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august 22-28, 2013

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A U G U S T 2 2–2 8 , 2 0 1 3 | V O L . 3 3 N O . 8 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Danny Alexander, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

A developer says the De Soto School District likes his housing development. The superintendent disagrees.

A R T

P R O D U C T I O N

Savings start in your home. A leaky toilet can waste up to 10,000

B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

gallons of water a year — enough

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Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkin Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

You could have a pool.

SAY WHAT?

to fill up a backyard swimming pool. Don’t be all wet.

C OM I N G AT T RAC T ION S

Call 816.561.1061, ext.135,

A D V E R T I S I N G

or visit bridgingthegap.org

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Page Olson, Brooke Swenson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

for more information.

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

WaterWorks!

Screenland Armour’s operators prepare and the next Crossroads theater. BY J U S T I N K E N DA L L

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

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D I S T R I B U T I O N

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F OLK HE RO SXSW co-founder Louis Meyers puts down roots in KC with Folk Alliance International.

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QUESTIONNAIRE

STALK US! WE DARE YOU

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KATHY HANIS

Owner of Entertainment Plus PR & Talent

Hometown: Kansas City. Lived in L.A. for 10 years, and I miss it. Love the ocean and the energy.

Current neighborhood: Westwood, Kansas and talent agent. I pitch clients and arrange interviews and book talent for commercials or feature films.   What’s your addiction? Thrift shopping   What’s your game? KU basketball. Love watching college ball, March Madness and the Final Four. Great players and coaches. And I love the game of basketball!

What’s your drink? Champagne! Where’s dinner? When I am not cooking at

SALON the new york times bestseller

from the writers of (500) Days of summer

home, you can find me at Lidia’s, Le Fou Frog, Story, Pandolfi’s Deli, Grünauer, Thai Orchid, Em Chamas, Café Cedar, Jasper’s, Anthony’s, Johnny Jo’s Pizzeria, Murray’s Ice Cream, RJ’s Bob-Be-Que, and Happy Gillis.   What’s on your KC postcard? Kansas Jayhawks, George Brett, Tom Watson, Buck O’Neil, Peregrine Honig, the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, the Kauffman family, Lamar Hunt, the Kansas City Chiefs, Len Dawson, Crosby Kemper, the Elders, McFadden Brothers and family, Gina and Chloe, Jennifer Janesko, Sporting KC, The Wizard of Oz, Guy’s Potato Chips, Gates Bar-B-Q Sauce and Charlie Podrebarac’s Cowtown.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” Let’s say, Jim Leedy, the legendary

artist, got it right when he created the idea and collaborated with Suzie Aron and the Crossroads Community Association in developing the Crossroads Arts District. Leedy’s vision grew, and his dream, now a reality, developed and stabilized the Crossroads Arts District, placing Kansas City on the map as a creative crossroads that celebrates and supports the arts community.

“Kansas City needs …” To reopen a film office

© 2013 TSN VENTURES, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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that would offer producers and studios financial opportunities to shoot feature films here. Kansas City has great talent, actors, directors, producers, casting and production companies, as good as L.A. or New York or better. Shooting a feature film would have a positive financial impact on the city from hotels, restaurants, creating jobs and income, as well as recognition for our fabulous city.

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

What I do (in 140 characters): I am a publicist

“In five years, I’ll be …” On the beach in Mexico!

“I always laugh at …” Will Ferrell and Dave Chappelle

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” CBS Sunday Morning. Great way to start the week! “I can’t stop listening to …” Michael Bublé, Robin Thicke, Pitbull, Pharrell, Marvin Gaye, Bruno Mars, Al Green, the Whispers, Jack Johnson, Michael Jackson and the Beatles.

“I just read …” The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, by Nicholas Carr

The best advice I ever got: “Never ever, ever, ever, ever, give up!” — Winston Churchill

Worst advice: Do not move to Los Angeles. (I am so glad I did!)

My sidekick: GG, my dog, never leaves my side.  

My brush with fame: In my over-30-year career

in the entertainment business, I have worked with everyone from Mickey Mouse to Michael Jackson, Garth Brooks to LL Cool J. It has been a fun ride.

My 140-character soapbox: I just booked my 1 millionth interview!

My recent triumph: I was instrumental in assisting Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care in raising more than a million dollars to expand its offices and services to assist families in need of health care. The clinic provides over $1 million of charity care annually, and donations help ensure that the work of Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care continues.

NEWS

L I V E D J • N E W S O U N D S Y S T E M • PA R T Y L I G H T I N G

SAY WHAT?

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he Shawnee City Council probably expected Tony Lauer to speak against a taxincrement-financing project slated for the western part of the suburban city. Lauer is a frequent guest at Shawnee City Hall, often making open-records requests and questioning City Council members’ actions. At the council’s August 12 meeting, Lauer analyzed a TIF project — 222 townhomes at Johnson Drive and Kansas Highway 7 — that would allow a developer to skim property taxes otherwise due to the city, the school district and the county. Lauer’s conclusion: The amount of revenue that the project may generate for the city wouldn’t make up for the property taxes going to Leawood developer Hickok-Dible Companies. Lauer also argued that the TIF would shortchange the De Soto School District, formally known as USD 232. “We often talk about the state and how the state makes decisions that impact our budgets,” Lauer told the Shawnee City Council. “I would ask you to consider that when you reflect on your decision this evening. Your decision is going to adversely, or could adversely, impact USD 232.” Then something funny happened — something that neither the Shawnee City Council nor the developer’s attorney expected. Mitch Powers approached the podium, claiming to speak for himself as a resident of Shawnee. But Powers is the president of the De Soto School District Board of Education. He said he did his own analysis of the TIF and figured the project would divert $4.1 million in revenue from the district over the next 20 years. He also told the council that a consultant predicted the housing project would add 50 students to the school district. New students cost the district $10,000 apiece each year to educate. The TIF, Powers said, would adversely affect the school district by $14 million over 20 years. “As a resident and someone who is a taxpayer in the district, as someone who obviously has a vested interest in the success of the district, I’m not comfortable at all with pulling or adding a $14 million budgetary load on the USD 232 school district at this time,” Powers said. Proponents of the plan sprang into action, knowing that in Johnson County, the idea of allowing development to burden school districts does not sit well with the public. Andrew Nave, executive director of the Shawnee Economic Development Council, told the City Council that he had met with De Soto

School District Superintendent Doug Sumner, whom he claimed supported the project. “I’m a little surprised that there’s a perspective that the school district is against this,” Nave said. Curt Petersen, a Polsinelli lawyer representing the developer, told the council that he wouldn’t speak for Sumner, but then did just about that. “The leadership of the school district, which is sophisticated, it’s not like they’ve never seen this before … they decided as they weighed this all out, decided this is what’s best for the school district,” Petersen said. That statement prompted Powers to return to the podium. “The only thing I can say is, this evening at 5:30, he [Sumner] said they did not provide their support,” Powers said. “They did not oppose it. They did not provide their backing of the proposal, and it should not come as a surprise to the individuals here.” So who’s telling the truth? The Pitch called Sumner’s office to see who said what and got a return call from district spokesman Alvie Cater. Cater told The Pitch that the prospect of adding students to the district without the benefit of tax revenue puts the school district in a difficult position. “We told them we would not oppose the project, but to say that we did not have concerns is not accurate,” Cater said. The De Soto School District is particularly sensitive to property-tax income. Unlike the Blue Valley School District and the Shawnee Mission School District, there is not as much commercial development (and, in turn, commercial tax revenue) in the De Soto district. That means De Soto schools depend on property taxes from homeowners for much of the budget. School districts can ask to increase the mill levy (the rate at which property tax is charged) up to a point, according to state law. But the De Soto district has reached its limit. An increase in the mill levy in the De Soto district generates $370,000 in additional revenue, while a more developed district such as Shawnee Mission can raise more than $3 million from the same rate increase. “That’s why I think projects of this nature are more amplified for us,” Cater told The Pitch. “We would prefer to have that funding, that property tax, sooner rather than later.” Not that it mattered to the Shawnee City Council — it passed the TIF plan by a 6–2 vote.

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CO M ING ATTRACTIONS SCREENLAND ARMOUR’S OPERATORS PREPARE FOR THEIR FIRST ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL

AND THE NEXT C R OSSROADS THEATER. | BY JUSTIN KEN D A L L | PH O TOGR A PHY B Y SABRINA STA IR ES

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t’s crazy.” Adam Roberts sounds almost short of breath as he says this and then disappears behind the bar at Screenland Armour. Keeping up with him on this Sunday night behind the movie house’s bar is Brent Miller, his new brother-in-law and business partner. The room is choked with 20- and 30-somethings, here for tonight’s Breaking Bad season premiere, which is about to be projected in the historic 1928 theater’s 275-seat auditorium. They’re buying microbrews and stuffed burgers. The “Jesse’s Dirty Mac,” named for the cable series’ meth prodigy Jesse Pinkman, comes filled with bacon and cheddar. Tallgrass Brewing Co. is sponsoring the screening and giving away samples. That has been good for business behind the bar; Armour has sold out of its Tallgrass supply. “It’s the biggest one we’ve ever done,” Roberts says later of the event. “We never just sell out of everything.” When the beginning of Walter White’s end is over, everyone leaves with the phrase “tread lightly” stuck in their heads. Roberts interrupts the trance with a quick sales pitch for the theater’s Arts & Crafts Festival — 12 bands, 15 artists, eight films and 60 different craft beers — August 23 and 24. “It’s pretty much the best fucking thing since Breaking Bad,” Roberts announces. To Roberts, this isn’t hyperbole — it can’t be. The festival is a risk for Screenland, the latest in a dicey recent past. “Arts & Crafts is, for sure, our biggest gamble yet because it’s almost $10,000 that we’re going to be spending,” Roberts later tells The Pitch. “And on top of that, we’re going to be giving a lot of the profits away. Hopefully, it does well. I want to do it again next year. It’s an event that I think can keep growing and hopefully grow out of these four walls.” Over two days, Arts & Crafts is putting a lot more than the usual local beer fest inside the Armour. Starting Friday evening and picking up Saturday afternoon, the music lineup includes the Dead Girls, the Cave Girls, Hidden Pictures and the American Life. Artists will have tables at the festival, and the projector lights up for screenings of Prince Avalanche (starring Paul Rudd), Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me, Drinking Buddies (with Olivia Wilde), Grabbers (which Roberts describes as an Irish Shaun of the Dead), Good Ol’ Freda (a documentary about the Beatles’ secretary), Évocateur (a documentary on the life of “trash TV” innovator Morton Downey Jr.) and two midnight mystery movies. Some of the proceeds from ticket sales 6

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are marked for six charities: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Kansas City; Resources for Human Development Missouri; Cancervive KC; Thank You, Walt Disney; Mid-America Arts Alliance; and Midwest Music Foundation. “People have been excited about it, but I think they’re waiting to buy them [tickets] that day,” Roberts says. Two-day passes are $60 (or $25 Friday and $50 Saturday). “Most people know that we’re not going to sell something out.”

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he next day, Roberts and Miller are still riding the Breaking Bad high. “We had a crazy weekend,” Roberts says. He has curly black hair, a scruffy beard and dark-rimmed Elvis Costello glasses. “It was awesome. I think a lot of people will actually be back for it [Breaking Bad].” That would be good news for Armour, where drawing regular audiences has been one of the biggest hurdles for Roberts and Miller. “Our hardest struggle is getting people to realize that we are open seven days a week,” Roberts admits. “Hey, we do have the best equipment. We do have the coolest programming. And we’re not a basement theater. So come check this out. And that’s ongoing. Being the small guy, you’re constantly making sure people see you and are checking you out. I think Arts & Crafts is definitely going to help us do that.”

“We’ve changed it from old, meaning ’50s-style theater, to ’80s-style theater. It’s kind of retro but not old-timey.” Roberts and Miller took over the Screenland Armour in September 2012. The previous operator had given up trying to draw that elusive regular audience. Screenland founder Butch Rigby was preparing to take over the business again when the theater’s manager suggested Miller and Roberts, who had been running the theater’s trivia night. “It kind of just landed in our lap,” Roberts says. “Butch kind of just took a chance on Brent and I.” Roberts and Miller met 10 years ago, when both were involved in the Kansas City skateboarding scene. A couple of months into their

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friendship, Miller started dating Roberts’ younger sister, Amanda, and the couple married in late July this year. “We’ve kind of had that brother relationship for a decade,” Roberts says. Roberts had worked in bars and restaurants, and he and Miller talked about co-owning an establishment someday. Then the Screenland opportunity came up. “He was in it, but really it was convincing my sister to let him do it,” Roberts says. “It’s a big risk of starting your own business, and we’re both 26, 27. It’s been easy because it’s like working with your brother — a brother you don’t fight with. We also have a fight club downstairs. That’s why we don’t argue. We beat the hell out of each other once a week.” Neither man had worked in a movie theater, but Roberts spent a decade making his own short horror movies (Method and The Cramps), hard-to-stomach films in the tradition of David Lynch and David Cronenberg. “I love movies,” Roberts says. “If I can’t make movies professionally, I can show movies professionally.” On this August Monday, the day after Breaking Bad, Miller does some accounting as Roberts updates Armour’s Facebook page. Miller handles the business side at Armour, while Roberts focuses on creative ventures. Miller is mahogany-tan from his Cancún honeymoon, and he has already been up for hours. He works a 6 a.m. construction shift, then heads to Screenland for an afternoon and an evening behind the bar. By next year, he hopes to narrow things down to just the Screenland full time. “Working for somebody else has never really appealed to me,” says Miller, who wears a white V-neck T-shirt, khaki shorts and flipflops. “Now everything’s coming together.” “Keep in mind that he had to pay for a wedding and buy a house,” Roberts says. “That’s really why he has two jobs. I didn’t get married and buy a house and a car in 12 months.” “Two of the things came before the business,” Miller says. “But then the house came after, but that was necessary. I didn’t want to live here, although sometimes I feel like I do.” Their work the past 10 months has yielded visible results. “If you saw a picture of what it looked like in here until now,” Roberts says, “it’s so different.” They’ve replaced the giant chalkboard behind the bar with a pair of LED screens to display their menu and prices. Roberts points to the bottles behind the bar. “When we took over the bar, I think all of those were mixers,” he says. “There were, like, 10 bottles of real booze.”

“That fridge didn’t work at all,” Miller says. “Bottled water and bottles of domestic beer — Bud Light, Miller Lite — and Boddingtons, Boulevard and Stella,” Roberts says of the previous offerings. “No drafts.” The cooler is now stocked with 90 varieties of craft beer. The men have hung paintings of iconic movie characters and scenes: Darth Vader, a Simpsons-ized Nicolas Cage from Raising Arizona, the Reservoir Dogs cast, the DeLorean from Back to the Future. A Gremlins doll lurks above the bar. A block of classic arcade games — Tetris, Ms. Pac-Man — bleeps in the lobby. New recliners and chairs have been installed in the theater. “It’s the same four walls, the same robot, but

a little different,” Roberts says. “It’s exciting to completely design and build something up the way that we want.” Last October, they booked a string of horror movies to appeal to a younger crowd. They also did free showings of The Walking Dead on the big screen. “Every weekend having The Walking Dead was huge,” Roberts says. “And we did Doctor Who, and that was really big.” They’ve also recalibrated what retro means at Screenland: less Casablanca and more The ’Burbs. “We’ve changed it from old, meaning ’50sstyle theater, to ’80s-style theater,” Roberts says. “It’s kind of retro but not old-timey. It’s re-creating the experience of seeing something

like Labyrinth at that time or Willow, our biggest movie ever.” Roberts is serious. “Willow, to this day, is our biggest movie ever.” They started doing Sunday movie brunches. Some (The ’Burbs) worked. Some (Fast Times at Ridgemont High) bombed. There have been directors’ series. Some (Kevin Smith) worked. Others (Wes Anderson) didn’t. They started a Girls’ Night Out. They threw an Oscar party for an overflowing crowd. They brought in 30 Rock’s Judah Friedlander in February and the Whitest Kids U’Know in April. “They both went over awesome,” Roberts says. Still, Roberts can’t help a nagging thought:

Would their new venture have been an all-out bonanza if the Alamo Drafthouse hadn’t come to Kansas City just as he and Miller made their investment. “Screenland, as Butch has always done it, has been, ‘Let’s take the risks, let’s be the weird ones, let’s have those failures so we can be Kansas City’s Alamo Drafthouse,’ ” Roberts says. “Now they’re kind of the corporate guys. They’re amazing guys, but they’re not as weird as they are in Austin. We’re still weird here. “The idea behind Screenland was kind of the Alamo style, but it was never executed the way it is now,” he continues. “We’re still pretty different from Alamo, but the same crowd likes it.” For now, Roberts is convinced that the Ar-

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mour is finally reaching a 21-to-40 crowd, one that wants to watch the same horror movies and R-rated comedies that he likes. “Those are the ones that are going to come here and bring people with them and drink and stay after and play video games,” he says. “Hopefully, we grow to be most people’s theater of choice.

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t has been a bumpy year for the Screenland brand. In February, Roberts put up a Kickstarter drive with this plea: “Help Armour go digital before we go dark!” Rigby and Friedlander were among those who helped pitch donors. Armour needed enough for a down continued on page 8 august 22-28, 2013

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S TA R L I G H T IF YOU SEE JUST ONE FILM AT ARMOUR THIS WEEKEND, SEE NOTHING CAN HURT ME. BY BILL LLOYD

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Roberts: “It’s a big risk.” payment on a digital projection system, upgrading from film. When Screenland Armour opened in May 2008, it was state-of-the-art. Within a year, the theater was outdated. “It was built to top-notch specs in ’08,” Roberts says. “Unfortunately, by early ’09, digital started taking off very quickly. And by 2010, it’s, ‘OK, digital is happening.’ ” He adds: “If we didn’t get digital in here, I don’t know if we’d be here right now,” Roberts says. “We’d probably be a second-run theater, I’d bet.” “Probably down to a dollar theater,” Miller says. “Yeah, probably down to a dollar, two-dollar theater,” Roberts says. When Roberts and Miller took over, getting 35 mm prints of new films was already tough, as it can be for operations not centered on a bustling array of screens. “We couldn’t get anything,” Roberts says. “We couldn’t get Paranormal Activity. We got Taken 2 because it was a bigger movie. And it wasn’t a huge movie for us. It was like, crap — we just got here and we don’t know our audience yet. “We were running, like, a second-run theater,” he adds. “A lot of times, we’d have to wait until an AMC that was still on film ran it for two weeks in three theaters and didn’t need two prints anymore. So we’d get it two weeks later.” And by then, the film had made all the money that it was going to make. The Kickstarter exceeded its $20,000 goal; 587 backers, including actor and director Matthew Lillard, donated $30,231. “It was totally worth it,” Roberts says of the digital upgrade. “It does sound better. It does look clearer. It is brighter. I love film, but digital is what everyone is used to now.” And it has helped business. “There were times, for sure, before digital, where there were zero dollars rung in,” Roberts says. He recalls Hansel & Gretel turning Armour into a “ghost town.” Now, he says, “that never happens.” But on May 17, Screenland took another hit.

hirty years ago, Big Star records were hard to fi nd and even harder to explain when you tried to put your finger on what was so wonderful about them. Was it the crystalline sound of Chris Bell’s and Alex Chilton’s chiming guitars? Was it the glorious groove and clamor of Jody Stephens’ drums? For believers, dropping the name Big Star in conversation wasn’t some lame hipster move. It was about sharing a personal discovery. My own discovery came at a record store where I was working in the summer of 1978. A copy of the group’s second album, Radio City (1974), ended up in the “play bin” at the store, and I could finally hear what I had been reading about in Creem and Trouser Press. Radio City spoke directly to me like someone from my neighborhood. It was full of retro-pop moments that conjured the Beatles, the Who, the Kinks, the Byrds — all the sounds and styles I couldn’t get enough of. I wasn’t alone in my admiration. By the end of the 1990s, there were cover versions of Big Star songs by Cheap Trick, the Bangles and Matthew Sweet. The Replacements’ Paul Westerberg even wrote a heroworshipping anthem called “Alex Chilton.” The cult of Big Star overshadowed its initial lack of commercial success, but critical acclaim grew over time and with various reissues and repackagings. After decades of downplaying the band’s legacy, Chilton did an about-face and played some Big Star gigs along with Jody Stephens and members of the Posies. Aside from the music, the intrigue surrounding Big Star was fueled by the human story. Group founder Bell died in a car crash in 1978. Chilton succumbed to a heart attack in 2010, and original Big Star bassist Andy Hummel died just four months later, of cancer. Stephens is the group’s only surviving member. The film never skirts the group’s turbulent dynamic — the reports of drugs, the depression, the self-destructive behavior. But behind the darker side of the Big Star tale is beauty, and that’s exactly what you see in Nothing Can Hurt Me. The documentary is an engaging flow of old and new interviews, a treasure trove of rare video and photos — and, of course, the music itself, which is all still there in the grooves of the records. The songs and sounds are preserved for all to find. A Big Star record can work its magic at any time.  Nashville power-pop pioneer Bill Lloyd has recorded with Jody Stephens.

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The Crossroads theater (1656 Washington) closed, following a dispute with its landlord, who wanted to triple the theater’s rent. Rigby vowed to open another location, but the where and the when were fuzzy. “I certainly pondered the possibility that there might not be the Screenland name on a screen for some time,” Rigby admits of the brand’s earlier woes. “I always knew that we could figure out a way to get the Armour digitized. And, fortunately, Adam and Brent made that a much quicker reality. Also, fortunately, I don’t ever want to forget that we have a terrific operator of the Screenland Crown Center. “I knew we’d figure a way to keep Screenland out there,” Rigby continues. “At one point out of the 10 years did I imagine Screenland as a large circuit, maybe. But what I really envisioned it as, was just part of the Kansas City landscape.” Rigby says he’s content to manage the Screenland name and its real estate while leaving the day-to-day operations to others. “It’s hard to meet a great movie nut like all of us and be an extraordinary businessperson,” Rigby says. But he feels that he has found both in Roberts and Miller. “They love the movies, which they have to, and they’re really quite extraordinary in their business acumen.” And Rigby believes that Roberts and

he next Screenland Crossroads location will be “in the heart of the Crossroads,” Roberts says. Roberts, Miller and Rigby don’t want to give away the exact location until the paperwork is finalized. But they say the next Screenland Crossroads will open in 2014. And Roberts and Miller are going to build the new location almost from the ground up. “It’s four walls right now,” Roberts says. “It was never a theater.” The plan is to put art-house, indie and retro pictures into two smaller auditoriums. But they also want to book live events: trivia and music and comedy shows. And, of course, they mean to serve good beer on draft — more of it, they say, than any other place in the Crossroads. “Our idea down there is to have close to a hundred draft beers,” Roberts says. “Our food is going to be very different, too. It’s going to be a very West Coast wrap or burrito-type stuff.” But don’t expect to see servers in the theater. “I’m not crazy about servers in theaters,” Roberts says. “No matter how hard they try, it’s still distracting. What we’ve talked about is in-service only until the previews start.” Roberts says the Crossroads theater should fi ll the hole left by the last Screenland’s shuttering. “That’s what we’re pushing: ‘Hey, we’re the original cinema badasses. We’re the renegades in Kansas City. We’ll do whatever. We’ll show whatever. You suggest a movie to us; if it’s good and we can get it, we’ll absolutely show it here,’ ” Roberts says. “That’s a beauty of having a small local theater. We can do what we want.”

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WEEK OF AUGUST 22-28

S

IN THE NOW

o we know where we stand, let’s get this out of the way: (500) Days of Summer is the worst U.S. movie ever made without the participation of Dan

Aykroyd or Tara Reid. It is so howlingly smug and emotionally undignified that you can watch it as a freshly heartbroken heterosexual male and still not feel all that sorry for … anybody. It is such an infuriating barge of tripe that even the Hall and Oates dance sequence — the film’s sole feint toward recognizable charm — fails to please Hall and Oates fans or anger Hall and Oates haters. Nope — Joseph Gordon-Levitt jazz-handsing his way through Los Angeles in post-coital jubilation is just one more stupid thing that happens in a movie full of stupid people speaking and behaving in ways that no one really does. continued on page 15

Daily listings on page 26

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ART

SURFACING

Subterranean Gallery’s Ayla Rexroth: the exit interview

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

A

yla Rexroth never did figure out exactly how much her landlord knew. Some renters leave behind shabby paint jobs or fatally scuffed hardwoods. But a move-out inspection of Rexroth’s apartment would reveal something different: an ambitious, under-the-radar showcase for local art (as well as for Rexroth’s own projects). Until this month, the artist and her partner, Clayton Skidmore, were using their gardenlevel unit (and some adjacent basement storage space) as both a dwelling and an exhibition space. Sometimes Subterranean Gallery was exhibitionist in its presentations. There was, for instance, the 2012 Hot Tub Dialogues, which used a couple of thousand dollars of donated cash to install a secondhand Jacuzzi, so that artists and curators and a small crush of interested onlookers could share a hot art minute. Other shows were less in-your-face, though not necessarily less meta. Last November, Rexroth tested her curatorial skills with the simply titled and exceptionally canny group show Curatorial Studies. But Rexroth and Skidmore have moved out, leaving KC for New York, where she’s set to start work on an M.F.A. at Hunter College this fall. Last week, Rexroth announced a changing of the guard at Subterranean, where former intern Melaney Mitchell is assuming the director role. In the midst of packing and making arrangements, Rexroth spoke with The Pitch by phone. The Pitch: What’s the plan? Rexroth: I’m leaving on Sunday and I’m going to be driving with a minivan I’m renting. I’ll start in late January at Hunter. I’m going now to establish residency early so that I’ll have in-state tuition by the fall. What are you going to study? Combined media. The [Hunter M.F.A.] program doesn’t have a huge emphasis on social practice, but it’s kind of open media — professors working on performance and interactive stuff. How did you decide on Hunter? When I first started applying to schools, I had no idea what I wanted to major in. I considered getting an M.B.A. or maybe getting an M.A. in art history or going into a curatorial studies program. I had a pretty wide range. I applied to a couple of curatorial studies programs. Hunter turned out to be the only M.F.A. I applied to. The decision came down to curatorial studies or a master of fine arts, and I just didn’t think I could deal with the price of a curatorial studies program when the market is flooded [with curatorial hopefuls]. I feel like I saw just enough of that in people I admire — watching them get fed up waiting to find work

with the institutions — that I couldn’t make that decision. An M.B.A.? It would have definitely steered back toward art. I trust commerce more than I trust, basically, arts institutions. I guess getting an M.B.A. and using it within an arts-related business that I start or help run would be something I’d feel more control over. But I realized I’d have to take — because I went to the Art Institute, I’d have had to take a year and a half of math just to apply. I just feel like over the last three years, I’ve gained a lot of perspective in my own studio practice, in the form of curation. I suppose I just want to take in all of what New York has to offer and go back to a setting where I’m working with professional artists who are managing international careers, not just national — basically, just learning to get all around the world. Any plans to start an apartment gallery in New York? I don’t think I’m done with the concept, but I kind of feel like if I re-entered that, I’d start from a much smarter financial situation. If I opened another space or another type of business, it’d be very different. It wouldn’t be an underground business — in every sense of the word. I feel like I’ve got all the day-to-day communications stuff down [about running a business] and grew up through running the gallery and became an adult member of the arts community. What have you learned from running Subterranean? I started the space when I was a senior at KCAI. The gallery taught me how to write my first press release, and it took me two weeks to get through it. I feel so much more competent in my writing, and I feel like going to graduate school would help me continue to push that

BY

Rexroth: out of the basement and off to NYC and give me reasons to really hash out the concepts I’m working with. At the gallery, I’d end up writing about other people, and it would tie back to my interest in the context of the space: What does it mean that it’s here? For all the schools I applied to, my work at Subterranean was central to the process. I used a couple of undergrad pieces in my portfolio, but it was really about showing my works in an institutional setting. It’s all about referencing the domestic in an institutional setting. That’s related to how cities get gentrified. My gallery is the absolute common Kansas City basement that’s completely unfinished, and I’ve transformed it. The midtown basement feels iconic to me. When I go to people’s houses, I’m always like, “Can I see your basement?” Who or what did you model Subterranean on? I guess my predecessors are people like Michelle Grabner. She runs this space in the suburbs of Chicago, and she creates art objects like, for example, [the Suburban] works that are paintings on canvases, and on the back you’ll see stuff stuck to the back of the canvas, home objects. Like, this [object] was in the vicinity of the piece and it got stuck to it. She’s always questioning the line between where art should be in daily life. I’m in the same mode. The art I interact with on a daily basis makes up the ways I organize the world and plan my life. How, for instance? With Curatorial Studies, I was really feeling tongue-in-cheek about this thing I was thinking about doing. I was inherently feeling very skeptical about it. I was like, “Look, I’m studying curation.” Titling an exhibition Curatorial Studies was a pretty deadpan move. I have a group of friends who are my editors, and I send stuff to them across the country, and

pitch.com

S C O T T W IL S ON

they send me thoughtful and wonderful edits back. A couple of them, when they read my press release for that show, were like, “I don’t know about the title.” This whole process has been about me trying to find out what a curator does. I’d meet with people for a month straight, and that definition is changing so rapidly anyway: Tumblr and other kinds of things, anything you like. Has the word curate lost its currency? I just think the word has changed in meaning, unless you are the museum curator at a big institution. And those people maybe never stop laughing to themselves at people who say “curated by” on, like, band-show fliers. They all have Ph.D.s, so they may never stop laughing anyway at curatorial-studies majors. What’s still kind of private to you? I suppose my relationships with other artists are what I continue to try to grow and maintain very preciously and have a lot of respect for. Would you ever come back to work here? The program’s two years, and I need to get through that and see where I am. I’m not from Kansas City. I really like living here, so if after school I say I really want to live in a midsized city again, KC would definitely be, like, “Why not?” So Melaney is going to take over? Yes. She has all of her big furniture and is starting to move all her boxes in. She’s been interning with me for the last two years. She’s, I believe, planning to focus on arts writing. And she’s going to continue to curate exhibitions, and I’ve encouraged her to form her own conceptual dialogue that she’s interested in. I work so intuitively, and I love working with people. It has kept me so motivated. I’d love her to have that, too. We’ve worked out a mission statement. The one thing we had to keep was the name: Subterranean. What about your landlord? Actually, he doesn’t know. At least, he doesn’t let on. I went in there and paid my rent a few months ago, and a fuse had blown down here. I’d commandeered all of the nasty basement space next to the apartment. He saw that the space, that maintenance space, was very different, that it was [painted] all white. He said to his dad, “This is the girl who lives in the basement.” And they both nodded a little bit. He wrote me a good letter of recommendation for my next apartment. He called me the ideal tenant.

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FILM

FLASKHOLES continued from page 11 The two dudes who wrote (500) Days of Summer have now adapted the well-regarded YA novel The Spectacular Now for director James Ponsoldt. And though Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber are still pathologically inE R O M capable of voicing their female characters as much more than cheerT A INE ONL .COM leaders for the breakable H C PIT young men who pursue them, two things make Now worth watching. One is its look. Ponsoldt and British cinematographer Jess Hall, shooting in Athens, Georgia, have cast an American summer in sylvan gloaming. This is what bright futures look like through a hangover squint. A dim glow vibrates around the edges of the frame, and you remember what it was like to feel most alive around 4 p.m., after school and before dark. It’s not hard to see why Wally Pfister, the go-to cinematographer for Christopher Nolan, hired Hall to shoot his own first feature as a director. The other is Shailene Woodley. The 21-year-old actress, so good in The Descendants two years ago, is even better here. She’s Aimee, the shy, bookish high school girl swept into a boozy riptide by her alcoholic classmate Sutter Keely (Miles Teller, channeling a very young Richard Dreyfuss, mostly in a good way). Sutter teaches her how to hang, gives her a flask, shows her what it feels like to mistake a discontented haze for romance. Wrapped together in a gauzy shroud of shared drunkenness, they negotiate the final weeks of high school as a couple, and Aimee of course helps Sutter reach a kind of fulfillment without the inconvenience of detox, through the magic elixir of teachable forgiveness. But Woodley is so alert and

The Spectacular Now:

BY

S C O T T W IL S ON

85-proof teen angst

FILM

natural that she helps you forgive the weak writing. She alone keeps The Spectacular Now from sinking into self-pity. ■

BLUE JASMINE

W

oody Allen’s annual talent show is this year a Wizard of Oz-ing of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, with the writer-director jumbling that play’s characters, motivations and outcomes and laying them around star Cate Blanchett in an uneven mosaic. As usual the past couple of decades, the cinematography (by Javier Aguirresarobe) is lush, the screenplay awkwardly tin-eared and thin. There’s brilliant casting, but Allen has again directed performances that fall out-ofsync with one another. For Blanchett, who has played Blanche DuBois onstage (under the direction of

Allen godhead Liv Ullmann), that disconnect works. Her Jasmine, this oversimple story’s version of Blanche, thinks and speaks and moves a plane apart from everyone around her, first as their social better and then as a woman grasping to regain a hold on her crumbling sanity. It’s another of Allen’s oldfashioned characters, tailored from increasingly distant cultural memory rather than from any interactions he may have had with persons born since, say, the Beatles broke up. In Blanchett’s care, though, Jasmine becomes a three-dimensional, viscerally discomfiting figure — one confused to discover the flat falsity all around her, like someone invited to a dinner party at which the other guests are all cardboard cutouts. It’s a swell party, one thrown by Hal (Alec Baldwin, perfectly reptilian), Jasmine’s hedgefund-criminal husband. And then it’s over (we see the trip over the cliff only in flashback), and

Blanchett and Sarsgaard in Blue Jasmine Jasmine packs her Vuittons and decamps to her sister’s place in San Francisco. In California, she meets a gallery of characters hostile to pretty much every moviegoing constituency, even by Allen’s recent standards. The working poor are loud meatheads (Bobby Cannavale, wasted; Andrew Dice Clay, redeemed) and dopes (Sally Hawkins, loose-limbed and overeager as the sister). Various men of various classes (Peter Sarsgaard, Michael Stuhlbarg, Louis C.K.) disappoint without nuance or regret. Rich and not rich are equally loathsome, and no one here would fail to find some improvement in a lobotomy. No one except Jasmine, and only because Blanchett knows things about her that Allen never will. — S.W.

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PHOTOGRAPH: ANGELA BOND

CAFÉ

OFF THE SAUCE

Applewood BBQ

BY

works best undressed.

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Applewood BBQ • 1003 East 23rd Street, Independence, 816-252-7753 • Hours: See applewoodbbqkc.com • Price: $

I

ANGELA C. BOND

realize that enthusiasm for sweet barbecue sauce runs high around here. But unless you’re a big fan of that kind of thing, you’ll want to order your Applewood BBQ meats naked. Here, the sauce is best considered on the side. The meat is good at this little familyowned barbecue shack on East 23rd Street, in Independence. I’ve tried tender, flavorful ribs, brisket and pulled pork here. But three of the house-made barbecue sauces are almost sweet enough to pour over ice cream. The signature sauce is made with apples and has such an aggressive cinnamon note that I wouldn’t mind spreading it on hot biscuits (which this restaurant doesn’t serve but should). Applewood is one thing — a fine thing for fragrant smoked meats. But apple butter? “I tell our customers that it tastes like apple butter,” confirms the cheery manager, who also acts as waitress, busperson and publicheavy, but the roasted corn is a pleasant surrelations representative. prise: “We take canned corn, we roast it in the My barbecue preferences aside, the comsmoker,” the manager confided, “then we toss bination of apples and pork is a classic one it with cilantro and a little cayenne.” I like it — roast pork and stewed apples make for a traditional Sunday supper in the Midwest. a lot. Not so much the gooey, jarringly sweet baked beans, which aren’t meaty enough. In fact, the only time I could really bring myThere’s a rum cake and a self to eat anything slathcheesecake, which taste ered w ith Applewood’s Applewood BBQ more or less as you’d expect. cinnamon-scented sauce Burnt-ends sandwich ...$6.48 B e fo r e t h i s lo c at io n was when it happened to Tuesday rib-tip was Applewood, it was a dress a superlative pulleddinner ............................ $7.48 corporate-chain sandwich pork sandwich. The sauce Pulled-pork sandwich......... $5 shop, the sort of place that didn’t ruin the pork for me Barbecue beans .............$2.98 belonged in this compact in this case, but it did cause little 23rd Street shopping the sandwich’s taste to veer strip. Among the unlikely combination of perilously close to apple-pie territory. The secret: Add a splash of this joint’s hot sauce, tenants here are a Mexican restaurant (don’t make the mistake of pulling into one of the which provides a not-sweet punch to tone reserved parking spots outside Los Gringos; down the cinnamon. its management is very territorial) and a The supermarkety slaw is mayonnaise-

The burnt ends (left) and ribs are best served sans sauce. needlework shop called the Stitching Post. Applewood still has a chain-store feel. It’s outfitted with six red-and-white, hardplastic booths and a few tables. You order at the counter, and a server brings out the barbecue on plastic plates with plastic flatware. After 5 p.m., there’s full service, the plates are china, and the utensils are metal. You have to settle for paper napkins at all hours, but at night you get a lot more of them. The restaurant recently began serving wine (a decent pinot grigio, a chardonnay and a riesling) and a limited selection of beers (Budweiser, Bud Light, Bud Black Crown) along with soft drinks and Country Time pink lemonade. The latter is very, very sweet but still not as sweet as the raspberry barbecue sauce that blanketed my burnt ends. The meat was crisp and smoky and not at all served by the fruity, sticky glaze.

pitch.com

The tomato-based traditional sauce is awfully sweet, too — with molasses or brown sugar or, I suspect, both — but it works as a dipping sauce for the beautifully crisp french fries. It’s far less likable on a plate of rib tips. Again, the meat itself is truly outstanding. The properly rough, caramelized crust imparted by the smoker needs no dressing, and a sweet sauce becomes an insult. “We use applewood and hickory in our smoker,” the manager told me. “That’s what sets us apart.” That and the supersweet sauces, which undercut some damn good meat. Save that raspberry stuff for the cheesecake, where it might do some good.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

august 22-28, 2013

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17

FAT C I T Y

IN THE RED

K

C’s surging sports teams seem to be running on smoke and molasses. Exhibit A: the Royals, a club now in the habit of dousing walk-off heroes in what players call “Rally Sauce” (Billy Butler’s Hit It a Ton barbecue sauce). Oklahoma Joe’s has played a role at the K, too. Following speculation that the Minnesota Twins took a Royals homestand because the team had tasted Z-Man sandwiches pregame, the local pitmen sent 51 heroes to the boys in blue. The Royals roared to life and promptly scored a 5–3 win. Sporting Kansas City unveiled a smoked tequila-blackberry brisket sandwich at July’s MLS All-Star Game (it’s still available at Sporting Park) and now sits at first place in the Eastern Conference. Coincidence? Probably. But this team loves its barbecue. Recall that, back in January, SportsBusiness Journal reported that Matt Besler, Graham Zusi and Jimmy Nielsen delivered a barbecue lunch to Ivy Funds, a move that helped seal the Overland Park investment-management company’s

decision to sponsor Sporting’s jerseys for the next five years. Even the absence of barbecue can be a winning formula. Dontari Poe, the Chiefs’ first-round pick in 2012, has been looking unstoppable at practice, a result of dropping 20 pounds from giving up — you guessed it — barbecue. Looking for our own high-performance moment, we picked up a bottle of Rally Sauce. And in order to cancel out any biases we might have about judging a sauce that helps a charity (the proceeds benefit Butler’s Hit-It-A-Ton Foundation, which in turn supports the Bishop Sullivan Center), we put it up against BGQ Barbeque Sauce, a condiment that aids another nonprofit, Boys Grow. That organization teaches city kids about entrepreneurship through a two-year apprenticeship on a farm; it’s now trying to raise $30,000 on Neighbor.ly to purchase a permanent growing site. Town Topic fries were procured to be dredged through both sauces. We kept score.

18

pitch.com

the pitch

august 22-28, 2013

Win or lose, it’s how

BY

you sauce the game.

JON AT H A N BENDER

BGQ BARBEQUE SAUCE

BILLY’S HIT IT A TON BARBECUE SAUCE

$5, Howard’s Organic Fare and Vegetable Patch

$2.79, Hy-Vee

18.5 ounces

Game time: The recipe for the Boys Grow bar-

becue sauce was developed by the teenage participants, as were the previously released salsa and ketchup. It includes some of the jalapeños and tomatoes grown on the Boys Grow garden plot. The orange-red sauce (a color born of orange juice concentrate and turmeric) flies out like water from a broken fire hydrant. With garlic powder and two types of vinegar, the stuff delivers echoes of Gates. “There’s a little tang,” said a staffer, who confessed to eating baby carrots with barbecue sauce at lunch. OK, so he hates ranch dressing, and that’s decidedly un-Midwestern, but his comment was met with nods. People are busy sneaking more fries. “It looks spicy, but there was just good heat at the end,” another taster said. Box score: solid double. The kids are all right.

22 ounces

Game time: One tester appreciated seeing a

bottle filled all the way to the top. Also going for it (depending on your body chemistry): It’s gluten-free. But things go downhill from there. This sauce is the liquid embodiment of the slugger: It’s full of tomato paste (the second ingredient listed) and cornstarch. As a tester noted, it’s “thick like Billy.” “It’s just paste,” another tester said, shaking his head. He’d expected a fastball and instead got a curve at the knees. The sauce, distributed by Zarda, has “classic Zarda seasoning,” according to the label, but it fails to capture a dominant note: sweet, salty or spicy. “This is really boring,” one taster complained. “I will not be eating this a ton.” Box score: swing and a miss.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

FAT C I T Y

LUNCH FOR ONE

ANOTHER GOOD START

The Majestic’s Liz Huffman is about to get Baked.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Choose any one of our 3 burgers with an order of fries & 24 oz soda

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VOTED A BEST MISSOURI RESTAURANT 2013

C

hef Liz Huff man had a gut feeling that a help-wanted post on Craigslist would lead to the right job for her. Huff man’s instincts were good. The gig was at the Majestic Restaurant (931 Broadway), and it would start with an unusual task. The Majestic’s owner, Frank Sebree, was looking not for an executive chef but for someone who could create a new breakfast and brunch menu. The challenge: The Majestic had never offered breakfast or brunch before. “Frank told me he was looking for a chef who could be very creative, with a more diverse culinary background,” Huffman says. It’s working out just fine. She has been with the Majestic for two years, and Sebree just promoted her to the executive chef position. (Jim Nelson, the longtime executive chef at the Majestic, is taking a sabbatical from the industry, Sebree tells me.) Huffman is also taking on executive chef duties at Sebree’s new bakery-restaurant concept, Baked in Kansas City — it’s scheduled to open this fall in the former Napoleon Bakery location in Westport and will offer breakfast, lunch and dinner. Huffman can’t say much yet about her plans for that location (“I’m working on a lot of different ideas right now,” she says), but she still likes a challenge. Even as she formulates a plan for Baked, she’s putting up a new menu at the Majestic in September. “We’ll still be embracing our reputation as a steakhouse,” she says, “but we’ll offer many more specials reflecting the seasonal fruits and produce.” When Huffman was the executive chef at the Blue Bird Bistro, from 2002 to 2007, she

Daily Lunch Specials completely changed the menu of that predominantly vegetarian venue at least three times a year. But her changes at the Majestic, she says, won’t be that dramatic. Huffman does, however, like a certain theatricality in her dishes, a preference formed by the run of nontraditional cooking jobs on her résumé. She worked stints preparing food on research ships in Seattle, San Diego and Alaska, and she served an apprenticeship on an organic farm in Washington state. “I lived in a tiny cabin where I had to haul my own water, use an outhouse, and had just enough electricity to power a radio,” she says. Huffman is a KC native, but her family moved during her childhood to Oklahoma and, later, Delaware — in the First State, she had her first executive chef job at a historic tavern. She was in her 20s, and she had found what she wanted to do. “I went to college for a couple of years,” Huffman says, “but I wasn’t ready for it. I’m a late bloomer. Cooking was a more natural fit. It gets in your blood because it’s the perfect combination of the physical, the creative and the intellectual.” But she was still a vagabond, and she spent her 20s and 30s packing up her truck whenever she felt the need to move, then taking cooking jobs wherever she landed. Her journey brought her back to Kansas City in 2001. A year later, she was hired at the Blue Bird by owner Jane Zieha. “Jane had a vision for a restaurant serving food from local, organic or sustainable sources,” Huffman says. “But she told me that even with those parameters, a Kansas City res-

Huffman: the Majestic’s new executive chef taurant had to also serve meat and martinis.” After five years in Zieha’s kitchen, Huffman took a sabbatical to care for her dying father in Maryland. After his death, she brought her mother back to Kansas City with her and took a culinary position with a senior-citizens facility in Kansas. A few years later, she was ready to jump back into a more mainstream restaurant position. She looked at Craigslist. She found the Majestic. “The breakfast business never really took off,” Huffman says, “and we stopped serving that morning meal. But the Saturday and Sunday brunches have been successful.” The Majestic sits in the 19th-century Fitzpatrick Saloon, and the building and its historic aura continue to interest Huffman. So her updates to the menu will reflect what she says is the place’s “reputation as a retro steakhouse.” “I don’t want to get campy about it,” Huffman explains, “but I am looking at some recipes from earlier decades to bring in a little more of that flavor.” She hasn’t settled on a menu for Baked in Kansas City yet, but the challenge of overseeing both restaurants excites her. “Do I see myself cooking 10 years from now? Yes, but not the way I’m doing it now,” she says. “I’m getting a lot better about taking what’s in my head and putting it in someone else’s head. That’s how you build a great kitchen crew.”

1414 W. 9TH ST . MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN 816.472.6333

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com pitch.com

august 22-28, 2013

the pitch

19

MUSIC

FOLK HERO

SXSW co-founder Louis Meyers puts down

BY

roots in KC with Folk Alliance International.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

ven before he became one of South by Southwest’s four founders, Louis Meyers knew how things worked. In 1987, the first year of the Austin, Texas, music conference, Meyers was working in that city as a promoter, manager, agent and talent booker. (He ran the 1,000-seat venue Liberty Lunch, which is now defunct.) Over the next seven years, the born-and-raised Austinite helped build South by Southwest into the country’s most vital destination for music-industry insiders and their targets. Every spring, Meyers’ hometown was the place for labels and agents to convene and scope out the nation’s best new talent. “The reason South by Southwest worked for the industry is because we took the time to be the A&R people,” Meyers says. “We cleared through thousands of showcase entries to find a few hundred acts that we felt were ready to be seen by the industry. It was critical to me personally that every act at South By was worth seeing, that nobody could walk away going, ‘How the hell did that band get booked at this thing?’ ” But by the eighth year of the fest, Meyers had grown frustrated. “That year, there were 640 acts, and my goal was to scale that back to around 500,” he says. “Now, of course, there’s 2,300 official acts. And what you lose by having that many acts is quality. You can’t prescreen all that talent efficiently and put it out in a way where the industry can digest it. And so I felt that the continued expansion of South By was — I don’t want to say greedy but find a nice way to say greedy.” So, in 1994, Meyers sold his share of SXSW and, as he puts it, “retired.” In the years that followed, he lived on an island in Denmark; ran a music conference in New Orleans; moved to Amsterdam and put together a SXSW-style event for the Dutch government (it was marred by 9/11); and finally returned to Austin to run a 24/7 music TV channel. Concurrent to some of these activities, Meyers was a member of Folk Alliance International, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting and celebrating folk music through education, networking and an annual three-day conference. “I’d been going to their conference for about five years and bitching to the people in charge about all the ways it could be better,” Meyers says. “Finally, they said, ‘Put your money where your mouth is,’ and offered me the position of executive director. That was nine years ago.” Until last year, Folk Alliance International kept its headquarters in Memphis. But the organization recently resettled in Kansas City. And its conference — which draws more than 2,000 registered participants for music showcases,

20

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CHRIS MULLINS

E

panels, workshops and, now, a music camp — will be held at the Westin and Sheraton hotels at Crown Center through 2018. (The first KCbased conference is scheduled for February 1923, 2014; Graham Nash is the keynote speaker.) Meyers also now operates the Folk Store, at 509 Delaware in the River Market. Here, he sells vintage and new music equipment, with an emphasis on strings: guitars, dobros, ukuleles. (The shop has been gently opening over the past few weeks, but its grand opening is set for 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Saturday, August 24.) “The store is our way of trying to get to know the community here,” Meyers says. “The conference is an international event, but it’s only one weekend a year. We want to make it easy for people to walk in and interact all 52 weeks of the year. We’re ultimately planning to do in-stores and meet-and-greets with musicians coming through town on gigs — things like that.” Why KC? Meyers cites some practical reasons: Crown Center, with its multiple hotels and attached Amtrak station, was ideal for the conference. The ease of booking Southwest Airlines flights in and out of KCI was also a factor. But he also liked what was already in place culturally. “We looked at 32 other cities, and everything about KC worked,” he says. “There really wasn’t a close second. “A big thing was that there seemed to be a demand for what we do here,” Meyers adds. “We were looking at whether there was a place for a local alternative community like the one

pitch.com

Meyers has come to play. we envision to grow. And there seems to be. And, obviously, there’s a lot of folk music happening here already — everything from shows with Sam Baker at the Folly to venues like Grinders and Knuckleheads and Davey’s Uptown. We also liked how much the local government seems to value the arts and music, whether it’s the Kauffman Center, the new ballet or 18th and Vine.” In addition to revenue from membership, sponsorships, donations, conference entry fees, and the Folk Store, the alliance’s operating budget comes from state and local grants. It hasn’t yet received anything from ArtsKC or the Missouri Arts Council, but Meyers says his organization is exploring what’s available from economic-development and tourism offices. “The access to funding was one of the reasons we chose KC, but we didn’t demand any money to make the move,” he says. “We’d rather prove ourselves by being a stable organization and letting the several million dollars a year, in economic impact the city will see from the convention, speak for itself.” Meyers participated this year in the Mayor’s Task Force for the Arts, a series of meetings and brainstorming sessions that this summer yielded a long document outlining how KC’s arts and cultural future might play out. He says Mayor Sly James’ task force had looked to Austin as a role model — and he objected. “I tend to take the role of pointing out

what didn’t work there,” Meyers says. “We had eight years of a real-estate-driven City Council that sold everything to the highest bidder. It screwed the city. I watched the city get sold. Everything that had local ownership is now part of some conglomerate that could care less about what Austin was.” He goes on: “Austin is unlivable now for the creative community. That was another thing that was appealing about KC: Artists can still affordably live here. I hope — and I think this current mayor gets it — that doesn’t change. I’m not trying to bring Austin to KC. KC doesn’t need Austin.” Meyers’ vision for Folk Alliance International is, in many respects, antithetical to the corporate orgy that SXSW has become. He has modeled the nonprofit after the 1992 and ’93 versions of SXSW, when the fest was thriving but before it sprawled into a behemoth. But it is also a very good time to be a folk organization — culturally and financially. Just 10 years ago, mandolins and banjos were confined to the periphery of popular music. Today, Mumford & Sons is the biggest band in the world. The Lumineers and the Avett Brothers sell out the kinds of large venues previously inhabited by rock acts. Retail banjo sales reached an all-time high in 2012. Eight years ago, the average Folk Alliance member was 50–55 years old. Today, he or she is 30–35. “When I took this job, folk was not a very good word,” Meyers says. “It had no hip factor. People shied away from it. We’ve seen that change pretty rapidly over the past few years. I mean, Mumford is essentially a skiffle band, but to a lot of kids these days, they might as well be new-wave. There’s no fear of folk music and folk culture anymore.” But Meyers prefers to approach Folk Alliance International as an altruistic endeavor. “In a lot of ways, we see ourselves as stewards of the word folk,” he says. “Our definition of folk is broad, and we’re OK with that. I love arguing with people who have degrees in folklore and ethnomusicology about what folk is. I know a guy who believes the day Alan Lomax turned on a tape recorder is the day traditional folk music died. “It’s great that you want Rev. Gary Davis’ style to live on, but in my world, every single day marks a new day of traditional music,” he says. “The Beatles — they fit every criteria of traditional music. Anywhere you go, everybody can sing Beatles songs. You can sit down anywhere on the planet and play a Bob Marley song and people will know the words. That’s tradition. To me, that’s folk.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

pitch.com

august 22-28, 2013

the pitch

21

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

AUGUST: 21: CeeCee James 22: Gaelic Storm w/ Head for the Hills 23: Jimmie Bratcher 23: Corey Stevens

AUGUST 24th Devil Doll with

Hillbilly CASINO

24: Sara Morgan 28: Uncle Lucius w/ Bryant Carter 29: English Beat 29: The Nighthawks 30: Junior Brown w/ Southern Hospitatlity 31: Jason Boland w/ Jason Eady

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

22

the pitch

august 22-28, 2013

STREETSIDE

AMERICAN PASTORAL

Goin’ country at Y’allapalooza

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

A

friend and I have been talking recently about writing our own country songs to sell in Nashville. Neither of us is what you would technically call a “musician” or “songwriter.” But we both know some guitar chords, and I can write words OK. The way we figure it, it’s mostly a matter of thinking up a gimmicky chorus that taps into some kind of folksy zeitgeist. We’re not too worried about the chord progressions, hooks or melodies — those we’ll steal from somebody else’s hit song. (See “Blurred Lines.”) So far, we have one song sketched out. The gist: Country boy has to go to the city for a party. At fi rst, he doesn’t fit in at the party — it’s a classy affair, and he showed up in his boots and cowboy hat. During the bridge, there’s a twist, and on the last verse, it’s the country boy who ends up showing the city slickers how to loosen up and party, country style. It’s kind of a feel-good story about harmony in a world of difference. The working title is “Party Like a Country Boy.” We’re looking to sell the rights to this song for somewhere in the neighborhood of $75,000. Because that one is pretty much a wrap, I’m on the hunt for some new ideas. So on Saturday, I drove to Starlight Theatre for Y’allapalooza, the annual concert hosted by local country radio station Q104. At the top of the bill was Tate Stevens, who was crowned the winner of Season 2 of The X Factor last year. I’ll root for Stevens because he’s a local guy — he’s from Belton — and because he worked as a construction worker before The X Factor, which makes his blue-collar lyrics more believable than most. But Stevens’ first round of songs (he released his debut album back in April) is about as safe as they come: a relentlessly bland collection celebrating a country lifestyle that, if it ever existed, certainly doesn’t today. As a country songwriter on the make, though, it’s inspiring. Even a rube like me can play in the same league as “I Got This”: Grease on my hands, name on my shirt; Got dirt on my boots, mud on my truck; and, of course, I’m a country boy, don’t mean to brag/I’m all about God, our troops and the flag. The other big name on the Y’allapalooza lineup was Aaron Lewis. You might remember Lewis from the late ’90s, when he was the frontman in the post-grunge butt-rock group Staind. That was a legendarily terrible band, but Lewis’ recent opportunist ventures into country music are even more objectionable. It’s of no concern to the conservative white males making up Lewis’ target demographic that he’s a carpetbagger (from a wealthy town in Massachusetts); they’re just happy to have

pitch.com

another guy around who’s as resistant to world progress as they are. If Lewis’ debut album, 2011’s Town Line, was a globe, you could spin it around and land your finger on a politically pandering or comically stupid line every single time. The definitive Lewis track is, uh, “Country Boy,” which is a direct rip-off of Bon Jovi’s “Wanted Dead or Alive.” Lewis brings in Southern redneck icon Charlie Daniels at the end to fiddle a little of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” and deliver this bit of proud ignorance: I love my country, I love my guns, I love my family. I love the way it is now, and anybody who tries to change it has to come through me. That should be all of our attitudes. Cause this is America, and a country boy is good enough for me, son. Take note, political activists and grassroots community organizers: Your efforts are in vain until you run them past the guy on the Geico commercial who sang “The Devil Went Down to Georgia.” The good news is that Lewis is, in a lot of ways, late to the party. Much like hip-hop, country music is undergoing an identity crisis as it inches closer toward the mainstream. Kanye West’s recent Yeezus has the industrial tones of a Nine Inch Nails album, and there was a dubstep song on Taylor Swift’s last album. Genre tags are growing ever looser in the search for hits. Lewis’ medium-angry guns-and-God shtick may play well with his base, but it’s not the kind of material that’s going to connect with the general electorate. One of the openers on Saturday, Cole Swindell, seemed to represent this shifting landscape. Swindell is cut in the mold of country-star-of-the-moment Luke Bryan, which is to say he dresses more like a frat boy than a cowboy (he was a Sigma Chi at a Georgia college), and doesn’t overplay the twang in his voice. Swindell wore a predistressed baseball cap and a well-fitting Royals T-shirt, and his songs tended toward the loose and breezy

Let the cowboys ride. — the closest thing he has to a hit is called, tellingly, “Chillin’ It.” Musically, this is not the stuff of Hank or Johnny or Randy Travis. It’s a lot of revved-up electric guitars, power chords and soaring choruses — take away the country signifiers in the lyrics and you might mistake it for a ’90s rock act like Matchbox Twenty. One of Swindell’s last songs was called “Brought to You by Beer.” It was such a perfectly dumb party anthem (complete with a reference to “12-ounce curls”) that I almost couldn’t enjoy it, so jealous I was that I hadn’t thought it up myself.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT CHRIS HAZELTON’S BOOGALOO 7 AT THE KILL DEVIL CLUB

Mesh soul with jazz and throw in a little funk, late-’60s and early ’70s style — think Lou Donaldson, Grant Green, Lonnie Smith. This group calls the sound boogaloo. Others might call it good ol’ bootyshakin’ jazz. Chris Hazelton’s Boogaloo 7 starts with Hazelton and his Hammond B-3 organ, then adds Nick Howell on trumpet, Nick Roland on alto and tenor saxophones, Brett Jackson on baritone sax, Matt Hopper on guitar, Kevin Frazee on drums and Gary Helm on congas. Saturday night, they shake up the Kill Devil Club in the Power & Light District. And speaking of booty shakin’: Between music sets, KC’s Burlesque Downtown Underground performs. — LARRY KOPITNIK  Chris Hazelton’s Boogaloo 7, 9 p.m.–1 a.m. Saturday, August 24, at the Kill Devil Club (31 East 14th Street, 816-471-0704)

SPONSORED BY

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august 22-28, 2013

P p the pitch

23

100041.1 | Blue October~Standlone Ad | 08-22-2013

MUSIC

MUSIC FORECAST

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

BLUE OCTOBER DECEmBER 8, 2013

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Robert Cray

Robert Cray is best-known for his 1986 album, Strong Persuader, which fused smooth ’80s production values with Cray’s soulful, Otis Redding–like delivery. His latest, last year’s mellow but inspired Nothin But Love, is another quiet, convincing argument for Cray’s place in the American blues-soul canon. Friday, August 23, at VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Drive, North Kansas City, 816-472-7777)

8/15/13 3:36 PM

The Lower 48, with Oils and No/Where

Like Dr. Dog or, more recently, Foxygen, Portland-via-Minneapolis act the Lower 48 capably mines the sunny sounds of mid-’60s heavyweights: the Beatles, the Stones, the Kinks, the Velvets. The group opens here for Oils, whose arty, sprawling jangle rock is some of the best music coming out of Lawrence at the moment. With No/Where. Wednesday, August 28, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Lawrence Busker Festival

Do any of our local buskers belong on a stage instead of a street corner? Should some be receiving cash from club owners instead of pocket change from passers-by? Find out at this gathering of minstrels, street performers, troubadours — whatever you want to call them

Robert Cray — in Lawrence this weekend. The Busker Ball, a meet-and-greet for the local and national performers, is Thursday at the Granada. The fest continues through Sunday at various downtown locations. See lawrencebuskerfest.com for the full schedule. Thursday, August 22, through Sunday, August 25, in downtown Lawrence (bounded by Massachusetts and New Hampshire between Seventh and 11th streets)

Big Band Tribute to Kansas City Jazz

The cocktail-culture festival Paris of the Plains continues this week with a variety of events (see page 26). Foremost among those for music fans is this Friday-night party at the Kill Devil Club. Recent Pitch Music Award winner Mark Lowrey leads a 12-piece swing band through big-band standards with an emphasis on the Kansas City jazz sounds of yore. Forty dollars gets you in the door, plus three drink tickets and passed hors d’oeuvres. This event sold out last year, so if you’re interested, it might be a good idea to reserve tickets ahead of time. See popfestkc.com for more info. Friday, August 23, at the Kill Devil Club (31 East 14th Street, 816-471-0704)

F O R E C A S T

24

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august 22-28, 2013

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K E Y

................................................... Pick of the Week

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UPCOMING SHOWS: 8/24

SIP Presents: Revive

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Kilroy Presents: Rebella Rising

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8/31

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august 22-28, 2013

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25

8/16/13 3:54 PM

AGENDA

continued from page 11

Thursday | 8.22 |

SPORTS

Royals vs. Nationals | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

DAY SATUR

FOOD & DRINK

8 . 24

Briarcliff Village Farmers Market | 3–7 p.m. Briarcliff Village, 4175 N. Mulberry Dr.

MUSIC

at -Fest, Bacon imore alt 3011 B

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: Distilling 101 | 1 p.m. Dark Horse Distillery, 11740 W. 86th Terr., Lenexa

Brain Damage — The Great American Pink Floyd Show | 8 p.m. the Riot Room, 4048 Broadway Jimmie Bratcher | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

La Chalupa Farmers Market | Mattie Rhodes North-

east, 148 N. Topping Ave.

Celebration of Basie with the Vine Street Rumble

| 8:30 p.m. the Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Martinis for Preemies | 4:30 p.m. Granfalloon Bar & Grill, 608 Ward Pkwy.

Cheap Thrill | KC Live, 14th St. and Grand

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: Midwest Melee! | 3 p.m. Dark Horse Distillery, 11740 W. 86th

Robert Cray | 6:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr.

Terr., Lenexa

Field Day Dreams, Nightbox, Max Justus | 10 p.m.

F E S T I VA L S

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

ThrottleFest 2013 | Berkley Riverfront Park

Foster, Hiatt & Currey | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Tiblow Days | Second and Oak streets, Bonner Springs NET WORKING

Social Media Club of KC Happy Hour | 5:30– 7:30 p.m. Mestizo, 5270 W. 116th Pl., Leawood

1809 Grand

Sad American Night, Carswell & Hope | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

F E S T I VA L S

Scruffy and the Janitors, Dsoedean, Here’s to the Life | Czar, 1531 Grand

SPORTS

Royals vs. White Sox | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium MUSIC

Josh Berwanger Band, Heidi Gluck | 10 p.m. Re-

MORE

EVENTS

O

play Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

E AT NLIN

M PITCH.CO

Blue Boot Heelers, A.J. Gaither, Walker and the Texas Dangers| 9p.m.Davey’s

Uptown, 3402 Main

Elephant Revival, Olassa | 8 p.m. the Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Gaelic Storm, Head for the Hills | 7:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

John Paul’s Flying Circus | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

1205 E. 85th St.

Lonnie Ray Blues Band | 7 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

Craig Morgan | KC Live, 14th St. and Grand Michael Pagan Trio | 8 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

26

the pitch

august 22-28, 2013

Friday | 8.23 |

The Telephone Line | Replay Lounge, 946 Massa-

Arts & Crafts Festival | 5:30 p.m. Screenland Armour Theater, 408 Armour Rd., NKC

Kansas State Fiddling and Picking Championship official preparty with Ashes to Immortality, Fast Food

Junkies, Kasey Rausch | 8:30 p.m. the Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Lonely Wild, Me Like Bees, Refero | 8 p.m.

Czar, 1531 Grand

chusetts, Lawrence

Busker Festival | 5 p.m. downtown Lawrence

Thermastat, the Finest Kind, DJ vs Drums | 8 p.m.

Parkville Days | 6–10 p.m. downtown Parkville

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

ThrottleFest 2013 | Berkley Riverfront Park

Lost Wax | 10 p.m. O’Dowd’s, 4742 Pennsylvania

the Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Roger Wilder | 7 p.m. the Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Tiblow Days | Second and Oak streets, Bonner Springs

Los Habaneros, the Barnes Brothers | 6 p.m. Replay

Mace Batons, My Oh My!, Interstate Astronauts

| 9 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider, 1515 Westport Rd.

NIGHTLIFE NET WORKING

Bikini contest with DJ Austin | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Connect KC | 5:30–7:30 p.m. American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

The Monarchs, the Heavy Figs, Nikki and the Rooftop Punch | 9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway Mudflap Mafia | 10 p.m. the Brooksider, 6330 Brookside Plz.

COMMUNIT Y EVENTS

Busker Ball 2013 | 7 p.m. the Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence Cocktail Club with DJ Highnoone | Empire Room,

Kids’ Jazzoo | 5:30–8:30 p.m. $35, Kansas City Zoo-

Old No. 5’s | 9 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

FOOD & DRINK

Parallax | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

logical Park, 6800 Zoo Dr.

334 E. 31st St.

Karaoke Lime Light | 8 p.m. Fat Fish Blue, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Chris Kattan | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: All Things Beer (and Cocktails) | 1 p.m. $25, Boulevard Brewing Co., 2501 Southwest Blvd.

Sellout | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: All Things Coffee (and Cocktails) | 10 a.m. $15, the Roasterie,

BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Rocky Laporte | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and

1204 W. 27th St.

Pop Shots with Clockwerk & DJ Archi | Gusto

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: Everything You Need to Know Before You Open Your Bar |

Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

pitch.com

Red Kate, the Quivers | Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

5 p.m. Google Fiber Space, 1814 Westport Rd.

Mike Smith and Kings of Sax | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside

Corey Stevens | 9 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester Stiff Middle Fingers, Drop a Grand, Joy Subtraction, Scene of Irony | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Tribute to Count Basie | Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

ART UNLEASHED

Velvet Jackson | Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa Fe

Troostwood Youth Garden Market | 9 a.m.–3 p.m. 5142 Paseo

Trail Dr., Lenexa

F E S T I VA L S

Isayah Warford’s All-Stars | Trouser Mouse, 410 S.

Arts & Crafts Festival | 12:30 p.m. Screenland Armour

We Don’t Know | 10 p.m. the Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

Busker Festival | 2 p.m. downtown Lawrence

Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

> MUSIC

Theater, 408 Armour Rd., NKC

Broadway

Parkville Days | 10 a.m.–10 p.m. downtown Parkville

Wells the Traveler, 40 Watts Dream | The Brick,

1727 McGee

ThrottleFest 2013 | Berkley Riverfront Park

The Wheelers, Dean Monkey and the Dropouts

Tiblow Days | Second and Oak streets, Bonner Springs

| 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

SHOPPING

Winners Circle | 8 p.m. the Bottleneck, 737 New Hamp-

shire, Lawrence

The Folk Store grand opening | 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Folk Alliance International, 509 Delaware

NIGHTLIFE

Saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Cowtown Mall-

room, 3101 Gillham Plz.

Check Your Head with Johnny Quest | The Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

DJ Highnoone | The Well, 7421 Broadway

“Johnny Cat” by Dave Barickman, up for auction at Art Unleashed, 7–10 p.m. Friday, $35, Hale Arena. 1701 American Royal Ct., hsgkc.org

DJ HoodNasty, DJ Clockwerk | 11 p.m. Czar, 1531

City Market Farmers Market | 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 205 E. Fifth St.

W. 167th St., Olathe

Filipino karaoke | 7 p.m. the Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market |

Royals vs. Nationals | 6:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

Chris Kattan | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club,

Grand Court Farmers Market | 10 a.m.–1 p.m. 501

DJ Brent Tactic | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Grand

Broadway

6:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

SPORTS

Parkville Days Run/Walk By The River | 8 a.m. 63rd St. and Hwy. 9, Parkville

• UPCOMING EVENTS • 8.21 THE OFFICIAL STS9 & UMPHREY’S MCGEE AFTERPARTY 8.22 SCRUFFY & THE JANITORS, DSOEDEAN, HERE’S TO THE LIFE 8.23 THE LONELYWILD, ME LIKE BEES 8.24 PHIL IN DA BLANKS 8.26 TORCHES, JOSH BERWANGER BAND 8.27 THE PARISH FESTIVAL, RAMBLIN PAN FREE SHOW

Trail Run for Haiti | 7 a.m. $35, Lone Elm Park, 21151

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 4PM - 7PM . MON-SAT FOOD SERVED DAILY: 5PM-10PM BY KC

TACO CO.

1531 GRAND KCMO

816.421.0300 . CZARKC.COM

MUSIC 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

W. 107th St.

Rocky Laporte | 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club

Irish Whiskey tasting | 2–4 p.m. Celtic Ranch, 404

and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Saturday | 8.24 |

Main, Weston

KC Organics and Natural Market | 8 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Minor Park, Holmes at Red Bridge Rd.

PERFORMING ARTS

KC Dance Day | 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity, 500 W. Pershing Rd. FOOD & DRINK

Bacon-Fest | 2–5 p.m. $50/$100, the Rehabilitation

Institute of Kansas City, 3011 Baltimore

Brookside Farmers Market | 8 a.m.–1 p.m. Border

Star Montessori, 6321 Wornall

Appropriate Grammar, Violet Vander Haar, Actors & Actresses | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

85th St.

Bob Bowman & Bowdog | 8:30 p.m. the Blue Room,

1616 E. 18th St.

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: Late-Night Cognac With the Late Night Callers | 11 p.m. the

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

California Voodoo, Miss Conception | 9 p.m. the

Majestic, 931 Broadway

Coyote Bill’s open blues jam | 5:30 p.m. Quasimodo,

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: Magical Mezcal | 12:30 p.m. $45, Snow & Co., 1815 Wyandotte

Devil Doll, Hillbilly Casino | 9 p.m. Knuckleheads,

Paris of the Plains Cocktail Festival: Rum for All With Paul Pacult | 10 a.m. Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

continued on page 28

12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

2715 Rochester

About Face | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, through January 19, 2014, nelson-atkins.org

Gorilla Event | 12 local artists, opening reception,

6 p.m. Friday, City Ice Arts Center, 2029 Campbell, cityicearts.com

Nomads: Traversing Adolescence | Kemper East,

Park, through September 8, nermanmuseum.org

Patterns in Time: New Work by Gary Pycior

“Ripe for Embarrassment: for a New Musical Masochism” | 2 p.m. Saturday. PLUG Projects, 1613

200 E. 44th St., through November 15, kemperart.org

6–9 p.m. Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway, 816-519-7717, kioskgallerygroup@gmail.com

Polychrome Fiction | Nerman Museum of Con-

temporary Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland

WED. 3/6 THURS. 3/7 WWW.THERECORDBAR.COM 816-753-5207 LIQUORBUDDIES CAVEMANCOMPUTER HOTDOGSKELETONS MAGIC VEHICLES FRI. 3/8 SAT. 3/9 1020 WESTPORT RD

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS Exhibition hours vary. For more details, contact the museum or gallery.

kcmo

Blue Orleans | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E.

MOCSA’s Young at Art Cocktail Party | 6:30– 10:30 p.m. $75, Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

We’re on a boat!

Genessee. plugprojects.com

Art Talk: Brad Schwieger | 7 p.m. Wednesday, Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org

WED. 8/21 JON WIRTZ NUSKOOL MODERN 6PM DOODADS DAY FITZGERALD 7PM WIRES 10PM CHEROKEE 10PM SOFT REEDS THURS. 8/22 CARSWELL&HOPE ROCK RIFLE NOISEFM BAD IDEAS SAD AMERICAN NIGHT GENTLEMANSAVAGE APPROPRIATE GRAMMAR ANDREAPERDUE FRI. 8/23 7PM DRUNKARD’S DREAM SUN. 3/10 MON. 3/11 10PM FIELD DAYDREAM 8PM BOX/MAX DESERT NOISES NIGHT JUSTUS ALATURKA MELISMA TICS CD RELEASE SO COW SAT.PARTY 8/24 ACTORS &(IRELAND) ACTRESSES APPROPRIATE GRAMMAR TUES. 3/12 VANDER WED. 3/13 VIOLET HAR OFF WITH THEIR HEADS MIDWEST GOTNEXT TWO4ONE SUN. 8/25 THE OCTOPUS PROJECT TEENAGEBOTTLEROCKET DOMCHRONICLES MASKEDINTRUDER GEMINI REVOLUTION PETER SENSAY KILL NOISEBOYS STEDDYP MON. 8/26 OUTLAW NATION UPCOMING ARM THE POOR / FADED 3/14 EXPENDABLES 4/8 FU MANCHU 3/18 DARWIN DEEZEROCK PAPER 4/16 MOWGLIS TUES. 8/27 7PM SCISSORS 3/19 LYDIA LOVELESS 4/23 BLACK MT. 10PM ASHFORD’S FOLLY & GUESTS 4/3 THAO& TGDSD 4/30 DEVIL MAKE 3 WEEKLY

SUN. 12-5PM BARTENDER’S BRUNCH & BLOODY MARY BAR MON. 7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA TUES. 7PM HONKY TONK SUPPER CLUB WED. 7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS THURS. 7PM TRIVIA CLASH

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WED-FRI 12PM-1:30AM KITCHEN OPENLATE

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pitch.com

august 22-28, 2013

the pitch

27

The Funner Brothers, Rolling Foliage | 6 p.m. Replay

continued from page 27 The Fairmounters | 8 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack,

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

5835 Lamar, Mission

Y S U N DA

8 . 25

Filthy 13, the Yellow Bricks | 10 p.m. Coda, 1744

Broadway

The Goddamn Gallows, the Calamity Cubes, St Dallas and the Sinners, Whiskey Breath | 8 p.m.

the Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

sker nce Bu Lawre al v ti s e F

Full Bloods, Akkilles, Jerad Bond and the Tornadoes | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Rich Hill | 7 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania Mark Lowrey jazz jam | 6 p.m. the Majestic, 931

Broadway

Fuzz and Fire Midwest Stoner and Doom Rock Festival | 8 p.m. Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam

Dr., Merriam

Matisyahu, Levi Robin | 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at

Grinders, 417 E. 18th St.

Hazelton’s Boogaloo 7 with Burlesque Downtown Underground | 9 p.m. the Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Mengel Brothers Duo | 5-9 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy.

Micah Herman and the Young Loins of Jazz | 8 p.m.

The Octopus Project | 7:30 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

Westport Rd.

Lonesome Hank | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Lungs, Vomit Assault, Boreas, Digester | 10 p.m.

Open Jam with Levee Town | 2-7 p.m. Knuckleheads,

2715 Rochester

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Sara Morgan | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Anne McCue, Amy Farrand, Mikal Shapiro | 8 p.m.

Phil N Da Blanks | 6:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Monsoon Lazer, Swanson! | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Scroat Belly, Snakebite, DJ Jeff Eaton | 8 p.m. the

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Stolen Winnebagos | 9 p.m. Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St.,

THEATER

Overland Park

Sundiver, Simple Lines | 9 p.m. Californos, 4124

Gossip at Reserve Bar | 8 p.m. Ambassador Hotel,

1111 Grand

Chris Kattan | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Sunday | 8.25 |

N. Boardwalk Ave.

Voodoo Soul | Barley’s Brewhaus, 11924 W. 119th St.,

Busker Festival | 1 p.m.downtown Lawrence Parkville Days | 10 a.m.–6 p.m. downtown Parkville

SPORTS

86 Cancer Poker Run | 9:30 a.m. Frank James Saloon,

St., Overland Park

10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville

Tim Whitmer & KC Express | 4:30 p.m. the Phoenix,

Tunes for TARA: Musicians Unite for Homeless Pets | 1–6 p.m. $25, Foundation, 1221 Union

White Collar Sideshow | 8 p.m. the Granada, 1020

FOOD & DRINK

302 W. Eighth St.

Massachusetts, Lawrence

7:30 p.m. the Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

The Bikinis | American Heartland Theatre, 2450

Wonderland | The Brooksider, 6330 Brookside Plz.

Paris of the Plains Bartending Competition |

Zodiac Ensemble | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St., thenewcenturyfollies.com

Dirty Stomp | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachu-

Picnic | Kansas City Actors Theatre, City Stage

DJ Ashton Martin | The Well, 7421 Broadway

The Session | Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, kcmeltingpot.com

28

the pitch

august 22-28, 2013

setts, Lawrence

DJ Domensha | Milieu, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park DJ Proof | The Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hamp-

shire, Lawrence

pitch.com

The Eastern Sea, Grandchildren, the Caves |

6 p.m. $20, Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway SPORTS

NIGHTLIFE

Theater, 30 W. Pershing Rd., kcactors.org

Royals vs. Rays | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

Celebration of Charlie Parker with Dennis Winslett | 7 p.m. the Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

E. Fifth St.

The New Century Follies Quarterly Review |

9800 Grandview Rd.

City Market Farmers Market | 8 a.m.–3 p.m. 205

Bram Wijnands Trio | 7 p.m. the Majestic, 931 Broadway

Theatre, 2450 Grand, musicaltheaterheritage.com

The Women’s Foundation of Greater Kansas City Golf Classic | 10 a.m. Oakwood Country Club,

MUSIC

KCMT Tiffany Ballroom, 903 Harrison, grimprov.com

Hello, Dolly! | Musical Theatre Heritage, Off Center

Madden 25 midnight launch party | 10 p.m.– 12:30 a.m. the Microsoft Store, 11467 W. 95th St., Overland Park

COMMUNIT Y EVENTS

Wells the Traveler | 9 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th

Grand, ahtkc.com

100 Richmond Ave., KCK

GAMES

Overland Park

Best Laid Plans — A Murder Mystery Dinner |

KCK Greenmarket | 7:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Juniper Gardens,

F E S T I VA L S

The Transients | The BrewTop Pub and Patio, 8614

Performance days and times vary. For more details, see the theater websites.

Monday | 8.26 | FOOD & DRINK

Rocky Laporte | 7 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club

Pennsylvania

Hello, Dolly!

Dominique Sanders Trio | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

Outlaw Nation, Arm the Poor, Faded | 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Tour de Shawnee | 7:30 a.m. $30, Power Play Family Entertainment Center, 13110 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee

Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Royals vs. Nationals | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6-9 p.m. the Brick, 1727 McGee

MUSIC

Mikal Shapiro and Anthony Ladesich | 9 p.m.

Bob Bowman and Danny Embrey | 7 p.m. Take Five

Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

Billy Ebeling | 6 p.m. Jazz, 1859 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Phantoms of the Opry, the All Togethers | 9 p.m.

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Torches, Josh Berwanger Band, Chekov’s Gun |

7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. the Piano Room,

MUSEUM EXHIBITS

8410 Wornall

NIGHTLIFE

DJ Ashton Martin | O’Dowd’s, 4742 Pennsylvania Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 7:30 p.m. Rhythm and

Booze, 423 Southwest Blvd.

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 8 p.m. Green Room Burgers & Beer, 4010 Pennsylvania Karaoke | 10:30 p.m. the Brick, 1727 McGee McMonday Karaoke | 9:30 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Tuesday | 8.27 |

Exhibition hours vary. For more details, contact the museum.

War I Museum, 100 W. 26th St., through October 27, theworldwar.org

Alien Worlds and Androids | Science City-Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., through September 15, sciencecity.com

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., through January 5, 2014, unionstation.org

American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St., traveling Smithsonian exhibit, through October 27, americanjazzmuseum.org

Harmonies of the Homefront | National World

Dave Hays’ open electric blues jam | 8 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

Kathleen Holeman | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

Walker Lukens and the Side Arms | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

LITERARY EVENTS

America for All — Not Just the Wealthy |

6:30 p.m. Kansas City, Kansas Public Library, South Branch, 3104 Strong Ave., KCK

Author Jeff Guinn | 7 p.m. $27.50, Unity Temple, 707 W. 47th St., rainydaybooks.com

FOOD & DRINK

Nonpoint, Red Line Chemistry, Surrender the Fall, Triplicity Guild, What I’ve Become | 7 p.m. Aftershock Bar & Grill, 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam

The Parish Festival, Ramblin Pan | 8 p.m. Czar,

1531 Grand

Trampled Under Foot | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205

Rosedale Farmers Market | 11 a.m.–2 p.m. 4020 Rainbow Blvd., KCK

KC T-Bones vs. Gary SouthShore RailCats | 7:05 p.m. CommunityAmerica Ballpark, 1800 Village W. Pkwy., KCK MUSIC

Hank 3 | 7 p.m. the Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

Truman Home Tours | 219 Delaware, Independence, 816-254-9929

Waldo Farmers Market | 3–7 p.m. Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 303 W. 79th St.

Westport Plaza Farmers Market | 4:30–7:30 p.m.

Westport Rd. and Wyoming St.

BREAKFAST ON SAT/SUN

NET WORKING

8/23 UNFILTERED FRIDAYS

1 Million Cups | 9 a.m. Ewing Marion Kauffman Foun-

8/24 TITANIUM BLUE & THE FABULOUS BOLT ONS

SPORTS

8/27 BILLY BEALE

dation, 4801 Rockhill Rd.

KC T-Bones vs. Gary SouthShore RailCats | 7:05 p.m. CommunityAmerica Ballpark, 1800 Village W. Pkwy., KCK

8/31 MIZZOU VS. MURRAY ST. 6PM

VISIT US AT BLACKGOLDKC.COM

816-561-1099 • 3740 BROADWAY KCMO

MUSIC NIGHTLIFE

Billy Beale blues jam | 9 p.m. Black & Gold Tavern,

3740 Broadway

Burlesque & Pinup Student Showcase | 9:30 p.m.

SPORTS

City Museum, 3218 Gladstone Blvd., through September 8, kansascitymuseum.org

E. 85th St.

KCK Greenmarket | 7:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Keeler Women’s Center, 2220 Central, KCK

That’s the Idea! Patents and Inventions from the Kansas City Museum Collection | Kansas

MON: RUR AL FRI 8/23 GRIT 6PM // KARAO KE 10PM WELLS TH ET SAT 8/24 40 WATTS DRERAAVELER TRMEUCMBKSERTOSPOFHONE YMOON FULL BLOO M - 9PM DS TUE 8/27 AND THE TORN,AAKKILLES, JERAD B FRI 8/30 BINGO - 8PM DOES - 10PM OND HEARTFELT A SAT 8/31 ABNORM, REANCARCHY, STIK FIGA, THU 9/5 BRAIN FOOD, THH, KING KIHEI, DJ THE E WAY B SKEME VICTOR RICK WIL&L PENNY, SPECIAALCK, REV GUSTO O GU U SAT 9/7 JAMES ISSAC OGNHBY ON BASS & ESTS BLUE BOO T HEELECRLSARINET I AM NATIO, ROOT & STEM, N

the Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin | 9 p.m. Sol

Bobaflex, Southern Pain, EMPYREAN | 7:30 p.m.

the Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge | 7:30 p.m. Knuckle-

heads, 2715 Rochester

Depth & Current, Many Moods of Dad | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Cantina, 408 E. 31st. St.

Billy Ebeling | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

The Low End with Nmezee & Sigrah | 10 p.m. the

Max Groove Trio | 6 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy.

Open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s,

| 7 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Tape Deck Tuesdays with DJ HoodNasty, $2 Tuesdays with Brent Tactic & DJ B-Stee | 10 p.m.

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

101 Southwest Blvd.

Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Wednesday | 8.28 |

Phil Hamilton, Jesse Harris & the Gypsy Sparrows

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern | 8 p.m. Green

Run Boy Run | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main Uncle Lucius with the Bryant Carter Band | 8 p.m.

Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

FOOD & DRINK

City Market Farmers Market | 9 a.m.–1 p.m. 205 E. Fifth St.

Gee Watts, Modest, Jake King, Jefe, Jordan Taylor, Peez, Weez, Leezy Hawk, Duncan Burnett, Kanvas, Grizz Lee, Yonnie, OT, Bay Hamp, Nave

| 8:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market | 7:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

Fresh Promises Farmers Market | 4:30–7:30 p.m.

Madden 25 launch party Monday night

Kill Creek Farm, Kill Creek Rd. off K-10, Gardner

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

pitch.com

august 22-28, 2013

the pitch

29

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august 22-28, 2013

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ity,’ just as his stepson says,” said Jesse Bering, a research psychologist and science writer who regularly contributes to Slate, Scientific American and other publications. “Young teenagers can’t express their overwhelming urges easily. We provide no ‘socially appropriate’ sexual outlets for 14-year-olds, masturbation aside.” Bering, who just finished his second book about human sexuality (Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us), remembers doing some freaky stuff himself at age 14. “I recall some exciting moments involving peeing in the bathroom sink,” said Bering. “The idea of pissing in the sink with an erection while looking at myself buck naked in the mirror isn’t particularly arousing to me these days.” So it’s possible that your stepson is just horny and experimenting. “Even if it turns out that his stepson is really into diapers, it’s a pretty harmless fetish,” Bering said. “It would be next to impossible to ‘cure,’ even at his young age. It’s just something he’ll need to learn how to handle responsibly. Never underestimate the power of a frank conversation grounded in truly unconditional love.” Start by reassuring him that you love him. Tell him that most humans are a little bit perverted, but our kinks are private, and you’re talking to him about his thing for diapers only because he hasn’t been very successful at keeping it private. Then cut him a deal: If he makes an effort to discreetly dispose of any diapers he soils, you won’t go looking for them and you’ll keep your mouth shut if you find one or two. “On the theft problem,” Bering said, “a 14-year-old diaper fetishist can’t just run to the store to buy erotic supplies out of his own paycheck. So let him earn enough money to buy

BY

D A N S AVA G E

a few pairs of pull-ups here and there. But tell your stepson that the stealing is the main reason you’ve decided to take him to a therapist. A good psychologist can explore the reasons for his kleptomania and lend a sympathetic and nonparental ear for any taboo feelings.”

Dear Dan: I’m a 19-year-old male college student.

I lost two and a half fingers on my right hand in an accident when I was 13. I am otherwise good-looking and in shape, but what does that matter? A counselor once told me, “A true lady of class will love you for who you are.” Bullshit. I’m disfigured, not stupid. Children fear me! And what sort of woman would look at me with desire when whole men can be found everywhere? Don’t tell me to go to counseling. I go to counseling. Don’t give me the link to some useless “support” group’s website. What is there to do?

Don’t Insult My Intelligence Dear DIMI: Get the fuck over yourself. I know that’s harsh, but I’m thinking that’s what you came to me for. If it isn’t, then you might wanna skip the rest of my response. There are people out there with missing limbs, who were badly burned in fires, with disfiguring birth defects. One day volunteering in a burn ward or at Walter Reed might help you put your mangled hand in perspective. Because it could be worse. And burn victims and people with missing limbs and people with birth defects? Lots of them are dating and getting laid and finding partners despite the cruel looks they sometimes get from thoughtless children. Yes, some women will be turned off by your right hand, but some won’t care. While there might be women who’ll find you more attractive — I’ve never received a letter from a woman with a fetish for missing fingers, but I’ll doubtless hear from one after your letter runs — I can tell you this for sure: No one is attracted to a person paralyzed by self-pity. Each of us moves through life covered with scars, some more visible than others. All we can do is make the best of what we have or what we have left. So get the fuck over yourself, get the fuck out of the house, and go meet women. If you’re worried that your right hand is the first thing a woman notices, get a prosthesis made or wear a glove. And while you may be tempted to blame your right hand for your lack of romantic success, remember that very few people your age — with 10 intact fingers — have met with much romantic success. I’m sorry about your accident, I really am. Good luck. Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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The Pitch: August 22, 2013