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Report on 2010

Turning Point 30 YE ARS OF AIDS

We will break the back When the full history is written, 2010 will forever be remembered as a turning point in the fight against the disease. Scientists discovered AIDS drugs could be used to stop the spread of HIV—a truly ground-breaking development in prevention research. And for the first time, the White House released a National HIV/AIDS Strategy to reduce the spread of HIV and ensure that everyone, regardless of age, race, or income, gets the care they deserve and need. It’s a powerful message from the highest level of government that HIV/AIDS needs urgent attention within our borders. 2010 is a far cry from the early days of the epidemic, when it was impossible for many people to think about the next day, let alone the next week or the next year. Hope was in short supply and tomorrow was uncertain, not guaranteed.

As we mark the thirtieth year of AIDS, it’s important to reflect on the struggles we’ve overcome, and the distance we have traveled. It’s a time to remember family members, friends, and loved ones lost to the disease. It’s a moment to pause and honor the pioneers who selflessly and courageously took a stand against HIV from the moment it first took hold in our homes. We made it through the most difficult moments of the epidemic, and our city became stronger and more united. Today we look forward with tremendous optimism, and momentum is building. We will seize this moment by expanding our services and constantly refocusing our treatment, prevention, and advocacy efforts to meet the demands of our city and the people who rely on San Francisco AIDS Foundation every day.

of the HIV epidemic. Much work remains, but hope is no longer in short supply. We have reached a turning point. We are scoring victories like never before and as we push forward we remain vigilant, because hope alone will not defeat this disease. That is our commitment. To those who have supported our work through the years, your contributions have propelled us to this point. We are grateful, and hope we may count on your continued involvement as we move into this next crucial phase of the epidemic. We need you with us now more than ever, because when we work together, progress spreads faster than HIV. In Service,

Neil Giuliano, Chief Executive Officer

Tom Perrault, Chair, Board of Directors

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In 1981, San Franciscans had no idea the city was about to be transformed by an as-yet unnamed virus. We had no idea it would claim tens of thousands of lives. We had no idea that our community and relationships would be profoundly altered.

A community united Everything changed that year. And just as we had no idea what lay ahead, we also had no idea just how resilient, how dedicated, how compassionate, and how united we would be in the face of tragedy. Indeed, we were never the same. Our organization would be born from that early response. And it was only the beginning. San Francisco would choose hope over fear, and we are all stronger because of it. HIV/AIDS challenged us to rise to the occasion, and our response would be spread around the country.

To this day, San Francisco serves as a model for fighting the disease and redefining what it means to be a community. Sam and Joyce embody this legacy. The outreach and counseling services they provide via the foundation’s Stonewall Project have a ripple effect, making our entire community healthier.

Forging a new model San Francisco AIDS Foundation is expanding services for HIV prevention and care that go beyond HIV testing and support for people living with HIV/AIDS. We seek to also address the key drivers of infection, like substance use, mental health issues, and homelessness. This multi-dimensional approach is central to our efforts to reduce new HIV infections and ensure access to care in hard-hit communities. “We know progress is made one person at a time, one community at a time. Our work is about changing lives.”

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In 2010, San Francisco AIDS Foundation conducted thousands of HIV tests, distributed millions of clean needles, delivered substance abuse treatment services to hundreds of people, provided housing subsidies to hundreds of clients at risk for homelessness, and offered an array of community support groups serving diverse populations.

Refusing to accept But we know the HIV epidemic continues to evolve and thrive on the margins. That’s why we will never let down our guard.

HIV as inevitable Seizing the momentum of 2010, San Francisco AIDS Foundation is expanding services to the African-American HIV/AIDS community through a Center of Excellence project. In collaboration with San Francisco General Hospital and UCSF, we will assist 250 clients, linking them to primary care and social services support. Magnet, our health clinic in the Castro, will double capacity for HIV testing and increase efforts to link gay and bisexual men to HIV testing and care services in a culturally appropriate environment that promotes community health. The Stonewall Project will expand services for substance abuse—a known driver of HIV infection—to include people struggling with alcohol. To see more about the impact our programs are making, visit sfaf.org/clientservices

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Ryan White was diagnosed with AIDS in 1984. He was 13 years old and doctors gave him just six months to live. Indiana administrators expelled Ryan from his middle school because of his infection. It’s hard to say what most teenagers would have done in a similar situation, but Ryan was not like most teenagers.

A boy took a stand He fought the school district to return to class. He committed himself to raising awareness about HIV/AIDS. He advocated for more AIDS research. He taught the world to be more accepting. Ryan died in 1990. That same year, Congress enacted the Ryan White CARE Act, the largest federally funded program for people living with HIV/AIDS. To this day it provides critical assistance for low-income, uninsured, and under-insured people.

Ken first entered our doors in 2000 as a client. Because he is on a fixed income and HIV-positive, he relies on the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) for medications that keep him healthy. Today, ADAP is a cornerstone of the Ryan White CARE Act.

Building a wave of adv This year, Ken’s taken up the legacy of Ryan White by advocating for all people living with HIV/AIDS. Ken attended AIDSWatch in Washington, D.C., where he shared his personal story with lawmakers to push for adequate funding of HIV/AIDS programs. Walking the halls of Capitol Hill, he gave a face to the epidemic, just like Ryan did. “The path that Ryan White paved not only keeps me healthy, it also inspires me to help others and remind people that HIV still deserves our urgent attention.”

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We continue to put a human face on what is, for us, a very human disease. San Francisco AIDS Foundation policy experts are among the most influential strategists in the nation, advocating on behalf of all people living with and at risk for HIV/AIDS.

Renewing momentum In 2010, the foundation played a key role in shaping the first-ever National HIV/AIDS Strategy. The plan was released by President Obama in July. It’s a blueprint for federal agencies, health departments, and community groups across the country to re-focus attention on our domestic epidemic.

for progress San Francisco AIDS Foundation will help shape implementation of the strategy on many fronts. At the federal level, our policy experts are actively involved in establishing benchmarks and monitoring progress against them. Statewide, we are working with peer organizations on a set of recommendations to inform lawmakers as they interpret the strategy to meet the needs of people in California. San Francisco is also one of 12 major cities identified as a focus area for the strategy. That means the city and the foundation will be at the forefront of efforts to improve coordination of HIV prevention, care, and treatment services. Learn more about our public policy and advocacy efforts at sfaf.org/advocacy

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Like most responses, it starts with a single step. Then it builds momentum, until it cannot be stopped. That’s the story of AIDS Walk. In 1987, more than 6,000 people courageously took to San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park to raise awareness and money in the first AIDS Walk.

A walk raised money It was a powerful moment. At the time, the federal government was dragging its feet allocating funds to address communities hard-hit by the disease. AIDS Walk stepped in and people stepped up. Men, women, and children of all races and sexual orientations united to raise their voices and raise money for a community in desperate need of financial support. In the process, they sparked a philanthropic effort that lives on today.

Maralina is a teacher and a parent. She rides in AIDS/LifeCycle to fight stigma and show her son and students that they can change the world.

Inspiring her to ride Last year, someone very close to Maralina was diagnosed HIV-positive. This will be her third year on AIDS/LifeCycle, but now it has a deeper meaning. Her purpose is greater. “You never know when or how HIV will impact your life. It touches us all.” During this journey, students have raised money for Maralina by selling rubber ducks. Her son set up a lemonade stand so he could help out. With each mile she rides, she’s educating a new generation about HIV and how to prevent it.

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At the core of every contribution is the powerful sense of community. The people who support our work are drawn together by a single calling: to end the HIV epidemic in the city where it began and eventually everywhere.

Propelled by a re In 2010, thousands of people joined our efforts and in doing so created bonds that will last a lifetime. Whether it was through the 2010 Leadership Recognition Dinner, the Annual Fund Campaign, or one of our legendary endurance events, every single supporter took part in something bigger than themself and made a world of difference in the lives of people with HIV/AIDS. We are deeply grateful.

markable community This passion cannot be stopped. 2011 is a momentous year. Our annual Leadership Recognition Dinner honors heroes from three decades. AIDS Walk celebrates its 25th anniversary and AIDS/Lifecycle marks its 10th anniversary. Already, support for our events is overwhelming and the foundation expects to break fundraising records. Through it all, our community will grow stronger, healthier, and more united than ever. Register, donate, volunteer, and learn more at sfaf.org/get-involved

2010 by the numbers 30 years WHY WE FIGHT

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People living with HIV/AIDS nationwide:

MILLION

GAY AND BLACK COMMUNITIES ARE ESPECIALLY HARD-HIT New infections among gay and bisexual men are on the rise—the only risk group for which this is the case

(cdc)

Black Americans account for more new HIV infections, AIDS diagnoses, and HIV-related deaths than any other racial/ethnic group

people living with HIV/AIDS in San Francisco:

15,836 (SFDPH)

TWO Estimated number of new infections in San Francisco every day (sfdph)

1 in 4 Estimated number of gay or BISEXUAL men in San Francisco infected with HIV (SFDPH)

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into the epidemic, here’s where we stand HOW WE FIGHT

EDUCATION ADVOCACY SERVICES HIV TESTS:

4,200+ SCREENs FOR SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS:

10,000+ To diagnose and link people to care and prevention services

RESEARCH & EVALUATION To build evidence to improve the effectiveness of our program & policy efforts and translate scientific advances to enhance awareness, knowledge, and action

CONDOMS:

50,000+ To prevent the spread of HIV

SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES:

500 PEOPLE To enable people to identify and address barriers to health

CLEAN SYRINGES:

2.1 MILLION To protect people from HIV and hepatitis C

HOUSING SUBSIDIES:

400

PEOPLE

To ensure a stable housing environment for HIV-positive people

San Francisco AIDS Foundation

Statement of activities and changes in net assets Years ended June 30, 2010, and June 30, 2009 $(000s)

2010

2009

PUBLIC AND GOVERNMENT SUPPORT: Government grants

$

6,246

$

7,475

Contributions and grants: 2,043

2,333

Corporations and foundations

Individuals

810

383

Donated goods and services

308

357

8,995

10,436

18,402

20,984

Special events Total Public and Government Support REVENUES AND GAINS: Net realized and unrealized gains on investments

574

(1,1 8 2)

Investment income

18 1

302

Service revenues

4 10

27 3

Other

155

206

19,722

20,583

Total Support and Revenues EXPENSES: Program services

12,419

14,139

Fund development

4,794

5,469

Support services

1,732

1,835

18,945

21,443

Total Expenses Change in Net Assets NET ASSETS (BEGINNING OF YEAR) NET ASSETS (END OF YEAR)

The financial information included herein is derived from our audited financial statements for the year ended June 30, 2010, a complete copy of which can be found on our website at www.sfaf.org/about-us/financial-information.

777

(860)

10,719

11,579

$ 11,496

$ 10,719

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San Francisco AIDS Foundation

Statement of financial position Years ended June 30, 2010, and June 30, 2009 $(000s)

2010

2009

ASSETS: $ 1,371

$ 2,392

Investments

Cash

9,373

8,1 2 2

Accounts receivable

1,104

812

Contributions receivable, net

713

390

Prepaid expenses

623

431

Security deposits and other assets

228

259

Property and equipment, net

656

963

14,068

13,369

Total Assets LIABILITIES:

1,209

1,1 88

Accrued payroll and related liabilities

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

789

804

Grants payable

229

256

Refundable advances

212

227

Capital lease obligations

133

175

2,572

2,650

10,921

9,997

Total Liabilities NET ASSETS: Unrestricted Temporarily restricted

155

302

Permanently restricted

420

420

11,496

10,719

$ 14,068

$ 13,369

Total Net Assets TOTAL LIABILITIES and NET ASSETS

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San Francisco AIDS Foundation

At a glance Year ended June 30, 2010 $(000s)

Sources of Revenue: Private Giving and Other Non-Government Sources 68.3%

31.7%

$ 13,476

Government Grants Total

6, 24 6 $ 19,722

Expense Allocation by Function: Program Services 65.6%

25.3% 9.1%

$ 12,419

Fund Development

4,794

Support Services

1,732

Total

$ 18,945

Expenditures by Program Area: 13.2% 41.3%

26.3%

11.5% 7.7%

HIV Prevention and Community-Level Intervention

$

5,129

Housing Services

3,264

Client Services and Treatment Education

1 ,6 3 5

Public Policy

1,429

Global Treatment Access Total

962 $ 12,419

Leadership Judith Auerbach Vice President, Research & Evaluation

Christa Brothers Director, Human Resources & Administration

Neil Giuliano Chief Executive Officer

Barbara Kimport Vice President, Development

James Loduca Vice President, Marketing & Communications

Bob Rybicki Vice President, Programs & Policy

Jonathan Zimman Chief Financial Officer

Board of Directors* Dan Bernal Denise Bradby (service through 2010) MPR Associates

Carol L. Brosgart, MD Alios BioPharma

Jonathan Deason Vanguard Properties

Christopher Esposito (service through 2010) Magley & Associates

David Galullo POLLACK architecture

Laurie S. Hane Morrison & Foerster LLP

Michael Kidd Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

Tom Perrault (Chair) Mike Richey Biotechnology consultant

Lorna Thornton, MD (Immediate Past Chair) San Mateo Medical Center *Organizations listed for affiliation purposes only

Design: www.Mission-Minded.com

Meebo Inc.

Contact San Francisco AIDS Foundation 1035 Market Street, Suite 400 San Francisco, CA 94103 415.487.3000 Get the latest on news and events: Sign up at sfaf.org Email us at feedback@sfaf.org Follow us on facebook.com/SFAIDSFoundation


Annual Report 2010 San Francisco AIDS Foundation