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“Cephalopod” by Scott Burchard; lacquer, acrylic and resin on plywood See page 10

Vol. 35 No. 9

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

LBUSD candidates emerge as longtime Boardmember Mary Stanton bows out of re-election bid for 2014

Megan Kerr

Staff Writer

Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) Boardmember Mary Stanton has told the Signal Tribune she will not seek re-election when her term expires next year, a decision that now opens up the field for a new representative to take the post. The longtime District 1 boardmem-

Long Beach organization seeks families to foster adults with developmental disabilities

Jeff Price

Uduak Ntuk

Sean Belk

August 2, 2013

Forging a family

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

ber, who won her sixth consecutive fouryear term in 2010, said via email on Tuesday, July 30 that she plans to end her tenure in July 2014 when she will have served 24 years on the school board. “I will not be running again for school board,” Stanton said. “I am proud of all that has been accomplished during my tenure and feel this is a good time to step

Mary Stanton

LB Council seeks stricter regulations on ‘cash for gold’ dealers, but experts say problem is lack of enforcement see CANDIDATES page 11

Sean Belk Staff Writer

The Long Beach City Council has agreed to look at ways to impose stricter regulations on “cash for gold” businesses by making them adhere to the same standards as pawnbrokers and other second-hand dealers. But experts in the field say gold buyers are already defined as second-hand dealers under California law and are required to apply for a state license to operate, adding that the proliferation of rogue, illegal dealers comes from merely a lack of city enforcement and oversight. At the July 16 meeting, the Council voted 7-0 to approve the request brought by 6th District Long Beach CouncilmemSean Belk/Signal Tribune ber Dee Andrews to have city A number of “cash for gold” establishments exist in Long Beach, such as this one located off staff come back with a new ordi- of Pacific Coast Highway, in which customers turn in their scrap gold and unwanted jewelry nance within 90 days. Ninth for cash. But city officials say some illegal operations may have contributed to a rise in propDistrict Councilmember Steven erty crime. The City Council is now looking to tighten restrictions on these businesses. Neal and Vice Mayor Robert several years, since unlawful businesses streets, police said. Garcia co-sponsored the proposal. “Many burglars tell us that they fence The proposal is an attempt to go after have made it easier for thieves to trade illegal and unregulated gold sales that stolen jewelry for cash. In fact, the rush stolen items like jewelry at ‘cash for gold’ police officials said have been contribut- for gold has prompted some criminals to businesses,” said Long Beach Police ing to a rise in property crime over the last snatch necklaces from people walking the see GOLD page 15

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Courtesy CA Mentor FHA

California Mentor FHA seeks to match mentors and their families with adults with developmental disabilities. Lakewood resident Stephen Bullard (left) has welcomed Miguel (center) and Marcus (right) into his home.

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Lakewood resident Stephen Bullard, 52, knows just how much his life has changed so quickly after he took on the responsibility of looking after two young men who really needed him. More than two years ago, the music instructor welcomed Marcus into his home. Soon after that, Miguel joined their family. Both Marcus and Miguel, clients of the California Mentor Family Home Agency (FHA), were matched with Bullard, who commits to mentor the young men in a safe family environment. (Their last names are being withheld to comply with privacy concerns.) California Mentor’s program certifies family homes and seeks individuals who are willing to provide in-home care for adults 18 and older who have developmental disabilities, according to its program director, Melissa Maynes. The program, located in Long Beach, is part of a nationwide for-profit agency called The Mentor Networks. see MENTOR page 14

CONCERTS IN THE PARK Wednesday Evenings at 6:30pm Signal Hill Park, 2175 Cherry Avenue

August 7 - Susie Hansen Latin Band Latin & Salsa

August 14 - Doobies, Inc. Doobie Bros. Tribute Concert Sponsors

Signal Hill Petroleum • Graner Oil Company • Supervisor Don Knabe Mesa Environmental Services • Aleshire & Wynder • EDCO Kluger Architects • Signal Tribune Newspaper 2201 East Willow St., Suite G | Signal Hill

Information: 562-989-7330

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

AUGUST 2, 2013

NEWS

AUGUST 2, 2013

Argument among brothers results in stabbing death

An altercation between two brothers has resulted in the stabbing death of one of them, according to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). On Saturday, July 27, at about 12:15am, LBPD officers responded to a possible stabbing in the area of Elm Avenue and Louise Street. Officers located a stabbing victim who was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced deceased. The victim has been identified as 20-year-old Long Beach resident Geovany Ortiz. The suspect was located nearby and taken into cus-

tody. He has been identified as 22-year-old Long Beach resident Israel Ortiz, who is the victim’s brother. He has been booked for murder. According to the LBPD, the brothers had engaged in an argument that led to the stabbing. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call homicide detective Peter Lackovic or Hugo Cortes at (562) 570-7244. Anonymous tips may be reported to lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

Man killed, another injured in three-vehicle crash in Belmont Shore

A motorcyclist was killed and another was injured in a three-vehicle collision on Friday, July 26, according to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). According to the LBPD, officers responded to an injury-traffic collision at the intersection of 2nd Street and Glendora Avenue at approximately 8:45pm. Upon arrival, officers found a three-vehicle traffic collision involving a 2005 Toyota Sequoia and two Harley Davidson motorcycles. The investigation revealed that the two motorcycles were driving eastbound on 2nd Street in the #2 lane and attempted to cross Glendora Avenue

on a green light. They struck the Toyota Sequoia, that was traveling westbound 2nd street and attempted to make an unsafe left turn onto southbound Glendora, directly in front of the motorcycles. Long Beach Fire Department personnel responded to the scene and transported one of the motorcycle drivers, Joseph Daroza, a 30-year-old resident of Huntington Beach, to a local hospital. He is listed in stable condition. The other motorcycle driver suffered major head trauma and was pronounced deceased at the scene. He has been identified as Taryn Hawk, a 35-

year-old resident of Huntington Beach. The Driver of the Toyota Sequoia, Nicholas Limer, a 68-year-old resident of Long Beach, was not injured in the collision and was interviewed and released. Detectives will present the case to the District Attorney’s Office for possible criminal charges. Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to call Long Beach Police Department Collsion Investigations Detail Detective Brian Watt at (562) 570-7355. Anonymous tips may be submitted by visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

City of LB names new Health and Human Services director

Long Beach City Manager Patrick West announced July 29 the appointment of Kelly Colopy as director of Health and Human Services, effective Sept. 9, 2013. Colopy has 17 years of professional experience in the field of Human Services, and she currently manages the public mental-health network in Salt Lake County, Utah, as network director for Optum Salt Lake County (SLCo), according to a press release issued this week by the City of Long Beach. “Kelly Colopy exemplifies the type of leadership we were looking for in a new Health Department director,” West said. “She has demonstrated the ability to manage a complex set of responsibilities over the course of her career, and we are pleased to welcome her aboard the City’s executive management team.” Since last year, Colopy has been the network director of Optum SLCo, where she manages the Medicaid Behavioral Health network of 220 service providers administering approximately $60 million in mental health and substance-abuse services, according to the press release. Her duties include leading a coordination of effort to ensure consumers have access to appropriate levels of care. Colopy also served as a member of Optum SLCo’s senior leadership team. Previously in her career, Colopy has served as associate director of the Salt Lake County Human Services and Community Services Departments, as well as research director for Substance Abuse at the Utah Department of Human Services. She is also the board chair for Utah Afterschool Network and served on the boards of Salt Lake County Children’s Justice Center and Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum. Colopy holds a master’s degree in public policy from

Duke University and a bachelor’s degree in political science with a minor in mathematics from Smith College. “My entire career thus far has reflected a personal commitment to working with communities and individuals to support successful and healthy living,” Colopy said. “I Kelly Colopy am thrilled to be appointed the City’s next Director of Health and Human Services and look forward to merging the enthusiasm I have for public health and human services with the City’s commitment to providing quality services.” Colopy is replacing Ron Arias, who retired in 2012. The Long Beach Health Department is one of only three City-operated local health jurisdictions in California. Local provision of public health services allows the Health Department to tailor its programs to meet the specific public health and human service needs of Long Beach, according to the City.

The Campaign Trail Source: City of LB

Lena Gonzales, field deputy to Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia, has announced she will seek his 1st District Council seat in the April 2014 election. “Over the last four years, I’ve worked closely with the 1st District community to improve public safety, invest in infrastructure and expand park space,” Gonzalez said. “I'm proud of the progress we’ve made, but there is still work to do.” Gonzalez is a resident of the West Gateway neighborhood. She has a bachelor’s degree from California State University, Long Beach, and is active in various downtown organizations and community groups, as well as programs for cancer awareness and at-risk youth.

Former 7th District Councilmember Tonia Reyes-Uranga announced this week that she has received the endorsement of International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAMAW) District Lodge 947 in her bid to represent the 70th District in the California State Assembly. “I am proud to have the confidence and support of our city employees, the majority of which live in this city and in the Assembly District,” Reyes-Uranga said. “While on the City Council, we worked together to make the community safe and clean. I know first-hand how hard they work, and I appreciate their support and thank them for their trust in me.” According to the press release she issued, Reyes-Uranga also has the endorsement of United Steel Workers 675 and the Painters District Council, and she recently garnered the endorsement of Senator Richard Polanco (ret.) and former Los Angeles City Councilmember Jan Perry, as well as former Long Beach City Councilmember Rae Gabelich.

Long Beach 9th District City Councilmember Steven Neal announced July 30 that he has raised more than $100,000 for his Assembly campaign in the past eight weeks and is officially beginning his bid for the 64th District. “I want to say ‘thank you’ to the residents of Assembly District 64 and all of the people who have already joined our grassroots campaign,” Neal said. “I am proud to have received such a groundswell of support and encouragement from so many hard-working Californians who have decided to stand with me early in this campaign.”

North Long Beach native Uduak Ntuk, a technical professional and community leader, has announced his candidacy for LBUSD District 1 seat. “I am running because I believe in a high-quality public education for all students,” Ntuk said. “I believe it’s time for a new generation of leadership that embraces the Uptown Renaissance community empowerment model of representation, increases parent engagement through a Parent University, and understands the technical skills needed to prepare our kids for the high-quality jobs of tomorrow.”

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

EXPLORE THE LIBRARY What Historical display Who Long Beach Main Public Library Where Main Library Exhibit Spaces, 101 Pacific Ave. When Friday, Aug. 2 through Friday, Aug. 30 More Info The library will open the doors of the “Hidden Library.” Since 1896, the Long Beach Public Library has acquired many items. These historical objects, which include dolls, art from the Works Progress Administration, the Lincoln Monument time capsule and more, will be on display. Call (562) 570-7500 or visit lbpl.org .

HELP RESTORE THE WETLANDS What Habitat restoration Who The Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Where Corner of 1st Street and PCH in Seal Beach When Saturday, Aug. 3 from 10:30am to 12:30pm More Info Volunteers must wear closed-toe shoes. Participants will be eligible to win prizes. Email iwanttohelp@tidalinfluence.com .

CELEBRATING MOTHERS What Community health fair Who Unitarian Universalist Church of Long Beach Where 5450 E. Atherton St. When Saturday, Aug. 3 from 10am to 1pm More Info The Latch & Link: Long Beach health fair will celebrate World Breastfeeding Week. Event will feature a breastfeeding resource fair, conversation groups for mothers, raffles and more. Email latchandlinkLB@gmail.com . BOOK TO ACTION What Film Festival Who The Long Beach Main Public Library, Where Main Library, Auditorium, 101 Pacific Ave. When Saturday, Aug. 3 at 2pm More Info Library will host the “Book to Action” Film Festival featuring the documentary Not My Life. The film depicts the practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a local and global scale. Call (562) 570-7500 or visit lbpl.org .

IN THE KNOW What Community meeting Who North Long Beach Community Action Group Where American Legion Hall, 1215 59th St. When Sunday, Aug. 4 from 2pm to 4pm More Info During this event, 64th District Assemblymember Isadore Hall will talk about his final term and his projects. Meeting is open to the public. Call (562) 428-7710. MEET AND EAT What Supper club Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where Nino’s Italian Restaurant, 3853 Atlantic Ave. When Monday, Aug. 5 at 6:30pm More Info Bixby Knolls Supper Club supports local restaurants on Monday nights, which are typically slow. Residents are invited to meet, eat and support the local economy. The August Supper Club will serve as a 55th anniversary celebration for Nino’s. RSVP at supperclub@bixbyknollsinfo.com . SIP, SHOP, EAT AND ROCK What Block party Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where 4100 Block on Long Beach Blvd. When Thursday, Aug. 8 from 6pm to 8:30pm More Info Event will feature live music. Urban Cottage, Lucy’s Boudoir and Furniture Consignment and More will have special sales for the evening. Attendees will be able to purchase dinner at Philly Steak and Sub, Handy’s Smoked Meats and Bundts on Melrose.

OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

AUGUST 2, 2013

Thoughts from the Publisher

We’ve all learned the facts of life at different ages and from different sources. As far as I can remember, my first real “birds and the bees” education came when I was in second grade. Mom filled me in a bit with the old adage of “when men and women are married, and love each other a lot, they sleep together and make a baby.” From that basic information I remember gathering that kissing must be the real baby-making mechanism, with each kiss producing another piece to the baby puzzle. From there I figured it must take nine months of nightly kissing to produce a finished product– full-term baby! Fast-forward about 40 years when my cousin’s little 6-year-old daughter (let’s call her Annie) asked me to tell her about “sex and stuff.” I quickly called her mother and asked what she wanted me to do. Her answer was, “You tell her– I don’t know what to say!” Oy!

by Neena Strichart

I asked the girl to give me a day to put together some information and to “come back tomorrow.” That evening I scoured through my old child-psychology books and any other appropriate written material that I thought might help. Narrowing it down to a couple of rather generic, clinical-looking biological drawings of women and men parts, I figured I’d have to wing it with the rest. I started off by telling Annie that what I was about to tell her was some pretty amazing stuff, and that although it may sound crazy, I was telling her the truth. We then went into the picture/visual-aids part of the discussion and on to a rather simplistic explanation of how “it’s” done… including a few hand gestures on my part. I couldn’t help but giggle inside when I saw the look of shock and disbelief on Annie’s face. Her first words at that point were, “What, really?” I assured her that, “Yep, that’s what it’s all about.”

She then looked rather puzzled and said, “If that’s sex, then what’s the difference between an R-rated movie and an X-rated movie?” My response was brief and to the point– R-rated movies show sex under the covers, and Xrated movies show sex on top of the covers. Satisfied with my response, Annie switched the topic to movies in general and wanted to know if I had ever seen Disney’s The Little Mermaid. I think the whole sex talk lasted about 8 minutes. I recently had lunch with my gal pal Missy. She informed me that she too was faced with explaining the birds and bees– to her young son. I told her I had a small book on the subject (I had picked it up a couple of years ago, just in case), and that I would be happy to lend it to her. Good luck, Missy. Your boy may want more explicit details! Update: Annie is now a grown woman and the mother of a beautiful little girl who looks just like her!

It’s not just about time at this gem of a jewelry-repair shop C O M M E N TA R Y

By Betty Karnette

Rush-a-Fix at 495 West Willow St. is a friendly local shop in the Wrigley area that is frequented by local residents. They know this is a dependable shop that is open Monday through Saturday from 11am until 6pm with well-informed people behind the glass storefront. There is also interesting jewelry available at this local business where safety measures are in place. For example, you must push a buzzer to enter through a glass door, and the person inside can easily see who is present. This kind of attention to detail lets the customer know that the owner understands that this is one way to keep our communities safe. Rush-a-Fix is doing its part. A huge chart is posted on the wall that gives the customer a list of what repairs are available. With the help of an assistant, you can see the way to having your problems solved. The list is as follows: watch bands and adjustments, watch batteries, eyeglasses repairs, jewelry accessories, gemstones, all jewelry and watch repairs, engraving, ring sizing, restringing, refurbishing of jewelry and watches, and rhodium plate. The prompt responses to customers’ needs are the result of the owners’ 20 years in the jewelry business. Their honest approach puts customers’ needs first. If it is discovered that batteries are the problem, then the charges are based on the cost of the batteries and the value of the watch as well as

Fostering care

the actual labor involved. Since 80 to 90 percent of the time, batteries are the problem with watches, this is an important fact of which the customer should be aware. There are many types of watches. There are also many types of jewelry that may have a “timepiece” component, and 20 years of experience makes a difference in quality of service. That’s why Rush-a-Fix is so popular in the neighborhood. Residents know that the experience required for jewelry repair is special. Rush-a-Fix, you are a business that is appreciated by the Wrigley community. Time pieces and jewelry often have very special meanings along life’s journey. It’s rarely the monetary value of an item that make a piece valuable to the owner. It’s the memories and sentiment that are attached. Therefore, watch and jewelry repair will always be important to a society. Rush-a-Fix jewelers know this. They are happy to be on Willow Street, and the locals are very happy to have them. Betty Karnette is a Wrigley resident as well as a retired California state assemblymember and state senator.

Rush-a-Fix at 495 West Willow St.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Thank you for introducing your readers to our Extraordinary Families–Extraordinary Children campaign to find caring foster families for vulnerable children who need stable and loving homes now [“Nonprofit launches campaign to recruit and train foster parents of children needing therapeutic care,” July 26, 2013]. Our campaign addresses the urgent needs of children and youth who are most at risk in foster care and who confront some of the toughest realities after leaving care. We would greatly appreciate hearing from individuals or families willing to open their homes to a child in need. To learn more, please visit our website (extraordinary-families.org), where those who have volunteered to become a foster parent describe the difference they have made in children's lives and what fostering a child has meant to them. For more information, please call us at (323) 549-3426. Andrew Bridge Executive Director Child Welfare Initiative PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Jane Fallon

Barbie Ellisen COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

Mea culpa

The July 26 article titled “Coyote attack on 2-year-old girl at Cypress cemetery spurs fears of a growing problem” should have indicated that officials have reported the incident was the first coyote attack against a human in Orange County this year.

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Sean Belk

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

STAFF WRITER

CJ Dablo

Shoshanah Siegel

CULTURE WRITERS

Leighanna Nierle ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ariana Gastelum

Brandy Soto

Tanya Paz

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

To read previous issues of the Signal Tribune, visit www.signaltribune.com

NEWS

AUGUST 2, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

Signal Hill ordinance puts time limits on new projects to expedite slow-moving construction

Sean Belk Staff Writer

A new city law that recently went into effect puts time constraints on newly approved commercial and residential construction in Signal Hill, as a way to expedite developments after previous projects have sat in limbo for years. The zoning-ordinance amendment went into effect late last month, or 30 days after the second reading by the City Council, which first approved the code change in a 5-0 vote on June 4. The new ordinance puts time limits on new projects based on their size and type. Provisions allow for time extensions and extension-approval processes. But, if developers fail to meet the City’s new timelines, they face penalties of $200 per day for up to 180 days, or a maximum of $36,000, and having their building permits revoked. City officials said the goal of the new requirements is to move developments along in a more timely fashion and give developers the message to not apply for permits until they are ready to start construction and complete projects.

“The intent is that, in the future, projects move more swiftly,” said Signal Hill Community Development Director Scott Charney in a phone interview with the Signal Tribune. The Planning Commission first addressed the issue last year after reports that a number of construction projects in the City had been stalled for the last two to six years, leaving “unsightly job sites” in neighborhoods and causing ongoing noise, dust, debris and fumes as well as parking and traffic impacts on roads and infrastructure, according to city officials. Developments have been hindered by the economic downturn that has hit the construction industry in the past several years while some projects in Signal Hill have been delayed by costly oilwell remediation requirements. A staff report provided a list of projects that have been on hold. The report shows that a project to build a second residential unit at 3240 Cerritos Ave. was still ongoing at the time of the Council meeting in June, after the applicant received approval for a site plan and design review back in January 2005.

Another project to erect a 1,845square-foot, two-story second residential unit at 1866 Stanley Ave. that involves converting a duplex into a three-bedroom, single-family dwelling had been in the works for more than three years. According to a previous Signal Tribune article, the City Council approved the project by Signal Hill property owner Mike Bailey in a 3-2 vote in November 2009. A list of construction projects that was updated as of July 9, however, states that the residential unit on Stanley Avenue has since been completed and the unit on Cerritos Avenue was near completion with work being done on the interior. Still, one project remains in question. Construction of a mosque at 995 27th St., in between EDCO’s recycling facility and administration building, has stopped and started for the past six years after the City Council approved a conditional-use permit in 2007. The Long Beach Islamic Center has proposed to build a one-story mosque with space for an office, conference room, assembly room, washrooms and restrooms on a

13,000 square-foot parcel of land. The building’s southern entry was expected to include an arcade with three arches supported by four columns finished in stucco. The Signal Tribune reported that construction began on the site in 2010 after being held up by oil-well-remediation requirements. Today, however, the project appears to have stopped in its tracks, leaving nothing but an exterior frame of the building and a dome on the ground. Charney said that a building permit for the project has expired and the applicant must now reapply for a site plan and building permits and go through another approval process with the Plan-

ating Celebrnew our on! locati

ning Commission. He said that, if the applicant decides to proceed, the project would be subject to the City’s new construction time limits and possibly other code enforcement. Charney said the new time-limit requirements only apply to newly approved construction projects and don’t apply to projects that were approved prior to the city ordinance going into effect, even though past projects were the “genesis” of the new law. He added that the Islamic center project appears to be an anomaly. “It’s not normal for an active project to lose their building permit,” Charney said. “This is an unusual situation.” see CONSTRUCTION page 6

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The Long Beach Islamic Center started building a mosque at 995 27th St. last year after the project was delayed for years. However, construction has since halted after the applicant’s building permits expired, according to city officials. The applicant now must reapply for approvals to proceed and must follow a new set of construction time limits.

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Thursday, July 25 DUI 1:59am– Cherry Ave./E. 32nd St.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide Auto burglary 9:11pm– 2700 block Walnut Ave.

Sunday, July 28 DUI 2:45am– Redondo Ave./Stearns St.

In public parks past hours of overnight closure 10:37pm– 2300 block Skyline Dr.

Residential burglary 3pm– 1900 block Junipero Ave.

Friday, July 26 Non-injury hit-and-run 1:04pm– 2200 block E. Willow St.

Auto burglary 3:30am– 1500 block E. 23rd St.

Petty theft with prior 4:28am– 1400 block E. Willow St.

Residential burglary 5:15pm– 2600 block Lime Ave.

Monday, July 29 Garage, residential burglary 5:39am– 1400 block E. Willow St.

Disorderly conduct while under the influence 9:17pm– Lewis Ave./E. Burnett St.

Auto burglary 8:42am– 2500 block E. Willow St.

Saturday, July 27 Scavenging 6:51am– E. 33rd St./Lewis Ave.

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Recovered stolen vehicle 8:53am– 3300 block E. Hill St. Identity theft 2pm– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

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Sunday, July 28 Robbery of person 1:20am–Walnut Ave./ E. PCH

Robbery of person 10:41am– W. PCH/Pacific Ave.

Residential burglary 6pm– 2400 block Elm Ave.

Unauthorized use of ID to obtain credit or goods 8:04pm– E. Pacific Coast Hwy./Junipero Ave.

Tuesday, July 30 Stolen vehicle 10:27pm– 3300 block Lewis Ave.

Wednesday, July 31 Trespassing 9:25am– 3500 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Reckless driving 4:23pm– Walnut Ave./E. Willow St.

Auto burglary 5:10pm- 2400 block E. Willow St.

Monday, July 29 Residential burglary 8pm– 300 W. 31st St.

Residential burglary 9:45am– 2400 block Oregon Ave.

Residential burglary 6pm– 400 block W. 31st St.

Tuesday, July 30 Residential burglary 10:36am– 2700 block Magnolia Ave.

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Islamic Center Chairman Tarek Mohamed had not responded by press time to the Signal Tribune’s phone messages and email seeking comment. According to city officials, site plans may remain valid for up to two years, but, once a building permit is issued, new projects are required to follow the City’s construction time limits based on project size and type. For instance, construction on a project with a floor-area size of 200 square feet or more would be required to start within 180 days of a building permit being issued. The City’s new code also requires that nearby property owners within 100 to 500 feet of a project be notified upon the issuance of a building permit. If a project has not been completed within the prescribed time limit, a request for a time extension may be filed after a 30-day grace period. After the extension request is

BIG

continued from page 5

received, public notices would then be sent to nearby property owners. A 10-day public-comment period then would allow nearby residents to comment for or against the project. If, for the first request, no public comments are received, planning officials may approve or deny the request. If the City receives public comments, however, the project would require Planning Commission approval. In the case of a second time-extension request, the Planning Commission would approve or deny the application. The commission’s decision may then be appealed to the City Council. If a project has not been completed within the time limits and after two extensions, however, penalties may ensue, following a final 30-day grace period. City officials acknowledged that some projects might be held up due to lawsuits or labor disputes but added that situations may be taken into account through the appeals process or court hearings. ß

AUGUST 2, 2013

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Chamber of Commerce and remains a boardmember to this day. She also serves on Signal Hill Police Chief Langston’s committee for evaluation of meritorious service. Last spring, The Undershirt partnered with the Signal Tribune to create and host a Spring Fling Shopping Thing, an arts-and-crafts event showcasing local artists and vendors for an evening of entertainment and smallbusiness advancement. Source: Lowenthal’s office

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been unfriendly to small businesses, according to Lowenthal’s office. Shortly after Blackwell purchased the company 10 years ago, she struggled to retain key account holders that transferred their business to other big-name printing and embroidery companies. The Undershirt has one part-time employee to help in its warehouse, but most of the work is done by Blackwell herself. In addition to singularly operating her business, Blackwell has also served as president of the Signal Hill

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7

Assemblymember Lowenthal’s office honors Undershirt, Inc. as Small Business of Month

Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) has selected The Undershirt, Inc. to be honored as State Assembly District 70’s July Small Business of the Month. Signal Hill-based The Undershirt, owned and operated by Shari Blackwell, was chosen to be honored because of its commitment to serving the community by offering a “highquality product while remaining dedicated to promoting the importance of small-business ownership and support in the city of Signal Hill and greater Long Beach areas,” according to Lowenthal’s office. The Undershirt, Inc. is a full-service, custom career-apparel company specializing in logo embroidery and custom screen-printing. Their main business is helping other companies advertise their trades by creating logo apparel for staff to wear or give away as promotional items. They also offer custom hats and other items used for business advertising. Blackwell has fought hard to stay open in an economic climate that has

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COMMUNITY

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

AUGUST 2, 2013

SHPD to host its 10th National Night Out event

The Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) will host its 10th Annual National Night Out celebration at Reservoir Park, 3315 Gundry Ave., on Tuesday, Aug. 6 from 5pm to 8pm. National Night Out is a nationwide event that promotes crime-prevention networks within communities and their partnerships. The event is free and open to the public. The Signal Hill Police Department’s National Night Out garnered awards from the

National Association of Town Watches in 2011 and 2012. Some of the activities during the evening include: a balloon artist, a face painter, arts and crafts, a train, a bounce house, a deejay, barbecued items for sale, a free raffle, and a dunk tank with employees of the Signal Hill Police Department. There will also be numerous businesses and organizations from the community providing free items and information. The SHPD will dis-

tribute free anti-car theft devices to the first 25 community members that show proof (through their vehicle registration) that they own one of the following types of most commonly stolen vehicles: 1990s Honda Accord or Civic; 1990s Toyota Camry; 1990s Nissan Sentra; or a 1980s Toyota pickup truck. Free street parking will be available.

The California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) Science Education Department will host its annual Young Scientists’ Camp, a paid summer science camp for any child in 2nd through 8th grade, plus highschool girls in any grade, from Aug. 5–16 on the CSULB campus. This year’s theme is Earth and Space Science, taught by experienced and future science teachers and science specialists, according to Science Education Department Chair Laura Henriques.

Second- and third-graders will study rocks, soil and animals who live there in a program called Digging into Science; third- and fourth-graders will explore space and Mars in Curiosity in Science; fifth- and sixth-graders will learn about the ways the Earth is reshaped in Don’t Mess with Mother Nature; and seventh- and eighth-graders will become crime-scene investigators in Forensic Investigations. High-school girls can enroll in Phun Physics for Phemales, which will feature women physi-

cists as instructors and is partially funded by the American Physical Society in an effort to get more young women interested in studying physics or physical sciences, Henriques said. Previous high-school physics coursework is not required. Both camps will take place from 8:30am to noon Mondays through Fridays at the CSULB campus. Fees are $300, with a $25 discount for siblings. For more information or to register, visit cnsm.csulb.edu/depts/scied/projects/ysc .

CSULB to host August camps for young scientists, physics for high-school girls

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Source: SHPD

Source: CSULB

SH Rotary’s first chili cook-off to fund its program for scholarships

The Signal Hill Rotary will host its inaugural “Chili CookOff” on Sunday, Aug. 4 at Curley’s Café, 1999 Willow St., to raise funds for its newly formed New Generations Scholarships program. The program provides up to 14 college scholarships to local 6th- to 12th-grade students from surrounding schools. The Signal Hill Rotary is welcoming local chefs, organizations and others to compete in the event, which will take place from 11am to 3pm. Community members are invited to attend, contribute a $3 tasting fee for the cook-off and partake in the subsequent ice-cream social and ceremonies from 2pm to 4pm. A joint vendor fair will be hosted at Signal Hill Petroleum. Signal Hill Rotary members Elizabeth Wise and Candace Yamagawa are leading the development of the scholarship program. “As servants of our communities, our scholarships will reward students, not only for academic achievement, but for dedication and service to their communities,” Yamagawa said. “Through a weighted system of evaluation, our highest ratings will be given to students who have a proven track record of community service and volunteerism.” For more information regarding the cook-off or New Generations Scholarships, contact President Seve Gilpin at seveann@yahoo.com or (562) 961-3434. Source: SH Rotary

COMMUNITY

AUGUST 2, 2013

Mexican Mobile Consulate coming to Long Beach

Sixth District Councilmember Dee Andrews, along with Consul General of Mexico Carlos Manuel Sada Solana, will host the Mexican Mobile Consulate’s coming to Long Beach on Sunday, Aug. 10 from 8am to 2pm at the McBride Teen Center,1520 Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave. Interested individuals may attend the free event to obtain important documents such as passports and consular ID cards. According to Andrews’s office, many Mexican nationals have difficulty getting to the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, and this event brings the necessary resources to the community. “It is a great honor to partner with the City of Long Beach to serve the Mexican citizens,” Solana said. “The community program is a great asset that allows us to reach out to our constituents to render our services where they are based. This spares them the time and expense of traveling to our

Los Angeles office.” Andrews said, “I am excited to be able to reach out to our strong Long Beach Mexican population to assist them with acquiring these important documents.” The event is open to the general public. All those attending for documents must make an appointment by calling 1-877 MEXITEL (639-4835). The following documents must be provided during the appointment in order to process services: original birth certificate, an effective official identification with the name on the identification the same as it appears on the birth certificate, proof of address in Los Angeles County, and two passport photos with a white background. For more information visit consulmex.sre.gob.mx/losangeles. For questions about requirements or application process, call (213) 351-6880 ext. 2518.

First Fridays Art Walk to celebrate Summer of Love

The First Fridays Art Walk in Bixby Knolls on Aug. 2 will turn back the clock to 1967’s Summer of Love. The evening will include: live art and interactive-art activities, jazz, incense and peppermints, classic cars, flower power, folk, politicos, break dancers, a Toaster Music (improvisational performance duo featuring Sumako and Sander Roscoe Wolff) sound installation, a hippie in stilts, goats and chickens, bubbles, the Knolls Ranger mascot, free books, gift items, antiques and the Big Red Bus. The Summer Shutters 3.0 Photo Contest display will be in the Jones Gallery at the Expo Arts Center. Winners and prizes will be announced at 8pm. Local band MOVE will perform hits from 1967 beginning at 7:30pm at 4313 Atlantic Ave. When the sun goes down, Nino’s Italian Restaurant & Digital Installers will host a big-screen projection of Monterey Pop, the 1968 concert film about the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, in Nino’s parking lot. Westerly School’s summer art camp will unveil a First Fridays mural in front of Expo Arts Center. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” will take the month off and return in September. Eighth District Councilmember Al Austin’s “Council on Your Corner” will be set up at Atlantic Avenue and Burlinghall Drive to meet and greet attendees Attendees may dine on “Art-Lantic” Avenue at one of the local restaurants then grab the Big Red

Source: Andrews’s office

Bus to travel from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have all the information about First Fridays, maps, business info, and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm. MORE INFORMATION firstfridayslongbeach.com

Source: BKBIA

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

9

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CULTURE

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

AUGUST 2, 2013

Abstract artist uses acrylics to create paintings reflective of ‘celestial’ visions

Brandy Soto Staff Writer

Not many people can appreciate the construction of abstract art the way Long Beach artist Scott Burchard can. He paints detailed and vibrant abstract pieces, often reflective of the cosmos, using acrylic paints, several different tools and a keen eye on his color composition. Burchard and his wife, Pamela Seager, both have a passion for art and happen to be big-time collectors. Seagar, the executive director of Rancho Los Alamitos, also helps Burchard with the layout of his shows.

“We both grew up with art,” he explains. “She worked in the world of art, and she grew up in a household of people who were very much into preserving antiquities. She grew up with a great appreciation for aesthetic and style. She hung [my current] show, and she’s very knowledgeable…you can see how there’s little groupings here and little groupings there. She tried to get them to work not only adjacent to each other, but to the piece along the way. It’s rather nice when you come into the room. I like the fact that the first image you really see, the image that grabs you the

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most, is the really strong work.” Before abstract art, Burchard mostly painted landscape scenes using oils. He says it wasn't until his wife asked him to do a “Jackson Pollock finish” on their kitchen floor that he became interested in acrylics. “I experimented with the acrylics, and I researched quite a bit about Pollock,” he says. “I looked through the images, and I thought about it quite a bit, and in working with the acrylics I was just overwhelmed with how quickly I could suddenly go back to the canvas– in this case it was a floor– but they dried so quickly, and I really enjoyed just the manner in which they interacted. And when the kitchen floor was finished I found this piece of masonite in my garage, and I decided that I would continue with the exploring of the Jackson imagery, if you will. And that’s [my] piece, called ‘Yo Jackson’ that was finished in 2009. So, I did two more in the Pollock sortof derivative style, and in so doing, I noticed how when I mixed the acrylics, how they interacted. And the more I worked with them, the more I thought that I wanted to paint images that were evocative of

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“Cephalopod,” mixed media

photographs that the Hubble Telescope might have taken. That started me in this whole galactic thing, and there’s a couple of those in ‘Cosmic Blues,’ then in [my] piece called ‘El Grand Conejo De Las Estrellas’ or ‘The Big Rabbit of the Stars.’” “Chinese Silk Scarf,” mixed media Burchard explains that his style has changed tremendously since he began, and it is continuously changing. As he delves into the world of acrylics, he is fascinated by how the colors intertwine and react with one another. He uses this fascination to his advantage in the creative process. “I’m moving more towards the realm of imagination in the cosmic scape, if you will. So that my style has now paintings more in the outer-world theme…such as, Scott Burchard the Marvel series, images that you might see in the backdrop of a comic book. That’s one of my agrees that his art is extremely styles. Also, I work on two differ- detailed and textured but says it is ent grounds; one is black lacquer, “of its own volition.” and the other is white gesso. The “The acrylics, depending on a white gesso look, I’ve been able couple of elements in the acrylic– to branch out [in the] Under Over and I don’t know if I’m well series, where I hit upon painting a versed enough to know what painting that I know I’m going to these are, but just the impression obscure with pigment. I paint this I get– that the dark purple, particpainting and let it dry, and then I ularly when it’s wet on wet on top skin the canvas with pigment. I of another acrylic, has its own like it more saturated, darker. sort of molecular dance. The pigWe’re talking deep purples, deep ments do things, so if you put blues, deep greens, and then I them in proximity to each other, work wet on wet on top of that.” then you get these pigments interHe says that his process is reacting. It takes a sort of very in-the-moment, and he has patience to watch it and see what limited time to experiment with happens. I also told you that I unlimited color combinations. He work with compressed air, so by painting underneath and then blowing the pigment away and scratching through and exposing with a paintbrush, revealing the underneath painting, you get these really wonderful, soft, sortof like a peek-a-boo effect. Like [my] piece “Blue Scape.” I think the thing I really like to do is work with high-contrasting colors, so that you place them in contrast and [the colors] punch up. If you’re working with blue, I like to come in with a little orange, with red I like to place a little green, with yellow I like to introduce the purple. Working with the contrasting.” Burchard became extremely ill in 2010 and used abstract painting as a type of therapy. He also explains how the effects of his illness later became inspirations for his pieces. “It brought me back to life, it’s given me a focus,” says Burchard. see ARTIST page 14

AUGUST 2, 2013

Candidates

continued from page 1

down. The difficult budget times are almost behind us, and the future looks promising for real sustained growth in achievement across the district.” Stanton added that she plans to spend time with her grandchildren, working in the garden and improving at duplicate bridge. The school board’s District 1 encompasses north Long Beach, including Bixby Knolls and California Heights, representing 10 elementary schools, four middle schools and two high schools, including Jordan High School. So far, it appears there are three candidates who have stepped up to nab the open District 1 seat in the primary election in April 2014, including Jeff Price, Uduak Ntuk and Megan Kerr. All three candidates said they have filed forms with the California Secretary of State to start raising funds. Price, who lost against Stanton in the 2010 election with 42.6 percent of the vote, has returned for another shot, recently launching a campaign website and a Facebook page. The local attorney and president of the PTA for Longfellow Elementary School, which his 3rd-grade son Parker attends, said he plans to make the same points he made in his last bid for LBUSD boardmember, with top priorities being “health and safety.” Price said his goals, if he is elected, would be to install additional bathrooms at Longfellow to serve the school’s nearly 1,100 students and fix heat problems in the school’s classrooms that Price said reach up to 95 degrees during warm days. “I’ve gone to school-board meetings, advocating for that, and nothing’s been done yet,” he said. A 20-year Long Beach resident of California Heights, Price added that he also wants the community to become more involved in school-board meetings, which he said have become brief and formulaic. He said school officials often focus more on awards than making real changes for the future. “There seems to always be a ‘disconnect’ between the school board and the general population,” Price said. “I’m not saying that we’re a bad district; I think we’re a great district, but one of the problems that arises is, I think, the school board uses these awards as a shield

against input and new ideas. I think that culture needs to change.” He added that, instead of only focusing on funding for east Long Beach schools, the school board should shift more money into existing schools in poverty-stricken neighborhoods of north Long Beach. He applauded the school district’s proposed multi-million-dollar renovation of Jordan High School. Price said the school board should also tackle the “achievement gap” between neighborhoods and different student ethnicities, adding that AfricanAmerican students are expelled three to four times the rate of Caucasian and Asian students. “That needs to be addressed,” Price said. “I think [school officials are] trying, I just don’t think they’ve been successful.” Ntuk, a petroleum-engineering associate for the City of Long Beach who works in a public-private partnership to operate the THUMS offshore oil islands, recently announced that he is running and has launched a campaign Facebook page. Growing up near Jordan High School, Ntuk said it was the Long Beach education system that helped him rise out of poverty and he now wants to give back. Throughout the past decade, Ntuk has worked with area schools, has served as a PTA chair, has volunteered during career days and has given presentations on engineering-career paths, he said. “I feel like I have a lot to contribute,” Ntuk said. “I feel like I can relate to the community.” Ntuk has also partnered with various LBUSD teachers to host the Inaugural Long Beach Robo Bowl middle-school robotics competition. More than 150 middle-school students participated in the competition, learning about problemsolving skills, teamwork and real-world application of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields, he said. Ntuk said the school district should focus on career paths in civil engineering, bio engineering and computer science– fields that he said will become doubledigit-growth sectors in LA County in coming years. After being a strong supporter of Proposition 30, which imposes tax hikes to allocate more public-school funding across the state, Ntuk said the focus now is to rebuild the school district that has had to lay off up to 600 teachers in recent years. “I think it’s time to start reducing our

NEWS

class sizes, restoring programs and making sure we’re looking out for the neediest students,” he said. Kerr, a PTA member who has volunteered in various capacities for LBUSD for the past 12 years and who is also a lifelong resident of north Long Beach like Ntuk, has launched her own campaign website and a Facebook page. According to her website, Kerr has worked in classrooms, offices, music programs, sports programs and green teams at every school her three children have attended, as well as at other schools in the LBUSD. She has also served on school-site councils as well as district-wide committees as a parent representative and was appointed to the position of school-board liaison by the Long Beach Council PTA. Kerr said, “It’s a really important time for schools,” especially with California’s Common Core State Standards. But she added there is a need for the school district to have “clear, consistent communication,” which she hopes to bring to the table if elected. Kerr said District 1 in north Long Beach has “some of the largest schools and some of the most diverse schools” in the district. At some schools, about 40 to 50 percent of students rely on school-funded lunches while at others the percentage is 80 to 90 percent, she said. “Students in District 1 come from all backgrounds, so that presents a challenge,” Kerr said. “It’s important to make sure we’re using money effectively, bringing those kids along and bringing those kids forward.” As far as the budget, she said cuts of the last six years appear to be “leveling off,” but LBUSD needs to be “strategic” in its allocation of funds as additional money may come in. Though running for school board wasn’t always her goal, Kerr said she is “passionate about education” and “passionate about students in Long Beach.” Stanton’s seat, however, is just one of three seats that may open up on the five-member LBUSD Board of Education next year, as the terms of current LBUSD Board President John McGinnis, who represents District 3, and Vice President Diana Craighead, who represents District 5, also expire in July 2014. The Long Beach Community College District (LBCCD) Board of Trustees may also see some changes

next year, as terms expire for current LBCCD President Jeffrey Kellogg of Trustee Area 1, Mark Bowen of Trustee Area 3 and Vice President Thomas Clark of Trustee Area 5. The elected officials are responsible for setting board policies and handling annual multi-million-dollar budgets for public-education institutions that represent Long Beach’s biggest employer. In the approaching term, a lot will be at stake for LBUSD and LBCCD, which are now shaking off the tremendous fiscal challenges that have plagued school districts and community colleges across California in recent years. In particular, the LBCCD Board of Trustees has taken some heat for handling recent budget deficits, specifically its decision to discontinue 11 instructional career trade programs that led to a recall effort by student leaders. So far, one candidate has stepped into the race in a bid to take Kellogg’s seat for LBCCD Trustee Area 1, which covers an area west of Cherry Avenue, north of 36th Street, east of the Los Angeles River and south of Alondra Boulevard. Dr. Marshall Blesofsky, a practicing physician assistant and a retired USC professor who also taught in the allied-health program at LBCC, has launched a campaign website, promising to “restore the career technical programs” discontinued by the LBCCD board and to make sure Measure E bond funds are “used for their intended purposes.” According to his website, Blesofsky also plans to: preserve jobs and maintain classes; increase transparency on the board; develop new programs for jobs in energy efficiency retrofitting and design, mass transit and regional food systems; advocate for a “tuition-free, quality,

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Marshall Blesofsky

federally funded, and locally controlled” community college; and “resist any efforts to corporatize public education at LBCC.” Meanwhile, at least five of the nine City Council seats in odd-numbered Council districts may also open up next year, in addition to the mayor’s seat and the city attorney’s seat. LBCCD Boardmember Doug Otto has indicated he will likely run for mayor. If he wins, the district would have to hold a special election to fill his term that expires in 2016. Unlike elected city officials, however, LBUSD and LBCCD members have no term limits, which means incumbent members may continue to seek re-election indefinitely, according to Long Beach City Clerk Larry Herrera. Other than Stanton, it’s unclear which incumbent members will run for another term. Herrera said the period in which LBUSD and LBCCD candidates may officially file nomination papers is from Dec. 16 to Jan. 10. Papers must be filed with the Los Angeles County Registrar of Voters in Norwalk. ß

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Cuatro Dias Wine Tasting Tuesday Aug. 13 6:00-8:00pm $25 per person

We have amazing local winemaker Gregg Allen coming by on Tuesday, August 13th to pour his Cuatro Dias wines at our next commuter wine tasting. Gregg makes excellent, well balanced, full-bodied wines in a classic Central Coast style, and winemaking isn't even his day job— he’s a firefighter. I can only imagine what his wines would taste like if he did it full time! Cuatro Dias Winery has a 1000-1500 case production annually and is located on The Central Coast, operating out of Riverstar Winery located in San Miguel. The grapes are sourced from Vineyards in Paso Robles, San Miguel, Santa Barbara, Los Olivos, and Santa Ynez. Wines vary each season depending on which varietals are chosen, and vineyards that are sourced that year. Six to eight varietals are produced each season, and sold in restaurants, and wine bars all over California. Call for reservations as space is limited. Light appetizers will be passed and you are welcome to come and go as you like within the time frame and taste at your own speed. If you find something you really enjoy, a limited amount of the wine being poured will be available that evening at special retail prices.

Wine Director: Dave Solzman

11

Sommelier: Matt Knightly

2951 CHeRRy Avenue, SignAl Hill for reservations, call 562-426-0694. w w w. d e l i u s r e s t a u r a n t . c o m

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4431 TSG No.: 8138420 TS No.: CA1300253427 FHA/vA/pMI No.: ApN: 7215-019-076 property Address: 2101 eAST 21ST STReeT #312 SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 NoTICe oF TRUSTee'S SALe YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST, DATeD 02/18/2005. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To pRoTeCT YoUR pRopeRTY, IT MAY Be SoLD AT A pUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN expLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe pRoCeeDING AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. on 08/15/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 03/03/2005, as Instrument No. 05 0482836, in book , page , , of official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LoS ANGeLeS County, State of California. executed by: FRANCIS p SweNToN AN UNMARRIeD MAN, wILL SeLL AT pUBLIC AUCTIoN To HIGHeST BIDDeR FoR CASH, CASHIeR'S CHeCK/CASH eQUIvALeNT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center plaza, 400 Civic Center plaza, pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MoRe FULLY DeSCRIBeD IN THe ABove MeNTIoNeD DeeD oF TRUST ApN# 7215-019-076 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2101 eAST 21ST STReeT #312, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $217,780.16. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NoTICe To poTeNTIAL BIDDeRS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off,

PUBLIC NOTICES

before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To pRopeRTY owNeR: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1300253427 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Title Insurance Company 3 FIRST AMeRICAN wAY FoR SANTA ANA, CA 92707 Date: TRUSTee'S SALe INFoRMATIoN pLeASe CALL (916)939-0772 First American Title Insurance Company MAY Be ACTING AS A DeBT CoLLeCToR ATTeMpTING To CoLLeCT A DeBT. ANY INFoRMATIoN oBTAINeD MAY Be USeD FoR THAT pURpoSe.Npp0218421 To: SIGNAL TRIBUNe 07/26/2013, 08/02/2013, 08/09/2013

TST4436 NoTICe oF TRUSTee'S SALe TS No. 110149049 Title order No. 11-0136821 ApN No. 7214-003-008 YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST, DATeD 08/10/2004. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To pRoTeCT YoUR pRopeRTY, IT MAY Be SoLD AT A pUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN expLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe pRoCeeDING AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. Notice is hereby given that ReCoNTRUST CoMpANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by AUSTIN v pLoNG, A MARRIeD MAN AS HIS SoLe AND SepARATe pRopeRTY, dated 08/10/2004 and recorded 8/13/2004, as Instrument No. 2004-2089829, in Book N/A, page N/A, of official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 09/05/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed

of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2424 wALNUT AveNUe, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $472,012.19. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NoTICe To poTeNTIAL BIDDeRS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To pRopeRTY owNeR The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case 11-0149049. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the

Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATeD: 03/31/2012 ReCoNTRUST CoMpANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6914-01-94 SIMI vALLeY, CA 93063 phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale officer ReCoNTRUST CoMpANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FeI # 1006.169315 8/02, 8/09, 8/16/2013       

TST4422 Trustee Sale No. 20697CA Title order No. 110392828-CA-MAI NoTICe oF TRUSTee’S SALe YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST DATeD 2/21/2009. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To pRoTeCT YoUR pRopeRTY, IT MAY Be SoLD AT A pUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN expLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe pRoCeeDINGS AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. on 9/16/2013 at 9:00 AM, MeRIDIAN FoReCLoSURe SeRvICe f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFoRNIA CoRpoRATIoN DBA MeRIDIAN TRUST DeeD SeRvICe as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 03/04/2009, Book , page , Instrument 20090302818 of official records in the office of the Recorder of LoS ANGeLeS County, California, executed by: MILDReD MeLeNDez AND MICHAeL MeLeNDez HUSBAND AND wIFe AS SoLe AND SepARATe pRopeRTY as Trustor, MoRTGAGe eLeCTRoNIC ReGISTRATIoN SYSTeMS, INC., AS NoMINee FoR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FeDeRALLY CHARTeReD SAvINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without convenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center plaza, 400 Civic Center plaza, pomona CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust The street address and other common designation of the real property purported as: 2281 AMeLIA STReeT, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 ApN Number: 7217-028-005 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $913,276.79 NoTICe To poTeNTIAL BIDDeRS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the property itself. placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To pRopeRTY owNeR: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet web site www. priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 20697CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet web site. In addition, the borrower on the loan shall be sent a written notice if the sale has been postponed for at least ten (10) business days. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATe: 7/12/2013 MeRIDIAN FoReCLoSURe SeRvICe f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFoRNIA CoRpoRATIoN DBA MeRIDIAN TRUST DeeD SeRvICe 3 SAN JoAQUIN pLAzA, SUITe 215, NewpoRT BeACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 oR (702) 586-4500 STepHANIe GARCIA, FoReCLoSURe oFFICeR MeRIDIAN FoReCLoSURe SeRvICe IS ASSISTING THe BeNeFICIARY To CoLLeCT A DeBT AND ANY INFoRMATIoN oBTAINeD wILL Be USeD FoR THAT pURpoSe. p1050174 7/19, 7/26, 08/02/2013 TST4435 / Case No. NS027392 oRDER To SHoW CAuSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUpeRIoR CoURT oF CALIFoRNIA, CoUNTY oF LoS ANGeLeS, 415 w. ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. peTITIoN oF Marilyn Mangini, For Change of Name. To ALL INTeReSTeD peRSoNS: 1. petitioner MARILYN MANGINI, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: present Name: LIBeRTY LUCIA MANGINI to proposed Name: DANIeL LIBeRTY MANGINI. 2. THe CoURT oRDeRS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NoTICe oF HeARING: Date: September 3, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. G, Room 51. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THe SIGNAL TRIBUNe, 939 e. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2013. ___//ss//___ M. vicencia, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: July 23, 2013 TST4417 / 2013 124572 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. So CAL pRIDe weDDINGS, 2. SoUTHeRN CALIFoRNIA pRIDe weDDINGS, 3. pRIDe AND JoY weDDINGS, 4. pRIDe AND JoY weDDINGS So CAL, 5. pRIDe weDDINGS

AUGUST 2, 2013

So CAL, 6. So CAL pRIDe AND JoY weDDINGS, 7. SoUTHeRN CALIFoRNIA pRIDe AND JoY weDDINGS, 3315 Knoxville Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrant: LINDA BARRA, 3315 Knoxville Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Linda Barra. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 14, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and professions Code). pub. The Signal Tribune: July 12, 19, 26, & August 2, 2013.

TST4434 / Case No. NS027378 oRDER To SHoW CAuSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUpeRIoR CoURT oF CALIFoRNIA, CoUNTY oF LoS ANGeLeS, 415 w. ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. peTITIoN oF Donnie Keith Freeman, For Change of Name. To ALL INTeReSTeD peRSoNS: 1. petitioner DoNNIe KeITH FReeMAN, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: present Name: DoNNIe KeITH FReeMAN to proposed Name: DoMeNIQ x. 2. THe CoURT oRDeRS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NoTICe oF HeARING: Date: August 26, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. 11, Room 31. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THe SIGNAL TRIBUNe, 939 e. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2013. ___//ss//___ Ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: July 15, 2013

TST4419 / 2013 140706 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CoLLeGe FINANCIAL pLANNING, 2005 palo verde Ave. #118, Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrant: S & S HoLDINGS Co., INC., 2005 palo verde Ave #118, Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Harry v. Dawson III, president. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on July 8, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and professions Code). pub. The Signal Tribune: July 12, 19, 26, & August 2, 2013. TST4418 / 2013 136556 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CoMpToN YoUTHBUILD, 477 e. Compton Blvd., Compton, CA 90221. Registrant: eNTReNoUS YoUTH eMpoweRMeNT SeRvICeS, INC., 4005 virginia Road Unit 3, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Sara A. M. Silva, CFo. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on May 28, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on July 1, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and professions Code). pub. The Signal Tribune: July 12, 19, 26, & August 2, 2013. TST4423 / 2013 142697 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MY BABY LoveS vINTAGe, 5485 orange Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: JANeT BoYLe, 5485 orange Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Janet Boyle. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on June 1, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on July 10, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and professions Code). pub. The Signal Tribune: July 19, 26, & August 2, 9, 2013. TST4424 / 2013 144346 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. FADDY'S FASHIoN, 2. FADDY'S FASHIoNS, 19514 Campaign Drive, Carson, CA 90746. Registrant: FADDY'S FASHIoN, 19514 Campaign Drive, Carson, CA 90746. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Stacey Nettles, president. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The regis-

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trant began using this fictitious business name on July 11, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on July 11, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and professions Code). pub. The Signal Tribune: July 19, 26, & August 2, 9, 2013. TST4432 / 2013 151669 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: TURBo pRINTS LLC, 1345 w. 14th St., Long Beach, CA 90813. Registrant: TURBo pRINTS LLC, 1345 w. 14th St., Long Beach, CA 90813. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Naturbo Ayala. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 22, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on July 22, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and professions Code). pub. The Signal Tribune: July 26, & August 2, 9, 16, 2013.

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CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4433 NoTICE oF PuBlIC HEARINGS

NoTICe IS HeReBY GIveN THAT on Tuesday, August 13, 2013, the planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill, California, will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the recommendation of the following:

NoTICe IS HeReBY GIveN that on Tuesday, August 20, 2013, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California to consider the following: exTeNSIoN oF CUp 97-03

IN 2012, A ReQUeST FoR A oNe YeAR exTeNSIoN oF CUp 97-03 wAS GRANTeD. THe CUp wAS FIRST AppRoveD FoR A 10 YeAR TeRM IN 2002. THe CUp CoveRS FACILITIeS AND opeRATIoNS AT SIGNAL HILL peTRoLeUM’S SeveN CoNSoLIDATeD DRILL SITeS. SIGNAL HILL peTRoLeUM IS ReQUeSTING A SIx MoNTH exTeNSIoN To ALLow TIMe FoR ADDITIoNAL AND UpDATeD STUDIeS To Be CoMpLeTeD. • 3051 California Avenue • 1251 e. 29th Street • North of willow Street, south of 27th Street, between walnut and Gardena Avenues • South of Combellack Drive between Cherry and Junipero Avenues • Southwest of Junipero and Combellack behind office Depot • South of 20th Street between Redondo and obispo Avenues • South of Grant Street between Redondo and obispo Avenues Applicant: Signal Hill petroleum Inc.

AN INITIAL STUDY AND MITIGATeD NeGATIve DeCLARATIoN 9/18/97 (1) for the subject CUp was approved and certified by the City Council under Resolution 98-06-4831 in 1998. on october 1, 2002 an Amended CUp 97-03 and Supplemental Mitigated Negative Declaration 8/12/02 (1), were approved for a term of 10 years and certified by the City Council under Resolution 375-09-02. The request is for a 6 month extension of the current CUp to allow time for additional and updated studies relevant to the CUp to be completed. In accordance with California Code of Regulations Section 15162 no subsequent Negative Declaration is required for the extension of CUp 97-03 in that no changes to the previously approved project are proposed. The Mitigated Negative Declaration, as well as material relevant to CUp 97-03, may be inspected by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and on Fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Community Development Department located on the lower floor of City Hall. ALL INTeReSTeD peRSoNS are hereby invited to attend the hearings to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. FURTHeR INFoRMATIoN on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Colleen Doan, Associate planner, at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7344. published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code §65091(a)(4): August 2, 2013 posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 on or before: August 2, 2013 Mailed to affected property owners within 300’ on or before August 2, 2013

NEWS

Mentor

continued from page 1

It might be challenging to find the right person who could commit to take individuals home and to integrate them into his or her own family. When he first considered working with the agency, Bullard didn’t know that the level of responsibility would literally be that close to home. “I thought, ‘Wow, that is a really good opportunity to have a greater impact on someone’s life,’” Bullard said in a telephone interview Tuesday. Bullard had previously worked in a group home for kids ages 8 to 18. He said he saw that this was now an opportunity to affect the lives of adults on a very personal level. Marcus is in his mid 20s. Miguel is in his early 30s. Bullard will tell you about the time he joined Marcus on his very first airplane ride when Bullard planned a visit to Florida to see relatives and enjoy Disney World. He also remembers the first time he brought Miguel to see his first professional soccer game at the Home Depot Center in the city of Carson. It was one of soccer superstar David

Beckham’s final games as a team member of the LA Galaxy. Bullard describes how Miguel was excited to see the number of fans who filled the stadium. He’ll talk like a proud father when he will tell you that Marcus plays the drums and that Marcus helped start an intramural basketball league with others who loved the sport. Maynes emphasizes that it is important for participants and their mentors to have community ties but it’s important to integrate clients into mentors’ families. “I think the greatest reward of all is being able to know that you are actually providing a service for someone and bringing someone into a family environment which they may have never had,” Maynes said in a telephone interview. According to Maynes, clients are exclusively referred to her agency by Harbor Regional Center, which is a private, nonprofit organization that contracts with the State of California. The Harbor Regional Center provides services to individuals with developmental disabilities. Maynes explained that many of the adults have been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities or other disabilities such as cere-

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4430 NoTICE oF A PuBlIC HEARING

NoTICe IS HeReBY GIveN that on Tuesday, August 13, 2013, the planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the following: NoTICe IS HeReBY GIveN that on Tuesday, August 20, 2013, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California to consider the following: CoSTCo GAS STATIoN

zoNING oRDINANCe AMeNDMeNT 13-03 AN AMeNDMeNT To THe TowN CeNTeR eAST SpeCIFIC pLAN (Sp-1) To INCLUDe ‘GASoLINe SeRvICe STATIoNS’ AS A CoNDTIoNALLY peRMITTeD USe; A ReQUeST FoR CoNDITIoNAL USe peRMIT 13-01 To opeRATe A GAS STATIoN FACILITY; AND SITe pLAN AND DeSIGN RevIew 13-03 FoR THe 16 pUMp ReTAIL GAS STATIoN oN THe weSTeRN poRTIoN oF THe exISTING CoSTCo ReTAIL SToRe SITe LoCATeD AT 2201 e. wILLow STReeT AppLICANT: CoSTCo wHoLeSALe

ALL INTeReSTeD peRSoNS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter.

If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings.

A MITIGATeD NeGATIve DeCLARATIoN has been prepared in conjunction with the subject project based on an initial study finding of potentially significant environmental impacts unless mitigated. Mitigation measures have been included to address Aesthetics, Geology & Soils, Hydrology & water Quality, Noise, Transportation/Traffic and National pollution Discharge elimination System impacts. written comments may be submitted to the Community Development Department regarding Mitigated Negative Declaration 07/26/13(1) during the public review period from July 26, 2013 to August 15, 2013. THe FILe and associated documents for the proposed project may be reviewed by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays, in the Community Development Department at City Hall. FURTHeR INFoRMATIoN on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Scott Charney, Community Development Director, at scharney@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7343. published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code §65091(a)(4): July 26, 2013 posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 on or before: July 26, 2013 Mailed to property owners within a 300’ radius: July 26, 2013

AUGUST 2, 2013

bral palsy, epilepsy and autism. Mentors are screened by the agency and must go through a certification process. Maynes described how many of the mentors are “empty nesters,” older adults whose own children have left home. To be a mentor, qualified candidates must be at least 25 years old, be financially stable, have community ties, and exhibit strong communication and advocacy skills. Mentors who are in the program are competitively compensated, according to Maynes. They receive a daily stipend that covers housing, food, utilities and travel expenses for medical appointments. There are staff members who regularly visit the homes, and mentors must attend continuing-education classes. Maynes said that the goal is for many of the clients to become independent, if they are able to. However, she also acknowledged that they are asking for a long-term commitment. “We don’t want them [the clients] to be moving from home to home to home,” Maynes said. “We want them to integrate and be part of a family.” Bullard says that it’s been a “lifetransforming” experience for him. His week is already booked between his commitments as a music director for a church, directing the International Children’s Choir of Long Beach, private music lessons and recitals, and now he and his young men regularly attend meetings held by California Mentor. Bullard says that he also makes time for family commitments with Miguel’s and Marcus’s relatives in addition to his own family. He makes sure his own family spends time with Miguel and Marcus. “It’s just really important to make sure that we are a very well-rounded, blended extended family,” Bullard said. MORE INFORMATION California Mentor FHA 4085 Long Beach Blvd. (562) 424-0066

Artist

continued from page 10

“I’ve had a near-death experience, now I’m producing a lot more rapidly than I have in most years. I enjoyed it, but it was more of a dabbling thing. But subsequent to my medical problems, my ability to do what I used to do in the world has greatly diminished. So, painting was first and foremost therapy. It allowed me to get my internal systems and my body and mind working again, and just setting up a studio was a rather wonderful way of going about that. Going, ‘Okay, I’m not just going to the garage to paint my painting, I’m going to now make this my studio.’ Making that decision and creating that space was a big step and so, there’s also a wonderful psychological curve since I’ve been doing my shows. When I was at my worst, I had some amazing visions. When you’re near death, your mind, or at least my mind, painted some amazing pictures. Primarily Georgia O’Keeffe influences I would say. And there’s a lot of that in my work– trying to gain that, if not outright, homage to O’Keeffe with that sort-of flora, labial theme. Even in this painting, I can see elements. They inspired me.” Burchard will be participating in the First Fridays Art Walk in Bixby Knolls beginning Aug. 2, showcasing his work at Nino’s Italian Restaurant, 3853 Atlantic Ave. MORE INFORMATION artslant.com/global/artists/sho w/120097-scottburchard?tab=PROFILE

AUGUST 2, 2013

Gold

continued from page 1

Department Deputy Chief Robert Luna in a statement. The Council’s motion comes after the skyrocketing price of gold in the last few years has generated a goldselling frenzy, as people across the country have flocked to sell off their scrap gold and unused jewelry to make quick cash. Since 2008, the price of gold has shot up from about $700 an ounce to $1,900 an ounce. Looking to cash in on the trend, businesses almost everywhere, from gas stations to grocery stores and clothing outlets to mobile operations, began buying up gold jewelry and personal items from customers, making a fast profit by quickly turning around and selling the items to a refinery that then melts it down. Businesses that buy gold illegally may take in stolen items, which can be scrapped almost immediately, leaving law-enforcement officials no recourse on claims of stolen goods or the ability to trace the item to its seller. The problem? This type of transaction is illegal, explains Tony DeMarco, legislative analyst and president-elect for the California Pawnbrokers Association (CAPA). He said passing a city law wouldn’t necessarily solve the problem if the City already lacks the resources to enforce the existing law. “Law enforcement and municipalities are ignorant of the law,” DeMarco said. “We are a very, very regulated industry.” He said state law considers any buyer of gold or any other precious metal a second-hand dealer, such as a consignment store, thrift shop or pawn shop. And, in California, all second-hand dealers that purchase “tangible personal items” are required to follow a strict set of rules. Firstly, state law requires dealers to obtain a second-hand dealer license from the State, pass criminal background checks and report to local law enforcement with records of transactions, including filing police reports. Then, these businesses are required to conduct transactions only on permanent business premises, hold items for a 30-day period and request official identification from sellers. Gold buyers are required to use specific scales that are tested and certified by the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s County Office of Weights and Measures. Second-hand dealers also face

misdemeanor charges and fines for purchasing known stolen property and not reporting it to police, DeMarco said. He said fines range from $1,500 for the first item and up to $25,000 for the third item. Many illegal gold-buying businesses, however, are still given a business license by the City and are allowed to operate without required second-hand dealer licenses or necessary certifications, and they don’t follow procedures required by law. Instead, they often take gold for cash with “no questions asked.” DeMarco says the issue is that many cities lack the resources to enforce the laws and hadn’t anticipated illegal gold-buyers flooding the market. Without the funds or the means to address the problem, many businesses have been able to operate unregulated. He said the issue was more of a problem from 2010 to 2012 and that today there are fewer gold-buyers as many people have already gotten rid of their gold. DeMarco said the goal now, however, is to establish a statewide database for all second-hand dealers in California that would help monitor transactions and help regulate the businesses. He said the State increased the second-hand dealer license fee from $12 to $300 in order to pay for the database. The City’s regulations on pawnbrokers and second-hand dealers, however, currently don’t recognize “cash for gold” businesses since they are relatively a recent phenomenon and they didn’t exist at the time the city ordinance was drafted, said Tonya Martin, spokesperson for Andrews’s office. City officials are now hoping to change the City’s code to regulate gold buyers. The changes wouldn’t apply to pawn shops or other second-hand dealers, such as jewelry stores that run deals as a side business and already follow such laws. Erik Sund, Long Beach’s businessrelations manager, said the City could be able to regulate primary “cash for gold” businesses through the City’s administrative-use permit (AUP) process. Andrews said he hopes the change will help local law enforcement fight crime. “By raising these standards, we are making it more difficult for criminals to sell stolen property, which will reduce crime,” Andrews said. “When we are identifying those who are selling it, we are helping police officers to make arrests and get the stolen goods back to their proper owners.”

NEWS

Licensed gold buyers in Long Beach say they support the City’s attempt to eradicate illegal operations but agree that the problem is a matter of a lack of enforcement, not a lack of laws. “Anybody who comes into our door, we get their ID and, if they don’t have it, there’s no sale,” said Jeffrey Winnick, co-owner of Gems & Jewels, which has been in business for about four months in Bixby Knolls on Atlantic Avenue and buys gold. “We have to hold items for 30 days. That’s the protocol in the state of California.” He said the matter of illegal operations has more to do with insufficient city resources for police to go after the criminals, adding that there is only one burglary-detail detective who works with all second-hand dealers in Long Beach. “There is a large amount of ‘cash for gold’ businesses doing it illegally– they just open up a store,” Winnick said. “The City of Long Beach and police are aware of them. They just don’t have the manpower. The city councilmember, I think, is mistaken. It has to be enforced because it’s affecting business. It’s a big problem.” One business owner of a longtime “cash for gold” business who declined to provide his name said having detectives post out at the business 24-7 wouldn’t be a problem because the operation has followed the rules for years. Mark Schneider, a third-generation jeweler who took over his father’s business, Dave Schneider Jewelry, of nearly 68 years in downtown Long Beach, said he supports any proposal to go after illegal businesses. Schneider said his company, which has cameras and double buzzer doors, requires customers to provide their fingerprints and a photo ID. Forms are sent to the Long Beach Police Department, and all items are held for 30 days before any metals are melted down, he said. “As a gold buyer, I’m all for stopping any criminal activity,” Schneider said. “I’m for full enforcement, because a lot of these companies come in, take a hotel room, and they’re here for one day to three days. I don’t even know if they are follow-

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ing the law. It would be great to have a police department do a check on all gold buyers.” Some local residents see “cash for gold” businesses as a form of blight or another “predatory” business, likening them to operations that offer loans with high interest rates. Last October, the City put a oneyear moratorium on firms that offer auto-title, payday and consumerfinance loans to come up with a way to regulate the relatively new types of money-lending businesses. The Wrigley Area Neighborhood Association was the main group that pushed for further regulations on such companies. Lee Fukui, a Wrigley neighborhood resident and one of the main proponents of regulating loan firms, said he is in favor of Andrews’s proposal but felt it should go even further, suggesting the Council put a permanent moratorium on “cash for gold” businesses or restrict the areas where they are able to locate.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

15

“While I do support the suggested regulations, I view ‘cash for gold’ businesses in the same way as predatory lenders like check cashing, payday, and auto title,” he said in an e-comment for the Council meeting. “They take far more from consumers than any benefit in services they pretend to provide… If we want to attract better businesses to a community, then we’ve got to take the steps to create a secure environment by keeping these blighting influences out.” CAPA states that customers who sell gold to illegal businesses that don’t comply with regulations run the risk of being misled about the value of their items, since representatives may tamper with scales. Business owners, however, say there is a legitimate need for the businesses that are doing a “public service” by providing a way for people to exchange their unwanted jewelry for cash during tough financial times. ß

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

AUGUST 2, 2013

16

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