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20 14 –20 15 S E A SO N

PA S S I O N

DR A M A RO MA N C E SINNOVATION PIR IT

HERE IS AN ORCHESTRA THAT HAS EARNED ITS MARKETING SLOGAN: "LISTEN BOLDLY." – THE NEW YORKER

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WE INVITE YOU TO LISTEN BOLDLY Experience the DRAMA, JOY and PASSION of live music as Music Director Ludovic Morlot and the award-winning Seattle Symphony take you on an unforgettable journey through the heart of symphonic music. From Dvořák’s powerful final three symphonies anchoring our Masterworks Season, to Mozart’s exquisite Requiem, to our once-in-a-lifetime Sibelius Festival, you’ll be transported to new and unexpected places with the many offerings in the 2014–2015 season. It’s a vibrant, engaging, energizing and fulfilling new season. And only you — our subscribers — get the best seats at the best prices.

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GIL SHAHAM

I T Z H A K P E R LM AN

SUBSCRIBER EXCLUSIVES

SAT U RDAY, S EPTEMBER 13, AT 4PM

T HU RSDAY, JANUARY 1 5, AT 7 :30 P M

OPEN ING NI GHT

I TZ H A K P ER LMA N

C ON C E RT & GA L A Ludovic Morlot, conductor Gil Shaham, violin

IBERT: Paris SATIE: Gymnopédies SAINT-SAËNS: Havanaise MASSENET: Méditation from Thaïs DELIBES: Selections from Coppelia SARASATE: Carmen Fantasy OFFENBACH: Selections from Orpheus in the Underworld Ludovic Morlot kicks off the 2014–2015 season with a Paris-inspired program, together with one of the foremost artists of our time: violinist Gil Shaham. To reserve a Gala package, please call 206.215.4756. Be part of the glamour and glitter of private pre-concert receptions and a post-concert black-tie Gala cocktail reception and dinner at the Fairmont Olympic Hotel.

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY Itzhak Perlman, conductor & violin J.S. BACH: Violin Concerto No. 2 BRAHMS: Academic Festival Overture BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 3, “Eroica” Beloved for his charm as well as his talent, Itzhak Perlman is treasured by audiences throughout the world who respond not only to his remarkable artistry, but also his irrepressible joy of making music. Hear him play and conduct in one unforgettable concert!

F RIDAY, JANUARY 30, AT 8P M

S ONI C EVOLU TI ON Ludovic Morlot, conductor Join the Seattle Symphony for a one-of-a-kind concert that celebrates Seattle’s musical legacy of innovation with brand-new symphonic compositions inspired by Nirvana and others.

Gala sponsors:

SUBSCRIBE BY MARCH 1, 2014 and be entered to win a trip for two to Carnegie Hall. See page 35 for details.

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AVA I L A B L E TO S U B S C R I B E R S F I R S T

THESE BLOCKBUSTER CONCERTS SELL OUT FAST —

YO -YO M A

Y UJA WA N G

ADD TO YOUR ORDER TODAY!

S U N DAY, MA RCH 1 , AT 4PM

T U E SDAY, AP RIL 21 , AT 7 :30 P M

C EL E BRATE ASI A

SEOUL PHILHARMONIC OR C H ESTR A

Carolyn Kuan, conductor Chiaki Endo, koto Dozan Fujiwara, shakuhachi Meeka Quan DiLorenzo, cello A.R. RAHMAN: Slumdog Millionaire JUGO KANNO: U.S. Premiere, Seattle Symphony Commission UNSUK CHIN: Gougalon: Scenes from a Street Theater TAN DUN: Selections from Crouching Tiger Cello Concerto, from the soundtrack to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Myung-Whun Chung, conductor Sunwook Kim, piano BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 5, “Emperor” BRAHMS: Symphony No. 4 The world-renowned Seoul Philharmonic returns to Benaroya Hall with conductor Myung-Whun Chung and a program of Romantic blockbusters by Beethoven and Brahms.

East meets West in this signature Seattle Symphony event, conducted by Carolyn Kuan and featuring soloists on traditional Japanese instruments. Come early to see pre-concert performances in the Samuel & Althea Stroum Grand Lobby.

SU NDAY, M AY 3, AT 2P M

Jugo Kanno, Chiaki Endo, and Dozan Fujiwara performances are generously

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY

underwritten by Yoshi and Naomi Minegishi.

W E D NES DAY, APRIL 1, AT 7:30PM

LONDON SY M PH ONY O R CH E STRA Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor Yuja Wang, piano

YO-YO MA Ludovic Morlot, conductor Yo-Yo Ma, cello

RAVEL: Mother Goose Suite STRAVINSKY: Suite from Pulcinella SCHUMANN: Cello Concerto Classical music icon Yo-Yo Ma joins Music Director Ludovic Morlot for one incredible evening — get your tickets early. Yo-Yo’s Ma’s performance generously underwritten by Jeff Lehman and Katrina Russell.

BRITTEN: Four Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes GERSHWIN: Piano Concerto in F SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 5 One of the world’s great orchestras makes its Benaroya Hall debut! With the sensational Yuja Wang in Gershwin’s jazz-inspired Piano Concerto in F, and Michael Tilson Thomas on the podium, this will be one of the great nights on Seattle’s classical music calendar. London Symphony Orchestra performance generously underwritten by Martin Selig.

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MASTERWORKS SERIES On the following pages, you’ll find listings of our Masterworks Series offerings. Weeknights, weekends or matinees — in packages of 13, 7 or 4 concerts — you’ll find a Masterworks series to suit your musical tastes, lifestyle and budget.

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SATU RDAYS AT 8PM

S EPTEMBER 25 OR SEPTEMBER 27

DE C E M B E R 1 1 OR DE C E M B E R 1 3

DVO ŘÁK ’ S

J OS H UA R OMA N

E IG H T H SYMPHO NY

WIT H T H E S E AT T LE SYMP H O NY

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Khatia Buniatishvili, piano

Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, conductor Joshua Roman, cello

DUTILLEUX: Métaboles RACHMANINOV: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 8

PROKOFIEV: Lieutenant Kijé Suite MASON BATES: Cello Concerto (World Premiere) TCHAIKOVSKY: Selections from Sleeping Beauty

Be swept off your feet by one of the most romantic piano works of all time as Ludovic Morlot leads the orchestra in Dvořák’s triumphant Eighth Symphony.

Seattle favorite Joshua Roman returns for the world premiere of innovative composer Mason Bates’ Cello Concerto. Tchaikovsky’s sublime Sleeping Beauty perfectly completes the evening’s program as we prepare for the holidays.

O CTO BER 2 OR OC TOBER 4

DVO ŘÁK A N D THE

NE W WORLD Ludovic Morlot, conductor Hilary Hahn, violin

JOHN ADAMS: Lollapalooza KORNGOLD: Violin Concerto DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 9, ”From the New World“ Superstar Hilary Hahn, hailed by The Wall Street Journal for her “warm tone, stunning technique and flawless intonation,” returns to Benaroya Hall for a powerhouse program that also includes Dvořák’s famous “New World“ Symphony.

JANUARY 29 OR JANUARY 31

MASTER PIECES BY

RACHMANINOV & IVES Ludovic Morlot, conductor Denis Kozhukhin, piano Seattle Symphony Chorale RACHMANINOV: Piano Concerto No. 3 IVES: Symphony No. 4 Rachmaninov’s technically daunting and treasured Third Piano Concerto will be illuminated by the electrifying Denis Kozhukhin. It’s followed by Ives’ Fourth Symphony, which draws together hymn tunes, popular songs and marching bands into a moving reflection on American music — and life itself.

NOVEM BER 6 OR N OVEMBER 8

TCH AI KOV S KY ’ S

FOURTH SYMPHONY Ludovic Morlot, conductor Leila Josefowicz, violin BARBER: Second Essay for Orchestra ESA-PEKKA SALONEN: Violin Concerto TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 4 Tragic, impassioned and dramatic. Tchaikovsky found his artistic voice in his Fourth Symphony, one of the great Romantic symphonies. Also hear Salonen’s vibrant violin concerto, written for the astounding Leila Josefowicz.

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F E B RUARY 1 2 O R F E B RUARY 1 4

BER LIOZ’ S

R OMÉO ET J U LI ETT E Ludovic Morlot, conductor Sylvie Brunet Grupposo, mezzo-soprano Kenneth Tarver, tenor Patrick Bolleire, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale BERLIOZ: Roméo et Juliette, Op. 17 Revel in the exquisite agony of Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers as Ludovic Morlot leads the orchestra in Berlioz’s rarely performed masterwork Roméo et Juliette.

S E AT T LE SYM P HONY

HILARY HAHN

M A RCH 1 2 OR MARC H 14

AP RIL 30 O R M AY 2

SI B E L I U S ’

Y EF I M B R ONF MA N P LAYS B EETH OV EN

Thomas Dausgaard, conductor

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Yefim Bronfman, piano

SY M PHONI ES 1 & 2 SIBELIUS: Finlandia SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 1 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 2 Newly appointed Principal Guest Conductor Thomas Dausgaard uncovers the “intimate voices” of Jean Sibelius as the orchestra begins its celebration of the beloved Finnish composer. (See pages 20 and 21 for full festival lineup.)

M A RCH 2 6 OR MAR C H 28

SI B E L I U S ’

SY M PHONI ES 5, 6 & 7 Thomas Dausgaard, conductor SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 5 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 6 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 7 Sibelius said his Sixth Symphony reminded him of the “scent of the first snow.” Embrace the cold Nordic landscape with the final three symphonies of Finland’s national composer.

BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 4 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 7 Immerse yourself in the powerful, emotional world of one of the greatest composers in this all-Beethoven program, featuring the inestimable and virtuosic Yefim Bronfman.

M AY 28 O R M AY 30

NEEME JÄ RV I COND U CTS

R U S S I A N MASTER S Neeme Järvi, conductor

GLINKA: Overture to Russlan and Ludmilla BORODIN: Symphony No. 2 PROKOFIEV: Selections from Cinderella World-famous conductor Neeme Järvi, adored by audiences and orchestras all over the world, leads the orchestra in repertoire dear to his heart — two delightful fairy tale-inspired masterpieces and Borodin’s greatest symphonic work, his exuberant and powerful Symphony No. 2.

A PRI L 2 OR APRIL 4

CH O P I N’S

PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2 Thomas Søndergård, conductor Ingrid Fliter, piano SZYMANOWSKI: Concert Overture CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 2 PROKOFIEV: Symphony No. 5 The ethereal grace of Chopin's piano concerto is given life by the remarkable virtuosity of Argentine pianist Ingrid Fliter. Prokofiev’s Fifth is the pinnacle of his symphonic output.

A PRI L 2 3 OR APRIL 25

G RI E G ’S

PIA N O CO NCERTO Ludovic Morlot, conductor Marc-André Hamelin, piano SEBASTIAN CURRIER: World Premiere GRIEG: Piano Concerto SCHUMANN: Symphony No. 2 Ludovic Morlot teams up with the great Marc-André Hamelin for an all-time favorite: Grieg’s rollicking and captivating Piano Concerto. Also, hear Schumann’s optimistic Symphony No. 2, which radiates with love as a gift to his wife, Clara.

J U NE 1 8 OR JU NE 20

MA H LER’ S

TH I R D SY MP H ONY Ludovic Morlot, conductor Christianne Stotijn, mezzo-soprano Women of the Seattle Symphony Chorale Northwest Boychoir MAHLER: Symphony No. 3 Hear why Mahler said, “the Symphony must be like the world. It must embrace everything.” In his formidable and majestic Third Symphony, Mahler celebrates the natural world in all its glory.

LISTEN

FOR THE EMOTION

MASTERWORKS SERIES 7 -CONCERT PAC KAGES

A B LISTEN FOR THE DRAMA

THU RSDAYS AT 7 :30P M

S E P TEM BER 1 8 OR SEPTEMBER 20

DVOŘÁK ’S

S E VE NT H SYMPHO NY Ludovic Morlot, conductor Daniil Trifonov, piano WAGNER: Overture to Die Meistersinger TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1 DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 7

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SAT U RDAYS AT 8 P M

Ludovic Morlot begins his three-week celebration of Dvořák with the Czech master’s stirring and melancholy tribute to his homeland. The sensational young Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov brings us the drama of Tchaikovsky’s awe-inspiring First Piano Concerto.

O C TO B ER 30 OR NOVEMBER 1

MOZ ART

R E QUIE M Ludovic Morlot, conductor Hélène Guilmette, soprano Sasha Cooke, mezzo-soprano Zach Finkelstein, tenor Alexander Hajek, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale R. STRAUSS: Metamorphosen MOZART: Requiem Devastating beauty and heartbreaking tenderness fill Mozart’s culminating work. Whether it’s your hundredth Requiem or your first, this is music not to be missed.

N OV E MBER 2 0 OR NOVEMBER 22

BEET H OVE N ’ S

F I FT H SY MPHO NY Carlo Montanaro, conductor ROSSINI: Overture to The Barber of Seville RESPIGHI: Church Windows BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 5 From the hammer blows of fate in its opening to its triumphant finale, Beethoven’s Fifth resounds with electrifying force. An inspiring evening for all, showing off the orchestra in Beethoven’s symphony of symphonies, complemented by Respighi’s kaleidoscopic and extravagant Church Windows.

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F E B RUARY 5 OR F E B RUARY 7

BEETH OV EN’ S

V I OLI N C ONC ERTO

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Christian Tetzlaff, violin BERLIOZ: Le Corsaire Overture BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto DEBUSSY: Ibéria RAVEL: La valse Hailed by The New York Times as a “bold artist with an instinctive feeling for the wild side,” Christian Tetzlaff brings his immense talents to Beethoven’s monumental Violin Concerto. Debussy’s exuberant Ibéria is paired with Ravel’s La valse to end the evening.

M A R C H 1 9 OR M A RCH 21

SIBE L I U S ’

SY M PH ONI ES 3 & 4 Thomas Dausgaard, conductor Pekka Kuusisto, violin SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 3 SIBELIUS: Violin Concerto SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 4 Sibelius’ Violin Concerto has been compared to the image of a “warm-blooded animal dancing in a frozen landscape.” Indeed that phrase captures perfectly the humane spirit of this great composer of the north, whose complete symphonies we’ll explore this season under the expert baton of Thomas Dausgaard.

A P R I L 1 6 OR A PRI L 18

SHO STA KOV IC H’ S

LENINGRAD SYMPHONY Andrey Boreyko, conductor Alexander Velinzon, violin SCHNITTKE: Violin Concerto No. 4 SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 7, ”Leningrad“ The orchestra’s full forces will be onstage for Shostakovich’s epic ”Leningrad“ Symphony, the composer’s stirring tribute to his country’s resistance to Nazi aggression. In this all-Russian program, our renowned Concertmaster, Alexander Velinzon, steps forward with Schnittke’s highly charged violin concerto.

J U N E 1 1 OR JUNE 1 3

MORLOT CO N D UC TS

B R AH M S’ F I RST SY M PH ONY Ludovic Morlot, conductor Carolin Widmann, violin

BEETHOVEN: Egmont Overture JULIAN ANDERSON: Violin Concerto BRAHMS: Symphony No. 1 Echoes of Beethoven infuse Brahms’ moving First Symphony. Music Director Ludovic Morlot leads this stunning program, including a crackling work by British composer Julian Anderson, who creates “vivid, transfixing sound worlds.”

SHOSTAKOVICH’S LENINGRAD SYMPHONY Shostakovich wrote his Seventh Symphony during the Nazis’ brutal advance into the Soviet Union in 1941. He escaped from his hometown of Leningrad (Saint Petersburg) several months into a siege that dragged on for two and a half years, killing a million residents. Upon completing the massive, wrenching symphony in a safe haven, he dedicated it to the city of Leningrad. While the battles raged on, orchestras in the United States, England and Russia — even a ragtag, half-starved group in Leningrad — performed the symphony, hailing Shostakovich as an international spokesman for Allied resolve. “Amid bombs bursting in Leningrad,” Time magazine wrote on a 1942 cover depicting “Fireman Shostakovich” in a gilded helmet and Coke-bottle glasses, “he hears the chords of victory.” As with so much of the music Shostakovich wrote under Stalin’s watchful eye, the “Leningrad” Symphony swirls with double meanings and veiled ironies. Perspectives that have only become public since the end of the Cold War confirm that the symphony was as much a protest against Soviet totalitarianism as it was a rally cry to beat back the Nazi invaders. On its deepest level, the symphony is more universal than any political struggle — it is the brave testament of a lone voice fighting to be heard over unyielding repression and power. A new century offers fresh perspective on this iconic cry for freedom and humanity, which is as relevant today as it was in World War II. Complementing the epic symphony is the Violin Concerto No. 4 of Alfred Schnittke, who carried Shostakovich’s unflinching vision and wit into the age of Glasnost and Perestroika.

A PRIL 1 6 & A PRIL 1 8

SHO STA KOV ICH’S

LENINGRAD SYMPHONY 20 6 .21 5.4 7 4 7

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7 - C O N C E RT PAC K AG E S

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SATU RDAYS AT 8 PM

F E B RUARY 1 2 O R F E B RUARY 1 4

BER LIOZ’ S

R OMÉO ET J U LI E T T E Ludovic Morlot, conductor Sylvie Brunet Grupposo, mezzo-soprano Kenneth Tarver, tenor Patrick Bolleire, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale BERLIOZ: Roméo et Juliette, Op. 17

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S EPTEMBER 25 OR SEPTEMBER 27

DVO Ř Á K ’ S

E IGHTH SYMPHO NY Ludovic Morlot, conductor Khatia Buniatishvili, piano DUTILLEUX: Métaboles RACHMANINOV: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 8 Be swept off your feet by one of the most romantic piano works of all time, as Ludovic Morlot leads the orchestra in Dvořák’s triumphant Eighth Symphony.

NOVEMBER 13 OR N OVEMBER 15

PICTURES AT A N EXHI BI TI ON Miguel Harth-Bedoya, conductor Augustin Hadelich, violin ESTEBAN BENZECRY: Colors of the Southern Cross MENDELSSOHN: Violin Concerto MUSSORGSKY: Pictures at an Exhibition Journey from Baba Yaga’s hut to the Great Gate of Kiev with Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Also, hear acclaimed violinist Augustin Hadelich perform Mendelssohn’s gem of the repertoire.

M ARC H 26 O R M ARC H 28

SIBELIU S’

SY MP H ONI ES 5, 6 & 7 Thomas Dausgaard, conductor SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 5 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 6 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 7 Sibelius said his Sixth Symphony reminded him of the “scent of the first snow.” Experience the craggy landscape and spiritual vastness of the Nordic world yourself with the final three symphonies of Finland’s national composer.

AP RIL 23 OR AP RIL 25

GR IEG’ S

P I A NO C ONC ERTO Ludovic Morlot, conductor Marc-André Hamelin, piano SEBASTIAN CURRIER: World Premiere GRIEG: Piano Concerto SCHUMANN: Symphony No. 2 Ludovic Morlot teams up with the great Marc-André Hamelin for an all-time favorite: Grieg’s rollicking and captivating Piano Concerto. And, hear Schumann’s optimistic Symphony No. 2, which radiates with love as a gift to his wife, Clara.

D ECEMBER 11 OR DEC EMBER 13

JOSHUA ROMAN

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, conductor Joshua Roman, cello PROKOFIEV: Lieutenant Kijé Suite MASON BATES: Cello Concerto (World Premiere) TCHAIKOVSKY: Selections from Sleeping Beauty Seattle favorite Joshua Roman returns for the world premiere of innovative composer Mason Bates’ Cello Concerto. Tchaikovsky’s sublime Sleeping Beauty perfectly completes the evening’s program as we prepare for the holidays.

SUB S CRIB E & SAV E TO DAY!

JO SH UA ROM AN

M AST ERWO RK S SERI ES

Revel in the exquisite agony of Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers as Ludovic Morlot leads the orchestra in Berlioz’s rarely performed masterwork Romeo et Juliette.

ROMÉO ET JULIETTE

FOR THE J U N E 1 8 OR JUNE 20

MA H L E R’S

T HIRD SYMPHONY Ludovic Morlot, conductor Christianne Stotijn, mezzo-soprano Women of the Seattle Symphony Chorale Northwest Boychoir MAHLER: Symphony No. 3 Hear why Mahler said, “the Symphony must be like the world. It must embrace everything.” In his formidable and majestic Third Symphony, Mahler celebrates the natural world in all its glory.

B U Y ALL TH REE SE VE N -CO NCERT PAC KAGES AND HEAR T HE ENTI R E ST U N N ING MASTE RWO R K S SEASO N

Few love stories have transcended time and space like Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, the tragic tale of star-crossed love and family rivalry in Verona, Italy. When the 23-year-old Hector Berlioz first witnessed the play in Paris, it hardly mattered that he “did not know a word of English,” as he claimed in his memoirs. Twelve years later, Berlioz translated the Elizabethan drama into a “dramatic symphony” with a French adaptation of the text for chorus and soloists, and an orchestral sound that captures the sensuous luxury of French Romanticism. The emotional arc of Roméo et Juliette unfolds within the lush, sparkling sound of the orchestra. From the contrapuntal skirmish of the opening fight scene to the wistful violins representing “Romeo alone,” the symphony’s themes and instrumental colors convey the passion, euphoria, tenderness and ultimate heartache of the young lovers. Berlioz translated universal feelings into pure music, thereby accessing, as he described it, “a language which is richer, more varied, less finite, and through its very imprecision incomparably more powerful.” As wondrous as it must have been for Berlioz to hear lines penned two centuries earlier in a foreign language, so it is now for those who witness his Roméo et Juliette, crafted 175 years ago. The language may be different from Shakespeare’s, but the message is unmistakable: As Juliet said herself, “That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet.”

21 A – TH URS DAYS OR 21B – SATURDAYS

Hear all 21 concerts and save up to 21% over single ticket prices

KH ATI A BU NI ATI S HVI LI

Includes all concerts on pages 8 – 13.

F EBRUA RY 1 2 & F EBRUA RY 14

B ERL IOZ’S

ROMÉO ET JULIE TTE

20 6 .21 5.4 7 4 7

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TWO MASTERPIECES — ONE MAGNIFICENT PROGRAM O C TO B E R 2 O R O C TO B E R 4

In 1909 Sergey Rachmaninov was an international piano virtuoso launching his first U.S. tour, while Charles Ives ran an insurance agency and used his nights and weekends to compose audacious music unknown outside of his home in Danbury, Connecticut. Over the next seven years, Ives assembled the Symphony No. 4, a sprawling work driven by the “searching questions of What? and Why? which the spirit of man asks of life.” This description comes from a performance of two of the symphony’s movements in 1927, the most that was heard until 1965, 11 years after the composer’s death. Even now, this maverick score stretches the boundaries of sonic perception with its kaleidoscopic collisions of hymns, popular songs and marching band music, all voiced by a massive orchestra.

DVOŘ Á K A ND TH E

NEW WOR LD Ludovic Morlot, conductor Hilary Hahn, violin

JOHN ADAMS: Lollapalooza KORNGOLD: Violin Concerto DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 9, ”From the New World” Superstar Hilary Hahn, hailed by The Wall Street Journal for her “warm tone, stunning technique and flawless intonation,” returns to Benaroya Hall for a powerhouse program that also includes Dvořák’s famous “New World“ Symphony.

NOVE M B E R 6 OR NOVE M B E R 8

TCH A IKOV SKY ’ S

F OU RTH SY MP HO N Y Ludovic Morlot, conductor Leila Josefowicz, violin BARBER: Second Essay for Orchestra ESA-PEKKA SALONEN: Violin Concerto TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 4 Tragic, impassioned and dramatic. Tchaikovsky found his artistic voice in his Fourth Symphony, one of the great Romantic symphonies. Also, hear Salonen’s vibrant and accessible Violin Concerto, written for the astounding Leila Josefowicz.

If Ives gave voice to the expansive, pioneering

JANUARY 29 OR JANUARY 31

aspect of his country, Rachmaninov spoke to

MASTER PIECES BY

the American fascination with luxury and glitz. Rachmaninov wrote that his U.S. tour placed him in front of “those audiences which always seek something extraordinary, something different.” The Piano Concerto No. 3, composed for the occasion, rises to the challenge with brilliant piano flights and aching, heartfelt lyricism, a musical treasure box that still

RACHMANINOV & IVES Ludovic Morlot, conductor Denis Kozhukhin, piano Seattle Symphony Chorale RACHMANINOV: Piano Concerto No. 3 IVES: Symphony No. 4 Rachmaninov’s technically daunting and treasured Third Piano Concerto will be illuminated by the electrifying Denis Kozhukhin. It’s followed by Ives’ Fourth Symphony, which draws together hymn tunes, popular songs and marching bands into a moving reflection on American music — and life itself.

shines bright on its beholders. M ARC H 1 2 O R M ARC H 1 4

SIBELIU S’ FE BR UARY 12 OR FEBR UARY 14

TWO MASTE R P EI C ES

RACHMANINOV & IVES

SY MP H ONI ES 1 & 2 Thomas Dausgaard, conductor SIBELIUS: Finlandia SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 1 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 2 Newly appointed Principal Guest Conductor Thomas Dausgaard uncovers the “intimate voices” of Jean Sibelius as the orchestra begins its celebration of the beloved Finnish composer. (See pages 20 and 21 for full festival lineup.)

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SUB S C RIB E & SAV E TO DAY!

MASTERWORKS SERIES 7 - C O N C E RT PAC K AG E S

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O RSATU RDAYS AT 8 PM

| T H U RS DAYS AT 7 :30 P M

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A P R I L 2 OR APRI L 4

CH O P I N’S

PIA N O CO NCERTO NO. 2

SUBSCRIBE BY MARCH 1, 2014 and be entered to win a trip for two to Carnegie Hall. See page 35 for details.

Thomas Søndergård, conductor Ingrid Fliter, piano SZYMANOWSKI: Concert Overture CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 2 PROKOFIEV: Symphony No. 5 The ethereal grace of Chopin’s piano concerto is given life by the remarkable virtuosity of Argentine pianist Ingrid Fliter. Prokofiev’s Fifth is the pinnacle of his symphonic output, which he declared to be “a symphony about the spirit of man.”

A P R I L 3 0 OR MAY 2

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Yefim Bronfman, piano BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 4 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 7 Immerse yourself in the powerful, emotional world of one of the greatest composers in this all-Beethoven program, featuring the inestimable and virtuosic Yefim Bronfman.

I N G R I D FL I T E R

Y E F IM B RO NF MAN PL AYS B EETHOVEN

LISTEN

FOR THE

M AY 28 OR M AY 30

NEE ME JÄRV I C O N D UC TS

R USSIA N MASTERS Neeme Järvi, conductor

GLINKA: Overture to Russlan and Ludmilla BORODIN: Symphony No. 2 PROKOFIEV: Selections from Cinderella

LUD OVI C MO RLOT

SPIRIT World-famous conductor Neeme Järvi, adored by audiences and orchestras all over the world, leads the orchestra in repertoire dear to his heart — two delightful fairy tale-inspired masterpieces and Borodin’s greatest symphonic work, his exuberant and powerful Symphony No. 2.

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MATINEES

M AT I N E E PA C K A G E S

7- CONC ERT PAC KAGE

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S EPTEMBER 28

F E B RUARY 8

DVO ŘÁK ’ S

BEETH OV EN’ S

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Khatia Buniatishvili, piano

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Christian Tetzlaff, violin

DUTILLEUX: Métaboles RACHMANINOV: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 8

BERLIOZ: Le Corsaire Overture BEETHOVEN: Violin Concerto DEBUSSY: Ibéria RAVEL: La valse

E IG H T H SYMPHO NY

V I OLI N C ONC ERTO

Be swept off your feet by one of the most romantic piano works of all time, as Ludovic Morlot leads the orchestra in Dvořák’s triumphant Eighth Symphony.

Hailed by The New York Times as a “bold artist with an instinctive feeling for the wild side,” Christian Tetzlaff brings his immense talents to Beethoven’s monumental Violin Concerto. Debussy’s exuberant Ibéria is paired with Ravel’s La valse to end the evening.

NOVEM BER 2

M OZ A RT

M ARC H 22

RE QUIEM

SIBELIU S’

SY MP H ONI ES 3 & 4

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Hélène Guilmette, soprano Sasha Cooke, mezzo-soprano Zach Finkelstein, tenor Alexander Hajek, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale

Thomas Dausgaard, conductor Pekka Kuusisto, violin SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 3 SIBELIUS: Violin Concerto SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 4

R. STRAUSS: Metamorphosen MOZART: Requiem

Sibelius’ Violin Concerto has been compared to the image of a “warm-blooded animal dancing in a frozen landscape.” Indeed that phrase captures perfectly the humane spirit of this great composer of the north, whose complete symphonies we’ll explore this season under the expert baton of Thomas Dausgaard.

Devastating beauty and heartbreaking tenderness fill Mozart’s culminating work. Whether it’s your hundredth Requiem or your first, this is music not to be missed.

NOVEM BER 1 6

PICT URES AT A N E XHI BI TI ON

M AY 31

NEEME JÄ RV I COND U CTS

R U S S I A N MASTER S

Miguel Harth-Bedoya, conductor Augustin Hadelich, violin

Neeme Järvi, conductor

ESTEBAN BENZECRY: Colors of the Southern Cross MENDELSSOHN: Violin Concerto MUSSORGSKY: Pictures at an Exhibition

GLINKA: Overture to Russlan and Ludmilla BORODIN: Symphony No. 2 PROKOFIEV: Selections from Cinderella

Journey from Baba Yaga’s hut to the Great Gate of Kiev with Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Also, hear acclaimed violinist Augustin Hadelich perform Mendelssohn’s gem of the repertoire.

World-famous conductor Neeme Järvi, adored by audiences and orchestras all over the world, leads the orchestra in repertoire dear to his heart — two delightful fairy tale-inspired masterpieces and Borodin’s greatest symphonic work, his exuberant and powerful Symphony No. 2.

J U NE 1 4

MOR LOT COND U CTS

B R A H MS ’ F I R ST SY MP H ONY NE EM E JÄRVI

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Carolin Widmann, violin

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BEETHOVEN: Egmont Overture JULIAN ANDERSON: Violin Concerto BRAHMS: Symphony No. 1 Echoes of Beethoven infuse Brahms’ moving First Symphony. Music Director Ludovic Morlot leads this stunnimg program, including a crackling work by British composer Julian Anderson, who creates “vivid, transfixing sound worlds.”

4- CO NC ERT PAC KAGE

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A

FRIDAYS AT 12 NOON

SEPTEMBER 19

JA N UA RY 1 6

DVOŘÁK ’S

I TZ H A K P ER LMA N

S E V E NT H SYMPHO NY Ludovic Morlot, conductor Daniil Trifonov, piano WAGNER: Overture to Die Meistersinger TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1 DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 7 Ludovic Morlot begins his three-week celebration of Dvořák with the Czech master’s stirring and melancholy tribute to his homeland. The sensational young Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov brings us the drama of Tchaikovsky’s awe-inspiring First Piano Concerto.

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY Itzhak Perlman, conductor & violin J.S. BACH: Violin Concerto No. 2 BRAHMS: Academic Festival Overture BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 3, “Eroica” Beloved for his charm as well as his talent, Itzhak Perlman is treasured by audiences throughout the world who respond not only to his remarkable artistry, but also his irrepressible joy of making music. Hear him play and conduct in one unforgettable concert!

APRIL 17

SH OSTA KOV ICH ’ S DECEMBER 12

J OSH UA ROMAN

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY

LENINGRAD SYMPHONY Andrey Boreyko, conductor Alexander Velinzon, violin

Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, conductor Joshua Roman, cello

SCHNITTKE: Violin Concerto No. 4 SHOSTAKOVICH: Symphony No. 7, ”Leningrad“

PROKOFIEV: Lieutenant Kijé Suite MASON BATES: Cello Concerto (World Premiere) TCHAIKOVSKY: Selections from Sleeping Beauty

The orchestra’s full forces will be onstage for Shostakovich’s epic ”Leningrad“ Symphony, the composer’s stirring tribute to his country’s resistance to Nazi aggression. In this all-Russian program, our renowned Concertmaster, Alexander Velinzon, steps forward with Schnittke’s highly charged violin concerto.

Seattle favorite Joshua Roman returns for the world premiere of innovative composer Mason Bates’ Cello Concerto. Tchaikovsky’s sublime Sleeping Beauty perfectly completes the evening’s program as we prepare for the holidays.

LISTEN FOR THE

INNOVATION

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M AT I N E E PA C K A G E S

MATINEES

S EATTLESYM PHONY.ORG

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THE FRESHNESS AND CREATIVITY OF MAESTRO MORLOT’S INNOVATIONS DESERVE TO BE ENTHUSIASTICALLY WELCOMED. – THE SEATTLE TIMES

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S EATTLESYMPHONY.ORG

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TRACING DVOŘÁK’S MUSICAL PATH With his three final symphonies, Antonín Dvořák reached the pinnacle of his craft, uniting his Czech heritage with the inspiration and discipline he inherited from Beethoven and Brahms. In a rare opportunity to hear these masterpieces in close proximity, Music Director Ludovic Morlot traces Dvořák’s musical path through the Seventh, Eighth and Ninth symphonies — the journey of the son of a Bohemian innkeeper who conquered Europe and won over the New World. Dvořák’s Slavonic Dances made him an international sensation, but he aspired to be more than just a “Czech” composer. His Symphony No. 7, requested by London’s Royal Philharmonic Society — the same organization that had commissioned Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and Mendelssohn’s “Italian” Symphony — reveals Dvořák at his most cosmopolitan, weaving gorgeous and melancholy strains in minor keys. The Eighth Symphony, by contrast, has the warm, nostalgic tone of a seasoned world traveler returning to the idylls of his youth. When Antonín Dvořák arrived in the United States in 1892, his hope was to lead Americans “into the Promised Land, the realm of a new, independent art, in short a national style of music!” His final symphony, subtitled “From the New World,” demonstrated that America’s local musical traditions could form the basis of a new national sound. Drawing inspiration from Longfellow’s epic poem The Song of Hiawatha as well as Native American melodies that had been transcribed by musicologists, the “New World” Symphony reads like a heartfelt dispatch from a country that was just discovering its own distinctive music.

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JOIN US AS MUSIC DIRECTOR LUDOVIC MORLOT TRACES DVOŘÁK’S MUSICAL PATH IN FIVE PROGRAMS FEATURING THE GREAT CZECH SYMPHONIC MASTER. O C TO B E R 2 O R O C TO B E R 4

DVOŘ Á K A ND TH E

S EPTEM BER 18 OR SEPTEMBER 20

NEW WOR LD

DVO ŘÁ K’ S

MASTERWO RKS S ERIES

SE V ENTH SYMPHONY

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Hilary Hahn, violin

M AST E RWO R K S S E R I E S

JOHN ADAMS: Lollapalooza KORNGOLD: Violin Concerto DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 9, “From the New World”

Ludovic Morlot, conductor Daniil Trifonov, piano WAGNER: Overture to Die Meistersinger TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1 DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 7 Ludovic Morlot begins his three-week celebration of Dvořák with the Czech master’s stirring and melancholy tribute to his homeland. The sensational young Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov brings us the drama of Tchaikovsky’s awe-inspiring First Piano Concerto.

S EPTEM BER 25 OR SEPTEMBER 27

DVO ŘÁ K’ S

E IG H TH SYMPHO NY M AST E RWO R K S S E R I E S Ludovic Morlot, conductor Khatia Buniatishvili, piano DUTILLEUX: Métaboles RACHMANINOV: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 8 Be swept off your feet by one of the most romantic piano works of all time, as Ludovic Morlot leads the orchestra in Dvořák’s triumphant Eighth Symphony.

Superstar Hilary Hahn, hailed by The Wall Street Journal for her “warm tone, stunning technique and flawless intonation,” returns to Benaroya Hall for a powerhouse program that also includes Dvořák’s famous “New World“ Symphony.

O C TO B E R 3

NEW WORLD UNTUXED SYMPHO NY U NTU XED Ludovic Morlot, conductor DVOŘÁK: Bagatelles DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 9, ”From the New World“

O C TO B E R 5

DVOŘ Á K’ S

DUMKY TRIO C HA MBER S ERIES Seattle Symphony Musicians and friends JOLIVET: Pastorales de Noël for Flute, Bassoon and Harp SCHUMANN: Piano Quintet MAHLER: Piano Quartet Movement in A minor DVOŘÁK: Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor, “Dumky”

ALL DVOŘÁK CELEBRATION CONCERTS ARE ALSO PART OF MASTERWORKS, CHAMBER AND UNTUXED SERIES.

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INTIMATE VOICES SIBELIUS ANNIVERSARY Commemorating the 100th anniversary of Jean Sibelius' birth, this three week festival celebrates the great Finnish master with a complete cycle of his symphonies. Sibelius drew his inspiration from surroundings that mirror our own Pacific Northwest, a landscape of glacial lakes, conifer forests, sea breezes, migrating birds, long summer nights and dark winters. 150 years after Sibelius’ birth, the Seattle Symphony celebrates this kindred spirit with a festival featuring all seven symphonies as well as chamber music, cultural events and the beloved Violin Concerto, all presided over by Thomas Dausgaard, the newly appointed Principal Guest Conductor who brings deep Nordic roots and unique insights into Sibelius’ world. While Europe shook violently around Sibelius, he stayed true to his singular musical identity. His early symphonies express the fervor of a young man fighting for recognition for his country and a place for his own voice on the international stage. Starting with the Third Symphony, Sibelius shifted toward a pure and refined orchestral sound, infusing the elegance of Mozart and Haydn into an incisive, modern language. Even through the dark years of a cancer scare and the devastation of World War I, Sibelius wrote honest, uncompromising music that encapsulated life’s joys and struggles in abstract forms. In his final symphonies, Sibelius defied the cynicism of the war-torn era; his symphonies became even more transparent and rarified, as guileless as the snow that blanketed his isolated country estate.

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TAKE A JOURNEY THROUGH SIBELIUS’ MASTERPIECES AS PRINCIPAL GUEST CONDUCTOR THOMAS DAUSGAARD BRINGS THE COMPOSER’S UNIQUE WORLD TO BENAROYA HALL. M ARC H 1 9 O R M ARC H 21

SIBELIU S’ MA RCH 1 2 OR MARC H 14

SY MP H ONI ES 3 & 4

SIBELIUS’

MASTERWO RKS S ERIES

SYM PHO NI ES 1 & 2 M AST E RWO R K S S E R I E S Thomas Dausgaard, conductor SIBELIUS: Finlandia SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 1 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 2 Newly appointed Principal Guest Conductor Thomas Dausgaard uncovers the “intimate voices” of Jean Sibelius as the orchestra begins its celebration of the famed and beloved Finnish composer.

Thomas Dausgaard, conductor Pekka Kuusisto, violin SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 3 SIBELIUS: Violin Concerto SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 4 Sibelius’ Violin Concerto has been compared to the image of a “warm-blooded animal dancing in a frozen landscape.” Indeed, that phrase captures perfectly the humane spirit of this great composer of the north.

M ARC H 26 O R M ARC H 28 MA RCH 1 3

SIBELIUS’

SYMPHONY NO. 2

SIBELIU S’

SY MP H ONI ES 5, 6 & 7 MASTERWO RKS S ERIES

SY M P H ON Y U N T U X E D

Thomas Dausgaard, conductor

Thomas Dausgaard, conductor SIBELIUS: Finlandia SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 2

SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 5 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 6 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 7

MA RCH 1 5

Sibelius said his Sixth Symphony reminded him of the “scent of the first snow.” Embrace the cold Nordic landscape with the final three symphonies of Finland’s national composer.

SIBELIUS’

PIANO QUINTET CHAMBER SERIES Seattle Symphony Musicians and friends SIBELIUS: String Quartet in D minor, ”Voces intimae“ SIBELIUS: Sonatina in E major for Violin and Piano, Op. 80 SIBELIUS: Piano Quintet in G minor, J. 159

M ARC H 29

BEYOND TH E SCOR E®:

S I B ELI U S ’ F I F TH SY MP H ONY

SPEC ADD- IAL CONC ON ERT

Thomas Dausgaard, conductor Explore the story behind Sibelius’ Fifth Symphony with this special Beyond the Score® presentation — a multimedia and live concert experience.

SIBELIUS FESTIVAL CONCERTS ARE ALSO PART OF THE MASTERWORKS, CHAMBER AND UNTUXED SERIES.

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AN UN FOR E X P E R G E TA B L E IENCE !

S

E L T E AT

! S P O P TYZ F F E J

IK, C

UC OND

TOR

Sponsored by

Join me and your wonderful Seattle Symphony as we embark on a tour of the world’s most exciting popular music! From the cinematic thrills of John Williams movie scores to the sweeping sounds of New Orleans, from Cirque Musica to the golden age of Broadway, this season’s Seattle Pops is the best yet! — Jeff Tyzik F RIDAY, O C TO B E R 1 0, AT 8P M SAT U RDAY, O C TO B E R 1 1 , AT 8P M SU NDAY, O C TO B E R 1 2, AT 2P M

T H E M OV I E M U S I C OF JOHN WILLIAMS Jeff Tyzik, conductor From Superman to Star Wars to Jaws, John Williams has penned some of the most unforgettable film scores of all time. Jeff Tyzik pays tribute to this cinematic master in the first pops program of the season.

F RIDAY, DE C E M B E R 5, AT 8P M SAT U RDAY, DE C E M B E R 6, AT 8P M SU NDAY, DE C E M B E R 7, AT 2P M

J E F F T Y Z I K ’S H O L I DAY P O P S W I T H C I R QU E MU S I CA C IRQU E M US I CA

Jeff Tyzik, conductor Cirque Musica

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SUB S CRIB E & SAV E TO DAY!

Bring your whole family to this special Holiday Pops concert featuring Cirque’s acrobats, jugglers, dancers and mimes performing with the Seattle Symphony — the ultimate holiday extravaganza.

SOME ENCHANTED EVENING:

RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN CELEBRATION Steven Reineke, conductor Ashley Brown, vocals Aaron Lazar, vocals University of Washington Choirs Celebrate the golden age of Broadway! Steven Reineke brings the music of Rodgers and Hammerstein to life — including selections from Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific and more.

R O D G E R S & H A M M E R ST E I N

F R I DAY, MA RCH 6, AT 8PM SAT U RDAY, M A RCH 7, AT 8PM S U N DAY, MA RCH 8, AT 2PM

F R I DAY, APRI L 1 0, AT 8PM SAT U RDAY, A PRI L 11, AT 8PM S U N DAY, APRI L 1 2 , AT 2PM

The Preservation Hall Jazz Band brings the sweet sounds of New Orleans jazz to Benaroya Hall. Be transported to the French Quarter with the joyful, timeless spirit of this incredible music. Performance does not include the Seattle Symphony.

F R I DAY, JUNE 5 , AT 8PM SAT U RDAY, JUNE 6, AT 8PM S U N DAY, JUNE 7, AT 2PM

A T R I B U T E TO R AY C H A R L E S Jeff Tyzik, conductor Ellis Hall, vocals

P R E S E RVAT I O N H A L L JA Z Z B A N D

P R E S E RVAT I O N H A L L JA Z Z B A N D

Jeff Tyzik concludes the 2014–2015 season with a tribute to Ray Charles, featuring Ellis Hall, a former protégé of the late singersongwriter. From hits like “I Can't Stop Loving You” and “This Little Girl of Mine” to “Hit the Road Jack” and “Georgia on My Mind,” this concert is filled with Ray’s soulful hits.

JOY

JE FF T YZI K

LISTEN FOR THE 20 6 .21 5.47 47

S EATTLESYMPHONY.ORG

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& WINE F R IDAYS

OR

SATU RDAYS AT 8 P M

Enjoy timeless favorites paired with wine tastings in the Samuel & Althea Stroum Grand Lobby — just $10 for four pours.

Mozart

THE GREAT C ON CE RTOS T HURSDAYS AT 7:3 0PM OR SAT URDAYS AT 8PM

One of the mos t enduri ngly pop u l ar compos ers of all ti me. T HU RSDAY, JANUARY 8

MOZA RT’ S O C TO B ER 2 4 OR O CTOBER 25

B ACH & TELEMANN Nicholas McGegan, conductor Robert Levin, piano J.C. BACH: Sinfonia to Cantata No. 42 HANDEL: Concerto grosso in G major, Op. 6, No. 1 J.S. BACH: Keyboard Concerto No. 1 in D minor, BWV 1052 J.S. BACH: Keyboard Concerto No. 5 in F minor, BWV 1056 C.P.E. BACH: String Symphony No. 3 in C major TELEMANN: Suite in G minor

C LA R I NET, V I OLI N & P I A NO C ONC ERTO S

Stilian Kirov, conductor Boris Allakhverdyan, clarinet Valeriy Sokolov, violin Jan Lisiecki, piano MOZART: Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major MOZART: Clarinet Concerto in A major MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor

SAT U RDAY, JANUARY 1 0 F E B R UA RY 2 0 OR F E BR UARY 21

B ACH ’S O R CH E STRAL SUI TES

Richard Egarr, conductor & harpsicord J.S. BACH: Orchestral Suites Nos. 1-4

M AY 1 5 OR MAY 1 6

H AN DE L , VI VALDI & M ORE Stephen Layton, conductor Amanda Forsythe, soprano Deanne Meek, alto David Gordon, trumpet Seattle Symphony Chorale PURCELL: Chaconne HANDEL: Concerto grosso in F major, Op. 6, No. 9 BACH: Cantata No. 51, ”Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen“ VIVALDI: Gloria

LISTEN FOR THE

CLAS S I C S

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MOZA RT’ S

F LU TE, V I OLI N & P I A NO C ONC ERTO S

Stilian Kirov, conductor Adam Walker, flute Valeriy Sokolov, violin Jan Lisiecki, piano MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major MOZART: Flute Concerto No. 1 in G major MOZART: Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major Please note that the Thursday series and the Saturday series include different programs.

F E B RUARY 26 O R F E B RUARY 28

MOZA RT’ S

MA R R I AGE OF F I GAR O Jonathan Cohen, conductor Kristian Bezuidenhout, piano MOZART: Overture to The Marriage of Figaro MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat major BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 1

M AY 7 O R M AY 9

MOZ A RT’ S P I A NO CONCERTOS NOS. 17 & 24 Imogen Cooper, piano & conductor MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 17 in G minor MOZART: Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor

UNTUXED

SHORTER CONCERTS FOR YOUR BUSY LIFESTYLE.

F R I D AY S AT 7 P M

SU NDAY

UNTUXED

SHORTER CONCERTS PERFECT FOR FAMILIES

S U N D AY S AT 2 P M This new Sunday series takes you on a trip through 300 years of musical history, sampling the best music of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic eras along the way. These short, no-intermission concerts are perfect for families.

O C TO B ER 3

O C TO B E R 26

NEW WORLD UNTUXED

BAROQUE

Ludovic Morlot, conductor

DVOŘÁK: Bagatelles DVOŘÁK: Symphony No. 9, ”From the New World“

N OV E M BER 2 1

THE BARBER OF SEVILLE Carlo Montanaro, conductor BOCCHERINI: String Quintet in E major ROSSINI: Overture to The Barber of Seville RESPIGHI: Church Windows

Nicholas McGegan, conductor J.C. BACH: Sinfonia to Cantata No. 42 HANDEL: Concerto grosso in G major, Op. 6, No. 1 C.P.E. BACH: String Symphony No. 3 in C major, WQ. 182 TELEMANN: Suite in G minor

JANUARY 1 8

C LAS S I CA L Ludovic Morlot, conductor Seth Krimsky, bassoon MOZART: Symphony No. 31, ”Paris“ WEBER: Bassoon Concerto in F major BEETHOVEN: Leonore Overture No. 3

M A R CH 1 3

SIBELIUS’

SYMPHONY NO. 2

M AY 1 7

ROMANTIC

Thomas Dausgaard, conductor

Stilian Kirov, conductor

SIBELIUS: Finlandia SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 2

BRAHMS: Academic Festival Overture R. STRAUSS: Don Juan TCHAIKOVSKY: Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture

APRIL 3

CHOPIN’S

PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2

Thomas Søndergård, conductor Ingrid Fliter, piano SZYMANOWSKI: Concert Overture CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 2

JUNE 12

B E E T H OV E N & B R A H M S Ludovic Morlot, conductor

SUBSCRIBE BY MARCH 1, 2014 and be entered to win a trip for two to Carnegie Hall. See page 35 for details.

BEETHOVEN: Egmont Overture BRAHMS: Symphony No. 1

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CLASSICAL SERIES

Symphony Untuxed takes you on a musical journey through Europe. These short, come-as-you-are concerts are an affordable, low-stress way to start your weekend.

S EATTLESYMPHONY.ORG

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CHAMBER CHAMBER SERIES SERIES

NO STAGE . NO PRE CONCE P T I O N S. LAT E -N I GHT.

[UNTITLED] F RI DAYS AT 1 0 PM

S U N DAYS AT 2 P M Hear the talented musicians of the Seattle Symphony as they perform chamber works in the intimate Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall.

In the informal atmosphere of the Samuel & Althea Stroum Grand Lobby, our late-night series featuring Seattle Symphony musicians is back and better than ever.

O C TO B ER 5

O C TO B E R 1 7

DVOŘÁK'S

DUMKY TRIO JOLIVET: Pastorales de Noël for Flute, Bassoon and Harp SCHUMANN: Piano Quintet MAHLER: Piano Quartet Movement in A minor DVOŘÁK: Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor, “Dumky”

[UNTITLED 1] Stilian Kirov, conductor DJURO ZIVKOVIC: On the Guarding of the Heart LIGETI: Three Arias from the Opera Le grand macabre ANDREW NORMAN: Try

F E B RUARY 1 3 MARCH 15

SIBELIUS PIANO QUINTET SIBELIUS: String Quartet in D minor, ”Voces intimae“ SIBELIUS: Sonatina in E major for Violin and Piano, Op. 80 SIBELIUS: Piano Quintet in G minor, J. 159

[UNTITLED 2] VLADIMIR MARTYNOV: Schubert Quintet (Unfinished) JACOB DRUCKMAN: Valentine for Solo Double Bass JOHN ADAMS: String Quartet

M AY 1 M AY 1 0

TCHAIKOVSY’S

S T R I N G Q UA RT E T N O. 1 PROKOFIEV: Quintet BRAHMS: Horn Trio in E-flat major TCHAIKOVSKY: String Quartet No. 1

[UNTITLED 3] Ludovic Morlot, conductor Michael Brown, piano PERLE: Molto Adagio, Critical Moments (No. 1), Serenade No. 3 TRIMPIN: New Works for Musicians and Sound Sculptures (World Premiere)

O C TO B E R 6

F L U K E / G A B E L E I N

O R G A N R E C I TA L S M O N DAYS AT 7 : 30P M World-class organists meet the magnificent Watjen Concert Organ — a marvel of old world craftsmanship and modern technology.

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SUBS CRIB E & SAV E TO DAY!

ISABELLE DEMERS

“Isabelle Demers imposes herself by her fabulous pedal and manuals virtuosity” – Bulletin des Amis de l’orgue de Québec

F E B RUARY 2

J OS E P H A DA M

“Adam, of course, is an organist who is capable of virtually anything.” – The Seattle Times

M AY 1 1

DOUGL AS CLEVEL AND

“In Douglas Cleveland’s hands the organ seemed to squeeze the air into towering sculptures.” – The Chicago Tribune

DISTINGUISHED

WOLFGANG WOLFGAN G

ARTISTS

A SERIES FOR PATRONS IN THEIR 20S & 30S.

VARIOUS DAYS & T IM E S

It’s your chance to hear the best of the best as they take the stage at Benaroya Hall.

From concert receptions to wine intermissions, WolfGang offers its members great food, great fun and, of course, great music.

Performances do not include the Seattle Symphony.

W E D NES DAY, D ECEMBER 3, AT 7:30PM

F RIDAY, O C TO B E R 1 0, AT 8P M

Y UJA WA NG

TH E MOV I E MU S I C OF J OH N W I LLI A M S

Yuja Wang, piano Hear why the San Francisco Chronicle praises Chinese pianist Yuja Wang's “practically superhuman keyboard technique with artistic eloquence that is second to none.”

Jeff Tyzik, conductor

T HU RSDAY, DE C E M B E R 1 1 , AT 7 :30 P M

J OS H UA R OMA N

TU E SDAY, MA RCH 3, AT 7:30PM

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY

S I M ON T RPČESKI

Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, conductor Joshua Roman, cello

Simon Trpčeski, piano “Electrifying virtuosity, but no whiff of show-off. The most delicate feelings, yet nothing precious or lacy. Head plus heart, lots of heart.” – London Times

PROKOFIEV: Lieutenant Kijé Suite MASON BATES: Cello Concerto (World Premiere) TCHAIKOVSKY: Selections from Sleeping Beauty

TU E SDAY, MAY 2 6, AT 7:30PM

T HU RSDAY, JANUARY 1 5, AT 7 :30 P M

PIN CH AS ZUKERMAN Pinchas Zukerman, violin Angela Cheng, piano

I TZ H A K P ER LMA N

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY Itzhak Perlman, conductor & violin

“Zukerman seems to be the forever-young virtuoso: expressively resourceful, infectiously musical, technically impeccable and effortless.” — The Los Angeles Times.

J.S. BACH: Violin Concerto No. 2 BRAHMS: Academic Festival Overture BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 3, “Eroica”

T HU RSDAY, F E B RUARY 1 2, AT 7 :30 P M

BER LIOZ’ S

YUJA WAN G

SIMON TRPČESKI

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN

R OMÉ O ET J U LI ETT E Ludovic Morlot, conductor Sylvie Brunet Grupposo, mezzo-soprano Kenneth Tarver, tenor Patrick Bolleire, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale BERLIOZ: Roméo et Juliette

SAT U RDAY, M AY 2, AT 8P M

Y EF I M B R ONF MA N P LAYS B EETH OV EN Ludovic Morlot, conductor Yefim Bronfman, piano

CLASSICAL SERIES

VA R IOU S DAYS & TIMES

BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 4 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 7

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Explore musical curiosity with children of all ages. No matter the age of your child, we have a concert series for your family. Ages 6 to 11

DISCOVER MUSIC S. MARK TAPER FOUNDATION AUDITORIUM

SATURDAYS AT 11AM Explore the world of symphonic music with five family-friendly Discover Music concerts. These hour-long concerts feature great classics and begin with pre-concert adventures in the Grand Lobby.

FEBRUARY 14

THE TOY BOX Ludovic Morlot, conductor What happens when a cardboard solider falls in love with a doll? Be there as the Seattle Symphony brings toys to life in Debussy’s Toy Box.

MAY 9

CARNEGIE HALL’S

THE ORCHESTRA ROCKS

OCTOBER 25

BEETHOVEN LIVES UPSTAIRS

Stilian Kirov, conductor How does the orchestra rock? Explore rhythm, pulse and groove as the Seattle Symphony draws on selected orchestral repertoire like Orff’s Carmina burana, Holst’s The Planets and more.

Stilian Kirov, conductor What happens when a “madman” moves upstairs? Embark on the story of young Christoph and discover the genius of master composer Ludwig van Beethoven, who has taken the upstairs apartment of our hero’s Vienna home.

JUNE 6

THE PIED PIPER Stilian Kirov, conductor

DECEMBER 13

British composer Colin Matthews brings to life the immortal story of Michael Morpurgo’s Pied Piper. Featuring a local youth chorus, this concert is the perfect start to your family’s summer.

A SPIRIT FOR THE HOLIDAYS Magic Circle Mime Stilian Kirov, conductor Three mischievous holiday spirits have their own ideas of what a holiday concert should be. The orchestra is caught in the middle and only the spirit of music can save them. This unusual holiday sing-along breaks the grinch-like “curse of noise.” Don’t miss this fun-filled concert that is packed with the holiday spirit.

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SOUNDBRIDGE PRESENTS ILLSLEY BALL NORDSTROM RECITAL HALL

W I T H L I SA A ND LINDA ™

SATURDAYS AT 10 AND 11:30AM

ILLSLEY BALL NORDSTROM RECITAL HALL

FRIDAYS AT 10:30AM SATURDAYS AT 9:30, 10:30 AND 11:30AM Engage your youngest music lovers with these 35-minute interactive programs featuring musical games, stories and songs in the Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall. OCTOBER 10 & 11

HI-LO BIG TOP CIRCUS It’s a three-ring circus filled with classic miniatures by the greatest composers on earth! Featuring the sounds of the flute, violin and tuba.

Soundbridge comes to the Recital Hall with these 45-minute interactive programs featuring Seattle Symphony musicians. Young audiences will sing and dance, and parents will have a blast too! NOVEMBER 1

WORLD BEAT: THE TREE STORY How does a tree become a violin? With the help of Seattle Symphony musicians, native violinist and storyteller Swil Kanim presents a tree’s journey through words and music.

JANUARY 17 DECEMBER 5 & 6

HOLIDAY HOORAY! We will play in the snow today! Celebrate the holiday season with singalong snow songs and move-along classics. Featuring the sounds of the trumpet, trombone and tuba.

HARMONICA POCKET With swinging story-songs, hula hoops and a suitcase of props, Harmonica Pocket mixes up music, dance and games into a giggly jambalaya.

MARCH 7

Choo, choo! Join us “Down by the Symphony Station” for a magical train ride through the music of Dvořák’s New World. Featuring the sounds of the flute, clarinet, cello and string bass.

APRIL 10 & 11

SAILING THE MUSICAL SEAS

Three teachers make kids’ music from their days in the classroom. Recess Monkey is back to join Symphony musicians in wacky songs. Fun for both kids and adults.

MAY 16

ELISA BARSTON AND FRIENDS Principal Second Violin Elisa Barston and Seattle Symphony musicians explore musical stories together. Don’t be surprised if your little one is ready to take violin lessons after this performance!

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Yo ho! Yo ho! Adventuring we go! Dance and wiggle with friends Presto the Porpoise and Largo the Tortoise in this move-along, sing-along favorite! Featuring the sounds of the flute, oboe and bassoon.

JUNE 12 & 13

TEDDY BEAR’S MUSICAL PICNIC Bring your teddy bear for this concert filled with playful songs, games and musical stories! Featuring the sounds of the clarinet, french horn and cello.

L is t e n F o r the Joyfulness

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MAGICAL MELODY TRAIN RIDE

RECESS MONKEY

HA RM ON IC A

FEBRUARY 20 & 21

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H O L IDAYS at the Symphony M O NDAY, DE C E M B E R 8, AT 7 :30 P M

TH E KI NG’ S S I NGE R S Reserve your seats now to the Seattle Symphony’s most popular holiday performances, including Holiday Pops with Cirque Musica, Handel’s Messiah and Beethoven’s Ninth — all before tickets go on sale to the general public.

One of the world’s most celebrated vocal ensembles, The King’s Singers perform for one night only in the acoustically spectacular Benaroya Hall. Don’t miss their blend of spot-on intonation and impeccable vocals. Performance does not include the Seattle Symphony.

F RIDAY, DE C E M B E R 1 9, AT 8P M SAT U RDAY, DE C E M B E R 20, AT 1 & 8P M SU NDAY, DE C E M B E R 21 , AT 2P M

H A ND EL’ S SAT U RDAY, D ECEMBER 6, AT 2PM

J E F F T Y Z IK’S H O L IDAY POPS W IT H C IRQUE MUSI CA Jeff Tyzik, conductor Cirque Musica

This special holiday pops concert features Cirque’s acrobats, jugglers, dancers and mimes performing with the Seattle Symphony.

MES S I A H Cristian Macelaru, conductor Heidi Grant Murphy, soprano Jennifer Johnson Cano, mezzo-soprano Ross Hauck, tenor Tyler Duncan, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale

Don’t miss the exquisite choral writing and the exultant “Hallelujah” chorus in Handel’s Messiah — featuring the Seattle Symphony, Chorale and soloists.

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THE KING'S SINGERS

TUES DAY, D ECEMBER 23, AT 7:30PM

A FESTIVAL OF LESSONS & CAROLS Joseph Crnko, conductor Northwest Boychoir / Vocalpoint! Seattle Members of the Northwest Sinfonia Experience the story of the Nativity told through readings, choral settings and audience carols.

W ED NES DAY, DEC EMBER 31, AT 9PM

NE W Y EAR’S EVE CO NCE RT, C O UN TD OW N & CE L E B R AT I O N Matthew Halls, conductor Rena Harms, soprano Sarah Larsen, mezzo-soprano Eric Neuville, tenor Morgan Smith, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale

N O RT H W E ST B OYCH O I R

Performance does not include the Seattle Symphony.

MOZART: Symphony No. 31, “Paris” BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 9

Start your New Year’s Eve off right with the grandeur of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Then, ring in 2015 at a post-concert party featuring a live band, dancing and a countdown to midnight.

F RI DAY, JA NUARY 2, AT 8PM SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, AT 8PM S UNDAY, JANUARY 4, AT 2PM

B E E T H OV EN ’ S Matthew Halls, conductor Rena Harms, soprano Sarah Larsen, mezzo-soprano Eric Neuville, tenor Morgan Smith, baritone Seattle Symphony Chorale MOZART: Symphony No. 31, “Paris” BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 9

Hear Beethoven’s monumental Ninth Symphony and enjoy the splendor of the “Ode to Joy” chorus with family and friends.

S EAT TL E SY MP H ONY CHOR ALE

NIN T H SYMPHONY

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L I ST E N BOLD LY TO ANOT HER G REAT SE ASON Subscribe by March 1, 2014, and be entered to win a trip for two to hear the Seattle Symphony at Carnegie Hall POPS SERIES

MASTERWORKS SERIES SEE PAGE

21 A OR B Package SEE PAGE

Orchestra F

13 A OR B Package

7 A, B, C, D, E, F, G Packages

4A Package

p. 22–23

Orchestra F

$125

3rd Tier Box

$145

p. 8–13

p. 6–7

p. 8–14

p. 15

$420

$260

$140

$73

3rd Tier

$170

Orchestra C Orchestra E 2nd Tier 2nd Tier Box

$240

Founders Tier Orchestra B Orchestra D

$305

Orchestra A

$350

Orchestra E 3rd Tier Box Orchestra D

$588

$377

$203

$118

Orchestra C 3rd Tier

$945

$598

$329

$197

2nd Tier 2nd Tier Box

$1,008

$650

$357

$197

Founders Tier Orchestra B

$1,281

$819

$448

$263

Founders Tier Box

$395

PARKING Benaroya Hall

$60

Orchestra A

$1,659

$1,066

$581

$287

Founders Tier Box

$2,163

$1,404

$763

$358

PARKING Benaroya Hall

$252

$156

$84

$48

Prices valid through March 1, 2014. Order early to guarantee these low prices!

CLASSICAL SERIES Baroque & Wine ..................... Mozart Concertos SEE PAGE

Distinguished Artists

Symphony Untuxed Friday

Symphony Untuxed Sunday

FAMILY SERIES

Wolfgang

Fluke/Gabelein Organ Recitals

Chamber Series

[untitled] Series

Discover Music

Tiny Tots Let Your Music Shine with Lisa & Linda™

Soundbridge Presents

p. 26

p. 26

p. 26

p. 28

p. 29

p. 29

p. 24

p. 27

p. 25

p. 25

p. 27

Orchestra F

$54

$75

$75

$54

$70

Orchestra E 3rd Tier Box Orchestra D

$90

$117

$100

$84

$109

Orchestra C 3rd Tier

$117

$171

$100/$150

$141

$145

2nd Tier 2nd Tier Box

$117

$171

$150

$141

$145

Founders Tier Orchestra B

$180

$255

$255

$183

$208

Orchestra A

$195

$288

$280

$210

$233

Founders Tier Box

$213

$339

$345

$231

$281

$36

$36

$60

$36

$60

$54

$96

$51

$90

Orchestra / 2nd Tier

in Recital Hall

General Admission in Grand Lobby

Adults

General Admission Seating

Senior / Child

in Recital Hall

in Recital Hall

$35

$35

$28

$69 Founders Tier / Founders Tier Box

$36

$36

Dvořák’s and The New World

New World Untuxed

Dvořák Dumky Trio p. 19

Sibelius’ Symphonies 1&2

Sibelius’ Symphonies 3&4

Sibelius’ Symphonies 5, 6 & 7

Sibelius’ Symphony No.2 Untuxed

Sibelius’ Fifth Symphony

Beyond the Score:

Sibelius’ Piano Quintet p. 21

p. 19

p. 19

p. 19

p. 19

p. 21

p. 21

p. 21

p. 21

p. 21

Orchestra F

$20

$20

$20

$19

$20

$20

$20

$17

$17

Orchestra D Orchestra E 3rd Tier Box

$30

$30

$30

$21

$30

$30

$30

$21

$25

Orchestra C 3rd Tier

$48

$48

$48

$21/$30

$48

$48

$48

$21/$30

$44

2nd Tier 2nd Tier Box

$48

$48

$48

$30

$48

$48

$48

$30

$44

Founders Tier Orchestra B

$62

$62

$62

$52

$62

$62

$62

$52

$58

Orchestra A

$77

$77

$77

$57

$77

$77

$77

$57

$66

$102

$102

$102

$69

$102

$102

$102

$69

$72

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

Founders Tier Box PARKING Benaroya Hall

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Dvořák’s Eighth Symphony

$36

SIBELIUS FESTIVAL

DVOŘÁK CELEBRATION Dvořák’s Seventh Symphony SEE PAGE

$39

General Admission Seating

$65

PARKING Benaroya Hall

$49

Adults/Child/Senior Adults/Child/Senior

SUBS C RIB E & SAV E TO DAY!

$34 in Recital Hall

$12

$34 in Recital Hall

$12

ADD THESE CONCERTS TO YOUR SUBSCRIPTION ORDER! PRICES SHOWN REFLECT 15% SUBSCRIBER DISCOUNT. Opening Night Gala

Itzhak Perlman with the Symphony

Seoul Philarmonic Orchestra

London Symphony Orchestra

Yo-Yo Ma with the Symphony

Handel’s Messiah

Beethoven’s Ninth

A Festival of Lessons & Carols

New Year’s Eve

The King’s Singers

Holiday Cirque Musica

Celebrate Asia

Sonic Evolution

p. 4

p. 4

p. 5

p. 5

p. 5

p. 30

p. 31

p. 31

p. 31

p. 30

p. 30

p. 5

p. 4

Orchestra F

$57

$89

$23

$30

$119

$20

$24

$17

$45

$62

$32

$17

$17

Orchestra D

$57

$89

$34

$44

$119

$30

$37

$28

$57

$62

$60

$27

$17

Orchestra E 3rd Tier Box

$48

$42

$34

$44

$56

$30

$37

$28

$57

$35

$48/$27

$27

$17

Orchestra C 3rd Tier

$70

$71

$46

$60

$94

$30

$58

$28

$82

$50

$48/$33

$37

$17

2nd Tier 2nd Tier Box

$70

$71

$46

$60

$94

$30

$58

$28

$82

$50

$60

$37

$25

Founders Tier Orchestra B

$87

$77

$72

$94

$102

$42

$76

$38

$100

$62

$70/$60

$55

$25

Orchestra A

$99

$89

$79

$103

$119

$64

$86

$59

$108

$77

$70

$60

$25

SEE PAGE

Founders Tier Box PARKING Benaroya Hall

$125

$117

$87

$113

$136

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

$75

$12

$109

$69

$130

$87

$79

$65

$25

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

$12

F I VE EASY WAYS TO SU B SC RIB E: ONLINE: seattlesymphony.org

(click Buy Tickets, then Series Tickets) PHONE: 206.215.4747 or 1.866.833.4747 (toll-free) FAX: 206.215.4748 Seattle Symphony Tickets, P.O. Box 2108, Seattle, WA 98111-2108 IN PERSON: Visit us at the corner of Third Avenue & Union Street (Mon–Fri, 10am to 6pm; Sat, 1 to 6pm) GROUPS: 206.215.4784 MAIL:

If you wish to sit with another patron, please inform the ticket office when ordering or include the information in the notes field for online orders.

BENAROYA HALL

The S. Mark Taper Foundation Auditorium is the main auditorium for most Seattle Symphony performances and has a capacity of 2,500 seats. THIRD TIER SECOND TIER FOUNDERS TIER

ORCHESTRA

C

E

THIRD TIER BOX SECOND TIER BOX FOUNDERS TIER BOX

PONCHO TIER

SAFECO FOUNDERS TIER

C

E

SECOND TIER BOX PONCHO FOUNDERS TIER TIER BOX

B A

THIRD TIER BOX

A

SAFECO FOUNDERS TIER

STAGE + Partial View: A limited portion of the stage may not be visible. Prices valid through March 1, 2014. Order early to guarantee these low prices!

Indicates wheelchair–accessible seating.

* Ticket prices include a $2 facility fee per ticket for the preservation of Benaroya Hall. Facility fee waived for children’s concerts. All prices are in U.S. dollars. All orders and seating subject to availability. All payments are processed upon receipt of order; this is not a guarantee of seating, but of your placement in the queue for the seats you’ve requested. You will be contacted by phone with any seating questions. No refunds will be made after your series has begun. All programs, artists and prices subject to change without notice. Group subscriptions are available by calling 206.215.4784. Children 5 years of age and older are welcome at all performances with a purchased ticket.

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FRIENDS OF THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY Yo u r d o n a t i o n s m a k e i t a l l p o s s i b l e ! When you become a Friend of the Seattle Symphony, you not only enrich your concert experience with priority subscription seating and exciting opportunities to connect with the Symphony, you also help open the doors of live symphonic music to everyone in our community!

DEAR SUBSCRIBER, Browsing the 2014–2015 season brochure, I think you’ll agree that the Seattle Symphony has something for everyone. With imaginative programming and innovative new concerts, we’re attracting a whole new audience to the Symphony, but there are also plenty of concerts to thrill our longtime subscribers. As you circle your must-see concerts for the 2014–2015 season, remember that every single Seattle Symphony concert is made possible by the generosity of individuals just like you. Please consider making a contribution along with your subscription purchase today. Thank you!

Leslie Jackson Chihuly Seattle Symphony Board Chair

B E N A R OYA H A L L A N D B E YO N D The Seattle Symphony is committed to education and community engagement, and your support makes these initiatives possible. With innovative new programs such as Link Up: Seattle Symphony, and inspiring community partnerships such as the Native Lands Community Composition project, the Seattle Symphony is making a positive impact on lives throughout our community. Help maintain this momentum by making your gift of support today.

FRIENDS OF THE S E AT T L E S Y M P H O N Y You’ll get more out of your subscription when you become a Friend of the Seattle Symphony. Visit us online at donate.seattlesymphony.org or call 206.215.4832 for information on membership levels and donor benefits.

FRIEND | $75–149 CONTRIBUTING FRIEND | $150–249 S U P P O RT I N G F R I E N D | $ 2 5 0 – 4 9 9 S U STA I N I N G F R I E N D | $ 5 0 0 – 9 9 9 M U S I C I A N S C LU B | $ 1 ,0 0 0 – 1 , 9 9 9 C O N D U C TO R S C LU B | $ 2 ,0 0 0 – 3 , 4 9 9

D E E P E N YO U R I M PAC T FOUNDERS CIRCLE | $3,500+ Founders Circle members make the Symphony’s most ambitious activities possible while enjoying premium benefits and artistic access throughout the season. Learn more at donate.seattlesymphony.org/founders or by calling 206.215.4733.

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SUB S CRIB E & SAV E TO DAY!

Photos (top to bottom): The Seattle Symphony’s annual Celebrate Asia concert (Don Pham); Native American youths participate in a cultural exchange (Jon LaFollette); a free Community Concert at Seattle City Hall (Courtesy of Seattle Office of Arts & Culture); Symphony musicians work with youths in California (Brandon Patoc).

SUBSCRIBER

R E WARD S SAVINGS ON THE BEST SEATS

♦ Save up to 20% over single ticket prices. ♦ Lock in the best prices for single concert add-ons, plus save 15% per ticket! ♦ Save 10% on recordings and other merchandise at Symphonica, The Symphony Store.

PRIORITY STATUS

♦ Priority presale opportunities for added concerts and special events. ♦ Access to the best remaining seats for you and your friends during Subscriber Advantage Week (July 26 – August 1, 2014). ♦ FREE one-time seating upgrade coupon.

FLEXIBILITY & SERVICE

♦ FREE and easy ticket exchanges. (Upgrade costs may apply.) ♦ FREE lost ticket replacement. ♦ NEW: FREE “Oops Voucher” to redeem after a missed concert.

SUBSCRIBER VIP REWARDS

♦ FREE access to the Naxos Online Music Library all season long. ♦ Exclusive invitations to special concerts and subscriber-only open rehearsals. ♦ Enjoy discounts at local restaurants near or in Benaroya Hall.

SAMPLE OUR SEASON NOW FOR FREE! Log on to the Naxos Music Library to listen to what the 2014–2015 season has to offer. VISIT: naxosmusiclibrary.com USERNAME: SymphonySubs PASSWORD: 20142015 After logging in, choose the Playlists tab, then open the Seattle Symphony 2014–2015 season folder and select a series. We’ve created specialized playlists for each of our classical series, as well as a playlist for each concert in the Masterworks Season. Or simply enter the name of a composer, artist or piece in the Keyword Search to start streaming.

QUESTIONS? Visit youtube.com/NaxosOnlineLibraries for step-by-step video instructions or email info@seattlesymphony.org. Free trial access expires March 1, 2014. Access available year-round to Seattle Symphony subscribers.

SUBSCRIBE BY MARCH 1, 2014, AND BE ENTERED TO WIN A TRIP FOR TWO TO CARNEGIE HALL! SUNDAY, MAY 4 – WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2014 Join Music Director Ludovic Morlot as he leads the Seattle Symphony in an incredible once-in-a-lifetime experience at New York’s legendary Carnegie Hall as part of the 2014 Spring For Music festival. WINNER WILL RECIEVE: Round-trip air transportation

SUBSCRIBE NOW FOR THE BEST SEATS AT THE BEST PRICES!

from Seattle to New York, three nights at Park Central Hotel, a signature New York guided side trip, tickets to the Seattle Symphony concert at Carnegie Hall, and an exclusive post-performance reception at the Russian Tea Room, hosted by Ludovic Morlot. Restrictions apply. See SEATTLESYMPHONY.ORG for full details.

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P.O. Box 2108 Seattle, WA 98111–2108

SUBSCRIBE BY MARCH 1, 2014, A N D W I N A T R I P F O R T WO TO H E A R T H E S E AT T L E S Y M P H O N Y P E R F O R M AT C A R N E G I E H A L L

S U B S C R I B E N OW A N D R E S E RV E YO U R S E AT S TO T H E S E P O P U L A R A RT I ST S A N D E V E N T S B E F O R E T H E Y G O O N SA L E TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC. TH URS DAY, JAN UARY 15, AT 7:30PM

IT Z H A K PERLMAN

W I T H T H E SEATTL E SY M PHONY W E DN E SDAY, A P R I L 1, AT 7 : 3 0P M

LON DON SYM PHO NY ORCH ESTRA SU N DAY, M AY 3 , AT 2 P M

YO-YO MA

>>> YO -YO M A

WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY G e t t h e be s t s eats at th e best price s t o t h e s e a n d oth er popu lar c on c erts . H OW TO O R D E R : ONLINE: seattlesymphony.org PHONE: 206.215.4747 or 1.866.833.4747 (toll-free) FAX: 206.215.4748 MAIL: Seattle Symphony

Tickets, P.O. Box 2108, Seattle, WA 98111–2108 IN PERSON: Visit us at the corner of Third Avenue & Union Street (Mon–Fri; 10am to 6pm; Sat, 1 to 6pm) GROUPS: 206.215.4784

CONNECT WITH US:

PHOTOS: all Seattle Symphony photos by Ben VanHouten, page 3 – Sussie Ahlburg, page 28 – Tracey Marshall (boy playing cello), page 28 – Brandon Patoc (Stilian Kirov)

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1415 Seattle Symphony Season Brochure