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Energized THE Next Generation Young guns in the Carolinas nuclear power industry are leading a new wave of innovation that likely will propel the region to national prominence. Sponsored By:

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On the cover: Photography by Donna Jernigan

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Red Hand Media LLC Publisher Ben Kinney Project Editor Steve Tuttle Design/Production Director Moira Johnson Art Director Merissa Jones Contributing writer Suzanne Wood Contributing photographer Donna Jernigan Red Hand Media LLC 5605 77 Center Drive Suite 101, Charlotte, NC 28217 Telephone: 704-523-6987 • Fax: 704-523-4211

Cooper #3 Columbiana Hi Tech in Greensboro, N.C., specializes in custom fabrication and specialty products for the nuclear industry, as in this portion of a reactor platform.

Features 2 Welcome to Energized 4 A COMPETITIVE EDGE FOR THE CAROLINAS 5 A NEW ENTERPRISE AT SRs 6 Everyone need apply 10 FIRST SMR LIKELY COMING TO SC 14 New Reactor Design Improves Safety

Group Publisher Grady Johnson • gjohnson@scbiznews.com Special Projects Editor Licia Jackson • ljackson@scbiznews.com Contributing writers Scott Carlberg Chuck Crumbo Lydia Dishman James T. Hammond Licia Jackson Dwayne Wilson SC Business Publications LLC 389 Johnnie Dodds Blvd., Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 Telephone: 843-849-3100 • Fax: 843-849-3122 All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced by any means, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of Red Hand Media, LLC and SC Biz News, LLC.

16 New nuclear construction going global 18 THE GREENING OF NUCLEAR POWER 20 WOMEN DRAWN TO NUCLEAR CAREERS 24 TRAINING THE NEW NUCLEAR WORKFORCE 26 ‘We don’t do brownouts’ 28 Nuclear Cluster Membership

The Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster:

Welcome to Energized This is the story of the nuclear industry in North and South Carolina. You probably know there are nuclear power plants in both states. You might know that there are seven plants housing 12 reactors in the two states. But there likely is much that you don’t know about the industry that you ought to. Here are some of those things. Right now, nuclear plants provide more than 50% of South Carolina’s electricity and about 32% of North Carolina’s. Those numbers are likely to grow, as utilities in the two states have applied for permission to build six more reactors. In South Carolina, SCANA, through its S.C. Electric & Gas subsidiary, and Santee Cooper have begun construction on two reactors at their V.C. Summer Nuclear Station near Jenkinsville. But here is what you most need to know about nuclear power in the two states: A vibrant cluster of industries that build and supply nuclear plants has developed. Some of the biggest names have operations here — Westinghouse, The Shaw Group and URS are just a few of them. Smaller companies also are learning how to become part of the cluster. This publication looks at the next generation in the nuclear industry — the bright young minds that will lead the workforce, the rapidly advancing technology and vital university research. And we take a moment to marvel at the construction of new reactors, whose impact is just now being realized by those outside the field. We hope you enjoy the trip.

a word from our platinum sponsor: By David Precht, Columbia plant manager, Westinghouse Electric Company Westinghouse leads in making the southeastern United States the hub of the nuclear energy industry. Nearly 2,000 Westinghouse professionals in the Carolinas and Georgia are building the latest generation of new nuclear power plants — the AP1000 — in Jenkinsville, S.C., and Waynesboro, Ga. They are also making the fuel to power more than half of the nation’s 104 nuclear power plants, and are on the forefront of bringing to market the next Westinghouse innovation, the Small Modular Reactor. We extend our thanks to the people of the Carolinas and Georgia, and applaud the federal, state and local officials of this region for their forward-thinking approach to the energy industry through the use of nuclear power.

Special

thanks To Our

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The Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster:

A COMPETITIVE EDGE FOR THE CAROLINAS By Scott Carlberg, manager, the Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster

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That quote describes the Carolinas’ nuclear industry to a tee. The Carolinas’ nuclear industry has seven generating plant sites and a network of suppliers. From the local economic perspective, the Nuclear Energy Institute reports: • Each year, the average nuclear plant generates approximately $470 million in sales of goods and services in the local community and nearly $40 million in total labor income. • The average nuclear plant generates almost $16 million annually in state and local taxes. • The average nuclear plant generates approximately $67 million in annual federal taxes. The Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster works hard to keep our dollars at home. In July we held a business session to introduce Carolina firms to procurement officers for major nuclear companies. We had 120 people at the session representing established companies and startups — from engineering to manufacturing to human resource firms. Nuclear energy plants supply an essential ingredient to attract companies to the Carolinas: Clean, reliable and affordable electricity. In 2011 Carolinas’ nuclear plants produced 93 million megawatt hours of electricity.

Duke Energy

cross the Carolinas the lights are on, the air conditioners hum and computer screens are bright because nuclear energy efficiently serves our citizens. Since 2008, organizations in the industrial collaboration known as the Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster have collaborated as an economic development force. Our companies are reinforcing their place in the Carolinas, and their multinational businesses recapture dollars to bring back home. More than 37,000 people are employed in this industry across the Carolinas. Harvard Business School’s Michael Porter, the guru of industry cluster development, recently released a report that is rich with details about what makes regions and nations productive. Here is a charge Porter gives to American industry overall; it’s relevant to the nuclear industry in the Carolinas: “... Business can and must be a positive part of the solution to America’s competitiveness problem. Individually and collectively, firms can upgrade the business environment in the communities where they operate — by supporting educational institutions, building shared infrastructure, investing in workforce skills, deepening clusters, and so on.”

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Our plants are always on the lookout for enhancement, too. This can mean more power, as the Raleigh News and Observer reported in May: The “... Shearon Harris nuclear plant in Wake County is getting the atomic equivalent of a turbocharge that will supply 43,000 extra homes with electricity ... power uprates [are] largely done by replacing components and equipment.” Ample carbon-free and dependable electricity is one reason high-tech firms locate data centers here. Here’s an interesting proof for that statement. One national IT journalist recently blogged about her “Ultimate Geek Road Trip ... One day, one tank of gas, and three data centers – those were the terms of a road trip that only a geek would dream up. My destination: a new cluster of cutting-edge, massive data centers north of Charlotte, North Carolina.” Ten years ago, who would have thought such a column could ever be written? It’s more than pure business, though. Michael Porter’s economic theory says that smart companies invest in their communities. Count the Carolinas’ nuclear industry “in” on that count, too. Some examples: • SCE&G sponsors after-school homework centers, including paid classroom teachers, snacks and incentives, at McCrorey-Liston Elementary School and Kelly Miller Elementary School in

Duke Energy Women in Nuclear members spend time at a middle school with sixthgrade science students. Topics include nuclear energy, basic science, and career and education information.

Fairfield County. These homework centers provide a safe, structured and fun learning environment to strengthen students’ academic skills. • In the high-bay test center at UNC Charlotte’s Energy Production and Infrastructure Center, two 30-ton overhead cranes are emblazoned with the Westinghouse logo. They were donated by the company. • More than 100 students interned at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, S.C., this past summer. • Members of the Women in Nuclear chapter at Duke’s McGuire Nuclear Station in Huntersville, N.C., teach middle school students about energy. • For 15 years employees at the Duke Energy Brunswick Nuclear Plant have delivered smiles to children in southeastern North Carolina as part of their annual holiday bike and helmet drive.

financially and with our time and talent. Working collaboratively, our institutions can make the Carolinas an engineering and research center of education teamwork. Tech development: The researchers involved with the Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster are advancing a sustainable two-state network of tech development and transfer officials for new technologies in the nuclear energy, electric generation and distribution industry. We want to hear from anyone who can be part of that effort. Finally, collaboration: Leaders of the Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster agree that building our industry across the Carolinas is a team sport. Our experience is this: When energy executives visit the Carolinas and see the way we collaborate, they are sold on us. Smart people want to associate with winners, and winners know how to work together. u

Healthy as the Carolinas’ nuclear industry is, it can be more robust and that would be good for our regional economy. What are the next steps? Policy: Our nation has not had a real energy policy in years. Smart policy will have to start with the states, and the Carolinas can be thought leaders for the nation. An all-of-the-above policy to grow generation, efficiency and energy diversity can serve our citizens and economic development efforts. This approach to energy policy has to start at the grassroots level and be a clarion call to state capitols. Education: The industry needs a strong pipeline of engineering grads. In fact, all industries that are strong foundations for economic development require top-flight science and engineering grads. It is critical to support our universities and tech schools,

The Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster:

A NEW ENTERPRISE AT SRS By Dwayne Wilson, president and CEO, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC

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ver the 62 years of its history, the 310-square mile Savannah River Site has represented an extraordinary investment in people and facilities. While SRS’s roots — and a portion of its present day work — are in national defense, SRS is much more diverse. SRS is known internationally for its expertise in environmental and waste management. SRS is a key to U.S. nonproliferation efforts, providing a safe location to take nuclear materials off the market, even transforming excess uranium and plutonium into nuclear fuel. SRS is now more than 20 years removed from the Cold War and we feel obligated to put forth a vision of the future for the nation’s investment here. In 2011, our company and the Department of Energy came together to develop a strategy for the future of SRS. We refer to that future vision as Enterprise SRS.

We also have agreements with potential vendors of small modular reactors (SMRs). We’re working with SCANA, and with our stakeholder community, and are anxious to see which direction this industry takes. We view factory-fabricated SMRs as the ideal power source for locations that require a dedicated, uninterruptible source of power (such as military bases), isolated areas where large-scale electrical distribution is prohibitively expensive, or regions with a modest electrical grid. There are multiple reasons why SRS is the perfect spot to demonstrate what this technology can do and why this region could be the focal point for this game-changing technology. u

The phrase we chose to describe our value proposition is “Nuclear Knowledge for the Nation.” That’s where SRS began, that’s what the Enterprise concept is about, and that is what has to be at the core of our future. Today, we receive, accept, secure, analyze, package and dispose of nuclear material, and we create new technologies. That is who we are and it’s the equity we’ve created. The Enterprise value of SRS is in our nuclear knowledge. We are exporting that knowledge to customers like the Department of Homeland Security, which needed a system for detecting radioactive material in shipping containers. The FBI came to our National Laboratory to locate a oneof-a-kind forensics lab. We have deployed people worldwide to address nuclear issues, safely retrieving materials from other countries when necessary. O

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Next Generation In Jobs:

EVERYONE NEED APPLY

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enior executives and hiring managers in the nuclear power industry are confronting some alarming statistics: About 38% of the industry’s workforce will reach retirement age by 2015. To compensate for this generational shift, between 120,000 and 160,000 new workers will be needed by the end of this year and as many as 200,000 by 2018. Just to maintain the current workforce, the industry will need to hire about 25,000 more workers by 2015. In the Carolinas and across the country, utilities, industry partners, government agencies and the education sector have initiated programs to help replenish the

pipeline of professional and technical workers so that these well-paid jobs don’t go begging. “At a time of high unemployment nationally, the U.S. nuclear industry is hiring — in significant numbers, and paying great salaries,” said Carol Berrigan, senior director, supplier and workforce policy, at the Nuclear Energy Institute. NEI is working with nearly 40 community colleges across the country to provide education and training to develop these new workers via the Nuclear Uniform Curriculum Program (NUCP). Because close to 80% of jobs in the industry don’t require four-year degrees, the industry helped start NUCP in 2007 to help

community colleges train workers for high-paying, skilled jobs. More than 40 colleges — including Gaston College in North Carolina and Aiken Technical College, Florence-Darlington Technical College, Midlands Technical College, Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College and Spartanburg Community College in South Carolina — are participating. The Center for Energy Workforce Development is collaborating with the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Energy Institute to encourage students to acquire nuclear job skills. The cornerstone of the program is the Get Into Energy Career Pathways initiative. (continued on page 9)

Maggie Collins Nuclear engineers. Business majors. Technical school graduates. When we imagine someone in the nuclear energy industry, these

From knowing very little about nuclear power, let alone construction of nuclear power

But there are plenty of people like The Shaw Group’s Maggie Collins,

plants, Collins now finds her-

and for good reason: they bring “soft” skills such as leadership, communi-

self the sole construction-

cation and training, to a highly technical, often mechanized environment.

issue source in the company’s

Collins, a 27-year-old South Carolina native, planned to be an English

Charlotte office. She also

teacher when she entered the University of South Carolina. She joined The

has the challenge of dealing

Shaw Group as a human resources administrative assistant in 2009. A year

with bottom-line oriented

after coming aboard Shaw, an engineering procurement company currently

engineers when she puts on

building two nuclear reactors at the V.C. Summer plant, she was promoted

leadership programs for high-

to training coordinator and, most recently, to learning strategist.

potential employees.

Today, Collins is putting her background in education and her

“When I teach engineers

communication skills to work developing the skills and potential of fellow

leadership, and take them

Shaw employees, including construction workers. Her most recent

through scenarios or ask them to ‘imagine,’ they give me ‘that look,’” she

accomplishment: Receiving her master training certificate, which qualifies

said, referring to their resistance to her “soft skills” approach. “Often they’d

her to do “train the trainer” training. Currently, she’s working onsite with

rather work from case studies, but if you don’t do things like role playing,

skilled craftsmen tasked with training their fellow employees.

you won’t get to step out of your comfort zone.”

“We find that while they might be excellent craftsmen, often they need help learning how to teach others what they do,” she said. An active member of the North American-Young Generation in Nuclear

Collins has no trouble imagining herself in the nuclear industry for years to come. “I definitely love training, and I love the field environment more than the office environment,” she said. “When I first started I didn’t

organization, Collins enjoys tapping into her education roots while doing

think I’d bring much to the table as a liberal arts person, but now I know

community outreach. She recently went into local fourth and fifth-grade

that I do,” she said. “Around here, when we were getting ready for the

classrooms to introduce kids to nuclear power, aided by the teaching tool

(International Youth Nuclear) conference and I was making sure we all had

Roddy the Nuclear Fuel Pellet. As part of the program, students could submit

our company polo shirts and everyone knew what they were doing, they

nuclear-related drawings and receive a prize.

called me ‘mom.’”

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Photography by Donna Jernigan

backgrounds come to mind.

Adam NyGAARD Adam Nygaard’s interest in a nuclear energy career began in, of all places, English class. Tasked with writing a term paper in 11th grade, Nygaard chose to explore energy sources. His paper merited him an A and sold him on the safety and benefits of nuclear power. “In doing that research, I learned that nuclear is the best energy

position for his group after the previous lead’s sudden transfer to another division. He credits involvement with the North AmericanYoung Generation in Nuclear

option,” he said. “I figured that by going into the field I’d be making a

organization for helping him

contribution to society.”

develop management

For the last three years, Nygaard has been with Duke Energy’s spent

potential. Currently, he’s the

fuel management division. He is an engineer II and procurement lead for

site representative for Duke

all dry-cask storage related projects for the Duke fleet.

Energy’s corporate office, and

A 2009 graduate of Pennsylvania State University with a degree in

recently, as part of NA-YGN’s

nuclear engineering, Nygaard has an aptitude for science and all things

involvement in the Interna-

technical. He plans to enroll in a part-time MBA program next year. “I

tional Youth Nuclear Congress,

read somewhere that only about 1% of nuclear-industry businesses are

was the local communications

solo operations,” he said. “I kind of always had in the back of my mind

chair for IYNC’s summer conference in Charlotte.

that I might like that challenge.” Nygaard has had a number of leadership experiences in his three

Landing the IYNC biennial conference — the last one was 2010 in Cape Town, South Africa — has been huge for Charlotte, Nygaard said.

short years on the job. Three months into his tenure with the

“I think the conference being here just proves that we’re an emerging

Charlotte-based utility, he was thrown into the procurement lead

energy hub,” he said.

Jimmy Hennen Two things attracted Jimmy Hennen to Clemson University:

a boon for the industry and an

the College of Engineering and Lake Hartwell. While Hennen

$11 billion payday for the

spent his share of hours on the lake, engineering won out. Today,

company. “There was a big

three years after graduating, Hennen is a senior mechanical

celebration,” he said.

engineer at Westinghouse’s Charlotte division. He’s also gone back

Like the other young

to school to the University of South Carolina to pursue his master’s

nuclear energy industry

degree in nuclear engineering.

professionals interviewed for

Hennen works in piping analysis, doing risk assessment and

this article, Hennen has been

systems interaction and analysis for the company, which is building

closely involved in the North

two new reactors for plants near Columbia, S.C., and Augusta, Ga.

American-Young Generation in

A native of Chattanooga, Tenn., Hennen was always interested in

Nuclear organization. He also

things mechanical. One of his biggest influences growing up was the

played a key role in the recent

father of one of his best friends. “He was a manager of a nuclear

International Youth Nuclear

power plant, and just the way that he conducted himself played a big

Congress conference in

part in my decision to pursue my career,” Hennen said.

Charlotte, planning 11

While most of Westinghouse’s 115 Charlotte employees are engineers, Hennen has friends and colleagues throughout the company and industry who work in a variety of disciplines. “The most common

professional development sessions and facilitating the plenary session, where he spoke in front of 600 people. Soon he’ll head back to school as a volunteer middle-school math

misconception is the variety of jobs in the industry,” he said. “It’s much

tutor as part of NA-YGN’s outreach efforts. The goal is to excite kids

more than just nuclear engineers.”

about math and science as a way of contributing to the nuclear

Although Hennen has been in the field only three years, he

industry’s future.

experienced a big moment in the industry when the Nuclear Regulatory

“I think nuclear will be an increasingly important part of the

Commission approved two new reactors being built by Westinghouse—

solution with the energy goals we (the U.S.) have got,” said Hennen.

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Melissa Crawford The colleagues and supervisors who were impressed enough with

this large scale of knowledge

Melissa Crawford’s performance at Siemens Energy to recommend her for

and cultural exchange, and

a two-year assignment in Germany can thank her father. That’s because

watching it all come together, is

when Crawford first entered the University of Florida, she planned to

an amazing experience.”

channel her passion for calculus into a career as a math teacher. Instead,

Although in her new

her father encouraged her to pursue engineering. She did — nuclear

position Crawford will be less

engineering, to be precise — and it’s proven to be the right choice for her

involved in the technical aspects

since her graduation in 2007.

of the T3000 and more involved

“I found nuclear engineering a good fit, and my strong math background gave me a leg up over my classmates,” she said. Late this past summer, Crawford left Charlotte and her position as an

in country-specific requirements and regulatory compliance, she will still be helping power plants

instrumentation and controls engineer to become a product manager for

move their control system from

the T3000 power-plant control panel system in Siemens’ Erlangen,

analog to digital. She’ll also

Germany, office.

remain focused on the future, both her own and that of the industry. For

The Miami, Fla., native has never lived abroad, but she has traveled some and, as part of North American-Young Generation in Nuclear’s involvement

one thing, she’s confident that her generation’s aptitude for — and familiarity with — technology will only benefit the nuclear power industry.

in the International Youth Nuclear Congress, had her horizons expanded.

Crawford still likes the idea of being an educator. She harbors a

“One of my proudest achievements has been to participate in the

dream of someday giving back to children. “After I complete my corporate

executive board of the International Youth Nuclear Congress. This

activities I plan to open a school that employs modern teaching and child

opportunity has allowed me to travel to new places and work with

psychology methods that challenge a student based on their individual

colleagues from all over the world. Being part of a team that has executed

talents and interests, not on the standards.”

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santee_scecde_4862_17 dp_7X4.875.indd 1

11/2/11 2:49 PM

(continued from page 6)

North and South Carolina are among nine states targeting low-income, young adults ages 16 to 26 for potential employment in skilled technician positions in the energy industry. As Duke Energy’s Nelson Peeler told the Charleston (S.C.) Business Review, the utilities represented by the Carolinas Energy Workforce Consortium will provide jobs to at least 80 of the students who complete the line worker and power plant operator training programs over the next two years. “This gives us a pipeline of talented, skilled workers for the future,” Peeler said. Member companies of the consortium include Duke Energy Progress, Pike Electric Corp., Areva Inc., Utility Lines Inc., The Shaw Group and North Carolina’s Electric Cooperatives. E-learning company Microburst has partnered with EngenuitySC and SCANA Corp. to produce a 20-minute, interactive job shadowing experience focusing on nuclear operators, radiation protection

technicians and nuclear engineers. The program is offered at Midlands Technical College in Columbia, S.C. The e-lesson enables students to experience what typical job tasks are required, what education and training are needed, what work hours and compensation levels they can expect. “We anticipate a need for 800 to 1,000 new employees as our new AP1000 reactors come online (at V.C. Summer) in 2017 and 2018,” said Scott McFarland, manager of SCANA’s Corporate Workforce Planning division, in an EngenuitySC blog entry. The workforce development efforts of the last decade are bearing fruit. Enrollment in undergraduate nuclear engineering programs has increased from 470 students in the 1999-2000 academic year to more than 1,300 at the end of 2008, the last year for which figures are available. During the same period, graduate enrollment has climbed from 220 students to more than 1,225.

And if the size and influence of one industry professional association are any indication, the future of nuclear power is in good hands. Membership in the Carolinas regional section of North American-Young Generation in Nuclear — an offshoot of the Nuclear Energy Institute for professionals 35 and younger — is at 300 and growing, with 8,000 total members in North America. In August, hundreds of NA-YGN members converged on Charlotte for a six-day conference of the group’s sister organization, the International Youth Nuclear Congress, which is made up of young nuclear industry workers in 40 countries. The event attracted more than 600 attendees. One conference organizer, Maggie Collins of the Shaw Group corporate chapter of NA-YGN, found it exhilarating to be around so many professionals from so many places. “The general public doesn’t understand it, but this is science. I want to help change that,” Collins said. u

BUILDING A LOW-CARBON FUTURE – TODAY. At Duke Energy, sustainability is about making decisions and taking actions that are good for today – and better for tomorrow. For more than 40 years, we’ve generated safe, reliable and clean nuclear energy for our region. Our work sustains thousands of jobs – and continues to power the Carolinas’ economy. Find out more at nuclear.duke-energy.com.

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NuScale Image of SMR

Next Generation In Technology:

FIRST SMR LIKELY COMING TO SC

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s the U.S. nuclear industry moves to deploy the first small modular reactors sometime in the next decade, there’s a high probability that one or more of the transportable nuclear reactors will be built and operated in South Carolina. In March the U.S. Department of Energy and its Savannah River Site announced three public-private partnerships to develop deployment plans for small modular nuclear reactor technologies at SRS facilities near Aiken, S.C. DOE, SRS and Savannah River National Laboratory have separate agreements with Hyperion Power Generation Inc.; SMR LLC, a subsidiary of Holtec International; and NuScale Power LLC. Small modular reactors could be built in factories and transported to sites by rail or truck. The region’s nuclear industry partners, organized as NuHub, have formed two alliances — with Holtec and NuScale — seeking to ensure that if small modular reactors are built on an industrial scale, the manufacturing site will be in the South Carolina Midlands. The agreements are not a federal funding commitment, DOE said. The

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agency expects private funding will implement the technologies. The agreements, and the officials involved, are separate from DOE’s funding for small modular reactor cost-share projects announced earlier. David Moody, DOE manager at SRS, said the agreements will continue to build a sustainable future for SRS by bringing solutions to challenges for clean energy. Building SMR units on an industrial scale would also create a new manufacturing sector in the region, potentially creating thousands of jobs. “I hope our communities will see this announcement as an ‘awakening’ that we have a clear vision for the future and a firm determination to succeed,” Moody said. The agreements will help the companies obtain information on potential SMR reactor sites at SRS and provide a framework for developing land use and site services agreements, DOE said. The DOE “funding opportunity” would give one or two SMR proposals an advantage over competitors in the form of a major subsidy to construct their first operational SMR units.

DOE was expected to award up to $452 million for SMR projects. Observers believe DOE will award two companies $226 million each. Two of the bidders, Holtec and NuScale, have committed to build the first such reactors at the Savannah River Site. The other two bidders are Westinghouse, a subsidiary of Toshiba of Japan; and Generation mPower, a subsidiary of Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Energy Inc. The four competitors have designs for reactors ranging from 45 to 225 megawatts. All four designs are of the pressurized light water reactor type. Two bidders — NuScale and Generation mPower — have non-nuclear prototypes. Westinghouse has the advantage of having designed and built numerous large-scale reactors, including the AP1000 units under construction at the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station at Jenkinsville, S.C., in Fairfield County. Holtec has never built a reactor. Holtec said in July that it had completed preliminary design and safety analyses of its small modular reactor, SMR-160. The detailed design phase was scheduled for launch Aug. 1. Holtec also

said it aims to design the SMR-160 to use mixed oxide, or MOX, fuel blended from weapons-grade nuclear materials at the MOX fabrication facility under construction at the SRS. Company engineers briefed the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the key features of SMR-160 on July 26, Holtec said. Holtec expected more meetings with NRC staff before submitting its construction permit application and preliminary safety analysis report in June 2014. DOE has agreed to host the first SMR-160 at SRS. Siting studies for building the first SMR-160 at the Savannah River facility have begun, Holtec said. Small modular reactors have been conceived as a factory-built, transportable, flexible and lower-cost means of producing electric power than the traditional 1,000-megawatt giants. Two of the large-scale units are under construction by South Carolina Electric and Gas Co. and Santee Cooper at Jenkinsville at a cost of almost $10 billion. Holtec estimates its 160-megawatt unit will cost an estimated $800 million and will produce enough electricity to power 100,000 homes. NuScale Power’s application for the grant should be enhanced by its partnership with SCE&G, one of the company’s executives said. “The federal application was fairly specific in saying you’ve got to have a customer,” said Mike McGough, NuScale vice president of business development. SCE&G signed a memorandum of understanding in April with the Corvallis, Ore.-based NuScale to work together to deploy the first commercial NuScale plant at SRS. “If you don’t have the utility you don’t have anything,” McGough said. He added that SCE&G’s experience in operating a commercial reactor at V.C. Summer Nuclear Station enhances NuScale’s application. Westinghouse, meanwhile, turned to a Missouri utility as its partner to seek the

ing and commercialization of its new SMR. If Westinghouse receives the federal funds, Ameren Missouri has agreed to seek a combined construction and operating license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that would allow it to build an SMR at its Callaway Energy Center in central Missouri. The Missouri officials estimated that getting the grant and building the Westing-

federal subsidy. Missouri political and business leaders responded in July with a conference to highlight the economic opportunities presented by a new, small nuclear reactor that Westinghouse Electric Co. and Ameren Missouri propose to develop. The summit was a political show of support for Westinghouse’s bid for the federal subsidies to support the enginee-

Bidders for Grants NuScale Power,

a subsidiary of Fluor Corp

• Electric output: 45 megawatts apiece, with concept of clusters of up to 12 reactors • Dimensions: 65 feet long, 14 feet in diameter • Weight: 450 tons, shipped from fabrication in 3 segments • Transport: Barge, truck or train • Prototype: One-third scale, electrically heated reactor unit in Corvallis, Ore. • Proposed location of first nuclear unit: Savannah River Site, Aiken, S.C. • Partners: NuHub; South Carolina Electric & Gas (electric utility); Savannah River Site

SMR LLC,

a subsidiary of Holtec International

• Electric output: 160 megawatts • Dimensions: 100 feet long • Corporate partners: NuHub; South Carolina Electric & Gas (electric utility); Savannah River Site; AREVA, Inc. (U.S.); and The Shaw Group

Generation mPower,

subsidiary of Babcock &

Wilcox Nuclear Energy Inc. • Electric output: 180 megawatts, conceived to operate alone or in clusters of 10 or more • Transport: Train • Prototype: Scaled, electrically heated prototype of B&W mPower reactor at B&W’s Integrated System Test facility, Bedford County, Va. • Proposed location of first nuclear unit: TVA’s Clinch River site, Roane County, Tenn. • Partners: Tennessee Valley Authority (electric utility); B&W; and Bechtel Power Corp.

Westinghouse Electric Co.,

a group company of

Toshiba Corp. • Electric output: 225 megawatts • Dimensions: 89 feet long, 32 feet in diameter • Proposed location of first nuclear unit: Ameren’s Callaway Energy Center in central Missouri • Partners: Burns & McDonnell; General Dynamics Electric Boat; Missouri Electric Alliance led by Ameren Missouri (electric utility)

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11

house SMR would mean an investment of $1.31 billion in the state, triggering an additional $1.57 billion in economic ripple effect. But the demonstration project would be just the beginning for the region that lands the prize. James Moody, president of James R. Moody & Associates, estimated that American SMR sales could average $25 billion a year.

SCE&G, meanwhile, is interested in small reactors because they’ll fit into the footprint of a coal-burning plant, Steve Byrne, COO for SCANA, the parent of SCE&G, said recently at a news conference called by S.C. Gov. Nikki Haley to voice support for the SMR industry. Instead of putting “very, very expensive” updates on the coal-burning plants, a non-polluting SMR might be a better

Leah, Julie and Jasmeen are the next generation of nuclear engineers. They’re part of the team that is building the two new nuclear units that will serve the growing energy needs of customers. Once completed, the new units will employ about 800 workers. The future of nuclear power in South Carolina is happening at SCE&G.

Leah Bush, Julie Ezell and Jasmeen Pharr SCE&G Engineers

sceg.com

option, Byrne said. He noted that a coal plant generates about 100 to 150 megawatts — about the same output as a small reactor unit. SCE&G announced earlier this year that it plans to close six of its coal-fired electric power generating stations. Some of that capacity will be taken up by the two large-scale reactors being built at Jenkinsville. But the energy company is looking to SMR technology to help it respond to growth and to hotspots for demand. The Energy Department defines SMRs as units that generate less than 300 megawatts. Other utilities, including Charlotte, N.C.-based Duke Energy, also see SMR technology as a means to achieve greater flexibility to meet growth and demand for power. “Duke Energy supports the development of small modular reactor technology and sees this as another potential clean energy option for the future of our nation. SMRs could allow the addition of new generation in smaller increments of less than 300 megawatts, which may be advantageous in supporting future customer demand from a cost and generation perspective,” said Rita Sipe, a Duke Energy spokeswoman. “Since SMRs are not yet available, we believe it is important for the industry to work together and with regulators to help establish suitable regulatory framework to support the technology,” Sipe said. “Duke Energy has representatives on industry groups who are reviewing and discussing this technology, and we will continue to be actively engaged in multiple aspects of work in this area.” If NuScale wins a grant, the small reactor unit would be built at the SRS and the company would set up an office nearby to handle licensing, McGough said. SRS has identified several locations on the 310-square-mile site that are suitable for the SMR project. The next step would be constructing a building where much of the hardware E

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would be assembled, McGough said. In addition, there would be test facilities where workers would examine assemblies of the reactor unit parts. “The logical place you do that is the place where you’re going to build the first one,” McGough added. After the Energy Department announces grant winners and a final agreement is worked out, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission would be asked to certify the reactor’s design. NuScale’s small reactor design is based on light water reactor technology, McGough said. The company has been developing the technology for more than a decade and has demonstrated its safety and performance at a one-third scale test facility that’s been in operation since 2003. NuScale launched the regulatory process with the NRC in 2008. If everything falls into place, McGough said the NRC could issue a combined construction and operating license in early 2018. Small, of course, is relative. The containment vessel, which would hold the guts of the reactor unit, is 65 feet long and 14 feet, 6 inches wide. McGough estimates that it would weigh about 400 tons when shipped from the plant. NuScale’s project is scalable. Each reactor unit can generate 45 megawatts and up to 12 units can be located at one site. McGough said the construction phase could employ 800 to 1,000 workers. Once operational, the small reactor plant would have a workforce of about 335 full-time workers, he added. NuScale already has invested $120 million in the project. If it wins a $226 million grant from the DOE, it would have to match the federal money. That would be a total of $452 million investment in a unit at SRS. The total investment could be between $700 million and $1 billion, he said. McGough praised South Carolina’s support of the nuclear industry and recent O

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statements by Gov. Haley backing SMR projects planned for the Savannah River Site. “NuScale has made major commitments to South Carolina, including encouraging our suppliers, to developing manufacturing centers and the development of educational and training programs, if we are able to proceed with a project in the state,” he said.

NuScale Power has the financial backing and technical assistance of Fluor Corp., a global engineering firm with a history of more than 60 years in the nuclear new-build market. Fluor has designed, built or provided construction support for 20 nuclear units in the United States, and provides a range of procurement and other services to nuclear plant operators worldwide. Fluor owns a majority stake in NuScale. u

Answering tomorrow’s energy needs... today The College of Engineering and Computing at the University of South Carolina is one of the nation’s most comprehensive energy research centers. • Ranked #1 in South Carolina for faculty research productivity* by the National Research Council • 50+ faculty members focused on energy research including nuclear, clean coal, fuel cells, hydrogen, batteries, smartgrid, micro-grid, biomass, and more • South Carolina’s ONLY Nuclear Engineering graduate degree program • New Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Management graduate degrees We are leading the way in for energy research and education. Find out more at www.cec.sc.edu. *For more info, see http://www.nap.edu/rdp

The new AP1000 nuclear plants under construction in South Carolina and Georgia are designed to stay safe even with a total loss of site power.

Next Generation In Safety:

New Reactor Design Improves SAFETY

F

ew imagined that an earthquake and tsunami in Japan would result in such a shakeup in the nuclear industry worldwide. The nuclear reactors in Fukushima responded as designed to the earthquake before the Dai-Ichi site was overwhelmed by the tsunami. The events were unprecedented, but they taught us lessons that will make our plants even safer. These events also focused attention on the safety benefits of new nuclear power plant designs, such as those being built in the southeastern United States. Eighteen months on, the lessons from Fukushima have been documented, regulators have made recommendations and the industry is enhancing the safety of the current fleet of plants. The new AP1000 plants under construction in South Carolina and Georgia, however, are designed to stay safe with a total loss of site power and no changes to these plants have been required. Back to the future By the early 1990s, Westinghouse Electric had completed all of its secondgeneration commercial nuclear plant 14

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construction programs. Led by R&D chief Howard Bruschi, the company set out to develop a new concept for the next generation of nuclear power plants. These efforts led to the creation of the Advanced Passive 1000 (AP1000) pressurized water reactor. The unique feature of the AP1000 design is that it uses natural forces – natural circulation, gravity, convection and compressed gas — to maintain the safe condition of the plant in the unlikely event of an accident, rather than relying on AC power and operator actions. Even with a complete loss of electrical power, such as occurred at Fukushima, the AP1000 passive safety systems will shut down the reactor automatically, with no need for operator action for up to 72 hours. After 72 hours, with some operator actions to transfer water, core cooling and containment cooling are maintained indefinitely. The AP1000 design was certified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2006. The design was then modified to meet additional NRC requirements — including those that require the design to withstand the impact of an aircraft crash on its shield

building, a steel-reinforced concrete structure that is approximately 3-feet thick and houses the steel containment vessel. The amended design was certified by the NRC in December 2011. The AP1000 plant is the only Generation III+ reactor to receive such certification. The safety features and other attributes of the AP1000 design had already been recognized by South Carolina Electric & Gas and Southern Nuclear, which in 2008 signed contracts with Westinghouse and The Shaw Group for two AP1000 units each at the V.C. Summer (South Carolina) and Vogtle (Georgia) sites, respectively. The AP1000 technology also had been selected for four units that are under construction in China, and is positioned to be used as the Generation III+ plant of choice in the country’s planned nuclear expansion. Why is passive safety so different? The industry has developed Generation III+ standards for new nuclear plants. All other current configurations have focused on redundant safety systems to achieve higher reliability demanded by the

Generation III+ requirements. This approach increases the equipment needed and the complexity of design, with a significant impact on construction and operation costs. AP1000 plants are different. The AP1000 plant does not need the active emergency systems used on current plants because it utilizes passive safety features. With no active critical emergency cooling systems or diesel generator systems, the AP1000 plant becomes much simpler with much less piping, pumps, valves, wiring and control systems. The simpler design is easier to construct, and uses modularization that allows construction tasks that were traditionally performed in sequence to be completed in parallel. Factory-built modules are assembled and installed at the site; as a result, overall site construction time and the associated financing costs are reduced. This approach is working well in China, where progress continues on the world’s first AP1000 plants at the Sanmen site in Zhejiang Province and the Haiyang site in Shandong Province. Post-Fukushima, the AP1000 plant fleet in China is expected to grow beyond the four plants under construction to at least five sites of four to six AP1000 plants at each site. Way to go! Because the AP1000 plant is engineered to be passively safe, it is a smaller and simpler design. It is cost-effective as an 1100-MW unit, which is suitable for most worldwide locations and grid systems. This U.S. technology and state-of-the-art design is bringing opportunity to our region as it is deployed worldwide. It is SCE&G’s choice for new baseload generation for its customers, recognizing that nuclear power can be a foundation to our regional success. We can watch the world’s most advanced nuclear reactor being built in our region to meet our needs and support the future growth in the Carolinas with clean, sustainable and cost-efficient power. u O

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Nuclear: The Global Marketplace

New nuclear construction going global

D

espite a slowdown in the world economy and safety concerns raised by the 2011 accident at Fukushima, countries are lining up to build nuclear power plants. “There are aggressive building programs in China, Russia, India, South Korea,” said George Felgate, managing director of the World Association of Nuclear Operators, as he began listing countries in the midst of new nuclear construction projects. “Overall, 45 countries have serious interest in new nuclear.” Felgate was among some two dozen speakers at the Nuclear Energy Assembly, held in Charlotte in May, who offered their insights on everything from safety issues raised by Fukushima to the needs of the next generation nuclear workforce. The event, sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Institute, drew more than 600 key executives of utilities and nuclear power companies, educators and regulators. New nuclear construction will be necessary to meet the world’s growing demand for energy, said Janice Dunn Lee, deputy director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The need is especially acute in developing nations, which regard access to modern energy sources and cheap reliable electricity as a key to their economic development.

The need for more nuclear power plants around the globe is driven by the fact that 1.6 billion people — or about one-fifth of the world’s population — don’t have electricity. Access to electricity would help to reduce poverty by making available better sources of clean water, health care and transportation, Lee said. To meet the demand for more power, the World Nuclear Association estimates 63 reactor units are currently under construction in 13 countries. Another 489 units are either planned or proposed. Carolinas growth engine Charlotte and the Carolinas nuclear cluster are at the center of surging demand for electricity. “We have a significant engine of growth here,” said Eli Smith, president, Shaw Power Group., a Charlotte-based business unit of The Shaw Group. The unit offers engineering, procurement and construction services to the electric generating industry and services 40% of U.S. nuclear units, including the country’s two largest nuclear fleets. Shaw is partnering with Westinghouse Electric in the construction of AP1000 reactors, including four units in China. “These units, which will begin to come online in early 2014, are the first of what we

V.C. Summer Unit 1, Jenkinsville, S.C. 16

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expect to be a worldwide fleet of Westinghouse AP1000 units,” Smith said. Shaw also has a strategic cooperation agreement with China’s State Nuclear Power Technology Corp. to assist it in the design of 25 AP1000 units, Smith added. In the United States, the Shaw-Westinghouse partnership is building four AP1000 units – two at Southern Company’s Vogtle power plant near Augusta, Ga., and two more at the V.C. Summer plant in Fairfield County, S.C., which is jointly operated by South Carolina Electric & Gas and Santee Cooper. Smith noted that the units in Georgia and South Carolina are the first nuclear units to be built in 34 years in the United States. New nuclear energy facility construction is benefiting in its early stages from lessons learned in overseas construction projects, an ample supply of skilled labor and low inflation rates. “This is a great time to be building a nuclear plant,” said Stephen Byrne, COO and president of generation and transmission at SCE&G’s parent, SCANA Corp. Low inflation and state legislation that permits project costs to be largely paid as they are incurred have been “hugely helpful” in controlling costs, Byrne said. With the unemployment rate running above 9% this summer in South Carolina, the V.C. Summer project also has been able to draw from an ample pool of workers to fill some 2,000 construction jobs, Byrne added. “We have people knocking at the door,” Byrne said. U.S. commitment to nuclear The new construction projects at Vogtle and V.C. Summer are important in helping the United States meet the power needs of a “new energy future” that will create economic growth, new jobs and keep energy costs low, said U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-N.C.

“With lower energy costs, businesses have more money to invest and hire,” said Butterfield, a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. “When jobs are created, consumers have more money to spend and save. Therefore, a new energy future is about a new energy economy. This boosts our economy and everyone benefits.” Energy policy is “an American issue,” not a partisan one, Butterfield said, noting that President Obama has challenged the nation to generate 80% of its electricity from clean energy sources by 2035. Nuclear energy, which produces 70% of the U.S. electricity supply that comes from low-carbon sources, is expected to play an essential role in lowering greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. “I believe the United States’ commitment to nuclear energy is strong,” Butterfield said. “Nuclear energy remains a key part of the energy mix in policy proposals from the White House and Congress.” Although the need for power in the United States and the world is growing, safety must be the top priority in new nuclear construction, officials and company executives said, referring to the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami that crippled the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant and resulted in reactor meltdowns. The incident prompted Japan’s government to shut down all of the nation’s 50 reactors and spurred Germany to announce it would close all of its reactors by 2022. As many as 20 countries are expected to be operating their first nuclear facilities by 2030, said Lee, adding that her organization is prepared to help introduce nuclear power “safely and profitably.” Safety always will be the top priority, Smith said. “Shaw is not immune to unforeseen circumstances. That said, I can tell you our company understands the need for a strong safety culture and a questioning attitude that puts safety before production schedules.” u O

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BUILDING A NEW GENERATION FOR A BRIGHTER TOMORROW We’re proud to build the world’s most advanced, carbon-free source of power generation for SCANA to support our region’s growing need for electricity.

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CONSTRUCTION OF VC SUMMER UNITS 2 & 3 JENKINSVILLE, SC

Next Generation In research:

THE GREENING OF NUCLEAR POWER

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NCSU

T

he nation’s growing demand for cleaner, more sustainable energy is fueling research and development in nuclear labs across the nation and throughout the Carolinas. “Green” energy is such a priority of the Obama Administration that nuclear projects are gaining traction. About $400 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds recently went to the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation to support nuclear technology projects. Since 2009, nuclear energy technology has been one of the most richly funded energy innovation categories at the federal level, representing almost 11% of all such spending. Most of those awards are focusing on four areas: • Extending the lifespan and increasing the sustainability of current nuclear reactors. • Developing next-generation reactor designs. • Creating small modular nuclear reactors. • Conducting fuel-cycle research, including improved fuel waste disposal and reprocessing. Cutting-edge research is under way at the University of South Carolina. In early 2012, the university established the SmartState Center of Economic Excellence in Nuclear Energy Science and Engineering. The center is a publicprivate partnership featuring $1.2 million in private support from Duke Energy, SCANA, The Shaw Group, Studsvik and Westinghouse. Elsewhere at USC, General Atomics is contributing $900,000 to create the General Atomics Center for the Development of Transformational Nuclear Technologies. Researchers will study technologies tied to recycling of used fuel, better resource utilization and waste

North Carolina State University student Luke Cornejo presents a poster summary of his work to Dr. Leigh Winfrey from Virginia Tech at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors conference. reduction, said Dr. Travis W. Knight, who heads the nuclear engineering department in the university’s College of Engineering and Computing. Together, about a dozen faculty members are doing work directly related to improving the efficiency, safety, sustainability and design features of the nuclear power industry. Projects focusing on fuel sources, higher fuel utilization and new reactor designs will likely take 10 or more years to see fruition, Knight said. That includes reducing corrosion in plant equipment. The focus of a two-year-old initiative with a major North Carolina presence is the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light-Water Reactors, a U.S. Department of Energy-funded initiative that has 10 partners, including N.C. State University. CASL’s chief scientist, Dr. Paul Turinsky of the N.C. State College of Engineering, said CASL uses computer models to develop new approaches to nuclear energy that will result in safer, cheaper power.

Turinsky said because of CASL’s close involvement with reactor operators and industry—Westinghouse is a core partner—researchers are working on real-world problems and opportunities. “Our research priorities center on economics, minimizing the volume of waste and safety,” he said. “We’ve translated these into 10 challenge problems, with five relating to operations and five to safety/plant sustainability. What we’re trying to do is predictive modeling using supercomputers, which provides a higher assurance of nuclear safety and also gives you insight into the science, allowing you to understand how design features impact the performance of a plant.” Without high-speed supercomputers, scientists wouldn’t be able to engage in the kind of precise simulations and modeling that is the cornerstone of CASL. “Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory are both part of CASL and, between them, have the three fastest computers in the world for doing scientific simulations of

SUPERCOMPUTING POWERS RESEARCH focusing on predictive modeling. The goal of Bolotnov’s team: to develop multiphase boil-

namics of a reactor coolant, the level of bubble generation, turbulence and

ing flow models based on experimental and

boiling must be controlled to prevent the nuclear fuel from overheating.

direct numerical simulation data.

Plant operators have cooled reactors safely for decades, but with the

“If you can predict the behavior of a

fleet aging and new reactors due to come on line soon, operators need a

reactor more precisely, you can generate

way to improve or redesign efficient cooling systems without resorting to

more power without compromising safety,”

trial and error.

Bolotnov said. “It’s a good feeling to help

Dr. Igor Bolotnov, an assistant professor at N.C. State’s College of En-

NCSU

An explosion of bubbles is great in a glass of Champagne. But in a nuclear-reactor cooling tank? Not so much. When it comes to the fluid dy-

bring an emissions-free and safe energy to people,” he added.

gineering, creates computer models that ultimately will make the cooling

His work requires frequent use of computer systems at Oak Ridge

and heat-transfer processes at nuclear reactors safer and more efficient.

National Laboratory, which meant Bolotnov commuted to Knoxville, Tenn.,

He is one of 11 N.C. State faculty members in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation in Light Water Reactors, a 10-partner project

from Raleigh, N.C. He’s been hitting the road less lately thanks to a new web-based videoconference program used by Oak Ridge.

SOFTWARE ALSO POWERS PLANTS Turinsky’s research has focused on

Paul Turinsky has a lot of business experience. He served in manage-

creating software to improve nuclear plant

ment positions at Westinghouse and has an MBA from the University

performance. “When this work was started,

of Pittsburgh to go along with his doctorate from the University of

the opinion of the community was that

Michigan.

real-world problems could not be addressed.

Still, he’s been surprised by the nuclear industry’s response to a

The work of my students, post-docs and I, I

major initiative he’s been involved with in the last two years: The Con-

believe, changed that opinion based upon

sortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), for

the capabilities we developed.”

which he’s chief scientist. CASL’s goal — to use computer modeling

NCSU

For a professor of nuclear engineering, N.C. State University’s

For nuclear to play a bigger role, Turinsky believes issues of econom-

to help operators enhance the safety, sustainability and profitability of

ics, safety and nuclear waste will need revisiting. “I am confident that

their operations.

safety and nuclear waste topics will be addressed to receive societal

“I’ve been absolutely amazed at how open industry is,” he said. “To help with our work, we even have some of their (computer) codes.”

physical phenoma,” Turinsky said. “We want to use that computer power to model everything from basic scientific principles to a nuclear power plant to predict the plant’s behavior over time.” It won’t be long before utility companies have free access to the software that CASL develops. In fact, Duke Energy, which sits on the organization’s industry advisory board, is expected to pilot one of CASL’s new programs in the coming months. Predictive modeling accomplished two goals, Turinsky said. “The ultimate goal is to lower the cost of energy while meeting all of the existing safety requirements.” u

approval,” he said. “That leaves economics. The economic challenge of new nuclear power plants is the large capital investment initially required.”

EPIC

DIVERSIFIED GENERATION

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ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENT

POWER SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION LARGE-COMPONENT MANUFACTURING

The Energy Production and Infrastructure Center at UNC Charlotte is a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort that is uniting the academic and research expertise of the university with the great wealth of energy engineering talent in the Charlotte region. Focused on growth and advancement in the energy industry, EPIC is strengthened by support from regional energy corporations.

WWW.EPIC.UNCC.EDU

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Next Generation In Women:

Leah Bush V.C. Summer

Julie Ezell V.C. Summer

W

omen have broken many glass ceilings but some fields still are slow to attract their interest, including nuclear energy. Yet when women learn more about the profession they find “it’s cool,” says Jasmeen Pharr, a quality systems surveillance specialist. Pharr is among a growing group of smart, well-educated and passionate women now helping build two AP1000 reactors at the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station site. The plant is jointly owned by South Carolina Electric & Gas and Santee Cooper. Pharr works as a quality systems surveillance specialist. She does audits and other examinations of internal departments to make sure they are complying with regulatory guidelines. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has staff on site as the construction progresses, so her role is critical. Another worker at the site is Julie Ezell, a licensing engineer who works on the licensing process. She answers questions for regulators and works on responses to ITAAC (Inspections, Tests, 20

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Analyses and Acceptance Criteria). More about those abbreviations later. Another woman working there is Leah Bush, who works with the construction group on building the containment vessel, a huge bowl-shaped structure that will hold Unit 2, the first of the new reactors. None of these three started out seeking a career in nuclear energy, but each had an experience in college that caught their attention. Pharr, a chemical engineering major, was enrolled in a co-op program at Clemson University that led to work at Southern Nuclear Co. She had a positive experience there and “liked that nuclear was the next big thing.” That was enough to guide her to her career. Bush grew up in Trinidad, where oil and natural gas fill energy needs. She studied as an undergraduate at S.C. State University; then, as a graduate student at Ohio State, she worked at Westinghouse. She took a job with the company in Pittsburgh where she worked on part of the design for the AP1000 reactor. Later she moved to South Carolina with Westinghouse and as a quality engineer she worked on fuel design for the

SCANA Corp.

WOMEN DRAWN TO NUCLEAR CAREERS

Jasmeen Pharr V.C. Summer AP1000. After that experience, when she had the opportunity to work on construction of that same reactor, she leaped at the chance. “I’m really excited about it,” Bush said. “I love what I do.” Ezell was working on a graduate degree in mechanical engineering at the University of South Carolina when she took an introductory course in nuclear energy to fill a need in her schedule. “We took a tour of V.C. Summer and they talked about the nuclear renaissance,” Ezell said. When a job opening was posted at the plant, she applied, and like Bush, “I very much love what I do.” Were there obstacles to these young women in finding success in the nuclear field? A few, they say, but not the kind you might think. Learning the language of nuclear energy — the alphabet soup of acronyms — was tough to conquer. However, they received good assistance. “Folks working here are very eager to mentor, to transfer knowledge,” Ezell said. “They were here for the Unit 1 (original reactor) build.”

(continued on page 22)

Electric Power Research Institute

Carey Haas had a decision to make when she completed her chemical engineering degree at Purdue University. Her career choice came down to working in nuclear for Westinghouse or working in the oil industry in Texas. She chose nuclear because it was so clean. “It was a drastic difference from an oil refinery in New Orleans.” These days she is a senior project manager in the area of chemistry, low-level waste and radiation management in the Charlotte office of the Electric Power Research Institute. Haas has focused on research in nuclear fuels and materials. She has traveled to Asia, Europe, South Africa and South America. Sharing knowledge, especially on safety issues, sets the nuclear industry apart. “It is gratifying to share U.S. experience, and the converse is to watch what other countries are doing.” When she entered the nuclear field about 12 years ago, Haas said she often was the only woman in a meeting. That would be unusual now. The learning curve is steep for anyone entering the field, Haas said. When she took her first job at Westinghouse, learning the jargon was hard. The veteran workers were protective of their departments and were not used to training new people.

Debra Hager,

“It took a certain mentality,” Haas said. “You had to find out how to get the knowledge. You had to figure out how to learn from different people.” She credits an excellent mentor at Westinghouse with helping her succeed. For Haas nuclear energy is an easy sell. “I have a 5-year-old who lives within miles of four nuclear plants and I don’t even think about it. When I was living outside a refinery or chemical plant, I thought about it.” An engineer’s skills at breaking down a problem serve Haas well in her career. “You have to have persistence and not be afraid to ask questions. You can’t sit back and wait for someone to bring it to you.” And in nuclear, no question is a dumb question, she said. “The really neat part is that utilities and our industry try to work together.”

EPRI

Carey Haas,

Duke Energy

When Debra Hager began her career in nuclear energy more than 30 years ago, the work sites sometimes lacked restrooms for women. “But the people were so good, it didn’t matter,” she said. Hager started out as a chemical technician at McGuire Nuclear Station near Charlotte. Later she was an instructor and then a supervisor in the chemical area. Though her college education in biology at UNC Charlotte helped her become analytical, her father’s help in developing mechanical ability was also important. Academic education is valuable to a person beginning a job in nuclear, but everyone is trained from the day they start, Hager said. Each worker has to be trained and then qualify for the job. Now, as a workforce developer for Duke Energy Hager’s task is to replace herself and all the other veterans of the energy industry who are five to 10 years from retirement. She goes into schools and colleges to create a pipeline of workers. “There definitely will be opportunity,” she said. “We are partnering with educators in preparing the next generation of workers.” Hager and her colleagues are using lessons learned to smooth the way for this next generation. Duke has designed an effective mentoring program and organizations such as Women

in Nuclear and North American – Young Generation in Nuclear support both women and men in the field. Duke looks for women and minorities to increase workforce diversity. But it can be hard to attract women, Hager said, not because of safety concerns but because of the schedules required for a plant that operates 24/7. The sacrifices may be big, but so are the rewards, Hager said. The pay is better than many other jobs and there’s a sense of community that is gratifying. At the end of a shift, there’s a feeling of accomplishment. “You dedicated yourself to nuclear and you want to hand it off to a competent and eager workforce,” Hager said. After her 30 years in the field, she is excited to see the opportunities opening up again.

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(continued from page 20)

Bush said she had “no clue about construction” when she took the job at V.C. Summer. “It’s one thing to work on the design. The ins and outs of a nuclear power plant were something I had to learn about.” She also found her co-workers more than willing to teach, with materials right at hand. Pharr said she also had some knowledge of her own to pass along.

“When a new person comes in they want to learn as much as they can, but they have a piece within they can share, such as knowledge of software or technology.” The whole nuclear industry is collaborative, Ezell said, sharing information and lessons learned among utilities, vendors and companies. This might differ in other, more competitive industries, but in nuclear, anyone’s success is everyone’s success.

ONE SMALL WESTINGHOUSE REACTOR

W E S T I N G H O U S E E L E C T R I C C O M PA N Y L L C

Another giant step by the world’s leader in nuclear energy

Westinghouse, the world leader in the development, licensing and deployment of commercial nuclear energy, is again leading the industry, this time with a 225 MWe reactor that can generate electricity for a community of 180,000 homes without emitting any greenhouse gases. The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is based on proven Westinghouse nuclear reactor technology that takes safety, reliability and ease of construction to unsurpassed levels. Always looking toward the future, Westinghouse nuclear technology will help provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Check us out at www.westinghousenuclear.com

Being a member of professional organizations has helped these women develop their careers. Pharr is the president of the North American — Young Generation in Nuclear Midlands-V.C. Summer Chapter. Networking, attending workshops on resumes and interviews, and exposure to people they wouldn’t otherwise have contact with have laid the footwork for them, they said. In addition to NA-YGN, the Women in Nuclear organization has been key in helping them take the next step in their careers. “People are so cooperative with each other,” Ezell said. And the professional meetings are a way to learn more about opportunities in the fast-growing nuclear field. Working in nuclear is like no other profession. “More than likely, you’ll be out there in a different world,” Pharr said. The V.C. Summer site is in rural Fairfield County, far from any restaurant, store or bank. Most of the workers have a long commute, and they can’t run errands on a lunch break. Currently, “it’s a construction city.” The women’s schedules vary. In construction, they work four 10-hour days, with night duty three to four times a year. There is some flexibility with start times, so Bush, who has a working spouse and two young children, tries to get to work at 5:30 a.m. so she can have some evening time with her family. Others at the plant work a schedule of 80 hours over two weeks: nine-hour days, with every other Friday off. On the working Friday, the schedule is eight hours. All three women participate in college outreach and career fairs to interest other young people in their field. They were all interested in science as kids (“to the point where my family had to take all the tools away to keep me from taking electronic equipment apart,” Ezell says). And they realize many young E

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girls have an undirected interest in science and math. “At a career fair, it was a woman I spoke to with Southern Nuclear Co.,” Pharr said. “That face in the nuclear industry made an impact.” They emphasize the unlimited potential for employment in nuclear energy, especially in the Southeast. And if a person is not inclined toward technology and engineering, there are jobs in accounting, public affairs and administration. “This is just the beginning,” Bush said. “We have people coming from all over the country for jobs. It will keep on growing.” SCE&G, which has made a name for itself in the nuclear field, tries to hire within the local area when possible and works with South Carolina schools and colleges, Pharr said.

▶ The Nuclear Environmental Engineering and Science (NEES) program is a graduate only academic program that focuses on the environmental aspects of nuclear technologies. ▶ Established in 1980, the NEES program is unique because it is housed within the multidisciplinary Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences department, which has been continuously ranked in the top 20 environmental engineering graduate programs in public universities by US News and World Report.

Learn more information about our graduate program, visit our web site: www.clemson.edu/~neesrwm

‘When a new person comes in they want to learn as much as they can, but they have a piece within they can share, such as knowledge of software or technology.’ — Jasmeen Pharr, quality systems surveillance specialist

Women may be more cautious about accepting the safety aspect of nuclear power, research has found. But when given complete information that makes sense, they can analyze it and realize “this is the way to go,” Bush said. “There is more education getting out to the general public about nuclear,” Ezell said. “And women are not a harder sell than men.” They stressed that safety concerns are part of everything they do. “Every year we have safety orientation training. We have a safety topic at every meeting,” Pharr said. They relish the opportunity to be a part of something so new and exciting as the construction of the nuclear reactors. “Everybody is learning,” Bush said. u O

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We respond to the needs of the

nuclear power industry

The nuclear power industry is growing across the Carolinas. Central Piedmont Community College offers a variety of training programs that help prepare individuals for jobs in nuclear plant construction, operation and maintenance. These include: · A.A.S. degree in Non-Destructive Examination · Diploma in Nuclear Power Plant Inspection · A.A.S. degree and certificates in Construction Management Technology · A.A.S. degree and certificates in Welding Technology · A.A.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology · A.A.S. degree in Electrical Engineering Technology · A.A.S. degree in Electrical Technology · A.A.S. degree in Civil Engineering Technology · Electrical Physical Designer certificate · Applied Project Management Program for the Energy Industry · Certificates in Automated Welding (Operation and Maintenance)

For more information, visit www.cpcc.edu/energy. No

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Next Generation In Education:

TRAINING THE NEW NUCLEAR WORKFORCE

D

ue to an aging workforce, by this time next year up to 160,000 workers will be needed in the electricity sector, according to the Washington, D.C.-based Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). Data from the South Carolina Council on Competitiveness indicates that about 37,000 people work at the seven licensed reactors in four operating nuclear power plants in the Carolinas, as well as in the plants’ supply chain. The NEI reports that nuclear plant workers earn about 36% more than average local salaries. For instance, the median salary for an electrical technician at a nuclear plant is $67,571; for a mechanical technician, $66,581; and for a reactor operator, $77,782. In the Carolinas the entire industry generates more than $2.3 billion in wages. To train a new workforce, technical schools, community colleges and universities in both North and South Carolina have stepped up with expanded curricula. Here’s a sample of how these schools are preparing a new generation of nuclear experts.

University of South Carolina The University of South Carolina has its sights set on educating engineers who will

CPCC

Clemson University In addition to its undergraduate programs in environmental, mechanical and electrical engineering, Clemson recently strengthened its graduate school of Environ-

mental Engineering and Earth Sciences by naming Timothy DeVol the university’s new Toshiba Endowed Professor of Nuclear Engineering. According to Clemson assistant professor Brian Powell, students in the program are trained to tackle problems related to protecting the health of people and the environment as nuclear power is used and waste disposed. After obtaining a civil engineering degree, Powell says Clemson students can take graduate courses in the science and engineering of radiation protection. “They can become certified health physicists, which are in pretty high demand right now both at power plants as well as Savannah River Site, which needs several a year,” Powell said. Clemson is building an online radiation detection class in which students can log in and measure samples in real time. Powell says this initiative is part of a collaboration with S.C. State University. Upon completing a master’s or doctorate degree in the program, Powell says the majority of graduates take jobs at consulting firms that handle mediation of radioactive waste.

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develop and manage the resurgent nuclear industry in research, design and operation. At the suggestion of its industrial advisory board, USC launched an undergraduate minor track in nuclear engineering. Students must complete six classes to earn the minor, according to Travis Knight, acting director of USC’s Nuclear Engineering program. Knight said an undergraduate degree such as mechanical engineering coupled with a master’s in nuclear engineering is “very sought after in the industry.” USC also offers an accelerated BS/MS program. USC’s graduate nuclear engineering program was established in 2003 and has awarded an average of 10 diplomas each year for three years. Graduates have gone on to jobs at utilities, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Naval Nuclear Power School and NASA, Knight said. Gaston College Gaston College offers a two-year associate degree in applied science as the Nuclear Uniform Curriculum Program (NUCP) partner with Duke Energy for training non-licensed operators (NLOs). Dean Virgil Cox says the program is only one year old and the first students were completing co-ops at McGuire and Catawba nuclear plants this summer. Cox said the nuclear technology course work includes theory and application related to industrial and engineering technology. Disciplines include nuclear reactor theory, reactor systems, industrial and nuclear safety, instrumentation, electrical generation, automation and robotics. Graduates of the program should qualify as entry-level nuclear reactor technicians. Graduates are prepared to

Welding class is one of the nuclear-related courses at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte.

Amy Hixon advance into other industrial or engineering technician positions within the commercial nuclear power industry, he said.

The summer between her junior and senior Ross Norton

years at Radford University proved life changing for Amy Hixon. Rather than toil behind a

Central Piedmont Community College For those interested in going from the classroom to the job site in two years or less, there are several study tracks available at Central Piedmont Community College. Jay Potter, dean of CPCC’s Harper campus, said courses range from a two-year degree in construction management to short-term certificate courses in orbital and robotic operation and maintenance. Other tracks lead to positions as nuclear plant inspectors after completing an associate degree in applied science program in non-destructive examination (NDE) technology. Potter said there are many job opportunities in NDE as a result of aging infrastructure and new facility construction. After earning an associate in applied science degree, a student can complete a B.S. online while being employed full-time. “It’s a tremendous opportunity for those driven to continue their formal education,” he said. Midlands Technical College According to Midlands Technical College public affairs coordinator Amanda Taylor, the school offers a two-year Nuclear Systems Technology program along with a 24-hour certificate designed to be earned along with an appropriate associate degree. The college’s Nuclear Systems Technology program teaches fundamentals of nuclear power systems. This certification can be used within the mechanical engineering technology degree program, or it can count as credit toward other certificates that fulfill an associate’s degree in general technology. Taylor says certificate curricula are reviewed and updated periodically in response to community and industry demands. Nuclear systems technicians commonly work at maintaining and operating equipment, conducting tests, setting up and installing new instruments at power plants. u O

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counter or take an extended road trip, Hixon signed up for nuclear chemistry summer school. Presented by the Division of Nuclear

Now at work on a doctorate, Hixon said

Chemistry and Technology of the American

her specialty led her to meet former Clemson

Chemical Society, the program is a series

students employed at the U.S. Nuclear Regula-

of lectures and labs that covers the basics

tory Commission, where she now works part

of nuclear theory, radiochemistry, nuclear

time. Although she has been promised a job

instrumentation, radiological safety and ap-

at the commission after graduation, Hixon

plications to related fields. Through special

is eyeing a career in academia at one of the

symposia, guest lectures and field trips to

national labs.

nearby research centers, students get to meet scientists leading innovation in the industry. When the six-week program ended,

“With the nuclear renaissance, I think there is the potential for lots of new jobs to be created,” Hixon said. “However, there

Hixon decided to specialize in nuclear studies.

are certain challenges, many of which were

After earning a Bachelor of Science degree

addressed by the Blue Ribbon Commission on

in chemistry with a double minor in forensic

America’s Nuclear Future, that the industry

science and mathematics, she went on to get

needs to address before the American public

her master’s in environmental engineering

accepts nuclear energy as a viable alternative

and earth science from Clemson University.

energy source to coal and foreign oil.”

Midlands Technical College trains operators for nuclear power plants... and the workforce to build them.

Headline

MTC’s Nuclear Systems Technology associate degree program covers the fundamentals of nuclear power systems including nuclear plant components, radiological protection, reactor theory and nuclear plant chemistry. MTC offers a number of skilled crafts programs in welding technologies, electrical technologies, and pipefitting and essential to the construction of today’s nuclear power generation sites.

You can get

Anywhere from here.

Visit midlandstech.edu to learn more.

Next Generation In Economic Development:

‘We don’t do brownouts’

Reliable, inexpensive power has attracted several data centers to the western Piedmont, including Apple’s new 500,000-square-foot, $1 billion data center in Maiden. 26

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helping to bring in 1,500 new jobs and capital investment of nearly $200 million in 2011 alone. Over the last 25 years, the utilities’ economic development efforts have helped attract more than 50,000 new jobs and an investment of $8.9 billion, said Bennett. And earlier this year, Santee Cooper and The Electric Cooperatives announced a new economic development rate that discounts electricity to new industrial clients that meet certain minimum requirements. North Carolina also is a nuclear leader. “This region of the country is known for having a combination of competitively priced electricity as well as highly reliable electricity,” said Dale Carroll, deputy secretary of the N.C. Department of Commerce. “The good news is we have both. The electric utilities have been thoughtful in how they mix the generation sources as well as creating a grid that is highly reliable.” This is one reason North Carolina’s western Piedmont in the heart of Duke Energy’s service area is becoming known as a data center corridor. Fortune 500 technol-

ogy companies are locating huge data centers here, bringing jobs and other economic benefits. These include: • Google. The first player to open a server farm in western North Carolina, Google operates a $600 million facility in the Caldwell County town of Lenoir. • Apple. Its new 500,000-square-foot, $1 billion data center is in tiny Maiden, N.C., less than an hour’s drive from Lenoir. • Facebook. The first phase of its $450 million, 300,000-square-foot data center in Forest City went online April 2012. • AT&T. The telecom giant recently announced it will build a 900,000-square foot data center in Kings Mountain, N.C., that, over the course of a 14-year phase-in, would have an estimated economic impact of $900 million. • Disney. In the same business park that lured AT&T — the Kings Mountain Data Center Park — Walt Disney Co. is working on a 26-acre, $200 million data center. More companies are likely to locate their data centers in and around the western Piedmont, Carroll predicts, especially now

Nancy pierce

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s employers, taxpayers and purchasers, nuclear plants are an economic powerhouse. The average nuclear facility generates close to $470 million each year in total output for the community and almost $40 million a year in total labor income, according to the CASEnergy Coalition. But nuclear plants also factor indirectly in boosting the economic vitality of the cities and states where they operate. That’s because when industries that use a lot of juice shop for places to locate their sites, they want affordable energy with a well-developed infrastructure. With rates that are about 15% lower than those of most other states, the Carolinas rise to the top of many economic developers’ lists. Credit these favorable rates to a diverse mix of fuel sources—including a high percentage of nuclear power — and robust power grids. Companies also are looking for reliability, said Sam Bennett, economic development manager at Santee Cooper, South Carolina’s state-owned electric utility. Electricity-intensive operations such as data centers can’t afford even minor disruptions in service. “We don’t do brownouts in South Carolina,” he said. “We have a lot of baseloads, and nuclear is one reason for that. And it’s not just transmission reliability, but having our fleet up 24/7.” In South Carolina, 50 percent of electricity is nuclear derived, making it the largest nuclear energy generator in the Southeast. Santee Cooper has partnered with The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina on many economic development initiatives,

that the cluster is so large. Helping to make that a reality: Commerce has a recruiter just for data center clients. South Carolina has its share of datacenter successes, too. Google operates a $600 million facility that employs about 200 in Goose Creek. The company also has purchased more than 250 acres in Blythewood, S.C., and announced plans for a potential future data center there. “Going forward, I think what you’re going to see in South Carolina is an aggressive approach to attracting data centers,” said Bennett. But it’s the aerospace industry, with its reliance on power-dependent advanced manufacturing practices, that is really gaining traction in the state, officials said. The anchor is Boeing, which three years ago chose North Charleston, S.C., for its second 787 Dreamliner final assembly and delivery facility. The company’s first commercial airplane plant outside Washington state, the plant represents an $870 million investment. Production began in July 2011, and the first plane rolled out of the hangar earlier this year. If Boeing is the hub, the spokes consist of more than 180 aerospace manufacturing companies and suppliers, among them Champion Aerospace, Eaton, GE, Honeywell, Lockheed Martin, Michelin Aircraft Tire and SKF. The industry employs more than 20,000 people across South Carolina. A new task force will leverage South Carolina’s strengths as an advanced manufacturing haven for aerospace companies. The state’s other assets include five interstate highways, six commercial airfields and two ports. “With a rich history in aviation, South Carolina now has a vibrant and growing aerospace industry that includes everything from aircraft manufacturing to space technology and defense,” said S.C. Secretary of Commerce Bobby Hitt. “The task force will provide an even better framework to support this industry through statewide communication and collaboration,” Hitt added.u O

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Clean energy advocates, innovative job creators, world class leaders, and a coalition of nuclear businesses dedicated to supporting the nuclear renaissance in the Midstate of South Carolina.

Join Our Movement Today

1000 Catawba St., Suite 130 Columbia, SC 29201 803-354-5720 info@engenuitysc.com

Membership Information Harris Nuclear Plant Carolinians are world leaders in the design, construction and supply of electricity. The Carolinas supply 11.5% of the nation’s nuclear energy. Our states are home to four publicly traded power generating companies and major energy engineering companies. Our two states have a strong nuclear supply chain and we are strengthening that supply chain. WHAT OUR ENERGY EXPERTISE MEANS TO US: The headlines about energy supply, economics and cleanliness align in an energy imperative: The Carolinas have a unique competitive advantage in nuclear energy. The two states, through the Carolinas Nuclear Cluster, can be the go-to source for a global nuclear renaissance. WHAT IS AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CLUSTER? An economic development cluster strategy builds on a foundation of comparative advantages. Well-run clusters spur corporate and educational innovation. Robust clusters lead to strong industry collaboration, gains in efficiency and a stronger presence in the market. A cluster can be an economic development magnet. The Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster is based on: VISION The people, services and products in the Carolinas’ Nuclear Cluster fortify our states’ economy, create environmentally friendly electricity, contribute to our energy independence and are the world’s center of nuclear energy excellence. MISSION The organization collaboratively strength28

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ens workforce, services, products and policies to extend our global leadership. STRATEGIC RESPONSES 1. Drive positive policy for the Carolinas’ nuclear energy industry base. 2. Develop and support an ample, sustainable energy oriented workforce. 3. Conceive and support innovative nuclear energy technologies and services. 4. Define the economic development proposition of the industry in the Carolinas and develop support businesses for industry growth. 5. Market the effectiveness of the states’ nuclear energy expertise. ANCHOR COMPANIES: • Duke Energy • Savannah River Nuclear Solutions • SCANA/SCE&G SUPPLIERS/CONTRACTORS: • AREVA • ASCO Valve/Emerson • Carotek • Columbiana Hi Tech • Electric Power Research Institute • Engenuity • Energy Solutions • Fluor • Generation mPower LLC • Global Quality Assurance • Hendrick Construction • J-E-T-S Nuclear Consultants • K&L Gates • Kontek Industries • Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems • Pegasus Nuclear • Qualitech Solutions • RCS Nuclear • Shaw Group • Siemens Energy

Tetra Tech Tindall • Toshiba America Nuclear Energy • URS • Wachs Services • WEC Welding and Machining • Weirich Engineering • Westinghouse • Zachry Nuclear Engineering • •

EDUCATION PARTNERS/OTHERS: • Aiken Technical College • Central Piedmont Community College • Citizens For Nuclear Technology Awareness • Clemson University • Economic Development Partnership of Aiken and Edgefield County • Francis Marion University • Gaston College • Midlands Technical College • N.C. Department of Commerce • N.C. State University • Orangeburg Technical College • S.C. Department of Commerce • S.C. State University • S.C. Technical College System • SCRA • S.C. University Research & Education Foundation — SUNRISE • Spartanburg Community College • SRS — Community Re-Use Organization • UNC Charlotte • University of South Carolina • York Technical College Contact/more information: website: www.newcarolina.org/clusters/ nuclear.aspx Scott Carlberg, Nuclear Cluster Coordinator, 704-841-7649

Count on us as a bright spot in the Nation’s future.

Savannah River National Laboratory Nuclear knowledge for the nation The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is the applied research and development laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site. Operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, SRNL applies stateof-the-art science to provide practical, high-value, cost-effective solutions to complex technical problems, such as the detection of weapons of mass destruction, the cleanup of contaminated groundwater and soils, the development of energy sources, the need for a viable national defense and the safe management of hazardous materials.

Dr. Terry Michalske Executive VP & Savannah River National Labortory Director

Dwayne Wilson President & CEO Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

www.srnl.doe.gov

WESTINGHOUSE AP10 0 0 R ECEIVES

W E S T I N G H O U S E E L E C T R I C C O M PA N Y L L C

Final Design Certification.

First and still first. Sixty years ago, Westinghouse Electric Company established its reputation for nuclear energy technology leadership with the development of the world’s first pressurized water reactor. Today, that tradition of investment and innovation continues. The Westinghouse AP1000 nuclear power plant is the most advanced design available in the global marketplace. To date, a total of ten AP1000 units are under contract — four in China and six in the US, with construction underway at Vogtle and VC Summer for four units. Deployment of the AP1000 reactor will create tens of thousands of good jobs, including 700 well-paying permanent jobs to operate each plant. Its design makes use of modern, modular-construction techniques enabling shorter construction times, lowering construction costs and bringing opportunities to local suppliers. The Westinghouse AP1000 plant is ready to provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Check us out at www.westinghousenuclear.com


2012 Energized