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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Long Beach city officials push for turnstiles and safety measures along Blue Line

June 7, 2013

‘Somebody in this room’ could be future mayor

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Former LB mayor gives civic lessons and life advice to third-graders

Leonardo Poareo

Editorial Intern

Providing life advice as well as insight into governing a city, former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill spoke to Jahneen Nadeau’s third-grade class at Los Cerritos Elementary School last Tuesday morning. O’Neill, whose grandniece is in the class, served as mayor of Long Beach for three terms, from 1994 to 2006. To get

elected for a third term, voters had to vote for her by writing her name on their ballots. Although a popular mayor, O’Neill told the children she wasn’t always so confident that she could actually fulfill mayoral duties. “People had asked if I would run, and I said, ‘No, I don’t think so– I don’t think I can do it,’” O’Neill said. “I learned something– you can’t ever say ‘can’t’ see O’NEILL page 10

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

A train bound for Los Angeles approaches the Willow Blue Line Station in Long Beach. Electric turnstiles are not currently installed at any of the Long Beach stations. A Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) spokesman says there are safety concerns with installing turnstiles at a number of stations. CJ Dablo Staff Writer

There’s an endless variety of people who board the trains at any one of Long Beach’s eight stations along the Blue Line. On a Sunday afternoon, Richard Vargas, 51, sat at the Willow Blue Line Station. He was on his way home to Koreatown after his sister dropped him off at the station. He had spent the day at her home in Orange County to celebrate his mother’s birthday. At a bench close to the parking garage, 78-year-old Carmen Saucedo of West Covina sat alone next to a tiny pink bag on wheels. Dan Brown, 29, finished his day out in Long Beach. He was also on his way home to Los Angeles. A couple of miles north of the Willow Sta-

tion, Eric Holiman also waited at the Wardlow Station. He was also hoping to catch one of the northbound trains. The 54-year old Long Beach resident on his way to work waited only a few minutes before the train headed for downtown LA stopped at the platform. Holiman wasn’t pleased to hear about any recommendations to add turnstiles at the station when he was asked to offer an opinion. “All it’s going to do is slow down the process of boarding the train,” Holiman said. “It’s going to be a madhouse.” None of the eight stations in the city has any kind of physical barrier or gate that stops a person from getting a free ride on Metro’s Blue Line. Right now Long Beach City offisee METRO page 4

Leonardo Poareo/Signal Tribune

Former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill visited Jahneen Nadeau’s third-grade class at Los Cerritos Elementary School on Tuesday.

SH Council seeks to require that political-action committees file financial statements with city clerk Sean Belk Staff Writer

The Signal Hill City Council voted 4-1 during its June 4 meeting to have the city attorney draft an amendment to the City’s election code, requiring all political action committees (PACs) and independent expenditure committees (IECs) that attempt to sway public opinion during election cycles file campaign financial statements with the city clerk. Mayor Michael Noll, who was targeted in fliers before the March 5 municipal election this year along with

Weekly Weather Forecast

Sunday

Vice Mayor Ed Wilson and former Councilmember Ellen Ward, brought forward the proposal at the end of the May 21 Council meeting under “new business,” calling the mass mailers “smear tactics.” The item was brought back for formal approval and to give city staff further direction. Signal Hill’s elections and campaign-finance law that was last amended in 1993 only regulates candidates running for Council, city treasurer and city clerk offices. The ordinance requires that candidates report campaign expenditures with the

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city clerk and that financial statements be made available upon public request. The ordinance also limits campaign expenditures to about $500 per election cycle. PACs and IECs are currently not covered under the law. Councilmember Lori Woods, who ran against Noll, Wilson and Ward in the last election, however, cast the lone dissenting vote, stating that the City may have trouble enforcing the proposed ordinance amendment. “I don’t know how you possibly enforce something like this,” she said. “My thought is that, if any organiza-

tion, any PAC, has enough money that they’re going to probably also have enough legal clout to bypass our whole system and ignore it, basically thumb their nose at it.” Woods said she would rather have the City spend resources on “strengthening” the existing code and make campaign financial statements available on the City’s website. Woods also questioned how much would be spent on amending the ordinance, to which the city attorney replied that it would be about $3,000 to $5,000. City Manager Ken Farfsing said

other cities have imposed such laws, including the City of Cypress, adding that if PACs choose not to file with the City, it would at least show voters something about their legitimacy. “If a PAC does not file with the City it sends a strong message to the voters that there’s something they don’t want to disclose,” he said. “Where I live, I want to at least be able to know that.” The city attorney said provisions of the existing code would give voters and the City the ability to bring legal

Approved Watering Sched-

see COUNCIL page 15

Watering is approved on the following days:

Monday, Thursday, and Saturday before 9:00 am and after 4:00 pm

For more information, call the Water Conservation Hotline: 562-989-7350

ST3501 - June 7_Layout 1 6/11/13 11:46 AM Page 2

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Signal Hill forecasts surplus for next fiscal year’s budget, but city leaders remain cautious

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Signal Hill financial management estimates the City will see a more than $71,000 surplus next fiscal year, but city officials remain cautious as employee costs are expected to rise and revenue projections are uncertain. During a budget workshop on Wednesday, May 29, the City Council received an overview of the preliminary budget for Fiscal Year 2013-2014 and gave staff direction on how to proceed with requested expenditures for city departments and capital-improvement projects. City Manager Ken Farfsing told the Council, “the budget is slowly returning to pre-Great Recession levels after five years of reduced expenditures and reduced revenues,” adding that it’s the “fourth budget in a row where the City has not had to rely on the City’s economic-uncertainties reserve fund in

order to balance the budget.” But he cautioned that city departments were obligated to tighten their budgets given the slow-moving economic recovery and rising employee costs. “The city’s department heads have been asked to prepare their upcoming budgets without significant increases over their existing expenditures,” Farfsing said. “That’s a difficult task since merit and step increases were granted this year and automatically increase each department’s budget.” Farfsing said the City forecasts sales-tax revenue of $11.5 million for next fiscal year, which is a decrease of about $190,000 from the estimated sales-tax revenue for the current fiscal year. Even though auto dealerships, Home Depot and constructionrelated retailers have reported increases in sales and are reflecting signs of an improving housing market, retailers such as Target and Best Buy have reported losses and have

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NEWS

JUNE 7, 2013

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston (fourth from left) and Police Capt. Ron Mark (far right) give a presentation to the City Council on the police department’s budget for fiscal year 2013-2014 during a budget workshop on May 29 at the Council Chamber. Also pictured are, from left, Mayor Michael Noll, Councilmember Tina Hansen and Councilmember Lori Woods.

reduced their full-year forecasts, he said. The City is also budgeting a drop in revenue from gasoline sales tax, Farfsing said. Finance Director Terri Marsh added that it remains uncertain how much revenue the City will receive through a new sales-tax revenue sharing agreement into which Signal Hill and Long Beach entered with Office Depot last year since the office-supplies retailer is merging with OfficeMax and going through a business restructure. Signal Hill is also projecting $622,613 more in expenditures next fiscal year over the current fiscal year, which Assistant City Manager Charlie Honeycutt primarily attributed to shifting full-time personnel from the now defunct Signal Hill Redevelopment Agency (RDA) to city departments. He added that the City also anticipates spending $75,000 for the June 5, 2014 special election associated with the “Taxpayers Right to Know and Vote” initiative. City staff is projecting an increase of $39,400 over what the city clerk budget would be for a regular municipal election, with legal costs of $20,000 and additional election costs of $19,400. Farfsing added that it’s important

to address the rising cost of employee retirement pensions. More than 10 years ago, the Council established a reserve fund that would have addressed some of the problems created by the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). Farfsing said a large and growing cost for the City’s budget is the planned increases in the PERS rates. The City has maintained that for a number of years PERS overestimated their internal rate of return and underestimated their retirement cost, he said. However, in April of this year, the PERS board adopted new actuarial policies, effectively increasing rates beginning Fiscal Year 2015. With the new proposed rates, Signal Hill city staff estimates that PERS costs will increase by more than $600,000 annually, Farfsing said. “Although the rate increases do not impact the upcoming budget, we need to begin planning for the increases,” he said. Another large expense the City will be incurring is the cost of meeting new Los Angeles County regional water board requirements for stormwater permits. First-year startup expenses are projected to

cost the City more than $750,000, according to Farfsing. He added that the Signal Hill Water Department’s budget is balanced, and this will be the fourth year in a row that the City has held water rates stable. However, Farfsing said city staff is projecting an increase in water rates next year. Signal Hill city staff estimates the current fiscal year to end with a balance for general-fund and economic-uncertainties-fund reserves totaling $10.1 million. It was reported, however, that the State Department of Finance recently requested the City pay nearly $1.5 million in loans the City was owed from RDA. Though it’s uncertain whether the City will challenge the State in court, the Council and city management have agreed to cover the costs through the economic-uncertainties fund. The new payment will be on top of a more than $2.5 million payment the City was required to pay the State after an audit on RDA housing funds earlier this year. The Council is scheduled to formally adopt the 2013-2014 budget during its June 18 meeting before the new fiscal year begins on July 1. ß

On June 2, 2013, at approximately 6:50pm, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers responded to a traffic accident at Del Amo Boulevard and Elm Street.

According to the LBPD, arriving officers discovered that a motorcycle had hit a tree and exploded on impact, causing the tree, motorcycle and driver to catch fire.

Long Beach Fire Department responded, extinguished the fire and discovered the driver deceased at the scene. The preliminary investigation revealed the victim was driving a 2007 Yamaha RS and traveling westbound on Del Amo Boulevard approaching Elm Street. The victim had been riding with a group of four other motorcyclist friends when he attempted to pass the group on the right, in the number-three lane, at a high rate of speed. He lost control of his motorcycle, struck the curb and then a tree, causing an explosion on impact The group of friends stopped and attempted to rescue the victim from the fire until Long Beach Fire Department personnel arrived. The driver has been identified as Daniel Thy, a 22 year-old resident of Long Beach. According to the LBPD, he had recently bought the motorcycle and did not have a valid motorcycle driver’s license. The LBPD is requesting that anyone with information regarding the incident call Collision Investigations Detective Brian Watt at (562) 570-7355. Those wishing to remain anonymous may call 1800-222-TIPS (8477), or text TIPLA plus the tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visit LACrimeStoppers.org .

Motorcyclist killed in collision with tree

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Source: LBPD

ST3501 - June 7_Layout 1 6/11/13 11:46 AM Page 3

JUNE 7, 2013

NEWS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Two-vehicle collision sends car through front of Long Beach restaurant, leaves five injured

3

SUPPORT VETS WITH SOMETHING SWEET What National Donut Day Who The Salvation Army Where Donut Place, 5476 Del Amo Blvd. and Winny’s Donut House, 3505 E. South St. When Friday, June 7 throughout the day More Info A portion of sales from the doughnut shops listed will be donated to The Salvation Army’s Haven Program for veterans. Call (562) 264-3689.

RUN FOR A CAUSE What Jalen Thayer Memorial Run Who Patrick Henry Elementary School Where 3720 Canehill Ave. When Saturday, June 8 at 8am More Info Registration can be done online at active.com or in person at Patrick Henry. Attendees may walk or run in the race. Proceeds will be benefit the Childhood Cancer Awareness organization.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

This Holé Molé restaurant at the corner of Wardlow Road and Orange Avenue was the location of a two-vehicle collision on Sunday, June 2. One vehicle crashed into the front of the Mexican restaurant, which was open at the time. Sean Belk Staff Writer

dnt txt n drv A reminder from the Signal Tribune

PAGE-TURNERS What Book club Who Los Altos Neighborhood Library Book Club Where Los Altos Neighborhood Library, 5614 E. Britton Dr. When Saturday, June 8 at 10am More Info The club will discuss Raymond Khoury’s The Last Templar. The club meets on the second Saturday of each month. Call (562) 570-1045 or visit lbpl.org .

Metro Briefs

GET POLITICAL What Regular meeting Who Long Beach Republican National Hispanic Assembly Where Mamy’s Place, 1234 Long Beach Blvd. When Tuesday, June 11 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm More Info At the group’s third meeting, members will share “a vision for a better Long Beach” and identify problems that have adversely affected election wins for the Republican party. The focus of the meeting will be “a hand up, not a hand out.” Email latinpolitics@yahoo.com .

GATEWAY CITIES

Join In “Dump The Pump Day” June 20 Now in its eighth year, National Dump the Pump Day encourages people to ride public transportation and save money, instead of driving a car. In LA taking public transit could mean saving as much as $10,000 annually instead of paying for gas and parking. Find out how at metro.net and plan to take public transit on Thursday, June 20.

New Metro Bus Schedules June 23 More frequent mid-day service on the Metro Orange Line is one of the changes Metro is making in its bus service to improve e;ciency and e=ectiveness starting June 23. For complete details on the service changes, visit metro.net. Revised timetables will be available online or on buses starting in June.

LEARN HOW NOT TO GET SCAMMED What Senior scam-prevention seminar Who Office of 70th District Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal Where El Dorado Park Community Center, 2800 Studebaker Rd. When Friday, June 14 from 9:30am to 11:30am More Info Learn important consumer information from State officials and other experts, including how to embower yourself against scams. Visit asmdc.org/members/a70/ or call (562) 4952915.

Metro’s Sustainability E=orts Honored Metro is the first and only recipient of the American Public Transportation Association’s Sustainability Commitment Platinum Recognition. Cited were Metro’s e=orts in reducing energy and water use, as well as reducing harmful air pollutant emissions in its facilities and buses.

Go Metro To The Dodgers, Save On Selected Games The winning combination of Metro and the LA Dodgers is getting better this season. Not only can you Go Metro to Union Station and connect with the Dodger Stadium Express, but now you can take advantage of discounted seats saving up to $20 on selected games through Metro’s Destination Discounts program. Visit metro.net/discounts for details.

PARK IT ON THE LOT What Concerts in the Park(ing Lot) Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA) Where Georgie’s Place parking lot, 3850 Atlantic Ave. When Monday, June 17 at 6:30pm More Info The free concert will feature music from California Feetwarmers, who will play jazz and Americana. The BKBIA has extended its series to four concerts. Visit bixbyknollsinfo.com .

Fourth Segment Launched On I-5 South Major work on San Antonio Drive, Imperial Highway and Pioneer Boulevard in Norwalk is underway as part of the I-5 South Widening project between the 605 Freeway and Orange County. The project is adding lanes in each direction to ease the bottleneck caused when it meets the 10-lane portion at the county line.

If you’d like to know more, visit metro.net.

13-2158cm_gat-ne-13-013 ©2013 lacmta

At about 3:40pm on Sunday, June 2, Long Beach police officers responded to a two-vehicle collision that occurred at the intersection of Orange Avenue and Wardlow Road in the 7th District, according to Cynthia Arrona, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) spokesperson. The incident involved one vehicle crashing into the front of the Holé Molé restaurant located at 1200 E. Wardlow Rd. in Long Beach. It was reported that the Mexican restaurant was open at the time of the crash, and patrons were inside when one of the vehicles came barreling through the front door. Five people were transported to a local hospital with what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries, she said. Arrona added that no arrests were made at the scene, and she could not provide an update on the victims’ medical conditions as of Monday, June 3. An employee for Holé Molé said the restaurant will be closed this week for repairs but may open back up again sometime next week. LBPD encourages anyone with information to call LBPD Collision Investigations Detail at (562) 5707355.

ADOPT A PET What Pet Adoption Day Who The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles Where PD Pitchford Companion Animal Village & Education Center, 7700 E. Spring St. When Saturday, June 8 from 10am to 4pm More Info The daylong event will include a meet-and-greet with Heidi and Frank of 95.5 KLOS radio, a silent auction, a photo booth for new adopters and a performance by Joan Pitt and the Catscratchers and Bark & Roll. Visit spcala.com .

SELL YOUR STUFF What Big community yard sale Who The Office of 6th District Councilmember Dee Andrews Where Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, 1950 Lemon Ave. When Saturday, June 22 from 8am to 2pm More Info Residents may sell furniture, desks, tools, music instruments, electronics, baby items, household items, clothing, kitchen items, books, bikes, holiday decorations and lawn equipment. The cost is $20 per space to sell items. Call (562) 5706816.

ST3501 - June 7_Layout 1 6/11/13 11:46 AM Page 4

NEWS

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Metro

continued from page 1

cials are hoping to change that, to the chagrin of Holiman and others who don’t think that turnstiles would cut down on the number of riders looking to avoid paying the $1.50 base fare. Holiman acknowledged that there is a fare-evasion problem, but he pointed out the obvious problem with turnstiles– people could always jump over them. The light-rail service that connects Long Beach to downtown Los Angeles is about 24 years old now, and Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia says that the city’s eight train stations are overdue for updates. Garcia gained unanimous support from the councilmembers at the June 4 meeting when he put forward a recommendation to ask Metro to install turnstiles or some other kind of electronic monitoring system at the stations in Long Beach. There were other elements to his proposal that went beyond the turnstile issue. Part of his recommendation also included a request to repair the public art and signage and to address safety issues at the station. According to Garcia, about six million riders use the eight train stations every year. “So the impact that we have is immense,” the vice mayor told the Councilmembers, “and the public safety need that we have is

also quite large.” Garcia said in an interview Wednesday that the safety concerns include crime prevention, but he also stressed the importance of safe crossings for pedestrians. Four out of the eight train stations are in Garcia’s first district. Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) officials have already begun to address the safety concerns voiced by Garcia. According to a letter issued to city officials by representatives of Metro’s Board of Directors, Metro has committed for the next two years about $21 million to update several rail stations in addition to a total of $172 million in various upgrades to the track, signal systems, wiring and power substations for the Blue Line. To address safety concerns, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department has added two deputies each to the morning and evening shifts to patrol four stations in Long Beach. Metro has also added four security personnel assistants to both shifts. Although Metro is already making a serious financial commitment to Long Beach’s section of the Blue Line, its officials say that installing turnstiles will be problematic at some of the rail stations. In a telephone interview Tuesday, Metro spokesman Rick Jager said that the stations in Long Beach are not scheduled at this time to have any turnstiles, explaining that there is a space problem with the stations that operate

JUNE 7, 2013

on street medians. He described safety concerns that may come when a large number of people are queuing up behind gates if they try to navigate through turnstiles. Jager described how that scenario may “pose a safety hazard if people are spilling out into the railroad tracks on the streets from the stations.” Jager said that he looked forward to discussing the issues with city officials. The Council voted to direct the city manager to return in 90 days with a timeline and a plan. Second District Councilmember Suja Lowenthal acknowledged at the Council meeting that turnstiles aren’t foolproof. “I don’t think any one of us is naïve about this expectation that somehow turnstiles will magically keep people from doing things they’re not supposed to do,” Lowenthal said Tuesday, but she explained that the turnstiles would at least be a “barrier” to more people. The possibility of putting in turnstiles didn’t bother Vargas, the Sunday-afternoon traveler at the Willow Station who was headed home to Koreatown. Vargas knows a lot of people don’t pay for a ride on the Metro rail lines. He thought turnstiles were a good idea. “I…think it’s good [because] people shouldn’t ride for free,” Vargas said. He, CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune however, acknowledges a little bias. He Electric turnstiles are not currently in place at the doesn’t pay full price. He said he qualifies Wardlow Blue Line Station nor at any of the Long for a fare discount since he’s an injured vetBeach stations. eran. ß

OPINION

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Thoughts from the Publisher

Like good neighbors

by Neena Strichart I am a lucky lady. My sweet husband Steve never forgets my birthday, anniversary or Valentine’s Day. He may not shower me with untold riches on such occasions, but heck, I’m just glad he remembers. We all hear tales of wives, girlfriends, and fiancées who complain about forgotten special occasions. Even though they drop hints, circle the dates in red on the calendar or go through other obvious attempts at reminding their significant others, the guys just sometimes don’t take the hint. One wonders if the faux pas are really due to faulty memories, or if apathy is the real culprit. Now, thanks to Remember Ring, you can find out! What, you may ask, is Remember Ring? According to Alaska Jewelry website alaskajewelry.com: The Remember Ring™ utilizes patent pending Hot Spot™ technology to deliver a reminder that it's “That time of the year again!” Twenty-four hours before your special day, the Hot Spot™ on the interior surface of your Remember Ring™ will warm to 120º F for approximately 10 seconds, and continue to warm up every hour, on the hour, all day long! Hot enough to cause discomfort but not hot enough to burn, the Remember Ring™ is impossible to ignore! It's maintenance free! Using a micro thermopile, The Remember Ring™ converts the heat from your hand into electricity, keeping the battery charged and microchip clock running perpetually. Just specify your anniversary date when you order, and we’ll program your ring for you. Set it and forget it-until your anniversary! Now, before you get all excited, the Remember Ring is not available; it is merely a concept being publicized by Cleve Oines of Alaska Jewelry. Located in Sitka, Alaska, hence the name of the company, Cleve told me recently that although many websites, newspapers and television stations have touted his brainchild wedding band as being in production and available for just under $800 each, in reality it is just an idea looking for a tech partner. “Maybe one day if the technology catches up, we’ll be able to make it,” said Cleve in a phone interview with me on Wednesday afternoon. Looking at his website and finding the page dedicated to the ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

Remember Ring, one would think it was the real deal– until the red lettering is spotted at the bottom of the page informing viewers that THIS IS A CONCEPT PRODUCT– IT IS NOT CURRENTLY IN STOCK. How did I hear about Remember Ring? Wednesday morning I learned about it while watching the local morning news. The anchor person gave a few details and claimed that the product was available for purchase. I decided to check it out and am glad I did. Who knows? Maybe one of our readers is just the tech partner Cleve is looking for!

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

Barbie Ellisen

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

Shoshanah Siegel

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

CULTURE WRITER

STAFF WRITER

CJ Dablo

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Jane Fallon

I had the true pleasure of attending the Benefit for Doug (Orr) and David (Rodriguez) last Sunday. For those that do not know, this was an event to help raise funds for our Cal Heights residents that have fallen on hard times. Words like “impressive,” “nice,” and “successful” do not do the event justice. It was incredibly heart-warming to see such a great turnout. So many familiar faces from around the neighborhood filled the room. Local musicians entertained us, and our restaurants really stepped up and were great about donating food. Art was being sold, checks being written, and the vibe was completely inviting, friendly and supportive. Just hours before, The Kids Theater Company wrapped their last show of the weekend, and the Expo Arts Center [EAC] was quickly transformed into the perfect venue for the benefit. Doug Orr has been our building manager for EAC and has really helped to turn the former furniture warehouse into an arts center from the ground up. We now brag to all other neighborhoods about having two art galleries, performance space, rehearsal space, and two theaters all under one roof. We must give kudos to China and her whole team of organizers for their truly heartfelt efforts in rallying people for the cause (businesses, families, friends, neighbors, and artists alike). I’m not sure where else in the city you can put out a cry for help and see such a show de force. There is no question that this is the best community in the city. Blair Cohn Executive Director BKBIA

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

Vicki Paris Goodman

Tanya Paz

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ariana Gastelum Leonardo Poareo Brandy Soto

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

ST3501 - June 7_Layout 1 6/11/13 11:46 AM Page 5

NEWS

JUNE 7, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

North LB community weighs in on violence prevention plan Sean Belk Staff Writer

Last year, Willard Elementary School student Joanna Ramos died at the young age of 10 after a street fight with an 11-year-old female classmate. Long Beach police described the incident as a “fight between two children that ended with unintended and tragic results.” Though police contended there was no evidence that the east-Long Beach student was a victim of bullying, the incident no doubt remains a prime example of the devastating consequences of an altercation that becomes violent. Long Beach city officials and community leaders are banding together this year to develop the Long Beach Violence Prevention Plan (LBVPP), with hopes of avoiding such tragedies in the future. The goal is to put together a comprehensive plan, to be fully written by the end of the year, for combating “family, school and community” violence with support and recommendations from a vast array of Long Beach stakeholders. The 18-month planning process is being funded through a $400,000 grant from the California Endowment foundation. More than 50 people weighed in on the issues during a communitysafety forum on Saturday, June 1 at Jordan High School in north Long Beach. The event was the third such forum organized in the city as a way to gather community input in developing the LBVPP. The last community-safety forum will be on Thursday, June 20 at El Dorado Park in east Long Beach. “We realized that: we can’t write a plan from City Hall; that we need the community voice; we need residents such as yourself, coming out telling us not only what the problems are, but what are the solutions,” said Tracy Colunga, LBVPP coordinator. “We really believe that you have some of

the solutions that we’ve been waiting to hear.” The community forum was the first of a weeklong series of community events planned as a way to keep north Long Beach safe this summer. The forum also coincides with efforts to expand park programs in the uptown area as a way to discourage gang involvement and other illegal, negative activities, especially in light of summer school being cut this year. Public basketball courts and other facilities at Houghton Park stay open until 9pm. Eighth District Long Beach Councilmember Al Austin said he was encouraged by the community showing up to give their input on how to come up with ways to prevent violence in the area and across the city. “The input that you’ll give as a community is going to be very, very important for us to develop a plan that will allow us as a city to gain necessary resources to continue to do those programs and to prevent violence in the future,” he said. “Violence in any form and any shape has no place in this city or any part of the city… We have to come together as a community to make it happen.” Also in attendance was 9th District Councilmember Steven Neal, in addition to Long Beach Police North Patrol Commander Robert Luman and Long Beach Police Administration Bureau Chief Braden Phillips. By sometime next year, Long Beach will join 32 other cities, including Chicago, Philadelphia, Oakland and San Francisco, in the United States that have adopted similar violence-prevention plans, she said, adding that the City enlisted the National League of Cities as a consultant for the project. Colunga said, by working together to prevent violence, the hope is that over time there will be a reduction in violent-crime incidents. The problem with violence is that

it often has many unintended consequences. A person victimized by violence, whether at home or on the school campus, at a young age may eventually become the offender later in life, affecting the entire community. Colunga said statistics show that about 80 percent of those individuals in jails and prisons were either abused as children or the witness to abuse as a child. “So if we can prevent abuse at an early age or the witness of abuse at an early age, we can prevent some behaviors down the road to empower some young people to be able to take control of their lives,” Colunga said. During the forum, University California Los Angeles (UCLA) graduate students provided research, expert information and statistics about Long Beach, the 90805 ZIP code and violence-related topics. The students, who are part of Colunga’s class at UCLA, spent six months on the research project. Students gave presentations on family violence, bullying and human trafficking, while presentations on child abuse and gang violence are being provided online only. UCLA graduate student Amie Eng said the World Trade Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2010 declared family violence as an issue that must be addressed on a national level. Though violence in the home can often lead to physical wounds, bruises and sometimes death, there are also invisible detriments, such as acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, high anxiety and substance abuse. “Basically, what starts in the home does not stay in the home, and it actually has numerous consequences for everyone as a community,” Eng said. “Relationships form in the family... and set the stage for how you behave in adulthood.”

5

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Mario Maciel, director of the gang-prevention task force for the City of San Jose, leads a group discussion during a community-safety forum at Jordan High School on June 1 to gather input in developing the Long Beach Violence Prevention Plan.

Family violence also comes with large economic costs, she said, adding that it is related to $4.1 billion in healthcare expenses nationwide, in addition to causing distractions for a person at work and loss of quality of life. For Long Beach, violence in the family is of particular concern, she said, since statistics show that the city

has more people living together per household than any other city in Los Angeles County. Eng said many domestic-violence incidents go unreported in some Hispanic and Asian communities because of language barriers, instances she called “linguistic isolation.” A high percentage of family viosee NLB page 14

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generate a love of day-camping that will extend into children’s later years. “Going to camp is often one of the best memories of childhood,” Mancini said. “And for very young children, it’s a great opportunity to spend some time away from Mom and Dad, but without the structure that often comes along with a more traditional school setting.” Itty Bitty Camp will focus on age-

appropriate activities that will include arts and crafts, cooking, drama, science and sports. Trained staff will provide guidance and supervision in an effort to help first-time campers (and parents) feel safe and at ease enjoying the day camp, according to Mancini. Call (562) 989-7330 for registration information. Source: City of SH

The June 7 First Fridays Art Walk in Bixby Knolls will be, like, totally ‘80s. Up until 6:30pm, locals are encouraged to post a photo of themselves on the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association’s First Fridays Facebook page for a chance to win a classic ‘80s three-pack movie set. Art-walk attendees are encouraged to get dressed up 1980s-style to go back in time for video games, music, fashion, hair, break-dancing, trivia games, singalongs of that decade. About U Boutique, 4340 Atlantic Ave., will host an

Instagram costume contest, and EJ Malloy’s, 4306 Atlantic Ave., will offer ‘80s drink specials. Also included in the evening will be: live-art and interactive-art activities, jazz and funk, the Rock for Vets, Melinda McCoy’s Flowers celebrating 28 years in Bixby Knolls, reggae, politicos, a Toaster Music sound installation, classic cars, a book-signing, Day-glo goats and chickens, the Knolls Ranger mascot, dramatic scenes, free books, gift items and antiques. Nino’s Italian Restaurant, 3853 Atlantic Ave., and Digital Installers will host a classic ‘80s film with big-screen projection and outdoor dining in the Nino’s parking lot. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” at the Dana Branch Library

will feature guest reader Hearty Marty from Agape Children’s Museum at 5:30pm. Eighth District Councilmember Al Austin’s “Council on Your Corner” will be set up at Atlantic Avenue and Burlinghall Drive to meet and greet attendees. Attendees may dine on “Art-Lantic” Avenue at one of the local restaurants then grab the Big Red Bus to travel from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have all the information about First Fridays, maps, business info, and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm.

Kenneth McKenzie

She shared with me that her mother had passed away recently in another state and the funeral director had told her a few things that she didn't understand at the time, and still doesn’t understand today. I listened, and I was able to clarify what was told to her and why. Because of this encounter, I thought perhaps some of you might have stories you would like to share with me or questions or concerns you have about my industry. I think by now you can tell I’m a straight shooter and, if you ask me a question, you will get a factual answer. So, share with me at kenjmckenzie@aol.com .

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ST3501 - June 7_Layout 1 6/11/13 11:46 AM Page 7

JUNE 7, 2013 Living Legends, Unsung Heroes

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Ohio farm girl has watched SH’s transfomation from ‘old timer’ oil town to redeveloped city Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

Redevelopment has not only helped Signal Hill grow through residential development has increased the city’s population, it has also substantially boosted sales-tax revenue through construction of major retail centers that are now anchored by Costco, Home Depot and numerous car dealerships. Without redevelopment, the small city on the hill might have remained a ghost town of oil derricks. Marjorie Grommé was there at the beginning, as city treasurer, when Signal Hill received its first redevelopment check in 1975. Born Marjorie England, she grew up on an Ohio farm with two brothers and two sisters. Having been a “Rosie the Riveter” during World War II, she was subsequently employed by Westinghouse and,

in 1946, traveled to Arizona, where she worked on B-29 and B-47 modifications. In 1955, she and her husband, Al Posner, moved to California and settled in Signal Hill. They moved to a rental home at 20th Street and Dawson Avenue on April 1, 1955, just in time for their daughter Neena to be born the following month. (Neena is now the publisher of the Signal Tribune.) Not only has Grommé been active in city government and community activities, she was living in Signal Hill during a number of significant events, such as a plane crash in the city and the Hancock Oil Fire, both in the late 1950s. Grommé has also been active in the Daughers of the American Revolution since 1965. In 1970, she and Posner helped establish an American-Indian Day in Signal Hill. They also founded the American-Indian Volunteers, a nonprofit that worked with local nativeAmerican groups, as well as Navajo and Hopi families in Arizona. In 1994, she was selected as Signal Hill Outstanding Older American. To this day, she can be seen at numerous Signal Hill functions, and various City staff, including Council members and mayors, greet her with hugs, kisses and royal treatment. Grommé spent an hour with the Signal Tribune for an interview about her time as city treasurer, the resistance to redevelopment in its early days, the Hancock Oil Fire and what she thinks makes Signal Hill an interesting place.

Alfred and Marjorie attending a party at the Santa Rita Hotel in Tuscon, Arizona, before they were married

In Living Color

Tell me about when you became Signal Hill’s city treasurer. I became city treasurer when Neena’s father, Al Posner, died. He was in his second four-year term as the elected treasurer when he took his own life, and somebody suggested to me that I apply. So I picked up the phone, and I called Bill Mendenhall, who was on the

Trash or treasure? You decide Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

With the economic challenges of recent years, recycling and conservation seem to be the trends. I have always enjoyed finding something I love at a yard sale, flea market, and antique or thrift store. That old saying “one person’s trash may be your treasure” definitely holds true for me. There was even a TV show called Trash to Treasure. A few years ago, I found a table left on the parkway near my house. The legs were milled with a

mix of round and square parts. Because I love color, I painted the legs in bright colors, added a piece of plywood to the top, and now I have a perfect table for the outdoors. The great part is that I found out that I was the fourth owner of this piece!

Do you have style? One of the questions I get asked quite often is “What is my style?” You may start with a certain style, but it is basically what you gravitate toward such as traditional, modern or Asian. Don’t pigeonhole yourself. Ultimately it is see IN LIVING COLOR page 13

Shoshanah Siegel/Signal Tribune

One approach to decorating is to focus on collections. For example, the writer’s flock of birds seen here comes from various parts of the world: Alaska, New Zealand and Ecuador.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

7

Council and was influential. He said, “Well, why not?” So, he took it to the other council members, and I got the call and [they] said, “Come in. We’d like to talk to you.” And I was appointed. Just as simple as that.

You mentioned in your book that there was an application process you had to go through. Yes. Tell me about that. I don’t remember details. I really do not. They made it very pleasant for me.

How long was it after Al passed that you applied for the position? Very shortly. Very shortly after.

And why did you apply for the position? Well, I guess because it was suggested to me that I might qualify. I had just retired from Los Angeles County... working in the Department of Public Social Services, known as DPSS, and I wasn’t ready to quit working. The recompense– is that the proper word?– was very little, but that had nothing to do with it. I was very proud to be accepted and to be working with the Council and the City and the treasurer’s department, which was very well staffed and taken care of.

How long did you hold the position? Well, to this day, I’m somewhat embarrassed, but I had good cause. I held the position for a couple of years, and I don’t remember precisely [how long], because I remarried. And I married a man [Norman LaPorte, who had been] a long-time friend. He and his deceased wife and I and Al Posner had been good friends and had done a number of things together as couples. [After his wife’s passing], he was lonely, up in Yucca Valley, where they had only lived a short time, and so he was coming back to Signal Hill to participate with some activities that he had been a part of down here. And so we did some things together, and went to a couple of my family’s activities, and he was made so welcome, we just gradually became a couple. It was just a nice thing to do, and we liked each other. As it happened, although he seemed in good shape at the time we married, it soon came out that he had cancer, and it was far advanced, and he didn’t survive. So, we had 15 months together married. We enjoyed the companionship. When he got sick, I had

Photos courtesy Marjorie Grommé

Marjorie (Posner) Grommé in 1975 with the City of Signal Hill’s first redevelopment check, which was worth $2,477,627.98

no choice but to resign. [She later married Justus Grommé.] In your book you say that some of the “oldtimers” were against redevelopment. Why did they put up such a resistance to it? They didn’t understand what it was all about. Whether I was sitting up at the front or sitting in the audience, I attended Council meetings. Period. And the big story was they said, near as I can quote, “We want our money to stay in Signal Grommé and her daughter Neena standing in front of their Hill.” They didn’t want Raymond Avenue home in Signal Hill, circa 1966 anybody else, outside, telling them how to spend their money. And that was exactly the front of our house. And of course that was frightening because we had no idea what it thing. was at that time. So we didn’t know Did they eventually come around and whether we were going to have to evacuate or what. In the meantime, it was, I believe, change their point of view about it? It was just a few people, and they were out- the latter part of the work week, and we were getting ready to leave that Friday night numbered when it came to the vote. for a weekend trip to Tucson, Arizona, and Where were you and your family, and we didn’t know whether we were going to what were you doing, during the Han- have to cancel our trip or not, because [we wondered,] “Were our houses going to be cock Oil Fire in 1958? We were renting a home on 20th Street and caught on fire? Might it be coming over the Dawson Avenue. I don’t remember the hill?” Of course, we soon found that it was hour, but I remember having heard some being handled. noises that were not correct, and, because we on the southwest side of the hill, and the How did you find that out? fire was on the north side of the hill, it Well, I don’t recall. I know, of course, like wasn’t really until the flames– the smoke everybody else, we had to drive over the hill started coming up that we could see from in see LIVING LEGENDS page 11

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DADS & GRADS

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Long Beach student named 2013 Outstanding Graduate for CSULB College of Engineering

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Jonathan McKenzie of Long Beach has been selected the 2013 Outstanding Graduate for the College of Engineering at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). McKenzie, a 2009 graduate of Long Beach Poly High School, was recognized during CSULB’s College of Engineering commencement exercises on May 24. He graduated with a bachelor’s of science degree in computer engineering. The son of Bruce and Norma McKenzie of Long Beach, McKenzie epitomizes the qualities of an outstanding student through both

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his mental and physical achievements, according to a press release issued by CSULB. His 3.9 gradepoint average has placed him on the President’s List since fall 2010. For his senior project, he developed a unique mesh network conof autonomous figuration hexacopters to enhance surveillance and search and rescue technology. He also was the lead software programmer for the 2010 Imagine Cup Competition entry “Swarm cast,” a device to help detect locust swarms in developing countries, and he was the project manager for the Best Autonomous Line-Following Robot in spring 2012. As a CSULB cycling team race coordinator and rider, he captured first place in a number of USA Cycling competitions, including the Ontario Grand Prix Series, back-to-back California Bicycle Racing criteriums and the UCSD Red Trolley Classic. He placed second in the 2013 Cal Poly Classic road race and, in April, he was the CSULB cyclist with the most points overall in the Western Collegiate Cycling Conference. “Cal State Long Beach played a major role in developing my character and making me the person I am today,” said McKenzie, who is also a cadet in the CSULB Army ROTC Trojan Batallion. “There are a handful of professors who taught the core classes of my degree and who took the time and personal effort to not only teach the material but give me the drive to be able to compete with other students from other highly credible schools.” His service to the campus includes volunteering at the CSULB Science Extravaganza, tutoring computer engineering/ computer science study groups and serving as an Embedded Applications Technology club member. “CSULB’s College of Engineering gave me an impressive first impression as I was exploring a multitude of universities. CSULB seemed to have a prestigious and well-organized Computer Engineering and Computer Science Department,” said McKenzie about his choice to attend CSULB. His sister, Chrissy, graduated from CSULB in 1994 with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. After graduation, McKenzie began working for L-3 Communications as an embedded software engineer. Additionally, he plans to pursue his appreciation for cycling at the professional level. Source: CSULB

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JUNE 7, 2013

Painter’s worldview shaped by ‘industrial wasteland’ in which he grew up

Brandy Soto Editorial Intern

Painter and part-time art teacher Daniel du Plessis began his art career in editing and design, but eventually found himself in fine arts. He was born in South Africa in 1953 and grew up in what he calls an “industrial wasteland,” which shaped his perspective of the world. “[It was] created by the extraction and dumping nature of gold-mining, strangely interspersed by areas of pristine grassland,” he explains. “The harshness of the country’s political and social history, coupled with its celebrated natural beauty, had a big influence on my aesthetics and worldview.” Du Plessis says he began drawing and painting from an early age. He took art courses in high school and continued his studies in college, where he majored in painting and drawing. He received an MA in fine arts from University of South Africa and an MFA from Cal State Fullerton. Although he has been creating art all of his life, he says it didn't become a professional career until he completed his master’s degree. Since then he has taught painting, life drawing and two-dimensional design at several community colleges and universities in Southern California. When he is not teaching students, Du Plessis is creating art of his own. His paintings are vivid scenes that are deeply reminiscent of romance, the universe, and the aspect of time. “Nature, garden, landscape and cosmic imagery unite to create imaginative, psychological environments with strong emotional undercurrents,” he says. In 2011, he was the featured painter at the Orange County Fair and has exhibited throughout the United States, Turkey, Canada and South Africa. He recently featured some of his work at the Mid-City Studio Tour in Long Beach. “I showed work from my most recent series, which shows cosmic imagery inspired by the Hubble Telescope,” he says.

In painting, what is the biggest challenge you have faced? Every new work has its own challenges, and it is part of the creative process to resolve the compositional and formal problems.

Do you think about placement before you begin a project, or do you freestyle in the moment? I start off with a rough composition but allow myself the freedom to

DADS & GRADS

explore new ideas as I go along.

Is there a special technique or theme that has become a staple of your art? I often use a technique called glazing, which involves the use of many layers of transparent paint to create a sense of luminosity. Sometimes, I also use transparent layers of resin as a final coating to enhance the visual depth of works.

“Cosmic Bubbles 2;” watercolor, charcoal and pastel on canvas

Is there a process in choosing the materials you will use for your paintings? I normally use panels for acrylic and mixed-media works, and sometimes I glue a sheet of aluminum to the wood panel. Some of my works are done on transparent acrylic boxes, which allow me to work underneath and on top of the surface. Do you feel that selling your work affects the creative process? No, because I do not make works with the single purpose of selling it. For me, making the work and selling it are two separate things.

How has your artwork developed over the years? As a young child, I saw a Dutch, 17th Century still-life painting at the Johannesburg Art Gallery. I was awestruck by the way the artist could depict dust on the bottles and other objects. That kind of acute observation and attention to detail form part of my current see ARTIST page 10

Courtesy the artist

Artist Daniel du Plessis was born in South Africa and grew up among “the extraction and dumping nature of goldmining, strangely interspersed by areas of pristine grassland.”

“Scorpion Fish Nebula;” acrylic, mixed media and resin on aluminum on wood panels

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10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Artist

continued from page 9 work; although I use naturalistic rendering to create convincing, imaginary worlds instead of “realistic” ones. A major turning point in my art came through studying and living in California and the exposure to the incredible diversity of artistic expression and culture here. California has a generosity of spirit that embraces idiosyncratic artistic vision; it’s a culture that values craftsmanship and imagination. It helped me to finally discard entrenched notions of what "fine art" is, should be and should look like.

DADS & GRADS

Normally I am “in love” with the current piece I am working on, or the last completed one. How do you feel about others’ interpretations of your art? I welcome different interpretations. Sometimes people see things that I may not have thought about, and that enriches my personal vision and insights.

Is there anything you hope people can take away from your pieces? Most of my works deal with the passage of time and the fleeting nature of life, which are things that all people share.

Lift Chairs

Is there a piece that you favor more than others?

In what type of setting do you work best? I prefer working in a studio setting.

Are there any artists that influenced you? I am constantly influenced by other artists. Among my major influences are Martin Johnson Heade, Caspar David Friedrich and Dutch, 17th Century artists, such as Rachel Ruysch. I transform disparate influences (Dutch vanitas and flower painting, Victorian fairy painting, Romanticism, Surrealism, and pop culture) into symbolic images that acquire new associations.

JUNE 7, 2013

O’Neill

continued from page 1

How has painting shaped who you are today, or who you want to be? Art has been a part of my life for many years, so it is simply part of who I am. MORE INFORMATION danielduplessis.com

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During her visit to a third-grade class at Los Cerritos Elementary on Tuesday, former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill told the students that a future mayor could be among them.

because when you say ‘can’t’, it makes you fail. You fail in the things you haven’t even tried.” During her visit, O’Neill told the third-graders about the purpose of a city, and how the mayor and council members work together to get things done. She also discussed the write-in process and her education in Long Beach, from Lee Elementary to Cal State Long Beach. Her visit had extra meaning for Nadeau, who said that O’Neill was her advisor when she was part of the cabinet at Long Beach City College. “This is so full circle because I retire next year, and now to have you [O’Neill] here, from my beginning…it’s really special to have you,” Nadeau said, as she addressed the former city leader in front of the class. “I just so appreciate it.” After her introductory remarks, O’Neill took questions from the class, viewed a PowerPoint presentation made by some of the students and then listened to a song the class performed for her. In her responses to their questions, she talked about the business of being a mayor, her nervousness during elections and her greatest motivation– her mother. “My mother always told me, ‘You can do whatever you want with your life, Beverly,’ and I believed it,” O’Neill said. “And so if you work hard at things, and if you stay in school and you get good grades, and if education is important to you, there’s probably nothing that you couldn’t do. And the mayor could be sitting here in front of you– somebody in this room.” ß

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ST3501 - June 7_Layout 1 6/11/13 11:47 AM Page 11

COMMUNITY

JUNE 7, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

‘Second Sundays’ in north LB aims to shine light on Living Legends from page 7 historic, redeveloped Virginia Village business corridor continued to see where it was actually coming from,

Staff Writer

A new monthly event in north Long Beach seeks to draw attention to the historic Virginia Village business corridor, a seven-block commercial district that was once its own city located along a stretch of Long Beach Boulevard between East Market Street and the Los Angeles River overpass. Replicating the concept of the now popular First Fridays Art Walk in Bixby Knolls, the new event called “Second Sundays in the Village” is being kicked off this Sunday, June 9 from 1pm to 4pm between 53rd Street and 56th Street. Hosted on the second Sunday of every month, the event will include live entertainment, food, face painting, a moon bounce, snow cones, city services and a “mobile aquarium” being provided by the Aquarium of the Pacific. The main stage at Long Beach Boulevard and East Market Street will feature a line-up of musicians and dancers from the local community, including Latin, Cambodian and Samoan performers. “It’s something I wanted to do actually before I came to office,” said 8th District Councilmember Al Austin, who organized the free event with the newly formed Virginia Village Business Association. “I see so much potential in Virginia Village not only for economic development but also for the opportunity to build community there.” Before redevelopment agencies were abolished by the State last year, the City’s redevelopment agency invested more than $5 million in streetscape improvements along the business corridor and other parts of Long Beach Boulevard between Del Amo Boulevard and 56th Street. Projects included adding historic light medallions, street lighting, Virginia Village banners, parking, public art, medians, decorative crosswalk pavers, new concrete sidewalks, street trees and façade improvements. The monthly event is a way to spotlight the redeveloped area, while bringing the neighborhood and business community closer together, something that Austin said hasn’t been done before. “We’re doing some things that up to this point have not been done,” he said. “The redevelopment agency did a great job of really beautifying that corridor and with the investment in infrastructure, the lights, the streetscape and the façade improvements for the buildings. We’re taking it a step further by programming it and branding the community there.” One longtime business is Katy’s Bakery, which has served cakes and Mexican pastries at 5417 Long Beach Blvd. for nearly 20 years. Business owner Norma Giorgi said she hopes the monthly event will bring new customers to the corridor that she said has “changed quite a bit in the last few years.” “Hopefully it will encourage people to come out here,” she said. “It looks like the city is really investing in this area.” The pedestrian-oriented area also has a sporting-goods store, barbershops, a florist, a doughnut shop, markets, retail clothing stores, a pawn shop, a mortuary and a furniture store. There are also Mexican restaurants, including Los Eduardos Restaurant and El Cortez Restaurant. William Gonzalez, owner of Los Eduardos, which has been at its location for 15 years, said he’s not sure how the event will turn out, but he has been encouraged by the improvements the City has made to the streets and sidewalks. “It looks a lot better than it used to,” he said. Gonzalez added in a statement provided by the City that, “Second Sundays in the Village is an opportunity to showcase the businesses along Long Beach Boulevard, and for the entire community to enjoy a fun time for the whole family. We invite everyone to come and experience the new Virginia Village.” Many of the restaurants and businesses will be offering specials for the day and sales on the sidewalk, while participating in the activities. Martin Rodriguez, who opened BRG Photo & Video at 5304 Long Beach Blvd. nearly two months ago, said he is extending discounts for weddings and quinceañeras as

well as the photo studio. He said he would like the event to eventually be expanded to more than just once a month. The business corridor gets its name from its past, being that the area used to be its own city once known as Virginia City before it was annexed by the City of Long Beach in 1924. Many of the buildings have maintained their historic architectural exteriors, including some that have brick walls and Art Deco design. As a way to highlight the area’s historic past, the 8th District office has funded a mural entitled “Memory Lane” at the corner of Long Beach Boulevard and Market Street. The mural to be unveiled during the event at 1pm was created by artists Gregory Navarro Pickens and Steve Elicker. With the help of the Long Beach Historical Society, the mural celebrates many of the historic buildings and landmarks that once graced the neighborhoods of north Long Beach. Though the event is modeled after the concept of First Fridays, Austin pointed out that he wants Second Sundays to have its own “flavor.” He added that the event is one of many events he will be organizing this year as he hopes to spread city resources throughout the 8th District. Austin said the cost of the event is “nominal” since the community, businesses and organizations have donated entertainment and other features for the event. He has also allocated a portion

of his office’s budget. Austin added that the Aquarium is providing its Aquarium on Wheels at a steep discount, while other community sponsors for the event include the Long Beach Airport, Signal Hill Petroleum and the Port of Long Beach. Austin added that in no way is the event or other events to be considered a replacement of the Bixby Knolls Car Show & Dragster Expo, which was cancelled by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA) earlier this year after being led for nearly eight years by former 8th District Councilmember Rae Gabelich. The car show took nearly $50,000 to $72,000 to put on, costing $10,000 just to shut down the street. Blair Cohn, executive director of the BKBIA, however, said First Fridays and other events, such as Concerts in the Park[ing Lot] and Kidical Mass bike rides have been a huge hit for attracting customers to the business district along Atlantic Avenue. He said businesses act as “carnival barkers” and “good hosts” to a couple thousand customers each first Friday of every month, which adds up to more business. “If you have 12 First Fridays a year, with 2,500 people each month, do the math,” Cohn said. “That’s how people are coming back every year. It has a direct impact on the businesses and shopping. We’re connecting directly to the businesses.” ß

on the hill. Otherwise, it would have eventually been swallowed up by Long Beach. And the citizens that lived there (in Signal Hill) had enough cohesion among themselves to keep it separate. That’s the way that I have gotten the story. And they had some people who had foresight. When Al and I moved there, the people were “oldtimers.” There were a lot of the “old-timers” left, people that had lived there a long time. And I can’t rattle off names anymore. I can pick out a few if I stop and think about it. But we liked the small-community part of it. We had lived in Tucson, Arizona, before coming to Long Beach-Signal Hill area, [where] Al, my husband, had been very active. They used to accuse us of working for the chamber of commerce because I worked downtown, and my husband did too. Me, doing secretarial work, such as it was, got the ranchers and the big hotel owners together and started the Pima County Sheriffs Posse. So, I was already involved in doing civic things when we came to Signal Hill, and it just seemed the right thing to do– to get involved.

but we saw that there was nothing around at that time to catch fire that would make it spread over the hill. We were satisfied that it was okay for us to leave. But the devastation was pretty bad. Very frightening for those that were having to work with it, because, how long was an oil fire going to take to extinguish? Do you remember how long it took to put it out? No, I don’t.

Do you remember a certain smell in the air? Oh, there was a certain amount of smell of oily substance. However, the winds tend to come in that area, because of the hill, from the northwest, and kind of blew it away from our area.

Tell me about the plane crash you heard shortly after moving into the Raymond Avenue house. It was early morning, about the time you think about getting up to go to work, and we heard this plane go over, and it was very, very low. I’d been around aircraft enough to be familiar with it. It sounded as though it was a small plane. As it turned out, it was. But it crash-landed Cherry across Avenue in what was then pretty much open area and used by the telephone company for some of their rig storage and so forth. I think there were some deaths involved. What do you think makes Signal Hill an interesting city? Signal Hill is interesting in interesting ways. The location– the fact that back there in 1924, ‘25, that some of the residents had the foresight to make it into a city because the oil had been discovered

Rachael Rifkin helped Grommé write her memoir in 2009 and assisted with the research of this article. To read more about Grommé, go to lifestoriestoday.com/stories, and scroll down to find her book.

Marjorie Grommé now lives in Bixby Towers in Bixby Knolls.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

More than $5 million in redevelopment funds have been invested for streetscape improvements along the Virginia Village business corridor along Long Beach Boulevard. Other improvements included new banners, street trees and façade upgrades.

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ST3501 - June 7_Layout 1 6/11/13 11:47 AM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4359 Trustee Sale No. : 20120159900612 Title Order No.: 1153934 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 01/12/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 01/27/2006 as Instrument No. 06 0203326 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: MICHAEL CARESS, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by California Civil Code 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 06/17/2013 TIME OF SALE: 9:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2008 2010 2012 CHERRY AVE, SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA 90755 APN#: 7216-009-010 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $427,326.15. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120159900612. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: PRIORITY POSTING & PUBLISHING, INC. 17501 IRVINE BLVD., SUITE ONE TUSTIN, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www.priorityposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 05/17/2013 P1040602 5/24, 5/31, 06/07/2013

TST4376 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.: 99852590 TSG Order No.: 94677 A.P.N.: 7216-034033 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED (The above statement is made pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(1). The Summary will be provided to Trustor(s) and/or vested owner(s) only, pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(c)(2).) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 05/06/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NBS Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 05/13/2005 as Document No.: 05 1133040, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: CHRIS COMPTON, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date and Time: 07/01/2013 at 11:00 AM Sale Location: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2280 VILLAGE WAY, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, posses-

PUBLIC NOTICES

sion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $465,950.17 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, (714)730-2727 for information regarding the trustee`s sale or visit this Internet Web site, https://www.lpsasap.com/, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9985-2590. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. NBS Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 800-766-7751 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: https://www.lpsasap.com/ or Call: (714)730-2727. NBS Default Services, LLC, Natalie Franklin "We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose." A-4390405 06/07/2013, 06/14/2013, 06/21/2013

TST4377 APN: 7211-026-137 TS No: CA09000191-13-1 TO No: 5912801 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED March 11, 2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On July 8, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Vineyard Ballroom at Doubletree Hotel Los AngelesNorwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on March 18, 2008 as Instrument No. 20080461082 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by ROBERT STRICKLAND, A SINGLE MAN, as Trustor(s), in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF EXHIBIT "A" A CONDOMINIUM COMPRISED OF: PARCEL 1: A) AN UNDIVIDED 1/82ND INTEREST IN AND TO LOT 1 OF TRACT NO. 31155, IN THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 1004 PAGES 95 TO 96 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL OIL, GAS, MINERALS, AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES LYING BELOW THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND, BUT WITH NO RIGHT OF SURFACE ENTRY, AS PROVIDED IN DEEDS OF RECORD. EXCEPT THEREFROM UNITS 1 TO 82, INCLUSIVE, AS DEFINED AND DELINEATED ON A CONDOMINIUM PLAN RECORDED APRIL 22, 1985 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 85-450742, OFFICIAL RECORDS. B) UNIT 60 AS DEFINED AND DELINEATED ON THE ABOVE REFERRED TO CONDOMINIUM PLAN. PARCEL 2: AN EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT, APPURTENANT TO PARCEL 1 ABOVE, FOR ALL USES AND PURPOSES OF A "GARAGE SPACE" OVER AND ACROSS THAT PORTION OF LOT 1 OF SAID TRACT NO. 31155, DEFINED AND DELINEATED AS "RESTRICTED COMMON AREA" G 60A AND 60B ON THE ABOVE REFERENCED CONDOMINIUM PLAN. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2599 WALNUT AVENUE 228, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $244,276.71 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section

5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address www.Auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA09000191-131. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: May 29, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA09000191-13-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AUCTION.COM at 800.280.2832 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1042817 6/7, 6/14, 06/21/2013 TST4358 / 2013 094692 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HARBOR OCEAN SPA, 24815 Western Ave., Harbor City, CA 90717. Registrant: KEVIN A. MURRAY, 5062 Quail Cir., Huntington Beach, CA 92649. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kevin A. Murray. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on May 8, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 8, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 17, 24, 31, & June 7, 2013.

TST4357 / 2013 083504 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: NINA'S PIZZA, 2403 W. Cameron St., Long Beach, CA 90810. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on September 10, 2012, original File No. 2012181333, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: AGUSTINA MENDOZA DE CARRILLO, 2403 Cameron St., Long Beach, CA 90810. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Agustina Mendoza De Carrillo. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on April 23, 2013. Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 17, 24, 31, & June 7, 2013. TST4364 / 2013 105471 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LOCKDOWN BOARD SHOP, 4401 Atlantic Ave., 2nd Floor, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 420 Kush Clothing Inc., 4401 Atlantic Ave., 2nd Floor, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: A Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Eva Quintero, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4365 / 2013 105472 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: TRANCE ON ATLANTIC, 3846 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 1. SUSANNE LEE, 2. BRUCE LEE, 3945 California Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Susanne Lee. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013. TST4366 / 2013 105473 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: KAYMICHAEL HAIR DESIGN, 3505 Long Beach Blvd. Suite 2E, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: MICHAEL GORMLEY, 23371 Villena, Mission Viejo, CA 92692. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Gormley. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This

fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4367 / 2013 105474 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: COMSTOCK COMMERCIAL PLUMBING, 5574 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: COMSTOCK COMMERCIAL PLUMBING, INC., 5574 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Earl Comstock, CEO. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4368 / 2013 105475 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: NO1SPECIAL, 2201 E. Willow St., Ste. D #348, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: NANCY CERVANTES, 2810 Daisy Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Nancy Cervantes. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4363 / 2013 098637 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: SMARTER COOKIE, located at 2172 Eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on April 27, 2010, original File No. 2013 098636, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: HARVEY, JO ANN, 2172 Eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Jo Ann Harvey. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 13, 2013. Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4369 / 2013 103059 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PARLAY PRINCIPAL, 2286 E. Carson St. #217, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: RYAN SIMMONS, 2286 E. Carson St. #217, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ryan Simmons. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 17, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 24, 31, & June 7, 14, 2013.

TST4372 / 2013 103580 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: C AND M FOUNDATION, 4235 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 1. CLYDE EMERSON, 2. MILA EMERSON, 4235 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Clyde Emerson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 20, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013.

TST4373 / 2013 109006 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CHERISHED ROSE, 12643 Belinda Ct., Lynwood, CA 90262. Registrant: CHERI WARD, 12643 Belinda Ct., Lynwood, CA 90262. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Cheri Ward. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 28, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013.

TST4374 / Case No. VS024592 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 12720 Norwalk Blvd., Norwalk, CA 90650. PETITION OF Karina Hernandez For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner KARINA HERNANDEZ, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: KARINA L. HERNANDEZ PEREZ to Proposed Name: KARINA L. RODRIQUEZ. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 24, 2013; Time: 1:30 P.M.; Dept. C, Room 312. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013. ___//ss//___ Yvonne T. Sanchez, Judge of the Superior Court

JUNE 7, 2013

TST4375 / Case No. NS027329 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 415 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Kristin Marie Figueroa-Bland and minor Kaleb Michael Figueroa-Bland For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner KRISTIN MARIE FIGUEROA-BLAND and minor KALEB MICHAEL FIGUEROA-BLAND, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: KRISTIN MARIE FIGUEROA-BLAND to Proposed Name: KRISTIN MARIE FIGUEROA and minor; Present Name: KALEB MICHAEL FIGUEROABLAND to Proposed Name: MAKAYLA MICHELLE FIGUEROA-BLAND. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 12, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. 11, Room 31. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: May 31, & June 7, 14, 21, 2013. ___//ss//___ Ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: May 30, 2013 TST4379 / Case No. LS024007 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 6230 Sylmar Ave., Van Nuys, CA 91401. PETITION OF Malli Gamliel For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner MALLI GAMIEL, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: MALLI GAMIEL to Proposed Name: EMILY GAMIEL. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: July 11, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. T, Room 600. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013. ___//ss//___ Richard H. Kirschner, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: May 28, 2013

TST4354 / 2013 092701 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. SQUARE ONE FINANCIAL SVCS., 2. MASONIC ENTERPRISE NETWORK, 5700 Ackerfield Ave. Apt. 246, Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: TYRONE GREGORY, 5700 Ackerfield Ave. Apt. 246, Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tyrone Gregory. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: May 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013. TST4378 / 2013 094927 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: DAVID'S TIRE SHOP & SERVICE, 906 E. Willow St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1. MARIANO VEGA, 2. EVA GUZMAN, 2485 Pasadena Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mariano Vega. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on May 8, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013.

TST4382 / Case No. BP141891 Notice of Petition To Administer Estate of: FRANCES L. KELLER aka FRANCES KELLER To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of FRANCES L. KELLER A Petition For Probate has been filed by CAROL STENBERG in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. The Petition For Probate requests that CAROL STENBERG, be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act with limited authority. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain and very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held on July 1, 2013 at 8:30 AM in Dept. 9 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. If You Object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections, with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If Your Are A Creditor or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: CAROL STENBERG 3640 Monica LONG BEACH, CA 90808 Attorney for Petitioner: Elizabeth Vozzella, Esq. 3553-A Atlantic Ave. #187 Long Beach, CA 90807 Pub. Signal Tribune, June 7, 14, 21, 2013

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In Living Color continued from page 7

what appeals to you. So surround yourself with items you love. I consider my style to be pretty eclectic. Webster defines the word “eclectic” as selecting what seems best from various styles, doctrines, ideas, methods, etc. I prefer this style because the sky is the limit. However, my rule of thumb for decor is to include metals, wood, glass, and ceramics.

Find inspiration Actually honing in on something you like can start you in a great direction. I like a collection of items. In my bathroom I have groups of various types of seashells that I have found from around the world. Not only do they bring in nature, but they bring back wonderful memories and take

me back to the places where I collected them. My seashell collection is diverse and fun to look at.

A rainbow of color It is easier to design around a favorite color palette or just one color. For example, my cousin decorated her beach house in cheerful colors of blue, red, yellow and green. By sticking with this color scheme, she has created a home that is both cozy and fun. In order to prevent the beach house from looking like a circus, the wall colors are in shades of light blue and warm sand. The couches are in denim blue, and the tile floors are a deep, rich, blue slate.

Do your homework When going to shop for items for your home be sure to bring a sampling of the colors you wish to match. Bring a photo of items you may have or are

looking for. Start looking for ideas online or in magazines. A few good sources for inspiration can be found on Etsy, ArtFire, ArtFlock, DaWanda, Folksy, ICraft and MadeItMyself.

Finding a new purpose for an item Use your imagination when looking for finds. I found an old picture frame but needed a decorative mirror. I painted the frame and had a piece of mirror cut to the size I needed. I now possess a one-of-a-kind item. Old doors make perfect headboards, coffee tables, or decorative panels to lean against a wall. Most items can be made to look old. Beating up a piece of wood with a chain or white-washing it make it look old and weathered. Rust and chipping paint add character and charm. Or you can take an old piece and give it a new coat of paint, or change the fabric to one that is hip and modern. Your imagination is your only limit.

Bide your time Patience is a virtue when it comes to finding an item you need. Looking for a dining-room table and chairs? Mixing the style of chairs is the big rage. Get four that match, and two others that don’t– have fun. Some of your chairs can be covered, some not. You can also paint the chairs the same color to add continuity. Ask friends and neighbors or check on Ebay or other sites to see what might be out there for a table. You never know where you will find your new treasure.

Shop at home Don’t forget to look at what is already in your home. Try moving items from one room to another. I once had an old piece with storage and doors on the bottom half, but it had a hutch on the top. By taking off the hutch, and repainting the piece I needed, I was then able to create the perfect credenza for my dining room.

Don’t forget to include items from your family’s past. Dishes from your grandmother can be on display. Take old pictures, and have them enlarged and framed. I love putting indoor furniture outside and vice versa. By just adding a few pillows, I can create a cozy seating area.

I hope that I’ve gotten your imagination going. In my next article I will give you some ideas about the tools you might bring with you on your new shopping adventure. Also, I will give you tips on getting what you want at a fair price.

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440 or at shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com. More of Siegel’s writing may be found at thebright.com . ß

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE Lives Lived Eutiquio T. Sahilan 87 Gregory J. Nelson 73 Marguerita Hreha 87 Larry R. Larkey 74 Dorothy L Wilson 79 Rodolfo Torres 84 Virginia Stauffer 96 Dorothy M. Turner 85 Kenneth VanCouvering 63 George W. Fowl 78 Richard Handy 48 Willard D. Wells 89 Wayne H. Ripley 91 David L. Hamilton 63 Frederick Wink 66 e families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301

Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide

Thursday, May 30 Exhibiting firearm 12pm– E. Willow St./Walnut Ave. Terrorist threats 4:57pm– 2200 block Cherry Ave. Stolen vehicle 11:11pm– 3200 block E. 19th St. Friday, May 31 Petty theft 3:32am– E. 29th St./Olive Ave.

Forgery 1:04pm– 2700 block Walnut Ave.

Forgery of official seal 6:07pm– 3300 block E. Willow St.

DUI 7:27pm– E. Willow St./Lewis Ave. Commercial burglary 8pm– 1800 block Freeman Ave.

Saturday, June 1 Recovered stolen vehicle 2:51am– E. 33rd St./Walnut Ave. DUI 7:12pm– E. Hill St./Obispo Ave.

Threatening crime with intent to terrorize 7:13pm– 2300 block Lemon Ave.

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lence incidents are carried out without a weapon, but through aggravated assault, and between spouses, Eng said, adding that communities need to do more to collaborate and create an open environment for families to bring such issues to light. “Prevention really begins in the family, and this is really just to say to invest in the family as a unit,” she said. In school, however, it appears bullying, which can stem from low selfesteem, depression, eating disorders or suicidal tendencies, is what leads to acts of violence, according to other UCLA students. In many cases, bullying can lead to students being truant or dropping out of school. And no longer are students only bullied at school; they can be harassed online through social media sites such as Facebook. The graduate students, however, recommended that Long Beach do more to combat human trafficking, which often leads to sexual and physical violence. The students, who said 84 percent of the human-trafficking victims reported in Los Angeles County come from the South Central L.A. or Long Beach area, added that Non-injury hit-and-run 10:31pm– E. Pacific Hwy./Redondo Ave.

Coast

Sunday, June 2 Scavenging 9:22am– 2300 block Cerritos Ave. Monday, June 3 Stolen vehicle 2:33pm– 2700 block Rose Ave.

Vandalism of $400 or more worth of property 8:15pm- 3500 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy. Tuesday, June 4 DUI 12:35am– Elm Ave./Spring St.

Stolen vehicle 4:57pm– E. Spring St./Walnut Ave. Identity theft 5:30pm– 1000 block E. 32nd St.

Petty theft with prior convictions 5:37pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Wednesday, June 5 Robbery 8:45am– E. 32nd St./Orange Ave.

Forgery 10:51am– 700 block E. Spring St.

Forgery 10:52am– 700 block E. Spring St.

JUNE 7, 2013

there needs to be more services for victims and the City should continue to develop a human-trafficking task force, collaborating with the police department and community leaders. After the student presentations, groups of 10 or more people took part in workshops in which they described areas in Long Beach where they feel the least safe and where incidents of violence or other illegal activities may occur more frequently. Sean Belk/Signal Tribune Consultants At last Saturday’s community-safety forum at Jordan High School, Tracy Colunga, coordinator for Georgina Mendoza, the Long Beach Violence Prevention Plan, encouraged local residents to give their input on solusafety director and tions to combat violence. senior deputy city attorney for the City of violence-prevention programs in the lence-prevention plan. Salinas, and Mario Maciel, director of city that may need more support, while “There are no guarantees, but it the gang-prevention task force in the providing a list of ideas for new strate- does allow us to focus and leverage City of San Jose, led the group discusgies. The group then took a collective our resources and [increase] the sions. The types of violence that were vote to prioritize the subjects in terms probabilities of having success,” discussed included gang violence, of their importance to the safety of Maciel said. “Again, there’s no silver human trafficking, prostitution, bullythe community as a whole. bullet, but what we want to be able ing, hate crimes, police brutality, racial Feedback from each group will to do is put a lid on this and diminviolence, child abuse and sexual abuse. be compiled as part of the City’s ish the violence to the extent that Groups also described successful ongoing process to develop a vio- we can.” ß

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, May 30 Commercial robbery 12:14am– 4400 block Atlantic Ave.

Commercial robbery 2:33am– 4500 block Orange Ave. Friday, May 31 Attempted residential burglary 12:14pm– 500 W. 35th St.

Battery on peace officer, emergency personnel 2:56am– 3300 block Atlantic Ave.

Saturday, June 1 Assault 2:36am– 4600 block Goldfield Ave.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4380 NoTICE oF oRDINANCE INTRoDUCTIoN

Ordinance No. 2013-06-1454 was introduced by the City Council at their meeting of Tuesday, June 4, 2013. A summary of the ordinance is as follows:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, APPROVING ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 13-02, ADOPTING TIME LIMITS FOR COMPLETION OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS BASED ON PROJECT SIZE AND PROJECT TYPE, INCLUDING AN EXTENSION APPROVAL PROCESS, AND AUTHORIZING CERTAIN FEES AND PENALTIES A copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the City Clerk’s Office and on the City’s website www.cityofsignalhill.org. Second reading and adoption of this Ordinance is scheduled for Tuesday, June 18, 2013. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on June 7, 2013. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and Reservoir Park on June 7, 2013.

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Council

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action against violating PACs or IECs, with reparations of three times the amount of a campaign expenditure. The California Fair Political Practices Commission has its own requirements and its own process for dealing with violations. Councilmember Larry Forester said, enforceable or not, he at least wanted to see “something on the books.” Vice Mayor Wilson said the Council may choose to make campaign financial statements available online but it’s not an “either/or” situation. “I think it is important to have some type of policy, some type of requirement for anyone that’s spending money within an election to be able to disclose that,” he said. “I think that shouldn’t be an issue for anybody, any PAC, unless they clearly are doing some things that even they find are a little shady.” Wilson added that including PACs and IECs in the City’s ordinance would help prevent other candidates from being accused of negative campaigning. Just one week prior to the last municipal election in Signal Hill, voters received two separate fliers in the mail that targeted the records of incumbent Council candidates, along with Farfsing and City Attorney David Aleshire. The fliers, which some people have called “hit pieces,” included snippets of newspaper articles and claimed that the longtime city officials have wasted public funds, while comparing the City to the beleaguered City of Bell. The fliers were sent out by an organization that calls itself Coalition for Clean Affordable Water. City officials said it is unclear whether the group is a PAC or an IEC. In 2011, the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters (LALCV) PAC sent out glossy mailers that criticized incumbent Councilmember Forester’s environmental record, depicting a cartoon figure of the councilmember with a sign that read, “I Protect Polluters.” But, unlike Coalition for Clean Affordable Water, LALCV has its own website that states the group is governed by a 25-member board of directors made up of “activists, advocates and professionals committed to protecting the environment and improving the quality of life for those who live and work in Los Angeles County.” The website also states that the PAC endorses political candidates in L.A. County and its 88 cities. Still, though Farfsing said the groups both have an identification number designated by the California Secretary of State, many Signal Hill voters and city officials have been mystified as to what individuals or political groups are behind the organizations. Farfsing said the organizations are required to file campaign financial documents with the county clerk of the Los Angeles County Registrar/Recorder, but State requirements give such groups six months to file documents after an election, leaving voters in the dark as to the groups’ financial supporters or political interests. Noll said he brought forward the proposal to include PACs and IECs in the city ordinance in an effort to make elections more transparent. “You know, we have some real good reporting standards for any candidates running, and we have to disclose everything and show transparency,” he said. “We’re just asking the outside people that come forth in a negative way to be running on the same standards so we know who they are and the voter knows who they are. It takes the mystery away.” Councilmember Tina Hansen said the new ordinance would protect all candidates. “It’s just human nature,” she said. “If you have one group of candidates

running and another group of candidates running, and that hit piece comes out, the natural response from the community is that it must have come from this other group of candidates. And so it is a protection in a way.” In the case of Long Beach, City Attorney Robert Shannon told the Signal Tribune that the Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce sued the City over a provision in the City’s election code that limited contributions for independent expenditure committees. He said, after a United States Supreme Court ruling, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the provision in the City’s ordinance was unconstitutional and the City had no right to limit contributions. Shannon added, however, that requiring IECs to simply disclose their financial statements would be permissible.

Nonprofit fee waivers The Council voted 5-0 to authorize City staff to prepare sample memorandums of understanding (MOUs), which are legal documents (often non-legallybinding) that describe bilateral or multilateral agreements between two parties, for nonprofits seeking waivers of fees associated with using city facilities. The Council also authorized the Signal Hill Parks and Recreational Commission to grant six-month fee waivers for Fiscal Year 2013-2014 to allow for the completion of MOUs with each nonprofit requesting fee waivers. The second six-month waivers, however, would be contingent on an MOU being completed and in place prior to Jan. 1. If an MOU is not completed, nonprofits would still be able to use the facilities but would have to pay resident rates. To accomplish this, city staff would accept fee-waiver requests from nonprofits this month and include this item on the Parks and Recreation Commission agenda for approval in July. For the current fiscal year, the City has granted about $36,660 worth of fee waivers. Currently, the only organization that has entered into an MOU with the City is the Signal Hill Community Foundation. The Council agreed, however, to not enter into an MOU with the Signal Hill Historical Society until the organization resolves its internal issues. In March, a decision to elect governing boardmembers of the Signal Hill Historical Society resulted in disagreement between two groups. Both groups are now claiming ownership of the same nonprofit. In light of the situation, Pilar AlcivarMcCoy, community services director, recommended allowing the commission to grant fee waivers to both nonprofit groups. If both groups request the same day for an event, a longer process could be used to determine which group is

NEWS

granted the date, she said. Vice Mayor Wilson, however, recommended that the City not grant fee waivers to either group while the organization resolves its issues. “I think it’s better just to stay completely out of it,” he said. “I think the organization is a good organization, and it exists. The problem is there is controversy.” Elizabeth Wise, who claims to be elected as the Historical Society’s preseident, submitted legal documents to the City regarding the matter, and said she has contacted the California attorney general to determine which group would serve as the official Signal Hill Historical Society. She said a ceaseand-desist letter was sent to the opposing group. “Our group has no problem in paying the fees and renting the facilities from the City until this all gets resolved,” Wise said. “We do not want the public to be deceived.” Councilmember Hansen pointed out, however, that entering into an MOU does not imply the City endorses one organization over another. “What the MOU does is just lay out ground rules as far as what the organization’s responsibilities are and what the City’s responsibilities are, but it’s not an endorsement of that organization,” Hansen said. Alcivar-McCoy added that if two nonprofits request facilities for the same date and one is granted a fee waiver and another is paying residential rates, then the group paying would get to use the facilities. In the case of two nonprofits paying fee waivers, the City would have to draw. Additionally, if two nonprofits are paying then it would be first come, first served, she said.

within the time limit, penalties may ensue after a 30-day grace period. A penalty of $200 per day may be applied to projects that are not completed within the construction time limits and approved time extensions, with the maximum cumula-

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tive penalty totaling $36,000, according to city staff. The next Signal Hill Council meeting will take place Tuesday, June 18 at 7pm in the City’s Council Chamber. ß

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4381 NoTICE oF A PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider an ordinance amending Chapter 8.48 of the Signal Hill Municipal Code.

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING CHAPTER 8.48 OF THE SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE, ENTITLED “SECURITY ALARM SYSTEMS”, TO REDUCE THE NUMBER OF FALSE ALARMS BEFORE A FEE IS ASSESSED. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Police Department, 2745 Walnut Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Michael Langston, Chief of Police at mlangston@signalhillpd.org or calling at (562) 989-7205. Published in the Signal Tribune: June 7, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: June 7, 2013

Construction time limits The Council voted 5-0 to amend a zoning ordinance to establish construction time limits to assure the completion of approved development projects. The item was brought forward last year since several projects have been ongoing for two to six years and have caused nuisance problems in the city, according to city staff. The construction time limits, which were approved by the planning commission in May, are based on project size and project type and include provisions for time extensions, extension approval processes, along with fees and penalties. For instance, a project with a floorarea size of 200 square feet or more would be required to start construction within 180 days of a building permit being issued. A site plan, however, could be valid for one year, with two six-month extensions. The amendment includes notifying nearby property owners within 100 to 500 feet of a project upon issuance of a building permit, according to city staff. If a project has not been completed

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