouse and Robbins have small roles (as does Cordes) but leave lasting impressions. Peterson’s sassy Phoebe has nearly nothing to do in Act 1 but commands her scenes later in the show. Lanker is dreamy and believable as lovestruck Orlando. And Noack, with the largest role in this work, anchors the play, skillfully communicating its sentiments. I saw a few people leave at intermission during a preview performance lasting till nearly 11 p.m. They must have faced an early morning (how full of briers, indeed, is this working-day world), because little else could explain abandoning a production so joyful and entertaining. I admit I was a bit weary myself the next day — but less weary of the world.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

Mike Zito with Samantha Fish

June 28

ART

MAKERS’ FARE

T

he value of an artwork can’t be measured covered or painted board stitched with horiby how long it took to conceive and make. zontal lines, suggesting notebook-paper rules. But how long it holds your attention is another Between these multicolored spacers is the thing. The dual exhibitions at Sherry Leedy text. Each tiny, typed word and punctuation Contemporary Art — Tracy Krumm’s In the mark has been individually cut out and pasted Making and Tanya Hartman’s We Write Our- into place. Visual variety comes from differences in the length and arrangement of text. selves Anew — cast lines of thought at each other Hartman has placed some narratives chronacross the rooms, and if you allow yourself to be caught up by them, intriguing connections ologically (Nos. 167 and 168, for example, both speak of a 40th birthday), but a closer reading emerge. The art within required patience to indicates a muting of seasons and a telescoping create. And it demands — fairly — the viewer’s. Both of these accomplished artists (their of time (in No. 87, she is 37 years old). And she has painted over some phrases while leaving résumés take pages) are rather obsessive. Krumm herself uses that word in a state- text visible underneath. We note among the words multiple locament, and her webby hangings, made of tions: Kansas City, New York, Mexico. There meticulously crocheted metal wire anchored are intimate interactions to rusty found objects and with a spouse, a parent, a hand-forged hardware, take Tracy Krumm: child. There is the decline ages to construct. Jennifer In the Making and death of the writer’s Bowerman, the gallery’s Tanya Hartman: We father. In No. 323, she hears assistant director, says the Write Ourselves Anew that an old friend has died, double-layered “Wall CurThrough June 29 at Sherry someone who had cut her tain (Saw Blade)” took the Leedy Contemporary Art out of her life, unexplained, artist about two years. 2004 Baltimore for years. “She was so wonHartman’s work here 816-221-2626 sherryleedy.com derful, complex, flawed and also spans time. “What Was striving, and now she is gone Beautiful,” a variation on the and we shall speak no more.” idea of a gratitude journal, As installed, the panels are challenging begins in 1999. Reminiscent of William Carlos to read without crouching or craning. FortuWilliams’ observational poetry, it offers accesnately, two Mac terminals allow gallery visitors sible meditations on daily life and — along with her prayer paddles and three larger sculptures to click on any day’s expression and see it up close, isolated on the screen. Hartman also — consists of assiduously layered materials. provides narration if you press Play — though, From a distance, the eight panels of “What if you’re like me, you prefer your own head’s Was Beautiful,” each holding 48 tablets, look voice to the poetry-reading formality that like carefully laid rows of iced rectangular comes through the headphones. (As for the cookies. Up close, each “page” is a cloth-

Tracy Krumm and Tanya Hartman

BY

share a conversation at Sherry Leedy.

T R A C Y A BE L N

blank, unnumbered panels, it seems unfair to give anything away here.) The framed texts-as-composition reveal, at a glance, the sheer endeavor of living through — much less documenting — each and every day. It’s impressive, this memoir, and it would make a good hand-held book, to be absorbed as slowly as its components were composed. Interacting with the eight wall panels, though, is valuable in its own right, in part as a kind of memory game. The human habit seeks to “match” motifs, learn who “characters” are, determine a chronology even as the lines jump around as much as our own memories. Hartman is, in fact, working on a book about a Sudanese refugee whose story is manifest in the three largest and most recent sculptures in the installation. “Secrets and Outtakes: Was It Me?” is a triptych of three puzzlelike pieces that would take as much time to decipher as reading 365 poems. It is dark and powerful, as is “Many People Died That Night,” which frankly exposes the horror of genocide. A large orange and black field of African-styled patterns, made of closely packed beads (actually map pins), surrounds a narrow text box. There is a list, in English — mother, father, sister, brother, uncle, cousin, friend, teacher, neighbor — between rows of Hebrew. (Hartman’s grandfather was a Jewish refugee who fled to Mexico.) After the intensity and warmth of so much immersion in written histories, Krumm’s cold, quiet curtains, tubes and “clothes” offer a respite. In the Making is conceptual and technical, and Krumm’s process explores the boundaries of material. She pairs heavy, handforged metal with wispy, crocheted wire in

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From left: Hartman’s “What Was Beautiful” (detail); Krumm’s “Taper (Anchor)” and Hartman’s “Many People Died That Night” endless-seeming combinations. Found objects, such as a rusty whipsaw blade or industrial weights, are worked in as hangers or anchors and bring their own character or question into each sculpture. Most, like the odd “strainer” that forms the crown of “Cavity/Strainer,” are unidentifiable. The pairings are neither clumsy nor awkward; the wire portions seem to grow organically from the more solid metal roots. If this pairing of “feminine” handcraft with “masculine” forging seems obvious, the result is a set of very still, very beautiful objects. And the longer you look, the more the current in that duality changes direction. Krumm’s durable-seeming sculptures are delicate. No bed quilt would last as well as “10 Squared, 9 Patched,” which incorporates wire, but all of these creations could be bent and smashed into ruin. The metallic curtain titled “Draped (Screwed)” alludes to medieval chain mail in a way that makes the gallery feel, for a moment, like a deserted wing in an antiquities museum. Aside from the challenge of dusting it, though, it would make a covetable household object. Krumm’s sculptures, she writes in a statement, “speak about the history of craft in their attention to detail and their thinking-throughmaking sensibilities.” If you have the patience to look carefully and at length, the repeated loops and emergent patterns in her art, as well as in Hartman’s, tell you plenty.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com june 27-july 3, 2013

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FILM

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Dirty Wars journalist Jeremy

BY

Scahill takes aim at U.S. secrecy.

D A N LY B A R G E R

A

s the national security correspondent for The Nation, Jeremy Scahill has posed some challenging questions about how the United States should conduct itself during wartime. His 2007 book, Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army, recounts how the company became a major player in the war in Iraq while removing layers of public accountability. Scahill’s latest book, Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield, examines how targeted assassinations, particularly drone strikes, may have become counterproductive. It follows the history of the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), the intelligence and military network behind part of the drone program. He pays particular attention to residents of a compound in Afghanistan, and to Yemen, where the radical U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki and Awlaki’s 16-year-old son were targeted for assassination. Scahill is the subject of Richard Rowley’s new documentary, Dirty Wars, which opens Friday at Tivoli Cinemas. The film follows Scahill as he covers these stories, and it shows us that the work is grim and troubling. (The film won the Cinematography Award: U.S. Documentary at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.) The Pitch spoke with him this month by phone. The Pitch: What makes a drone strike more ominous than sending a SEAL team into a place? Scahill: To me, the issue is not the [drone] technology as much as it is the principle upon which these strikes are being authorized — that the U.S. is asserting, under both Republican and Democratic administrations, that it has the right to conduct what are assassination operations in any country it pleases around the world. I think that part of the drone issue is that they’re spooky. You’ve got guys sitting in trailers in the Southwest United States that are essentially bombing Pakistan or Yemen. And then they get into their cars at the end of the day. As they get off of their base, they pass a sign that says: “Buckle up. This is the most dangerous part of your day.” Meaning they have a greater likelihood of being killed in a traffic accident than they do in the war that they’re helping to fight. I also think that the domestic concerns about drones, combined with how we’ve seen them used internationally, and the fact that the Tea Party folks like [U.S. Sen.] Rand Paul and others have raised a ruckus about it and the idea that drones could be used on U.S. soil, have all tapped into people’s greatest fears about a national security state. I have tried to caution people that if you focus too much about one weapon, you’re doing so at the expense of missing all the other trees

Scahill, second from left, investigates the death of an Afghan policeman. in the forest. I think that all of that taps into people’s greatest fears of robotic warfare and of dudes in trailers somewhere piloting drones. Unlike some of the pundits who dismiss your findings, you’ve actually been to Afghanistan and Iraq to see for yourself what has happened. I’ll tell you something sort of funny. When Bush and Cheney were in power, and I was covering Blackwater and the war in Iraq, talking about human-rights abuses and torture and mass killings, I would get a lot of e-mails praising me from liberals. “Oh, thank you for exposing this.” “We need to hold these guys accountable.” “This can’t happen.” “This is America.” “This is against our values.” And then Obama becomes president, and then my inbox flips around. I have liberals telling me how much they despise me and how I’m undermining the president. “What do you want? For Mitt Romney to be president?” And all I’m doing is the same sort of basic reporting. I think that a lot of liberals in particular have sort of coat-checked their conscience during the two terms of the Obama party. And, to me, it calls into question if these are principles in play, because you were against these things when Bush was doing it and now you seem to support it when Obama’s doing it, or you’re silent in the face of him doing many of the same things Bush and Cheney were doing. And I also empathize with some of these people. Look at all these racist, bigoted attacks on the president, coming from the craziest corners of the right wing. It’s not like the guy isn’t under siege. His citizenship has been called into question. They portray him as a sort of bizarre, Marxist Manchurian candidate and not a real American. I also think the president has been very effective in convincing people that this is a

smarter, more effective way of waging war against people who are plotting against the United States. There’s been a portrayal of this as surgical and not so many civilians have died, and you don’t subject American forces to being killed or maimed on the battlefield. I think a lot of people have bought into that idea. I just disagree that that’s the reality. I disagree not based on being embedded on my couch but going in and talking to people in areas that are being targeted. I think we’ve killed a tremendous number of innocent people, and in some places, our policies are making more enemies than they are killing terrorists. In the film, you document the deaths of an Afghan policeman and two women who lived in the same house. It was obvious that they weren’t Taliban. I’ll tell you something about that family. We originally had a line in the film explaining how these guys weren’t ethnic Pashtuns, meaning they were not the almost exclusive ethnicity of the Taliban. The women were not wearing burqas. These guys had a proven record of fighting against the Taliban. They were a minority in a very Taliban part of Afghanistan, and I write all of this in the book. When you know these details, it makes it [the strike] even more egregious. So let me get this straight: The Americans went into this place and they gunned these people down. And it turned out it was one of their allies, a guy who was on the Taliban’s death list, we killed there? One of the Afghans who was actually collaborating with us? Which is why, when the guy [a relative of the victims] said, “I wanted to put on a suicide vest and blow myself up among the Americans,” it’s so profound because this was a very pro-American family. And we lost them. The male members of this family wanted to kill Americans in retaliation. At the same time, the film shows that Anwar

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al-Awlaki’s father, Nasser al-Awlaki, despite losing a son and a grandson to drone strikes, is still not denouncing America. This guy [Anwar] was not his only son. One of his children is a beekeeper. One is a schoolteacher. The other works for an international oil company. They’re all modern, sort of Westernoriented folks. Anwar al-Awlaki, for reasons we try to get into in the film, became radicalized, I think in a large part because of American foreign policy. To this day, they are still based in the United States. This is a guy who went to the United States in 1966 as a Fulbright Scholar and wanted to raise his children in the spirit of sort of American culture and values. I’m always in awe of people who let us come in and talk with them and share their stories. Look, he’s fighting in the court system still in the U.S. to try to get answers, particularly as to why his grandson was killed. And, in part, it’s because he has faith that if the American people were to look at all the facts, they would give an honest assessment. That’s pretty profound that he still believes that. In the book and the film, you present a nuanced picture of Anwar al-Awlaki. Two of the 9/11 hijackers briefly attended his mosque. But say a Catholic priest performed a mass, and Timothy McVeigh once attended that mass in his parish. Would they do the same to him? I never heard somebody put it that way. I wish I had talked with you before I started writing the book. That would have been a good example to give. I’m willing, for the sake of debate, to concede that Awlaki is guilty of everything that the president and his advisers have leaked to the media and have now publicly said about him. To me, the question is, what do we do with a [U.S.] citizen like that, who is a reprehensible individual? It’s more about who we are as a society than who Awlaki was. My biggest problem has always been why the secrecy in it. Why not just say, “This is a man who did XYZ. Here’s the evidence against him. We’re going to indict him, and if Yemen doesn’t hand him over, then we’re going to take our own action against him to bring him to justice.” But none of that happened. We basically fast-forwarded past the indictment phase, the trial phase and the verdict phase, and just went right into the sentencing phase with him where he’s sentenced to death. I don’t think that he was a noble man at all. And he may well have been guilty of all sorts of things. But how we are going to treat someone like that is relevant to all Americans.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com june 27-july 3, 2013

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CAFÉ

WHO’S YOUR DADA?

Voltaire starts its own movement in the West Bottoms.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Voltaire • 1617 Genessee, 816-472-1200 • Hours: Happy hour 4–6:30 p.m. Wednesday–Saturday, dinner 6–10 p.m. Wednesday–Thursday and 6–10:30 p.m. Friday–Saturday, closed Sunday–Tuesday • Price: $$–$$$

urich’s legendary Cabaret Voltaire was an avant-garde oasis while World War I devoured Europe. Almost a century later and a continent away, as hipsters devoured the Crossroads, the West Bottoms’ R Bar was a different kind of oasis. One gave the world Hugo Ball’s Dada manifesto. The other gave Kansas City Ron Megee’s giant, illuminated R. Both flourished briefly — while Cabaret Voltaire recovered, R Bar floundered. That lighted R may be gone, but the space itself is back from no man’s land, this time as an exceptionally promising bistro called Voltaire, a reference to that radically chic place where exiles changed art and caused a riot or two. No one’s going to attack the stage at Jill Myers and chef Wes Gartner’s dinner-only restaurant. For one thing, there’s no longer a stage. Before Gartner and Myers opened Voltaire seven weeks ago, they converted R Bar’s MORE bandstand into a cozy seating area with a big T sofa and two comfortable A E IN ONL .COM chairs. They aren’t planH C IT P ning to book live music; for now, they’re encouraging their patrons to bring in their own vinyl albums for a spin on the high-grade turntable behind the bar. (I suppose I could have started an uprising if I’d taken my old pressing of Ethel Merman’s disco album.) The new owners have wisely decided to change virtually nothing else about the inside of this saloon and restaurant. It still looks like an untouched relic from the days when this neighborhood was dominated by the stockyards, with original tile floors and all the touches engineered by Dolphin gallery owner John O’Brien, who designed R Bar’s interior in 2009. Instead, Gartner and Myers have channeled their efforts into an imaginative menu of small plates (and three more substantial dishes that could be considered entrées), which are so attractive and pleasurable that you can’t help but quote Voltaire as they arrive at the table. As that 18th-century wit put it: “Nothing would be more tiresome than eating and drinking, if God had not made them a pleasure as well as a necessity.” No one would ever consider drinking cabernet a necessary evil at Voltaire, if only because the wineglasses are so novel: Spanish-made vessels that suggest a cross between a specimen cup and a Pyrex custard dish. They’re practically unbreakable, Gartner says, as though made for a revolting dadaist to hurl. The wine list itself is compact and serviceable,

CAFÉ

ANGELA C. BOND

Z

At Voltaire, the fish and chips are worth a thousand words, and carrot cake is poetic.

though it could use more wines by the glass Minh treatment: a bottle of nuoc cham and a cluster of soothing, minty watercress-andfrom its moderately priced bottles. cucumber slaw. Myers, who was concerned that people There’s a similarly arresting emphasis on would assume she and Gartner were simply reopening R Bar, has been relieved to flavor all over the menu. The chunky sticks of see Voltaire’s almost immediate success. “It fried yucca would be a yawn served naked, but helped that it took so long for us — nearly a the serrano-kiwi ketchup delivers a serious unyear — to get the place open,” she says. “We dercurrent of cardamom for an almost currylike edge. The steamed mussels (good and plump) could rebrand it as Voltaire right away.” Gartner and sous chef Ryan Holopter are give off an intoxicating perfume of fennel, thyme and Pernod. The pulled pork in Voltaire’s getting raves for their food, even from the tacos al pastor has been maricriti cal patrons who frenated in chiles and pineapple quented R Bar when Alex Voltaire until the meat is succulent Pope was in the kitchen. Yucca, fried...........................$6 and gloriously rich, further There’s no reason to miss Chicken wings, complemented by fresh cilanPope here. Voltaire’s is the Vietnamese ........................$8 Tacos al pastor .....................$8 tro, lime, pickled onion and best bar food in the city right Risotto ..................................$12 salsa verde. One hot Friday now, served in one of KC’s Fish and chips .....................$13 night, I went through two most comfortable saloons. Pot of French-press orders of the tacos without a Two people could easily coffee ..................................$6 second thought. make a satisfying light meal A bowl of pigeon peas, of Gartner’s $14 cheese-andcooked with lemongrass and coconut, comes charcuterie plate, a Marcel Duchamp–style assemblage of soft, hard and blue cheeses; a scattered with cauliflower florets that have been rubbed in olive oil, sprinkled with turclump of duck prosciutto; two circles of sopresmeric and slow-roasted. I like the fiery nam sata salami; a rectangle of house-made pâté; a lonely anchovy; a spoonful of stone-ground prik num and the long, curly bean pod (dipped in tempura batter and flash-fried) that dress mustard; a jumble of crispy giardiniera; and this dish, and vegetarians shouldn’t miss it, slices of grilled baguette and house-baked but I’d rather have the risotto. Voltaire’s version crackers. I shared it with two friends but got to isn’t the usual boring sop to the meatless crowd keep it mostly to myself because they were enbut is instead perfectly creamy, adorned with tranced by their own plate of tiny, gorgeously bits of asparagus, morels, toasted pistachios crisp Vietnamese chicken wings. Here, these and translucent flakes of grana padano. dainty but meaty drumettes get the Ho Chi

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Gartner’s interest in Indian cuisine shows up again in his delicious lamb chop entrée. The delicate chops are discreetly crusted in coriander before roasting, and they come out perched on a fluffy saffron-potato pancake that’s surrounded by a vivid-orange tikka masala sauce. Far less fancy are the fish and chips, but there’s no need for flash when the beer batter is this evanescent and the skate wing is this flaky. There’s also a fine hunk of pink salmon, slathered in a sake-yuzu beurre blanc and then grilled and glazed with miso and ginger. It comes with roasted daikon and baby-soft bok choy. You can polish off a meal here with a cocktail or a pot of Oddly Correct coffee, served in a press pot. The latter tempers the delicious brass of Myers’ pillow-soft carrot cake (made with lots of fresh orange zest), but it was one of Andy Cool’s cookies that I found myself craving later. Cool, a Hallmark artist, frosts some of these spicy little half dollars in lime-jalapeño or orange-habanero icing, and also makes a potently gingery snap and a snickerdoodlestyle cookie rolled in a cayenne sugar. It takes a certain self-assurance to nibble on a toddler-size cookie in a see-and-be-seen room like this one has already become. I’m sure the real Voltaire — or Hugo Ball — must have composed an appropriate bon mot for such an absurd scene. But I can’t recall it just now.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com june 27-july 3, 2013

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FAT C I T Y BY

rolls into farmers markets.

JON AT H A N BENDER

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

NEW FLAVOR

Erika Massow’s H & C Ice Cream

E

rika Massow doesn’t drive a van that plays jangly, public-domain windup tunes. She’s got a Ford Focus with a front license plate that reads: “Powered by bacon.” And Wednesdays and Saturdays, the car is packed with Igloo coolers full of the salted-caramel, blood-orange buttermilk, and peanut-buttercup ice creams that she can’t keep in stock at area farmers markets. “I got tired of going to the store and not finding anything that wasn’t made with corn syrup,” Massow says of what sparked her month-old business. “Ice cream just needs to be five ingredients.” On a recent Saturday morning, Massow, 33, leans down to talk to some children who have approached her table at the Brookside Farmers Market. She smiles and opens a glass jar filled with cartoon stickers. Every child leaves with a sticker, and more than a few end up triumphantly carrying away 5-ounce containers of blueberries-and-cream or chocolate-covered-strawberry ice cream. Breakfast is served. “My friends call me a sugar pusher because of those stickers,” Massow says in a voice that has the deep lilt of a sassy bartender. She sees herself as more of a cardamom pusher — she adds the spice to her vanilla as a nod to her

22

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june 27-july 3, 2013

Swedish grandmother’s recipe for cardamom coffee cake — or a local pusher or a farm pusher. “We have so much around here,” she says. “I went to Eudora to pick strawberries. I’ll go to Lexington for peaches. And I’m making my mint flavors by steeping mint, from local farmers, in milk.” Massow was laid off from her filmmarketing position in December 2011. She wryly notes that she lost her job on the Monday after an Office Space–themed party. She knew she didn’t want to return to a desk, so at first she filled her time volunteering at Cultivate Kansas City’s Gibbs Road Farm and taking beekeeping classes at Johnson County Community College. By then, she says, she had already begun a “personal agricultural renaissance.” What started as a tomato plant on her West Plaza condo patio had evolved over six years to a sprawling backyard garden in Mission with raised beds, berry bushes and fruit trees. When a life coach recommended that she talk with several area food producers, Massow interviewed Jan Knobel and Elaine Van Buskirk, the sisters who run the Upper Crust Bakery, and Brian Jurgens, the bearded barista behind the wheel at CoffeeCakeKC. Massow bought a used ice-cream mixer on

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eBay and launched H & C Ice Cream, named for her wheaten terriers, Harold and Clover. Massow makes batches Sunday nights in a downtown commissary, 96 ounces at a time. She doesn’t use stabilizers: ingredients (sometimes called emulsifiers) such as guar gum and gelatin, which manufacturers add to reduce iciness and increase shelf life. The base for nearly all of her flavors includes fair-trade organic sugar, organic half-and-half and organic eggs. Her creations then set for two days in the freezer before she packs the ice cream on Tuesdays for the Lee’s Summit farmers market Wednesday morning and Waldo’s later that afternoon. For now, Massow keeps the ice cream cold using freezer bags wrapped in ice inside the coolers; she expects that she’ll have to start using dry ice when the temperature climbs. “Somebody asked for a gallon the other day, but I’m not Breyers,” Massow says. “People need to realize ice cream is not an everyday thing. You shouldn’t have a gallon of ice cream every night.” The most popular size is that 5-ounce mini, though she also sells pints and half pints. In just the first few weeks since opening, marketgoers have asked her to work on sugarfree and dairy-free options. There’s already a vegan berry, made with organic almond milk,

Massow hopes to keep Kansas City cool this summer. organic blue agave, fresh strawberries, organic coconut milk and vanilla. Massow doesn’t want someone’s dietary restrictions to stop them from enjoying ice cream. “My niece has celiac disease and she misses what she can’t have anymore. I just want to re-create what people could have before,” she says. She also doesn’t want to dilute her product to lower production costs. “I’m not going to hem and haw with a farmer,” she says. “I respect what they do, and in that respect I’m willing to pay their price. I feel like, so far, people have respected that this is a smallbatch product and there’s a cost associated with that.” She hopes to break even within the first two years of her business, and for now she’s supporting herself and her company with part-time jobs at Williams-Sonoma and an accounting firm. But she’s looking at moving into a brick-and-mortar space or upgrading to a food truck. In the meantime, she just tries to keep H & C firing on all four cylinders.

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helsea Williams is performing again. You can see her most days at 500 Walnut, in the building that’s still called the Gillis Opera House. Williams is a pastry chef, not a soprano, and the luxurious Gillis burned down in 1925. But a stipulation in Mary Troost’s will requires that any building on the property, which she donated to the city, must include some kind of stage, so somewhere there’s a little riser in the Opera House Food & Coffee Emporium (though you’d be hard-pressed to find it). But Williams’ food is arguably the star. She has been one of the metro’s most popular dessert makers for years, and for the seven-month-old Opera House Food & Coffee Emporium, she makes scones, cookies and granola-style “Star bars.” She does this in an exhibition-style space (“It’s sort of like a greenhouse,” she says) that gives her much more personal interaction with her customers than she has ever had before. Williams also sells her sweets to local coffeehouses, including the three Roasterie Cafés, Oddly Correct, the Broadway Roasting Co., Espresso ala Carte, and the Nature’s Own store at 43rd Street and Main. “I feel strongly about creating good products for them because there seems to be a dearth of good baked goods in other coffee venues,” she says. It’s a long way from her gig as the “potato girl” at Putsch’s Cafeteria, when she was 15 years old and her duties included scooping mashed potatoes and “putting in the divot for the gravy.” Two years later, at 17, she was working in the kitchen at Stanford & Son’s restaurant in Westport. Her culinary career was officially launched. There have been other careers: After leaving a traditional college, Williams earned a massage-therapy degree from a Colorado school in the early 1980s. She set up a practice in Kansas City but recalls that the profession

Williams dreams bigger than cupcakes. was, at the time, still beset by “a perception of, let’s say, seediness.” She adds, “I thought I would enjoy that kind of work, but I didn’t like it.” She then spent five years living and working as an organic farmer but preferred the image to the job. I first met Williams in 1986, when we were both working at a Greek restaurant in midtown. She was in the kitchen; I was a waiter. We endured the temperamental owner differently. She bit her tongue or sneaked out to the parking lot and cried. I was fired. Often. I lost touch with Williams for many years before she turned up as the chef and “sweat equity partner” at the Crossroads creperie Chez Elle, in 2010. The partnership with the restaurant’s owner, Ellen Trakas, was shortlived, though, and the next time I saw Williams, she was the baker for the Green Acres Market in Briarcliff Village. Today, she seems to have figured out how to thrive as a freelance baker, though she remains a part-time employee at the Opera House. “I’m really into making retro cookies for my coffeehouse clients,” Williams says. “Nobody makes hermit cookies anymore — you know, those moist, soft and spicy old-fashioned cookies. And iced sugar cookies. Not the stiff ones that some places offer but a soft, sour-cream version that you can really sink your teeth into. Very bad for you but so good.” (Ask her about cupcakes, though, and she sighs. “People still seem to love them, and I get requests for them all the time, but I don’t really like them myself.”) Williams still has dreams of opening her own bakery. “I’m a little fearful,” she says. “I’ve had a couple of failures. That makes you wary. But I love baking so much that I’ve never really put away that dream.”

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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25

STREETSIDE

ON THE LOCAL

Grand Marquis’ new album; Kill Devil Club

D AV ID HUDN A L L

residencies; Louder Than Bombs returns.

F

ollowing a successful Kickstarter campaign, Blues and Trouble, the new album from old-school swing, jazz and jump-blues local act Grand Marquis, sees the light of day this week. The five-piece is celebrating twice: once with a show on the official release date (Tuesday, June 25) at Westport’s excellent new record store, Mills Record Co., and more grandly on Friday, June 28, at Knuckleheads Saloon. “The Knuckleheads show should be really big and fun,” lead singer and sax player Bryan Redmond told us recently, as the band was driving to Dodgeville, Wisconsin, to play in the town’s summer concert series. “Playing after us is the RUF’s Blues Caravan, which has Bart Walker and some other great blues artists in it. Walker’s a cat from Nashville — he’s kind of a rising star in the blues world. We got to know him a few years back at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis.” Grand Marquis will be back on the road pretty quickly after the release show — the band is touring pretty hard this summer. “It’s almost perpetual,” Redmond said. “Omaha, Des Moines, Minneapolis, Wisconsin, the upper peninsula of Michigan are all coming up.” Are many of the gigs civic events like the one in Dodgeville? “Yeah, we do a fair amount of those types of shows,” Redmond said. “It’s a good fit for our music. It’s clean for kids. Grandparents like it. It’s kind of a unifying type of music. Plus, it’s nice not to have to worry about door charges at clubs and things like that.” If you can’t meet Grand Marquis out on the road, you can find the band doing its Thursday residency at Jazz: A Louisiana Kitchen on 39th Street. They’ve held the gig for a jaw-dropping 14 years now. “Yeah, hard to believe,” Redmond said. “I was 21 — early 1999 — when we started there. It’s like home. I don’t want to call it a practice because we are very much performing at those shows. But it’s kind of like inviting people into

BY

the night musically with neighboring genres of their active years: Britpop, post-punk, new wave, punk punk, as well as some anachronisms and why nots.” They’re only doing six this summer, and two have already happened. The next one is July 11, then July 25, August 8 and August 22. Thursdays all. Morrissey fans, note: not Sundays.

W

our living room. Especially later in the night when it’s looser and we can try new songs out. Jazz is where we cut our teeth on the new songs for this new record, for sure. Playing there is about as real as it gets with the Grand Marquis.”

S

peaking of residencies: the Kill Devil Club — the most non–Power & Light bar in the Power & Light District, specializing in cocktails and jazz — has been adding some to its calendar. Two are actually coming to a close this week, but there’s still time to roll by and get a feel. Making Movies’ Afro-Cuban, jazzy side project, the Making Movies Social Club, is playing consecutive Wednesdays, June 26 and July 3. The group invites special-guest local players, such as Hermon Mehari, Mark Lowrey and Julia Haile, to join in during its sets. Also wrapping up a Kill Devil residency is producer-percussionist Brandon Draper. He’s there this Thursday, June 27, for his final show, Bass Trap. It’s a collaboration with Steve Molitz, a founding member of Particle who has toured with Phil Lesh and others. “My format has been improvisational dance music, with guests each week, including John Brewer [keyboardist], Zach Rizer [bassist] and Leonard Dstroy [turntablist],” Draper says. “I

Residents association: Grand Marquis (left) and Draper play drums, guitar, bass, vocals, percussion, and LiveLoop to create DJ-style music in a variety of genres.” He’s not bothered by the P&L location. “I really like the venue,” he says. “Kill Devil is a block from the P&L open mall, and on Thursday evening it’s not your typical P&L crowd in there at all. The only reason I’m not continuing it [the residency] is that I’m traveling and booked most of July and August. The residency has helped me hone in on a few new details for my solo live show.”

L

ouder Than Bombs, the Smiths-themed DJ night, has returned to the Union. The party — arguably generous language for what happens when people stand around drinking and listening to the Smiths — started at El Pueblito, the little Mexican restaurant on Southwest Boulevard. Then it moved into some warehouse spaces, into Westport, back into warehouse spaces, and is now back in Westport. Says Iggy Romeu (also known as DJ Norrit): “We obviously play some Smiths, some Morrissey, and focus on filling out the rest of

hat you can do Sunday is take in a toast to the music of the Rolling Stones at the Sonic Spectrum Tribute Series at RecordBar. Participating in the hero worship are the Cody Wyoming Deal (which a few years back performed a much-loved set at Crosstown Station, where it covered Exile on Main Street from front to back); the Empty Spaces, whose pared-down ’60s-rock vibe should serve them well at this show; and two groups formed for just this occasion (one includes members of Dream Wolf and Molly Picture Club; the other features members of Drew Black and Dirty Electric and the Latenight Callers). “The set lists are diverse and hitting a lot of deep cuts,” says organizer Robert Moore. In July, the theme is Dealer’s Choice, an annual birthday show for Moore in which he handpicks the artists and set lists. Beyond that, final Sundays of the month at RecordBar are odes to Cheap Trick (in August), the Who (in September) and the Cramps (in October). “I’m extremely happy with it,” Moore says of the tribute series, which has been going for more than two years. “We have given a good amount of money to Midwest Music Foundation to aid musicians. And it’s brought together many musicians who have never collaborated before, which is a great testament to the open support and strength of the Kansas City scene.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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27

MUSIC

RIOT GIRLZ

With Booty Jamz, Madeline Farrell and Wilson Vance have turned

BY

Wednesdays at the Riot Room into one of the city’s hottest parties.

L E S L IE K I N S M A N

W

hen Madeline Farrell and Wilson Vance took over as Wednesday-night DJs at the Riot Room a year ago March, their rap- and R&B-themed night at first had “a really intimate house-party vibe,” Farrell says. These days, not so much. Every week, a huge, diverse crowd swells and bobs on the Riot Room’s patio. Bodies bounce to tracks like “Blow the Whistle” by Too Short, “Ayy Ladies” by Travis Porter, “Are You That Somebody” by Aaliyah, and “Like Whaaat” by Problem. Marilyn Manson stopped in one night. In October, Tech N9ne went onstage to tell Farrell and Vance that he dug the vibe and to keep doing what they’re doing. They plan to. The Pitch sat down with the duo last week to talk about the growing popularity of the party, a woman’s right to shake her ass, and what exactly qualifies as a booty jam. The Pitch: Can you describe the first night of Booty Jamz? Farrell: The first one that I did, I did solo. It was February 1, and it was inside and didn’t go very well. I did one more and I think maybe five people showed up. I was confused because I was playing really good music, but not a lot of people were coming out. So I decided I needed someone fresh, and that’s when Wilson came in. That was in March, and a lot of our friends showed up. It had a really intimate house-party vibe. It wasn’t until the summer that it became a block-party vibe. Farrell: We don’t really get included in a The Pitch: Do you think that’s a reflection of lot of the women DJ nights or girl DJ nights, which is fine. I would rather be considered a what you play? Vance: Yes, and we try to cater to women. We DJ on my own, nongendered. try to make women feel comThe Pitch: When did you fortable dancing and safe, start DJing? Booty Jamz because it is so crowded. Farrell: I actually started Wednesdays on the Riot There’s definitely been an DJing for KKFI back in 1999, Room patio. Cover is $3 for emphasis, I hate to say this, so I came from a radio backmen, free for women. but on girl power. Mostly ground. Then, a few years making sure women feel safe later, I started DJing at Karma and playing maybe more female-empowering with Jacob Sharp for a night called “Don’t Stop songs, which I think is vital. the Rock.” When Karma closed down, I didn’t The Pitch: But at the same time, you do play have any regular gigs. I got a call from the manager at the Riot Room in January 2012. They some hood shit. Farrell: For sure. I’ve DJed with a lot of guys needed someone to fill in for their Wednesday before, and they tend to play a lot of music night, and I decided to do an R&B and rap night. that you can just bob your head to. And what The Pitch: How did you two meet each other? we play is music that you dance to with your Vance: It’s a small town. I would always go to whole body. You can just get real loose. There’s Madeline’s DJ nights and kind of backseat DJ. definitely a lot more emphasis on movement. I’d let her know what I wanted to hear. I knew We’re careful about selecting those kinds of what I wanted to dance to as a girl, listening to songs. There are a lot of really good rap songs hip-hop or rap. So I think that’s probably why that we just won’t play because they aren’t a she thought of me. booty jam. They don’t have emphasis on havThe Pitch: Who came up with the name? ing fun or hanging out with your friends or Farrell: I had actually used the name Booty getting inebriated. Jamz before, with Jacob Sharp way back in The Pitch: How do you feel about being identi- 2007. It was whenever the smoking ban happened. We had a couple of good nights there. fied as a woman DJ in Kansas City? 28

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this in,” and she’s like, “I need to play some Bone Thugs!” And I’ll be like, “I just want to play some E-40!” But then there’s been tons of time when you [turns to Vance] have suggested songs that I didn’t think were going to be really big, and then all of a sudden they blew up. You have a great ear for that. The Pitch: So sometimes it’s about the people. Vance: It’s about reading the crowd. Farrell: Yeah, it’s all about reading the crowd and figuring out what they’re going to get hyphy on. Vance: Once you have a good vibe going, keeping it is the hardest part. Once you have people dancing, it can be stressful to maintain. But people love middle-school jams. People are like, “Oh I haven’t heard this song since I was 13!” The Pitch: So should we define what a booty jam is? Vance: A booty jam is something that you can’t help but shake your ass to. Farrell: And we may get shit-talked on us for how we DJ, but it’s worked out really well for us, and we’ve proven it by how popular we are on Wednesday nights. When we first started out, we got a little crap for being white, but that easily got squashed. We just play what we love. The stuff that we play is what I listen to at home. Vance: Yeah, it’s not meant to be ironic.

Farrell (top left) and Vance (top right) queue up bangers for the ladies. The last night we did it was when the smoking ban started, so that just kind of killed it for us at McCoy’s. I had to put it on the shelf. The Pitch: Madeline, why did you decide that you needed a partner? Farrell: For me, because I had been DJing for so long, it had started to become formulaic. I didn’t want to do the same thing, where you see a DJ and they just play the same 10 songs over and over again every week, and they look so bored when they’re doing it. I definitely wanted somebody who liked to dance. And that’s where Wilson was so essential to helping me out. She just brought a really good face and a really good attitude. The Pitch: It’s a good dynamic. Farrell: Yeah, I’ll turn to Wilson all the time and ask her what I should play next, and she always has a good answer. Vance: Yeah, we both do that. Sometimes Madeline is feeling it a little harder than I am and vice versa. We’re a really good team. The Pitch: Do you ever disagree on what to play? Farrell: Yeah, sometimes. Like toward the end of the night, I’ll be like, “I want to work

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT TRUMPET SUMMIT AT THE BLUE ROOM

I’ve told Mike Metheny more than once that there aren’t enough opportunities to hear him play. Whether he’s on trumpet or his magical EVI (Electronic Valve Instrument, introduced to him by little brother Pat), or whether he’s blowing lyrical solos on a standard or the inventive lines of his own compositions, Metheny’s jazz performances are a rare Kansas City treat. This weekend, he holds court with two other KC jazz-trumpet masters: Stan Kessler and Hermon Mehari. Back that trumpet trio with T.J. Martley on piano, Gerald Spaits on bass and Brian Steever on drums. Now you have Trumpet Summit, spanning jazz traditional and eclectic, Saturday at the Blue Room. — LARRY KOPITNIK Trumpet Summit, 8:30 p.m.–12:30 a.m. Saturday, June 29, at the Blue Room (1600 East 18th Street, 816-474-2929).

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6/20/13 2:29 PM

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

Futurebirds

Athens, Georgia’s Futurebirds is a stonerfriendly kind of alt-country band: lots of noodling, reverb, open jams, and usually a pedal steel crying in the back of the mix. At Middle of the Map, the group covered “Wicked Game” by Chris Isaak; I always kind of liked that song, but I think I like it more now. Nashville’s Diarrhea Planet is enjoying some blog hype at the moment for its fiery live shows. The group plays ragged pop-punk that’s not quite as ugly as its name suggests; underneath all the squalor are hooks and melodies. With Spirit Is the Spirit. Tuesday, July 2, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Imagine Dragons

Few bands in recent memory have exploded as quickly and as thoroughly as Imagine Dragons, an alt-rock act that you possibly are hearing about for the first time. Selling a million copies of a record is a pretty rare feat in this day and age, but the Las Vegas group’s 2012 debut album, Night Visions, went platinum last week. How? Imagine Dragons plays it pretty savvy with the influences. Its big hit, “Radioactive,” is like a Coldplay song with faint dubstep mannerisms. Its other big hit, “It’s Time,” transi-

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J U N E 2 7

James McMurtry, with the Bottle Rockets

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros tions from Mumford stomps into Killers-style synth pop. The album may as well have been created in a payola radio laboratory, but I’ve heard far worse on modern rock dials. Friday, June 28, at Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, 816-363-7827)

Tree Frog

In the 1970s, Tree Frog was a popular Lawrence-based, country-rock band with a sound similar to the Flying Burrito Brothers; the Byrds; and Crosby, Stills and Nash. Tree Frog toured nationally, had some regional success, but never got signed and was kaput by the time Reagan entered office. But the members (only one of them still lives in Lawrence) reunite every couple of years and play a show for the old fans. This is one of those shows. Saturday, June 29, at Liberty Hall (644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972)

Alejandro Escovedo, with Los Lobos and Los Lonely Boys

It’s possible that Alejandro Escovedo is such a cool dude, he’s tight with scene musicians in dozens of towns in the United States. But it’s just as likely that the reason he comes up from Austin once or twice every year is because he likes KC’s scene and the people in it more than those of other towns. Here, the roots-rock

F O R E C A S T

30

Other shows worth seeing this week.

singer-songwriter is bringing along some big Latin names: Los Lobos and Los Lonely Boys. That’s un gran espectáculo! Muy bueno! Saturday, June 29, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

Marilyn Manson and Alice Cooper

Alice Cooper pioneered shock rock in the 1970s by murdering chickens and staging fake executions onstage. Marilyn Manson took up the mantle in the 1990s with his industrial-metal songs full of drug references, anti-religion messages and — my favorite — the obviously false rumor that he had one of his ribs removed so he could suck his own dick. Today, neither performer’s shtick seems especially scary, but they both still have plenty of devotees. The two have wisely linked up this summer for the Masters of Madness Tour. Prediction: lots of black T-shirts, eye makeup and people on Ecstasy. Thursday, June 27, at Cricket Wireless Amphitheater (633 North 130th Street, Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400)

BY

The son of novelist Larry McMurtry, singersongwriter James McMurtry has inherited his father’s gift for storytelling; the eye for detail and the ear for wordplay common to his Americana tunes are literary to the core. He’s paired here with the Bottle Rockets, contemporaries of Uncle Tupelo and the Jayhawks in the early ’90s Midwestern alt-country scene. Wednesday, July 3, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

Grouplove

One upside of the implosion of the Kanrocksas Music Festival is that a lot of the bands have rescheduled at various venues in town. This Grouplove show at the Power & Light District has the added bonus of being free. The band’s bright-eyed indie pop is polished and melodic, like a glossier version of the first MGMT album. With Middle Class Rut and Robert DeLong. Friday, June 28, at the KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District (14th Street and Grand, 816-842-1045)

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros

A post-“Home” hit has proved elusive for this band of fake hippies. Perhaps they will land one on their new, self-titled album, out next month? We’ll find out soon. In the meantime, Sharpe and his cronies are continuing to tour like mad and return to Crossroads for a Saturday evening of folk-inflected Sixties throwback tunes. Saturday, June 29, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

..............................................................Cult Vibe

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.............................................................. Hot Girls

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june 27-july 3, 2013

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Greg Bates: 7 p.m. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand.

F R I D AY, J U N E 2 8 The Depth & Whisper, John Velghe & His Prodigal Sons, Adam Marsland: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Mike Dillon Band: The Brick, 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Grand Marquis CD-release show: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Yeasayer, Reptar: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

S AT U R D AY, J U N E 2 9 Daughtry: 7:30 p.m. Kansas Star Arena, 777 Kansas Star Dr., Mulvane, 316-719-5000. Colt Ford: 7 p.m. Kearney Amphitheater at Jesse James Park, 3001 N. Missouri 33, Kearney, 816-903-4730. Mewithoutyou, Rocky Votolato, Auctioneer: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

S U N D AY, J U N E 3 0 Anthony Hamilton, Dave Hollister: 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Bill Payne, Tracing Footsteps: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

M O N D AY, J U LY 1 Maylene & the Sons of Disaster, Icarus, the Owl, American Ghouls, Hot Knives: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Rocket Summer: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

T U E S D AY, J U LY 2 Jeff Black: 6 p.m. The Corbin Theatre, 15 N. Water St., Liberty, 816-407-9117. Dark Star Orchestra: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. Radius Clause, No Bragging Rights: 6:30 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 3 Bret Michaels: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454.

FUTURECAST J U LY THURSDAY 4 Fourth of July, Hospital Ships: Replay Lounge, Lawrence SUNDAY 7 Tim McGraw: Kansas Star Arena, Mulvane WEDNESDAY 10 John Mayer, Needtobreathe: Cricket Wireless Amphitheater, Bonner Springs FRIDAY 12 Buckcherry: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District SATURDAY 13 Ian Anderson: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts FRIDAY 19 One Direction: Sprint Center THURSDAY 25 Cody Simpson, Before You Exit, Ryan Beatty: The Midland

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EAR CANDY?

JAZZ/LOUNGE

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with James “Fuzzy” West, 5:30 p.m.; The Jazz Disciples with Lisa Henry and Will Matthews, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jimmy Dykes & The Blisstonians, 4 p.m.; Max Groove Trio, 7-11 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Joe Cartwright Trio, 5:30 p.m.; Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816877-8312. Sons of Brasil, 10 p.m. MORE The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 4 p.m.; Joe DeFio, 5 p.m.; S Bram Wijnands, Barry Springer and G IN T IS L AT Tommy Ruskin, 7 p.m. INE ONL The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., M O .C H C IT P 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; Eboni & the Ivories, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Broken String, 8 p.m.

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. A Tribute to Rock and Roll Series: Wonderfuzz does Led Zeppelin, 7 p.m., free. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Coitus, Instant Karma, The Way Back, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Jamaican Queens, 1,000,000 Light Years, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Kilmaat, Sequoia, Plague. Tell the Others, 8 p.m.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Rich Berry. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Blue Orleans, 8 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 7 p.m.

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CLUB

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Andrew Bruns Band, the After Party, 9 p.m.

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Drunkard’s Dream, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. The Horsebite Tears, Old Fangled, 6-9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Bryant Carter Band, the Silver Maggies, Lance Pollard, 7 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

COVERS

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Makusa, 7 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Ron Gutierrez & Michael Pagan, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Ruskin Quartet, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. KU Jazz Combo I. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brandon Draper and Steve Molitz, 9 p.m.

Argosy Casino: 777 N.W. Argosy Pkwy., 816-746-3100. Souled Out. Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. The Transients. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Radio Flyers. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Thin Ice, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Kevin Hiatt, 7:30 p.m. Paul and Jack’s Tavern: 1808 Clay, North Kansas City, 816221-9866. Cherry Bomb.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

Sign up for MUSIC NEWSLETTER

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Underground Railroad with Nelson-El, 10 p.m.

T H U R S D AY 2 7

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

Need some

HIP-HOP/RAP

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Sarah Potenza and Matt Stell, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. M-Bird Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

F R I D AY 2 8 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Abandon Kansas, Behold the Brave, Attic Wolves, 6:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Origins, Population Not, Underwater Knife Fight, Seasons of Pain, Wuzz, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Ex-Cult, the Gospel Truth, Jocks, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Savoy, LeoNightUs, 8 p.m.; Traindodge, Self Evident, Ghost Town Heart, Sundiver, 8 p.m.; Showbaby, 11:59 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. The Reverend Jimmie Bratcher. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Valentine and the Ticklers, 7 p.m. Juicy’s Burgers & Spirits: 8680 N.W. Prairie View Rd. Briar, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jeff Bergen’s Elvis show, 7 p.m.; Bart Walker, JoAnne Shaw Taylor & Jimmy Bowskill, 10 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus Trio, 6:30 p.m.; Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Old No. 5’s.

VA R I E T Y The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Trivia, 6 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Brain Food, the Phantastics. Kick Comedy Theater: 4010 Pennsylvania. Grasshopper, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Big Goody Girls Burlesque, 6:30 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 9 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Clairaudients CD-release show with We Are Voices and Not a Planet, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Melting Point of Bronze, Vomit Assault, Dismantle the Virus, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Basement. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Insanitones, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Dreamwolf, Darkside of the Force, Deco Auto, Scene of Irony, 9:45 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Jeff Nelson & the Secrets.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. James Armstrong, 9 p.m.; Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Big 3, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Coyote Bill, 7 p.m.

Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Maria the Mexican, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Josh Vowell Band, 5:30 p.m.; Blue 88, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Ben Miller Band. Uncle Bo’s: 420 E. Sixth St., Topeka, 785-234-5400. Michael Charles, 8:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. My Six Gun Heart, 8 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Black Wall Monument, Last Night’s Regret, Branded Fate, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Shannon & the Clams, Nude Beach, Dean Monkey and the Dropouts, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Antennas Up, In the Back of a Black Car, Brain Food, 8 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Digital Ass with Montyill, Maxx Groovez, Panduh!, Disco Fortress, Jawhn Le Cock, Dantwom, Syrian Burlesque Squad, 9 p.m. Qudos Cigar & Cognac Bar: 1116 Grand, 816-474-2270. Grown & Sexy Saturdays.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. KC Trumpet Summit with Mike Metheny, Stan Kessler and Hermon Mehari, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Karl McComas-Reichl & Peter Schlamb Trio, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands, Barry Springer and Tommy Ruskin, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Mark Lowrey with Pablo Sanhueza and Patrick Alonzo Conway, 8 p.m.

COVERS Argosy Casino: 777 N.W. Argosy Pkwy., 816-746-3100. Souled Out. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Blue Oyster Culture Club. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Dolewite. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Cherry Bomb. Paul and Jack’s Tavern: 1808 Clay, North Kansas City, 816221-9866. Salem Road.

S U N D AY 3 0 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Tribute Series: The Rolling Stones, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Oarsman, the Adopted, 7 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Revolver.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Sam Vega, Captain Ahab & the Narwhals, Flight, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Schwervon!, Pale Hearts and Organ Loaners, 10 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sky Smeed, Cowgirl’s Trainset, 6-9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rich Berry. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Lauren Anderson, 9 p.m.

M O N D AY 1 JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Arny Young. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m.

The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Slaughter Movie House: Collapse, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Karaoke with Baby Brie, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton open mic and jam session, 8 p.m.; Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2

a

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Yellowbricks, Daniel Ouellette and the Shobijin, Attic Light, 7:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Pacific Dub, Root & Stem, We Were Born in Babylon, 10 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Greg Meise Jazz Duo, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Paul Shinn Trio, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Open jam with El Barrio Band, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ Open Blues Jam, 8 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Open jam with the Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Ensemble Tuesdays — R&B jam and open mic, 7 p.m.

check out FIND

HAPPY HOURS

time, feature,ONname or location YOUR BY

IPHONE/BLACKBERRY/ANDROID

W E D N E S D AY 3 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Lightning Swords of Death, Valdur, Stonehaven, Reign of Lies, 8 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Freedom Fest with Kadayne, Drek and Take the Day.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Making Movies Social Club, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Mr. & the Mrs., Fake Fancy, Herr Trolldick, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Dom Chronicles, Brett Gretzky, John Price, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Devin Henderson’s Mind Madness, 7:30 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. Humpday Comedy Night, 9 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

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33

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Frustrated Lady Earnestly Enquires Today Dear FLEET: “Women need to understand that

our sexualities change throughout life,” says Dr. Leah Torres, a general obstetrician-gynecologist. “Menopause can be tricky, but one can adapt to changes. There are medications and lubricants and all sorts of tricks.” But what about the enemas, Doc? “The enemas are not harmful as long as they are not painful, though the practice may change the balance of bacteria that normally live in the colon and make one more susceptible to changes in bowel movements,” she says. If it would really kill you if your doc figured it out, how about a white lie? Mention that you’re administering enemas to yourself, leaving the masturbate-as-you-expel bit out, and ask your doc if that’s a problem. “She can ask her doctor an ‘innocent’ question like, ‘When I feel constipated, I give myself an enema. Is that dangerous?’ ” Torres says. “No need to mention masturbation, and the doctor’s answer may allay her other concerns.”

Dear Dan: My mother cannot find her clit. I’m se-

rious. She’s 80 years old, quite fit and otherwise anatomically correct, but she noticed about a week back that she couldn’t find her clit. She went to her gyno and told him, and he didn’t seem shocked. She isn’t sexually active, but she’d like to keep as many of her original parts as she can. I couldn’t find much online about missing clits.

Help My Mother Find Her Clit Dear HMMFHC: “It is normal for the vagina,

and the parts within and around the vagina, to atrophy with age,” Torres says, because “women who have gone through menopause have very little estrogen.” But there’s one thing that doesn’t happen. “Women do not ‘lose’ their clitorises,” she says. “The majority of the clitoris is located inside the body, but women recognize the

34

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‘clitoral glans’ as the clitoris. This may become smaller with age. But it never goes away.”

Dear Dan: My husband and I both hit 40 this

year. We were kinky from the start, became involved in the BDSM community in our 20s, and found ourselves in a poly relationship before we knew that was an option. After years of struggling with polycystic ovary syndrome, I had a hysterectomy a couple of years ago, and I’ve had a hard time getting regulated with hormone replacement. There was bodily trauma with my surgery, and I’ve been trying to be patient in getting back to my sexual self, but it’s been a struggle. I have no interest anymore in kink, and I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around how I could go from being a pain slut to not even liking to have my hair pulled. I also don’t have the driving need for sex that I used to. I haven’t had luck talking to my OB-GYNs. If I’m not having hot flashes, in their opinion, I shouldn’t mess with it. My boyfriend has been supportive, but my husband, whose girlfriend is menopause age and a nympho, sees my lack of interest as a lack of interest in him.

Too Young to Be Old Dear TYTBO: “Society makes talking about

sex taboo, and that taboo can invade the clinic room and adversely affect the doctor-patient relationship,” Torres says. If your docs are unwilling to discuss and prioritize your sex life — and your sexual fulfillment and your sexual relationships ��� you need to get new OB-GYNs. “If a patient comes to me with changes in sexual function that concern her and she wants addressed,” Torres says, “it is the same as if she came to me with ‘it hurts right here, Doc.’ Having a hysterectomy often includes removing the ovaries, which is equivalent to inducing menopause. Even if you still have your ovaries, their function may be affected. This can affect the libido or have no effect whatsoever. After major surgery, particularly after a difficult and prolonged recovery, people may not enjoy sex the same way they used to. For this woman, pain may now be associated with the struggle to recover as opposed to orgasm. “There are options other than female hormone replacement therapy for treating hypoactive sexual desire,” Torres continues, “and it may be a good idea to consult a specialist in sexual health.” Torres blogs at leahtorres.com. The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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